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Sample records for psychosocial intervention program

  1. Children and Mothers in War: An Outcome Study of a Psychosocial Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybdahl, Ragnhild

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated effects on children in Bosnia and Herzegovina of a 5-month psychosocial intervention program of weekly group meetings for mothers. Found that although all participants were exposed to severe trauma, their distress varied considerably. The intervention program had a positive effect on mothers' mental health, children's weight gain, and…

  2. Family carers’ experiences of attending a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program for carers and persons with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannessen A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aud Johannessen,1 Frøydis Kristine Bruvik,1,3,4 Solveig Hauge2 1Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, 2Norway Faculty of Health and Social Studies and Centre of Caring Research – Southern Norway, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, 3Kavli Centre, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, 4Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Bergen, Norway Background: Psychosocial interventions for persons with dementia and their primary family carers are promising approaches to reducing the challenges associated with care, but, obtaining significant outcomes may be difficult. Even though carers in general are satisfied with such interventions, few studies have evaluated the interventions by means of qualitative methods. Aim: The objective of the study reported here was to investigate family carers’ experiences of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention program, and also to offer advice on how to develop the intervention program. Methods: Content analyses were taken from individual qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 with 20 carers (aged 50–82 years who participated in a psychosocial intervention program that included education, individual and family counseling, and parallel group sessions for carers and persons with dementia. Results: Two main categories emerged: 1 benefits of the intervention program, which sets out the informants’ experiences for the benefits of participation, described in the subcategories “importance of content and group organization” and “importance of social support”; and 2 missing content in the intervention program, which details the informants’ suggestions for future interventions, contained in the subcategories “need for extended content” and “need for new group organization”. Conclusion: The carers found the interventions useful. The importance of even earlier and more flexible interventions for the family carers, the extended family, and

  3. Psychosocial interventions for pregnant women in outpatient illicit drug treatment programs compared to other interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terplan, Mishka; Ramanadhan, Shaalini; Locke, Abigail; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Lui, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background Illicit drug use in pregnancy is a complex social and public health problem. The consequences of drug use in pregnancy are high for both the woman and her child. Therefore, it is important to develop and evaluate effective treatments. There is evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in drug treatment but it is unclear whether they are effective in pregnant women. This is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2007. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in pregnant women enrolled in illicit drug treatment programmes on birth and neonatal outcomes, on attendance and retention in treatment, as well as on maternal and neonatal drug abstinence. In short, do psychosocial interventions translate into less illicit drug use, greater abstinence, better birth outcomes, or greater clinic attendance? Search methods We conducted the original literature search in May 2006 and performed the search update up to January 2015. For both review stages (original and update), we searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Trial's register (May 2006 and January 2015); the Cochrane Central Register of Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 1); PubMed (1996 to January 2015); EMBASE (1996 to January 2015); and CINAHL (1982 to January 2015). Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials comparing any psychosocial intervention vs. a control intervention that could include pharmacological treatment, such as methadone maintenance, a different psychosocial intervention, counselling, prenatal care, STD counselling and testing, transportation, or childcare. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. We performed analyses based on three comparisons: any psychosocial intervention vs. control, contingency management (CM) interventions vs. control, and motivational interviewing based (MIB) interventions vs. control. Main results

  4. Racial-Ethnic Protective Factors and Mechanisms in Psychosocial Prevention and Intervention Programs for Black Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shawn C T; Neblett, Enrique W

    2016-06-01

    Extending previous reviews related to cultural responsiveness in the treatment of ethnic minority youth, the current review provides a critical assessment and synthesis of both basic and applied research on the integration of three racial-ethnic protective factors (racial identity, racial socialization, Africentric worldview) in psychosocial prevention and intervention programs for Black children and adolescents. Seventeen programs meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were evaluated for the extent to which racial-ethnic protective factors and related mechanisms were integrated, applied, and tested in such programs. A systematic assessment of these programs revealed that several prevention and intervention programs drew upon the three factors, particularly Africentric worldview. In addition, a number of studies hypothesized and assessed mechanisms, both those previously identified in conceptual literature and those that emerged from the interventions themselves. A set of recommendations encouraging the implementation of these factors into future prevention and intervention programs, examples of how clinicians can infuse these factors into psychotherapy, and areas for future research are discussed.

  5. Psychosocial Intervention Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    criticises the reductionistic dichotomy - either own or parental choice - and appeals for broader concepts, which focus both on own choice and parental acceptance. The article also throws light on some strategic services dealing with ethnic minority youths' intimate partnership formation problems U.......K. as well as Nordic countries. Finally a model for psychosocial intervention is presented which directs attention to the issues of ageism, sexism as well as racism at personal, interpersonal and structural levels....

  6. Factors influencing childhood cancer patients to participate in a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program : Quality of Life in Motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk-Lokkart, Elisabeth M.; Braam, Katja I.; Huisman, Jaap; Kaspers, Gertjan Jl; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; Bierings, MB; Merks, Hans; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Eibrink, Marry; Streng, Isabelle C.; Van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline

    2015-01-01

    Background For a multi-center randomized trial investigating the effects of a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, we invited 174 patients (8-18 years old) on treatment or within 1 year after treatment; about 40% participated. Reasons for non-participation

  7. Factors influencing childhood cancer patients to participate in a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program : Quality of Life in Motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk-Lokkart, Elisabeth M.; Braam, Katja I.; Huisman, Jaap; Kaspers, Gertjan Jl; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; Bierings, MB; Merks, Hans; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Eibrink, Marry; Streng, Isabelle C.; Van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline

    Background For a multi-center randomized trial investigating the effects of a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, we invited 174 patients (8-18 years old) on treatment or within 1 year after treatment; about 40% participated. Reasons for non-participation

  8. Psychosocial Interventions in Depressive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Basogul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years, improvements in effective psychosocial interventions in the prevention and treatment of depression are remarkable. The World Health Organization stated that major depression affects children, adults and the elderly and is the leading cause of approximately 12% of all disabilities around the World. Medical expenses, loss of workforce, suicide risk, the risk of relapse or recurrence are taken into account, depression is an issue that needs to be handled with utmost care for health care workers especially psychiatric nurses. The purpose of this literature review is to examine psychosocial interventions and effectiveness of these interventions for depressive disorders shows a gradual increase in prevalence in worlwide. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 1-15

  9. Psychosocial support intervention for HIV-affected families in Haiti: implications for programs and policies for orphans and vulnerable children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Eustache, Eddy; Oswald, Catherine; Louis, Ermaze; Surkan, Pamela J; Scanlan, Fiona; Hook, Sarah; Mancuso, Anna; Mukherjee, Joia S

    2012-05-01

    Given the increased access of antiretroviral therapy (ART) throughout the developing world, what was once a terminal illness is now a chronic disease for those receiving treatment. This requires a paradigmatic shift in service provision for those affected by HIV/AIDS in low-resource settings. Although there is a need for psychosocial support interventions for HIV-affected youth and their caregivers, to date there has been limited empirical evidence on the effectiveness of curriculum-based psychosocial support groups in HIV-affected families in low-income countries. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and assess the preliminary effectiveness of a psychosocial support group intervention for HIV-affected youth and their caregivers in central Haiti. The study was conducted at six Partners In Health-affiliated sites between February 2006 and September 2008 and included quantitative as well as qualitative methods. HIV-affected youth (n = 168) and their caregivers (n = 130) completed a baseline structured questionnaire prior to participation in a psychosocial support group intervention. Ninety-five percent of families completed the intervention and a follow-up questionnaire. Psychological symptoms, psychosocial functioning, social support, and HIV-related stigma at baseline were compared with outcomes one year later. Qualitative methods were also used to assess the participants' perspectives of the intervention. Comparing pre- and post-intervention assessment, youth affected by HIV experienced decreased psychological symptoms as well as improved psychosocial functioning and social support. Caregivers (95% HIV-positive) demonstrated a significant reduction in depressive symptoms, improved social support, and decreased HIV-related stigma. Although further study is needed to assess effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial, corroborative findings from qualitative data reflected reduced psychological distress, less social isolation and

  10. A randomized controlled clinical trial of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program for people with first-onset mental illness in psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai-Tong; Bressington, Daniel

    2015-09-30

    This study aimed to test the effectiveness of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness. A single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial design was used. The study involved 180 participants with mild to moderate-severe symptoms of psychotic or mood disorders who were newly referred to two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Hong Kong. Patients were randomly assigned to either an eight-session nurse-led psychosocial intervention program (plus usual care) or usual psychiatric outpatient care (both n=90). The primary outcome was psychiatric symptoms. Outcomes were measured at recruitment, one week and 12 months post-intervention. Patients in the psychosocial intervention group reported statistically significant improvements in symptoms compared to treatment as usual. There were also significant improvements in illness insight and perceived quality of life and reduction in length of re-hospitalizations over the 12-month follow-up. The findings provide evidence that the nurse-led psychosocial intervention program resulted in improved health outcomes in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness.

  11. Preventing child abuse: psychosocial description of clients of brief intervention programs in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gómez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The study describe characteristics and risk factors for child abuse and neglect,in 591 children and adolescents, their parents and families served by eight brief intervention programs (PIB “Viviendo en Familia”, funded by the Chilean National Service of Children (SENAME and implemented by Protectora de la Infancia (a non-profit organization in Chile. The results revealed the existence of problems of moderate complexity, on the environment,parental competencies, family interactions, family safety and child well-being. About three of each four caregivers show signs of high risk for the abuse or neglect of children, especially in their mental health, a topic that must be considered by the staff to develop a plan of coordinated work with the local network of health services.

  12. Evidence based psychosocial interventions in substance use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Jhanjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic. Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs.

  13. Psychosocial interventions for premature ejaculation

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    Tamara Melnik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Premature ejaculation (PE is a very common sexual dysfunction among patients, and with varying prevalence estimates ranging from 3% to 20%. Although psychological issues are present in most patients with premature PE, as a cause or as a consequence, research on the effects of psychological approaches for PE has in general not been controlled or randomised and is lacking in long-term follow up. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for PE. CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING STUDIES FOR THIS REVIEW: Trials were searched in computerized general and specialized databases, such as: MEDLINE by PubMed (1966 to 2010; PsycINFO (1974 to 2010; EMBASE (1980 to 2010; LILACS (1982 to 2010; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library, 2010; and by checking bibliographies, and contacting manufacturers and researchers. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating psychosocial interventions compared with different psychosocial interventions, pharmacological interventions, waiting list, or no treatment for PE. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Information on patients, interventions, and outcomes was extracted by at least two independent reviewers using a standard form. The primary outcome measure for comparing the effects of psychosocial interventions to waiting list and standard medications was improvement in IELT (i.e., time from vaginal penetration to ejaculation. The secondary outcome was change in validated PE questionnaires. MAIN RESULTS: In one study behavioral therapy (BT was significantly better than waiting list for duration of intercourse (MD (mean difference 407.90 seconds, 95% CI 302.42 to 513.38, and couples' sexual satisfaction (MD -26.10, CI -50.48 to -1.72. BT was also significantly better for a new functional-sexological treatment (FS (MD 412.00 seconds, 95% CI 305.88 to 518.12, change over time in subjective perception of duration of intercourse (Women: MD 2

  14. Study protocol: translating and implementing psychosocial interventions in aged home care the lifestyle engagement activity program (LEAP) for life.

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    Low, Lee-Fay; Baker, Jess R; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Camp, Cameron; Haertsch, Maggie; Skropeta, Margaret

    2013-11-16

    Tailored psychosocial activity-based interventions have been shown to improve mood, behaviour and quality of life for nursing home residents. Occupational therapist delivered activity programs have shown benefits when delivered in home care settings for people with dementia. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of LEAP (Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program) for Life, a training and practice change program on the engagement of home care clients by care workers. Secondary aims are to evaluate the impact of the program on changes in client mood and behaviour. The 12 month LEAP program has three components: 1) engaging site management and care staff in the program; 2) employing a LEAP champion one day a week to support program activities; 3) delivering an evidence-based training program to care staff. Specifically, case managers will be trained and supported to set meaningful social or recreational goals with clients and incorporate these into care plans. Care workers will be trained in and encouraged to practise good communication, promote client independence and choice, and tailor meaningful activities using Montessori principles, reminiscence, music, physical activity and play. LEAP Champions will be given information about theories of organisational change and trained in interpersonal skills required for their role. LEAP will be evaluated in five home care sites including two that service ethnic minority groups. A quasi experimental design will be used with evaluation data collected four times: 6-months prior to program commencement; at the start of the program; and then after 6 and 12 months. Mixed effect models will enable comparison of change in outcomes for the periods before and during the program. The primary outcome measure is client engagement. Secondary outcomes for clients are satisfaction with care, dysphoria/depression, loneliness, apathy and agitation; and work satisfaction for care workers. A process evaluation will also be

  15. Effects of using a nursing crisis intervention program on psychosocial responses and coping strategies of infertile women during in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-Hsin, Lee

    2003-09-01

    Infertility and its treatment may cause life crises in infertile women. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a crisis intervention program on improving psychosocial responses and enhancing coping strategies for infertile women attending different stages of an In-Vitro Fertilization V Embryo Transfer (IVF-ET) treatment program. Using an experimental study design, infertile women attending an IVF-ET treatment program were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. In the experimental group, infertile women completed and answered a questionnaire and received nursing crisis intervention at the initial stage of treatment (day 3). This included (1). viewing a video explaining the therapeutic process of IVF-ET, (2). self-hypnosis and muscle relaxation training, and (3). provision of cognitive-behavioral counseling. The same questionnaire was used again for subjects at the stage of embryo transfer and before taking a pregnancy test. The women in the control group were only interviewed using the same questionnaire and at the same times as the experimental group. Analysis by repeated measurement ANOVA demonstrated that there was a reduction in psychosocial response in terms of interpersonal relationships, and there was an interaction between intervention effects and stage of treatment. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the level of psychosocial responses between the experimental and control groups although some meaningful findings were made. However, in terms of state of anxiety, confrontational problems, and isolated mind/body relaxation, there were significant differences between the two groups of infertile women at some stages of IVF-ET treatment. The women in the experimental group perceived a positive effect of the nursing intervention in relieving their psychosocial responses. The results of this nursing crisis intervention could be helpful in nursing practice when dealing with infertile women attending IVF

  16. The "Romsås in Motion" community intervention: program exposure and psychosocial mediated relationships to change in stages of change in physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenum Anne

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conducting process evaluations of health promoting interventions, and measuring the effectiveness of specific intervention components, may help in the understanding of program failure or success. The purposes of the present study were to examine adults' exposure to and involvement in specific components of a three year long pseudo-experimental community-based physical activity intervention, and to examine the relationship between such exposure and participation and changes in stages of change in physical activity and psychosocial mediators. Methods 1497 persons in the intervention group attended the baseline survey in 2000 (50.6% and 1204 (80.4 of baseline attendees provided data on the outcome variables of the present study. In 2003, 1089 were still living in the area, and were re-invited to follow-up assessments. Current analyses are based on the 603 persons (mean age 49 ± 10 years who provided baseline and follow-up data for the current purposes (56.6% follow-up rate. Process data, stages of change in physical activity, and potential psychosocial mediators of change in physical activity were assessed by questionnaires. The theory-based intervention was composed of communication, physical activity, environmental and participatory components. Data were analysed using frequency and descriptive statistics, Chi-square and t-tests, and regression analyses. Results Exposure and participation rates in the various intervention components varied greatly (1.5–92.7%. Participation in walking groups and aerobic exercise groups, as well as having seen the "Walk the stairs"-poster were significantly and positively related to change in stages of change in physical activity (β = .12, p = .011; β = .211, p Conclusion Findings revealed that particular intervention components, such as participation in physical activity groups, were more strongly related to forward transition in stages of change in physical activity than others. These

  17. Early psychosocial intervention in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Sørensen, Jan; Waldorff, Frans B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost utility of early psychosocial intervention for patients with Alzheimer's disease and their primary caregivers. DESIGN: Cost utility evaluation alongside a multicentre, randomised controlled trial with 3 years of follow-up. SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics...

  18. Mass conflict and care in war affected areas. In search of assessment and psychosocial intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Research in this thesis is focused on the relevance of psychosocial programs in areas of mass violence. Central questions are: how to assess needs in terms of psychosocial health, how to best address those needs, and what is the effectiveness of these mental health interventions? Our findings in Che

  19. Mass conflict and care in war affected areas. In search of assessment and psychosocial intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Research in this thesis is focused on the relevance of psychosocial programs in areas of mass violence. Central questions are: how to assess needs in terms of psychosocial health, how to best address those needs, and what is the effectiveness of these mental health interventions? Our findings in Che

  20. [Psychosocial intervention in hospitalization due to alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, J; Solano, S

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a descriptive-type research on the findings of a 1-year follow-up experiment on a 72-inpatient at the Instituto sobre Alcoholismo y Fármacodependencia of the city of San José, Costa Rica. Information wa obtained from a 59-question instrument aimed at exploring: Sociodemographic aspects, alcohol ingestion-abstention patterns; interpersonal, family and labor relationships, autodiagnosis, and evaluation of the treatment program. During the 3-week inpatient treatment, a psychosocial treatment was administered to all subjects. Owing to the substantial changes patients evidenced in the above mentioned areas, findings suggest that the objectives were fulfilled satisfactorily enough.

  1. A systematic review of psychosocial suicide prevention interventions for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calear, Alison L; Christensen, Helen; Freeman, Alexander; Fenton, Katherine; Busby Grant, Janie; van Spijker, Bregje; Donker, Tara

    2016-05-01

    Youth suicide is a significant public health problem. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of school, community and healthcare-based interventions in reducing and preventing suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and deliberate self-harm in young people aged 12-25 years. PsycInfo, PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched to the end of December 2014 to identify randomised controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for youth suicide. In total, 13,747 abstracts were identified and screened for inclusion in a larger database. Of these, 29 papers describing 28 trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the current review. The results of the review indicated that just over half of the programs identified had a significant effect on suicidal ideation (Cohen's d = 0.16-3.01), suicide attempts (phi = 0.04-0.38) or deliberate self-harm (phi = 0.29-0.33; d = 0.42). The current review provides preliminary support for the implementation of universal and targeted interventions in all settings, using a diverse range of psychosocial approaches. Further quality research is needed to strengthen the evidence-base for suicide prevention programs in this population. In particular, the development of universal school-based interventions is promising given the potential reach of such an approach.

  2. Psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J; Sabioni, Pamela; Copeland, Jan; Le Foll, Bernard; Gowing, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Cannabis use disorder is the most commonly reported illegal substance use disorder in the general population; although demand for assistance from health services is increasing internationally, only a minority of those with the disorder seek professional assistance. Treatment studies have been published, but pressure to establish public policy requires an updated systematic review of cannabis-specific treatments for adults. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder (compared with inactive control and/or alternative treatment) delivered to adults in an out-patient or community setting. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cumulaive Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and reference lists of articles. Searched literature included all articles published before July 2015. Selection criteria All randomised controlled studies examining a psychosocial intervention for cannabis use disorder (without pharmacological intervention) in comparison with a minimal or inactive treatment control or alternative combinations of psychosocial interventions. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We included 23 randomised controlled trials involving 4045 participants. A total of 15 studies took place in the United States, two in Australia, two in Germany and one each in Switzerland, Canada, Brazil and Ireland. Investigators delivered treatments over approximately seven sessions (range, one to 14) for approximately 12 weeks (range, one to 56). Overall, risk of bias across studies was moderate, that is, no trial was at high risk of selection bias, attrition bias or reporting bias. Further, trials included a large total number of participants, and each trial ensured the fidelity of treatments provided. In contrast, because of the

  3. Insights into workplace bullying: psychosocial drivers and effective interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escartín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Research on effectiveness of workplace bullying interventions has lagged behind descriptive studies on this topic. The literature on bullying intervention research has only recently expanded to a point that allows for synthesis of findings across empirical studies. This study addresses the question of whether workplace bullying can be reduced in prevalence and consequences, if so to what extent and by which strategies and interventions. It opens with a brief overview of the nature of bullying at work and discussion of some precursors and existing interventions. However, its principal focus is on the findings obtained from selected (quasi-) experimental longitudinal studies on antibullying interventions, drawing together the results of studies conducted in Europe, USA, and Australia, including several economic sectors, and concerned about primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs and strategies. Additional emphasis is considered from the psychosocial drivers highlighted both from prescriptive and cross-sectional studies and factual empirical studies. One randomized control study and seven quasiexperimental longitudinal studies were identified by searching electronic databases and bibliographies and via contact with experts. The majority of outcomes evidenced some level of change, mostly positive, suggesting that workplace bullying interventions are more likely to affect knowledge, attitudes, and self-perceptions, but actual bullying behaviors showed much more mixed results. In general, growing effectiveness was stated as the level of intervention increased from primary to tertiary prevention. However, methodological problems relating to the evaluation designs in most studies do not allow direct attribution of these findings to the interventions. Overall, the evaluation of antibullying interventions must flourish and be improved, requiring close cooperation between practitioners and academics to design, implement, and evaluate effective interventions based

  4. The Impact of an Ergonomics Intervention on Psychosocial Factors and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Thai Hospital Orderlies

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    Withaya Chanchai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Musculoskeletal disorders have a multifactorial etiology that is not only associated with physical risk factors, but also psychosocial risk factors; (2 Objective: This study evaluated the effects of an ergonomic intervention on musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial risk factors; (3 Material and Methods: This study took a participatory ergonomic (PE approach with a randomized controlled trial (RCT conducted at tertiary care hospitals during July to December 2014. A group of hospital orderlies in Thailand were randomly selected for examination. Fifty orderlies were placed in a case group and another 50 orderlies were placed in the control group. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaire (NMQ and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ were used for data collection before and after the intervention program; (4 Results: The most commonly reported problem among hospital orderlies was found to be lower back symptoms (82%. The study found significant differences in prevalence rates of reported musculoskeletal conditions in the arm, upper back, and lower back regions before and after intervention. Findings showed that psychosocial risk factors were affected by the intervention. COPSOQ psychosocial risk factors were significantly different pre/post intervention. These variables included: work pace, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, rewards, role conflicts, and social support from supervisors. No other psychosocial risk factors were found to be significant; (5 Conclusions: Positive results were observed following the intervention in the work environment, particularly in terms of reducing physical work environment risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders and increasing promotion factors of the psychosocial work environment.

  5. The Impact of an Ergonomics Intervention on Psychosocial Factors and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Thai Hospital Orderlies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchai, Withaya; Songkham, Wanpen; Ketsomporn, Pranom; Sappakitchanchai, Punnarat; Siriwong, Wattasit; Robson, Mark Gregory

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Musculoskeletal disorders have a multifactorial etiology that is not only associated with physical risk factors, but also psychosocial risk factors; (2) Objective: This study evaluated the effects of an ergonomic intervention on musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial risk factors; (3) Material and Methods: This study took a participatory ergonomic (PE) approach with a randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted at tertiary care hospitals during July to December 2014. A group of hospital orderlies in Thailand were randomly selected for examination. Fifty orderlies were placed in a case group and another 50 orderlies were placed in the control group. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaire (NMQ) and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) were used for data collection before and after the intervention program; (4) Results: The most commonly reported problem among hospital orderlies was found to be lower back symptoms (82%). The study found significant differences in prevalence rates of reported musculoskeletal conditions in the arm, upper back, and lower back regions before and after intervention. Findings showed that psychosocial risk factors were affected by the intervention. COPSOQ psychosocial risk factors were significantly different pre/post intervention. These variables included: work pace, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, rewards, role conflicts, and social support from supervisors. No other psychosocial risk factors were found to be significant; (5) Conclusions: Positive results were observed following the intervention in the work environment, particularly in terms of reducing physical work environment risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders and increasing promotion factors of the psychosocial work environment. PMID:27153076

  6. Psychosocial Interventions and Children’s Rights: Beyond Clinical Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Doná, Giorgia

    2002-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in psychosocial interventions in the aftermath of ethno-political violence. Rwanda after genocide received sustained psychological attention and this paper critically examines the contribution of psychosocial interventions to the broader development agenda of reconstruction and rehabilitation. We undertake a brief psychologically informed analysis of the factors that contributed to genocide as a means of outlining the political and cultural context in whi...

  7. Insights into workplace bullying: psychosocial drivers and effective interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escartín J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Escartín Department of Social Psychology, Facultad de Psicologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d’Hebrón, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Research on effectiveness of workplace bullying interventions has lagged behind descriptive studies on this topic. The literature on bullying intervention research has only recently expanded to a point that allows for synthesis of findings across empirical studies. This study addresses the question of whether workplace bullying can be reduced in prevalence and consequences, if so to what extent and by which strategies and interventions. It opens with a brief overview of the nature of bullying at work and discussion of some precursors and existing interventions. However, its principal focus is on the findings obtained from selected (quasi- experimental longitudinal studies on antibullying interventions, drawing together the results of studies conducted in Europe, USA, and Australia, including several economic sectors, and concerned about primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs and strategies. Additional emphasis is considered from the psychosocial drivers highlighted both from prescriptive and cross-sectional studies and factual empirical studies. One randomized control study and seven quasiexperimental longitudinal studies were identified by searching electronic databases and bibliographies and via contact with experts. The majority of outcomes evidenced some level of change, mostly positive, suggesting that workplace bullying interventions are more likely to affect knowledge, attitudes, and self-perceptions, but actual bullying behaviors showed much more mixed results. In general, growing effectiveness was stated as the level of intervention increased from primary to tertiary prevention. However, methodological problems relating to the evaluation designs in most studies do not allow direct attribution of these findings to the interventions. Overall, the evaluation of

  8. Psychosocial Prevention Education: A Comparison of Traditional vs. Thematic Prevention Programming for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgent, Rebecca A.; Higgins, Kristin K.; Belk, Stephanie E.; Behrend, Bonni A. Nickens; Dunbar, Kelly A.

    2011-01-01

    Group counseling has been highlighted as one effective intervention for at-risk students, yet debate remains as to the comparable efficacy of traditional interventions versus thematic interventions. This study compared two psychosocial educational programs, the PEGS and ARK Programs, designed to help elementary school students with social skills…

  9. Parent Management Training Program Developed by “Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Psychosocial Interventions (RUPP Autism Network” for Education of Family with Children in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Arslan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Parent management training programme was prepared by Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Psychosocial Interventions (RUPP Autism Network based on ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis. The programme aims to prevent or decrease the problem behavior and to bring the children with autism in positive behaviors by educating their families. The controlled randomized clinical research of RUPP has determined that Parent Managament Training (PMT have provided meaningful improvements on childrens’ function and family relationships. The group of children on which risperidone and PMT have implemented together had statistically meaningful improvements such as increase in adaptive skills and decrease in the aggressive behaviors when compared with the children who used only risperidone. There is no such programme in Turkey for the families with children in pervasive developmet disorder. This paper aims to introduce and show the potentials of the PMT programme that has been developed by RUPP Autism Network.

  10. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Winger, Joseph G; Given, Barbara A; Shahda, Safi; Helft, Paul R

    2017-07-01

    A significant minority of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients experience clinically meaningful distress that may warrant intervention. The goal of this systematic review was to assess the impact of psychosocial interventions on quality-of-life and psychosocial outcomes for CRC patients. A systematic search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES was undertaken to obtain relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published through October 2016. Fourteen RCTs of psychosocial interventions for CRC patients were identified. Only three of these RCTs showed significant intervention effects on multiple mental health outcomes. These interventions included written and verbal emotional expression, progressive muscle relaxation training, and a self-efficacy enhancing intervention. Eight of the 14 trials, testing a range of psychoeducational and supportive care interventions, produced little to no effects on study outcomes. An evaluation of RCT quality highlighted the need for greater rigor in study methods and reporting. A limited evidence base supports the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for CRC patients. Large-scale trials are needed before drawing definitive conclusions regarding intervention impact.

  11. Cost Analysis of Early Psychosocial Intervention in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, R.; Sørensen, J.; Waldorff, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the impact of early psychosocial intervention aimed at patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on resource use and costs from a societal perspective. METHODS: Dyads of patients and their primary caregiver were randomised to intervention (n = 163...

  12. A Systematic Review of Psychosocial Interventions to Cancer Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the effect of psychosocial interventions on improving QoL, depression and anxiety of cancer caregivers.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of psychosocial interventions among adult cancer caregivers published from 2011 to 2016. PsycINFO, PubMed, Proquest, Cochrane Library, Embase, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI and EBSCO, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and WANFANG were searched. Inclusion criteria were: randomized controlled trails (RCTs; psychosocial intervention to cancer caregivers; psychosocial health indicators including quality of life, depression or anxiety.Results: 21 studies out of 4,666 identified abstracts met inclusion criteria, including 19 RCTs. The intervention modes fell into the following nine categories: family connect intervention, self-determination theory-based intervention (SDT, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, emotion-focused therapy (EFT, comprehensive health enhancement support system (CHESS, FOCUS programme, existential behavioral therapy (EBT, telephone interpersonal counseling (TIP-C, problem-solving intervention (COPE.Conclusion: paired-intervention targeting self-care and interpersonal connections of caregivers and symptom management of patients is effective in improving quality of life and alleviating depression of cancer caregivers while music therapy is helpful for reducing anxiety of cancer caregivers.

  13. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  14. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  15. Functional impairment, stress, and psychosocial intervention in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklowitz, David J

    2011-12-01

    The longitudinal course of bipolar disorder (BD) is highly impairing. This article reviews recent research on functional impairment in the course of BD, the roles of social and intrafamilial stress in relapse and recovery, and the role of adjunctive psychosocial interventions in reducing risk and enhancing functioning. Comparative findings in adult and childhood BD are highlighted. Life events and family-expressed emotion have emerged as significant predictors of the course of BD. Studies of social information processing suggest that impairments in the recognition of facial emotions may characterize both adult- and early-onset bipolar patients. Newly developed psychosocial interventions, particularly those that focus on family and social relationships, are associated with more rapid recovery from episodes and better psychosocial functioning. Family-based psychoeducational approaches are promising as early interventions for children with BD or children at risk of developing the disorder. For adults, interpersonal therapy, mindfulness-based strategies, and cognitive remediation may offer promise in enhancing functioning.

  16. Trauma Collaborative Care Intervention: Effect on Surgeon Confidence in Managing Psychosocial Complications After Orthopaedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Stephen T; Carroll, Eben A; Gary, Joshua L; McKinley, Todd O; OʼToole, Robert V; Sietsema, Debra L; Castillo, Renan C; Frey, Katherine P; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Huang, Yanjie; Collins, Susan C J; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-08-01

    The impact of the Trauma Collaborative Care (TCC) program on surgeon confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae of orthopaedic trauma was evaluated as part of a larger prospective, multisite, cluster clinical trial. We compared confidence and perceived resource availability among surgeons practicing in trauma centers that implemented the TCC program with orthopaedic trauma surgeons in similar trauma centers that did not implement the TCC. Prospective cohort design. Level-I trauma centers. Attending surgeons and fellows (N = 95 Pre and N = 82 Post). Self-report 10-item measure of surgeon confidence in managing psychosocial issues associated with trauma and perceived availability of support resources. Analyses, performed on the entire sample and repeated on the subset of 52 surgeons who responded to the survey at both times points, found surgeons at intervention sites experienced a significantly greater positive improvement (P < 0.05) in their (1) belief that they have strategies to help orthopaedic trauma patients change their psychosocial situation; (2) confidence in making appropriate referrals for orthopaedic trauma patients with psychosocial problems; and (3) belief that they have access to information to guide the management of psychosocial issues related to recovery. Initial data suggest that the establishment of the TCC program can improve surgeons' perceived availability of resources and their confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae after injury. Further studies will be required to determine if this translates into beneficial patient effects. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. Minority Youth, Broad Context and Inclusive Psychosocial intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    are proposed, based on the processes of inclusion at multiple levels. These processes of inclusion are fundamental to the principles in the psychosocial service (TTT) at the personal, interpersonal as well as societal level. At personal level, the intervention principle implies an identity with multiple...

  18. Is training in psychosocial interventions worthwhile? Report of a psychosocial intervention trainee follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Saul, Carol; Robinson, Jeannie; King, Jenny; Dudley, Mike

    2003-09-01

    A follow-up study of psychosocial intervention (PSI) trainees from the Sheffield and Maudsley training centres was undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1, 141 students, at two PSI training centres, were sent a simple postal questionnaire to elicit career trajectory following PSI training. A response rate of 82% was achieved. The sub-group, who had been trained and who still engaged in clinical practice were identified and followed-up in more detail (n=96). The effect of PSI training in a range of domains was investigated. The impact of training may not be to equip students with formal technical skills in CBT and family work. What is more likely is that trainees acquired proficiency in: working effectively using a case management model; conveying 'therapeutic optimism'; enabling users to meet their own goals and helping them to develop better coping strategies; using 'stress vulnerability' and formal outcome measures as means of structuring this approach. The secondary aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the barriers that impede the effective implementation of PSI skills in routine service settings. For the second phase of the survey the response rate was again 82%. This group's service managers were identified and surveyed for the same information and 59% responded. The aim was to gather information about implementation issues from both the clinical and service perspectives. The results of the survey indicate that PSI training has a positive impact on the development of services for people with serious mental health problems although there are serious organisational hurdles for managers, trainees and organisations to overcome if PSI skills are to be properly implemented. Key factors that impact upon faithful implementation are related to resource issues (caseload size), organisational factors (the existence of an implementation plan and training strategy), and the extent to which the trainee's team is supportive.

  19. Preliminary Evidence for a Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention for Disaster Exposed Children with Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Ask; Rønholt, Stine; Karsberg, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    a substantial number of symptoms 3 years after the incident. Thus, a treatment program designed to target PTSD symptoms in trauma-exposed children was established. Objectives The first aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence that a classroom-based psychosocial intervention program for children....... Furthermore, the results indicated that the Darryl instrument is a useful screening tool for assessing PTSD symptoms in this sample of children. Keywords Trauma Disaster Treatment Children Assessment...

  20. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey JN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available John N Harvey Diabetes Research Group, Wrexham Academic Unit, Bangor University, Wrexham, UK Abstract: Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient's health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. Keywords: health beliefs, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, adolescence

  1. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deter Hans-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented

  2. Psychosocial Intervention In Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočníková Jana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide for males, and the fifth most common cancer overall. Using of autogenic training could reduce the influence of ADT and raise quality of prostate cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of autogenic training in patients with prostate cancer. Patients were divided to experimental and control group. Experimental group participated in fourteen weeks long autogenic training program. Control group performed usual daily activities. Every subject of research performed input and output diagnostics which monitored psychical states of patients by psychological standardized tests - Differential questionnaire of depression (DDF and Questionnaire of anxiety (STAI X1. Our data showed autogenic training program significant improved depressions symptoms and anxiety in experimental research group (p ≤ 0.05, however there was no main change of depression symptoms and anxiety values for control group (p = n.s..

  3. Early psychosocial interventions after disasters, terrorism, and other shocking events: Guideline development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, H. te; Dückers, M.; Vries, M. de; Duin, D. van; Rooze, M.; Spreeuwenberg, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Internationally, several initiatives exist to describe standards for post-disaster psychosocial care. Objective: This study explored the level of consensus of experts within Europe on a set of recommendations on early psychosocial intervention after shocking events (Dutch guidelines),

  4. Health behaviors of mandated and voluntary students in a motivational intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention programs to reduce drinking by college students need to address developmental dynamics of freshmen students, including gender, psychosocial factors, personality, and lifestyle health-promoting behaviors.

  5. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F B; Buss, D V; Eckermann, A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers. DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, controlled, rater blinded trial. SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics in five...... Danish districts. PARTICIPANTS: 330 outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their 330 primary care givers. INTERVENTIONS: Participating dyads (patient and primary care giver) were randomised to control support during follow-up or to control support plus DAISY intervention (multifaceted and semi...... for attrition (P = 0.0146 and P = 0.0103 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The multifaceted, semi-tailored intervention with counselling, education, and support for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their care givers did not have any significant effect beyond that with well structured follow-up support at 12...

  6. [Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions and endophenotypes in bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correard, N; Elissalde, S N; Azorin, J-M; Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R

    2012-12-01

    Diseases with complex determinism, bipolar disorders, involve at the same time environmental and genetic factors of vulnerability. The characterization of these vulnerabilities would allow a better knowledge of their etiology and envisage the development of therapeutics, more specialized, even preventive. The research in genetic psychiatry allowed to highlight endophenotype candidates associated to bipolar disorders. They are endogenous clinical or biological features, biologically more elementary than phenotypes and more directly bound to the physiological consequences of genes and their polymorphisms. Targeting some of them with specific psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions could reduce the consequences of their expression and so have an action on the course of the disease and also preventive.

  7. [Advances in psychosocial interventions on quality of life of cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuefen; Wang, Jiwei; Gong, Xiaohuan; Yu, Jinming

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of psychosocial interventions' studies on quality of life in cancer survivors because of improving cancer survival rate. This paper was an integrative literatures review of various psychosocial interventions including cognitive behavioral therapy, group-based supportive therapy, counseling or psychotherapy, education or psychoeducation and music therapy et al, and analyzing the complexity of psychosocial interventions' RCTs in oncology and the current characteristic of these studies in China.

  8. Prevention of Targeted School Violence by Responding to Students' Psychosocial Crises: The NETWASS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, Vincenz; Fiedler, Nora; Schultze, Martin; Ahlig, Nadine; Göbel, Kristin; Sommer, Friederike; Scholl, Johanna; Cornell, Dewey; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    The standardized, indicated school-based prevention program "Networks Against School Shootings" combines a threat assessment approach with a general model of prevention of emergency situations in schools through early intervention in student psychosocial crises and training teachers to recognize warning signs of targeted school violence.…

  9. A Systematic Review of Psychosocial Interventions for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Minshew, Nancy J.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) spend the majority of their lives as adults, and psychosocial interventions show promise for improving outcomes in this population. This research conducted a systematic review of all peer-review studies evaluating psychosocial interventions for adults with ASD. A total of 1,217 studies were…

  10. Psychosocial Issues in Engaging Older People with Physical Activity Interventions for the Prevention of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the psychosocial factors that influence older people's participation in physical activity interventions to prevent falls. The importance of psychosocial factors is stressed inasmuch as interventions will be rendered useless if they do not successfully gain the active participation of older people. The theory of…

  11. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for stroke family caregivers and stroke survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ho Yu; Chair, Sek Ying; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for family caregivers on their psychosocial and physical wellbeing, quality of life, and the use of healthcare resources by stroke survivors. Electronic English and Chinese bibliographic databases were searched (inception to January 2012) for clinical trials. Two reviewers independently selected and appraised study quality. When possible, data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were statistically pooled. Otherwise, a narrative summary was used. Eighteen studies (psychoeducation and social support group) were included. Pooled analysis of two individual psychoeducation programs showed a small effect on improving family functioning (SMD: -0.12; 95% CI: -0.23 to -0.01; p=0.03). Caregivers receiving psychoeducation that aimed at equipping caregivers with the skills of problem-solving, caregiving, and stress-coping appeared to have a more positive influence on the caregivers' psychosocial wellbeing and a reduced use of healthcare resources by stroke survivors. Evidence on the effects of psychosocial interventions was limited. More RCTs of multifaceted psychoeducation programs are needed to further examine the optimal dose and format. To support caregivers across the stroke trajectory, the core skills of problem-solving and stress-coping should be included in the psychosocial interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Examination of the Relationship between Psychosocial Mediators and Intervention Effects in It’s Your Game: An Effective HIV/STI/Pregnancy Prevention Intervention for Middle School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Baumler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of mediation analyses were carried out in this study using data from It’s Your Game. . .Keep It Real (IYG, a successful HIV/STI/pregnancy prevention program. The IYG study evaluated a skill and normbased. HIV/STI/pregnancy prevention program that was implemented from 2004 to 2007 among 907 urban low-income middle school youth in Houston, TX, USA. Analyses were carried out to investigate the degree to which a set of proposed psychosocial measures of behavioral knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, behavioral, and normative beliefs, and perceived risky situations, all targeted by the intervention, mediated the intervention’s effectiveness in reducing initiation of sex. The mediation process was assessed by examining the significance and size of the estimated effects from the mediating pathways. The findings from this study provide evidence that the majority of the psychosocial mediators targeted by the IYG intervention are indeed related to the desired behavior and provide evidence that the conceptual theory underlying the targeted psychosocial mediators in the intervention is appropriate. Two of the psychosocial mediators significantly mediated the intervention effect, knowledge of STI signs and symptoms and refusal self-efficacy. This study suggests that the underlying causal mechanisms of action of these interventions are complex and warrant further analyses.

  13. Immunological changes associated with clinical improvement of asthmatic children subjected to psychosocial intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castés, M; Hagel, I; Palenque, M; Canelones, P; Corao, A; Lynch, N R

    1999-03-01

    In the present study we evaluated the impact of a program of psychosocial intervention (PSI) on the immunological status and the clinical management of a group of asthmatic children of an island population in Venezuela. We studied a total of 35 asthmatic children who belonged to either a PSI group (19 patients) or a control group (16 patients), both of which received conventional antiasthmatic treatment. The PSI group received, in addition, a 6-month psychosocial intervention program which included relaxation, guided imagery, and self-esteem workshops. During the PSI period, the number of asthmatic episodes and the use of bronchodilator medication were significantly reduced, and pulmonary function was significantly improved, compared to the 6 months before intervention. There was also a significant reduction in the specific IgE responses against the most important allergen in these children, the intestinal parasite Ascaris lumbricoides. PSI resulted in a significant increase of NK cells, an augmented expression of the T-cell receptor for IL-2, and a significant decrease of leukocytes with low affinity receptors for IgE. In fact, these surface markers became similar to those of nonasthmatic children from both Coche Island and the mainland. None of these clinical or immunological changes were seen in the control group of asthmatics who did not undergo PSI. These results are consistent with the possibility that PSI induces immunological alterations that are responsible for the clinical and physiological improvements observed in the study group. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. The feasibility of implementing recovery, psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for psychosis: comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krieke, Lian; Bird, Victoria; Leamy, Mary; Bacon, Faye; Dunn, Rebecca; Pesola, Francesca; Janosik, Monika; Le Boutillier, Clair; Williams, Julie; Slade, Mike

    2015-05-23

    Clinical guidelines for the treatment of people experiencing psychosis have existed for over a decade, but implementation of recommended interventions is limited. Identifying influences on implementation may help to reduce this translational gap. The Structured Assessment of Feasibility (SAFE) measure is a standardised assessment of implementation blocks and enablers. The aim of this study was to characterise and compare the implementation blocks and enablers for recommended psychosis interventions. SAFE was used to evaluate and compare three groups of interventions recommended in the 2014 NICE psychosis guideline: pharmacological (43 trials testing 5 interventions), psychosocial (65 trials testing 5 interventions), and recovery (19 trials testing 5 interventions). The 127 trial reports rated with SAFE were supplemented by published intervention manuals, research protocols, trial registrations and design papers. Differences in the number of blocks and enablers across the three interventions were tested statistically, and feasibility profiles were generated. There was no difference between psychosocial and recovery interventions in the number of blocks or enablers to implementation. Pharmacological interventions (a) had fewer blocks than both psychosocial interventions (χ (2)(3) = 133.77, p recovery interventions (χ (2)(3) = 104.67, p recovery interventions (χ (2)(3) = 0.74, p = 0.863) but had fewer enablers than psychosocial interventions (χ (2)(3) = 28.92, p recovery and psychosocial interventions. Feasibility profiles show that pharmacological interventions are relatively easy to implement but can sometimes involve risks. Psychosocial and recovery interventions are relatively complex but tend to be more flexible and more often manualised. SAFE ratings can contribute to tackling the current implementation challenges in mental health services, by providing a reporting guideline structure for researchers to maximise the potential for

  15. Gender based violence and psychosocial intervention at Quito. Weaving narratives to construct new meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Guarderas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Very few studies have been done in Ecuador on psychosocial interventions involving gender violence. This article, based on research carried out in Quito with people who have experienced this type of violence, is intended to contribute to the debate on the subject. Through narrative production methodology, we hope to construct new meanings of psychosocial intervention and gender violence. The participants offer conceptions of gender violence that go beyond aspects usually taken into account in the creation of laws and services. They point out that current psychosocial intervention in response to gender violence tends to homogenize women, providing services that reduce these situations to woman/victim-man/perpetrator scenarios.

  16. Psychosocial changes in the Mississippi communities for healthy living (MCHL) nutrition intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the psychosocial changes reported by participants in a nutrition education intervention in the Lower Mississippi Delta. The psychosocial constructs such as decisional balance (DB), self-efficacy (SE), and social support (SS) are correlated with fruit and ve...

  17. Review of implementation processes for integrated nutrition and psychosocial stimulation interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Aisha K; Aboud, Frances

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the implementation processes for interventions that integrate nutrition and psychosocial stimulation for children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. We examine the content of these programs, the delivery strategy, intensity and duration, personnel training and supervision, compliance, and fidelity. A systematic search of the Global Health Ovid database yielded 1020 articles, of which 29 fit the criteria, and two further studies recently completed were reported by author communication. Some of these articles describe efficacy or effectiveness studies where nutritional supplements or education along with psychosocial stimulation experiences or education were delivered directly to children or their caregivers. Other papers describe large-scale programs, such as conditional cash transfers in Latin America, Integrated Child Development Services preschools in India, and World Bank collaborations with national governments in Africa. A summary table of the implementation processes of the 31 programs is included. We conclude with a set of recommendations summarizing what we know so far regarding best practices for integrative programs.

  18. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F B; Buss, D V; Eckermann, A

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers.......To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers....

  19. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  20. [Provincial public center for crisis intervention and psycho-social rehabilitation. A path towards communitary suicidology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work on the systematic comprehensive approach towards the Prevention and Postvencion of Suicide started to develop back in mid 2011 in Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz Province. The first step on this development was a Pilot Plan for the Training of Professionals and also field intervention. The Center for Crisis Intervention and Psycho-social Rehabilitation was founded eight months later. The case-client in crisis plus family group- undergoes quantitative and qualitative evaluation by means of a triage system, all of which allows starting intensive face-to-face and also phone follow up according to the Crisis Intervention Model. Such intervention is developed by means of the participation in the "Grupo Sostén", the Adolescents Group if the client fits into that age, and also family relationship interviews as well as Multi-family meetings open to the Community. There is also a Community Team in the Center which performs collective assessment in schools, in conjunction with the "Equidad en Redes" Educational Specialty Team, belonging to the Provincial Education Council. The approach takes place on the field, and works as a screening step for the early detection of risk. Such risk is dealt with by means of short term intervention group programs involving the whole of the educational community. When facing situations of committed suicide there are interventions in communities to the interior of the province, fundamentally through the Hospital Team which works as the cluster convener for the social intersectoral frame-work.

  1. Psychosocial interventions in workplace mental health promotion: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabała, Czesław; Charzyńska, Katarzyna; Mroziak, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    A review based on the DataPrev final report concerning workplace mental health promotion is presented. Out of 4865 studies identified in a comprehensive bibliographical data search, 315 were selected for abstract screening and 79 were included in the final review. The studies were categorized in terms of their aims/expected outcomes and evaluated for quality on the grounds of their design and type of analysis. The most frequent aims were stress reduction and better coping, followed by increased job satisfaction and effectiveness, mental health enhancement and reduction in mental health-related absenteeism. In the 79 intervention studies, 99 outcome variables were measured using 163 instruments, mostly developed for the study purposes. Different intervention categories turned out to be used to attain the same aim, with skills training being the most popular (other approaches included improvement of occupational qualifications and working conditions, physical exercise, relaxation and multicomponent interventions). Among the few intervention programs that were implemented and evaluated in two or more studies, the Stress Inoculation Training (Cecil and Forman, in Effects of stress inoculation training and coworker support groups on teachers' stress. Journal of School Psychology, 28, 105, 1990) based on the model by Meichenbaum (Meichenbaum, in Stress Inoculation Training. Pergamon Press, New York, 1985) seemed to be the most promising. Its effectiveness, evidenced in a majority of the measures, was evaluated in studies using the randomized controlled design. This paper is illustrated by high-quality intervention studies. In high and moderate quality studies, positive effects were reported in about a half of the examined outcome variables. However, conclusive evidence of intervention programs effectiveness would require further research-repetition of studies using treatments equivalent to the experimental ones, and outcome evaluation taking into account other criteria

  2. Early psychosocial interventions after disasters, terrorism and other shocking events: is there a gap between norms and practice in Europe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, H. te; Dückers, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Internationally, several initiatives exist to describe standards for post-disaster psychosocial care. Objective: This study explored the level of consensus of experts within Europe on a set of recommendations on early psychosocial intervention after shocking events (Dutch guidelines),

  3. Strategies for implementing evidence-based psychosocial interventions for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiraldi, Ricardo B; Mautone, Jennifer A; Power, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    An extensive amount of research has demonstrated the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for children with ADHD. Historically, the research has focused on interventions targeting problems in the home or school setting, but more recent research has highlighted the importance of family – school partnerships and conjoint approaches to intervention involving family and school. Effective approaches to psychosocial intervention consist of strategies to address performance deficits, promote adaptive behavior, and improve children’s self-control and academic and social skills. Considerable evidence exists to indicate that combined approaches are more effective in reducing ADHD symptoms and related academic and social impairments than separate treatments.

  4. The psychosocial impact of armed conflict on children. Rethinking traditional paradigms in research and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichick, T

    2001-10-01

    It is undeniable that the impact of war on children is a significant issue that merits continued efforts in research and intervention. It is time for a shift in paradigms; instead of focusing solely on exposure to traumatic events and defining pathology per dominant diagnostic criteria, it is essential that research turn to examining the effect of chronic stressors and exploring how certain mechanisms may be protective or act to moderate the psychosocial impact of war on children. The role of such protective mechanisms must be examined for differences by development and gender and by cultural context and the nature of the conflict situation itself. Investigations of the health and psychosocial well-being of war-affected children and the programs that serve them must attend to the restoration of basic physiologic needs, safety, structure, familial ties, and other sources of support and integration of cultural practices of healing. The coping efforts of young people and their families and the creation of more positive roles for youth also must be explored. Addressing these fundamental issues in research and programming will go a long way in fostering new opportunities for peace, healing, and the promotion of mental health and well-being for war-affected children in modern times.

  5. Smoking cessation in pregnancy: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Miyazaki,1 Kunihiko Hayashi,2 Setsuko Imazeki1 1Faculty of Health Care, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, Takasaki, 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan Background: Smoking during pregnancy causes obstetric and fetal complications, and smoking cessation may have great benefits for the mother and the child. However, some pregnant women continue smoking even in pregnancy.Objective: To review the literature addressing the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy, explore psychosocial factors associated with smoking, and review the evidence of psychosocial interventions for smoking cessation during pregnancy in recent years.Literature review: Computerized Internet search results in PubMed for the years spanning from 2004 to 2014, as well as references cited in articles, were reviewed. A search for the keywords “smoking cessation pregnancy” and “intervention” and “clinical trials” yielded 52 citations. Thirty-five citations were identified as useful to this review for the evidence of psychosocial interventions for smoking cessation during pregnancy.Results: The prevalence of smoking during pregnancy differs by country, reflecting the countries’ social, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds. Women who had socioeconomic disadvantages, problems in their interpersonal relationships, higher stress, depression, less social support, and who engaged in health-risk behaviors were more prone to smoking during pregnancy. Psychosocial interventions, such as counseling, are effective methods for increasing smoking cessation.Conclusion: Smokers may have various psychosocial problems in addition to health problems. It is important to understand each individual’s social situation or psychosocial characteristics, and a psychosocial intervention focused on the characteristics of the individual is required. Keywords: women’s health, smoking cessation, pregnancy, psychosocial intervention  

  6. Facilitating Long-Term Recovery from Natural Disasters: Psychosocial Programming for Tsunami-Affected Schools of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Jayasena, Asoka; Summerville, Meredith; Borja, Amanda P.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a school-based intervention project conducted in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka 15 to 18 months after the December 2004 Tsunami. The work responds to the need for culturally relevant programming to address long-term psychosocial recovery of children and adolescents affected by large scale disasters. Program…

  7. Psychosocial Interventions for Women with HIV/AIDS: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Julieta P.; Macgowan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recent research on psychosocial interventions addressing the well-being of women with HIV/AIDS has brought new options for practitioners. This study critically reviews the treatment features, methodological quality, and efficacy of these interventions. Methods: A comprehensive search between 2000 and 2011 identified 19 studies employing…

  8. Psychosocial Interventions for Women with HIV/AIDS: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Julieta P.; Macgowan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recent research on psychosocial interventions addressing the well-being of women with HIV/AIDS has brought new options for practitioners. This study critically reviews the treatment features, methodological quality, and efficacy of these interventions. Methods: A comprehensive search between 2000 and 2011 identified 19 studies employing…

  9. Policy-level interventions and work-related psychosocial risk management in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leka, S.; Jain, A.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Cox, T.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a substantial degree of diversity across strategies to prevent and manage work- related psychosocial risks and their associated health effects. Whereas it is common to distinguish between organizational and individual interventions, the important level of policy- level interventions has

  10. The effects of physical activity interventions on psychosocial outcomes in adolescents: A meta-analytic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, A.; Assink, M.; van Vugt, E.; van der Put, C.; Stams, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity interventions are often implemented in the adolescent mental health care practice to prevent or treat psychosocial problems. To date, no systematic review of the effect of these physical activity interventions in adolescents has been conducted. In the current study, four multilevel

  11. Psychosocial interventions for the promotion of mental health and the prevention of depression among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anna K; Nordmyr, Johanna; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for the promotion of mental health and prevention of depression among older people. A systematic review of prospective controlled trials was conducted including 69 studies. The studies were divided into physical exercise, skill training, reminiscence, social activities, group support and multicomponent interventions. Data from 44 trials contributed to a meta-analysis of effectiveness. Overall, psychosocial interventions had a positive effect on quality of life and positive mental health. The pooled interventions also had a statistically significant effect on reduction in depressive symptoms. Social activities significantly improved positive mental health, life satisfaction and quality of life and reduced depressive symptoms. Based on the results of this study, duration of interventions is of importance, since interventions lasting for >3 months exhibited more positive effects compared with shorter interventions. Meaningful social activities, tailored to the older individual's abilities and preferences should be considered in aiming to improve mental health among older people.

  12. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions delivered by general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, M.J.H.; Beurskens, A.J.H.M.; Bleijenberg, G.; Schayck, C.P. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients visit their general practitioner (GP) because of problems that are psychosocial in origin. However, for many of these problems there is no evidence-based treatment available in primary care, and these patients place time-consuming demands on their GP. Therefore, GPs could b

  13. Humanitarian Curriculum and Psychosocial Interventions: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Gonzalo; Low, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical description of the impact of violence and natural disasters on schoolchildren. It attempts to explore the present state of the art in psychosocial aspects of education and the curriculum in humanitarian settings. This is carried out through a compilation and a brief annotated bibliography of existing literature…

  14. The Skills of Facilitator Nurses in Psycho-Social Group Intervention for Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chujo, Masami; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to provide cancer patients with a psychosocial group intervention consisting of 3 parts, i.e., education on how to cope with stress and solve problems, group discussions, and progressive muscle relaxation, and to investigate the intervention techniques of Japanese facilitators. Methods Group interventions for breast cancer patients performed by 3 facilitators were analyzed qualitatively and inductively using a phenomenological approach. Results The s...

  15. Effectiveness of a participatory ergonomics intervention in improving communication and psychosocial exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, A C; Cole, D C; Theberge, N; Wells, R P; Kerr, M S; Frazer, M B

    2007-07-01

    A participatory ergonomics programme was implemented in an automotive parts manufacturing factory in which an ergonomics change team was formed, composed of members from management, the organized labour union and the research team. It was hypothesized that the participatory nature of this change process would result in enhanced worker perceptions of workplace communication dynamics, decision latitude and influence, which in conjunction with anticipated mechanical exposure reductions would lead to reduced worker pain severity. Utilizing a sister plant in the corporation as a referent group, a quasi-experimental design was employed with a longitudinal, repeat questionnaire approach to document pre-post intervention changes. Nine participatory activities (psychosocial interventions) were implemented as part of the process. Communication dynamics regarding ergonomics were significantly enhanced at the intervention plant compared to the referent plant. However, there were no significantly different changes in worker perceptions of decision latitude or influence between the two plants, nor did pain severity change. Possible explanations for these results include limited intervention intensity, context and co-intervention differences between the two plants, high plant turnover reducing the statistical power of the study and lack of sensitivity and specificity in the psychosocial measures used. Further research should include the development of psychosocial tools more specific to participatory ergonomic interventions and the assessment of the extent of change in psychosocial factors that might be associated with improvements in pain.

  16. Evaluation of a classroom-based psychosocial intervention in conflict-affected Nepal: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordans, M.J.D.; Komproe, I.H.; Tol, W.A.; Kohrt, B.A.; Luitel, N.P.; Macy, R.D.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background:  In situations of ongoing violence, childhood psychosocial and mental health problems require care. However, resources and evidence for adequate interventions are scarce for children in low- and middle-income countries. This study evaluated a school-based psychosocial intervention in con

  17. Psychosocial interventions for adolescents and young adult cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Diana; Koehler, Michael; Friedrich, Michael; Hilgendorf, Inken; Mehnert, Anja; Weißflog, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients experience unique psychosocial needs and developmental challenges. A cancer diagnosis can stress this development and disrupt AYAs in their normal life. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the impact of psychosocial interventions on mental health in AYAs. A literature research was conducted, which resulted in twelve eligible studies. The standardized mean difference between intervention and control conditions was 0.13 (95% CI: -0.16 to 0.42) for quality of life, 0.27 (95% CI: -0.22 to 0.76) for cancer-related knowledge and -0.16 (95% CI: -0.73 to 0.42) on psychological distress indicating, small and non-significant effects for interventions improving mental health. This work strengthens the need for age-appropriated interventions in psycho-oncology. Future research should develop interventions more graduated by age. Randomized intervention studies with larger samples and focusing psychosocial outcomes are needed to establish evidence-based psycho-oncological interventions for AYAs.

  18. Methodological limitations of psychosocial interventions in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ockene Ira S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the potentially life-saving benefits of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD, a significant group of patients experiences emotional distress after ICD implantation. Different psychosocial interventions have been employed to improve this condition, but previous reviews have suggested that methodological issues may limit the validity of such interventions. Aim: To review the methodology of previously published studies of psychosocial interventions in ICD patients, according to CONSORT statement guidelines for non-pharmacological interventions, and provide recommendations for future research. Methods We electronically searched the PubMed, PsycInfo and Cochrane databases. To be included, studies needed to be published in a peer-reviewed journal between 1980 and 2008, to involve a human population aged 18+ years and to have an experimental design. Results Twelve studies met the eligibility criteria. Samples were generally small. Interventions were very heterogeneous; most studies used cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT and exercise programs either as unique interventions or as part of a multi-component program. Overall, studies showed a favourable effect on anxiety (6/9 and depression (4/8. CBT appeared to be the most effective intervention. There was no effect on the number of shocks and arrhythmic events, probably because studies were not powered to detect such an effect. Physical functioning improved in the three studies evaluating this outcome. Lack of information about the indication for ICD implantation (primary vs. secondary prevention, limited or no information regarding use of anti-arrhythmic (9/12 and psychotropic (10/12 treatment, lack of assessments of providers' treatment fidelity (12/12 and patients' adherence to the intervention (11/12 were the most common methodological limitations. Conclusions Overall, this review supports preliminary evidence of a positive effect of psychosocial interventions

  19. Effects of a Psychosocial Intervention on the Executive Functioning in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Ana; Presentacion, M. Jesus; Siegenthaler, Rebeca; Jara, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of an intensive psychosocial intervention on the executive functioning (EF) in children with ADHD. The treatment was carried out in a coordinated manner over a period of 10 weeks with 27 children with ADHD aged 7 to 10, their parents, and their teachers. A battery of neuropsychological tasks was…

  20. European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part III : behavioural and psychosocial interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdellen, Cara; van de Griendt, Jolande; Hartmann, Andreas; Murphy, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This clinical guideline provides recommendations for the behavioural and psychosocial interventions (BPI) of children and adolescents with tic disorders prepared by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS). A systematic literature search was conducted to obt

  1. Psychosocial interventions for patients with advanced cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitterhoeve, R.J.; Vernooy, M.; Litjens, M.; Potting, K.; Bensing, J.; Mulder, P. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    Advanced cancer is associated with emotional distress, especially depression and feelings of sadness. To date, it is unclear which is the most effective way to address these problems. This review focuses on the effects of psychosocial interventions on the quality of life (QoL) of patients with advan

  2. Effectiveness of a psychosocial counselling intervention for first-time IVF couples : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, C; Hunfeld, JAM; Duivenvoorden, HJ; den Outer, MA; Fauser, BCJM; Passchier, J; Macklon, NS

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate a psychosocial counselling intervention for first-time IVF couples. In this article the results on women's distress are presented. METHODS: Two hundred sixty-five couples admitted to an IVF treatment programme at the Erasmus MC were asked to pa

  3. Cognitive Remediation: A New Generation of Psychosocial Interventions for People with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental health condition characterized by broad impairments in cognition that place profound limitations on functional recovery. Social work has an enduring legacy in pioneering the development of novel psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, and in this article the author introduces cognitive remediation, the…

  4. Goal Attainment Scaling as an Outcome Measure in Randomized Controlled Trials of Psychosocial Interventions in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Lisa; McGrew, John H.; Toland, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal attainment scaling (GAS) holds promise as an idiographic approach for measuring outcomes of psychosocial interventions in community settings. GAS has been criticized for untested assumptions of scaling level (i.e., interval or ordinal), inter-individual equivalence and comparability, and reliability of coding across different behavioral…

  5. European ways to combat psychosocial risks related to work organisation : towards organisational interventions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Morvan, E.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Vaas, F.; Wiezer, N.

    2004-01-01

    From 24-26 November 2004, the 6h Annual Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology ‘Healthy, Efficient & Productive Organisations’ was held in Oporto, Portugal. During this conference, the Workshop ‘Organisational interventions to combat psychosocial factors of stress’ was

  6. Psychosocial Interventions for School Refusal with Primary and Secondary School Students: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Maynard

    2015-05-01

    , medication but CBT has been the most studied intervention and most prior reviews have focused on CBT and/or behavioral interventions. While prior reviews have found some support for CBT and behavioral interventions for reducing anxiety and/or improving attendance, the reviews have been mixed (Maynard et al., 2013. Prior reviews have also been limited to published research, have not adequately assessed the quality of evidence, and have primarily employed either qualitative or vote-counting methods for synthesizing study outcomes. No prior meta-analysis of interventions targeting school refusal has been located. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this review was to inform practice and policy by evaluating the effects of psychosocial interventions for school refusal. The following research questions guided this study: 1 Do psychosocial interventions targeting school refusal reduce anxiety? 2 Do psychosocial interventions targeting school refusal increase attendance? SEARCH METHODS Electronic searches were conducted in 15 databases and 4 research registers, and internet searches were conducted for conference proceedings and other grey literature. Searches were conducted using the following keywords: (anxiety OR “school refus*” OR “school phobia” AND (attendance OR absen* AND (evaluation OR intervention OR treatment OR outcome OR program AND (student* OR school* OR child* OR adolescen*. Reviews of reference lists of included studies and prior reviews and personal contact with authors of prior studies of school refusal were also conducted to identify potential studies for this review. SELECTION CRITERIA Published or unpublished studies assessing effects of psychosocial interventions to improve attendance or reduce anxiety with school-age youth who met criteria for school refusal were included in this review. To be eligible for inclusion in this review, studies must have been conducted or reported between January 1980 and November 2013 and employed an experimental or quasi

  7. Disclosure of Financial Conflicts of Interests in Interventions to Improve Child Psychosocial Health: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Manuel; Humphreys, David K; Wilson, Philip; Gardner, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Academic journals increasingly request a full disclosure of financial conflict of interest (CoI). The Committee for Publication Ethics provides editors with guidance about the course of action in the case of suspected non-disclosure. No prior study has examined the extent to which journal articles on psychosocial interventions disclose CoI, and how journal editors process requests to examine suspected undisclosed CoI. Four internationally disseminated psychosocial interventions were examined. 136 articles related to an intervention, co-authored by intervention developers and published in health sciences journals were retrieved as requiring a CoI statement. Two editors refused consent to be included in the study. COI disclosures and editor responses were coded for 134 articles. Overall, 92/134 (71%) of all articles were found to have absent, incomplete or partly misleading CoI disclosures. Disclosure rates for the four programs varied significantly between 11% and 73%. Journal editors were contacted about 92 published articles with no CoI disclosure or a disclosure that was considered problematic. In 65/92 (71%) of all cases the editors published an 'erratum' or 'corrigendum'. In 16 of these cases the journal had mishandled a submitted disclosure. The most frequent reason for non-publication of an erratum was that the journal had no disclosure policy at the time of the publication (16 cases). Consumers of research on psychosocial interventions published in peer-reviewed journals cannot currently assume that CoI disclosures are adequate and complete. More efforts are needed to achieve transparency.

  8. Psychosocial Intervention with ethnic minority families in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    that relatively newer conceptualizations such as identities with multiple dimensions, transnationalism, resilience orientation and health promotion play a salient role in family intervention in this era of globalization perceived as the growing interconnectedness between people around the world with regards...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vos Theo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on cost-effectiveness of interventions to treat schizophrenia can assist health policy decision making, particularly given the lack of health resources in developing countries like Thailand. This study aims to determine the optimal treatment package, including drug and non-drug interventions, for schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods A Markov model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of typical antipsychotics, generic risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and family interventions. Health outcomes were measured in disability adjusted life years. We evaluated intervention benefit by estimating a change in disease severity, taking into account potential side effects. Intervention costs included outpatient treatment costs, hospitalization costs as well as time and travel costs of patients and families. Uncertainty was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. A sensitivity analysis of the expected range cost of generic risperidone was undertaken. Results Generic risperidone is more cost-effective than typicals if it can be produced for less than 10 baht per 2 mg tablet. Risperidone was the cheapest treatment with higher drug costs offset by lower hospital costs in comparison to typicals. The most cost-effective combination of treatments was a combination of risperidone (dominant intervention. Adding family intervention has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 1,900 baht/DALY with a 100% probability of a result less than a threshold for very cost-effective interventions of one times GDP or 110,000 baht per DALY. Treating the most severe one third of patients with clozapine instead of risperidone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 320,000 baht/DALY with just over 50% probability of a result below three times GDP per capita. Conclusions There are good economic arguments to recommend generic risperidone as first line treatment in combination with family intervention. As the uncertainty interval indicates

  10. The singing nurse?! Music therapy, interdisciplinarity and an overview of research in psychosocial interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    , and music therapy is described as an effective psychosocial intervention for reducing agitation in persons with dementia. I will shortly refer to an exploratory RCT where we found that 6 weeks of biweekly music therapy sessions reduced agitation disruptiveness as well as the prescription of psychotropic...... be carried out as direct practice (Bunt & Stige, 2014) but also as indirect music therapy practice. Indirect practice is suggested to play an important role in future culture of care in nursing homes with the music therapist as a key ‘actor’ in implementing music interventions in daily care situations, e.......g. in dyads with caregivers or relatives and the person with dementia. The aim is to provide and develop psychosocial interventions in the interdisciplinary team, and to support staff and caregivers in their use of music as part of the daily culture of care. References Bunt, L. & Stige, B. (2014). Music...

  11. [Evaluation of interventions intended to reduce psychosocial work stress. Proposal for a classification scheme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, R; Bauer, J; Nübling, M; Rose, U; Krause, A

    2011-08-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of measures aiming to reduce psychosocial work stress is sporadic. This is contradictory to the requirement identified by the German Social Security Code (SGB VII) that interventions constitute the most important method of maintaining and improving employees' health. Reasons for this can be seen in the complexity of the subject and methodological issues concerning scientific standards. In addition, agreed quality standards are nonexistent for the evaluation of intervention measures. For this reason, a synopsis of existing audit and evaluation schemes was performed, thus, resulting in refined and adapted quality standards for intervention measures aiming to reduce psychosocial work stress. The quality criteria presented in this paper comprise aims, effectiveness, and facilitators, each being composed of several indicators. The criteria are designed as quality indicators which translate the outcome of an evaluation into quality figures. The process is transparent and offers a rational basis for communication, planning, and decision-making in health promotion.

  12. Assessment effects in educational and psychosocial intervention trials: an important but often-overlooked problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Ward, Sandra E

    2015-06-01

    Baseline assessments and repeated measures are an essential part of educational and psychosocial intervention trials, but merely measuring an outcome of interest can modify that outcome, either by the measurement process alone or by interacting with the intervention to strengthen or weaken the intervention effects. Assessment effects can result in biased estimates of intervention effects and may not be controlled by the usual two-group randomized controlled trial design. In this paper, we review the concept of assessment effects and other related phenomena, briefly describe study designs that estimate assessment effects separately from intervention effects and discuss their strengths and limitations, review evidence regarding the strength of assessment effects in intervention trials targeting behavior change, and discuss implications for intervention research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users’ Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. Objective This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Results Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users’ experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. Conclusions There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main

  14. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for family carers of palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kristina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being a family carer to a patient nearing the end of their life is a challenging and confronting experience. Studies show that caregiving can have negative consequences on the health of family carers including fatigue, sleep problems, depression, anxiety and burnout. One of the goals of palliative care is to provide psychosocial support to patients and families facing terminal illness. A systematic review of interventions for family carers of cancer and palliative care patients conducted at the start of this millennium demonstrated that there was a dearth of rigorous inquiry on this topic and consequently limited knowledge regarding the types of interventions likely to be effective in meeting the complex needs of family carers. We wanted to discern whether or not the evidence base to support family carers has improved. Furthermore, undertaking this review was acknowledged as one of the priorities for the International Palliative Care Family Carer Research Collaboration http://www.centreforpallcare.org. Methods A systematic review was undertaken in order to identify developments in family carer support that have occurred over the last decade. The focus of the review was on interventions that targeted improvements in the psychosocial support of family carers of palliative care patients. Studies were graded to assess their quality. Results A total of fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The focus of interventions included psycho-education, psychosocial support, carer coping, symptom management, sleep promotion and family meetings. Five studies were randomised controlled trials, three of which met the criteria for the highest quality evidence. There were two prospective studies, five pre-test/post-test projects and two qualitative studies. Conclusions The systematic review identified a slight increase in the quality and quantity of psychosocial interventions conducted for family carers in the last decade. More rigorous

  15. An Empirical Study of the Relationship between Mentoring program and Mentees’ psychosocial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to investigate the correlation between mentoring program and mentees’ psychosocial development using self-report questionnaires collected from undergraduate students in teaching based higher learning institutions in Sarawak, Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model analysis showed two important findings: firstly, communication positively and significantly correlated with psychosocial. Secondly, support positively and significantly correlated with psychosocial. In sum, the result demonstrates that mentoring program does act as an important determinant of mentees’ psychosocial development in the organizational sample. In addition, this study provides discussion, implications and conclusion.

  16. Timing of intervention affects brain electrical activity in children exposed to severe psychosocial neglect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross E Vanderwert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early psychosocial deprivation has profound effects on brain activity in the young child. Previous reports have shown increased power in slow frequencies of the electroencephalogram (EEG, primarily in the theta band, and decreased power in higher alpha and beta band frequencies in infants and children who have experienced institutional care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the consequences of removing infants from institutions and placing them into a foster care intervention on brain electrical activity when children were 8 years of age. We found the intervention was successful for increasing high frequency EEG alpha power, with effects being most pronounced for children placed into foster care before 24 months of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dependence on age of placement for the effects observed on high frequency EEG alpha power suggests a sensitive period after which brain activity in the face of severe psychosocial deprivation is less amenable to recovery.

  17. The Skills of Facilitator Nurses in Psycho-Social Group Intervention for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Masami; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to provide cancer patients with a psychosocial group intervention consisting of 3 parts, i.e., education on how to cope with stress and solve problems, group discussions, and progressive muscle relaxation, and to investigate the intervention techniques of Japanese facilitators. Group interventions for breast cancer patients performed by 3 facilitators were analyzed qualitatively and inductively using a phenomenological approach. The skills of facilitators included 10 intervention techniques and 1 problem in interventions. Intervention techniques, which promote group dynamics and thereby help participants acquire improvements in their coping abilities and quality of life (QOL), were somewhat different between new and experienced facilitators, with the content showing immaturity and maturity in the new and experienced facilitators, respectively. Both experienced and new facilitators faced the risk of experiencing problems in interventions, which countered the purpose of the intervention of improving the participants' coping abilities or QOL. While intervention skills are necessary for facilitators to execute group interventions, it must be borne in mind, that even well-experienced facilitators may not always be able to accomplish skillful intervention.

  18. [Social cognition of schizophrenia: bridging gap between brain science and psychosocial intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebuchi, Emi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Ikezawa, Satoru; Miura, Sachie; Yamasaki, Syudo; Nemoto, Takahiro; Hidai, Shin-Ichi; Mogami, Tamiko

    2012-01-01

    The concept and assessment tools for social cognition of schizophrenia were reviewed in order to bridge the gap between brain cognitive science and psycho-social intervention. Social cognition as well as neuro-cognition strongly influences social functioning, and the impact of neuro-cognition is mediated by social cognition. Neuronal networks of personal identification, facial perception, emotional identification, eye contact, "theory of mind", mutual communication, and the decision-making process have been clarified recently. The results of face discrimination and emotion recognition tasks show impairment in persons with schizophrenia as compared with healthy controls, especially fear, dislike, and sad recognition tasks. It might be difficult for them to link ambiguous stimuli with specific emotions, and they have a tendency to recognize uncomfortable emotions easily. "Jumping to conclusions" tendency (JTC) was identified in previous research on delusion. JTC develops from information uptake bias and confidence bias, and they might be thought to be trait and state. Social problem-solving is the skill to use social cognition to comprehensively adjust to specific social situations, and processing skills of social problem-solving are related to divergent thinking. Rating scales and the results of previous studies on emotion recognition, social perception, attribution style, and "theory of mind" were summarized. Furthermore, psycho-social interventions to improve emotion recognition directly, JTC, and divergent thinking were reported. Interventions aiming at improving social cognition or meta-cognition directly have been recently developed, which might improve some components of social functioning that used to be difficult to improve. These concepts of social cognition and researches on brain science, assessment tools, and intervention methods would clarify the mechanisms of the effects of psycho-social interventions, improve their methodology, and help to develop new

  19. Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszycki, Lee H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

  20. Scientific Evidence in the Study and Treatment of Addictive Behaviours in Psychosocial Intervention. Journal on Equality and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Iruarrizaga Díez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, the importance and relevance of substance dependence and other addictive behaviours has generated great interest among the scientific community. Since its creation in 1992, Psychosocial Intervention. Journal on Equality and Quality of Life has transmitted the needs and training demands of psychologists, paying special attention to those aspects related to prevention, health outcomes and psychosocial factors involved in the onset and maintenance of drug addiction, psychosocial intervention and the treatment of addictive behaviours. As an introduction to this report on the Scientific evidence in the study and treatment of addictive behaviours, all topics covered by this journal throughout the years will be addressed.

  1. Tackling psychosocial risk factors for adolescent cyberbullying: Evidence from a school-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Lazuras, Lambros; Ourda, Despoina; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Cyberbullying is an emerging form of bullying that takes place through contemporary information and communication technologies. Building on past research on the psychosocial risk factors for cyberbullying in this age group, the present study assessed a theory-driven, school-based preventive intervention that targeted moral disengagement, empathy and social cognitive predictors of cyberbullying. Adolescents (N = 355) aged between 16 and 18 years were randomly assigned into the intervention and the control group. Both groups completed anonymous structured questionnaires about demographics, empathy, moral disengagement and cyberbullying-related social cognitive variables (attitudes, actor prototypes, social norms, and behavioral expectations) before the intervention, post-intervention and 6 months after the intervention. The intervention included awareness-raising and interactive discussions about cyberbullying with intervention group students. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that, after controlling for baseline measurements, there were significant differences at post-intervention measures in moral disengagement scores, and in favorability of actor prototypes. Further analysis on the specific mechanisms of moral disengagement showed that significant differences were observed in distortion of consequences and attribution of blame. The implications of the intervention are discussed, and guidelines for future school-based interventions against cyberbullying are provided.

  2. Psychosocial intervention for children with narcolepsy: Parents' expectations and perceived support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippola-Pääkkönen, Anu; Härkäpää, Kristiina; Valkonen, Jukka; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Autti-Rämö, Ilona

    2016-04-18

    The study focuses on the parents of children who were affected by narcolepsy after a pandemic influenza and vaccination campaign in Finland. The main aim of the study was to clarify parents' expectations and perceived support from the intervention and to assess their need for additional support. The data were gathered using questionnaires. Fifty-eight parents answered the baseline questionnaire and 40 parents the final questionnaire. Parents' expectations of and perceived support from the intervention mainly related to peer support. The intervention offered an arena for sharing information and experiences and provided encouragement for coping in everyday life. Many expectations were not met, especially those concerning information about needed services, financial benefits and availability of local support. The results highlight that for persons with rare disorders and their families, an inpatient psychosocial intervention can offer an important arena to receive both informal and professionally led peer support. Comprehensive psychosocial and other support services are also needed in the community. Listening to parents' perspectives on the intervention and perceived support can help to establish multiform family-centred support for families with children affected by a rare chronic disabling condition. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Family-oriented psychosocial intervention in children with cancer: A systematic review

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    Leila Ostadhashemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, evidence has shown the growing trend of published studies on family-oriented interventions in children with cancer. Besides shedding light on the current status of knowledge, a review of the existing evidence can serve an effective step toward designing and implementing appropriate interventions in this domain. Methods: This systematic review was carried out to categorize and report the findings of all types of psychosocial interventions on the family caregivers of children with cancer. The English keywords "family career", "family caregiver", “children with cancer", "psychosocial", "intervention”, “educational", and "childhood cancer" were searched in CINAHL, Web of Science (ISI, PsychINFO, Pubmed and Scopus databanks, and equivalent Persian keywords were searched in the SID of Jihad University, IRANDOC, and IranPsych and Magiran databanks. From among 819 papers found between 1994 and 2014, a total of 17 articles were included in the study after qualitative evaluation. Results: Interventions were often performed on mothers and indicated various interventional approaches. The majority of the interventions were cognitive-behavioral which were reported to be effective in improving the measured criteria such as increasing the quality of life, decreasing emotional distress, anxiety and depression, and increasing adaptive behaviors. Conclusion: The findings were generally reported to be hopeful and most of interventions were reported to have positive effects on the participants, among which behavioral-cognitive interventions were found to show the strongest evidence. Supportive interventions must be considered as an indispensable part of care for children with cancer.

  4. The Influence of Exercise Training on Quality of Life and Psychosocial Functioning in Children with Congenital Heart Disease:A Review of Intervention Studies

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    Karolijn Dulfer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents operated upon for congenital heart disease may show reduced exercise capacity and physical activity, associated with lowered quality of life. This review presents intervention studies on the influence of an exercise program on quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children with severe congenital heart disease. Participation in an exercise program among young people with complex congenital heart disease seemed to have positive effects on quality of life and passive leisure time spent. However, more effects of the exercise programs may have been expected. For future research it is important to critically evaluate the content of the exercise programs.

  5. Individual, employment and psychosocial factors influencing walking to work: Implications for intervention design.

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    Adams, Emma J; Esliger, Dale W; Taylor, Ian M; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-01-01

    Promoting walking for the journey to and from work (commuter walking) is a potential strategy for increasing physical activity. Understanding the factors influencing commuter walking is important for identifying target groups and designing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors associated with commuter walking and to discuss the implications for targeting and future design of interventions. 1,544 employees completed a baseline survey as part of the 'Walking Works' intervention project (33.4% male; 36.3% aged logistic regression was used to examine the associations of individual (age, ethnic group, educational qualifications, number of children <16 and car ownership), employment-related (distance lived from work, free car parking at work, working hours, working pattern and occupation) and psychosocial factors (perceived behavioural control, intention, social norms and social support from work colleagues) with commuter walking. Almost half of respondents (n = 587, 49%) were classified as commuter walkers. Those who were aged <30 years, did not have a car, had no free car parking at work, were confident of including some walking or intended to walk to or from work on a regular basis, and had support from colleagues for walking were more likely to be commuter walkers. Those who perceived they lived too far away from work to walk, thought walking was less convenient than using a car for commuting, did not have time to walk, needed a car for work or had always travelled the same way were less likely to be commuter walkers. A number of individual, employment-related and psychosocial factors were associated with commuter walking. Target groups for interventions to promote walking to and from work may include those in older age groups and those who own or have access to a car. Multi-level interventions targeting individual level behaviour change, social support within the workplace and organisational

  6. A Participatory Physical and Psychosocial Intervention for Balancing the Demands and Resources Among Industrial Workers (PIPPI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Christian Dyrlund; Nøhr Henriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    will be carried out allowing team members to discuss current physical and psychosocial work demands and resources, and develop action plans to minimize strain and if possible, optimize the resources. At all levels, the intervention will be integrated into the existing organization of work schedules. An extensive...... receive the intervention in year two. More than 400 workers from three companies in Denmark will be aimed to be cluster randomized into intervention and control groups with at least 200 workers (at least 9 work teams) in each group. An organizational resources audit and subsequent action planning workshop......Background: Need for recovery and work ability are strongly associated with high employee turnover, well-being and sickness absence. However, scientific knowledge on effective interventions to improve work ability and decrease need for recovery is scarce. Thus, the present study aims to describe...

  7. Towards recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: Quality of life outcomes, stage-sensitive treatments, and mindfulness mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Greg; Leitan, Nuwan D; Thomas, Neil; Michalak, Erin E; Johnson, Sheri L; Jones, Steven; Perich, Tania; Berk, Lesley; Berk, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Current adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder (BD) aim to impact illness course via information sharing/skill development. This focus on clinical outcomes contrasts with the emergent recovery paradigm, which prioritises adaptation to serious mental illness and movement towards personally meaningful goals. The aim of this review is to encourage innovation in the psychological management of BD by considering three recovery-oriented trends in the literature. First, the importance of quality of life as a target of recovery-oriented clinical work is considered. Second, the recent staging approach to BD is described, and we outline implications for psychosocial interventions tailored to stage. Finally, we review evidence suggesting that mindfulness-based psychosocial interventions have potential across early, middle and late stages of BD. It is concluded that the humanistic emphasis of the recovery paradigm provides a timely stimulus for development of a next generation of psychosocial treatments for people with BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A stakeholder-collaborative evaluation of intervention for students with greater psychosocial needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Yu, Lu

    2012-01-17

    The Tier 2 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) in Hong Kong was designed and implemented by school social workers targeting adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. Based on the responses of 237 participants, 48 program implementers wrote down five conclusions on the program effectiveness in their reports submitted to the funding body. Based on a stakeholder-collaborative approach involving secondary data analyses, results showed that most conclusions were positive regarding participants' perceptions of the program, instructors and their perceived program effectiveness, although there were also conclusions reflecting difficulties encountered and suggestions for improvements. In conjunction with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the stakeholders and the program was beneficial to the development of the program participants.

  9. Basic nursing care: retrospective evaluation of communication and psychosocial interventions documented by nurses in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvé-Udina, Maria-Eulàlia; Pérez, Esperanza Zuriguel; Padrés, Núria Fabrellas; Samartino, Maribel Gonzalez; García, Marta Romero; Creus, Mònica Castellà; Batllori, Núria Vila; Calvo, Cristina Matud

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of psychosocial aspects of basic nursing care, as e-charted by nurses, when using an interface terminology. An observational, multicentre study was conducted in acute wards. The main outcome measure was the frequency of use of the psychosocial interventions in the electronic nursing care plans, analysed over a 12 month retrospective review. Overall, 150,494 electronic care plans were studied. Most of the intervention concepts from the interface terminology were used by registered nurses to illustrate the psychosocial aspects of fundamentals of care in the electronic care plans. The results presented help to demonstrate that the interventions of this interface terminology may be useful to inform psychosocial aspects of basic and advanced nursing care. The identification of psychosocial elements of basic nursing care in the nursing documentation may lead to obtain a deeper understanding of those caring interventions nurses consider essential to represent nurse-patient interactions. The frequency of psychosocial interventions may contribute to delineate basic and advanced nursing care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. Why Latinas With Breast Cancer Select Specific Informal Caregivers to Participate With Them in Psychosocial Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Terry; Segrin, Chris; Swiatkowski, Paulina; McNelis, Melissa; Weihs, Karen; Lopez, Ana Maria

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the reasons 88 Latinas with breast cancer selected specific supportive others to participate in an 8-week psychosocial intervention. Participants were asked one open-ended question during the baseline assessment for a larger clinical trial: "Could you tell me more about why you selected [insert name] to participate in the study with you?" A content analysis of the responses found three thematic categories: source of informational or emotional support, concern for the informal caregiver's welfare, and special characteristics or qualities of the informal caregiver. These findings reflected both the cultural value of familism, the woman's role as caregiver to the family ( marianismo), and the man's role of provider ( machismo). Findings provide support for including the supportive person identified by the patient during a health crisis rather than the provider suggesting who that should be. Psychosocial services designed and implemented through such a cultural lens are more likely to be successful.

  11. The Effects of a School-Based Psychosocial Intervention on Resilience and Health Outcomes among Vulnerable Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowokere, A. E.; Okanlawon, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Responding to the psychosocial health needs of the vulnerable population has been considered as a significant public health issue that must be addressed through access to public health professionals. The study adopted a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the impact of a training program on nurses and teachers' knowledge of psychosocial health…

  12. Positive youth development programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: evaluation based on program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ng, Catalina S M; Law, Moon Y M

    2017-02-01

    As program implementers' views are seldom included in program evaluation and there are few related studies in different Chinese communities, this study examined the perceptions of the program implementers who implemented the Tier 2 Program of the P.A.T.H.S. Program in Hong Kong. The Tier 2 Program was designed to promote the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. In the community-based P.A.T.H.S. Project, 400 program implementers completed a subjective outcome evaluation form (Form D) for program implementers. Consistent with the previous findings, program implementers generally held positive views towards the program, implementers, and program effectiveness and their views towards these three domains did not differ across grades. In line with the hypotheses, perceived program quality and perceived implementer quality predicted program effectiveness. The present findings provided an alternative perspective showing that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the program implementers and they regarded the program to be beneficial to the program participants.

  13. Psychosocial interventions for addiction-affected families in Low and Middle Income Countries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Anil; Church, Sydney; Bhatia, Urvita; Orford, Jim; Velleman, Richard; Nadkarni, Abhijit

    2017-11-01

    To review the literature on psychosocial interventions for addiction affected family members in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). A systematic review with a detailed search strategy focussing on psychosocial interventions directed towards people affected by addiction without any gender, year or language specifications was conducted. Identified titles and abstracts were screened; where needed full papers retrieved, and then independently reviewed. Data was extracted based on the aims of the study, to describe the modalities, acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of the interventions. Four papers met our selection criteria. They were published between 2003 and 2014; the total sample size was 137 participants, and two studies were from Mexico and one each from Vietnam and Malaysia. The predominantly female participants comprised of parents, spouses and siblings. The common components of all the interventions included providing information regarding addiction, teaching coping skills, and providing support. Though preliminary these small studies suggests a positive effect on affected family members (AFM). There was lowering of psychological and physical distress, along with a better understanding of addictive behaviour. The interventions led to better coping; with improvements in self-esteem and assertive behaviour. The interventions, mostly delivered in group settings, were largely acceptable. The limited evidence does suggest positive benefits to AFMs. The scope of research needs to be extended to other addictions, and family members other than spouse and female relatives. Indigenous and locally adapted interventions are needed to address this issue keeping in mind the limited resources of LMIC. This is a field indeed in its infancy and this under recognised and under-served group needs urgent attention of researchers and policy makers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Perceived benefits and psychosocial outcomes of a brief existential family intervention for cancer patients/survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlan, Robert W; Butler, Lisa D; Rosenbaum, Ernest; Siegel, Alison; Spiegel, David

    This study assessed a range of benefits from participation in a brief existential intervention consisting of a semi-structured videotaped interview with cancer patients and their families designed to illuminate a life legacy for the family (the Life Tape Project [LTP]). Results indicated the majority reported intervention-specific benefits, especially in the areas of symbolic immortality (passing on personal values and philosophy), self-reflection and growth, and improved family cohesion and communication. Participants, particularly those who had perceived their cancer as a threat of death, serious injury, or threat to their physical integrity, and responded with intense fear or helplessness, also reported more general reductions in mood disturbance, improvements in aspects of well-being (including overall quality of life), satisfaction with the understanding they received, and enhanced cancer-related posttraumatic growth. In short, the LTP is a brief, inexpensive, existential intervention that can yield broad positive psychosocial changes for a majority of participants.

  15. Psychosocial child adjustment and family functioning in families reached with an assertive outreach intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots-de Vries, Carin; van de Goor, Ien; Stronks, Karien; Garretsen, Henk

    2011-06-01

    Families who experience a chronic complex of socio-economic and psychosocial problems are hard to reach with mainstream care. Evidence exists that the core of this problem is a problematic interaction between this type of family and current systems of care and services. To improve access to problem families, an assertive outreach intervention was implemented into the field of preventive child health care, The Netherlands. The study aimed to provide a more detailed insight into characteristics of the target group. Although there is consensus about some general features of hard to reach problem families, little is known about their specific characteristics because empirical studies among this group are rarely conducted. Especially, the problems of the children is shed insufficient light on. The studied population consisted of families included in the assertive outreach intervention delivered during one year (N=116). To assess psychosocial adjustment of the children, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was filled in by the parents. Furthermore, a Dutch questionnaire on family functioning was completed by professional carers. Descriptive data were calculated. The findings show that by using the assertive outreach intervention, programme staff came into contact with families characterised by a considerably higher than average proportion of single parents and unemployed households receiving social benefits. The families faced a high level of risk and a wide range of severe and multiple difficulties, including a lack of basic child care, an inadequate social network and poor parenting. Children in these families were also facing a number of risks. The proportion of psychosocial problems was well above the (inter)national average. The findings reveal the problem areas of unreached families and a need to improve the access to care for these families.

  16. A new generation of pragmatic trials of psychosocial interventions is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, M; Lasalvia, A; Bonetto, C

    2013-06-01

    This Editorial addresses the crucial issue of which research methodology is most suited for capturing the complexity of psychosocial interventions conducted in 'real world' mental health settings. It first examines conventional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodology and critically appraises its strengths and weaknesses. It then considers the specificity of mental health care treatments and defines the term 'complex' intervention and its implications for RCT design. The salient features of pragmatic RCTs aimed at generating evidence of psychosocial intervention effectiveness are then described. Subsequently, the conceptualization of pragmatic RCTs, and of their further developments - which we propose to call 'new generation' pragmatic trials - in the broader routine mental health service context, is explored. Helpful tools for planning pragmatic RCTs, such as the CONSORT extension for pragmatic trials, and the PRECIS tool are also examined. We then discuss some practical challenges that are involved in the design and implementation of pragmatic trials based on our own experience in conducting the GET UP PIANO Trial. Lastly, we speculate on the ways in which current ideas on the purpose, scope and ethics of mental health care research may determine further challenges for clinical research and evidence-based practice.

  17. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Sau Fong Leung, Frederick KK Yeung, Wai Kit Wong School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major healthcare databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy, psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of

  18. The effect of psychosocial supportive interventions on PTSD symptoms after Bam earthquake

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    Y. Fakour

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have shown the efficacy of cognitive – behavioral therapy and psychological debriefing in treatment of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and a few evidences are available for using these techniques in large scale disasters. This study aimed to asses the effect of some psychological interventions in reducing PTSD symptoms after Bam earthquake in different age groups. Methods: In a before-after quasi experimental clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of one session of psychological debriefing and three sessions of group cognitive-behavioral therapy in bam earthquake PTSD symptoms in different age groups. We evaluated PTSD symptoms before and immediately and three months after interventions by CASP scaling system and analyzed data. Results: one hundred and thirty persons entered in the study and 51 persons excluded during interventions because of migration. Interventions were showed to be effective only in short term period. The means of PTSD symptoms frequency and severity of avoidance symptoms were reduced during three months period of study which were statistically significant P<0.05. Interventions showed no efficacy for recall symptoms in long term and hyper arousal symptoms in short term and long term periods. There was no statistically significant difference among age groups. Conclusion: Psychosocial supportive interventions may be effective on some of the PTSD symptoms but there is no difference in different age groups.

  19. Psychosocial group intervention for patients with primary breast cancer: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Karlsen, Randi; Christensen, Jane; Paaschburg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Dorte; Bloch, Iben Seier; Christiansen, Birgitte; Jacobsen, Kathrine; Johansen, Christoffer

    2011-06-01

    To test the effectiveness of a psycho-educational group intervention to improve psychological distress measured by POMS TMD, Quality of Life measured by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the core and breast cancer module, Mental Adjustment measured by MAC and marital relationship measured by BLRI in women with primary breast cancer conducted 10 weeks after surgery. A secondary outcome was 4-year survival. We randomly assigned 210 patients with primary breast cancer to a control or an intervention group. Patients in the intervention group were offered two weekly 6-h sessions of psycho-education and eight weekly 2-h sessions of group psychotherapy. All participants were followed up for Quality of Life, coping ability and social relations 1, 6 and 12 months after the intervention and on survival 4 years after surgical treatment. No statistically significant effects of the intervention were found on any of the psychosocial questionnaire outcomes. There were not enough cases of death to analyse overall survival. The only statistically significant result was for patients who used anti depressive medication, for whom almost all measures improved over time, in both the control and intervention groups. Psycho-education and group psychotherapy did not decrease psychological distress or increase Quality of Life, Mental Adjustment or improve marital relationship among patients with primary breast cancer. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Improving the psychosocial work environment at multi-ethnic workplaces: a multi-component intervention strategy in the cleaning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louise Hardman; Hviid, Kirsten; Frydendall, Karen Bo; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2013-10-14

    Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places.

  1. Improving the Psychosocial Work Environment at Multi-Ethnic Workplaces: A Multi-Component Intervention Strategy in the Cleaning Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari-Ann Flyvholm

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Global labour migration has increased in recent years and immigrant workers are often recruited into low status and low paid jobs such as cleaning. Research in a Danish context shows that immigrants working in the cleaning industry often form social networks based on shared languages and backgrounds, and that conflict between different ethnic groups may occur. This paper evaluates the impact of a multi-component intervention on the psychosocial work environment at a multi-ethnic Danish workplace in the cleaning sector. The intervention included Danish lessons, vocational training courses, and activities to improve collaboration across different groups of cleaners. Interviews about the outcome of the intervention were conducted with the cleaners and their supervisor. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used as a supplement to the interviews. The results suggest that the psychosocial work environment had improved after the intervention. According to the interviews with the cleaners, the intervention had led to improved communication, trust, and collaboration. These findings are supported by the questionnaire where social support from supervisor and colleagues, social community, trust, and teamwork seem to have improved together with meaning of work, rewards, and emotional demands. The design of the intervention may provide inspiration for future psychosocial work environment interventions at multi-ethnic work places.

  2. Systematic review and meta-analyses of psychosocial interventions for veterans of the military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J. Kitchiner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of psychosocial therapies for common mental health disorders in veterans is unclear and requires further examination. Method: Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Twenty databases were searched. Studies were included if they reported a psychosocial intervention designed to treat or reduce common mental health symptoms in veterans identified as being symptomatic at the time they entered the study. Studies of substance dependency disorders and psychosis were excluded. Eligible studies were assessed against methodological quality criteria and data were extracted and analysed. Results: Twenty-nine RCTs were identified. There was evidence for the use of trauma-focused therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and some evidence for psychological interventions in the treatment of borderline personality disorder, depression, insomnia, and panic disorder co-morbid to PTSD. However, methodological quality of many of the studies was less than optimal. Conclusions: Trauma-focused psychological therapies are likely to be effective for combat-related PTSD but there is a need for more research to determine the efficacy of psychological treatments for other mental health disorders in veterans.

  3. [Psychosocial Interventions in Acute and Maintenance Treatment of Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahunca Velásquez, Luisa Fernanda; García Valencia, Jenny; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Palacio Acosta, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the psychosocial strategies designed to improve the outcomes in adults with schizophrenia in both, acute and stable phase of the disorder. This evidence is used to propose recommendation in the guidelines of integral attention for the diagnosis, treatment and psychosocial rehabilitation of adults with schizophrenia. A guideline for clinical practice was developed using the methodological framework of the Ministerio de la Protección Social to collect evidence and grading recommendations. A search, evaluation and synthesis of evidence were carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The psychoeducation and family intervention showed higher efficacy, compared with the usual treatment, to prevent relapses and hospital readmissions, to reduce family burden and to improve adherence to treatment. The social skill training was effective to improve symptoms, social functioning and quality of life. However, the quality of evidence was low. There was not enough evidence about the efficacy of occupational therapy, but considering patients preferences and its wide clinical utilization, the GDG suggested its inclusion. Psychoeducation, family intervention and social skill training are recommended to be offered for the treatment of schizophrenia. Furthermore, occupational therapy is suggested for inpatients and outpatients with the disorder. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part III: behavioural and psychosocial interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdellen, Cara; van de Griendt, Jolande; Hartmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This clinical guideline provides recommendations for the behavioural and psychosocial interventions (BPI) of children and adolescents with tic disorders prepared by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS). A systematic literature search was conducted...... to obtain an update on the efficacy of BPI for tics. Relevant studies were identified using computerised searches of the Medline and PsycINFO databases and the Cochrane Library for the years 1950-2010. The search identified no meta-analyses, yet twelve (systematic) reviews and eight randomised controlled...... trials provided evidence for the current review. Most evidence was found for habit reversal training (HRT) and the available but smaller evidence also supports the efficacy of exposure with response prevention (ERP). Both interventions are considered first line behavioural treatments for tics for both...

  5. Group psychosocial program for enhancing psychological well-being of people with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Petrus; Chan, Winky

    2007-01-01

    Emotional ups and downs are common among people with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) as they live with fears about treatment, pain from the illness and unexpected "flare-ups." The side effects of medications have a severe impact on their self-esteem and lead to psychological distress. This paper reports a study on the impact of a psychosocial group program on the self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE. A total of 56 people with SLE were recruited to participate in a 6-week, 2.5-hour weekly session psychosocial group. The group served to equip members with knowledge and skills to cope with SLE and stress arising from the illness, to enhance their self-confidence and develop a positive attitude toward the illness, and to enhance their social support network. The members were assessed before the commencement and during the last session of the groups with Rosenberg's Self-esteem Inventory and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30). Results showed that members obtained better scores in self-esteem (p self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE after the psychosocial group program. The implications for psychosocial programs for people with SLE are discussed.

  6. A Systematic Review on the Use of Psychosocial Interventions in Conjunction With Medications for the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugosh, Karen; Abraham, Amanda; Seymour, Brittany; McLoyd, Keli; Chalk, Mady; Festinger, David

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use and overdose rates have risen to epidemic levels in the United States during the past decade. Fortunately, there are effective medications (ie, methadone, buprenorphine, and oral and injectable naltrexone) available for the treatment of opioid addiction. Each of these medications is approved for use in conjunction with psychosocial treatment; however, there is a dearth of empirical research on the optimal psychosocial interventions to use with these medications. In this systematic review, we outline and discuss the findings of 3 prominent prior reviews and 27 recent publications of empirical studies on this topic. The most widely studied psychosocial interventions examined in conjunction with medications for opioid addiction were contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy, with the majority focusing on methadone treatment. The results generally support the efficacy of providing psychosocial interventions in combination with medications to treat opioid addictions, although the incremental utility varied across studies, outcomes, medications, and interventions. The review highlights significant gaps in the literature and provides areas for future research. Given the enormity of the current opioid problem in the United States, it is critical to gain a better understanding of the most effective ways to deliver psychosocial treatments in conjunction with these medications to improve the health and well-being of individuals suffering from opioid addiction.

  7. Effects of a Workplace Intervention Targeting Psychosocial Risk Factors on Safety and Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie B. Hammer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to test the effectiveness of a workplace intervention targeting work-life stress and safety-related psychosocial risk factors on health and safety outcomes. Data were collected over time using a randomized control trial design with 264 construction workers employed in an urban municipal department. The intervention involved family- and safety-supportive supervisor behavior training (computer-based, followed by two weeks of behavior tracking and a four-hour, facilitated team effectiveness session including supervisors and employees. A significant positive intervention effect was found for an objective measure of blood pressure at the 12-month follow-up. However, no significant intervention results were found for self-reported general health, safety participation, or safety compliance. These findings suggest that an intervention focused on supervisor support training and a team effectiveness process for planning and problem solving should be further refined and utilized in order to improve employee health with additional research on the beneficial effects on worker safety.

  8. Psychosocial approaches to violence and aggression: contextually anchored and trauma-informed interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Deborah; Guyer, Margaret; Sanders, Kathy

    2015-06-01

    Psychosocial interventions are part of the complex understanding and treatment of violent behavior in our state mental health hospitals. A comprehensive assessment of violence and aggression includes attention to all 3 domains of prevention and assessment (primary-institutional, secondary-structural, and tertiary-direct). Trauma experiences and their consequences may include behavioral violence and aggression. The authors' premise is that trauma is a universal component in the individual assessment of violent behavior. Therapeutic interventions must include a trauma-informed formulation to be effective. Organizational commitment to trauma-informed, person-centered, recovery-oriented (TPR) care is crucial to the efficacy of any of the interventions discussed. Thus, the dynamic nature of the individual, interpersonal, environmental, and cultural factors associated with the daily operations of the inpatient unit need to be assessed through the lens of primary and secondary violence prevention, building on the recognition that the majority of persons served and staff have significant trauma histories. Once a compassionate, respectful, empathic, and empowering approach is embraced by leadership and staff, the work with individuals can proceed more effectively. Interventions used include a variety of cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, and somatosensory therapies. These interventions, when effectively applied, result in more self-esteem, self-mastery, self-control for the person served, and diminished behavioral violence.

  9. Ecological Momentary Interventions: Incorporating Mobile Technology Into Psychosocial and Health Behavior Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Kristin E.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Psychosocial and health behavior treatments and therapies can be extended beyond traditional research or clinical settings by using mobile technology to deliver interventions to individuals as they go about their daily lives. These Ecological Momentary Interventions [EMI] are treatments that are provided to people during their everyday lives (i.e., in real time) and in natural settings (i.e., real world). The goal of the present review is to synthesize and critique mobile technology-based EMI aimed at improving health behaviors and psychological and physical symptoms. Methods Twenty-seven interventions using palmtop computers or mobile phones to deliver ambulatory treatment for smoking cessation, weight loss, anxiety, diabetes management, eating disorders, alcohol use, and healthy eating and physical activity were identified. Results There is evidence that EMI can be successfully delivered, are accepted by patients, and are efficacious for treating a variety of health behaviors and physical and psychological symptoms. Limitations of the existing literature were identified and recommendations and considerations for research design, sample characteristics, measurement, statistical analyses, and clinical implementation are discussed. Conclusions Mobile technology-based EMI can be effectively implemented as interventions for a variety of health behaviors and psychological and physical symptoms. Future research should integrate the assessment and intervention capabilities of mobile technology to create dynamically and individually tailored EMI that are ecologically sensitive. PMID:19646331

  10. Effects of a Workplace Intervention Targeting Psychosocial Risk Factors on Safety and Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Truxillo, Donald M.; Bodner, Todd; Rineer, Jennifer; Pytlovany, Amy C.; Richman, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the effectiveness of a workplace intervention targeting work-life stress and safety-related psychosocial risk factors on health and safety outcomes. Data were collected over time using a randomized control trial design with 264 construction workers employed in an urban municipal department. The intervention involved family- and safety-supportive supervisor behavior training (computer-based), followed by two weeks of behavior tracking and a four-hour, facilitated team effectiveness session including supervisors and employees. A significant positive intervention effect was found for an objective measure of blood pressure at the 12-month follow-up. However, no significant intervention results were found for self-reported general health, safety participation, or safety compliance. These findings suggest that an intervention focused on supervisor support training and a team effectiveness process for planning and problem solving should be further refined and utilized in order to improve employee health with additional research on the beneficial effects on worker safety. PMID:26557703

  11. A randomized controlled trial of a resilience-based intervention on psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS: Effects at 6- and 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Harrison, Sayward E; Fairchild, Amanda J; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2017-10-01

    Global literature suggests that resilience-based interventions may yield improvements in psychosocial well-being for vulnerable children, but limited data are available regarding the efficacy of such interventions among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS. To evaluate initial efficacy of a multi-level resilience-based intervention among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in China in improving children's psychosocial well-being and resilience-related outcomes. Seven hundred-ninety children, 6-17 years of age, were recruited from rural China. Children were either AIDS orphans or were living with one or two parents infected with HIV/AIDS. Children and primary caregivers were randomly assigned to participate in a 4-arm trial to evaluate the Child-Caregiver-Advocacy Resilience (ChildCARE) intervention. This resilience-based psychosocial intervention provides programming at three levels (child, caregiver, community). Survey data were collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months in order to examine efficacy of the child-only and child + caregiver arms in improving children's psychological resilience. Intervention groups displayed improvements in several resilience-related outcomes at 6- and 12-month follow-ups, including self-reported coping, hopefulness, emotional regulation, and self-control. The child-only intervention arm showed some fading of intervention effects by 12-months. Preliminary findings suggest that the ChildCARE intervention is efficacious in promoting psychosocial well-being of children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China. Targeting both children and caregivers for psychosocial intervention may be effective in improving children's resilience. Additional evaluation and modifications, including the inclusion of booster sessions, should be considered to further strengthen the program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions for managing stress in multiple sclerosis: the contribution of mindfulness-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz San José, A; Oreja-Guevara, C; Cebolla Lorenzo, S; Carrillo Notario, L; Rodríguez Vega, B; Bayón Pérez, C

    2016-03-01

    Depression or anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been linked to a more severe course of the disease and higher numbers of relapses, in addition to poorer treatment adherence and exacerbated immune system dysregulation. Recent investigations indicate that psychotherapeutic interventions for stress management, such as mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), could improve quality of life, depression, anxiety, and fatigue in MS patients. Mindfulness fosters the ability to slow down and observe experiences as they truly are, which improves affect regulation. Mindfulness is acquired through training; its advantage over other psychotherapeutic interventions is that effects may remain over time, since cultivating mindfulness depends on regular practising of abilities learned during training. The objective of this article is to review the current evidence of psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions, including MBIs for stress management, and their beneficial effects on MS patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai Tong; Leung, Sau Fong; Yeung, Frederick Kk; Wong, Wai Kit

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major health care databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy), psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of functioning, and/or relapse rate. However, the comparative effects between these five approaches have not been well studied; thus, we are not able to clearly understand the superiority of any of these interventions. With the

  14. Implementation of the thinking skills for work program in a psychosocial clubhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Susan R; Schiano, Diane; Mueser, Kim T; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive remediation programs aimed at improving role functioning have been implemented in a variety of different mental health treatment settings, but not in psychosocial clubhouses. This study sought to determine the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of providing a cognitive remediation program (the Thinking Skills for Work program), developed and previously implemented in supported employment programs at mental health agencies, in a psychosocial club-house. Twenty-three members with a history of difficulties getting or keeping jobs, who were participating in a supported employment program at a psychosocial clubhouse, were enrolled in the Thinking Skills for Work program. A neurocognitive battery was administered at baseline and 3 months later after completion of the computer cognitive training component of the program. Hours of competitive work were tracked for the 2 years before enrollment and 2 years following enrollment. Other work-related activities (school, volunteer) were also tracked for 2 years following enrollment. Twenty-one members (91%) completed 6 or more computer cognitive training sessions. Participants demonstrated significant improvements on neurocognitive measures of processing speed, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions. Sixty percent of the members obtained a competitive job during the 2-year follow-up, and 74% were involved in some type of work-related activity. Participants worked significantly more competitive hours over the 2 years after joining the Thinking Skills for Work program than before. The findings support the feasibility and promise of implementing the Thinking Skills for Work program in the context of supported employment provided at psychosocial clubhouses.

  15. Design of aging intervention studies: the NIA interventions testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadon, N L; Strong, R; Miller, R A; Nelson, J; Javors, M; Sharp, Z D; Peralba, J M; Harrison, D E

    2008-12-01

    The field of biogerontology has made great strides towards understanding the biological processes underlying aging, and the time is ripe to look towards applying this knowledge to the pursuit of aging interventions. Identification of safe, inexpensive, and non-invasive interventions that slow the aging process and promote healthy aging could have a significant impact on quality of life and health care expenditures for the aged. While there is a plethora of supplements and interventions on the market that purport to slow aging, the evidence to validate such claims is generally lacking. Here we describe the development of an aging interventions testing program funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to test candidate interventions in a model system. The development of this program highlights the challenges of long-term intervention studies and provides approaches to cope with the stringent requirements of a multi-site testing program.

  16. Psychosocial interventions for social communication, repetitive, and emotional-behavioral difficulties in children and young people with spectrum disorders: an update on effectiveness and the role of caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Magiati, I.; Essau, C.A.; Allen, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of time-limited psychosocial interventions targeting social skills, internalizing and externalizing difficulties have been developed for children and young people with ASD. Increasingly more evidence is emerging that such interventions are effective in reducing difficulties and improving

  17. The efficacy of targeted interventions for modifiable psychosocial risk factors of persistent nonspecific low back pain e A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kjær, Per

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable interest in whether best practice management of nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) should include the targeting of treatment to subgroups of people with identifiable clinical characteristics. However, there are no published systematic reviews of the efficacy...... were randomised controlled trials of targeted psychosocial interventions that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on the efficacy of targeted treatment (treatment effect modification) for the outcomes of pain, activity limitation and psychosocial factors (fear avoidance...... limitation at 12 months, when targeted to people with higher movement-related pain. Few studies have investigated targeted psychosocial interventions in NSLBP, using trial designs suitable for measuring treatment effect modification, and they do not provide consistent evidence supporting such targeting...

  18. Intervenções psicossociais no transtorno bipolar Psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pereira Justo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, os autores, através de revisão bibliográfica narrativa, situam as intervenções psicossociais dentro do panorama terapêutico para o transtorno bipolar e constatam que ainda são insuficientes os estudos primários feitos com metodologia adequada para a obtenção de informações científicas de boa qualidade. São sucintamente descritos os trabalhos mais relevantes.In this paper, the authors review the status of psychosocial interventions within the general treatment for bipolar disorder. They have verified the scantiness of studies performed with adequate methodology to obtain scientific information of good quality. The more relevant studies are briefly described.

  19. PSYCHOSOCIAL PROFILE OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE FAMILY PRESERVATION USERS: AN ANALYSIS OF NEEDS AND INTERVENTION CLUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Ayala-Nunes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At-risk families live under circumstances that hinder their parenting competences, compromising their ability to fulfill their children’s needs appropriately. The complex and multiple-source nature of the adversities that they endure makes family preservation interventions challenging. Because their efficacy largely depends on the extent to which interventions fit participants’ needs and characteristics, the aims of this study were to draw the sociodemographic (individual, family, economic, labor, and child-related variables and psychosocial profile (negative life events, parenting stress, and psychological distress symptomatology of Spanish and Portuguese family preservation users while testing the inter-country differences. The results showed that the majority of participants had a low educational level, were unemployed, and were poor. Spanish and Portuguese participants had suffered an average of 5 and 4 negative life events over the past 3 years, respectively, with a high emotional impact. The most common were labor precariousness and economic hardship. Clinical levels of parenting stress were found in 48.1% of the Spanish participants and 39.1% of the Portuguese participants. An important proportion of the participants had clinical levels of psychological distress (Spain = 71.9%; Portugal = 45.8%, indicating the presence of mental health problems. Families’ support needs are discussed and guidelines for interventions aimed at improving parents’ and children’s well-being are outlined.

  20. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for adult refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribe, Rachel H; Sendt, Kyra-Verena; Tracy, Derek K

    2017-05-09

    Europe is in the midst of the largest refugee migration since the Second World War; there is an urgent need to provide an updated systematic review of the current best evidence for managing mental distress in refugee populations. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive summary of the current literature on psychosocial interventions, both trauma- and non-trauma-focused, for refugee populations experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depressive or anxiety symptoms. To produce recommendations for future research and current clinical practice. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO (Hosted by Ovid), PILOTS and Social Services Abstracts; 5305 articles were screened and 40 were included. This review found medium to high quality evidence supporting the use of narrative exposure therapy (NET). A lack of culturally adapted treatments was apparent and there was less evidence to support standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) and multidisciplinary treatments. NET produced positive outcomes in refugees from a diverse range of backgrounds and trauma types. There is a general dearth of research in all intervention types: further research should include more "real-world" multidisciplinary interventions that better model clinical practice. Recommendations for evaluating local need, and creating a culturally sensitive workforce are discussed.

  1. PSYCHOSOCIAL GROUP INTERVENTION AND THE RATE OF DECLINE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN ASYMPTOMATIC HIV-INFECTED HOMOSEXUAL MEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULDER, CL; ANTONI, MH; EMMELKAMP, PMG; VEUGELERS, PJ; SANDFORT, TGM; VANDEVIJVER, FAJR; DEVRIES, MJ

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine changes in the rate of decline of immunological parameters after psychosocial group intervention. Subjects were 26 asymptomatic HIV-infected homosexual men who participated in a cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT; n = 14), or an experiential group therapy p

  2. A randomised trial of a psychosocial intervention for cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (promoting optimal outcomes in mood through tailored psychosocial therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolley Damien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence that up to 35% of patients with cancer experience significant distress, access to effective psychosocial care is limited by lack of systematic approaches to assessment, a paucity of psychosocial services, and patient reluctance to accept treatment either because of perceived stigma or difficulties with access to specialist psycho-oncology services due to isolation or disease burden. This paper presents an overview of a randomised study to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief tailored psychosocial Intervention delivered by health professionals in cancer care who undergo focused training and participate in clinical supervision. Methods/design Health professionals from the disciplines of nursing, occupational therapy, speech pathology, dietetics, physiotherapy or radiation therapy will participate in training to deliver the psychosocial Intervention focusing on core concepts of supportive-expressive, cognitive and dignity-conserving care. Health professional training will consist of completion of a self-directed manual and participation in a skills development session. Participating health professionals will be supported through structured clinical supervision whilst delivering the Intervention. In the stepped wedge design each of the 5 participating clinical sites will be allocated in random order from Control condition to Training then delivery of the Intervention. A total of 600 patients will be recruited across all sites. Based on level of distress or risk factors eligible patients will receive up to 4 sessions, each of up to 30 minutes in length, delivered face-to-face or by telephone. Participants will be assessed at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Patient outcome measures include anxiety and depression, quality of life, unmet psychological and supportive care needs. Health professional measures include psychological morbidity, stress and burnout. Process evaluation will be conducted to assess perceptions

  3. STEM Intervention Programs: Funding Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Blanca E.; George-Jackson, Casey E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the funding practices and challenges of diversity initiatives found in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Interviews with 55 intervention program administrators, representing 48 unique STEM intervention programs, were conducted at nine large research-intensive universities. The interviews,…

  4. Psychosocial Intervention Is Associated with Altered Emotion Processing: An Event-Related Potential Study in At-Risk Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L Pincham

    Full Text Available Emotion processing is vital for healthy adolescent development, and impaired emotional responses are associated with a number of psychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear whether observed differences between psychiatric populations and healthy controls reflect modifiable variations in functioning (and thus could be sensitive to changes resulting from intervention or stable, non-modifiable, individual differences. The current study therefore investigated whether the Late Positive Potential (LPP; a neural index of emotion processing can be used as a marker of therapeutic change following psycho-social intervention. At-risk male adolescents who had received less than four months intervention (minimal-intervention, N = 32 or more than nine months intervention (extended-intervention, N = 32 passively viewed emotional images whilst neural activity was recorded using electroencephalography. Significant differences in emotion processing, indicated by the LPP, were found between the two groups: the LPP did not differ according to valence in the minimal-intervention group, whereas the extended-intervention participants showed emotion processing in line with low risk populations (enhanced LPP for unpleasant images versus other images. Further, an inverse relationship between emotional reactivity (measured via the LPP and antisocial behaviour was observed in minimal-intervention participants only. The data therefore provide preliminary cross-sectional evidence that abnormal neural responses to emotional information may be normalised following psychosocial intervention. Importantly, this study uniquely suggests that, in future randomised control trials, the LPP may be a useful biomarker to measure development and therapeutic change.

  5. Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program for Adolescents with Greater Psychosocial Needs: Integrated Views of Program Implementers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542 in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  6. Evaluation of a positive youth development program for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: integrated views of program implementers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Ma, Cecilia M S; Sun, Rachel C F

    2010-10-01

    To help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) was designed and implemented by school social workers and teachers. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (n = 2,542) in 49 schools, program implementers were invited to write down five conclusions based on an integration of the evaluation findings. With reference to 245 conclusions included in the 49 evaluation reports, secondary data analyses showed that most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive. In addition, difficulties encountered and recommendations for program improvement were highlighted. In conjunction with previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received and was perceived to be beneficial to the development of adolescents with greater psychosocial needs.

  7. An interactive media program for managing psychosocial problems on long-duration spaceflights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James A; Buckey, Jay C; Greenhalgh, Leonard; Holland, Albert W; Hegel, Mark T

    2005-06-01

    Space crews must be self-reliant to complete long-duration missions successfully. This project involves the development and evaluation of a network of self-guided interactive multimedia programs to train and assist long-duration flyers in the prevention, assessment, and management of psychosocial problems that can arise on extended missions. The system is currently under development and is intended for use both during training and on orbit. A virtual space station 3-dimensional graphic was created to serve as a portal to multimedia-based training, assessment, and intervention resources. Additionally, original content on interpersonal conflict and depression is being developed for the system. Input on the best practices for managing conflict and depression on extended missions was obtained from 13 veteran long-duration flyers, as well as from clinical experts. Formative evaluation of a prototype of the system will be conducted with 10 members of the astronaut corps. Subsequently, the content on conflict and depression will be completed, and the depression self-treatment portion will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Although this study involves developing countermeasures to assist long-duration flyers, it also provides a model that could be applied in many Earthbound settings, both in operational environments and in everyday life.

  8. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  9. Assessment of the Long-Term Benefits of Life Skills Programming on Psychosocial Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruby; Reddon, John R.; Hoglin, Brenda; Woodman, Mary-Ann

    2008-01-01

    The durability of the psychosocial benefits of Life Skills programming on outpatient adults with mental health/forensic issues was examined. Participants were 52 adults (28 males, 24 females) who completed 16 weeks of Life Skills at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and were re-assessed between six months and six years following treatment.…

  10. Early psychosocial interventions after disasters, terrorism and other shocking events: is there a gap between norms and practice in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Brake, Hans; Dückers, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Internationally, several initiatives exist to describe standards for post-disaster psychosocial care. This study explored the level of consensus of experts within Europe on a set of recommendations on early psychosocial intervention after shocking events (Dutch guidelines), and to what degree these standards are implemented into mental health care practice. Two hundred and six (mental) health care professionals filled out a questionnaire to assess the extent to which they consider the guidelines' scope and recommendations relevant and part of the regular practice in their own country. Forty-five European experts from 24 EU countries discussed the guidelines at an international seminar. The data suggest overall agreement on the standards although many of the recommendations appear not (yet) to be embedded in everyday practice. Although large consensus exists on standards for early psychosocial care, a chasm between norms and practice appears to exist throughout the EU, stressing the general need for investments in guideline development and implementation.

  11. Early psychosocial intervention does not delay institutionalization in persons with mild Alzheimer disease and has impact on neither disease progression nor caregivers' well-being: ALSOVA 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Anne M; Hallikainen, Ilona; Välimäki, Tarja; Hongisto, Kristiina; Hiltunen, Asta; Karppi, Pertti; Sivenius, Juhani; Soininen, Hilkka; Martikainen, Janne

    2016-03-01

    Early diagnosis, initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy and programs that support care of persons with AD at home are recommended. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of early psychosocial intervention on delaying the institutionalization of persons with AD. We also assessed the influence of intervention on AD progression, behavioral symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in persons with AD and caregivers. Kuopio ALSOVA study, a prospective, randomized intervention study with a 3-year follow-up, was carried out at memory clinics. Home-dwelling persons with very mild or mild AD (n = 236) and AD-targeted therapy and their family caregivers (n = 236) were randomized to the intervention or control group (1:2). Psychosocial intervention including education, counseling, and social support was given during the first 2 years (16 days). The primary outcome was the cumulative risk (controlled for death) of institutionalization over 36 months. Secondary outcomes were adjusted mean changes from baseline in disease severity, cognition, daily activities, behavior, and HRQoL for persons with AD; and change in psychological distress, depression, and HRQoL for caregivers. No differences were found in nursing home placement after the 36-month follow-up between intervention and control groups. No beneficial effects of the intervention were found on the secondary outcomes. The psychosocial intervention did not delay nursing home placement in persons with AD and had no effect on patient well-being, disease progression, or AD-related symptoms or caregiver well-being. Instead of automatically providing psychosocial intervention courses, individualized support programs may be more effective. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Building Resilience in Families, Communities, and Organizations: A Training Program in Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Jack; Simon, Winnifred

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the Summer Institute in Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Support, a brief immersion training program for mental health, health, and allied professionals who work with populations that have endured severe adversities and trauma, such as domestic and political violence, extreme poverty, armed conflict, epidemics, and natural disasters. The course taught participants to apply collaborative and contextually sensitive approaches to enhance social connectedness and resilience in families, communities, and organizations. This article presents core training principles and vignettes which illustrate how those engaging in such interventions must: (1) work in the context of a strong and supportive organization; (2) appreciate the complexity of the systems with which they are engaging; and (3) be open to the possibilities for healing and transformation. The program utilized a combination of didactic presentations, hands-on interactive exercises, case studies, and experiential approaches to organizational team building and staff stress management. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  13. Psychosocial experiences of breast cancer survivors involved in a dragon boat program: exploring links to positive psychological growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; McDonough, Meghan H; Crocker, Peter R E

    2007-08-01

    This study explored psychosocial experiences of breast cancer survivors involved in dragon boat programs. Twenty women (M(age) = 58.69, SD = 6.85) were interviewed for 45-60 min about their experiences as members of survivor dragon boat teams. Interviews were analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methods. The dragon boat program facilitated social support from women with common challenges and a shared understanding of survivorship. It also provided opportunities to (re)gain a sense of personal control, develop new identities as athletes, and overcome physical challenges. Together these elements contributed to positive psychological growth and linked to the literature on posttraumatic growth. Future physical activity interventions targeting breast cancer survivors may benefit from developing strategies that share key characteristics of dragon boating.

  14. Managing psychosocial adjustment to aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, D

    1999-01-01

    This article argues for incorporating psychosocial adjustment into treatment plans for people with aphasia. It proposes that rehabilitation is a social rather than a medical construct and that by adopting a broad range of intervention strategies, more effective approaches to reintegration can be adopted. Outcome measures relating to self-esteem are judged to be central to evaluating the efficacy of treatment. The role of social factors in managing psychosocial adjustment are considered alongside individual and family approaches to counseling. It is concluded that clinicians need to broaden their treatment program to include psychosocial adjustment in rehabilitation.

  15. Intervention program efficacy for spelling difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Maria Nobre; Capellini, Simone Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    To develop an intervention procedure for spelling difficulties and to verify the effectiveness of the intervention program in students with lower spelling performance. We developed an intervention program for spelling difficulties, according to the semiology of the errors. The program consisted of three modules totaling 16 sessions. The study included 40 students of the third to fifth grade of public elementary education of the city of Marilia (SP), of both genders, in aged of eight to 12 years old, being distributed in the following groups: GI (20 students with lower spelling performance) and GII (20 students with higher spelling performance). In situation of pre and post-testing, all groups were submitted to the Pro-Orthography. The results statistically analyzed showed that, in general, all groups had average of right that has higher in post-testing, reducing the types of errors second semiologycal classification, mainly related to natural spelling errors. However, the results also showed that the groups submitted to the intervention program showed better performance on spelling tests in relation to not submitted. The intervention program developed was effective once the groups submitted showed better performance on spelling tests in relation to not submitted. Therefore, the intervention program can help professionals in the Health and Education to minimize the problems related to spelling, giving students an intervention that is effective for the development of the spelling knowledge.

  16. Psychosocial Interventions for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care: Review of Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsverk, John A.; Burns, Barbara J.; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Rolls Reutz, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Between one-half and three-fourths of children entering foster care exhibit behavioral or social-emotional problems warranting mental health care. This paper, condensed and updated from a technical report prepared for Casey Family Programs in 2005, reviews evidence-based and promising interventions for the most prevalent mental conditions found…

  17. The efficacy of psychosocial interventions for adults in contexts of ongoing man-made violence - A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleber, Rolf; de Jong, K; Knipscheer, Jeroen; Ford, N.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to psychosocial programs implemented in post-conflict settings those executed in areas of ongoing conflicts may have different effects. Their evidence of efficacy has never been systematically reviewed. We searched PubMed, PsychInfo and the Dutch Tropical Institute Literature Portal from

  18. The efficacy of psychosocial interventions for adults in contexts of ongoing man-made violence - A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleber, Rolf; de Jong, K; Knipscheer, Jeroen; Ford, N.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to psychosocial programs implemented in post-conflict settings those executed in areas of ongoing conflicts may have different effects. Their evidence of efficacy has never been systematically reviewed. We searched PubMed, PsychInfo and the Dutch Tropical Institute Literature Portal from in

  19. Internet-based support programs to alleviate psychosocial and physical symptoms in cancer patients: a literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Grietje; Admiraal, Jolien M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Schröder, Carolien P; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E; Reyners, Anna K L

    2015-07-01

    In this review the effect of internet-based support programs on psychosocial and physical symptoms resulting from cancer diagnosis and treatment is analyzed. Selection of studies was based on the following criteria: (non-)randomized controlled trials, performed in adult cancer patients, comparing quantitative psychosocial and/or physical outcomes of an internet-based support program with (a) comparison group(s). Literature search yielded 2032 studies of which 16 fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Three different internet-based support programs were identified: social support groups, online therapy for psychosocial/physical symptoms, and online systems integrating information, support, and coaching services. Outcomes improved by these programs in nine studies. Especially fatigue, social support, and distress improved, regardless of the program type. All online systems showed positive effects, mainly for social support and quality of life. This analysis indicates that internet-based support programs are effective in improving psychosocial and physical symptoms in cancer patients.

  20. Nutrition Intervention Program and Childhood Malnutrition: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high prevalence of childhood under‑nutrition in the Niger delta might not ... Keywords: Nutrition intervention program, Childhood malnutrition, Nutrition education,. Niger delta region ..... factors and coronary heart disease. Arch Internal Med.

  1. Psychosocial interventions for children exposed to traumatic events in low- and middle-income countries: study protocol of an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purgato, M.; Gross, A.L.; Jordans, M.J.D.; de Jong, J.T.V.M.; Barbui, C.; Tol, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The burden of mental health and psychosocial problems in children exposed to traumatic events in humanitarian settings in low- and middle-income countries is substantial. An increasing number of randomized studies has shown promising effects of psychosocial interventions, but this eviden

  2. Helping adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: evaluation of a positive youth development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F

    2008-06-13

    The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes), designed and implemented primarily by school social workers, attempts to help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. After completion of the Tier 2 Program in the Full Implementation Phase (2006/07 school year), 10,255 Secondary 1 students in 207 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C) to assess their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. Pearson correlation analyses showed that perceptions of the program and instructors were significantly correlated with perceived effectiveness of the program. Participants who joined volunteer training activities generally had higher global subjective outcome evaluation scores than did participants who attended programs without volunteer training activities.

  3. Diagnóstico y tratamiento psicosocial del tabaquismo Smoking cessation: Diagnosis and psychosocial intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO BELLO S

    2009-01-01

    . The current treatment of smoking has two pillars: psycho-social intervention and pharmacological therapy. The current interventions are based on two theoretical models that try to understand changes of smoking behavior: The Stages of Change and PRIME Theory. Brief intervention is a strategy internationally approved because of its population impact on smoking cessation. The methodology used is named "5A's": Ask, Advise, Asses, Assist and Arrange follow-up. For not motivated patients at the intervention time it can be used the "5R 's" methodology: Relevance, Risks, Rewards, Roadblocks and Repetition. The actual approach used in smokers management, is Motivational Interview, which tries to produce the behavioral change from inside and not imposing it. Its four tools are: express empathy, develop discrepancy, roll with resistance and support self efficacy. The useful psychosocial strategies, in which exists consensus, are: 1 Give practical counseling of problem solving and skills training to face risky situations; 2 Intra-treatment support, encouraging attempts of smoking cessation and communicate caring and concern.

  4. [The psychosocial aspects of perinatal care and their relationship to selected medical interventions and health complications during parturition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, L; Kodyšová, E; Seidlerová, J

    2012-06-01

    Find association between psychosocial factors of perinatal care and selected childbirth complications and interventions. Original study. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Charles University, Prague. Statistical data analysis of questionnaire survey of low-risk parturients (n=657) was carried out. Respondents were divided into experimental groups (EG) according to experienced interventions and complications (hemorrhage, failure to progress, fetal distress, forceps/VEX delivery, caesarean birth, failure to progress followed by caesarean birth, labour acceleration infusion, other infusion, epidural anesthesia, other form of pharmacological analgesia, episiotomy, amniotomy). EG were compared with a control group (CG) of women with no complications and interventions (n=107) in evaluation of psychosocial factors of perinatal care (healthcare provider attitude; control; communication; woman-friendliness of hospital rules) and physical comfort and services, presence of other persons at birth, prevailing emotional reaction and overall satisfaction with maternity care. The interpretation of results draws from qualitative analysis of open-ended question answers. EG and CG differed significantly in control (all EGs scored lower) and healthcare provider attitude evaluation (significantly more negative perception at EGs: hemorrhage, failure to progress, fetal distress, forceps/VEX delivery, labour acceleration infusion, episiotomy). Significant differences were noted also for woman-friendliness of hospital rules (lower scores for EGs: hemorrhage, failure to progress, failure to progress followed by caesarean birth) and for presence of other persons at birth. Possible interpretations of the above results are discussed. Psychosocial factors of perinatal care constitute important childbirth process determinants, while playing a key role for parturients ability to cope with anxiety and stress connected with childbirth complications and interventions

  5. A meta-analytic review of psychosocial interventions for substance use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Dutra; G. Stathopoulou; S.L. Basden; T.M. Leyro; M.B. Powers; M.W. Otto

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Despite significant advances in psychosocial treatments for substance use disorders, the relative success of these approaches has not been well documented. In this meta-analysis, the authors provide effect sizes for various types of psychosocial treatments, as well as abstinence and treat

  6. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  7. Psychosocial effects of competitive Boccia program in persons with severe chronic disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Sharon; Mendoza-Laiz, Nuria; Fuentes, Maria Teresa Gutierrez; Rubiera, Maria; Huyzler, Yeshayahu

    2016-01-01

    People with severe physical disabilities may experience psychosocial problems. Boccia is one sport that athletes with severe disability can engage in, but no information on the effects of Boccia on psychosocial outcomes for participants with severe disability is available. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of Boccia on psychosocial outcomes in persons with severe disabilities. The study included two competitive Boccia groups: independent competitive (IC) (n = 9) and nonindependent competitive (NIC) (n = 7), as well as a recreational Boccia group (n = 14) and control subjects (n = 13) (mean age = 46.46 +/- 10.75). All participants underwent a rehabilitation program. Between-group differences in change scores were assessed using analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of variance. Within-group differences were compared using t-tests and effect sizes (ESs). Change in psychosocial parameters was not significantly influenced by study group (p > 0.05). All groups presented moderate-to-large ESs in physical and psychological quality of life (ES > 0.51). In comparison to the control group, who presented small-to-trivial ESs in General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Profile of Mood States-Tension, the IC and recreational group presented moderate ESs in GHQ-28, whereas the NIC group presented moderate ESs in anxiety and tension. In conclusion, the rehabilitation program had a general positive effect on the psychosocial status of individuals with severe physical disabilities. However, the competitive Boccia groups demonstrated a greater number of favorable changes, suggesting an added value of participation in Boccia.

  8. Psychosocial interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nosè, Michela; Ballette, Francesca; Bighelli, Irene; Turrini, Giulia; Purgato, Marianna; Tol, Wietse; Priebe, Stefan; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    .... This systematic review examined the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of randomised trials, CINAHL, EMBASE, PILOTS, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science up to July 2016...

  9. Effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in eating disorders: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcelle Barrueco; Melnik, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders are psychiatric conditions originated from and perpetuated by individual, family and sociocultural factors. The psychosocial approach to treatment and prevention of relapse is crucial. To present an overview of the scientific evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treatment of eating disorders. All systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Cochrane Library on the topic were included. Afterwards, as from the least recent date of these reviews (2001), an additional search was conducted at PubMed with sensitive search strategy and with the same keywords used. A total of 101 primary studies and 30 systematic reviews (5 Cochrane systematic reviews), meta-analysis, guidelines or narrative reviews of literature were included. The main outcomes were: symptomatic remission, body image, cognitive distortion, psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial functioning and patient satisfaction. The cognitive behavioral approach was the most effective treatment, especially for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome. For anorexia nervosa, the family approach showed greater effectiveness. Other effective approaches were interpersonal psychotherapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, support therapy and self-help manuals. Moreover, there was an increasing number of preventive and promotional approaches that addressed individual, family and social risk factors, being promising for the development of positive self-image and self-efficacy. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of multidisciplinary approaches on all eating disorders, as well as the cost-effectiveness of some effective modalities, such as the cognitive behavioral therapy. RESUMO Transtornos alimentares são doenças psiquiátricas originadas de e perpetuadas por fatores individuais, familiares e socioculturais. A abordagem psicossocial é essencial para o tratamento e a prevenção de recaídas. Apresentar uma vis

  10. Dealing with cancer: a meta-synthesis of patients’ and relatives’ experiences of participating in psychosocial interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeck, Bente; Ledderer, Loni; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2017-01-01

    interventions were used to try to deal with the changes in the human conditions caused by cancer. Sharing their experiences and forming social relationships helped the participants adapt to cancer. An existential perspective may provide a nuanced understanding of patients’ and relatives’ experiences......The aim was to synthesise patients’ and relatives’ experiences of participating in a psychosocial intervention related to having cancer. The study was a meta-synthesis inspired by Noblit & Hare’s ‘meta-ethnography’ approach. We systematically searched six databases and included 33 studies...

  11. The Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Group Rehabilitation Program on the Psychosocial Functioning of Elderly People Who Are Visually Impaired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Suurmeijer, Theodorus; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pilot study reported here determined the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program, Visually Impaired Elderly Persons Participating (VIPP), on psychosocial functioning. Methods: The single-group pretest-posttest pilot study included 29 persons with visual

  12. The Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Group Rehabilitation Program on the Psychosocial Functioning of Elderly People Who Are Visually Impaired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Suurmeijer, Theodorus; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pilot study reported here determined the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program, Visually Impaired Elderly Persons Participating (VIPP), on psychosocial functioning. Methods: The single-group pretest-posttest pilot study included 29 persons with visual im

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Adolescent Psychosocial Smoking Prevention Programs Published between 1978 and 1997 in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Myunghee Song; Yeagley, Kathleen Lux; Petosa, Rick

    2004-01-01

    Psychosocial smoking prevention studies have shown inconsistent results and theory-driven programs have been related to program success. This meta-analysis was used as a judgment tool for resolving these issues by estimating average program effects and investigating the relative efficacy of program types. The present study examined 65 adolescent…

  14. Long-term effects of methadone maintenance treatment with different psychosocial intervention models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Wang

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the long-term effects of different psychosocial intervention models in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT in Xi'an China. Patients from five MMT clinics were divided into three groups receiving MMT only, MMT with counseling psychology (CP or MMT with contingency management (CM. A five-year follow-up was carried out with daily records of medication, monthly random urine morphine tests, and tests for anti-HIV and anti-HCV every six months. Drug use behavior was recorded six months after initial recruitment using a survey. Adjusted RRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated using an unconditional logistic regression model or a Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 2662 patients were recruited with 797 in MMT, 985 in MMT with CP, and 880 in MMT with CM. Following six months of treatment, the injection rates of MMT with CP and MMT with CM groups were significantly lower than that of MMT (5.1% and 6.9% vs. 16.3%, x²  =  47.093 and 29.908, respectively; P<0.05. HIV incidences for MMT, MMT with CP and MMT with CM at the five year follow-up were 20.09, 0.00 and 10.02 per ten thousand person-years, respectively. HCV incidences were 18.35, 4.42 and 6.61 per hundred person-years, respectively, demonstrating that CP and CM were protective factors for HCV incidence (RR  =  0.209 and 0.414, with range of 0.146-0.300 and 0.298-0.574, respectively. MMT supplemented with CP or CM can reduce heroin use and related risk behaviors, thereby reducing the incidence of HIV and HCV.

  15. The psychosocial burden of human papillomavirus related disease and screening interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, M; Ung, L; Stein, A; Conway, E L; Mast, T C; Fairley, C K; Garland, S

    2009-12-01

    (i) To assess the psychosocial burden of testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) related genital disease or of a HPV-related diagnosis; (ii) to compare an instrument specifically designed to measure HPV-related psychosocial burden with other generic quality of life (QoL) instruments. A cross-sectional design. Researchers recruited women from outpatient clinics at a major tertiary women's hospital and a sexual health centre who completed surveys within 3 months of receiving 331 women, 18-45 years, who had experienced a normal cervical Papanicolaou (Pap) result, an abnormal Pap result, biopsy confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or external genital warts (EGW). The HPV impact profile (HIP) designed to assess the psychosocial impact of HPV; two general health-related QoL surveys-the EuroQoL VAS and the Sheehan disability scale; and a HPV knowledge survey. Response rate was 78%. Significant psychosocial impacts were found for women screened for, or having a diagnosis of, HPV-related genital disease. The largest impact was in women with CIN 2/3 and EGW. This HPV-related psychosocial impact was most sensitively detected with the HIP. Relative to generic measures of QoL, the HIP provided insight into the full range of psychosocial impacts of HPV testing and diagnoses. Clinicians need to be aware of the potential psychosocial impact of testing for or diagnosing HPV-related genital disease, in particular CIN 2/3 and EGW. The HIP survey is a more sensitive measure of the psychosocial impact of HPV-related genital disease than generic QoL surveys.

  16. Positive Youth Development Programs Targeting Students with Greater Psychosocial Needs: Subjective Outcome Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, and the related programs were designed and implemented by school social workers. After completion of the Tier 2 Program, 2,173 students in 52 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C, assessing their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the agencies to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed” overall profile of the perceptions of the program participants. Four major types of program were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (N = 8, programs concentrated on volunteer training and services (N = 7, programs incorporating both adventure-based counseling and volunteer training elements (N = 30, and other programs with different foci (N = 7. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the programs and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. The present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong for the experimental implementation phase.

  17. Positive youth development programs targeting students with greater psychosocial needs: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tak Lan; Shek, Daniel T L

    2010-02-12

    The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, and the related programs were designed and implemented by school social workers. After completion of the Tier 2 Program (Secondary 1 Level), 9,931 participants in 212 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C) in order to assess their views of the program, workers, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the agencies to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a "reconstructed" overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Four major types of program were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (n = 58), programs concentrating on volunteer training and services (n = 31), programs offering both adventure-based counseling and volunteer training activities (n = 91), and other programs with different foci (n = 32). Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the programs and the workers, and over four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. The present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong for the Full Implementation Phase.

  18. Positive youth development programs targeting students with greater psychosocial needs: subjective outcome evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Lee, Tak Yan; Sun, Rachel C F; Lung, Daniel W M

    2008-01-14

    The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes) targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, and the related programs were designed and implemented by school social workers. After completion of the Tier 2 Program, 2,173 students in 52 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C), assessing their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the agencies to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a "reconstructed" overall profile of the perceptions of the program participants. Four major types of program were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (N = 8), programs concentrated on volunteer training and services (N = 7), programs incorporating both adventure-based counseling and volunteer training elements (N = 30), and other programs with different foci (N = 7). Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the programs and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. The present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong for the experimental implementation phase.

  19. Positive Youth Development Programs Targeting Students with Greater Psychosocial Needs: A Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs, and the related programs were designed and implemented by school social workers. After completion of the Tier 2 Program (Secondary 1 Level, 9,931 participants in 212 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C in order to assess their views of the program, workers, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the agencies to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed” overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Four major types of program were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (n = 58, programs concentrating on volunteer training and services (n = 31, programs offering both adventure-based counseling and volunteer training activities (n = 91, and other programs with different foci (n = 32. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the programs and the workers, and over four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. The present study provides support for the effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong for the Full Implementation Phase.

  20. A randomized control trial of a psychosocial intervention for caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: Effects on distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudenslager, Mark L.; Simoneau, Teri L.; Kilbourn, Kristin; Natvig, Crystal; Philips, Sam; Spradley, Janet; Benitez, Patrick; McSweeney, Peter; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Caregivers of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (Allo-HSCT) serve a pivotal role in patient care but experience high stress, anxiety, and depression as a result. We theorized that a stress management adapted for Allo-HSCT caregivers would reduce distress compared to treatment as usual (TAU). From 267 consecutive caregivers of Allo-HSCT patients approached, 148 (mean=53.5 years, 75.7% female) were randomized to either psychosocial intervention (n=74) or TAU (n=74). Eight 1-on-1 stress management sessions delivered across the 100 day post-transplant period focused on understanding stress, changing role(s) as caregiver, cognitive behavioral stress management, pacing respiration, and identifying social support. Primary outcomes included perceived stress (psychological) and salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) (physiological). Randomized groups were not statistically different at baseline. Mixed models analysis of covariance (intent-to-treat) showed that intervention was associated with significantly lower caregiver stress 3 months post-transplant (Mean=20.0, CI95=17.9-22.0) compared to TAU (Mean=23.0, CI95=21.0-25.0) with an effect size (ES) of 0.39 (p=0.039). Secondary psychological outcomes, including depression and anxiety, were significantly reduced with ESs of 0.46 and 0.66 respectively. Caregiver CAR did not differ from non-caregiving controls at baseline and was unchanged by intervention. Despite significant caregiving burden, this psychosocial intervention significantly mitigated distress in Allo-HSCT caregivers. PMID:25961767

  1. Visibility and Social Recognition as Psychosocial Work Environment Factors among Cleaners in a Multi-Ethnic Workplace Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hviid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the psychosocial work environment of immigrant cleaners at a Danish workplace. Today, many cleaners working in Danish cleaning jobs are women from the established immigrant communities, but also labour migrants from the newer EU member states have found their way to the cleaning industry. Studies have drawn attention to immigrants’ low position in the cleaning industry and their increased risk of work injuries. This article is based on a case study of an intervention called “Make a Difference” designed to improve the work environment among cleaners at a multi-ethnic workplace. We used semi-structured interviews, photo logs, observation and participation to investigate how the cleaners experienced their work environment. The cleaners reported an overload of heavy work, related to the concept of a classroom’s “readiness for cleaning”, and they expressed strained social relations and communication in addition to a lack of social recognition and invisibility at the workplace, a school. We analysed these psychosocial work environmental problems by investigating the different forms of social relationships and communication within the group of cleaners, and between the cleaners and the teachers and pupils at the school. Moreover, we discussed why the intervention, based on training of language and cleaning skills and social interaction, only partially improved the cleaners’ psychosocial work environment problems. In this article, we argue that social divisions based on ethnicity between the new and the established group of cleaners, combined with their marginal position and poor work organisation at the school, reinforced the cleaners’ experiences of psychosocial work environment problems. This article suggests that increased effort towards social inclusion at work and improved work organisation, especially for the new labour migrants from newer EU-countries, should be considered.

  2. Formative evaluation of the STAR intervention: improving teachers' ability to provide psychosocial support for vulnerable individuals in the school community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ronél; Ebersöhn, Liesel

    2011-04-01

    The article describes the pilot phase of a participatory reflection and action (PRA) study. The longitudinal investigation explores teachers' ability to provide psychosocial support within the context of HIV/AIDS following an asset-based intervention. The study ensued from our desire to understand and contribute to knowledge about the changed roles of teachers due to adversity in the community, specifically in relation to HIV/AIDS and education. The supportive teachers, assets and resilience (STAR) intervention was facilitated from November 2003 to October 2005 and consisted of the research team undertaking nine field visits and facilitating 20 intervention sessions (2-3 hours each), and 12 post-intervention research visits have been conducted to date. Ten female teachers were selected for participation through random purposeful sampling at a primary school in an informal settlement outside Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Data-generation included PRA activities, observation, informal interactive interviews, and focus group discussions. The data were analysed by means of inductive thematic analysis. We found that the teachers did not view vulnerability as being related to children or HIV/AIDS in isolation, but rather that their psychosocial support to children and the school community was inclusive across a spectrum of vulnerabilities and services. We argue that teachers who are inclined to provide such support will fulfil this role irrespective of understanding policy or receiving training. We contend that teachers are well-positioned to manage school-based psychosocial support in order to create relevant and caring spaces for vulnerable individuals in the school community.

  3. Do Psychosocial Interventions Improve Quality of Life and Wellbeing in Adults with Neuromuscular Disorders? A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walklet, Elaine; Muse, Kate; Meyrick, Jane; Moss, Tim

    2016-08-30

    Quality of life and well-being are frequently restricted in adults with neuromuscular disorders. As such, identification of appropriate interventions is imperative. The objective of this paper was to systematically review and critically appraise quantitative studies (RCTs, controlled trials and cohort studies) of psychosocial interventions designed to improve quality of life and well-being in adults with neuromuscular disorders. A systematic review of the published and unpublished literature was conducted. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were appraised using a validated quality assessment tool and results presented in a narrative synthesis. Out of 3,136 studies identified, ten studies met criteria for inclusion within the review. Included studies comprised a range of interventions including: cognitive behavioural therapy, dignity therapy, hypnosis, expressive disclosure, gratitude lists, group psychoeducation and psychologically informed rehabilitation. Five of the interventions were for patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The remainder were for patients with post-polio syndrome, muscular dystrophies and mixed disorders, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myasthenia gravis and myotonic dystrophy. Across varied interventions and neuromuscular disorders, seven studies reported a short-term beneficial effect of intervention on quality of life and well-being. Whilst such findings are encouraging, widespread issues with the methodological quality of these studies significantly compromised the results. There is no strong evidence that psychosocial interventions improve quality of life and well-being in adults with neuromuscular disorders, due to a paucity of high quality research in this field. Multi-site, randomised controlled trials with active controls, standardised outcome measurement and longer term follow-ups are urgently required.

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial resilience training for heart health, and the added value of promoting physical activity: a cluster randomized trial of the READY program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakenham Kenneth I

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and poor social support are significant risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD, and stress and anxiety can trigger coronary events. People experiencing such psychosocial difficulties are more likely to be physically inactive, which is also an independent risk factor for CHD. Resilience training can target these risk factors, but there is little research evaluating the effectiveness of such programs. This paper describes the design and measures of a study to evaluate a resilience training program (READY to promote psychosocial well-being for heart health, and the added value of integrating physical activity promotion. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized trial, 95 participants will be allocated to either a waitlist or one of two intervention conditions. Both intervention conditions will receive a 10 × 2.5 hour group resilience training program (READY over 13 weeks. The program targets five protective factors identified from empirical evidence and analyzed as mediating variables: positive emotions, cognitive flexibility, social support, life meaning, and active coping. Resilience enhancement strategies reflect the six core Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (values, mindfulness, defusion, acceptance, self-as-context, committed action and Cognitive Behavior Therapy strategies such as relaxation training and social support building skills. Sessions include psychoeducation, discussions, experiential exercises, and home assignments. One intervention condition will include an additional session and ongoing content promoting physical activity. Measurement will occur at baseline, two weeks post intervention, and at eight weeks follow-up, and will include questionnaires, pedometer step logs, and physical and hematological measures. Primary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of psychosocial well-being and depression. Secondary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of

  5. Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, R; Brisson, C; Vinet, A; Vézina, M; Lower, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects. Methods The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was performed, using a quantitative approach, to determine the prevalence of adverse psychosocial work factors and of psychological distress in the hospital compared to an appropriate reference population. In addition, a qualitative approach included observation in the care units, interviews with key informants, and collaborative work with an intervention team (IT) including all stakeholders. Results The prior risk evaluation showed a high prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors and psychological distress among care providers compared to a representative sample of workers from the general population. Psychosocial variables at work associated with psychological distress in the prior risk evaluation were high psychological demands (prevalence ratio (PR) = 2.27), low social support from supervisors and co‐workers (PR = 1.35), low reward (PR = 2.92), and effort‐reward imbalance (PR = 2.65). These results showed the empirical relevance of an intervention on the four selected adverse psychosocial factors among care providers. Qualitative methods permitted the identification of 56 adverse conditions and of their solutions. Targets of intervention were related to team work and team spirit, staffing processes, work organisation, training, communication, and ergonomy. Conclusion This study adds to the scarce literature describing the development and implementation of preventive intervention aimed at reducing psychosocial factors at work and their health effects. Even if adverse conditions in the psychosocial environment and

  6. A livelihood intervention to improve economic and psychosocial well-being in rural Uganda: Longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Kakuhikire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV and poverty are inextricably intertwined in sub-Saharan Africa. Economic and livelihood intervention strategies have been suggested to help mitigate the adverse economic effects of HIV, but few intervention studies have focused specifically on HIV-positive persons. We conducted three pilot studies to assess a livelihood intervention consisting of an initial orientation and loan package of chickens and associated implements to create poultry microenterprises. We enrolled 15 HIV-positive and 22 HIV-negative participants and followed them for up to 18 months. Over the course of follow-up, participants achieved high chicken survival and loan repayment rates. Median monthly income increased, and severe food insecurity declined, although these changes were not statistically significant (P-values ranged from 0.11 to 0.68. In-depth interviews with a purposive sample of three HIV-positive participants identified a constellation of economic and psychosocial benefits, including improved social integration and reduced stigma.

  7. Exploring Burnout in Batterer Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahner, Angela D.; Berkel, LaVerne A.

    2007-01-01

    This study used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to explore burnout in a sample of 115 batterer intervention program (BIP) workers (56% female, 44% male) from four midwestern states. The purpose of this study was to explore the role that demographic variables, job-setting variables, supervisor support, and personality characteristics played in…

  8. Stressors, supports and the social ecology of displacement: psychosocial dimensions of an emergency education program for Chechen adolescents displaced in Ingushetia, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick

    2005-09-01

    This study explored the psychosocial benefits of an emergency education intervention serving adolescents displaced by the war in Chechnya. It set out to describe key stressors and sources of social support available to youth served by the International Rescue Committee's (IRC) emergency education program. Interviews were conducted with 57 Chechen adolescents living in spontaneous settlements in Ingushetia, Russia in the fall of 2000. Of particular interest was the degree to which the education program addressed specified psychosocial goals. Findings indicated that young people and their families faced a number of physical and emotional stressors. The data indicated that the emergency education program provided benefits by enriching sources of social support, providing meaningful activity and a sense of hope for the future, and creating a space for young people to spend time and connect to others. However, the contrast between the desire of adolescents "to live like other kids" and the options available to them presented a dilemma for the emergency education program: adolescents craved normalcy, but for any intervention to be delivered, it had to first begin with creative and adaptive strategies that were by no means a complete replacement for formal, mainstream education. The programmatic and policy implications of these findings are presented here.

  9. Changeover-time in psychosocial wellbeing of people living with HIV and people living close to them after an HIV stigma reduction and wellness enhancement community intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidrawi, H Christa; Greeff, Minrie; Temane, Q Michael; Ellis, Suria

    2015-01-01

    HIV stigma continues to affect the psychosocial wellbeing of people living with HIV (PLWH) and people living close to them (PLC). Literature unequivocally holds the view that HIV stigma and psychosocial wellbeing interact with and have an impact on each other. This study, which is part of a larger research project funded by the South Africa Netherlands research Programme on Alternatives in Development (SANPAD), responds to the lack of interventions mitigating the impactful interaction of HIV stigma and psychosocial wellbeing and tests one such intervention. The research objectives were to test the changeover-time in the psychosocial wellbeing of PLWH and PLC in an urban and a rural setting, following a comprehensive community-based HIV stigma reduction and wellness enhancement intervention. An experimental quantitative single system research design with a pre- and four repetitive post-tests was used, conducting purposive voluntary sampling for PLWH (n = 18) and snowball sampling for PLC (n = 60). The average age of participants was 34 years old. The five measuring instruments used for both groups were the mental health continuum short-form scale, the patient health questionnaire, the satisfaction with life scale, the coping self-efficacy scale and the spirituality wellbeing scale. No significant differences were found between the urban-rural settings and data were pooled for analysis. The findings show that initial psychosocial wellbeing changes after the intervention were better sustained (over time) by the PLC than by the PLWH and seemed to be strengthened by interpersonal interaction. Recommendations included that the intervention should be re-utilised and that its tenets, content and activities be retained. A second intervention three to six months after the first should be included to achieve more sustainability and to add focused activities for the enhancement of psychosocial wellbeing. PLWH and PLC are to be encouraged to engage with innovative community

  10. Psychosocial interventions for social communication, repetitive, and emotional-behavioral difficulties in children and young people with spectrum disorders: an update on effectiveness and the role of caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Magiati, I.; Essau, C.A.; Allen, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of time-limited psychosocial interventions targeting social skills, internalizing and externalizing difficulties have been developed for children and young people with ASD. Increasingly more evidence is emerging that such interventions are effective in reducing difficulties and improving sk

  11. A Community-Based, Environmental Chronic Disease Prevention Intervention to Improve Healthy Eating Psychosocial Factors and Behaviors in Indigenous Populations in the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Erin L.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Roache, Cindy; Corriveau, André; Sharma, Sangita

    2013-01-01

    Diet-related chronic diseases are highly prevalent among indigenous populations in the Canadian Arctic. A community-based, multi-institutional nutritional and lifestyle intervention--Healthy Foods North--was implemented to improve food-related psychosocial factors and behaviors among Inuit and Inuvialuit in four intervention communities (with two…

  12. Psychosocial interventions for social communication, repetitive, and emotional-behavioral difficulties in children and young people with spectrum disorders: an update on effectiveness and the role of caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Magiati, I.; Essau, C.A.; Allen, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of time-limited psychosocial interventions targeting social skills, internalizing and externalizing difficulties have been developed for children and young people with ASD. Increasingly more evidence is emerging that such interventions are effective in reducing difficulties and improving sk

  13. Neurocognition as a Predictor of Response to Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia: What is the State of the Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Matthew M.

    2011-01-01

    Impairment in functional status is a hallmark of schizophrenia that has been linked to deficits in aspects of neurocognition (e.g., attention, memory, and problem-solving). A growing number of evidence-based behavioral interventions have been developed to address impairment in functional status, yet the relationships between these interventions and neurocognitive impairment are not well-understood. We conducted a synthetic, critical literature review of studies of performance on neurocognitive tests as a predictor of response to evidence-based behavioral treatment in schizophrenia. Behavioral treatments were selected based on the Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT; Dixon et al., 2010) recommendations for practice and areas of emerging interest. Comprehensive searches of PsychINFO and MEDLINE/PUBMED databases identified 20 relevant studies. Results revealed that: (1) attention and memory measured at study entry were most frequently linked to proximal measures of progress in social skill training programs, (2) composite measures of neurocognitive function, as well attention, memory and problem-solving, were linked to progress in work therapy and supported employment programs, and comprehensive, integrated programs of psychosocial rehabilitation, while (3) baseline impairment on neurocogntive tests was not shown to limit progress in treatment studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy. The relevance of these findings for clinical practice and future research is discussed. PMID:21482324

  14. Psychosocial child adjustment and family functioning in families reached with an assertive outreach intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rots-de Vries; I. van de Goor; K. Stronks; H. Garretsen

    2011-01-01

    Families who experience a chronic complex of socio-economic and psychosocial problems are hard to reach with mainstream care. Evidence exists that the core of this problem is a problematic interaction between this type of family and current systems of care and services. To improve access to problem

  15. Helping Adolescents with Greater Psychosocial Needs: Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes, designed and implemented primarily by school social workers, attempts to help adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. After completion of the Tier 2 Program in the Full Implementation Phase (2006/07 school year, 10,255 Secondary 1 students in 207 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C to assess their views of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Results showed that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as helpful to them. Pearson correlation analyses showed that perceptions of the program and instructors were significantly correlated with perceived effectiveness of the program. Participants who joined volunteer training activities generally had higher global subjective outcome evaluation scores than did participants who attended programs without volunteer training activities.

  16. Psychosocial Interventions in Reducing Cannabis Use in Early Phase Psychosis: A Canadian Survey of Treatments Offered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cristina; Tibbo, Philip G; Ursuliak, Zenovia

    2016-06-01

    Cannabis use in people with early phase psychosis (EPP) can have a significant impact on long-term outcomes. The purpose of this investigation was to describe current cannabis use treatment practices in English-speaking early intervention services (EISs) in Canada and determine if their services are informed by available evidence. Thirty-five Canadian English-speaking EISs for psychosis were approached to complete a survey through email, facsimile, or online in order to collect information regarding their current cannabis use treatment practices. Data were acquired from 27 of the 35 (78%) programs approached. Only 12% of EISs offered formal services that targeted cannabis use, whereas the majority (63%) of EISs offered informal services for all substance use, not specifically cannabis. In programs with informal services, individual patient psychoeducation (86%) was slightly more common than individual motivational interviewing (MI) (76%) followed by group patient psychoeducation (52%) and information handouts (52%). Thirty-seven percent of EISs offered formal services for substance use, and compared to programs with informal services, more MI, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and family services were offered, with individual treatment modalities more common than groups. No EISs used contingency management, even though it has some preliminary evidence in chronic populations. Evidence-based service implementation barriers included appropriate training and administrative support. While most English-speaking Canadian EIS programs offer individual MI and psychoeducation, which is in line with the available literature, there is room for improvement in cannabis treatment services based on current evidence for both people with EPP and their families. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals’, Patients’ and Partners’ Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Tim; Levesque, Janelle V.; Lambert, Sylvie D.; Kelly, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs) regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples’ psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals) and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma). Interviews were analysed using the framework approach. Results Three core themes were identified: “How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?” emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. “What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?” described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. “How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?” described couples’ view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying

  18. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Regan

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma. Interviews were analysed using the framework approach.Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening and

  19. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Tim; Levesque, Janelle V; Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs) regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals) and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma). Interviews were analysed using the framework approach. Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening) and referring

  20. Changing meanings through art: a systematization of a psychosocial intervention with Chilean women in urban poverty situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Marianne; Haz, Ana María

    2011-06-01

    This study explores the experiences that women in urban poverty situation have about their participation in a psychosocial group intervention mediated by artistic techniques. An investigation was done using a qualitative methodology. Participants were ten women older than 21 years old who live in Santiago de Chile in poverty situation. Two group evaluations were performed during the intervention process and once it was completed, ten individual semi-structure interviews. The information was analyzed following the proposals of Grounded Theory, identifying negative experience about tiredness and sacrifice related to the circumstances they live in. It was possible, at the same time, to describe the benefits of an artistic activity including a psychosocial work over the individual well-being. The artistic creation was revealed as a way of expression, of re-viewing oneself and the environment, and relaxation. Transformation is discussed concerning self-affirmation, reparation and transference of this experience in their lives, as a preventive and protective resource to overcome their problems.

  1. Psychosocial interventions for children and adolescents after man-made and natural disasters: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Witt, A; Fegert, J M; Keller, F; Rassenhofer, M; Plener, P L

    2017-08-01

    Children and adolescents are a vulnerable group to develop post-traumatic stress symptoms after natural or man-made disasters. In the light of increasing numbers of refugees under the age of 18 years worldwide, there is a significant need for effective treatments. This meta-analytic review investigates specific psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents after man-made and natural disasters. In a systematic literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO, as well as hand-searching existing reviews and contacting professional associations, 36 studies were identified. Random- and mixed-effects models were applied to test for average effect sizes and moderating variables. Overall, treatments showed high effect sizes in pre-post comparisons (Hedges' g = 1.34) and medium effect sizes as compared with control conditions (Hedges' g = 0.43). Treatments investigated by at least two studies were cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), narrative exposure therapy for children (KIDNET) and classroom-based interventions, which showed similar effect sizes. However, studies were very heterogenic with regard to their outcomes. Effects were moderated by type of profession (higher level of training leading to higher effect sizes). A number of effective psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent survivors of disasters exist. CBT, EMDR, KIDNET and classroom-based interventions can be equally recommended. Although disasters require immediate reactions and improvisation, future studies with larger sample sizes and rigorous methodology are needed.

  2. Psychosocial Interventions for the Acute Treatment of Late-life Major Depression: A Systematic Review of Evidence-based Treatments, Predictors of Treatment Outcomes and Moderators of Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Dimitris N.; Leon, Andrew C.; Areán, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for the acute treatment of late-life depression and identify predictors of treatment outcomes and moderators of treatment effects. The results of the systematic review may help to advance the development of personalized psychosocial treatments for late-life major depression. Based on our criteria, Problem Solving Therapy (PST), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Treatment Initiation and Participation Program (TIP) have supportive evidence of efficacy, pending replication. Even though the data on the predictors of treatment outcomes and moderators of treatment effects are still preliminary, it appears that baseline anxiety and stress level, personality pathology, endogenous depression, and reduced self-rated health are associated with worse depression outcomes. More research is also recommended to examine the moderating effects of baseline depression severity; for instance, our review indicates that Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) may work better in participants with high baseline depression severity than in participants with low depression severity. Recommendations for future novel psychosocial interventions for the acute treatment of late-life major depression include application of these interventions in non-traditional settings, involvement of the caregivers in the treatment of cognitively and functionally impaired older adults with major depression, and expansion of research to include more racially and ethnically diverse populations as the samples of the examined studies is highly selective, i.e. overly healthy, cognitively intact, Caucasian, and highly educated. PMID:21536164

  3. Efficacy of additional psychosocial intervention in reducing low birth weight and preterm birth in teenage pregnancy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhato, Kanokporn; Wongrathanandha, Chathaya; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Dellow, Alan; Horsuwansak, Pornpot; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the efficacy of psychosocial interventions in reducing risk of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB) in teenage pregnancy. Relevant studies were identified from Medline, Scopus, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases. Randomized controlled trials investigating effect of psychosocial interventions on risk of LBW and PTB, compared to routine antenatal care (ANC) were eligible. Relative risks (RR) of LBW and PTB were pooled using inverse variance method. Mean differences of birth weight (BW) between intervention and control groups were pooled using unstandardized mean difference (USMD). Five studies were included in the review. Compared with routine ANC, psychosocial interventions significantly reduced risk of LBW by 40% (95%CI: 8%,62%) but not for PTB (pooled RR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.42,1.05). Mean BW of the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group with USMD of 200.63 g (95% CI: 21.02, 380.25). Results of our study suggest that psychosocial interventions significantly reduced risk of LBW in teenage pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rethinking research on psychosocial interventions in biopsychosocial oncology: an essay written in honor of the scholarly contributions of Bernard H. Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temoshok, Lydia R

    2004-07-01

    In his best known contribution to the field of psychooncology, the late Dr Bernard H. Fox applied his breadth of scholarship in biopsychosocial cancer epidemiology to address the question of whether and to what extent stress and other psychosocial factors may contribute to cancer risk. Less well known but equally important to the field is his incisive critique of the 1989 study by Spiegel et al. on survival time of patients with metastatic breast cancer following a psychosocial intervention. This essay represents an attempt to take Fox's line of thought to the next logical level of rethinking research on psychosocial interventions in biopsychosocial oncology. Following an analysis of the inadequacy of randomized clinical trials (RCT) to evaluate the causal effects of psychosocial interventions on cancer outcomes and distinguish these from mere prediction, an integrated RCT design is suggested to take into account the psychogenicity of a given intervention, potential mediating mechanisms, and individual differences that could help illuminate hypothesized causal processes linking an experimental intervention and cancer outcomes. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Deliverability, Acceptability, and Perceived Effect of the Macmillan Approach to Weight Loss and Eating Difficulties: A Phase II, Cluster-Randomized, Exploratory Trial of a Psychosocial Intervention for Weight- and Eating-Related Distress in People with Advanced Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hopkinson, Jane B; Fenlon, Debbie R; Okamoto, Ikumi; Wright, David N.M; Scott, Issy; Addington-Hall, Julia M; Foster, Claire

    2010-01-01

    .... The Macmillan Weight and Eating Studies (2000-2009) have used the Medical Research Council complex interventions framework to develop the first psychosocial intervention for weight- and eating-related distress (WRD and ERD...

  6. Design and Implementation of the Galician Program for Batterers’ Re-education: A Psychosocial Answer to a Social and Penitentiary Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Arce

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction in Spain of the Spanish Law on Comprehensive Preventive and Protective Measures against Gender Violence, (L.O. 1/2004, has supposed that a very large number of sentenced as batterers who are eligible to parole or supervision orders as an alternative to incarceration. This paper reviews the state of the art in terms of the theoretical explanations and efficacy of the interventions, concluding that the intervention that has proven to be more effective is one driven the specific needs and characteristics of the batterer than those based on general intervention programs for all the batterers. The evaluation schedule for this aim is discussed. Other additional features of the intervention that mediate the efficiency of the outcomes are also discussed. For the treatment under these conditions, in Galician, Norwest of Spain, a psychosocial program was developed the Galician Programme for the Treatment and Re-education of Convicted Gender Aggressors (Arce and Fariña, 2007. The results of the implementation of this program from 2005 to 2010 are satisfactory.

  7. Family caregivers’ assessment of symptoms in persons with dementia using the GBS-scale: differences in rating after psychosocial intervention – an 18-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Dahlrup

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Beth Dahlrup, Eva Nordell, Signe Andrén, Sölve ElmståhlDepartment of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, SwedenAbstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if psychosocial intervention for family caregivers made any differences in describing symptoms of dementia in the persons they cared for. The study population comprised family caregivers of persons aged 70 years and older receiving social services and diagnosed with dementia disorders. A group of 129 family caregivers underwent psychosocial intervention including education, information, and provision of a support group, while 133 family caregivers did not and these formed the control group. Family caregivers were followed-up every 6 months for a total of 18 months. They rated intellectual, emotional, and activity of daily living (ADL functions in persons with dementia using the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen scale (GBS-scale. Family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention rated the intellectual and emotional symptoms of dementia significantly higher 6 months later compared to controls and the effect was sustained during the 18-month follow-up irrespective of relationship and education. Most notably, decrease in function of recent memory, ability to increase tempo, long-windedness, distractibility, and blunting were better identified. Our findings suggest that the family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention achieved better understanding of different symptoms and the behaviors of dementia. These findings may explain earlier findings of positive effects after psychosocial intervention on family caregivers’ sense of burden, satisfaction, and ability to delay nursing home placement.Keywords: intervention, dementia, family caregivers, education, GBS-scale

  8. Internet-based support programs to alleviate psychosocial and physical symptoms in cancer patients : A literature analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Grietje; Admiraal, Lien M.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schroder, Carolien P.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Reyners, Anna K. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this review the effect of internet-based support programs on psychosocial and physical symptoms resulting from cancer diagnosis and treatment is analyzed. Selection of studies was based on the following criteria: (non-)randomized controlled trials, performed in adult cancer patients, comparing qu

  9. Trauma Healing in Refugee Camps in Guinea: A Psychosocial Program for Liberian and Sierra Leonean Survivors of Torture and War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepakoff, Shanee; Hubbard, Jon; Katoh, Maki; Falk, Erika; Mikulu, Jean-Baptiste; Nkhoma, Potiphar; Omagwa, Yuvenalis

    2006-01-01

    From 1999 to 2005, the Minneapolis-based Center for Victims of Torture (CVT) served Liberian and Sierra Leonean survivors of torture and war living in the refugee camps of Guinea. A psychosocial program was developed with 3 main goals: (1) to provide mental health care; (2) to train local refugee counselors; and (3) to raise community awareness…

  10. The Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Group Rehabilitation Program on the Psychosocial Functioning of Elderly People Who Are Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Suurmeijer, Theo P. B. M.; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pilot study reported here determined the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program, Visually Impaired Elderly Persons Participating (VIPP), on psychosocial functioning. Methods: The single-group pretest-posttest pilot study included 29 persons with visual impairments (aged 55 and older) who were referred…

  11. Development of Psychosocial Scales for Evaluating the Impact of a Culinary Nutrition Education Program on Cooking and Healthful Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrasky, Margaret D.; Williams, Joel E.; Catalano, Patricia Michaud; Griffin, Sara F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Develop scales to assess the impact of the "Cooking with a Chef" program on several psychosocial constructs. Methods: Cross-sectional design in which parents and caregivers were recruited from child care settings (Head Start, faith-based, public elementary schools), and cooks were recruited from church and school kitchens. Analysis…

  12. The pursuit of evidence-based practice: Comparisons of three guidelines on psychosocial interventions for alcohol problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmark Anders

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - In this article we scrutinise three prominent guidelines on psychosocial interventions for alcohol problems. We pay special attention to how congruent the guidelines are in terms of the interventions recommended, and the processes used in order to identify and rank the “evidence” underpinning these recommendations. DATA - The analysed guidelines are: 1 Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Substance Use Disorders, American Psychiatric Association (2006; 2 Alcohol-Use Disorders. The NICE Guideline on Diagnosis, Assessment and Management of Harmful Drinking and Alcohol Dependence (2011, National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, UK; 3 Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol Problems, Australian Government, Department of Health and Ageing (2009. The purpose is not to review the three guidelines as such, but to study them as an example of the production of evidence. All report to be based on “best available evidence”, so the guidelines were compared both regarding the actual recommendations and the guideline production procedures and differences in these procedures with related consequences. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS - Prestigious organisations in different national contexts have reached divergent conclusions about evidence-based practice and the quality of the scientific studies underpinning these conclusions. Differences in the guidelines regarding interpretations, limitations and grading illustrate the difficulties with the dilemmas of sensitivity (to include factors that are significant for how a psychological intervention is to be judged and specificity (that irrelevant studies are cleared off in the recommendations presented.

  13. The Psychosocial Work Environment, Employee Mental Health and Organizational Interventions: Improving Research and Practice by Taking a Multilevel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angela; Karanika-Murray, Maria; Biron, Caroline; Sanderson, Kristy

    2016-08-01

    Although there have been several calls for incorporating multiple levels of analysis in employee health and well-being research, studies examining the interplay between individual, workgroup, organizational and broader societal factors in relation to employee mental health outcomes remain an exception rather than the norm. At the same time, organizational intervention research and practice also tends to be limited by a single-level focus, omitting potentially important influences at multiple levels of analysis. The aims of this conceptual paper are to help progress our understanding of work-related determinants of employee mental health by the following: (1) providing a rationale for routine multilevel assessment of the psychosocial work environment; (2) discussing how a multilevel perspective can improve related organizational interventions; and (3) highlighting key theoretical and methodological considerations relevant to these aims. We present five recommendations for future research, relating to using appropriate multilevel research designs, justifying group-level constructs, developing group-level measures, expanding investigations to the organizational level and developing multilevel approaches to intervention design, implementation and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Moderators of the efficacy of a psychosocial group intervention for children with chronic illness and their parents: what works for whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, L.; Willemen, A.M.; Napoleone, E.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Last, B.F.; Dijk-Lokkart, E.M. van; Zandbelt, N.; Ensink, E.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Schuengel, C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate psychosocial characteristics of children and parents as predictors and moderators of the effect of a group intervention for children with chronic illness and their parents. METHODS: Data from a randomized controlled trial were used, including 194 children (8-18 years) who

  15. Depression in Homebound Older Adults: Recent Advances in Screening and Psychosocial Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; Sirey, Jo Anne; Bruce, Martha L

    2013-03-01

    Homebound older adults are more likely than their ambulatory peers to suffer from depression. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of antidepressant medications alone in such cases is limited. Greater benefits might be realized if patients received both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy to enhance their skills to cope with their multiple chronic medical conditions, isolation, and mobility impairment; however, referrals to specialty mental health services seldom succeed due to inaccessibility, shortage of geriatric mental health providers, and cost. Since a large proportion of homebound older adults receive case management and other services from aging services network agencies, the integration of mental health services into these agencies is likely to be cost-efficient and effective. This review summarizes recent advances in home-based assessment and psychosocial treatment of depression in homebound recipients of aging services.

  16. The action and the psychosocial approach of the intervention in social contexts: can we move from the fashion to the theoretical, epistemological, and methodological precision?.

    OpenAIRE

    Villa Gómez, Juan David; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    The following article, derived from research, poses the question about a growing issue in Colombia: the increase in projects of psychosocial intervention in diverse social sectors, particularly with victims of the armed conflict, social violence, violence of gender and family, etc., as well as population in a situation of extreme poverty, forced displacement and victims of natural disasters. In relation to this logic of intervention and action, the academic reflection tends to be scarce, uncl...

  17. Should psychosocial intervention be added to pharmacological treatment for opiate abuse/dependence? An overview of systematic reviews of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Amato

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Opioid abuse and dependence are major health and social issues in most societies. Different interventions are available, but the majority of heroin patients relapse and these relapses are a substantial problem to their rehabilitation. Psychosocial interventions for drug addicts have been suggested as possible instruments to overcome the difficulty of maintaining a drug-free state. The aim of this paper is to provide a summary of the available evidence of effectiveness.

    Methods: We summarised the results from two systematic reviews on psychosocial interventions combined with Methadone Maintenance Treatment and Methadone or Buprenorphine Detoxification Treatment.

    Results: For detoxification treatments, the results show that benefits can be gained from adding any psychosocial treatment to any substitution detoxification treatment in terms of completion of treatment: relative risk (RR 1.68 (95% CI 1.11-2.55, and compliance (proportion of clinical absences: RR 0.48 (95% CI 0.38-0.59; for the use of heroin during treatment, the differences were not statistically significant. For maintenance treatments, there is an additional benefit to be gained in adding any psychosocial treatment to methadone maintenance treatment in relation to the use of heroin during treatment: RR 0.69(95% CI 0.53-0.91; no statistically significant additional benefit was shown in terms of treatment retention and results at follow-up.

    Conclusions: Psychosocial treatments offered in addition to pharmacological detoxification treatments are effective in terms of completion of treatment and compliance, while adding any psychosocial support to methadone maintenance significantly improves the non-use of heroin during treatment but does not improve the other outcomes considered.

  18. Musculoskeletal, visual and psychosocial stress in VDU operators before and after multidisciplinary ergonomic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarås, A; Horgen, G; Bjørset, H H; Ro, O; Thoresen, M

    1998-10-01

    The study has a parallel group design with two intervention groups (T and S) and one control group (C) of VDU operators. Three serial interventions were carried out in the T and S groups, first a new lighting system, then new workplaces and last an optometric examination and corrections if needed. The new lighting gave significantly increased illuminance levels, increased luminances of the room surfaces and better luminance distribution. The two intervention groups reported significant improvement of the lighting conditions, as well as of the visual conditions and significantly reduced visual discomfort and glare. Significant reduction of headache was found in one of the intervention groups. Optometric corrections reduced the visual discomfort in both the intervention groups. When looking at those given new corrections, a significant reduction was found in the T group and a clear tendency was also found in the S group. The C group reported no improvements for any of these health outcomes. The workplace intervention gave the operator the possibility to support the whole forearm and hand on the table top. Before the intervention there were no significant differences between the three groups regarding shoulder pain and static trapezius electromyographic (EMG) load. Two years after the intervention, a significant reduction of shoulder pain was reported in the T and S groups in parallel with a significant reduction in static trapezius load, while no such reduction was found in the C group. At the same time, both static trapezius load and shoulder pain were significantly lower in the T and S groups compared with the C group. Pain in the forearm and hand showed no significant changes in any of the groups during the study period. However, there seem to be a relationship between pain in the forearm and hand and the time the operator used the mouse. The C group reported significantly higher intensity of pain and used the mouse significantly more than the S group.

  19. The effectiveness, acceptability and cost-effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for maltreated children and adolescents: an evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Geraldine; Livingstone, Nuala; Hanratty, Jennifer; McCartan, Claire; Cotmore, Richard; Cary, Maria; Glaser, Danya; Byford, Sarah; Welton, Nicky J; Bosqui, Tania; Bowes, Lucy; Audrey, Suzanne; Mezey, Gill; Fisher, Helen L; Riches, Wendy; Churchill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Child maltreatment is a substantial social problem that affects large numbers of children and young people in the UK, resulting in a range of significant short- and long-term psychosocial problems. OBJECTIVES To synthesise evidence of the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of interventions addressing the adverse consequences of child maltreatment. STUDY DESIGN For effectiveness, we included any controlled study. Other study designs were considered for economic decision modelling. For acceptability, we included any study that asked participants for their views. PARTICIPANTS Children and young people up to 24 years 11 months, who had experienced maltreatment before the age of 17 years 11 months. INTERVENTIONS Any psychosocial intervention provided in any setting aiming to address the consequences of maltreatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Psychological distress [particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety, and self-harm], behaviour, social functioning, quality of life and acceptability. METHODS Young Persons and Professional Advisory Groups guided the project, which was conducted in accordance with Cochrane Collaboration and NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidance. Departures from the published protocol were recorded and explained. Meta-analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses of available data were undertaken where possible. RESULTS We identified 198 effectiveness studies (including 62 randomised trials); six economic evaluations (five using trial data and one decision-analytic model); and 73 studies investigating treatment acceptability. Pooled data on cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for sexual abuse suggested post-treatment reductions in PTSD [standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.44 (95% CI -4.43 to -1.53)], depression [mean difference -2.83 (95% CI -4.53 to -1.13)] and anxiety [SMD -0.23 (95% CI -0.03 to -0.42)]. No differences were observed for post-treatment sexualised behaviour

  20. Adapting a Psychosocial Intervention for Smartphone Delivery to Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Serious Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Karen L; Lohman, Matthew C; Gill, Lydia E; Bruce, Martha L; Bartels, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    To describe the process of adapting an integrated medical and psychiatric self-management intervention to a smartphone application for middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness using an adaptive systems engineering framework and user-centered design. First, we determined the technical abilities and needs of middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illnesses using smartphones. Then, we developed smartphone content through principles of user-centered design and modified an existing smartphone platform. Finally, we conducted a usability test using "think aloud" and verbal probing. We adapted a psychosocial self-management intervention to a smartphone application and tested its usability. Ten participants (mean age: 55.3 years, SD: 6.2 years) with serious mental illness and comorbid chronic health conditions reported a high level of usability and satisfaction with the smartphone application. Middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness and limited technical abilities were able to participate in a process involving user-centered design and adaptation of a self-management intervention to be delivered by a smartphone. High usability ratings suggest that middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness have the potential to use tailored smartphone interventions. Future research is indicated to establish effectiveness and to determine the type and intensity of clinical support needed to successfully implement smartphone applications as a component of community-based services for older adults with psychiatric and medical conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effectiveness of Psychosocial Intervention for Individuals With Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Alyson; Persson, Martin; Stock, Nicola; Rumsey, Nichola; Sandy, Jonathan; Waylen, Andrea; Edwards, Zoe; Hammond, Vanessa; Partridge, Lucy; Ness, Andy

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of different psychological interventions for children and adults with cleft lip and/or palate and their parents. We searched six databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE to June 2013 and checked bibliographies. We included research that evaluated any psychological intervention in studies in which at least 90% of the participants had cleft lip and/or palate or were parents of those with cleft lip and/or palate. Studies containing less than 90% were excluded unless they reported results separately for those with cleft lip and/or palate, or raw data were available upon request from the authors. Inclusion assessment, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were carried out independently by two reviewers. Seven studies were identified as inclusions, with only two studies being included in the full data analysis (one of which failed to meet the full inclusion criteria). The five remaining studies were included only in a narrative synthesis because data were available for people or parents of those with cleft lip and/or palate only. This highlights a distinct dearth of research into psychological intervention within the field of cleft lip and/or palate. The review found no evidence to support any specific intervention. Key uncertainties need to be identified and addressed. Adequately powered, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials are needed to provide a secure evidence base for psychological intervention techniques in participants with cleft lip and/or palate and their parents.

  2. Role of personality traits in cocaine craving throughout an outpatient psychosocial treatment program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ismael

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cocaine dependence is a major international public health concern. Its chronically relapsing nature is possibly related to craving intensity, which can be influenced by diverse biological and psychological aspects. This study aimed to evaluate the role of different personality traits in craving measured throughout a psychosocial treatment program. Method: The sample comprised 66 cocaine-dependent outpatients who were enrolled in an individual and manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy program. The influence of personality traits on craving intensity, frequency, and duration was analyzed using a generalized estimating equations model with an autoregressive correlation structure. Results: Craving varied during treatment. The personality traits of novelty seeking, reward dependence, and harm avoidance interacted with craving intensity, and the personality trait of persistence interacted with craving duration throughout the treatment period. Furthermore, there were significant interactions between drug use and craving intensity, and between different routes of administration and craving intensity. Participants who used cocaine/crack while in treatment and concurrent users of crack (i.e., freebase cocaine and powder cocaine also had a higher craving intensity. Conclusion: The extent of craving variation can depend on certain personality styles. This study shows that craving is influenced by personality traits, and this may presumably change clinical expression involved in disease.

  3. Psychosocial interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosè, Michela; Ballette, Francesca; Bighelli, Irene; Turrini, Giulia; Purgato, Marianna; Tol, Wietse; Priebe, Stefan; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries presents specific challenges. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of randomised trials, CINAHL, EMBASE, PILOTS, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science up to July 2016. Studies included randomised and controlled clinical trials comparing psychosocial interventions with waiting list or treatment as usual in adult refugees and asylum seekers with PTSD resettled in high-income countries. PTSD symptoms post-intervention was the primary outcome. We computed standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). This study is registered with PROSPERO: CRD42015027843. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. Psychosocial interventions were effective in decreasing PTSD symptoms relative to control groups (SMD -1·03, 95% CI -1·55 to -0·51; number needed to treat 4·4; I2 86%; 95% CI 77 to 91). Narrative exposure therapy, a manualized short-term variant of cognitive behavioural therapy with a trauma focus, was the best-supported intervention (5 RCTs, 187 participants, SMD -0·78, 95% CI -1·18 to -0·38, I2 37%; 95% CI 0 to 77). Methodological quality of the included studies was limited. Overall, psychosocial interventions for asylum seekers and refugees with PTSD resettled in high-income countries were found to provide significant benefits in reducing PTSD symptoms. Yet, the number of studies is small and their methodological quality limited, so that more rigorous trials should be conducted in the future.

  4. Psychosocial interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosè, Michela; Ballette, Francesca; Bighelli, Irene; Turrini, Giulia; Purgato, Marianna; Tol, Wietse; Priebe, Stefan; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries presents specific challenges. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of randomised trials, CINAHL, EMBASE, PILOTS, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science up to July 2016. Studies included randomised and controlled clinical trials comparing psychosocial interventions with waiting list or treatment as usual in adult refugees and asylum seekers with PTSD resettled in high-income countries. PTSD symptoms post-intervention was the primary outcome. We computed standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). This study is registered with PROSPERO: CRD42015027843. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. Psychosocial interventions were effective in decreasing PTSD symptoms relative to control groups (SMD -1·03, 95% CI -1·55 to -0·51; number needed to treat 4·4; I2 86%; 95% CI 77 to 91). Narrative exposure therapy, a manualized short-term variant of cognitive behavioural therapy with a trauma focus, was the best-supported intervention (5 RCTs, 187 participants, SMD -0·78, 95% CI -1·18 to -0·38, I2 37%; 95% CI 0 to 77). Methodological quality of the included studies was limited. Overall, psychosocial interventions for asylum seekers and refugees with PTSD resettled in high-income countries were found to provide significant benefits in reducing PTSD symptoms. Yet, the number of studies is small and their methodological quality limited, so that more rigorous trials should be conducted in the future. PMID:28151992

  5. The Association between Cumulative Psychosocial Risk and Cervical HPV Infection Among Female Adolescents in a Free Vaccination Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Lourdes Oriana; Shankar, Viswanathan; Diaz, Angela; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Strickler, Howard D.; Peake, Ken; Weiss, Jocelyn; Burk, Robert D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the association of cervical Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection with cumulative psychosocial risk reflecting family disadvantage, psychological distress, and unhealthy life style. Methods The sample (N=745) was comprised of sexually-active female adolescent patients (12-19 years), primarily ethnic minorities, enrolled in a free HPV vaccination program. Subjects completed questionnaires and provided cervical swabs for HPV DNA testing. Unweighted and weighted Principal Component Analyses (PCA) for categorical data were used to derive multi-systemic psychosocial risk indices using nine indicators: low socioeconomic status, lack of adult involvement, not attending high-school/college, history of treatment for depression/anxiety, antisocial/delinquent behavior, number of recent sexual partners, use of alcohol, use of drugs, and dependency risk for alcohol/drugs. The association between cervical HPV (any-type, high risk-types, vaccine-types) assayed by polymerase chain reaction and self-reported number of psychosocial risk indicators was estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results Subjects had a median of three psychosocial risk indicators. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed associations with unweighted and weighted number of psychosocial indicators for HPV any-type (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.2 ); with the strongest associations between weighted drug/alcohol use, drug/alcohol dependency risk, and antisocial/delinquent behavior and detection of HPV vaccine-types (aOR=1.5; 95%CI: 1.1-2.0) independent of number of recent sexual partners and vaccine dose (0-3). Conclusion Increased HPV infections including HPV vaccine-types were associated with greater number of psychosocial risk indicators even after controlling for demographics, sexual behavior, history of chlamydia, and vaccine dose. PMID:25985216

  6. Effects of a pain programme on nurses' psychosocial, physical and relaxation interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Luiken, J.B.; Garssen, B.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of a continuing education programme on pain assessment and management was investigated in 106 surgical cancer nurses. It was found that the programme led to a more positive attitude towards physical and relaxation interventions (such as the use of relaxation, distraction and

  7. Psychosocial group intervention for patients with primary breast cancer: A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, E. H.; Karlsen, R.; Christensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effectiveness of a psycho-educational group intervention to improve psychological distress measured by POMS TMD, Quality of Life measured by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the core and breast cancer module, Mental Adjustment measured by MA...

  8. Evaluating Psychosocial and Behavioral Mechanisms of Change in a Tailored Communication Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, John P.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Slymen, Donald J.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Campbell, Nadia R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a tailored nutrition intervention at 3 and 6 months postintervention. In all, 357 Latinas were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) a control condition comprised of previously developed Spanish language targeted materials, (2) tailored print materials, or (3) tailored print materials accompanied by…

  9. Effects of a pain programme on nurses' psychosocial, physical and relaxation interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Luiken, J.B.; Garssen, B.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of a continuing education programme on pain assessment and management was investigated in 106 surgical cancer nurses. It was found that the programme led to a more positive attitude towards physical and relaxation interventions (such as the use of relaxation, distraction and massag

  10. Small-Group Standardized Patient Encounter Improves Athletic Training Students' Psychosocial Intervention and Referral Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Thrasher, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers provide psychological support, counseling, intervention, and referral to patients during clinical practice. However, students are rarely exposed to real-life opportunities to develop these skills. Objective: To determine if a small-group standardized patient (SP) encounter improved athletic training students'…

  11. Research and Psychosocial Intervention With Families of Children and Adolescents With Eating Disorders and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alexina Ribeiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders and obesity in children and adolescents have been calling researchers and public health institutions’ attention due to severity and increasing incidence in the last decades. Studies on etiological factors of diseases related to alimentation are important to justify more efficient treatment methodologies. The family participation has been suggested by authors of systems theory, motivating us to study this issue from the point of view of individual, family and socio-cultural. This paper aims to present research data to construct a psychosocial attendance methodology to children and adolescents with eating disorders and obesity and their families. The method used is qualitative and includes a family life cycle interview, Multifamily Group, children and adolescents groups and the use of Rorschach test in adolescents. Partial data show that parents’ life history has influence on eating pattern of family; the genitors don’t comprehend the obesity as a multi-factorial syndrome and don’t recognize that their children are obese and have difficulty setting boundaries in general and regarding to food; conjugal and parental conflicts and grandparents interference have negative influence on children dietary and on treatment of obesity and eating disorders; the use of Rorschach test has identified: low self-esteem, anguish and distorted self and body perceptions, self-concept and self-image distortions in adolescents with eating disorders and depressive thoughts, dependency, fear of abandonment and distortion between ideal and real images in obese adolescents. These data are in accordance with bibliographic review regarding to family influence on each member’s health development and on family eating pattern. Parents and adults have a central role as in orientation and education as presenting appropriate models in terms of alimentation.

  12. Effects of life review interventions on psychosocial outcomes among older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiuyan; Xiao, Huimin; Chen, Ying

    2017-01-26

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of life review interventions on psychosocial outcomes among older adults. We searched PubMed, Ovid, CINHAL, Cochrane library, PsycINFO, Springer Link, Oxford Journals Collection, FRMS, CBM, VIP, CNKI, and Wanfang to identify randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials that evaluate the effects of life review among older adults. The quality of studies included was evaluated and the relevant information was extracted. Then, a meta-analysis was carried out with RevMan software. We identified 15 studies that met the inclusion criteria, and 11 studies were allowed for meta-analysis. The combined results of the meta-analysis showed that life review significantly reduced depression (standardized mean difference 0.57, 95% CI 0.73 to -0.42) and hopelessness (mean difference [MD] 4.01, 95% CI 6.13 to -1.89). There was a significant improvement in well-being (standardized mean difference 0.54, 95% CI 0.01-1.06) and specific memory (MD 1.05, 95% CI 0.07-2.03). However, other study findings did not support its effect in life satisfaction (MD 2.15, 95% CI 0.69- 5.00), self-esteem (MD 0.21, 95% CI 2.09-2.50), the quality of life (standardized mean difference 0.15, 95% CI 0.96-0.66), extended memory (MD 0.03, 95% CI 0.61-0.55), categorical memory (MD 0.48, 95% CI 1.08- 0.12) and no recall (MD 0.30, 95% CI 1.12- 0.52). Life review is a worthwhile intervention for reducing depression and hopelessness, and improving quality of life, well-being and specific memory in older adults. More well-designed trials with a large sample and long-term follow up are necessary to confirm the effects of life review on other psychosocial outcomes. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Psychosocial risk factors, interventions and comorbidity in patients with non-specific low back pain in primary care: need for comprehensive and patient-centered care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline eRamond-Roquin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific low back pain (LBP affects many people and has major socio-economic consequences. Traditional therapeutic strategies, mainly focused on biomechanical factors, have had moderate and short-term impact. Certain psychosocial factors have been linked to poor prognosis of LBP and they are increasingly considered as promising targets for management of LBP. Primary health care providers (HCPs are involved in most of the management of people with LBP and they are skilled in providing comprehensive care, including consideration of psychosocial dimensions. This review aims to discuss three pieces of recent research focusing on psychosocial issues in LBP patients in primary care. In the first systematic review, the patients’ or HCPs’ overall judgment about the likely evolution of LBP was the factor most strongly linked to poor outcome, with predictive validity similar to that of multidimensional scales. This result may be explained by the implicit aggregation of many prognostic factors underlying this judgment and suggests the relevance of considering the patients from biopsychosocial and longitudinal points of view. The second review showed that most of the interventions targeting psychosocial factors in LBP in primary care have to date focused on the cognitive-behavioral factors, resulting in little impact. It is unlikely that any intervention focusing on a single factor would ever fit the needs of most patients; interventions targeting determinants from several fields (mainly psychosocial, biomechanical and occupational may be more relevant. Should multiple stakeholders be involved in such interventions, enhanced interprofessional collaboration would be critical to ensure the delivery of coordinated care. Finally, in the third study, the prevalence of psychosocial comorbidity in chronic LBP patients was not found to be significantly higher than in other patients consulting in primary care. Rather than specifically screening for

  14. Psychosocial interventions as adjunct therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Rukmal Kumari; Bertouch, James V

    2010-10-01

    To identify the psychological interventions for which there is consistent, high quality evidence of efficacy in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A computer-aided search and manual screening of identified papers was conducted. Randomised controlled trials published in English in peer-reviewed journals, assessing the use of psychological interventions in adult patients with RA were included. Thirty-four papers published between 1981 and 2009 encompassing 31 studies with 2021 patients were included. There is consistent supportive evidence for the efficacy of disclosure therapy (four studies) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with maintenance therapy (five studies). There is supportive evidence for improvement with CBT of greater than 6 weeks duration (six studies) in the short-term but conflicting evidence for its long-term efficacy. There is some evidence for improvement with biofeedback-based interventions (two studies). There is conflicting evidence for the benefits of counselling (three studies), psychotherapy (two studies) mindfulness and meditation (two studies), and CBT of less than 6 weeks duration (six studies). There is limited evidence regarding relaxation therapy (two studies). Methodological limitations of the reviewed literature included failure of allocation concealment, blinding and conduction of intention-to-treat analysis, as well as the heterogeneity and choice of outcome measures. This review shows consistent supportive evidence for the use of disclosure therapy, and CBT with maintenance therapy as adjunct therapies in patients with RA. It also highlights methodological limitations in the current literature and the need for future research in this area.

  15. Dancing as a psychosocial intervention in care homes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-García, A; Hughes, J C; James, I A; Rochester, L

    2013-09-01

    There is a need to find meaningful and engaging interventions to improve mood and behaviour for residents of care homes. The demand on care staff might diminish opportunities for them to encourage these activities. Staff anecdotal information attests that dancing as an activity improves mood in residents and staff. Hence, the importance of investigating what dancing brings to the care home social environment. To provide a systematic review of the evidence from studies related to dancing interventions for older people with dementia living in care homes. Electronic databases were searched. Previous reviews were also included, and recognised experts were consulted up to January 2012. Inclusion criteria considered study methodology and evidence that the impact of the dance intervention had been measured. Ten studies were identified that satisfied the inclusion criteria: seven qualitative and three quantitative. Studies used different approaches such as therapeutic dance, dance movement therapy, dance therapy, social dancing and psychomotor dance-based exercise. There was evidence that problematic behaviours decreased; social interaction and enjoyment in both residents and care staff improved. A few adverse effects were also acknowledged. The evidence on the efficacy of dancing in care homes is limited in part owing to the methodological challenges facing such research. This review aims to raise awareness of the possibility of implementing dance work as an engaging activity in care homes. We shall also consider options for future dance work research as a means to encourage relationships and sensory stimulation for both residents and staff. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effects of Psychosocial Interventions for School-aged Children's Internet Addiction, Self-control and Self-esteem: Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to perform an effect size analysis of psychosocial interventions for internet addiction and to identify the intervention moderators applied to school-aged children. Methods For the meta-analysis, studies were included that were published in English or Korean until January 2015, without limitation in terms of the year. They were retrieved from 11 electronic databases and by manual searches according to predefined inclusion criteria. Results A total of 37 studies were selected, which included 11 treatment conditions and covered a total of 1,490 participants. The effect size estimates showed that psychosocial interventions had a large effect for reducing internet addiction (standardized mean difference [SMD], –1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], –1.52 to –0.87) and improving self-control (SMD, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.47) and self-esteem (mean difference, 3.58; 95% CI, 2.03 to 5.12). The moderator analyses reveals that group treatments, a selective approach, a long duration, a community setting, or higher school grade had a larger effect. Conclusions The findings of this review suggest that psychosocial intervention may be used to prevent Internet addiction in school-aged children, although further research should be conducted using a randomized controlled trial design or diverse age groups to provide evidence-based recommendations. PMID:27525163

  17. Re-education of Perpetrators of gender Violence: An Intervention Program with Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Expósito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gender violence is one of the major issues that society faces. During the last few years, important legislative and interventional changes have been carried out, in order to adapt to with the specific nature of this type of crime. Because of the increase in the number of men that have been convicted of gender violence, and taking into account their general characteristics (in most of the cases it is their first crime, penal law offers an opportunity for intervention. One of the most novel measures imposed by the judges for these types of crimes is that, instead of giving jail sentences, they sentence the offenders to attend psychological treatment programs that deal with gender violence. This paper describes the experience with the application of a psycho-social intervention program with a gender perspective. We analyze the sample’s sociodemographic profile, and, in order to evaluate the program, we also use scales that measure gender ideology, beliefs about intimate relationships, and attitudes towards gender violence. Results showed that it is important to support and promote the intervention with this type of offender as a way to prevent new episodes of gender violence.

  18. [Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Patrícia Santos de Souza; Sato, Miki Takao; Antoneli, Patrícia de Paulo; Guimarães, Paulo Octávio da Silva

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The strategies used in this partnership were meetings with both teams with training, case discussion about the families assisted, support to workers' difficulties and elaboration of therapeutical projects, and joint domiciliary visits. Some difficulties had been found during the research: great demand for health services and lack of institutional guidelines to guarantee the effectiveness of the partnership. The look directed to the family and the social context presents positive results compared to the look directed only to the illness. The partnership enriches the practice and a larger network of care in the territory becomes possible. It is necessary to bring up new proposals and innovative enterprises.

  19. Micronutrient status and intervention programs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Geok Lin

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 70% of the world's malnourished children live in Asia, giving that region the highest concentration of childhood malnutrition worldwide. Prevalence of stunting and underweight are high especially in south Asia where one in every two preschool children is stunted. Iron-deficiency anemia affects 40%-50% of preschool and primary schoolchildren. Nearly half of all vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in the world occurs in south and southeast Asia. Iodine deficiency disorders have resulted in high goiter rates in India, Pakistan, and parts of Indonesia. Compared with other developing countries in Asia, the nutrition situation in Malaysia is considerably better, owing to rapid economic and socioeconomic development that has occurred since Malaysia gained its independence in 1957. Prevalence of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency is markedly lower in Malaysian children. Nonetheless, undernutrition in the form of underweight, stunting, and anemia can be found in poor communities throughout the country. A prevalence of 25% underweight and 35% stunting is reported among young children from poor rural households. Anemia and subclinical forms of vitamin A deficiency were reported in children under 5 years old. Typical of a country in nutrition transition, Malaysia faces the dual burden of malnutrition in children, with the persistence of under-nutrition problems especially among the poor and the emerging overweight problem especially in urban areas. Since 1996, nutrition programs of the government sector are coordinated under the National Plan of Action for Nutrition. These activities and other nutrition intervention efforts by other agencies are discussed in this paper.

  20. ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: pilot testing of a book club as a psychosocial intervention and recruitment and retention strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Peter J; Rajcan, Julia L; Sami, Susie A; Patterson, Marian B; Smyth, Kathleen A; Edland, Steven D; George, Daniel R

    2006-01-01

    Both psychosocial and biologic interventions may delay or prevent Alzheimer disease. Staying mentally active may help older people maintain their cognitive abilities. In the Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument Project a book club was introduced as a recruitment and retention device. A 3-arm study was designed and included: a nonrandomized, self-selected group (n=211) who chose not to participate in the book club, and 2 groups randomly assigned to receive 2 books per year in individual self-improvement (n=210) or community involvement (n=207) categories. Participants reported their reactions to the selections and other reading behaviors. Results from the first 2 years revealed that most book club participants agreed with Likert-type statements indicating the readings were enjoyable (Popen-ended questions in the reader survey revealed such themes as developing plans for successful aging and reflecting on attitudes and behaviors in their own lives. Further longitudinal analyses are planned to determine whether the book club influenced retention and whether participation was associated with slowing cognitive decline.

  1. Positive youth development program targeting students with greater psychosocial needs: Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Sun, Rachel C F; Tsui, Pik Fong

    2011-01-01

    The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. targets adolescents with greater psychosocial needs. Based on subjective outcome evaluation data collected from 2173 participants recruited in 52 schools, 257 conclusions were reported by the program implementers in the evaluation reports. These conclusions were further analyzed via secondary data analyses. Although most of the conclusions concerning perceptions of the Tier 2 Program, instructors, and program effectiveness were positive in nature, there were also conclusions on the difficulties encountered and suggestions for improvements. Consistent with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received by different stakeholders and the program was beneficial to the development of the program participants in the first year of the Experimental Implementation Phase.

  2. Group psychosocial interventions for adults with schizophrenia and bipolar illness: the evidence base in the light of publications between 1986 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segredou, I; Xenitidis, K; Panagiotopoulou, M; Bochtsou, V; Antoniadou, O; Livaditis, M

    2012-05-01

    The treatment of major mental disorders usually combines medical and psychosocial interventions. The present study reviews research pertaining to the efficacy of group psychosocial interventions for people with psychotic illness. An electronic search was conducted through Medline and PsychINFO to identify articles relevant to group therapy for people with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Articles published in the English language, between January 1986 and May 2006, were considered. Studies were included if they had a control group and at least 20 participants. The search resulted in 23 articles concerning patients with schizophrenia and five concerning patients with bipolar affective disorder. The therapeutic approach in the majority of the studies was along the lines of cognitive behaviour therapy and psychoeducation. All studies reported improvement in at least one parameter. Most of them report improvement in skills and overall functioning.

  3. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental and…

  4. Voyager Reading Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Voyager Passport"[TM] is a supplemental reading intervention system for students in grades K-5. "Voyager Passport Reading Journeys"[TM] is a reading intervention program designed for adolescents who struggle with reading. The "Voyager Universal Literacy System"[R] is a K-3 reading program that includes a core reading…

  5. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety......, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being were assessed before randomization and at 3 and 9 months after randomization using t tests. Bonferroni and Pipper corrections were applied for multiple testing adjustments. RESULTS: At 9 months, the GSD-GYN-C plus UC group scored significantly higher on the QOL...

  6. The development of a fear of falling interdisciplinary intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gomez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fernando Gomez, Carmen-Lucia CurcioResearch Group on Gerontology and Geriatrics, Health Sciences Faculty, University of Caldas, Manizales, ColombiaObjective: To describe the development process of a protocol for a fear of falling interdisciplinary intervention program based on the main factors associated with fear of falling.Design/methods: The process of developing a protocol consisted of defining the target population, selecting the initial assessment components, adapting the intervention program based on findings about fear of falling and restriction of activities in this population.Settings: University-affiliated outpatient vertigo, dizziness and falls clinic in coffee-growers zone of Colombian Andes Mountains.Results: An intervention program was developed based on three main falling conceptual models. A medical intervention, based on a biomedical and pathophysiological model, a physiotherapeutic intervention based on a postural control model and a psychological intervention based on a biological-behavioral model.Conclusion: This interdisciplinary fear of falling intervention program developed is based on particular characteristics of target population, with differences in the inclusion criteria and the program intervention components; with emphasis on medical (recurrent falls and dizziness evaluation and management, psychological (cognitive-behavioral therapy and physiotherapeutic (balance and transfers training components.Keywords: fear of falling, elderly programs, Colombian, intervention

  7. Psychosocial intervention improves depression, quality of life, and fluid adherence in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Ver Halen, Nisha; Asher, Deborah Rosenthal; Coplan, Jeremy D; Weedon, Jeremy; Wyka, Katarzyna E; Saggi, Subodh J; Kimmel, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ESRD have high rates of depression, which is associated with diminished quality of life and survival. We determined whether individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces depression in hemodialysis patients with elevated depressive affect in a randomized crossover trial. Of 65 participants enrolled from two dialysis centers in New York, 59 completed the study and were assigned to the treatment-first group (n=33) or the wait-list control group (n=26). In the intervention phase, CBT was administered chairside during dialysis treatments for 3 months; participants were assessed 3 and 6 months after randomization. Compared with the wait-list group, the treatment-first group achieved significantly larger reductions in Beck Depression Inventory II (self-reported, P=0.03) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (clinician-reported, Pimprovements in quality of life, assessed with the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (P=0.04), and interdialytic weight gain (P=0.002) than the wait-list group, although no effect on compliance was evident at follow-up. In summary, CBT led to significant improvements in depression, quality of life, and prescription compliance in this trial, and studies should be undertaken to assess the long-term effects of CBT on morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD.

  8. Effectiveness of a School-Based Fitness Program on Youths' Physical and Psychosocial Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Maureen R; Phillips, Alison C; Kipp, Lindsay E

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an existing physical fitness program (CHAMPIONS) implemented during physical education on health-related indices (BMI percentile, waist circumference, cardiorespiratory endurance), self-perceptions, academic performance, and behavioral conduct over a school year. Students in 3 intervention (n = 331) and 3 control (n = 745) middle schools participated in the study that included assessments at pre, mid, and postintervention. Multivariate repeated measures analyses indicated that boys and girls in CHAMPIONS compared favorably (p physical health indices among middle school youth.

  9. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Predictive Validity of a Psychosocial Screening Program for Children and Youth Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David D.; Cline, Virginia Depp; Axelrad, Marni E.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Psychosocial screening has been recommended for pediatric patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and their families. Our objective was to assess a psychosocial screening protocol in its feasibility, acceptability to families, and ability to predict early emerging complications, nonadherent family behavior, and use of preventive psychology services. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 125 patients and their caregivers were asked to participate in a standardized screening interview after admission at a large urban children’s hospital with a new diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Medical records were reviewed for subsequent diabetes-related emergency department (ED) admissions, missed diabetes clinic appointments, and psychology follow-up within 9 months of diagnosis. RESULTS Of 125 families, 121 (96.8%) agreed to participate in the screening, and a subsample of 30 surveyed caregivers indicated high levels of satisfaction. Risk factors at diagnosis predicted subsequent ED admissions with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98.6%. Children from single-parent households with a history of behavior problems were nearly six times more likely to be seen in the ED after diagnosis. Missed appointments were likeliest among African Americans, 65% of whom missed at least one diabetes-related appointment. Psychology services for preventive intervention were underutilized, despite the high acceptability of the psychosocial screening. CONCLUSIONS Psychosocial screening of newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes is feasible, acceptable to families, and able to identify families at risk for early emerging complications and nonadherence. Challenges remain with regards to reimbursement and fostering follow-up for preventive care. PMID:21216856

  10. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: psychosocial and personal risk factors (part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, P M; Ijmker, S; van den Heuvel, S; Blatter, B M

    2006-09-01

    upper limb problems are discussed. Few randomised or non randomised controlled trials have been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of individual or organisational interventions to improve work related psychosocial factors. Very few have reported on the preventive effect for work related neck and upper limb symptoms. Therefore, there is a great need for additional high quality trials before any conclusions on effectiveness of bio-behavioural interventions for reduction of neck and upper limb problems and return to work after these symptoms can be made. From the low back pain intervention research can be learned that interventions should best be targeted to both the worker and the organisation and that interventions will only be successful when all stakeholders are involved.

  11. Sociodrama: A Program for Intervention in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gabriella; Tetel-Hanks, Joan

    1981-01-01

    Sociodrama is used at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (North Carolina) as a successful intervention method in dealing with emotionally handicapped learning disabled or mentally handicapped students. (SB)

  12. Key components of early intervention programs for preterm infants and their parents: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzies Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm infants are at greater risk for neurodevelopmental disabilities than full term infants. Interventions supporting parents to improve the quality of the infant’s environment should improve developmental outcomes for preterm infants. Many interventions that involve parents do not measure parental change, nor is it clear which intervention components are associated with improved parental outcomes. The aim of this review was to categorize the key components of early intervention programs and determine the direct effects of components on parents, as well as their preterm infants. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched between 1990 and December 2011. Eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs included an early intervention for preterm infants, involved parents, and had a community component. Of 2465 titles and abstracts identified, 254 full text articles were screened, and 18 met inclusion criteria. Eleven of these studies reported maternal outcomes of stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and sensitivity/responsiveness in interactions with the infant. Meta-analyses using a random effects model were conducted with these 11 studies. Results Interventions employed multiple components categorized as (a psychosocial support, (b parent education, and/or (c therapeutic developmental interventions targeting the infant. All interventions used some form of parenting education. The reporting quality of most trials was adequate, and the risk of bias was low based on the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Meta-analyses demonstrated limited effects of interventions on maternal stress (Z = 0.40, p = 0.69 and sensitivity/responsiveness (Z = 1.84, p = 0.07. There were positive pooled effects of interventions on maternal anxiety (Z = 2.54, p = 0.01, depressive symptoms (Z = 4.04, p Z = 2.05, p = 0.04. Conclusions Positive and clinically meaningful effects of early

  13. Evaluation of a Community-Based Aging Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Chen; Wang, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome and process of a community-based aging intervention program for the elderly in Taiwan. The program included education on nutrition and dietary behavior and on physical activities. Outcome and process evaluations were conducted. The program may have had some effects on decreasing some dietary behavioral problems and…

  14. Design of the Quality of Life in Motion (QLIM study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a combined physical exercise and psychosocial training program to improve physical fitness in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takken Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood cancer and its treatment have considerable impact on a child's physical and mental wellbeing. Especially long-term administration of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy impairs physical fitness both during and after therapy, when children often present with muscle weakness and/or low cardiorespiratory fitness. Physical exercise can improve these two elements of physical fitness, but the positive effects of physical exercise might be further increased when a child's wellbeing is simultaneously enhanced by psychosocial training. Feeling better may increase the willingness and motivation to engage in sports activities. Therefore, this multi-centre study evaluates the short and long-term changes in physical fitness of a child with a childhood malignancy, using a combined physical exercise and psychosocial intervention program, implemented during or shortly after treatment. Also examined is whether positive effects on physical fitness reduce inactivity-related adverse health problems, improve quality of life, and are cost-effective. Methods This multi-centre randomized controlled trial compares a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, with care as usual (controls. Children with cancer (aged 8-18 years treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and who are no longer than 1 year post-treatment, are eligible for participation. A total of 100 children are being recruited from the paediatric oncology/haematology departments of three Dutch university medical centres. Patients are stratified according to pubertal stage (girls: age ≤10 or >10 years; boys: ≤11 or >11 years, type of malignancy (haematological or solid tumour, and moment of inclusion into the study (during or after treatment, and are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Discussion Childhood cancer patients undergoing long-term cancer therapy may benefit from a combined physical exercise and

  15. The macular degeneration and aging study: Design and research protocol of a randomized trial for a psychosocial intervention with macular degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Silvia; White, Katherine; Mak, Wingyun; Zanibbi, Katherine; Tang, Wan; O'Hearn, Amanda; Hegel, Mark T

    2015-05-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible and predictable blindness among older adults with serious physical and mental health consequences. Visual impairment is associated with negative future outlook and depression and has serious consequences for older adults' quality of life and, by way of depression, on long-term survival. Psychosocial interventions have the potential to alleviate and prevent depression symptoms among older AMD patients. We describe the protocol of the Macular Degeneration and Aging Study, a randomized clinical trial of a psychosocial Preventive Problem-Solving Intervention. The intervention is aimed at enhancing well-being and future planning among older adults with macular degeneration by increasing preparation for future care. Adequate randomization and therapeutic fidelity were achieved. Current retention rates were acceptable, given the vulnerability of the population. Acceptability (adherence and satisfaction) was high. Given the high public health significance and impact on quality of life among older adults with vision loss, this protocol contributes a valid test of a promising intervention for maintaining mental and physical health in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Community-based, acute posttraumatic stress management: a description and evaluation of a psychosocial-intervention continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Robert D; Behar, Lenore; Paulson, Robert; Delman, Jon; Schmid, Lisa; Smith, Stefanie F

    2004-01-01

    Much of today's psychological trauma can be identified as resulting from sudden and seemingly random events, and particularly from events that involve the loss of human life. This article presents a perspective on how behavioral health providers may approach the design, development, and implementation of community-based psychological trauma interventions. These interventions allow those community members most affected by the trauma to play a central role in the resolution of, and community adaptation to, traumatic losses. After a brief discussion of "critical incident stress debriefing"--a common form of psychological "first aid" that is sometimes used following traumatic events that affect a community--the article turns to the description of a community-based trauma-response program that provides a continuum-of-care model for the care and management of individual and group reactions to shared, traumatic events. A recent evaluation of that program, which was developed by the Community Services Program of the Trauma Center in Boston, is presented as an important first step toward determining the types of community-based responses that show promise in our efforts to ameliorate the impact of traumatic events in communities nationwide and internationally.

  17. Young People and Caregivers' Perceptions of an Intervention Program for Children Who Deliberately Light Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Ian; Seymour, Fred; Popaduk, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of children and adolescents engage in deliberate fire setting, beyond the scope of curiosity and experimentation. Interventions developed to respond to the needs of such fire setters generally involve educational and/or psychosocial approaches. Research evaluating the effectiveness of these interventions is dominated by…

  18. Effectiveness of a workplace-based intervention program to promote mental health among employees in privately owned enterprises in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Buys, Nicholas; Wang, Xinchao

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to examine the effectiveness of a workplace-based intervention program to improve mental health, work ability, and work productivity in privately owned enterprises in China. A prospective cohort intervention study design was employed in which the intervention program was implemented for 30 months (from July 2009 to December 2012). Nine privately owned retail enterprises in China participated in the intervention study. Researchers administered a self-report survey to 2768 employees. The research team measured participants' job stress, resilience, work ability, absenteeism, depression, and work performance. A comprehensive Health Promotion Enterprise Program was implemented that entailed the following components: policies to support a healthy work environment, psychosocial interventions to promote mental health, provision of health services to people with mental illness, and professional skills training to deal with stress and build resilience. Analysis of variance was used to examine preintervention versus postintervention differences in stress, resilience, and work ability. Logistic regression was used to examine absenteeism related to depression. The results suggest that the intervention program was effective at improving participants' ability to work, their sense of control over their jobs, and, in particular, their ability to meet the mental demands of work. The intervention program also reduced participants' job stress levels and reduced the probability of absenteeism related to depression. The intervention programs incorporating both individual-level and organizational-level factors to promote mental health were effective and have implications for both practice and policy regarding enterprises taking more responsibility for the provision of mental health services to their employees.

  19. The Effect of Psychosocial Support Intervention on Depression in Patients with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers: An Assessor-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froydis Kristine Bruvik

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: A three-component tailored psychosocial 12-month assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial to reduce depression in people with dementia (PWD and carers was conducted. Methods: A total of 230 home-dwelling dyads of PWD and their carers were randomized to usual care or intervention consisting of three components over 12 months. Primary outcomes were the difference between the baseline and 12-month score on the Cornell Scale of Depression in Dementia (CSDD in the PWD and on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS in the carers. Results: The intent-to-treat difference between the baseline and 12- month change score was not significant between the intervention and control groups for the CSDD (p = 0.95 or GDS (p = 0.82. Conclusions: The trial did not show a significant difference between usual care and the intervention on depressive symptoms in PWD or their family caregivers.

  20. Psychosocial correlates of suicidal ideation in rural South African adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilubane, Hilda N; Ruiter, Robert A C; Bos, Arjan E R; van den Borne, Bart; James, Shamagonam; Reddy, Priscilla S

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a prevalent problem among young people in Southern Africa, but prevention programs are largely absent. This survey aimed to identify the behavioral and psychosocial correlates of suicidal ideation among adolescents in Limpopo. A two-stage cluster sample design was used to establish a representative sample of 591 adolescents. Bivariate correlations and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Findings show that suicidal ideation is prevalent among adolescents. The psychosocial factors perceived social support and negative feelings about the family and the behavioral factors forced sexual intercourse and physical violence by the partner were found to increase the risk of suicidal ideation. Depression mediated the relationship between these psychosocial and behavioral risk factors and suicidal ideation. This study increased our understanding of the psychosocial and behavioral predictors of adolescent suicidal ideation. The findings provide target points for future intervention programs and call for supportive structures to assist adolescents with suicidal ideation.

  1. Effects on the family context of a complex psychosocial intervention in children with TDAH - Efectos sobre el contexto familiar de una intervención psicosocial compleja en niños con TDAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Miranda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder has a complex negative impact on the family system that has not been thoroughly examined. This study analyzes the effects of psychosocial treatment on a wide range of aspects of family dynamics, such as to what degree the families overcome the difficulties they experience in the social and economic areas, improvements in the feelings and attitudes of the parents, or the tension between siblings or the within the couple. The purpose is also to analyze whether the presence of associated behavioral problems modulates the effects of the intervention.The participants in the study were 42 families divided into two groups, with and without treatment. The intervention included 3 programs differentiated according to the context in which they were implemented: directly with the children, with the parents and with the teachers. Each program included techniques of behavior modification, self-regulation, academic accommodations and social skills. The results show the beneficial effect of the multi-component intervention performed on all the family aspects analyzed, especially for the group of children without associated behavior problems.

  2. Methods of intervention in reducing the psychosocial impact while dealing with cancer as a disease: A clinician′s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: We searched for the clinically relevant suggestions, recommendations and findings amongst the papers on psycho oncology. The term clinically relevant for us meant ′practical and implemental modes of intervention that contribute but would not affect or interfere with the normal functioning of the present system and treatment modality of the patients.′ Our intention was to use the available information for the benefit of our patients. We also searched for the data that would prove the significance of these methods. In most parts of the world it is not possible to involve a psychologist at every level of cancer care. Based on the findings, we intend to carry out our own project for the psychosocial intervention in cancer patients and make suggestions that could be adopted even by those who have little or no experience in psychology. Conclusion: The field of psycho oncology is a relatively new and evolving subspecialty of oncology and psychology at the same time. Current data and papers, which would make simple and implemental modes of intervention at psychosocial level, are limited. There is a dire necessity of solid data and list of suggestion to the specialists, non-specialists and those who take care of the cancer patients, to enhance the care they provide to the cancer patients.

  3. Methods of intervention in reducing the psychosocial impact while dealing with cancer as a disease: A clinician′s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: We searched for the clinically relevant suggestions, recommendations and findings amongst the papers on Psycho-oncology. The term clinically relevant for us meant ′practical and implemental modes of intervention that contribute but would not affect or interfere with the normal functioning of the present system and treatment modality of the patients.′ Our intention was to use the available information for the benefit of our patients. We also searched for the data that would prove the significance of these methods. In most parts of the world it is not possible to involve a psychologist at every level of cancer care. Based on the findings, we intend to carry out our own project for the psychosocial intervention in cancer patients and make suggestions that could be adopted even by those who have little or no experience in psychology. Conclusion: The field of psycho oncology is a relatively new and evolving subspecialty of oncology and psychology at the same time. Current data and papers, which would make simple and implemental modes of intervention at psychosocial level, are limited. There is a dire necessity of solid data and list of suggestions to the specialists, non-specialists and to those who take care of the cancer patients, to enhance the care they provide to the cancer patients.

  4. Mississippi's DUI Offender Intervention: 40 Years of Programming and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela A.; Gardner, Sheena; Xu, Xiaohe; Chi, Guangqing; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Alcohol Safety Education Program (MASEP) is a court-mandated driving under the influence (DUI) intervention for persons convicted of DUI. This study describes the evolution of the curriculum, evaluates the effectiveness of MASEP in reducing recidivism, and examines whether recent program revisions have led to improvements in…

  5. Faith Is Confidence: The Implication of Psychosocial Components in Faith-Based Educational Programs on Expressive Communication Skills of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Erin M.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based programs for adult learners have environmental factors that differentiate them from non-faith based programs, but explicit empirical studies evaluating the impact of the psychosocial factors have been lacking in the literature. This study comparatively examines the achievement level of expressive communication skills as measured…

  6. Writing-skills Intervention Programming and its being a Component of Response to Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael William Dunn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a struggling writer, step-by-step instruction can be a helpful means to manage organizing and producing elaborate text. This mixed-methods project offered four struggling writers a mnemonic strategy called Ask, Reflect, Text (ART in 45-minute sessions over 22 days. The second- and fourth-grade students attended a public school in the US Pacific Northwest. As a parallel component to the project, the students’ teachers and intervention specialist met with the author for 4 one-hour sessions to discuss: 1 the children’s intervention programming and progress, and 2 the paradigm of response to intervention (RTI and their thoughts about its feasibility in classrooms. The end-of-project assessment data demonstrated that the children made progress with writing skills, but the teachers and intervention specialist felt that support personnel would be needed to manage RTI-type intervention programming in general education classrooms.

  7. Batterer intervention programs in Spain: The professionals perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Ferrer-Perez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Organic Law 1/2004 of 28 December on Integrated Protection Measures against Gender Violence has had, among other consequences, the generalization of intervention programs for batterers in cases of gender violence. The objective of this research is to explore the point of view of specialized professionals about these programs. For this purpose a qualitative methodology was used, by applying semi-structured interviews to 65 key informants, i.e. professionals with experience in implementing and/or managing and evaluating such programs. In general, these professionals were satisfied with the programs in which they had participated and they valued them positively. They considered that certain characteristics of participants and of the programs themselves contribute to promoting or hindering their success and also that they could obtain better results by customizing interventions. These results provide valuable information for understanding the difficulties encountered in implementing these programs and to improve them.

  8. Psychosocial Correlates of AUDIT-C Hazardous Drinking Risk Status: Implications for Screening and Brief Intervention in College Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahesh, Edward; Lewis, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    The current study identified psychosocial variables associated with AUDIT-C hazardous drinking risk status for male and female college students. Logistic regression analysis revealed that AUDIT-C risk status was associated with alcohol-related negative consequences, injunctive norms, and descriptive norms for both male and female participants.…

  9. Development of a Patient-Centred, Psychosocial Support Intervention for Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Care in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Sudeepa; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Baral, Sushil C; Bhatta, Bharat Raj; Newell, James N

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses a major threat to public health worldwide, particularly in low-income countries. The current long (20 month) and arduous treatment regime uses powerful drugs with side-effects that include mental ill-health. It has a high loss-to-follow-up (25%) and higher case fatality and lower cure-rates than those with drug sensitive tuberculosis (TB). While some national TB programmes provide small financial allowances to patients, other aspects of psychosocial ill-health, including iatrogenic ones, are not routinely assessed or addressed. We aimed to develop an intervention to improve psycho-social well-being for MDR-TB patients in Nepal. To do this we conducted qualitative work with MDR-TB patients, health professionals and the National TB programme (NTP) in Nepal. We conducted semi-structured interviews (SSIs) with 15 patients (10 men and 5 women, aged 21 to 68), four family members and three frontline health workers. In addition, three focus groups were held with MDR-TB patients and three with their family members. We conducted a series of meetings and workshops with key stakeholders to design the intervention, working closely with the NTP to enable government ownership. Our findings highlight the negative impacts of MDR-TB treatment on mental health, with greater impacts felt among those with limited social and financial support, predominantly married women. Michie et al's (2011) framework for behaviour change proved helpful in identifying corresponding practice- and policy-level changes. The findings from this study emphasise the need for tailored psycho-social support. Recent work on simple psychological support packages for the general population can usefully be adapted for use with people with MDR-TB.

  10. Effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention program on the health of caregiversof people with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Ruiz-Robledillo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Caregivers of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD are chronically exposed to high levels of stress.In turn, such stress is associated with high rates of negative health outcomes. However, few studies haveanalyzed the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions in improving health in this population. The mainaim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral intervention program,based on the model proposed by Ruiz-Robledillo and Moya-Albiol (2014a. For this, we used a sample of 17informal caregivers of people diagnosed with ASD. The study was based on a pre-post design. Caregivershad lower levels of burden immediately after the intervention than at baseline, while both immediatelyafter the intervention and at 1 month of follow-up, they had fewer somatic symptoms, lower levels ofdepression, and better mood states than at baseline. These results provide evidence of the efficacy of thecognitive-behavioral intervention developed for reducing stress and health complaints in chronicallystressed caregivers. Additionally, the program could be useful in early stages of the caring process, toprovide caregivers with effective skills for preventing future health problems. The integration of theprogram in general psychosocial interventions would be highly beneficial for this population.

  11. Working memory intervention programs for adults: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Netto

    Full Text Available Abstract This systematic review aimed to identify the designs, procedures, and results of empirical studies that performed neuropsychological interventions on WM in adults. Methods: A PubMed and LILACS literature search was conducted using the keywords working memory AND (training OR rehabilitation OR intervention AND adult. Results: Of the seven studies found, three were randomized controlled trials, two were case reports, one was a clinical trial, and one was an evaluation study. With regard to the type of programs and samples, three studies employed global programs with healthy elderly adults and four employed specific programs for samples with neurologically-impaired adults. Conclusions: The effectiveness of the WM intervention programs was more evident in studies that employed specific methods of rehabilitation for samples with neurological disorders than in those based on global programs with healthy adults. There is a need for more empirical studies to verify the effectiveness of WM intervention programs in order to provide adequate guidance for clinical neuropsychologists and future research.

  12. Do psychosocial sleep interventions improve infant sleep or maternal mood in the postnatal period? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Liora; Sharpe, Louise; Miller, Christopher B; Bartlett, Delwyn J

    2016-10-01

    Sleep complaints are common amongst mothers of infants and insufficient, inefficient or fragmented sleep is associated with postnatal depression. The aim of this review is to determine whether psychosocial sleep-focused interventions offered in the perinatal period improve infant sleep or maternal mood. We searched PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE and CINAHL with no date restriction. We reviewed 1097 articles, resulting in nine papers (n = 1,656) that fit the eligibility criteria for inclusion in the analyses. The primary outcome was infant sleep, defined as maternal reports of infant nocturnal total sleep time and number of night-time wakes. The secondary outcome was maternal mood. The meta-analysis indicated improvements in reported infant nocturnal total sleep time (Hedge's g = 0.204, p improvements (Hedge's g = 0.152, p = 0.014), however, this could have been influenced by publication bias. Psychosocial sleep interventions appear to impact the amount of sleep that a mother reports her baby to have, although the infants continue to wake as frequently. More research is needed to confirm whether sleep-related improvements can translate into improvements in maternal mood.

  13. Integrating psychosocial skills into a medical-surgical curriculum in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Jean; Barron, Anne-Marie; Lynch, Marla; Caroline, Harlene

    2010-10-01

    With the increasing acuity levels of hospitalized patients, faculty members struggle with accessing clinical sites for undergraduate students. Teaching students how to interact with patients and their families can often take second place to attending to the many needs and safety issues in caring for acutely ill individuals, particularly in medical-surgical settings. Over the past several years, the psychiatric and medical-surgical faculty members in the nursing department of a college in Boston have struggled with how best to prepare students for both the physical and psychosocial aspects of care. In this article, the evolution of our psychiatric consultation-liaison model is discussed.

  14. Humor intervention program for children with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, In Ok

    2015-11-01

    This study developed and implemented a humor intervention program for school-aged children with chronic diseases. Thirty-three children with atopic dermatitis and type 1 diabetes were divided into experimental and control groups. The experimental group included 17 children while the control group included 16 children. The experimental group participated in 6 weekly sessions of a 60-minute humor intervention. The subject and type of humorous material was collected from a survey of parents and children. Outcome measures assessed pre- and post-intervention included stress, behavior profile scores, and resilience. There was a significant decrease in behavior problems and increase in resiliency in experimental group compared to control group. There was no difference in stress cortisol measures between the groups. This study was the first to examine a humor intervention for children with chronic diseases in South Korea and offers practical implications for humor interventions in pediatric nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Adults Who Stutter: Psychosocial Adjustment and Speech Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Janet M.; Byrnes, Michelle L.; Yaruss, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group intervention program for adults who stutter (N = 20). The program consisted of 2-h therapeutic sessions conducted weekly for eight consecutive weeks. It was an integrated program designed to improve: (a) psychosocial functioning, (b)…

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Adults Who Stutter: Psychosocial Adjustment and Speech Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Janet M.; Byrnes, Michelle L.; Yaruss, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group intervention program for adults who stutter (N = 20). The program consisted of 2-h therapeutic sessions conducted weekly for eight consecutive weeks. It was an integrated program designed to improve: (a) psychosocial functioning, (b)…

  17. A pilot study of a family focused, psychosocial intervention with war-exposed youth at risk of attack and abduction in north-eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; Branham, Lindsay; Shannon, Ciarán; Betancourt, Theresa S; Dempster, Martin; McMullen, John

    2014-07-01

    Rural communities in the Haut-Uele Province of northern Democratic Republic of Congo live in constant danger of attack and/or abduction by units of the Lord's Resistance Army operating in the region. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate a community-participative psychosocial intervention involving life skills and relaxation training and Mobile Cinema screenings with this war-affected population living under current threat. 159 war-affected children and young people (aged 7-18) from the villages of Kiliwa and Li-May in north-eastern DR Congo took part in this study. In total, 22% of participants had been abduction previously while 73% had a family member abducted. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions, internalising problems, conduct problems and pro-social behaviour were assessed by blinded interviewers at pre- and post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. Participants were randomised (with an accompanying caregiver) to 8 sessions of a group-based, community-participative, psychosocial intervention (n=79) carried out by supervised local, lay facilitators or a wait-list control group (n=80). Average seminar attendance rates were high: 88% for participants and 84% for caregivers. Drop-out was low: 97% of participants were assessed at post-intervention and 88% at 3 month follow-up. At post-test, participants reported significantly fewer symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions compared to controls (Cohen's d=0.40). At 3 month follow up, large improvements in internalising symptoms and moderate improvements in pro-social scores were reported, with caregivers noting a moderate to large decline in conduct problems among the young people. Trial Registration clinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01542398.

  18. Intervenções psicossociais na comunidade: desafios e práticas Psychosocial interventions in community: challenges and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Ansara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, apresentamos os desafios teórico-práticos que os profissionais de diferentes áreas sociais têm encontrado em suas práticas de intervenção psicossocial em comunidades de diversos municípios de São Paulo. Entre os grandes desafios estão os limites dos programas sociais propostos pelo poder público, as dificuldades dos agentes externos em desenvolver um trabalho que leve ao fortalecimento da comunidade e a ausência de referenciais teórico-metodológicos que fundamentem as práticas desses agentes. A fim de ilustrar tais desafios, relatamos a experiência de um curso de Psicologia Comunitária e da Libertação no qual discutimos propostas de intervenção comunitária a partir de conceitos desenvolvidos por Martín-Baró (1998 e da contribuição de Maritza Montero (2004 com o Paradigma da Construção e Transformação Crítica. Com base nesses referenciais teóricos, analisamos a relação entre Estado, Programas e Organizações, assim como as contradições existentes entre uma prática social comunitária e as exigências dos planos e programas governamentais.In this article we present the theoretical-practical challenges that professionals from different social fields face in their practices of social psychological intervention in communities in various cities of São Paulo. Among the largest challenges are the limitations of social programs offered by public authorities, the difficulties of external agents in developing actions that lead to the strengthening of the community, and the absence of theoretical-methodological references that support the practices of these agents. In order to illustrate these challenges, we narrate the experience of a course on Community Psychology and Psychology of Liberation in which we discussed propositions for community intervention from the perspective of concepts developed by Martín-Baró (1998 and the contributions of Maritza Montero (2004 with the Paradigm of Construction and

  19. Psychosocial determinants of physical activity in children attending afterschool programs: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; McCarthy, Valerie Lander; Speck, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for controlling childhood obesity, but a comprehensive PA model for school-aged children is lacking. Guided by the youth PA promotion (YPAP) model, this study estimated the direct and indirect effects of self-efficacy, enjoyment, parental influence, and environment on self-reported PA and pedometer steps. A secondary purpose was to explore the association between self-reported PA and pedometer steps. An observational and prospective study was conducted among 133 children, aged 8-11 years old, from 10 elementary schools with afterschool programs in a Midwestern U.S. school district from August through October 2013. PA was assessed by a 7-day recall scale and pedometers. Other variables were assessed by validated questionnaires. Approximately 65 (49%) children were overweight or obese-only 17 (13%) met national PA recommendations-and body mass index z-score was negatively correlated with pedometer steps (r = -.18 p = .04). A path analysis showed that self-efficacy had a direct effect on self-reported PA and pedometer steps, enjoyment had only a direct effect on self-reported PA, and parental influence had a direct effect on pedometer steps and an indirect effect on self-reported PA through self-efficacy and enjoyment. The association between self-reported PA and pedometer steps was not significant. Because this study only partially supports the YPAP model, studies with a larger sample size and longitudinal design are essential to further examine this model. The nonsignificant relationship of self-reported PA with pedometer steps may be due to the systematic error resulting from a common method artifact of self-report. Given the importance of parental influence, enjoyment, and self-efficacy, targeting these three determinants in future interventions to increase PA among children is recommended.

  20. A three-year follow-up on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for patients with mild dementia and their caregivers: the multicentre, rater-blinded, randomized Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, K.T.T.; Waldorff, F.B.; Buss, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the long-term efficacy at the 36-month follow-up of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme lasting 8-12 months for community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, controlled, rater-blinded trial....... SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics in five Danish districts. PARTICIPANTS: 330 home-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary caregivers (dyads). INTERVENTIONS: Dyads were randomised to receive intervention during the first year after diagnosis. Both intervention and control...... of Life Scale for Alzheimer's disease (QoL-AD), Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, Alzheimer's disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale, all-cause mortality and nursing home placement. RESULTS: At a 36-month follow-up, 2 years after the completion of the Danish Alzheimer...

  1. Moderate alcohol consumption--need for intervention programs in pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meberg, A; Halvorsen, B; Holter, B; Ek, I J; Askeland, A; Gaaserud, W; Steinsvåg, J

    1986-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol was investigated in two groups of pregnant women: an intervention group (n = 58) (two structured interviews during pregnancy including counseling focused on reduction of alcohol consumption and potential benefits to the fetus, and interview after delivery), and a control group (n = 74) (interview after delivery). Prepregnancy 80% of the women were light or moderate alcohol consumers, and 20% teetotalers. Pregnancy considerably reduced alcohol consumption in both groups. 66% abstained from alcohol during pregnancy, and use of liquor nearly ceased. The changes in alcohol consumption occurred independently to the intervention program. Strategy for reducing alcohol consumption during pregnancy should include a structured alcohol anamnesis at the first ante-natal visit, accompanied by counseling focused on reduction of alcohol consumption. More extensive intervention programs may be reserved for pregnancies at higher risk (high-consumers, abusers).

  2. A Description of the Hawthorn Center Early Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovinsky, Ira; Keller, Jackie

    An early intervention project for preschool handicapped children is described. Specific program goals (including improved functioning in social, emotional, communication, and preacademic areas) are listed, and roles of the interdisciplinary staff members are considered. Among evaluation approaches discussed are psychological measures, family…

  3. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Arbitration Program Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathy on Juvenile Diversion program completion for youths involved in a clinical trial, and evaluation of an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines baseline interview data for…

  4. The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) Program: Underlying Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulden, Walter T.

    2010-01-01

    The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) is a proactive school-wide behavior management plan for all students, emphasizing schools partnering with students and parents through caring relationships and high expectations. The BIST program is well-grounded in behavioral theory and combines strength-based and resiliency principles within the…

  5. Physiologic and psychosocial approaches to global management of the hemodialysis patient in the Southern Alberta Renal Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Tina; Magat, Ofelia; Hager, Suzy; Ng, Fanny; Lee, Miran

    2012-01-01

    As frontline nurses, we know firsthand the many challenges of renal disease faced by our patients and the impact on their lives and their families. How can we help them cope with their illness? How can we improve their quality of life? How can we prevent the complications inherent to the disease? How do we know we are doing a good job? Where do we start? The purpose of this presentation is to showcase the global management of the hemodialysis (HD) patient. It provides a collaborative and systematic approach to assessing, implementing, evaluating and coordinating the physiologic and the psychosocial aspects of their care. It is a model of case management followed by the Southern Alberta Renal Program (SARP) in meeting the many and complex needs of our hemodialysis patients. The quality indicators, to name a few, that relate to the physiologic aspects of their care are dialysis adequacy and fluid removal, improved blood pressure (BP) control, maintenance and improved vascular access function, anemia, bone and mineral disease management, nutritional, and diabetes management. The psychosocial aspects of care encompass goals of care, residential support, transportation, and mobility programs in the community. There may be positive implications resulting from our practice that we believe would be invaluable in terms of improved patient care, increased adherence to therapeutic regimens, improved mortality and morbidity and overall enhanced quality of life. Moreover, better communication would possibly be fostered and wise and prompt use of resources may be a result. To date, we have not done studies to prove or disprove these outcomes.

  6. Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Program on Psycho-Social Attributes of Youth with and without Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, D.; Baran, F.; Aktop, A.; Nalbant, S.; Aglamis, E.; Hutzler, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sports (UNS) soccer program on psycho-social attributes of youth with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). Participants were 76 male youth with (n = 38) and without (n = 38) ID. Participants with ID were randomly allocated into a SO athletes group (n…

  7. Psychosocial intervention, as a contribution to local human development within Medellin’s public scope. Case study: project aps - “buenvivir” (good living into a family. sponsor: City hall of Medellin, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. García

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides information about a research held on the psychosocial intervention offered from social projects such as educational formative spaces. A critical analysis is made by means of a government project conducted by the local administration of the city of Medellin known as “APS Buenvivir en Familia, 2011”, compiled by the Social Welfare Town Council Office, in association with the Municipality’s Health Department. Its purpose was to examine the logic and approach of psychosocial intervention as an input to human development. It was carried out through a qualitative focusing, taking in consideration the following categories: The psychosocial intervention has a definite impact on local human development, psychosocial praxis from the point of view of a public action strategy, community involvement taken as a true political act. The results showed that the psychosocial as a public exercise makes a contribution to local human development starting from the social involvement of communities and, in its everyday doing, presents structural and formal contradictions between the way they are designed and how the projects are planned and implemented among the people. 

  8. Non-specialist psychosocial interventions for children and adolescents with intellectual disability or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Reichow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of effective treatments for use by non-specialists is listed among the top research priorities for improving the lives of people with mental illness worldwide. The purpose of this review is to appraise which interventions for children with intellectual disabilities or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders delivered by non-specialist care providers in community settings produce benefits when compared to either a no-treatment control group or treatment-as-usual comparator. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched electronic databases through 24 June 2013 to locate prospective controlled studies of psychosocial interventions delivered by non-specialist providers to children with intellectual disabilities or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders. We screened 234 full papers, of which 34 articles describing 29 studies involving 1,305 participants were included. A majority of the studies included children exclusively with a diagnosis of lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders (15 of 29, 52%. Fifteen of twenty-nine studies (52% were randomized controlled trials and just under half of all effect sizes (29 of 59, 49% were greater than 0.50, of which 18 (62% were statistically significant. For behavior analytic interventions, the best outcomes were shown for development and daily skills; cognitive rehabilitation, training, and support interventions were found to be most effective for improving developmental outcomes, and parent training interventions to be most effective for improving developmental, behavioral, and family outcomes. We also conducted additional subgroup analyses using harvest plots. Limitations include the studies' potential for performance bias and that few were conducted in lower- and middle-income countries. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review support the delivery of psychosocial interventions by non-specialist providers to children who have intellectual disabilities or lower

  9. [Preventing school violence: an evaluation of an intervention program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Carla Silva

    2011-06-01

    School violence (bullying), is currently considered a growing public health issue across the globe. It is essential to intervene in order to improve the quality of life of children/adolescents at school. Therefore, it should be a research priority to include the issue in the agenda of nurses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of an anti-violence program implemented with 307 secondary level students in a school in Lisbon. The evaluation before and after the program was performed using a questionnaire that was elaborated and validated for this study. We found that before the intervention, there was a high level of bullying (50% victims and 35% aggressors), and that the aggressions also included teachers (7%) and other school workers (9%). The program consisted of building awareness/preparation in teachers and parents and practicing social competencies among the students. After the intervention significant results were observed in the global reduction of school violence.

  10. Content Validity and Satisfaction With a Stroke Caregiver Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Farran, Carol J.; Austin, Joan K.; Given, Barbara A.; Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Williams, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Establishing evidence of content validity and satisfaction is an integral part of intervention research. The purpose of this article is to describe content validity and satisfaction relative to the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit (TASK), an 8-week follow-up program based on individualized assessment of stroke caregiver needs. Design and Methods The TASK intervention enables caregivers to develop skills based on assessment of their own needs. During the development of the TASK program, 10 experts rated the validity of the TASK intervention components for accuracy, feasibility, acceptability, and problem relevance. After incorporating feedback from the experts, a randomized controlled clinical trial was instituted using a convenience sample of 40 stroke caregivers to determine satisfaction (usefulness, case of use, and acceptability) with the TASK intervention (n=21) compared with an attention control group (n=19). Data collection occurred between March 2005 and June 2006. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent sample t tests, and content analysis. Findings Expert ratings on a 1 to 5 scale, with 5 being strongly agree, provided evidence of content validity (accuracy 4.71, feasibility 4.46, acceptability 4.40, problem relevance 4.67). Caregivers in the TASK group scored significantly higher than the attention control group on all satisfaction measures (usefulness p=.02; ease of use p=.02; acceptability p=.05). Qualitative comments from caregivers provided further evidence of satisfaction. Conclusions Evidence of content validity and user satisfaction for the TASK intervention relative to an attention control group was found. Clinical Relevance The TASK program may be a viable telephone-based program that can be implemented by nurses to support family caregivers during the first few months after stroke survivors are discharged home. PMID:19941582

  11. The design, implementation and acceptability of an integrated intervention to address multiple behavioral and psychosocial risk factors among pregnant African American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Maryann

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African American women are at increased risk for poor pregnancy outcomes compared to other racial-ethnic groups. Single or multiple psychosocial and behavioral factors may contribute to this risk. Most interventions focus on singular risks. This paper describes the design, implementation, challenges faced, and acceptability of a behavioral counseling intervention for low income, pregnant African American women which integrated multiple targeted risks into a multi-component format. Methods Six academic institutions in Washington, DC collaborated in the development of a community-wide, primary care research study, DC-HOPE, to improve pregnancy outcomes. Cigarette smoking, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, depression and intimate partner violence were the four risks targeted because of their adverse impact on pregnancy. Evidence-based models for addressing each risk were adapted and integrated into a multiple risk behavior intervention format. Pregnant women attending six urban prenatal clinics were screened for eligibility and risks and randomized to intervention or usual care. The 10-session intervention was delivered in conjunction with prenatal and postpartum care visits. Descriptive statistics on risk factor distributions, intervention attendance and length (i.e., with Results Forty-eight percent of women screened were eligible based on presence of targeted risks, 76% of those eligible were enrolled, and 79% of those enrolled were retained postpartum. Most women reported a single risk factor (61%; 39% had multiple risks. Eighty-four percent of intervention women attended at least one session (60% attended ≥ 4 sessions without disruption of clinic scheduling. Specific risk factor content was delivered as prescribed in 80% or more of the sessions; 78% of sessions were fully completed (where all required risk content was covered. Ninety-three percent of the subsample of intervention women had a positive view of their

  12. Integrating the Principles of Effective Intervention into Batterer Intervention Programming: The Case for Moving Toward More Evidence-Based Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radatz, Dana L; Wright, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The majority of batterer intervention program (BIP) evaluations have indicated they are marginally effective in reducing domestic violence recidivism. Meanwhile, correctional programs used to treat a variety of offenders (e.g., substance users, violent offenders, and so forth) that adhere to the "principles of effective intervention" (PEI) have reported significant reductions in recidivism. This article introduces the PEI-the principles on which evidence-based practices in correctional rehabilitation are based-and identifies the degree to which they are currently integrated into BIPs. The case is made that batterer programs could be more effective if they incorporate the PEI. Recommendations for further integration of the principles into BIPs are also provided.

  13. The Need for Psychosocial Interventions to Facilitate the Transition to Extended-Release Naltrexone (XR-NTX) Treatment for Opioid Dependence: A Concise Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Susan E.; Rounsaville, Dan; Hoskinson, Randall; Park, Tae Woo; Ames, Evan G.; Neirinckx, Victor D.; Friedmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given the increase of opioid dependence and opioid-related morbidity and mortality, improving treatment options for individuals with opioid dependence warrants increased attention. This article provides a concise review of work in this area. Remission from opioid dependence can be very difficult to sustain, particularly in the absence of opioid replacement or opioid antagonist therapy. For those who wish to transition from opioid use or opioid replacement therapy to opioid antagonist therapy, a significant challenge can be the period of withdrawal symptoms that must be endured prior to the initiation of opioid antagonist therapy. Studies that have incorporated psychosocial interventions into detoxification protocols have found that they can result in improved treatment outcomes. Interventions based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy have shown promise in the treatment of clinical disorders that present with symptoms similar to those of opioid withdrawal and have been found to positively impact outcomes among those tapering from methadone. However, the use of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based intervention has yet to be studied among opioid-dependent patients transitioning to XR-NTX, and its value to those transitioning to XR-NTX is currently unknown. PMID:27512336

  14. Evaluation of programs for adolescents with greater psychosocial needs: community-based Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Law, Moon Y M

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the perceptions of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social programmes) among Chinese secondary school students displaying greater psychosocial needs. Results showed that participants held positive views of program qualities, implementer qualities, as well as the perceived effectiveness of the program. Significant grade differences in terms of various indicators of satisfaction related to program qualities, implementer qualities, and program effectiveness were found. Correlation analyses showed that there were significant inter-relationships amongst program qualities, implementer qualities and program effectiveness. In line with the predictions, both program qualities and implementer qualities were significant predictors of perceived program effectiveness. The present study provides support for the perceived effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. in the community-based project context.

  15. Can a "Psychosocial Model" Help Explain Violence Perpetrated by Female Batterers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Regardt J.; Buttell, Frederick P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the psychosocial predictors of propensity for abusiveness among a large sample of women ordered into a 26-week batterer intervention program (BIP). Method: The study employed a nonequivalent, control group design (comparing program completers to dropouts) in a secondary analysis of 485 women.…

  16. 精神分裂症患者的心理社会干预%Psychosocial Interventions for Patients with Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白哈拉桑; 黄楠; 陆峥

    2011-01-01

    精神分裂症的治疗不仅包括药物治疗,还包括为患者提供支持、有效的信息、心理社会干预以及康复治疗.中国的研究者在精神分裂症患者非药物治疗领域进行着各项研究,而国外研究数据一致显示心理社会干预可以降低复发率和再住院率.尽管缓解症状仍然是精神分裂症治疗的一个重要目标,但工作、学习、独立生活及社会化方面的功能损伤往往也是患者及其家属关注的重点.因此,精神分裂症患者更有可能从着重于减轻残疾的干预中获益.本文对中外有效应用于精神分裂症患者的主要心理社会干预进行综述,包括认知行为治疗、社会技能训练、家庭干预、认知纠正、心理教育、职业训练、危机干预及综合心理治疗;同时就中外心理社会干预的差异进行讨论.%This article reviews the main psychosocial interventions that have been used effectively in patients with schizophrenia in China and abroad,namely cognitive-behavioral therapy,social skills training,family intervention therapy,cognitive remediation,psycho education,vocational training,crisis intervention and integrated psychotherapy.The difference between psychosocial interventions in China and abroad has also been discussed.

  17. When the healthcare does not follow the evidence: The case of the lack of early intervention programs for psychosis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Celso; Bernardo, Miguel; Bonet, Pere; Cabrera, Ana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Cuesta, Manuel J; González, Nel; Parrabera, Sílvia; Sanjuan, Julio; Serrano, Alfonso; Vieta, Eduard; Lennox, Belinda R; Melau, Marianne

    There is now sufficient evidence to support the importance of interventions in the early stages of psychosis. The delay in the detection and treatment of the first-episode psychosis is related to a lower and slower recovery, as well as a higher risk of relapse. Despite this fact, early intervention units or teams are still not regularly implemented in mental health service settings in Spain. In this opinion article, a review is presented of the main arguments for defending the need to implement these programs and strategies in order to achieve this aim. There are a number of programs for early intervention for psychosis currently working in other countries, with a therapeutic program that includes pharmacological and psychosocial interventions, together with public awareness, information dissemination, and family-professional collaboration activities. Published literature on the experience of these programs indicates that early intervention is not only effective in terms of the improvement of health status, but is also economically efficient. The main steps and recommendations needed to implement such early intervention programs in our country are described. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. All rights reserved.

  18. A successful intervention program for high ability minority students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Winson R.

    1989-01-01

    Among professional occupations in the United States, non-Asian minorities are least represented in science and engineering fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that over the next decade, civilian employment of scientists and engineers has the potential to grow by 40 percent. Furthermore, projections for the year 2000 indicate that 100,000 fewer B.S. and B.A. degrees will be awarded than were awarded in 1984. The latter projection takes into consideration the overall declining proportion of all 18 year old college students. Within this shrinking pool of 18 year old potential college students will be an increasing proportion of Blacks and Hispanics. In order to change the educational patterns for minority youth, an intense look at the factors that affect the science and mathematics performance of minorities. Furthermore, the work of programs that are successful at producing minority scientists and engineers must be examined and documented with the intent of replicating these programs. The fundamental concern at this time appears to be the quality of precollege experience because research has shown that lack of precollege preparation is the single most important cause of underrepresentation of minorities in science and engineering careers. For many years, intervention programs have attempted to improve the quality of the minority precollege experience by latter year intervention in grades eleven and twelve. Later efforts, such as this one, have concentrated on earlier years. The effectiveness of intervention programs is widely accepted but not rigorously documented. The mechanisms these programs have developed need to be identified and their potential for broader use evaluated. The ultimate goal of such studies would be to provide the different educational communities with a set of proven cost-effective state of the art mechanisms designed to increase participation and success of minority students in science and mathematics-related courses. One such

  19. Marketing defibrillation training programs and bystander intervention support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneath, Julie Z; Lacey, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study identifies perceptions of and participation in resuscitation training programs, and bystanders' willingness to resuscitate cardiac arrest victims. While most of the study's participants greatly appreciate the importance of saving someone's life, many indicated that they did not feel comfortable assuming this role. The findings also demonstrate there is a relationship between type of victim and bystanders' willingness to intervene. Yet, bystander intervention discomfort can be overcome with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation training, particularly when the victim is a coworker or stranger. Further implications of these findings are discussed and modifications to public access defibrillation (PAD) training programs' strategy and communications are proposed.

  20. Student and teacher perceptions of a school involvement intervention program

    OpenAIRE

    Sabiston, Claire

    2009-01-01

    A secondary school student enrolled in an intervention program for lower-achieving students reported positive affective, motivational, and cognitive experiences indicative of involvement and flow. Interview data revealed greater support for positive experiences related to extrinsic factors of improved grades and volume of work completed than to challenging activities that matched skills. Autonomy-supportive classroom practices appear to promote involvement through allowing students flexibilit...

  1. [Intervention programs in hospital nutrition: actions, design, components and implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Porben, S; Barreto Penié, J

    2005-01-01

    Metabolic, Nutrient and Feeding Intervention Programs must become the methodological tool for dealing with the health problem posed by disease-associated-malnutrition on one side, and the "Bad Practices" affecting the nutritional status of the patient, on the other one. Programs like these ones should prescribe clear policies and actions in the three domains of contemporary medical practice: assistance, research and education. The fullfillment of these Program's objectives, and the relization of the implicit benefits, will only be possible if a methodological platform that armonically integrates elements of Continuous Education, Cost Analysis, Recording and Documentation, and Quality Control and Assurance, is created. The experience acumulated after the inception and conduction of the Intervention Program at the Clinical-Surgical "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital (Havana City, Cuba) has served to demostrate that it is feasible not only to create a theoretical and practical body to satisfy the aforementioned goals, but, also, to export it to another institutions of the country, in view of the fact that minimal investments for adquiring the resources needed to deploy such Program, as well as for training and capacitation of medic and paramedic personel in the corresponding Recording & Documentation and Feeding & Nutrition Good Practices might result in short-term economical and medical care benefits.

  2. Intervenções farmacológica e psicossocial para os distúrbios por uso da cannabis Pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for cannabisuse disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Budney

    2010-05-01

    . This article provides a review of the research evaluating potential treatments for cannabis use disorders. METHOD: A search of publication databases identified research studies and reviews of the scientific literature on psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for cannabis use disorders. RESULTS: For adults, behaviorally-based interventions engender significant positive effects on abstinence and reductions in cannabis use. With adolescents, similar treatments and family-based interventions have demonstrated efficacy. Across studies, response rates appear modest even with the most potent psychosocial treatments. Evaluations of pharmacological approaches to cannabis use disorders have yet to provide clinical efficacy data for any specific medication. Agonist and antagonist approaches appear to offer the most promise. Advances in understanding of the neurobiology of the cannabinoid system provide optimism that the synthesis of compounds that alter CB1 receptor site functioning may produce promising medications. CONCLUSION: Clinical research has identified effective psychosocial treatments, but has yet to yield effective pharmacotherapies. Much work remains to enhance the potency of and access to interventions for those seeking treatment for cannabis use disorders.

  3. Reducing HIV-related risk and mental health problems through a client-centred psychosocial intervention for vulnerable adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nrupa Jani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethiopia is experiencing an increasingly urban HIV epidemic, alongside a rise in urban adolescent migration. Adolescent migrants are often confronted by unique social challenges, including living in a difficult environment, abuse and mental health problems. These issues can increase adolescents’ vulnerability to HIV and compromise their capacity to protect themselves and others from HIV. We piloted and assessed the effects of a targeted psychosocial intervention to reduce mental health problems and improve HIV-related outcomes among migrant adolescents in Addis Ababa. Methods: A pre- and post-comparison design was used in a cohort of 576 female and 154 male migrant adolescents aged 15 to 18 years in Addis Ababa receiving services from two service delivery organizations, Biruh Tesfa and Retrak. We implemented a three-month client-centred, counsellor-delivered psychosocial intervention, based on findings from formative research among the same target population, to address participants’ increased vulnerability to HIV. The intervention package comprised individual, group and creative arts therapy counselling sessions. Key outcome indicators included anxiety, depression, aggressive behaviour, attention problems, social problems, knowledge of HIV, safer sex practices and use of sexual health services. Longitudinal data analysis (McNemar test and random effects regression was used to assess changes over time in key indicators by gender. Results: For females, aggressive behaviour decreased by 60% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 0.4 (0.25 to 0.65 and any mental health problem decreased by 50% (AOR: 0.5 (0.36 to 0.81 from baseline to end line. In addition, knowledge of HIV increased by 60% (AOR: 1.6 (1.08 to 2.47, knowledge of a place to test for HIV increased by 70% (AOR: 1.7 (1.12 to 2.51 and HIV testing increased by 80% (AOR: 1.8 (1.13 to 2.97. For males, HIV knowledge increased by 110% (AOR: 2.1 (1.1 to 3.94, knowledge of a place to test

  4. Reasons for (nonparticipating in a telephone-based intervention program for families with overweight children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Alff

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Willingness to participate in obesity prevention programs is low; underlying reasons are poorly understood. We evaluated reasons for (nonparticipating in a novel telephone-based obesity prevention program for overweight children and their families. METHOD: Overweight children and adolescents (BMI>90(th percentile aged 3.5-17.4 years were screened via the CrescNet database, a representative cohort of German children, and program participation (repetitive computer aided telephone counseling was offered by their local pediatrician. Identical questionnaires to collect baseline data on anthropometrics, lifestyle, eating habits, sociodemographic and psychosocial parameters were analyzed from 433 families (241 participants, 192 nonparticipants. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with nonparticipation. RESULTS: The number of overweight children (BMI>90(th percentile was higher in nonparticipants than participants (62% vs. 41.1%,p97(th percentile was higher in participants (58.9% vs.38%,p<0.001. Participating girls were younger than boys (8.8 vs.10.4 years, p<0.001. 87.3% and 40% of participants, but only 72.2% and 24.7% of nonparticipants, respectively, reported to have regular breakfasts (p = 0.008 and 5 regular daily meals (p = 0.003. Nonparticipants had a lower household-net-income (p<0.001, but higher subjective physical wellbeing than participants (p = 0.018 and believed that changes in lifestyle can be made easily (p = 0.05. CONCLUSION: An important reason for nonparticipation was non-awareness of their child's weight status by parents. Nonparticipants, who were often low-income families, believed that they already perform a healthy lifestyle and had a higher subjective wellbeing. We hypothesize that even a low-threshold intervention program does not reach the families who really need it.

  5. The Effects of Severe Psychosocial Deprivation and Foster Care Intervention on Cognitive Development at 8 Years of Age: Findings from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nathan A.; Almas, Alisa N.; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous reports from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project suggested that children removed from institutions and placed into intervention displayed gains in IQ relative to children randomized to remain in institutional care. Method: The current report presents data from the 8-year follow-up of these children. One hundred and three…

  6. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for children with a psychiatric disorder and mild intellectual disability to borderline intellectual functioning: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Lidwien; van der Waa, Anne; Klip, Helen; Staal, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Children with intellectual disability frequently have difficulties in adapting to their environment. The extent of the experienced problems does not only depend on cognitive functioning but is influenced by other factors, such as the presence of a psychiatric disorder or other brain disorders, or adverse environmental factors. Several epidemiological studies show that children with intellectual disabilities are at an increased risk to develop psychiatric disorders. This is also true for youth with a mild intellectual disability and even those with borderline intellectual functioning (mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID)). Psychiatric disorders are often overlooked because behavioral problems are rather attributed to the intellectual disability. Consequently, effective psychiatric interventions, which are needed to improve the level of functioning, are not applied. This review aimed to systematically evaluate the currently available, qualitatively sound research concerning the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions, specifically directed at psychiatric disorders in children with MBID. Assessed for eligibility were 1409 unique reports, and the review ultimately included only 12 reports. Review of the results and meta-analyses showed that the majority of studies suffer from multiple limitations and that methodological variations between studies are extensive. This possibly reflects the high variance of factors that may be involved in MBID. It will be important in future research to address multi-causality.

  7. 癌症疼痛心理社会干预治疗的研究进展%Research Progress of the Psychosocial Intervention of Cancer Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂冰; 陈永和

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a complex and multidimensional experience that affects and is affected by psychological and social factors .This article reviews recent domestic and overseas research that points to a number of key psychosocial factors associated with pain ,including psychological distress ,coping ,and social support ,as well as the impact of socioeconomic factors on barriers to pain management . We also review recent research suggesting that psychosocial interventions , including education ,coping skills training ,and hypnosis ,which may be useful complement to medical management of pain ,and the antidepressants are also useful for the treatment of pain .%癌症疼痛是一种复杂和多维的感受,与心理和社会因素相互影响。本文回顾近期国内外相关研究指出,许多重要的社会心理因素与疼痛有关,包括心理压力、应对方法、社会支持以及社会经济因素,它们是疼痛管理的难点。近期的国内外研究表明缓解癌痛的心理社会干预措施包括:疼痛教育、应对技能训练和催眠等,它们对疼痛治疗管理是有益的补充,同时抗抑郁药物应用对疼痛治疗有益。

  8. Differential profile in partner aggressors: Prison vs. mandatory community intervention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús J. García-Jiménez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, there are two types of sentence for partner aggressors: prison sentence and the alternative measure, specifically psychosocial intervention programs. The goal of this study was to determine differences in the delinquent and psychopathological profile of these aggressors as a function of the prison sentence received, for which the models proposed by Dutton (1995 and Holtzworth-Munroe and Stuart (1994 were followed. The sample was made up of 50 incarcerated aggressors and 40 men sentenced to mandatory community orders. The variables were obtained through a mixed method, with supervision of penitentiary case files, clinical interview for personality disorder (SCID-II, and self-reports for the personality profile (NEO-PI-R. Binary logistic regression was used to identify the final model, which best reveals the differences between both groups. The results describe the incarcerated aggressors' profile as having more altered risk factors at the socioeconomic, delinquent, and psychopathological levels. The three variables that increase the probability of belonging to the prison inmate group, according to the final model obtained were: use of weapons, drug consumption, and personality disorder. In contrast to other investigations, the high incidence in the outcomes of the target variables, mainly drug use and personality disorder, makes us wonder whether the diagnostic method used influenced the results in contrast to the exclusive use of self-reports, a goal to be confirmed in future studies.

  9. Middle School Teachers' Perceptions of Computer-Assisted Reading Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippert, Kelli; Harmon, Janis

    2017-01-01

    Middle schools often turn to computer-assisted reading intervention programs to improve student reading. The questions guiding this study are (a) in what ways are computer-assisted reading intervention programs utilized, and (b) what are teachers' perceptions about these intervention programs? Nineteen secondary reading teachers were interviewed…

  10. No effect on survival of home psychosocial intervention in a randomized study of Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Boesen, Sidsel H;

    2009-01-01

    for measurement of immune parameters. Survival was assessed 6.5-9.5 years after the first operation.Results: A total of 148 patients died during follow-up. The intervention was not significantly associated with survival (p=0.68) after adjustment for Dukes' stage, radicality of the operation, age, sex, family...... social class and marital status. Likewise, no significant interactions were found between group and these covariates (all p>/=0.08). In the substudy of the possible effect of the intervention on immune parameters, there were no differences between the two groups with respect to lymphocyte proliferation...

  11. ELSa interventional Portuguese health program to promote physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão Carvalhal, Maria Isabel Martins; Fonseca, Sandra; de Castro Coelho, Eduarda Maria Rocha Teles

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the communication was to present the baseline data from incidence of obesity, eating habits, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, before ELSa, interventional Portuguese health program. The sample was composed of 496 children (238 girls and 258 boys) with an average 7.7 (± 2.5) years of age. Thinness, overweight and obesity were calculated by using the BMI and the cut off of Cole et al., 24 h dietary recalls and a general questionnaire was completed by the parents to provide information about eating habits, sedentary behaviour and physical activity. The results indicated high incidence of overweight and obesity, many hours in screen activities and low level of physical activity. The eating habits seemed healthy, but our children's lifestyles were sedentary. To combat the high incidence of obesity it is very urgent to design a multi-level intervention aimed to modify key behaviours: physical activity, screen time and nutrition.

  12. Assessing Change in Psychosocial Functioning of Incarcerated Girls with a Substance Use Disorder: Gender Sensitive Substance Abuse Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Lewis, Amelia C.; Welch-Brewer, Chiquitia L.; Jackson, Mary S.; Kirk, Raymond; Pharr, O. Martin

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to determine the effectiveness of a female gender-specific substance abuse treatment intervention (Holistic Enrichment for At-Risk Teens, or HEART) in improving problems related to personal and social functioning. A quasi-experimental, 2-group pretest and posttest repeated measures design was used to…

  13. Prematurity and Programming Contribution of neonatal (NICU) interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, Satish C; Wilson-Costello, Dee

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary clinical practice for the care of the prematurely born babies has markedly improved their rates of survival so that most of these babies are expected to grow up to live a healthy functional life. Since the clinical follow up is of short duration (years), only limited data are available to relate non-communicable diseases in adult life to events and interventions in the neonatal period. The major events that could have a programming effect include (1) Intrauterine growth restriction (2) Interruption of pregnancy with change in redox and reactive oxygen species injury (3) Nutritional and pharmacological protocols for Clinical care (4) Nutritional care in the first two years resulting in accelerated weight gain. The available data are discussed in the context of perturbations in one carbon (methyl transfer) metabolism and its possible programming effects. Although direct evidence for genomic methylation is not available, clinical and experimental data on impact of redox and ROS, of low protein intake, excess methionine load and vitamin A, on methyl transfers are reviewed. The consequences of antenatal and postnatal administration of glucocorticoids are presented. Analysis of the correlates of insulin sensitivity at older age, suggests that premature birth is the major contributor, and is compounded by gain in weight during infancy. We speculate that premature interruption of pregnancy and neonatal interventions by effecting one carbon metabolism may cause programming effects on the immature baby. These can be additive to the effects of intrauterine environment (growth restriction) and are compounded by accelerated growth in early infancy. PMID:25054678

  14. Prematurity and programming: contribution of neonatal Intensive Care Unit interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, S C; Wilson-Costello, D

    2013-04-01

    Contemporary clinical practice for the care of the prematurely born babies has markedly improved their rates of survival so that most of these babies are expected to grow up to live a healthy functional life. Since the clinical follow-up is of short duration (years), only limited data are available to relate non-communicable diseases in adult life to events and interventions in the neonatal period. The major events that could have a programming effect include: (1) intrauterine growth restriction; (2) interruption of pregnancy with change in redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury; (3) nutritional and pharmacological protocols for clinical care; and (4) nutritional care in the first 2 years resulting in accelerated weight gain. The available data are discussed in the context of perturbations in one carbon (methyl transfer) metabolism and its possible programming effects. Although direct evidence for genomic methylation is not available, clinical and experimental data on impact of redox and ROS, of low protein intake, excess methionine load and vitamin A, on methyl transfers are reviewed. The consequences of antenatal and postnatal administration of glucocorticoids are presented. Analysis of the correlates of insulin sensitivity at older age, suggests that premature birth is the major contributor, and is compounded by gain in weight during infancy. We speculate that premature interruption of pregnancy and neonatal interventions by affecting one carbon metabolism may cause programming effects on the immature baby. These can be additive to the effects of intrauterine environment (growth restriction) and are compounded by accelerated growth in early infancy.

  15. Psychosocial interventions for perinatal common mental disorders delivered by providers who are not mental health specialists in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Clarke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal common mental disorders (PCMDs are a major cause of disability among women. Psychosocial interventions are one approach to reduce the burden of PCMDs. Working with care providers who are not mental health specialists, in the community or in antenatal health care facilities, can expand access to these interventions in low-resource settings. We assessed effects of such interventions compared to usual perinatal care, as well as effects of interventions based on intervention type, delivery method, and timing.We conducted a systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression. We searched databases including Embase and the Global Health Library (up to 7 July 2013 for randomized and non-randomized trials of psychosocial interventions delivered by non-specialist mental health care providers in community settings and antenatal health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries. We pooled outcomes from ten trials for 18,738 participants. Interventions led to an overall reduction in PCMDs compared to usual care when using continuous data for PCMD symptomatology (effect size [ES] -0.34; 95% CI -0.53, -0.16 but not binary categorizations for presence or absence of PCMDs (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.35, 1.080 [corrected]. We found a significantly larger ES for psychological interventions (three studies; ES -0.46; 95% CI -0.58, -0.33 than for health promotion interventions (seven studies; ES -0.15; 95% CI -0.27, -0.02. Both individual (five studies; ES -0.18; 95% CI -0.34, -0.01 and group (three studies; ES -0.48; 95% CI -0.85, -0.11 interventions were effective compared to usual care, though delivery method was not associated with ES (meta-regression β coefficient -0.11; 95% CI -0.36, 0.14. Combined group and individual interventions (based on two studies had no benefit compared to usual care, nor did interventions restricted to pregnancy (three studies. Intervention timing was not associated with ES (β 0.16; 95% CI -0.16, 0.49. The small number

  16. Intervenções psicossociais em comunidades: contribuições da psicanálise Psychosocial interventions in communities: psychoanalyses contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Lara Junior

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe uma reflexão de cunho teórico-metodológico sobre as formas de intervenção psicossocial em comunidades e as contribuições que a psicanálise freudo-lacaniana pode oferecer a esse campo. Para tanto, nosso ponto de partida será, além de uma revisão bibliográfica sobre o tema na psicologia social comunitária, a nossa experiência profissional e acadêmica. Nosso objetivo é fundamentar uma proposta praxiológica de intervenção com comunidades e para isso utilizaremos alguns conceitos e ideias relevantes pautadas na psicanálise que nos possibilitam refletir sobre a prática interventiva dos psicólogos e também de outros profissionais que atuam na área social. Neste texto dialogamos com autores como Jacques Lacan, Slavoj Zizek e Chantal Mouffe.This article proposes a theoretical-methodological reflection on the forms of psychosocial intervention in communities and the contributions that Freud-Lacanian psychoanalyzes can offer to this field. Therefore we will have a bibliographic revision on the topic according to the Community Social Psychology and our professional and academic experience. However our objective is to found a praxiological proposal of intervention in communities and, to do so, we will use some concepts and relevant ideas based in Psychoanalyses, which enable the reflection on the intervention practices of the psychologist, and also of other professionals who work in the social area. In this text, we dialogue with authors like: Jacques Lacan, Slavoj Zizek e Chantal Mouffe.

  17. The effect of a diabetes education, coping skills training, and care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in black women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Chyun, Deborah; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Newlin, Kelley; Jefferson, Vanessa; Langerman, Susan

    2010-07-01

    An 11-week culturally relevant group diabetes self-management training (DSMT), coping skills training (CST), and diabetes care intervention was compared to a 10-week usual diabetes education and diabetes care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in 109 Black women (aged 48 +/- 10 years) with type 2 diabetes in primary care (PC). Strong time effects for hemoglobin A1c improvement were seen in both groups from baseline to 3 months and remained similar at 12 and 24 months (p < .0001). Systolic blood pressure (p =.01) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = .05) improved in both groups from baseline to 24 months. Baseline quality of life ([QOL]; Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36) was low. Social function, role-emotional, and mental health domains increased initially in both groups then declined slightly, with less decline for the experimental group at 12 months. At 24 months, experimental group scores increased. General health (p = .002), vitality (p = .01), role-physical, and bodily pain (p = .02) domains increased in both groups over time. Perceived provider support for diet (p = .0001) and exercise (p = .0001) increased in both groups over time. Diabetes-related emotional distress decreased in the experimental compared to the control group (group x time, p = .01). Findings suggest that both methods of diabetes education combined with care can improve metabolic control, QOL, and perceptions of provider care. CST may further assist in long-term improvements in health outcomes. Behavioral interventions are needed in addition to routine diabetes care, particularly in PC.

  18. Demographic, Behavioral, and Psychosocial Correlates of Using the Website Component of a Worksite Physical Activity and Healthy Nutrition Promotion Program: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroek, Suzan JW; Brouwer, Wendy; Lindeboom, Dennis; Oenema, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet-delivered behavior change programs have the potential to reach a large population. However, low participation levels and high levels of attrition are often observed. The worksite could be a setting suitable for reaching and retaining large numbers of people, but little is known about reach and use of Internet-delivered health promotion programs in the worksite setting. Objective This study aimed (1) to gain more insight in the use of the website component of a worksite behavior change intervention and (2) to identify demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors associated with website use. Methods The study was an observational study among participants from 5 workplaces in a cluster randomized controlled trial. At baseline, all participants visited a study website to fill out the baseline questionnaire. Then a physical health check was done followed by face-to-face advice. After this contact, all participants received an email to promote visiting the website to view their health check results and the personal advice based on the baseline questionnaire. In the subsequent period, only participants in the intervention group received monthly email messages to promote website visits and were offered additional Web-based tools (self-monitors and a food frequency questionnaire [FFQ] assessing saturated fat intake) to support their behavior change. Website use was monitored by website statistics registering website access. Complete data were available for 726 employees. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify characteristics of employees who visited and used the website. Results In total, 43% of the participants visited the website after the email to promote website visits. Participants who were insufficiently physically active were less likely to visit the website (odds ratio [OR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45-0.88), whereas individuals with an elevated total cholesterol level visited the website more often (OR 1.44, 95

  19. Reporting and understanding the safety and adverse effect profile of mobile apps for psychosocial interventions: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Gire, Nadeem; Xiang, Shuo; Yang, Megan; Syed, Yumeen; Shokraneh, Farhad; Adams, Clive; Farooq, Saeed

    2016-06-22

    Recent years have seen a rapidly increasing trend towards the delivery of health technology through mobile devices. Smartphones and tablet devices are thus becoming increasingly popular for accessing information and a wide range of services, including health care services. Modern mobile apps can be used for a variety of reasons, ranging from education for the patients and assistance to clinicians to delivery of interventions. Mobile phone apps have also been established to benefit patients in a scope of interventions across numerous medical specialties and treatment modalities. Medical apps have their advantages and disadvantages. It is important that clinicians have access to knowledge to make decisions regarding the use of medical apps on the basis of risk-benefit ratio. Mobile apps that deliver psycho social interventions offer unique challenges and opportunities. A number of reviews have highlighted the potential use of such apps. There is a need to describe, report and study their side effects too. The adverse effects associated with these apps can broadly be divided into: (1) those resulting from the security and safety concerns; (2) those arising from the use of a particular psycho social intervention; and (3) those due to the interaction with digital technology. There is a need to refine and reconsider the safety and adverse effects in this area. The safety profile of a mobile PSI app should describe its safety profile in: (1) privacy and security; (2) adverse effects of psychotherapy; and (3) adverse effects unique to the use of apps and the internet. This is, however, a very new area and further research and reporting is required to inform clinical decision making.

  20. Developmental programming of the metabolic syndrome - critical windows for intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Mark H

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic disease results from a complex interaction of many factors, including genetic, physiological, behavioral and environmental influences. The recent rate at which these diseases have increased suggests that environmental and behavioral influences, rather than genetic causes, are fuelling the present epidemic. In this context, the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis has highlighted the link between the periconceptual, fetal and early infant phases of life and the subsequent development of adult obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although the mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated, this programming was generally considered an irreversible change in developmental trajectory. Recent work in animal models suggests that developmental programming of metabolic disorders is potentially reversible by nutritional or targeted therapeutic interventions during the period of developmental plasticity. This review will discuss critical windows of developmental plasticity and possible avenues to ameliorate the development of postnatal metabolic disorders following an adverse early life environment. PMID:21954418

  1. Intervention program for modification the nutrition habits of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statharou A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The healthy way of diet of mental patients, as it appears from the international bibliography, occupies the professionals of health for a lot of years. A lot of efforts have become in this sector and mainly in acquire the mental patients the control of natural health and well-being. Each program of intervention that aims in the modification of alimentary habits with the use of cognitive-behavior theories contributes in the improvement of quality of diet, but also in the aid of self-esteem Nevertheless, it should be becomes obvious that this programs, with any their cost it corresponds, can be economically compensated with in the long term profits. Profits that result from the co morbidity and by extension of reduction the use of health services.

  2. Demonstration of an E-mailed Worksite Nutrition Intervention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Block

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dietary fat and low fruit and vegetable intake are linked to many chronic diseases, and U.S. population intake does not meet recommendations. Interventions are needed that incorporate effective behavior-change principles and that can be delivered inexpensively to large segments of the population. Methods Employees at a corporate worksite were invited to participate in a program, delivered entirely by e-mail, to reduce dietary fat and increase fruit and vegetable intake. Behavior-change principles underlying the intervention included tailoring to the participant’s dietary lifestyle, baseline assessment and feedback about dietary intake, family participation, and goal setting. Assessment, tailoring, and delivery was fully automated. The program was delivered weekly to participants’ e-mail inboxes for 12 weeks. Each e-mail included information on nutrition or on the relationship between diet and health, dietary tips tailored to the individual, and small goals to try for the next week. In this nonrandomized pilot study, we assessed technical feasibility, acceptability to employees, improvement in Stage of Change, increase in fruit and vegetable consumption, and decrease in fat intake. Results Approximately one third (n = 84 of employees who were offered the 12-week program signed up for it, and satisfaction was high. There was significant improvement in Stage of Change: 74% of those not already at the top had forward movement (P < .001. In addition, results suggest significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption (0.73 times/day, P < .001 and significant decrease in intake of fat sources (-0.39 times/day, P < .001. Conclusion This inexpensive program is feasible and appears to be effective. A randomized controlled trial is needed.

  3. A multi-element psychosocial intervention for early psychosis (GET UP PIANO TRIAL) conducted in a catchment area of 10 million inhabitants: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Mirella; Bonetto, Chiara; Lasalvia, Antonio; De Girolamo, Giovanni; Fioritti, Angelo; Rucci, Paola; Santonastaso, Paolo; Neri, Giovanni; Pileggi, Francesca; Ghigi, Daniela; Miceli, Maurizio; Scarone, Silvio; Cocchi, Angelo; Torresani, Stefano; Faravelli, Carlo; Zimmermann, Christa; Meneghelli, Anna; Cremonese, Carla; Scocco, Paolo; Leuci, Emanuela; Mazzi, Fausto; Gennarelli, Massimo; Brambilla, Paolo; Bissoli, Sarah; Bertani, Maria Elena; Tosato, Sarah; De Santi, Katia; Poli, Sara; Cristofalo, Doriana; Tansella, Michele; Ruggeri, Mirella; Mirella, Maria Elena; Bissoli, Sarah; Bonetto, Chiara; Cristofalo, Doriana; De Santi, Katia; Lasalvia, Antonio; Lunardi, Silvia; Negretto, Valentina; Poli, Sara; Tosato, Sarah; Zamboni, Maria Grazia; Ballarin, Mario; De Girolamo, Giovanni; Fioritti, Angelo; Neri, Giovanni; Pileggi, Francesca; Rucci, Paola; Bocchio Chiavetto, Luisella; Scasselatti, Catia; Zanardini, Roberta; Brambilla, Paolo; Bellani, Marcella; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Marinelli, Veronica; Negretto, Valentina; Perlini, Cinzia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bertani, Mariaelena; Bissoli, Sarah; Lazzarotto, Lorenza; Bardella, Sonia; Gardellin, Francesco; Lamonaca, Dario; Lasalvia, Antonio; Lunardon, Marco; Magnabosco, Renato; Martucci, Marilena; Nicolau, Stylianos; Nifosì, Francesco; Pavanati, Michele; Rossi, Massimo; Piazza, Carlo; Piccione, Gabriella; Sala, Alessandra; Sale, Annalisa; Stefan, Benedetta; Zotos, Spyridon; Balbo, Mirko; Boggian, Ileana; Ceccato, Enrico; Dall'Agnola, Rosa; Gardellin, Francesco; Girotto, Barbara; Goss, Claudia; Lamonaca, Dario; Lasalvia, Antonio; Leoni, Roberta; Mai, Alessia; Pasqualini, Annalisa; Pavanati, Michele; Piazza, Carlo; Piccione, Gabriella; Roccato, Stefano; Rossi, Alberto; Sale, Annalisa; Strizzolo, Stefania; Zotos, Spyridon; Urbani, Anna; Ald, Flavia; Bianchi, Barbara; Cappellari, Paola; Conti, Raffaello; De Battisti, Laura; Lazzarin, Ermanna; Merlin, Silvia; Migliorini, Giuseppe; Pozzan, Tecla; Sarto, Lucio; Visonà, Stefania; Brazzoli, Andrea; Campi, Antonella; Carmagnani, Roberta; Giambelli, Sabrina; Gianella, Annalisa; Lunardi, Lino; Madaghiele, Davide; Maestrelli, Paola; Paiola, Lidia; Posteri, Elisa; Viola, Loretta; Zamberlan, Valentina; Zenari, Marta; Tosato, Sarah; Zanoni, Martina; Bonadonna, Giovanni; Bonomo, Mariacristina; Santonastaso, Paolo; Cremonese, Carla; Scocco, Paolo; Veronese, Angela; Anderle, Patrizia; Angelozz, Andrea; Amalric, Isabelle; Baron, Gabriella; Candeago, Enrico Bruttomesso Fabio; Castelli, Franco; Chieco, Maria; Cremonese, Carla; Di Costanzo, Enrico; Derossi, Mario; Doriguzzi, Michele; Galvano, Osvaldo; Lattanz, Marcello; Lezzi, Roberto; Marcato, Marisa; Marcolin, Alessandro; Marini, Franco; Matranga, Manlio; Scalabrin, Donato; Zucchetto, Maria; Zadro, Flavio; Austoni, Giovanni; Bianco, Maria; Bordino, Francesca; Dario, Filippo; De Risio, Alessandro; Gatto, Aldo; Granà, Simona; Favero, Emanuele; Franceschin, Anna; Friederici, Silvia; Marangon, Vanna; Pascolo, Michela; Ramon, Luana; Scocco, Paolo; Veronese, Angela; Zambolin, Stefania; Riolo, Rossana; Buffon, Antonella; Cremonese, Carla; Di Bortolo, Elena; Friederici, Silvia; Fortin, Stefania; Marcato, Marisa; Matarrese, Francesco; Mogni, Simona; Codemo, Novella; Russi, Alessio; Silvestro, Alessandra; Turella, Elena; Viel, Paola; Dominoni, Anna; Andreose, Lorenzo; Boemio, Mario; Bressan, Loretta; Cabbia, Arianna; Canesso, Elisabetta; Cian, Romina; Dal Piccol, Claudia; Dalla Pasqua, Maria Manuela; Di Prisco, Anna; Mantellato, Lorena; Luison, Monica; Morgante, Sandra; Santi, Mirna; Sacillotto, Moreno; Scabbio, Mauro; Sponga, Patrizia; Sguotto, M Luisa; Stach, Flavia; Vettorato, M Grazia; Martinello, Giorgio; Dassiè, Francesca; Marino, Stefano; Cibiniel, Linda; Masetto, Ilenia; Marcato, Marisa; Cabianca, Oscar; Valente, Amalia; Caberlotto, Livio; Passoni, Alberto; Flumian, Patrizia; Daniel, Luigino; Gion, Massimo; Stanziale, Stanziale; Alborino, Flora; Bortolozzo, Vladimiro; Bacelle, Lucio; Bicciato, Leonarda; Basso, Daniela; Navaglia, Filippo; Manoni, Fabio; Ercolin, Mauro; Neri, Giovanni; Giubilini, Franco; Imbesi, Massimiliano; Leuci, Emanuela; Mazzi, Fausto; Semrov, Enrico; Giovanni, Castel S; Taro e Ceno, Valli; Ovest, Polo; Anelli, Silvio; Amore, Mario; Bigi, Laura; Britta, Welsch; Anna, Giovanna Barazzoni; Bonatti, Uobes; Borziani, Maria; Crosato, Isabella; Galluccio, Raffaele; Galeotti, Margherita; Gozzi, Mauro; Greco, Vanna; Guagnini, Emanuele; Pagani, Stefania; Maccherozzi, Malvasi; Marchi, Francesco; Melato, Ermanno; Mazzucchi, Elena; Marzullo, Franco; Pellegrini, Pietro; Petrolini, Nicoletta; Volta, Paolo; Anelli, Silvio; Bonara, Franca; Brusamonti, Elisabetta; Croci, Roberto; Flamia, Ivana; Fontana, Francesca; Losi, Romina; Mazzi, Fausto; Marchioro, Roberto; Pagani, Stefania; Raffaini, Luigi; Ruju, Luca; Saginario, Antonio; Tondelli, M Grazia; Marrama, Donatella; Bernardelli, Lucia; Bonacini, Federica; Florindo, Annaluisa; Merli, Marina; Nappo, Patrizia; Sola, Lorena; Tondelli, Ornella; Tonna, Matteo; Torre, M Teresa; Tosatti, Morena; Venturelli, Gloria; Zampolla, Daria; Bernardi, Antonia; Cavalli, Cinzia; Cigala, Lorena; Ciraudo, Cinzia; Di Bari, Antonia; Ferri, Lorena; Gombi, Fabiana; Leurini, Sonia; Mandatelli, Elena; Maccaferri, Stefano; Oroboncoide, Mara; Pisa, Barbara; Ricci, Cristina; Poggi, Enrica; Zurlini, Corrado; Malpeli, Monica; Colla, Rossana; Teodori, Elvira; Vecchia, Luigi; D'Andrea, Rocco; Trenti, Tommaso; Paolini, Paola; Mazzi, Fausto; Carpeggiani, Paolo; Pileggi, Francesca; Ghigi, Daniela; Gagliostro, Mariateresa; Pratelli, Michela; Rucci, Paola; Lazzaro, S; Antonelli, Antonio; Battistini, Luana; Bellini, Francesca; Bonini, Eva; Capelli, Caterina Bruschi Rossella; DiDomizio, Cinzia; Drei, Chiara; Fucci, Giuseppe; Gualandi, Alessandra; Grazia, Maria Rosaria; Losi, Anna M; Mazzoni, Federica Mazzanti Paola; Marangoni, Daniela; Monna, Giuseppe; Morselli, Marco; Oggioni, Alessandro; Oprandi, Silvio; Paganelli, Walter; Passerini, Morena; Piscitelli, Maria; Reggiani, Gregorio; Rossi, Gabriella; Salvatori, Federica; Trasforini, Simona; Uslenghi, Carlo; Veggetti, Simona; Bartolucci, Giovanna; Baruffa, Rosita; Bellini, Francesca; Bertelli, Raffaella; Borghi, Lidia; Ciavarella, Patrizia; DiDomizio, Cinzia; Monna, Giuseppe; Oggioni, Alessandro; Paltrinieri, Elisabetta; Rizzardi, Francesco; Serra, Piera; Suzzi, Damiano; Carlo, Uslenghi; Piscitelli, Maria; Arienti, Paolo; Aureli, Fabio; Avanzi, Rosita; Callegari, Vincenzo; Corsino, Alessandra; Host, Paolo; Michetti, Rossella; Pratelli, Michela; Rizzo, Francesco; Simoncelli, Paola; Soldati, Elena; Succi, Eraldo; Bertozzi, Massimo; Canetti, Elisa; Cavicchioli, Luca; Ceccarelli, Elisa; Cenni, Stefano; Marzola, Glenda; Gallina, Vanessa; Leoni, Carla; Olivieri, Andrea; Piccolo, Elena; Ravagli, Sabrina; Russo, Rosaria; Tedeschini, Daniele; Verenini, Marina; Abram, Walter; Granata, Veronica; Curcio, Alessandro; Guerra, Giovanni; Granini, Samuela; Natali, Lara; Montanari, Enrica; Pasi, Fulvia; Ventura, Umbertina; Valenti, Stefania; Francesca, Masi; Farneti, Rossano; Ravagli, Paolo; Floris, Romina; Maroncelli, Otello; Volpones, Gianbattista; Casali, Donatella; Miceli, Maurizio; Bencini, Andrea; Cellini, Massimo; De Biase, Luca; Barbara, Leonardo; Charles, Liedl; Pratesi, Cristina; Tanini, Andrea; Cellini, Massimo; Miceli, Maurizio; Loparrino, Riccardo; Pratesi, Cristina; Ulivelli, Cinzia; Cussoto, Cristina; Dei, Nico; Fumanti, Enrico; Pantani, Manuela; Zeloni, Gregorio; Bellini, Rossella; Cellesi, Roberta; Dorigo, Nadia; Gullì, Patrizia; Ialeggio, Luisa; Pisanu, Maria; Rinaldi, Graziella; Konze, Angela; Cocchi, Angelo; Meneghelli, Anna; Bianco, Mario; Modignani, Litta; Frova, Maria; Monzani, Emiliano; Zanobio, Alberto; Malagoli, Marina; Pagani, Roberto; Barbera, Simona; Morganti, Carla; Monzani, Emiliano; Amadè, Elisabetta Sarzi; Brambilla, Virginia; Montanari, Anita; Caterina, Giori; Lopez, Carmelo; Marocchi, Alessandro; Moletta, Andrea; Sberna, Maurizio; Cascio, M Teresa; Scarone, Silvio; Manzone, Maria Laura; Barbara, Barbera; Mari, Luisa; Manzone, Maria L; Razzini, Edoardo; Bianchi, Yvonne; Pellizzer, M Rosa; Verdecchia, Antonella; Sferrazza, M Gabriella; Manzone, M Laura; Pismataro, Rosa; D'Eril, Gian Vico Melzi; Barassi, Alessandra; Pacciolla, Rosana; Faraci, Gloria; Torresani, Stefano; Rosmini, Bolzano; Carpi, Fabio; Soelva, Margit; Anderlan, Monica; De Francesco, Michele; Duregger, Efi; Torresani, Stefano; Vettori, Carla; Doimo, Sabrina; Kompatscher, Erika; Soelva, Margit; Torresani, Stefano; Forer, Michael; Kerschbaumer, Helene; Gampe, Anna; Nicoletti, Maira; Acerbi, Chiara; Aquilino, Daniele; Azzali, Silvia; Bensi, Luca; Bissoli, Sarah; Cappellari, Davide; Casana, Elisa; Campagnola, Nadia; Dal Corso, Elisa; Di Micco, Elisabetta; Gobbi, Erika; Ferri, Laura; Gobbi, Erika; Mairaghi, Laura; Malak, Sara; Mesiano, Luca; Paterlini, Federica; Perini, Michela; Puliti, Elena Maria; Rispoli, Rosaria; Rizzo, Elisabetta; Sergenti, Chiara; Soave, Manuela; Alpi, Andrea; Bislenghi, Laura; Bolis, Tiziana; Colnaghi, Francesca; Fascendini, Simona; Grignani, Silvia; Meneghelli, Anna; Patelli, Giovanni; Faravelli, Carlo; Casale, Silvia; Zimmermann, Christa; Deledda, Giuseppe; Goss, Claudia; Mazzi, Mariangela; Rimondini, Michela; Gennarelli, Massimo; Scassellati, Catia; Bonvicini, Cristian; Longo, Sara; Bocchio Chiavetto, Luisella; Zanardini, Roberta; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Squitti, Rosanna; Frisoni, Giovanni; Pievani, Michela; Balestrieri, Matteo; Brambilla, Paolo; Perlini, Cinzia; Marinelli, Veronica; Bellani, Marcella; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Atzori, Manfredo; Mazzi, Fausto; Carpeggiani, Paolo; Beltramello, Alberto; Alessandrini, Franco; Pizzini, Francesca; Zoccatelli, Giada; Sberna, Maurizio; Konze, Angela; Politi, Pierluigi; Emanuele, Enzo; Brondino, Natascia; Martino, Gianvito; Bergami, Alessandra; Zarbo, Roberto; Riva, Marco Andrea; Fumagalli, Fabio; Molteni, Raffaella; Calabrese, Francesca; Guidotti, Gianluigi; Luoni, Alessia; Macchi, Flavia; Artioli, Stefania; Baldetti, Marco; Bizzocchi, Milena; Bolzon, Donatella; Bonello, Elisa; Cacciari, Giorgia; Carraresi, Claudia; Cascio, M Teresa; Caselli, Gabriele; Furlato, Karin; Garlassi, Sara; Gavarini, Alessandro; Lunardi, Silvia; Macchetti, Fabio; Marteddu, Valentina; Plebiscita, Giorgia; Poli, Sara; Totaro, Stefano; Bebbington, Paul; Birchwood, Max; Dazzan, Paola; Kuipers, Elisabeth; Thornicroft, Graham; Pariante, Carmine; Lawrie, Steve; Pariante, Carmine; Soares, Jair C

    2012-05-30

    Multi-element interventions for first-episode psychosis (FEP) are promising, but have mostly been conducted in non-epidemiologically representative samples, thereby raising the risk of underestimating the complexities involved in treating FEP in 'real-world' services. The Psychosis early Intervention and Assessment of Needs and Outcome (PIANO) trial is part of a larger research program (Genetics, Endophenotypes and Treatment: Understanding early Psychosis - GET UP) which aims to compare, at 9 months, the effectiveness of a multi-component psychosocial intervention versus treatment as usual (TAU) in a large epidemiologically based cohort of patients with FEP and their family members recruited from all public community mental health centers (CMHCs) located in two entire regions of Italy (Veneto and Emilia Romagna), and in the cities of Florence, Milan and Bolzano. The GET UP PIANO trial has a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled design. The randomized units (clusters) are the CMHCs, and the units of observation are the centers' patients and their family members. Patients in the experimental group will receive TAU plus: 1) cognitive behavioral therapy sessions, 2) psycho-educational sessions for family members, and 3) case management. Patient enrollment will take place over a 1-year period. Several psychopathological, psychological, functioning, and service use variables will be assessed at baseline and follow-up. The primary outcomes are: 1) change from baseline to follow-up in positive and negative symptoms' severity and subjective appraisal; 2) relapse occurrences between baseline and follow-up, that is, episodes resulting in admission and/or any case-note records of re-emergence of positive psychotic symptoms. The expected number of recruited patients is about 400, and that of relatives about 300. Owing to the implementation of the intervention at the CMHC level, the blinding of patients, clinicians, and raters is not possible, but every effort will be made

  4. Psycho-social consequences in everyday life of patients of diabetes mellitus and the potential for the improvement of health-care interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsounis A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic illness with multiple medical, psychological, social and economic consequences, both in macro-social and individual level. Aim: The aim of the present task is το study the multiple consequences of the illness in patients’ and their social environment life and tο search for ways of coping that will take into account all the involvement parts (patients, health-professionals, health-care system. Method: the methodology which was used included a literature review of Greek and international bibliography with the help of keywords. Conclusions: The meeting of an individual with a chronic illness like Diabetes Mellitus brings rapid changes to his/her everyday life. The constraints that emerge in all social activities, the effects on the quality of social contacts, the development of psychological clinical symptoms, the social stigma, the impact on self-image and self-esteem cause significant psychosocial burden. For their effective treatment, holistic interventions on the part of health professionals and exploitation of the potential of the patient’s social environment are imposed.

  5. The role of psychosocial stress in the onset and progression of bipolar disorder and its comorbidities: the need for earlier and alternative modes of therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R M; Leverich, G S

    2006-01-01

    Psychosocial stress plays an important role at multiple junctures in the onset and course of bipolar disorder. Childhood adversity may be a risk factor for vulnerability to early onset illness, and an array of stressors may be relevant not only to the onset, recurrence, and progression of affective episodes, but the highly prevalent substance abuse comorbidities as well. A substantial group of controlled studies indicate that various cognitive behavioral psychotherapies and psychoeducational approaches may yield better outcomes in bipolar disorder than treatment as usual. Yet these approaches do not appear to be frequently or systematically employed in clinical practice, and this may contribute to the considerable residual morbidity and mortality associated with conventional treatment. Possible practical approaches to reducing this deficit (in an illness that is already underdiagnosed and undertreated even with routine medications) are offered. Without the mobilization of new clinical and public health approaches to earlier and more effective treatment and supportive interventions, bipolar illness will continue to have grave implications for many patients' long-term well being.

  6. Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Multi-Element Psychosocial Intervention for First-Episode Psychosis: Results From the Cluster-Randomized Controlled GET UP PIANO Trial in a Catchment Area of 10 Million Inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Mirella; Bonetto, Chiara; Lasalvia, Antonio; Fioritti, Angelo; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Santonastaso, Paolo; Pileggi, Francesca; Neri, Giovanni; Ghigi, Daniela; Giubilini, Franco; Miceli, Maurizio; Scarone, Silvio; Cocchi, Angelo; Torresani, Stefano; Faravelli, Carlo; Cremonese, Carla; Scocco, Paolo; Leuci, Emanuela; Mazzi, Fausto; Pratelli, Michela; Bellini, Francesca; Tosato, Sarah; De Santi, Katia; Bissoli, Sarah; Poli, Sara; Ira, Elisa; Zoppei, Silvia; Rucci, Paola; Bislenghi, Laura; Patelli, Giovanni; Cristofalo, Doriana; Meneghelli, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Integrated multi-element psychosocial interventions have been suggested to improve the outcomes of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients, but they have been studied primarily in experimental settings and in nonepidemiologically representative samples. Thus, we performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, comparing an integrated multi-element psychosocial intervention, comprising cognitive behavioral therapy, family intervention, and case management, with treatment as usual (TAU) for FEP patients in 117 community mental health centers (CMHCs) in a large area of northern Italy (10 million inhabitants). The randomized units (clusters) were the CMHCs, and the units of observation the patients (and, when available, their family members). The primary hypotheses were that add-on multicomponent intervention: (1) results in greater improvements in symptoms, as assessed with positive and negative syndrome scale and (2) reduces in-hospital stay, based on days of hospitalization over the 9-month follow-up. Four hundred and forty-four FEP patients received the intervention or TAU and were assessed at baseline and 9 months. Based on the retention rates of patients (and families) in the experimental arm, multi-element psychosocial interventions can be implemented in routine mental health services. Regarding primary outcomes, patients in the experimental arm showed greater reductions in overall symptom severity, while no difference could be found for days of hospitalization. Among the secondary outcomes, greater improvements were detected in the experimental arm for global functioning, emotional well-being, and subjective burden of delusions. No difference could be found for service disengagement and subjective burden of auditory hallucinations. These findings support feasibility and effectiveness of early interventions for psychosis in generalist mental health services.

  7. The need for a systematic approach to disaster psychosocial response: a suggested competency framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robin S; Danford, Taryn

    2014-04-01

    Competency models attempt to define what makes expert performers "experts." Successful disaster psychosocial planning and the institutionalizing of psychosocial response within emergency management require clearly-defined skill sets. This necessitates anticipating both the short- and long-term psychosocial implications of a disaster or health emergency (ie, pandemic) by developing effective and sustained working relationships among psychosocial providers, programs, and other planning partners. The following article outlines recommended competencies for psychosocial responders to enable communities and organizations to prepare for and effectively manage a disaster response. Competency-based models are founded on observable performance or behavioral indicators, attitudes, traits, or personalities related to effective performance in a specific role or job. After analyzing the literature regarding competency-based frameworks, a proposed competency framework that details 13 competency domains is suggested. Each domain describes a series of competencies and suggests behavioral indicators for each competency and, where relevant, associated training expectations. These domains have been organized under three distinct categories or types of competencies: general competency domains; disaster psychosocial intervention competency domains; and disaster psychosocial program leadership and coordination competency domains. Competencies do not replace job descriptions nor should they be confused with performance assessments. What they can do is update and revise job descriptions; orient existing and new employees to their disaster/emergency roles and responsibilities; target training needs; provide the basis for ongoing self-assessment by agencies and individuals as they evaluate their readiness to respond; and provide a job- or role-relevant basis for performance appraisal dimensions or standards and review discussions. Using a modular approach to psychosocial planning, service

  8. Animal assisted therapy (AAT program as a useful adjunct to conventional psychosocial rehabilitation for patients with schizophrenia: results of a small-scale randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eCalvo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal-assisted therapy (AAT for specific profiles of patients or participants.The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D, pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program.We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning, a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration and a family program. Each member of the control group (n=8 participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n=14 participated in twice-weekly 1-hour sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  9. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  10. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R.; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L.; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J.; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human–animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6–month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre–program with post–program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre–session with post–session salivary cortisol and alpha–amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty–two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6–month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT–treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice–weekly 1–h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT–treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT–treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology

  11. Long Term Follow-Up after a Randomized Integrated Educational and Psychosocial Intervention in Patient-Partner Dyads Affected by Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Liljeroos

    Full Text Available To date, contemporary heart failure care remains patient-focused, but awareness of the partners' and families' situation is increasing. Randomized studies have mainly evaluated the short-term effects of dyadic interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the 24-month effects of an intervention with psych-educational support in dyads of heart failure patients and their partners.This study used a randomized study design and 155 patient-partner dyads were enrolled. The intervention included a nurse-led program of three sessions addressing psychoeducational support.The intervention did not have any effect on health, depressive symptoms or perceived control among the patient-partner dyads after 24 months. Furthermore, time to first event did not differ significantly between the intervention group and the control patients.This study may be regarded as a first step in trying to understand dyads' need for supportive care. Individualized and more targeted interventions seem necessary to achieve a higher impact on dyad outcomes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02398799.

  12. A Community-Based Early Intervention Program for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Pamela Rosenthal; Campbell, Michelle; Hoffman, Renee Thibodeau; Self, Kayli

    2016-01-01

    This study examined Pathways Early Autism Intervention, a community-based, parent-mediated, intensive behavioral and developmental intervention program for children with autism spectrum disorders that could be used as a model for state-funded early intervention programs. A single-subject, multiple-baseline, across-participants design was used.…

  13. Advances in psychosocial interventions on quality of life of cancer survivors%心理社会干预对癌症生存者生命质量改善的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈学芬; 王继伟; 宫霄欢; 余金明

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,there has been increasing recognition of the importance of psychosocial interventions' studies on quality of life in cancer survivors because of improving cancer survival rate.This paper was an integrative literatures review of various psychosocial interventions including cognitive behavioral therapy,group-based supportive therapy,counseling or psychotherapy,education or psychoeducation and music therapy et al,and analyzing the complexity of psychosocial interventions' RCTs in oncology and the current characteristic of these studies in china.%随着癌症生存率提高,对癌症生存者生命质量改善的心理社会研究越来越受到关注,本文综述了近年来常见的心理社会干预措施如认知行为干预、支持性小组干预、咨询或心理疗法和音乐疗法等,分析了心理社会干预RCT研究的复杂性以及我国心理社会研究现状.

  14. Psychosocial Interventions for Cancer Survivors, Caregivers and Family Members—One Size Does Not Fit All: My Perspective as a Young Adult Survivor, Advocate and Oncology Social Worker” a personal reflection by Mary Grace Bontempo - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychosocial Interventions for Cancer Survivors, Caregivers and Family Members—One Size Does Not Fit All: My Perspective as a Young Adult Survivor, Advocate and Oncology Social Worker” a personal reflection by Mary Grace Bontempo page

  15. Maintenance Model of Integrated Psychosocial Treatment in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy E.; Henry, David B.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The chronic and refractory course of pediatric bipolar disorder merits the study of adjunctive psychosocial interventions designed to facilitate long-term improvements. The objective of this study is to conduct a pilot study of a maintenance model of the child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy program (CFF-CBT), which…

  16. Empirically Based Psychosocial Therapies for Schizophrenia: The Disconnection between Science and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn D. Shean

    2013-01-01

    Empirically validated psychosocial therapies for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia were described in the report of the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT, 2009). The PORT team identified eight psychosocial treatments: assertive community treatment, supported employment, cognitive behavioral therapy, family-based services, token economy, skills training, psychosocial interventions for alcohol and substance use disorders, and psychosocial interventions for weight manageme...

  17. Drug related hospital admissions. Results from an intervention program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, J.; Harvald, B.; Worm, J.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, drug education, hospital admission, adverse drug reactions, drug utilisation, intervention......Farmakologi, drug education, hospital admission, adverse drug reactions, drug utilisation, intervention...

  18. Web-Based Intervention for Postpartum Depression: Formative Research and Design of the MomMoodBooster Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, Brian G; Milgrom, Jeannette; Seeley, John R; Stuart, Scott; Schembri, Charlene; Tyler, Milagra S; Ericksen, Jennifer; Lester, Whitney; Gemmill, Alan W; Lewinsohn, Peter

    2012-11-22

    Postpartum depression is a significant public health problem affecting approximately 13% of women. There is strong evidence supporting Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for successful psychosocial treatment. This treatment model combines cognitive and behavioral strategies to address pessimism, attributions for failure, low self-esteem, low engagement in pleasant activities, social withdrawal, anxiety, and low social support. Encouraging results have been reported for using Web-based CBT interventions for mental health domains, including the treatment of panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and complicated grief and depression. To date, however, Web-based interventions have not been used and evaluated specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression. We describe the formative work that contributed to the development of our Web-based intervention for helping to ameliorate symptoms of postpartum depression, and the design and key components of the program. A total of 17 focus group participants and 22 usability testers, who shared key characteristics with the participants of our planned feasibility study, took part. The proposed structure and ingredients of the program and mock-ups of selected webpages were presented to focus group participants. At various points, participants were asked a series of thought questions designed to elicit opinions and set the occasion for group discussion. At the end of the session, participants were asked to describe their overall reaction to the proposed features of the program emphasizing candid opinions about what they did not like and features they thought were missing and should be added. Usability testers were asked to interact with a series of seven different Web-based interactions planned for the program while receiving minimal direction. Each tester was asked to describe her thoughts using a think-aloud technique. They were then asked to consider all that they had learned about the program and complete the

  19. OSTA program: A French follow up intervention program for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouaffak, Fayçal; Marchand, Arnaud; Castaigne, Emmanuelle; Arnoux, Armelle; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-12-30

    Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behavior. In recent years, a particular interest has been given to follow-up interventions as a potential effective strategy in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. We developed a follow-up intervention program called OSTA (organization of a suitable monitoring for suicide attempters) aimed at addressing this issue and tested its effectiveness in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Individuals who attempted suicide and were admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Bicêtre Hospital (n=320) were randomly allocated to receive either the OSTA program or a control treatment. On an intention to treat basis, the proportion of patients who reattempted suicide did not differ significantly between the interventional group (IG) 14.5% (22/152) and the control group (CG) 14% (21/150). There were also no significant differences, between the two arms, in the number of suicide attempts. Although no significant difference has been found between the OSTA program and the control treatment concerning the rate of suicide reattempts, we believe that further studies should be conducted to test the effectiveness of more standardized follow-up studies in suicide prevention.

  20. Cognitive behavioural therapy and short-term psychoanalytical psychotherapy versus a brief psychosocial intervention in adolescents with unipolar major depressive disorder (IMPACT): a multicentre, pragmatic, observer-blind, randomised controlled superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyer, Ian M; Reynolds, Shirley; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Dubicka, Bernadka; Hill, Jonathan; Holland, Fiona; Kelvin, Raphael; Midgley, Nick; Roberts, Chris; Senior, Rob; Target, Mary; Widmer, Barry; Wilkinson, Paul; Fonagy, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Psychological treatments for adolescents with unipolar major depressive disorder are associated with diagnostic remission within 28 weeks in 65-70% of patients. We aimed to assess the medium-term effects and costs of psychological therapies on maintenance of reduced depression symptoms 12 months after treatment. We did this multicentre, pragmatic, observer-blind, randomised controlled superiority trial (IMPACT) at 15 National Health Service child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) clinics in three regions in England. Adolescent patients (aged 11-17 years) with a diagnosis of DSM IV major depressive disorder were randomly assigned (1:1:1), via a web-based randomisation service, to receive cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or short-term psychoanalytical therapy versus a reference brief psychological intervention. Randomisation was stochastically minimised by age, sex, self-reported depression sum score, and region. Patients and clinicians were aware of group allocation, but allocation was concealed from outcome assessors. Patients were followed up and reassessed at weeks 6, 12, 36, 52, and 86 post-randomisation. The primary outcome was self-reported depression symptoms at weeks 36, 52, and 86, as measured with the self-reported Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ). Because our aim was to compare the two psychological therapies with the brief psychosocial intervention, we first established whether CBT was inferior to short-term psychoanalytical psychotherapy for the same outcome. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN83033550. Between June 29, 2010, and Jan 17, 2013, we randomly assigned 470 patients to receive the brief psychosocial intervention (n=158), CBT (n=155), or short-term psychoanalytical therapy (n=157); 465 patients comprised the intention-to-treat population. 392 (84%) patients had available data for primary analysis by the end of follow-up. Treatment fidelity and

  1. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Scholten; A.M. Willemen; M.A. Grootenhuis; H. Maurice-Stam; C. Schuengel; B.F. Last

    2011-01-01

    Coping with a chronic illness (CI) challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the int

  2. Behavioral and psychosocial interventions for HIV prevention in floating populations in China over the past decade: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    Full Text Available Floating populations have been repeatedly characterized as "the tipping point" for the HIV epidemic in China. This study aims to systematically summarize and assess the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions in floating populations in China over the past decade.We conducted a systematic search in three international databases for literature published between 2005 and 2012 with condom use as the primary outcome, and knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention and stigma towards HIV-infected individuals as secondary outcomes. The impact of interventions on changing the primary and secondary outcomes was calculated by risk difference (RD. We also performed subgroup analyses and meta-regression based on different study characteristics, using Stata 12.0, for the primary outcome.Sixteen studies (out of 149 involved 19 different programs and a total of 10,864 participants at entry from 11 provinces in China. The pooled effect estimate of all studies indicated that people participating in HIV-related interventions were 13% more likely to use condoms (95%CI: 0.07, 0.18, however, the effects on increasing condom use exhibited significant heterogeneity across programs (P<0.01, I2 = 0.93. The meta-regression results suggest that interventions have been significantly less successful in changing condom use in more recent studies (β, 0.14; 95%CI: 0.01, 0.27, adjusted for sexual relationship, study design and follow-up period. Regarding the secondary outcomes, HIV-related interventions were successful at improving knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention (RD, -0.26; 95%CI: -0.36, -0.16 and RD, -0.25; 95%CI: -0.33, -0.16, respectively, and decreasing stigma (RD, 0.18; 95%CI: 0.09, 0.27.The included studies between 2005 and 2012 indicate that HIV prevention interventions among Chinese floating populations in the past decade were only marginally effective at increasing condom use, but relatively successful at increasing HIV knowledge and

  3. Effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention program for young children with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a parent-implemented intervention on children's speech-language development and parents' interaction styles. Seventeen children with cleft palate (CP) and their mothers participated in all sessions of a parent-implemented intervention program. Nine children with CP and their mothers who did not receive the intervention were included to examine the full effectiveness of the program. The intervention program consisted of four phases, pre-intervention test, parent training, parent-implemented intervention at children's home for 3 months, and post-intervention test. Children's language and speech measures and maternal measures from pre- and post-intervention tests were compared between groups (intervention vs. no intervention). Children who received a parent-implemented intervention exhibited significant improvement in language measures based on standardized tests and quantitative language and speech measures from spontaneous utterances. The children in the intervention group showed a significantly greater extent of change in expressive vocabulary size, number of total words, and mean length of utterance than did those who did not receive the intervention. Mothers who received the training showed a significantly decreased number of different words, increased responsiveness, and decreased non-contingent utterances for children's communication acts compared to those who did not receive the training. The results of the study support the effectiveness of parent-implemented early intervention on positive changes in children's speech-language development and mothers' use of communication strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical Activity Programs with Post-Intervention Follow-Up in Children: A Comprehensive Review According to Categories of Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sally; Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Pagani, Linda; Bigras, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-30

    Only 9% of Canadian children meet the National Guidelines of 60 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. The aim of this review is to assess the mid- and long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors in children. We assessed the success of interventions within three different categories: those using a behavioural and social approach, an informational approach or an environmental approach. The average number of children included in these studies was 860 (range of 30-5106); the age range was from 2 to 18 years; and the mean intervention duration was 1607 min (range of 12-8160 min). The length of follow-up post-intervention averaged 13 months (ranging from 0.25 to 96 months). A positive impact on physical activity was found in 74% and on any measured outcomes in 90% of the studies reviewed. However, the benefits of physical activity interventions decreased with longer follow-up. Regardless of the approaches, physical activity interventions improved cardiovascular risk factors. However, the challenge of any program is to maintain beneficial effects once the intervention is completed. These findings will inform the development of future intervention programs in order to optimize sustained cardiovascular benefits.

  5. Physical Activity Programs with Post-Intervention Follow-Up in Children: A Comprehensive Review According to Categories of Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Only 9% of Canadian children meet the National Guidelines of 60 min of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. The aim of this review is to assess the mid- and long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors in children. We assessed the success of interventions within three different categories: those using a behavioural and social approach, an informational approach or an environmental approach. The average number of children included in these studies was 860 (range of 30–5106; the age range was from 2 to 18 years; and the mean intervention duration was 1607 min (range of 12–8160 min. The length of follow-up post-intervention averaged 13 months (ranging from 0.25 to 96 months. A positive impact on physical activity was found in 74% and on any measured outcomes in 90% of the studies reviewed. However, the benefits of physical activity interventions decreased with longer follow-up. Regardless of the approaches, physical activity interventions improved cardiovascular risk factors. However, the challenge of any program is to maintain beneficial effects once the intervention is completed. These findings will inform the development of future intervention programs in order to optimize sustained cardiovascular benefits.

  6. Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

    2012-01-01

    The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)…

  7. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  8. Protecting prosecution : Exploring the powers of law in an intervention program for domestic violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römkens, R.

    2006-01-01

    This article critically analyzes how the criminal justice system centrally situates itself in an intervention program intended to protect victims of domestic abuse and stalking. Based on the first empirical, in-depth study in the Netherlands of an intervention program using electronic technology tha

  9. Effectiveness of School-Based Bullying Intervention Programs in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogini, Eric U.

    2012-01-01

    Bullying behavior has reached pandemic proportions and is a growing concern in primary school. Most intervention programs in primary school are focused on bullying prevention or principally on the behavior of the bully. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a school-based bullying intervention program is an effective method for reducing…

  10. Program Monitoring Practices for Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anne E.; Marvin, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Program monitoring is an important and necessary assessment practice within the field of early childhood deaf education. Effective program monitoring requires a focus on both the consistent implementation of intervention strategies (fidelity) and the assessment of children's ongoing progress in response to interventions (progress monitoring).…

  11. Development of a Postnatal Educational Program for Breastfeeding Mothers in Community Settings: Intervention Mapping a useful guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Kok, Gerjo

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistency in how professionals can best support the breastfeeding mother after discharge call on further investigation. The authors describe how intervention mapping was used to develop a postnatal breastfeeding support intervention for mothers in community settings. Breastfeeding cessation...... determinants for implementation. Finally, process and effect evaluations were planned. Support of the breastfeeding mother in community settings should address the psychosocial and practical aspects of breastfeeding to prevent premature cessation....

  12. Direct and Indirect Psychosocial Outcomes for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their Parents Following a Parent-involved Social Skills Group Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan A; Viecili, Michelle A; Sloman, Leon; Lunsky, Yona

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect outcomes of a social skills group intervention for children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders and their parents. Thirty-five children and their parents participated in the program evaluation. Children and parents completed measures of child social skills and problem behaviors. Children reported on their self-concept, and parents reported on their psychological acceptance and empowerment. Results indicate significant increases in overall child social skills according to parent and child report, in child general self-worth, and in parent service empowerment and psychological acceptance. While past program evaluations of social skills groups highlight changes in social competence, taking a broader perspective on the types of positive outcomes suggests potential benefits for both child and parent.

  13. Psychosocial Issues in Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Alice B.

    1983-01-01

    Emotional development from infancy to adolescence is traced and the effects of psychosocial issues on a child with a learning disability are considered for five of E. Erikson's seven proposed stages (trust, autonomy, initiative, industry, adolescence). The need for intervention and parent counseling at each state is emphasized. (CL)

  14. Development of a program logic model and evaluation plan for a participatory ergonomics intervention in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegers, Lisa; Dale, Ann Marie; Weaver, Nancy; Buchholz, Bryan; Welch, Laura; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Intervention studies in participatory ergonomics (PE) are often difficult to interpret due to limited descriptions of program planning and evaluation. In an ongoing PE program with floor layers, we developed a logic model to describe our program plan, and process and summative evaluations designed to describe the efficacy of the program. The logic model was a useful tool for describing the program elements and subsequent modifications. The process evaluation measured how well the program was delivered as intended, and revealed the need for program modifications. The summative evaluation provided early measures of the efficacy of the program as delivered. Inadequate information on program delivery may lead to erroneous conclusions about intervention efficacy due to Type III error. A logic model guided the delivery and evaluation of our intervention and provides useful information to aid interpretation of results. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sexual Behavior Among Young Carers in the Context of a Kenyan Empowerment Program Combining Cash-Transfer, Psychosocial Support, and Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael L; Selwyn, Beatrice J; Morgan, Robert O; Lloyd, Linda E; Mwongera, Moses; Gitari, Stanley; Keiser, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    This study examined associations between sexual initiation, unprotected sex, and having multiple sex partners in the past year with participation in a three-year empowerment program targeting orphan and vulnerable children (OVC). The Kenya-based program combines community-conditioned cash transfer, psychosocial empowerment, health education, and microenterprise development. Program participants (n = 1,060) were interviewed in a cross-sectional design. Analyses used gender-stratified hierarchical logit models to assess program participation and other potential predictors. Significant predictors of increased female sexual activity included less program exposure, higher age, younger age at most recent parental death, fewer years of schooling, higher food consumption, higher psychological resilience, and lower general self-efficacy. Significant predictors of increased male sexual activity included more program exposure, higher age, better food consumption, not having a living father, and literacy. Findings support a nuanced view of current cash transfer programs, where female sexual activity may be reduced through improved financial status but male sexual activity may increase. Targeting of OVC sexual risk behaviors would likely benefit from being tailored according to associations found in this study. Data suggest involving fathers in sexual education, targeting women who lost a parent at a younger age, and providing social support for female OVC may decrease risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission.

  16. [Empirically based early intervention programs for children with autistic disorders - a selective literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M

    2010-07-01

    Autistic Disorders (AD) are characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, as well as by stereotyped behaviors and interests. Early intervention programs in AD aim to improve several aspects of the child's abilities: joint attention, play abilities, language development, and especially social interaction and communication. In this review article based on a selective literature search, the relatively best empirically based early intervention programs will be discussed with a focus on the proven efficacy of these interventions.

  17. [Psychosocial aspects of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szita, Bernadett; Baji, Ildikó; Rigó, János

    2015-12-13

    Distress conditions during pregnancy may contribute to the development of preeclampsia by altering functions of the neuroendocrine and immune systems, e.g. activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increase in plasma proinflammatory cytokines. Preeclampsia may also precipitate mental health problems due to long-term hospitalization or unpredictable and uncontrollable events such as preterm labor and newborn complications. Besides, preeclampsia may induce persistent neurocognitive complaints with a negative impact on patients' quality of life. As growing evidence indicates that poor maternal mental health has an adverse effect on pregnancy outcome and fetal development, psychosocial interventions may be beneficial for women with preeclampsia.

  18. Assessment for Effective Intervention: Enrichment Science Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Irit; Cohen, Donita

    2012-11-01

    Israel suffers from a growing problem of socio-economic gaps between those who live in the center of the country and residents of outlying areas. As a result, there is a low level of accessibility to higher education among the peripheral population. The goal of the Sidney Warren Science Education Center for Youth at Tel-Hai College is to strengthen the potential of middle and high school students and encourage them to pursue higher education, with an emphasis on majoring in science and technology. This study investigated the implementation and evaluation of the enrichment science academic program, as an example of informal learning environment, with an emphasis on physics studies. About 500 students conducted feedback survey after participating in science activities in four domains: biology, chemistry, physics, and computer science. Results indicated high level of satisfaction among the students. No differences were found with respect to gender excluding in physics with a positive attitudes advantage among boys. In order to get a deeper understanding of this finding, about 70 additional students conducted special questionnaires, both 1 week before the physics enrichment day and at the end of that day. Questionnaires were intended to assess both their attitudes toward physics and their knowledge and conceptions of the physical concept "pressure." We found that the activity moderately improved boys' attitudes toward physics, but that girls displayed decreased interest in and lower self-efficacy toward physics. Research results were used to the improvement of the instructional design of the physics activity demonstrating internal evaluation process for effective intervention.

  19. A community intervention trial of multimodal suicide prevention program in Japan: A Novel multimodal Community Intervention program to prevent suicide and suicide attempt in Japan, NOCOMIT-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Yuriko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To respond to the rapid surge in the incidence of suicide in Japan, which appears to be an ongoing trend, the Japanese Multimodal Intervention Trials for Suicide Prevention (J-MISP have launched a multimodal community-based suicide prevention program, NOCOMIT-J. The primary aim of this study is to examine whether NOCOMIT-J is effective in reducing suicidal behavior in the community. Methods/DesignThis study is a community intervention trial involving seven intervention regions with accompanying control regions, all with populations of statistically sufficient size. The program focuses on building social support networks in the public health system for suicide prevention and mental health promotion, intending to reinforce human relationships in the community. The intervention program components includes a primary prevention measures of awareness campaign for the public and key personnel, secondary prevention measures for screening of, and assisting, high-risk individuals, after-care for individuals bereaved by suicide, and other measures. The intervention started in July 2006, and will continue for 3.5 years. Participants are Japanese and foreign residents living in the intervention and control regions (a total of population of 2,120,000 individuals. Discussion The present study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the community-based suicide prevention program in the seven participating areas. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR UMIN000000460.

  20. The Bullying Literature Project: An Evaluation of a Class-Wide Bullying Intervention Program

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS The Bullying Literature Project: An Evaluation of a Class-wide Bullying Intervention Program by Lauren Kelley Couch Master of Arts, Graduate Program in Education University of California, Riverside, June 2015 Dr. Cixin Wang, Chairperson As the problem of bullying on school campuses gains more attention among educators nationwide, the need for effective bullying prevention programs increases. Existing bullying interventions have either had mixed results in term...

  1. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, P.M.; IJmker, S.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Work related neck and upper limb symptoms have a multi-factorial origin. Possible risk factors are of a physical, psychosocial or personal origin. These factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or societal factors. Initially, most research on neck and upp

  2. Applying the Transactional Stress and Coping Model to Sickle Cell Disorder and Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Identifying Psychosocial Variables Related to Adjustment and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Lochman, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This review paper examines the literature on psychosocial factors associated with adjustment to sickle cell disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in children through the framework of the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model. The transactional stress and coping model views adaptation to a childhood chronic illness as mediated by…

  3. Feasibility of a Psychosocial Rehabilitation Intervention to Enhance the Involvement of Relatives in Cancer Rehabilitation: Pilot Study for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledderer, Loni; la Cour, Karen; Mogensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer often affects the quality of life and well-being of patients as well as their relatives. Previous studies have suggested that relatives should be involved in psychosocial rehabilitation to address the needs for an interpersonal relationship with others in the disease trajectory...

  4. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, P.M.; IJmker, S.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Work related neck and upper limb symptoms have a multi-factorial origin. Possible risk factors are of a physical, psychosocial or personal origin. These factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or societal factors. Initially, most research on neck and

  5. Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivas, C

    2016-01-01

    - 0.12, 95% CI - 0.37 to 0.14, agreeing with the change score (MD - 0.07, 95% CI - 0.30 to 0.16 from a third study and the OR (0.96, 95% CI 0.44 to 2.12 from a fourth antenatal, multi-component study. Emotional abuse One study in antenatal care, rated at low risk of bias, showed reduced emotional abuse at ≤ 12-month follow-up (MD (change score - 4.24, 95% CI - 6.42 to - 2.06; n = 110. Psychosocial health Quality of life Meta-analysis of two studies (high risk of bias showed intensive advocacy slightly improved overall quality of life of women recruited from shelters (MD 0.23, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.46; n = 343 at 12-month follow-up, with greater improvement in perceived physical quality of life from a primary care study (high risk of bias; MD 4.90, 95% CI 0.98 to 8.82 immediately postintervention. Depression Meta-analysis of two studies in healthcare settings, one at high risk of bias and one at moderate risk, showed that fewer women developed depression (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.65; n = 149; NNT = 4 with brief advocacy. One study at high risk of bias reported a slight reduction in depression in pregnant women immediately after the intervention (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.29; n = 103; NNT = 8. There was no evidence that intensive advocacy reduced depression at ≤ 12-month follow-up (MD - 0.14, 95% CI - 0.33 to 0.05; 3 studies; n = 446 or at two years (SMD − 0.12, 95% CI − 0.36 to 0.12; 1 study; n = 265. Adverse effects Two women died, one who was murdered by her partner and one who committed suicide. No evidence links either death to study participation. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS Results suggest some benefits from advocacy. However, most studies were underpowered. Clinical and methodological heterogeneity largely precluded pooling of trials. Therefore, there is uncertainty about the magnitude of benefit, the impact of abuse severity, and the setting. Based on the evidence reviewed, intensive advocacy may improve short-term quality of life and reduce physical abuse one to

  6. Effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy on physicians' referral behavior to an evidence-based psychosocial intervention in dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, Carola M E; Graff, Maud J L; Teerenstra, Steven; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2013-05-30

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy on physicians' referral rate to and knowledge on the community occupational therapy in dementia program (COTiD program). A cluster randomized controlled trial with 28 experimental and 17 control clusters was conducted. Cluster included a minimum of one physician, one manager, and two occupational therapists. In the control group physicians and managers received no interventions and occupational therapists received a postgraduate course. In the experimental group physicians and managers had access to a website, received newsletters, and were approached by telephone. In addition, physicians were offered one outreach visit. In the experimental group occupational therapists received the postgraduate course, training days, outreach visits, regional meetings, and access to a reporting system. Main outcome measure was the number of COTiD referrals received by each cluster which was assessed at 6 and 12 months after the start of the intervention. Referrals were included from both participating physicians (enrolled in the study and received either the control or experimental intervention) and non-participating physicians (not enrolled but of whom referrals were received by participating occupational therapists). Mixed model analyses were used to analyze the data. All analyses were based on the principle of intention-to-treat. At 12 months experimental clusters received significantly more referrals with an average of 5,24 referrals (SD 5,75) to the COTiD program compared to 2,07 referrals in the control group (SD 5,14). The effect size at 12 months was 0.58. Although no difference in referral rate was found for the physicians participating in the study, the number of referrals from non-participating physicians (t -2,55 / 43 / 0,02) differed significantly at 12 months. Passive dissemination strategies are less likely to result in changes in professional behavior. The amount of physicians exposed to

  7. Identifying Nursing Interventions in a Cancer Screening Program Using Nursing Interventions Classification Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Llucia; Lluch, María Teresa; Falcó, Anna Marta; García, Montse; Puig, Montse

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate which Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) labels correspond to specific nursing interventions provided during cancer screening to establish a nursing documentation system. This descriptive study was conducted to identify and classify the interventions that cancer screening nurses perform based on an initial list. The initial list was grouped into 15 interventions that corresponded to four domains and eight classes. The study found expert consensus regarding the duties of cancer screening nurses and identified 15 interventions that should be implemented in clinical practice for cancer screening care, according to the NIC taxonomy. This study is the first step in developing indicators to assess nursing performance in cancer screening, and it helps to establish the core competency requirements for cancer screening nurses. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  8. Crisis intervention program: an alternative to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Samuel H

    2002-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a Crisis Intervention program as an alternative to use of psychiatric treatment beds for young children. A multidisciplinary community-based intervention was utilized, including family therapy, psychiatric intervention, and school consultations. The impact of the service was evaluated in relation to the use of psychiatric treatment beds by the population of children eligible for Medicaid or uninsured. In comparison to an historical control group, the program resulted in a 23% reduction in the use of psychiatric treatment beds. A cost-minimization analysis indicated that in addition to the program reducing the use of psychiatric treatment beds, the cost of treatment was also slightly reduced.

  9. Motivational Factors for Youth Recruitment in Voluntary Interventions: The Case of a Community Sport Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Catherine; Moreau, Nicolas; Jaimes, Annie; Turbide, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Recruitment is known to be a challenge for intervention programs targeting youths, including sports programs. Following the popularity of the "Alter-Action" program of the Montreal-based organization "DesÉquilibres", we wanted to understand the motivations and barriers to youths' recruitment in this voluntary sports community…

  10. Program Evaluation of the Direct Instruction Reading Interventions: Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nita M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the Direct Instruction programs, Reading Mastery and Corrective Reading, from SRA McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, which were being used as a school-wide reading intervention. These programs were implemented at a small elementary school in the Piedmont area of North Carolina beginning in the…

  11. Progress of First and Second Language Learners in an Early Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia R.; And Others

    This report summarizes the results of three studies concerning the Reading Recovery or Descubriendo la Lectura program with first-grade California students. Studies were conducted using state-wide data obtained during 1993-94 programs to determine if the program was an effective intervention for children with difficulty in learning to read. The…

  12. A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs' Effects on Bystander Intervention Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized bullying prevention programs' effectiveness at increasing bystander intervention in bullying situations. Evidence from 12 school-based programs, involving 12,874 students, indicated that overall the programs were successful (Hedges's g = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.29, p = 0.001), with larger…

  13. A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs' Effects on Bystander Intervention Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized bullying prevention programs' effectiveness at increasing bystander intervention in bullying situations. Evidence from 12 school-based programs, involving 12,874 students, indicated that overall the programs were successful (Hedges's g = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.29, p = 0.001), with larger…

  14. Program-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports in Rural Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Elizabeth A.; Pomerleau, Tina; Muscott, Howard; Rohde, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the quantitative findings from an evaluation of program-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in three rural preschool programs. Each rural preschool program included children 3 through 5 years of age with and without disabilities. Following 3 years of on-site training, technical assistance, and coaching…

  15. DoD Educational Intervention Programs for Scientists and Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    etc.) Tuition assistance for Summer faculty (research) 3 S&E :ance for Internships for S&E ohool Programs for Programs for 3 for HBCU/MIs...centrally-managed endeavor. The programs do not employ mentors, as do the best high school apprenticeship programs and some college internship and work...0430 Botany 0 12 12 GS-0434 Plant Pathology 0 0 0 GS-0435 Plant Physiology 0 0 0 GS-0436 Plant Protection & Quarantine 0 9 9 GS-0437 Horticulture 0 1

  16. Flexible guided self-determination intervention for younger adults with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes, decreased HbA1c and psychosocial distress in women but not in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, V; Vistisen, D; Due-Christensen, M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report results from an 18-month randomized controlled trial (RCT) testing the effectiveness of a flexible guided self-determination (GSD) intervention on glycaemic control and psychosocial distress in younger adults with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Between January 2010...... and February 2012, we randomly allocated two hundred 18-35-year-olds [mean age 25.7 (5.1) years, 50% men] with Type 1 diabetes for ≥ 1 year [mean duration 13.7 (6.8) years] and HbA1c ≥ 64 mmol/mol (8.0%) to either an immediate GSD (intervention; n = 134) or 18-months delayed GSD group (control; n = 66). Group...

  17. Impact of a nutrition intervention program on the growth and nutritional status of Nicaraguan adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Moore, Jean Burley

    2007-06-01

    This research examines the impact of a nutrition education intervention program on the nutritional status and knowledge of Nicaraguan adolescent girls. Anthropometric measurements, hemoglobin values, and data concerning nutritional knowledge were collected from adolescent girls living in Managua, Nicaragua. Using a pre-test/post-test design, data are compared prior to and after the nutrition intervention program. When using Mexican American reference data, statistically significant differences in height-for-age z-scores and weight-for-age z-scores were found when comparing the entire sample of baseline data with data collected after three years of the nutrition intervention program (p nutrition intervention programs in Nicaragua, and examines the possibility that catch-up growth occurs during adolescence.

  18. An Overview of the Evidence on Bullying Prevention and Intervention Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishna, Faye

    2008-01-01

    ... of experiencing problems that may persist into adulthood. The aim of this article is to provide a brief overview of key points and issues regarding the current state of anti-bullying prevention and intervention programs...

  19. An Exercise Prescription Intervention Program with Periodic Ergometric Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, C. A.; Beard, E. F.

    1970-01-01

    A long term exercise prescription type of physical conditioning program has been available to executive personnel of the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center for the past two years. Periodic ergometric testing with a heart rate controlled, automatically programmed, bicycle ergometer is used to follow the individual's progress and appropriately alter his exercise prescription from time to time. Such a program appears feasible, and acceptance is excellent, dropout rates small and periodic testing participation good. Subjects training diligently can maintain satisfactory levels of conditioning.

  20. Follow-up two years after diagnosis of diabetes in patients with psychosocial problems receiving an intervention by a medical social worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gåfvels, Catharina; Rane, Kristina; Wajngot, Alexandre; Wändell, Per Erik

    2014-01-01

    We followed up the psychosocial situation two years after diabetes diagnosis in patients (n = 82) aged 18-65 years, with psychosocial problems (PSP; n = 27) or not (NPSP; n = 55). We used a social questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC), and the General Coping Questionnaire (GCQ). The PSP group had a more difficult situation with more strained economy, lower social support, more anxiety and depression, and lower SOC on both occasions. Being in the PSP group predicted experiencing a strong negative influence of the disease at follow-up. Regarding coping strategies, "problem focusing" decreased in both PSP and NPSP over time. "Social trust" and "intrusion" decreased only in NPSP. Otherwise the coping pattern was unchanged, with PSP showing lower scores on "self-trust" and "minimization" and higher scores on "protest," "isolation," and "intrusion." The most influenced areas at follow-up in the PSP group were work, relationship to partner and economy, and in the NPSP leisure-time activities, sexual life and work. Our findings underline the need to identify patients with psychosocial problems early.

  1. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  2. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  3. Connecting Neuroscience, Cognitive, and Educational Theories and Research to Practice: A Review of Mathematics Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Lori A.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas; O'Brien, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This article describes major theories and research on math cognition across the fields of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and education and connects these literatures to intervention practices. Commercially available math intervention programs were identified and evaluated using the following questions: (a) Did neuroscience…

  4. A Qualitative Look at the Perceived Strengths of Male Batterers: Implications for Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Regina T. P.; Lehmann, Peter; Patton, Joy D.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, batterer intervention programs tend to focus on education and confrontation, with outcomes being less than promising. Limitations of current interventions have encouraged development of alternative treatment forms aimed at ending relationship violence. An emerging trend in the fields of social work and positive psychology is to build on…

  5. Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) Services: Case Management Overlay in a Juvenile Diversion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poythress, Norman G.; Dembo, Richard; DuDell, Gary; Wareham, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In this issue we describe a clinical trials study of the impact of adding specific case manager overlay services to "treatment as usual" services for youths in a Juvenile Arbitration Program. In this first article we describe the experimental intervention, the Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) service, which was provided to a randomly selected…

  6. Effects of a Culturally Adapted Social-Emotional Learning Intervention Program on Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kristine M.; Castro-Olivo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Student self-reports of resiliency and social-emotional internalizing problems were examined to determine intervention effects of a culturally adapted social and emotional learning (SEL) program. Data were analyzed from 20 culturally and linguistically diverse high school students who participated in a school-based 12-lesson SEL intervention and…

  7. Brief report : An intervention program for parents of pediatric cancer patients: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luteijn, EEF; Jackson, SAE; Volkmar, FR; Minderaa, RB

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a psychoeducational intervention program for parents of pediatric cancer patients, using cognitive and behavioral techniques. Methods: Parents were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 39) and a control condition (n = 42). Baseline assessment took place at diagnosis. Shor

  8. Developing a Home-Based Early Intervention Personnel Training Program in Southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huichao; Chen, Ching-I; Chen, Chieh-Yu; Squires, Jane; Li, Wenge; Liu, Tian

    2017-01-01

    China is expected to have a rapid growth in specialized early intervention (EI) services for young children ages birth to 6 and their families. A major barrier in the provision of EI services in China is the shortage of well-trained EI personnel. In 2013, a Home-Based Early Intervention Program (HBEIP) was started at South China Normal University…

  9. Connecting Neuroscience, Cognitive, and Educational Theories and Research to Practice: A Review of Mathematics Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Lori A.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas; O'Brien, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This article describes major theories and research on math cognition across the fields of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and education and connects these literatures to intervention practices. Commercially available math intervention programs were identified and evaluated using the following questions: (a) Did neuroscience…

  10. LA Sprouts: a garden-based nutrition intervention pilot program influences motivation and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M; Ventura, Emily E; Cook, Lauren T; Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Davis, Jaimie N

    2012-06-01

    Garden-based approaches to nutrition education may be effective for improving nutrition habits in adolescents. A quasi-experimental, garden-based intervention for Latino youth (LA Sprouts) was piloted and assessed for its influence on behavior associated with dietary intake and psychosocial factors. Study participants were 104 predominately Latino fourth and fifth grade students in Los Angeles (mean age, 9.8±0.7 years; n=70 control subjects, n=34 LA Sprouts participants); more than half (n=61, 59.8%) were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥85th percentile). LA Sprouts participants received an intervention of weekly 90-minute culturally tailored, interactive classes for 12 consecutive weeks at a community garden during the spring of 2010; control participants received an abbreviated delayed intervention. Questionnaire data were obtained before and after the intervention. Compared with control subjects, LA Sprouts participants had an increased preference for vegetables overall, increased preferences for three target fruits and vegetables, as well as improved perceptions that "vegetables from the garden taste better than vegetables from the store." In the overweight/obese subgroup (n=61), LA Sprouts participants had a 16% greater increase in their preference for vegetables compared with control subjects (P=0.009). Results from this pilot study suggest that a cooking, nutrition, and gardening after-school program in a garden-based setting can improve attitudes and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth, which may lead to improved nutritional habits and dietary intake and reduced health disparities.

  11. An Online Bystander Intervention Program for the Prevention of Sexual Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Anne; Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee; Rosenfield, David

    2015-07-01

    Because of its high prevalence and serious consequences for victims, sexual violence is a significant problem on college campuses. Sexual assault prevention programs based on the bystander intervention model have been shown to be effective; however, current programs are limited in terms of ease of distribution. To address this issue, we developed and evaluated "Take Care," an online bystander intervention program. To our knowledge, this is the first empirical evaluation of an online bystander intervention program designed to prevent sexual violence. Ninety-three participants (80.6% female, 19.4% male) recruited from social psychology classes at a mid-size university were randomly assigned to view one of two online programs: Take Care or a control program on study skills. Before viewing the programs, participants completed measures of bystander behaviors and feelings of efficacy for performing such behaviors. Measures were administered again post-intervention and at a two-month follow-up assessment. Participants who viewed Take Care reported greater efficacy for engaging in bystander behaviors at post-treatment and two months following treatment, compared to those who viewed the control program. In addition, participants who viewed Take Care reported performing relatively more bystander behaviors for friends at the two-month follow-up assessment, compared to participants who viewed the control program. These results suggest that sexual violence prevention programs may be effectively adapted to an online format.

  12. Mediating Variables in a Transtheoretical Model Dietary Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noia, Jennifer; Prochaska, James O.

    2010-01-01

    This study identified mediators of a Transtheoretical Model (TTM) intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N = 549). Single-and multiple-mediator models were used to determine whether pros, cons, self-efficacy, and stages of change satisfied four conclusions necessary…

  13. The Moderation of an Early Intervention Program for Anxiety and Depression by Specific Psychological Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Smith, Phillip N.; Hohmeister, Holly C.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the influence of a number of psychological factors on the effectiveness of an early intervention program targeting anxiety and depression in a non-clinical sample of college students. The program was influenced by the Cognitive-Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (McCullough, 2000) delivered in a two-hour computer-based educational program. Participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, and general distress prior to the prevention program and then a...

  14. Intervention Program for Long-Term English Learners: A Study of Long-Term English Learners' Literacy Performance in a Reading Intervention Program at Falcon School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential explanatory embedded mixed methods study was to: (a) investigate and describe the academic performance of eighth grade students in the Falcon School District (FSD) who were designated as Long Term English Learners (LTELs) and participants in FSD's reading intervention program during their fourth through eighth grade…

  15. Talent Development Middle Grades Program. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "Talent Development Middle Grades Program" is a comprehensive reform model that transforms the structure and curriculum of large urban middle schools with the aim of improving student achievement and raising teacher and student expectations. Key features of the "Talent Development Middle Grades Program" include small…

  16. Credit Recovery Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Credit recovery programs" allow high school students to recover course credit, through in-school, online, or mixed modes, for classes they previously failed. The WWC reviewed the research on these programs and their impacts on middle school, junior high school, or high school students at risk of dropping out or who have already dropped…

  17. High School Puente Program. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "High School Puente Program" aims to help disadvantaged students graduate from high school, become college eligible, and enroll in four-year colleges and universities. Interdisciplinary in approach, the program has three components: writing, counseling, and mentoring. Students in the ninth and tenth grades receive rigorous writing…

  18. Psychosocial Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Watkins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay advocates for a paradigm shift in psychology toward the activity and ethics of accompaniment. Accompaniment requires a reorientation of the subjectivity, interpersonal practices, and critical understanding of the accompanier so that (she can stand alongside others who desire listening, witnessing, advocacy, space to develop critical inquiry and research, and joint imagination and action to address desired and needed changes. The idea of “accompaniment” emerged in liberation theology in Latin America, and migrated into liberatory forms of psychology as “psychosocial accompaniment.” This essay explores accompaniment and its ethics from a phenomenological perspective, highlighting differences from mainstream stances in psychology. Attention is also given to the effects of accompaniment on the accompanier. Efforts to decolonize psychology require careful attention to the psychic decolonization of its practitioners and to the cultivation of decolonizing interpersonal practices that provide a relational and ethical foundation for joint research, restorative healing, and transformative action. Such practices endeavor through dialogue to build mutual respect and understanding, promote effective solidarity, and contribute to the empowerment of those marginalized. The decolonization of psychology should enable practitioners to be more effective in working for increased social, economic, and environmental justice; peace building and reconciliation; and local and global ecological sustainability.

  19. Evaluation of Effectiveness of Integrated Intervention Program in Improving Drug Addicts' Psychological Health1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YA-QIONG YAN; YONG-YOU LIU; YUE-FENG ZENG; YI-WEI CUI; JI-WEI LEI; ZENG-ZHEN WANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the social mental state of drug addicts in a compulsive drug abuse treatment center;evaluate the effectiveness of integrated program for the prevention of abuse relapse and improvement of drug addicts' psychological health.Methods The study subjects were addicts from the Wuhan Compulsive Drug Abuse Treatment Center between October 2003 and June 2004,who satisfied the inclusion criteria.A non-randomized control-intervention study design was adopted.Volunteers willing to take part in intervention were put into the intervention group with their full awareness and willingness to prevent drug abuse relapse.The control group was composed of the addicts who were willing to prevent relapse and to be followed up after their discharge. Results The effectiveness of the integrated intervention program in promoting addicts' psychological health:before the intervention,the scores of Self-Rating Anxiety Scale(SAS),the positive and negative dimensionalities of Simple Coping Style Questionnaire(SCSQ)and Chinese Perceived Stress Scales(CPSS)had no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group.After the intervention,exccpt that the SCSQ's positive dimensionality in the intervention group was significantly higher than that in the control group,other indices in the intervention group were lower.Before and after the intervention.the psychological health level in both the groups was lower than that in the normal population;there were significant differences between addicts and normal subjects in regards with all of the indices above. Conclusion Drug abuse was associated closely with addicts' social mental factors.The integrated intervention program can alleviate anxiety and stress,reduce co-morbid mental disorders and effectively improve their coping style.In conclusion,the program can promote addicts' psychological health significantly.

  20. A community based intervention program to enhance neighborhood cohesion: The Learning Families Project in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Wan, Alice; Kwok, Lit Tung; Pang, Sally; Wang, Xin; Stewart, Sunita M; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood cohesion, which refers to the extent of the connectedness and solidarity among residents in a community or neighborhood, is an important determinant of human health. To enhance neighborhood cohesion, the "Learning Families Project" was developed with a series of intervention programs in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, a district with low neighborhood cohesion. This project, based on the social ecological model, provided a platform for neighbors to learn, communicate and interact with each other. This quasi-experimental study included two nearby government subsidized low rent housing estates separated by busy main roads. One served as the intervention (Tsui Ping (South) Estate) and one as the control (Shun Tin Estate) estate. The intervention included promotion, resident training and learning programs, embodied by a series of community activities such as talks, day camp, thematic activities and horticulture class. Baseline (before the programs) and follow-up (one year after the programs) surveys were conducted both in the intervention and control estate to assess the impact of the programs on neighborhood cohesion. The number of residents who completed both the baseline and follow-up surveys was 502 in the intervention estate and 476 in the control estate. Neighborhood cohesion significantly improved in the intervention group after the programs (Cohen effect size d: 0.15). Compared with the control group, the improvements in closeness of the neighborhood and trust in neighbors were significantly greater in the intervention group (Cohen effect size d: 0.13 and 0.14, respectively). This brief intervention program using a quasi-experimental study design increased neighborhood cohesion in a low rent housing estate. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02851667.

  1. Effectiveness of a Pregnancy Smoking Intervention: The Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of pregnancy smoking, rates remain high, especially in the rural, Southern United States. Interventions are effective, but few have been developed and tested in regions with high rates of pregnancy smoking, a culture that normalizes smoking, and a hard-to-reach prenatal population. The goals were to describe a smoking…

  2. Increasing physical activity for veterans in the Mental Health Intensive Case Management Program: A community-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, S Akeya; Libet, Julian; Pope, Charlene; Lauerer, Joy A; Johnson, Emily; Edlund, Barbara J

    2017-08-01

    the comfort of their familiar living environment, veterans were assisted to meet their physical and mental health goals with a program that could easily be integrated into their daily lives. Healthy People 2020 developed goals to improve levels of physical activity and has ranked physical activity as a leading health indicator (US DHHS. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Physical activity topic overview. In Healthy People 2020. 2016. Retrieved from https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/physical-activity). Individuals with SMI are significantly less active than the general population (Shor and Shalev, 2014). It is sometimes difficult for the average individual to obtain the recommended 10,000 steps and even more difficult for those with SMI. Lifestyle modifications, in particular diet and exercise, are recommended for improvement of chronic disease outcomes (US Preventive Services Counseling Task Force, 2016). The health benefits of physical activity for people with SMI are mixed (Pearsall R, Smith D, Pelosi A, Geddes J. Exercise therapy in adults with serious mental illness: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Psychiatr. 2014;14:117). Some studies found significant physical health benefits, while others did not. However, according to a review by Soundy et al., physical exercise is shown to not only have physical benefits but also psychosocial benefits. One of the barriers that hinder participation in physical activities is accessibility (Shor and Shalev, 2014). Integrating a more personalized supported, and in-home pedometer program into mental healthcare should ensure better access to interventions that could possibly reverse the causes of premature death. The program was offered to 69 veterans in the MHICM. Forty-nine agreed to start the program and 20 declined. Twenty-five clients actually started the program with 17 veterans completing it. Preimplementation data included collecting blood pressure and weight measures for

  3. Demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial correlates of using the website component of a worksite physical activity and healthy nutrition promotion program: a longitudinal study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robroek, Suzan J W; Brouwer, Wendy; Lindeboom, Dennis; Oenema, Anke; Burdorf, Alex

    2010-01-01

    ...) to identify demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors associated with website use. The study was an observational study among participants from 5 workplaces in a cluster randomized controlled trial...

  4. Galvanizing action: conclusions and next steps for mainstreaming zinc interventions in public health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth H; Baker, Shawn K

    2009-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the foregoing reviews of the impact of different intervention strategies designed to enhance zinc nutrition, including supplementation, fortification, and dietary diversification or modification. Current evidence indicates a beneficial impact of such interventions on zinc status and zinc-related functional outcomes. Preventive zinc supplementation reduces the incidence of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory tract infection among young children, decreases mortality of children over 12 months of age, and increases growth velocity. Therapeutic zinc supplementation during episodes of diarrhea reduces the duration and severity of illness. Zinc fortification increases zinc intake and total absorbed zinc, and recent studies are beginning to confirm a positive impact of zinc fortification on indicators of population zinc status. To assist with the development of zinc intervention programs, more information is needed on the prevalence of zinc deficiency in different countries, and rigorous evaluations of the effectiveness of large-scale zinc intervention programs should be planned. Recommended steps for scaling up zinc intervention programs, with or without other micronutrients, are described. In summary, there is now clear evidence of the benefit of selected interventions to reduce the risk of zinc deficiency, and a global commitment is urgently needed to conduct systematic assessments of population zinc status and to develop interventions to control zinc deficiency in the context of existing public health and nutrition programs.

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of students towards peers with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander; Post, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    In this study we examine the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of elementary school students towards peers with intellectual, physical and severe physical and intellectual disabilities. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was designed with an experimental group and a control group, both comprising two rural schools. An intervention program was developed for kindergarten (n(experimental) = 22, n(control) = 31) and elementary school students without disabilities (n(experimental) = 91, n(control) = 127) (age range 4-12 years old). This intervention consisted of a 3 weeks education project comprising six lessons about disabilities. The Acceptance Scale for Kindergarten-revised and the Attitude Survey to Inclusive Education were used to measure attitudes at three moments: prior to the start of the intervention, after the intervention and 1 year later. The outcomes of the multilevel analysis showed positive, immediate effects on attitudes of kindergarten students, but limited effects on elementary school students' attitudes.

  6. Pregnancy intention, demographic differences, and psychosocial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Pamela; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2011-08-01

    We explore the psychosocial, demographic, and maternal characteristics across wanted, mistimed, and unwanted pregnancies. Data from 1321 women from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women in Durham, NC, are analyzed. Psychosocial correlates were obtained through prenatal surveys; electronic medical records were used to ascertain maternal health and pregnancy outcomes. Sixty-two percent of the women indicated an unintended pregnancy, with 44% (578) mistimed and 18% (245) unwanted. Only 38% of the pregnancies were characterized as wanted. Women with unwanted and with mistimed pregnancies were similar demographically, but they differed significantly on psychosocial profiles and maternal characteristics. Women with mistimed and with wanted pregnancies differed in demographics and psychosocial profiles. Wanted pregnancies had the healthiest, mistimed an intermediate, and unwanted the poorest psychosocial profile. Women with unwanted pregnancies had the highest depression, perceived stress, and negative paternal support scores (ppsychosocial profiles had higher odds of being in the unwanted category. Controlling for psychosocial and demographic variables, perceived stress and positive paternal support remained significant predictors of belonging to the unwanted and mistimed groups. Fully characterizing pregnancy intention and its relationship to psychosocial profiles may provide a basis for identifying women with highest risk during pregnancy and early motherhood. Women with unwanted and mistimed pregnancies may appear similar demographically but are different psychosocially. Women with unwanted pregnancies have multiple risk factors and would benefit from targeted interventions.

  7. Do cultural differences influence batterer intervention program outcomes? A studywith Spanish and Latin American offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Vargas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed, first, if there were any differences in attitudes towards partner violence (i.e., perceivedseverity, victim blaming, and acceptability, responsibility attributions, sexism, and risk of recidivismbetween Latin American immigrants and Spanish offenders convicted of intimate-partner violence at thebeginning of a batterer intervention program. Second, differences in the batterer intervention programoutcomes between Spanish and Latin American offenders were explored. The sample consisted of 278batterers (211 Spanish and 67 Latin American who participated in a community-based battererintervention program. Results showed significant differences between Spanish and Latin Americanoffenders in perceived severity, victim blaming, violence against women acceptability, and benevolentsexism. Regarding batterer intervention program outcomes, results showed that despite initial differencesbetween Spanish and Latin American offenders, both groups benefit equally from the intervention.

  8. Psychosocial rehabilitation and democratic development in Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafillou, Peter; Sassene, Michel

    2011-01-01

    interventions have made critics proclaim that Western psychosocial expertise subjects the bereaved of the Third World to repressive administrative power by objectifying and colonizing their minds. Meanwhile, advocates of psychosocial rehabilitation maintain that such criticisms fail to appreciate the ability...... of local healing strategies to actually empower torture victims through rehabilitation programmes. Inspired by Michel Foucault's concept of government, this article argues that both these assessments of torture rehabilitation overlook forms of power that work through the constitution of subjectivities...

  9. Psychosocial aspects of 'mixedness' in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    The increasing number of interethnic married couples and their children in Scandinavia, challenges the stereotypes about us and others. However, these are relatively unresearched, invisible social categories against the backdrop of societal hegemonic homogeneity. This paper covers some psychosoci...... regarding the complex negotiation processes of identity through both ‘celebratory’ and ‘critique’ perspectives to ‘mixedness’, are presented along with implications for psychosocial support– and intervention services....

  10. Dyadic interventions for community-dwelling people with dementia and their family caregivers: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Prick; A.M. Pot; Dr. P.D.D.M. Roelofs; Dr. J. de Lange; M.A. van 't Leven; Dr. J.H. Groenewoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this review, we study the effects of dyadic psychosocial interventions focused on communitydwelling people with dementia and their family caregivers, and the relationship of the effects with intervention components of programs. Methods: A search from January 2005 to January 2012 led t

  11. Dyadic interventions for community-dwelling people with dementia and their family caregivers: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leven, M.A. van 't; Prick, A.E.; Groenewoud, J.H.; Roelofs, P.D.D.M.; Lange, J. de; Pot, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this review, we study the effects of dyadic psychosocial interventions focused on communitydwelling people with dementia and their family caregivers, and the relationship of the effects with intervention components of programs. Methods: A search from January 2005 to January 2012 led t

  12. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Intervention Program for Restraint Prevention in an Acute Spanish Psychiatric Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Aguilera Serrano, Carlos; García-Sánchez, Juan A; Pino-Benítez, Isabel; Alba-Vallejo, Mercedes; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-05-01

    International recommendations have called to implement strategies to reduce the use of coercion in psychiatric settings. However, in Spain there is a lack of research about intervention programs to reduce mechanical restraint in acute psychiatric units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multimodal intervention program based on the principles of six core strategies to reduce the frequency of use of mechanical restraint in an acute psychiatric ward. The design was a retrospective analysis of the frequency and duration of episodes of mechanical restraint prior to the intervention program (2012) and during the intervention program (2013) in one acute psychiatric ward. The intervention was governed by four strategies: (1) leadership and organizational changes, (2) registration and monitoring of risk patients, (3) staff training, and (4) involving patients in the treatment program. There was a significant difference between the mean number of monthly episodes of mechanical restraint per 1,000 patient days, pre-intervention (18.54 ± 8.78) compared with postintervention (8.53 ± 7.00; p = .005). We found the probability that mechanical restraint would occur in a hospital admission decreased after performing the intervention (odds ratio = .587; confidence interval = 0.411-0.838; p = .003) after adjusting for confounding variables. The total percentage of restrained patients fell from 15.07% to 9.74%. The main implication of the study is to support the effectiveness of specific intervention programs based on different measures to reduce mechanical restraint and without contemplating all the strategies that are considered effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Psychosocial rehabilitation in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Thara; Sujit, John

    2012-10-01

    Psychosocial rehabilitation (PSR) is an essential component in the management of schizophrenia. It is especially relevant in the improvement of functioning and the quality of life of these individuals. The scarcity of mental health personnel and lack of training in many low and middle income countries (LAMIC) has led to low priority being accorded to PSR. This paper describes some of the PSR initiatives in LAMIC, especially those undertaken after disasters, home-based interventions and community-based rehabilitation programmes.

  14. Evaluation of an intervention program for the reduction of bullying and victimization in schools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.; Farrington, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of an intervention program on the reduction of bullying and victimization in schools with a sample of 239 students aged 10–16 years old in Rome, Italy. The program deals with bullying and violence. It consists of three videos and a booklet that help students to

  15. A Report on Longitudinal Evaluations of Preschool Programs. Volume II: Is Early Intervention Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    This document is the second part in a report on longitudinal evaluations of preschool programs. Part I reviewed long-term, controlled studies in order to generally assess the impact of preschool intervention. Part II reviews follow-up data in order to resolve the following five questions: (1) Do children in experimental programs continue to gain…

  16. Goodness of Fit Assessment of an Alcohol Intervention Program and the Underlying Theories of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Diana; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted an investigation of The Pennsylvania State University's Alcohol Intervention Program Level 2 (AIP2) to determine goodness of fit of the program components and its underpinning theories. They determined that the Health Belief Model, Social Norms Theory, Social Learning Theory, and the Transtheoretical Model Stages of Change…

  17. Adulthood Animal Abuse among Women Court-Referred to Batterer Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Shorey, Ryan C.; Brasfield, Hope; Zucosky, Heather C.; Ninnemann, Andrew; Elmquist, Joanna; Bucossi, Meggan M.; Andersen, Shawna M.; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    The substantial increase in the enrollment of women in batterer intervention programs (BIPs) over the past 30 years has greatly outpaced research on women who perpetrate intimate partner violence (IPV). As a result, it is unknown whether existing programs, which were originally designed to treat male perpetrators, are effective at preventing…

  18. Can Intervention Early Prevent Crime Later? The Abecedarian Project Compared with Other Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Stevens H.; Campbell, Frances A.

    1998-01-01

    Examined whether the Abecedarian Project affected young adult crime. Found no effects of program on crime. Comparison with other early-intervention programs suggests that reducing boys' delinquency is possible without improving school performance, improving school performance does not guarantee youth crime reductions, and working with parents on…

  19. The Earlier, the Better: Early Intervention Programs for Infants and Toddlers at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung

    2008-01-01

    What are the characteristics of programs that have the greatest likelihood of success in promoting the development of very young children at risk? This brief review of research offers insights for policy makers and early childhood educators alike. The United States is fortunate to have well-designed early educational intervention programs that may…

  20. Early Childhood Intervention Programs: Opportunities and Challenges for Preventing Child Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, Lindsay E.; Hansen, David J.; Flood, Mary Fran

    2008-01-01

    Due to the destructive impact of child maltreatment and limited available funding to address its consequences, the value of preventive measures is evident. Early Childhood Intervention Programs (ECIPs) provide excellent opportunities to prevent and identify cases of child maltreatment, among other varied objectives. These programs are typically…

  1. Feasibility and effectiveness of a cosmetic intervention program for institutionalized older women in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohko Hayakawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a cosmetic intervention program for frail older women. Thirty-nine older adults (83.0 ± 8.65 years from two nursing homes in Tokyo were allocated to a cosmetic (intervention: n = 27 or a light-exercise (control: n = 12 group according to their nursing home residence. Both groups attended weekly classes over a 5-week period from May to June 2009. The program feasibility was examined using class participation, class attendance, and program adherence rates, while the effectiveness of the program was examined using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS and participants' engagement in positive activities (i.e., engaging in social activities and going outside. The intervention group showed significantly higher rates on all feasibility measures than did the control group (class participation: 24.1% vs. 13.3%, class attendance: 75.5% vs. 32.6%, program adherence: 70.8% vs. 10.0%. Furthermore, the GDS scores decreased significantly in the intervention group, but not the control group. Although the change in GDS score was larger in the intervention group (−1.30 ± 2.36 than in the control group (−0.75 ± 3.53, the inter-group difference in this change was not significant. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-intervention positive activity rates in either group, or in the inter-group comparisons of changes in these rates. Overall, the cosmetic program was highly feasible and effective for improving the mental health of frail older women. However, further studies using longer intervention periods and larger samples would be needed to identify the program effectiveness.

  2. Practical Application of Theory-Driven Intervention to Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Carolyn; McClelland, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    For education to be effective, educators need to understand pertinent theories concerning behavior change and to apply them in programming. The study reported here sought to determine if the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) could be used to design, implement, and evaluate a brief educational session. Results show a significant increase in…

  3. Wyman Teen Outreach Program (TOP). What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Wyman Teen Outreach Program" (TOP) is a life skills curriculum for 12- to 17-year-olds that aims to prevent negative youth behaviors, such as school failure and early pregnancy. Trained facilitators deliver the curriculum in weekly classes throughout the school year. Participants discuss topics such as goal-setting, peer pressure,…

  4. Practical Application of Theory-Driven Intervention to Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Carolyn; McClelland, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    For education to be effective, educators need to understand pertinent theories concerning behavior change and to apply them in programming. The study reported here sought to determine if the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) could be used to design, implement, and evaluate a brief educational session. Results show a significant increase in…

  5. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  6. Long-Term Psychosocial and Health Economy Consequences of ADHD, Autism, and Reading-Writing Disorder: A Prospective Service Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyden, Agneta; Myren, Karl-Johan; Gillberg, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The study aims to evaluate psychosocial, societal, and family cost consequences of a psychoeducational intervention program. Methods: Sixty boys with ADHD, Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism (AS/HFA), and reading and writing disorder (RD/WD) were allocated to participate in a service evaluation project. Every other boy in each…

  7. Intervention study on psychosocial adaptptation of freshmen in medical university%医科大学新生心理社会适应干预效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳芳; 吴晓兵; 郭巍伟; 邢玉梅; 石倩; 马艳艳; 何丽玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨改善医科大学新生心理社会适应能力干预实验的方法、内容和效果,为制定干预措施提供依据.方法 采用心理测验量表评价被试的心理社会适应能力.在对560名新生进行基线问卷测查的基础上,通过分层整群随机抽样对223名学生进行了"学校生活技能"干预,对照组为其余337人.干预实验以班为单位进行,每周2学时,共进行5次.干预实验结束后,采用基线测查时所用相同心理测验问卷进行复测.结果 干预后干预组的社会适应和人际关系测验总得分均显著高于干预前(P值均<0.05),且干预组均显著高于对照组(P>0.05).但干预前、后2组学生的应对方式总得分差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 学校生活技能干预对改善医科大学新生的社会适应能力和人际关系状况有一定的效果,但对应对方式的改善效果不明显.%Objective To set up valid, feasible and reliable intervention to improve psychosocial adaptation of freshmen in medical university, and to provide bases for the intervention measurement. Methods Psychological test scales were used to measure the psychosocial adaptation ability of the subjects. Based on baseline questionnaire survey among 560 freshmen, we conducted school life-skill intervention on 223 students who were selected by stratified cluster random sampling,control group included other 337 students. Intervention was conducted in class two hours a week and totally 5 times. After intervention post-test was completed using the same questionnaires as base line. Results After intervention the total scores of social adaptation and interpersonal relations were significantly improved in intervention group comparing to pre-test ( P < 0.05 ), and the scores were significantly higher in intervention group than those in control group( P <0.05 ). However the total score of coping style between two groups was not different before and after intervention ( P > 0

  8. A Program Evaluation of the Language Lab™: Response to Intervention Program for Teaching Grammar, Vocabulary, and Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechmann, JoAnn; Richardson, Martha; Jones, Don

    2014-01-01

    This program evaluation study addressed the struggle of local elementary school speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in a school district to provide evidence-based intervention in language for students below grade level as required by the U.S. Department of Education. Recently, Language Lab™ was published to address the needs of oral language…

  9. Translating an evidence-based lifestyle intervention program into primary care: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonstein, Andrea C; Yank, Veronica; Stafford, Randall S; Wilson, Sandra R; Rosas, Lisa Goldman; Ma, Jun

    2013-07-01

    The E-LITE (Evaluation of Lifestyle Interventions to Treat Elevated Cardiometabolic Risk in Primary Care) trial evaluated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of translating an evidence-based lifestyle intervention for the management of obesity and related risk factors in a primary care setting. Delivered by allied health care providers, the intervention promoted at least 7% weight loss and at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity through gradual, sustainable lifestyle changes. Activities included interactive group lessons, food tasting, guided physical activity, and technology-mediated self-monitoring and behavioral counseling. This article discusses insights and potential areas for improvement to strengthen program implementation for dissemination of the E-LITE program to other primary care settings. We focus on (a) the role of allied health professionals in program delivery, (b) strengthening program integration within a primary care clinic, and (c) the use of information technology to extend the reach and impact of the program. Our experience shows the feasibility of implementing an evidence-based lifestyle intervention program combining group-delivered nutrition and behavioral counseling, physical activity training, and technology-mediated follow-up in a primary care setting. Challenges remain, and we offer possible solutions to overcome them.

  10. Sex trafficking in Nepal: a review of intervention and prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Michelle R; Crawford, Mary

    2011-05-01

    Trafficking of girls and women for the purpose of sexual exploitation is a problem worldwide, particularly in South Asia. This review focuses on Nepal-to-India sex trafficking with an examination of current anti-trafficking intervention and prevention programs. The activities of both governmental agencies and nongovernment organizations are described and critically analyzed. Suggestions for evaluating and improving interventions, and thereby reducing the trafficking of girls and women, are discussed.

  11. Effectiveness of a community-based multidomain cognitive intervention program in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Yang, YoungSoon; Oh, Jeong-Gun; Oh, Seongil; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Kyoung Hee; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multidomain program in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A total of 53 patients with probable AD participated in the present study. The participants were classified to a cognitive programming group (n = 32) and control group (n = 21). Participants in the cognitive intervention program received multidomain cognitive stimulation including art, music, recollection and horticultural therapy, each period of intervention lasting 1 h. This program was repeated five times per week over a period of 6 months at the Seongdong-gu Center for Dementia. The Mini-Mental State Examination, the Korean version of Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease, Clinical dementia rating scales, and the Korean version of the Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease were used to evaluate cognitive ability at baseline and after intervention. After 6 months, cognitive abilities were compared between patients actively participating in cognitive intervention and the pharmacotherapy only group. Patients receiving cognitive intervention showed significant cognitive improvement in the word-list recognition and recall test scores versus the control. There was no change in the overall Clinical dementia rating score, but the domain of community affairs showed a significant improvement in the cognitive intervention group. Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease of caregivers was slightly improved in the cognitive intervention group after 6 months. Multidomain cognitive intervention by regional dementia centers has great potential in helping to maintain cognitive function in patients with dementia, increase their social activity and reduce depression, while enhancing the quality of life of caregivers. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Disseminating ASD interventions: a pilot study of a distance learning program for parents and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Allison L; Ingersoll, Brooke R

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for the adaptation of training in evidence-based interventions to non-traditional methods, particularly for individuals working with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). An internet-based self-directed distance learning program was created to teach reciprocal imitation training, a naturalistic behavioral intervention aimed at increasing imitation in children with ASD. A single-subject multiple-baseline design study evaluated the effect of the program on changes in therapist (sample 1) and parent (sample 2) knowledge and behavior, and changes in child behavior. Adult participants improved their knowledge and use of the intervention techniques, and child participants improved their rates of imitation. Results suggest that a self-directed distance learning program may be effective for disseminating evidence-based practices to individuals working with children with ASD.

  13. Exploring the Academic and Psychosocial Impact of El Sistema-Inspired Music Programs within Two Low Socio-Economic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Margaret S.; McPherson, Gary E.; Faulkner, Robert; Davidson, Jane W.; Barrett, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to understand the potential for positive non-musical outcomes for economically and socially disadvantaged primary school students who are involved in instrumental music learning programs. Two schools with students experiencing generational poverty, current or first-generation immigrant or refugee status who were running El-Sistema…

  14. Behavioral and Psychosocial Outcomes of a 16-Week Rebound Therapy-Based Exercise Program for People with Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martyn C.; Walley, Robert M.; Leech, Amanda; Paterson, Marion; Common, Stephanie; Metcalf, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    People with profound intellectual disabilities rarely experience a physically active lifestyle, and their long-term physical inactivity likely contributes to poor health. The authors developed and implemented a pilot exercise program for persons with a profound intellectual disability and conducted a study to evaluate the effort. The development…

  15. Exploring the Academic and Psychosocial Impact of El Sistema-Inspired Music Programs within Two Low Socio-Economic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Margaret S.; McPherson, Gary E.; Faulkner, Robert; Davidson, Jane W.; Barrett, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to understand the potential for positive non-musical outcomes for economically and socially disadvantaged primary school students who are involved in instrumental music learning programs. Two schools with students experiencing generational poverty, current or first-generation immigrant or refugee status who were running El-Sistema…

  16. 78 FR 25458 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services...

  17. The Effects of a Bully Intervention Program on the Relational Aggressive Behaviors of 5th Grade Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Waukita; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a mixed method design, this study investigated the effectiveness of a bully intervention program aimed at fifth-grade girls. The Ophelia Project provided the framework for a six-week prevention program. Results showed that the bullying intervention program did decrease the relational aggressive behaviors among the participants and indicated…

  18. 78 FR 31568 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.... ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services One-Time Noncompetitive Award to Ensure Continued HIV Primary Medical Care. SUMMARY: To prevent a lapse in comprehensive primary...

  19. Socio-demographic psychosocial and clinical characteristics of participants in e-HealthyStrides©: an interactive ehealth program to improve diabetes self-management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemu, Priscilla E; Quarshie, Alexander Q; Josiah-Willock, R; Ojutalayo, Folake O; Alema-Mensah, Ernest; Ofili, Elizabeth O

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes self-management (DSM) training helps prevent diabetic complications. eHealth approaches may improve its optimal use. The aims were to determine a) acceptability of e-HealthyStrides© (an interactive, Internet-based, patient-driven, diabetes self-management support and social networking program) among Morehouse Community Physicians' Network diabetics; b) efficacy for DSM behavior change c) success factors for use of e-HealthyStrides©. Baseline characteristics of pilot study participants are reported. Of those approached, 13.8% agreed to participate. Among participants, 96% were Black, 77% female; age 56±9.2 years; education: 44% college or higher and 15% less than 12th grade; 92.5% with home computers. Over half (51%) failed the Diabetes Knowledge Test. Nearly half (47%) were at goal A1C; 24% at goal blood pressure; 3% at goal LDL cholesterol level. Median (SD) Diabetes Empowerment Scale score = 3.93 (0.72) but managing psychosocial aspects = 3.89 (0.89) scored lower than other domains. There was low overall confidence for DSM behaviors. Assistance with healthy eating was the most frequently requested service. Requestors were more obese with worse A1C than others. Chronic care delivery scored average with high scores for counseling and problem solving but low scores for care coordination and follow up.

  20. Reducing maladaptive weight management practices: developing a psychoeducational intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Karina M; LeBow, Michael D

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has addressed the issues of behavior change and eating disorder prevention among adolescents and young women. The current study was designed to evaluate: (a) whether an 8-week psychoeducational intervention can reduce maladaptive weight-management practices in women (University females, N=24) with sub-clinical levels of eating pathology; and (b) whether its implementation reduces the risk of developing more severe eating pathology across time. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (EX) group or a self-monitoring control (SMC) group. Statistically significant changes on measures of eating pathology, including the Eating Attitudes Test-26 [Garner, D. M., Olmsted, M. P., Bohr, Y., & Garfinkel, P. (1982). The Eating Attitudes Test: psychometric features and clinical correlates. Psychological Medicine, 12, 871-878]; Forbidden Food Survey [Ruggerio, L., Williamson, D. A., Davis, C. J., Schlundt, D. G., & Carey, M. P. (1988). Forbidden Food Survey: Measure of bulimic's anticipated emotional reactions to specific foods. Addictive Behaviors, 13, 267-274]; and Bulimia Test-Revised [Thelen, M. H., Farmer, J., Wonderlich, S., & Smith, M. (1991). A revision of the bulimia test: The BULIT-R. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 3(1), 119-124] were observed, as were changes in body image, as measured by the Body Shape Questionnaire [Cooper, P. J., Taylor, M. J., Cooper, Z., & Fairburn, C. G. (1987). The development and validation of the body shape questionnaire. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 6(4), 485-494]. Additional significant between-group differences in eating behavior, as measured by daily meal records, were also seen. Participants in the EX group evidenced improvements in scores which were significantly different from those observed in the SMC group. Unfortunately, attrition limited the utility of follow up data.

  1. Efficacy of a 3-month lifestyle intervention program using a Japanese-style healthy plate on body weight in overweight and obese diabetic Japanese subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Keiko; Katayama, Tomomi; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Takahashi, Kaoru; Sakane, Naoki

    2014-11-24

    The portion size of food is a determinant of energy intake, linking with obese traits. A healthy plate for portion control has recently been made in a Japanese style. The aim of the current study was to assess the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention program using the Japanese-style healthy plate on weight reduction in overweight and obese diabetic Japanese subjects. We randomized overweight and obese diabetic subjects (n = 19, 10 women) into an intervention group including educational classes on lifestyle modification incorporating the healthy plate (n = 10) or a waiting-list control group (n = 9). The intervention period was three months, and the educational classes using the healthy plate were conducted monthly in a group session for the intervention group. The body weight, blood glycemic and metabolic measures, and psychosocial variables were measured at the baseline and after the 3-month intervention in both groups. The impression of the intervention was interviewed using a structured questionnaire. There was one drop-out in the control group. No adverse events were reported in the groups. Subjects in the intervention group had a greater weight change from baseline to the end of the 3-month intervention period (-3.7 +/- 2.5 [SD] kg in the intervention group vs. -0.1 +/- 1.4 kg in the control group, P = 0.002). Most subjects recorded that the use of a healthy plate could be recommended to other people. The lifestyle intervention program using the Japanese-style healthy plate, which was developed for portion control, may effectively reduce body weight in overweight and obese diabetic subjects in Japan. Further studies are needed to establish the efficacy of this methodology on weight management.

  2. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Seraphine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. Methods The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. Results This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Conclusion Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  3. Clinical perspective: Linking psychosocial care to the disease continuum in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabora, James; Buzaglo, Joanne; Kennedy, Vicki; Richards, Tiffany; Schapmire, Tara; Zebrack, Brad; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-08-01

    A model of psychosocial care specific for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers has not yet been proposed. We sought to develop a model of care that considers the specific profile of this disease. The authors, representing a multidisciplinary care team, met in December of 2012 to identify a model of psychosocial care for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers. This model was determined by consensus during the meeting and via total agreement following the meeting. The meeting was sponsored by Onyx Pharmaceuticals. The need for targeted psychosocial care for the multiple myeloma patient and caregiver throughout the disease process is essential to ensure quality of life and optimal treatment outcomes. We propose herein the first known model of care for the treatment of multiple myeloma that engages both the patient and their caregivers. Innovative partnerships between psychosocial providers and other entities such as pharmaceutical companies can maximize resources for comprehensive program development. This manuscript proposes a model of care that promotes active engagement in therapies for multiple myeloma while engaging the individual patient and their family caregivers. This treatment approach must be evidence based in terms of distress screening tools, comprehensive psychosocial assessments, and, most importantly, in the interventions and measurements of response that clinicians apply to this population.

  4. Building evidence for sustainability of food and nutrition intervention programs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunny S; Rogers, Beatrice L; Coates, Jennifer; Gilligan, Daniel O; Sarriot, Eric

    2013-09-01

    After making large investments to put in place effective health and nutrition interventions, researchers, program implementers, policy makers, and donors all expect lasting effects. However, it is uncertain whether this is the case, and there is less certainty on how to approach the study of program sustainability. This symposium, "Building Evidence for Sustainability of Food and Nutrition Intervention Programs in Developing Countries," provided not only frameworks for conceptualizing sustainability but concrete evidence about the approaches and methods used as well as lessons on how they do or do not work in particular contexts. We presented the following findings: 1) sustainability of activities and impacts of Title II food aid programs in Bolivia and Kenya, 2) sustainability of impact in terms of adoption and consumption of a biofortified orange sweet potato in Uganda, and 3) lessons from incorporating pro-sustainability investment strategies in child survival programs in Guinea. Our symposium introduced a new important body of research on program sustainability to provide insights and stimulate innovative thinking in the design and planning of further applied research and future prosustainability intervention programs.

  5. Gender differences in effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) lifestyle intervention: an Australasian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Lillian M; Morton, Darren P; Rankin, Paul M; Mitchell, Brett G; Chang, Esther; Diehl, Hans

    2014-12-01

    Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a lifestyle modification program that promotes healthy diet, physical activity and stress management techniques. Among US CHIP participants, differences in gender responsiveness to improvements in chronic disease risk factors were demonstrated. This study examined gender differences in outcomes to the CHIP intervention in Australasia. Changes in body weight, blood pressure (BP), blood lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were assessed in 925 participants (34.3% men, mean age=56.0±12.5 years; 65.7% women, mean age=54.4±13.5 years) 30 days after program commencement. Significant reductions (Pdisease risk factors among men than women. All participants, but particularly men, entering the program with the greatest risk achieved the largest reductions. Possible physiological or behavioural factors include food preferences, making commitments and differential support modes. SO WHAT?: Developers of lifestyle intervention programs should consider gender differences in physiological and behavioural factors when planning interventions. In particular, developers should manage expectations of people entering lifestyle interventions to increase awareness that men tend to respond better than women. In addition, this is a call for further research to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disproportionate responsiveness of males.

  6. The Role of Theory in Developing Psycho-Environmental Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Raúl Palacios Delgado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the activities of psychology is to promote positive change in personal behavior. This article show the usefulness of the theory for behavior change through design effective messages to behavioral change and development programs of psychosocial intervention. The theoretical model focuses in factors of behavioral changing: self-efficacy, skills, disposition and intention (MAHDI. The article describes the theory, shows how they can be applied to the selection environmental behavior, as well as their appropriate application in complementary intervention strategies that includes needs analysis, development and piloting program, applicability, social marketing and evaluation. Finally, how the theory can contribute to design youth intervention programs is discussed.

  7. Psychosocial changes as correlates of weight regain vs. continued loss within 2-year trials of a self-regulation-focused community-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, J J; Mareno, N

    2017-02-01

    Although health-enhancing weight reductions are associated with behavioural treatments initially, a trajectory towards full regain typically begins within 6-9 months. Women with obesity (body mass index = 30-40 kg m(-2) ) who lost at least 3% of their baseline weight within two trials of a new cognitive-behavioural treatment incorporating physical activity prior to changes in eating behaviours, and either regained ≥50% of that weight over 2 years (Regain group, n=32) or continued to lose weight (ContinuedLoss group, n = 34), were assessed from months 6 to 24 on changes in weight-loss behaviours and psychosocial predictors of those behaviours derived from established behavioural theories. For the Regain group, significant decreases in physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake during months 12-24, from both months 6 to 24 and 12 to 24 in eating- and physical activity-related self-regulation and from months 6 to 24 in eating-related self-efficacy (i.e. feelings of ability), were found. No significant behavioural or psychosocial changes were found over those times in the ContinuedLoss group. Changes in self-regulation and self-efficacy completely mediated the relationship between changes in fruit/vegetable intake and group (Regain vs. ContinuedLoss) (McFadden's R (2)  = 0.19 and 0.20, respectively), with self-regulation independently contributing to the explained variance. Changes over both months 6-24 and 12-24 in self-regulation significantly mediated the relationship between changes in physical activity and group membership (McFadden's R (2)  = 0.24 and 0.27, respectively). Findings suggested that approximately 6 months after treatment initiation would be a suitable time to intervene with some bolstering methods, while approximately 12 months post-initiation would be most applicable for others. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  8. Life skills in educational contexts : testing the effects of an intervention program

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, António Rui; Marques, Brazelina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a training program on students’ acquisition of life skills, life satisfaction, life orientation and expectations about academic achievement. Participants were allocated to either an intervention group (n = 41) that took part in a life skills program, or a control group (n = 43). Participants completed the Youth Experiences Scale 2.0, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, and the Expectations about Academic Achievement. Results ...

  9. Challenges to translating new media interventions in community practice: a sexual health SMS program case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cassandra J C; Leinberger, Kaytlyn; Lim, Megan S C

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Herein we discuss translational challenges for new media interventions, using the Sexual Health & Youth (SHY) short message service (SMS) project to illustrate particular challenges relating to recruitment and evaluation. Methods Following the delivery of an SMS sexual health program, available documents (progress reports, communications with project staff, ethics submissions and reporting) were analysed thematically to elucidate the barriers to recruitment, implementation and evaluation. Results Despite being framed by evidence-based research, the project had little impact on the intended population. Only 119 of an expected 5100 young people (2%) enrolled to receive SMS messages. Program documents highlighted the difficulty of recruiting participants for new media interventions. Key issues identified in recruitment included under-resourcing, delays waiting to receive ethics approval and challenges of school-based recruitment. Conclusion The minimal impact of the SHY program illustrates the need for improved research translation in the field of new media interventions. It is important that recruitment procedures align with the convenience and appeal of mobile phone-based interventions. So what? New media research is not always easily translated into community settings. Large-scale recruitment requires adequate resourcing and careful planning, even for low-cost mobile interventions. Stronger formative research, documentation and use of partnerships are essential for successful implementation. Researchers must also consider translation in planning and disseminating their work.

  10. Effectiveness of iterative interventions to increase research productivity in one residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alweis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to expose residents to research opportunities. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a series of iterative interventions to increase scholarly activity in one internal medicine residency. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the effectiveness of a series of interventions to increase resident and faculty scholarly productivity over a 14-year period was performed using quality improvement methodology. Outcomes measured were accepted regional and national abstracts and PubMed indexed manuscripts of residents and faculty. Results: Initially, regional meeting abstracts increased and then were supplanted by national meeting abstracts. Sustained gains in manuscript productivity occurred in the eighth year of interventions, increasing from a baseline of 0.01 publications/FTE/year to 1.57 publications/FTE/year in the final year measured. Run chart analysis indicated special cause variation associated with the interventions performed. Conclusions: Programs attempting to stimulate research production among faculty and residents can choose among many interventions cited in the literature. Since success of any group of interventions is likely additive and may take years to show benefit, measuring outcomes using quality improvement methodology may be an effective way to determine success.

  11. Parental psychosocial predictors of secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jody S; Tyc, Vida L; Lensing, Shelly

    2012-09-01

    Children with cancer are at greater risk for the negative consequences of secondhand smoke exposure, making the identification of predictors of exposure critical. The current study investigated the impact of parents' psychosocial variables (perceived stress and vulnerability, self-efficacy), as well as health-related and demographic variables, on children's current exposure levels. Data were from 135 families whose children (M = 8.6 years old) lived with a smoker and were being treated for cancer. Self-efficacy was the consistent significant psychosocial predictor of exposure and the time since a child's diagnosis was indicative of lower exposure when limiting the sample to only smoking parents (n = 95). Both predictors of exposure have implications on motivation for behavioral change and may be suggestive of a teachable moment. Interventions may profit from tailoring programs to families based on these predictors of exposure, in particular for tobacco-based interventions for parents of medically compromised children, such as children with cancer.

  12. Skills Versus Pills: Psychosocial Treatments for ADHD in Childhood and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Erin N; Sasser, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Although side effects and family concerns are common and long-term medication adherence is low, stimulant medications are a front-line treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Psychosocial treatments include classroom, family, and child-focused interventions that teach caregivers and teachers how to implement contingencies to shape behavior and provide children with skills to compensate for ADHD deficits. Such programs have a growing evidence-base and can be implemented alone or in conjunction with pharmacological treatments. The most efficacious psychosocial treatments for children with ADHD include Behavioral Parent Training, Behavioral Classroom Management, and Behavioral Peer Interventions, which all focus on contingency management by adults. Training interventions are increasingly used to teach organizational and interpersonal skills to children and adolescents. These treatments are found to improve functional outcomes associated with ADHD, including on-task behavior, compliance, academic performance, social relationships, and family functioning. Clinicians play an important role in educating families about psychosocial treatments for ADHD, increasing family motivation and engagement, and including these interventions in multimodal treatment plans for youth with ADHD across development. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e367-e372.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Impact of an integrated intervention program on atorvastatin adherence: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami NJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nilesh J Goswami,1 Mitch DeKoven,2 Andreas Kuznik,3 Jack Mardekian,3 Michelle R Krukas,2 Larry Z Liu,3,4 Patrick Bailey,1 Cynthia Deitrick,5 John Vincent3 1Prairie Heart Cardiovascular Consultants, Springfield, IL, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Alexandria, VA, USA; 3Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 4Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 5Prairie Heart Education and Research Cooperative, Springfield, IL, USA Background: This trial evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated intervention program that included a 3-to-5-minute nurse counseling session, copay relief cards, and a monthly newsletter on adherence to atorvastatin treatment. Methods and results: A prospective, integrated (composed of nurse counseling, adherence tip sheet, copay relief card, opportunity to enroll in 12-week cholesterol management program randomized interventional study was designed involving patients >21 years of age who were prescribed atorvastatin at a large single-specialty cardiovascular physician practice in Illinois from March 2010 to May 2011. Data from the practice's electronic medical record were matched/merged to IMS Health's longitudinal data. A total of 500 patients were enrolled (125 in the control arm; 375 in the intervention arm. After data linkage, 53 control patients and 155 intervention patients were included in the analysis. Results: Mean age was 67.8 years (control and 69.5 years (intervention; 67.9% and 58.7%, respectively, were male. The mean 6-month adherence rate was 0.82 in both arms. The mean proportion of days covered for both the new-user control and intervention groups was the same, averaging 0.70 day (standard deviation [SD], 0.27 day; for continuing users, the proportion of days covered for the control group was 0.83 (SD, 0.24 and for the intervention group was 0.84 (SD, 0.22. For continuing users, the control group had mean persistent days of 151.6 (SD, 50.2 compared with 150.9 days

  14. Easier said than done: intervention sustainability in an urban after-school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R; Frazier, Stacy L; Mehta, Tara; Atkins, Marc S; Weisbach, Jessica

    2011-11-01

    Although sustainability is frequently described as a project goal in community-based programs, concentrated efforts to sustain interventions beyond the conclusion of research funding have only recently emerged as a focus of implementation research. The current paper describes a study of behavioral consultation to after-school program staff in low-SES, urban communities. Following consultation, staff use of four recommended tools and strategies was examined, emphasizing facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Results indicated high perceived utility and intention to use intervention components, but low sustainability at two follow-up time points within 1 year after the initial consultation concluded. Findings suggest that ongoing implementation support in community settings may be necessary to ensure the sustainability of interventions and meet the mental health needs of participating high-risk youth.

  15. Effectiveness of an Intervention Program for Improving School Atmosphere: Some Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, A. M.; Rivas, M. T.; Trianes, M. V.

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the results of the "Programa de Desarrollo Social y Afectivo" [Social and Affective Development Program] (Trianes & Munoz, 1994; Trianes, 1996), under way during four years at a public school in a disadvantaged area Malaga, earmarked for special educational resources. The intervention is meant to improve classroom…

  16. Evaluation of a Group CBT Early Intervention Program for Adolescents with Comorbid Depression and Behaviour Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wignall, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Depression and externalising behaviour disorders frequently occur together in adolescence and are associated with a marked increase in symptom severity and poorer outcome. Clinical treatment research and early intervention programs for depression have not addressed the specific cognitive and interpersonal deficits associated with comorbidity. This…

  17. The Impact of a Nutritional Intervention Program on Academics in Selected Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative quasi-experimental study is to examine the effectiveness of the "Healthy Kids, Smart Kids" intervention program on academics. Extant data will be used to determine if a statistically significant difference in academics exist between experimental schools implementing the "Healthy Kids, Smart…

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of students towards peers with disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander; Post, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examine the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of elementary school students towards peers with intellectual, physical and severe physical and intellectual disabilities. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was designed with an experimental group and

  19. Intervention programs for children whose parents have a mental illness: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reupert, A.E.; Cuff, R.; Drost, L.; Foster, K.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Santvoort, F. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify and describe intervention programs to improve outcomes for children whose parents have a mental illness. Data sources: Grey and black literature was sourced from (i) three previous reviews/scoping studies, (ii) PsycINFO and MEDLINE searches of English, German and Dutch papers,

  20. Addressing Career Success Issues of African Americans in the Workplace: An Undergraduate Business Program Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Belinda Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Career success as measured by the objective, traditional criteria of the composite of high number of promotions, high annual compensation, and high organizational level in corporate America has eluded the majority of African Americans. This article describes an undergraduate business program career success intervention designed to assist African…

  1. Effects of a Computer-Based Intervention Program on the Communicative Functions of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E.; Tannous, Juman

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of computer-based intervention for enhancing communication functions of children with autism. The software program was developed based on daily life activities in the areas of play, food, and hygiene. The following variables were investigated: delayed echolalia, immediate echolalia, irrelevant speech, relevant…

  2. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  3. An Evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention: A Mentoring Program for Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha; VandeWiele, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the results of an evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention (ILI), a mentoring program for early childhood educators that is built upon adult self-directed learning experiences and the collaborative support of others. Sixteen Mentor and 16 Protege teachers in Head Start classrooms were selected for participation…

  4. MENTAL-HEALTH INTERVENTION PROGRAMS IN PRIMARY CARE - THEIR SCIENTIFIC BASIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBRINK, W; LEENSTRA, A; ORMEL, J; VANDEWILLIGE, G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the scientific basis for mental health intervention programs in primary care. The validity of five underlying assumptions is evaluated, using the results of a naturalistic study covering a representative sample of 25 Dutch family practices and data from the literature. Our findin

  5. Efficacy of the Social Skills Improvement System Classwide Intervention Program (SSIS-CIP) Primary Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPerna, James Clyde; Lei, Puiwa; Bellinger, Jillian; Cheng, Weiyi

    2015-01-01

    A multisite cluster randomized trial was conducted to examine the effects of the Social Skills Improvement System Classwide Intervention Program (SSIS-CIP; Elliott & Gresham, 2007) on students' classroom social behavior. The final sample included 432 students across 38 second grade classrooms. Social skills and problem behaviors were measured…

  6. Effects of a Computer-Based Intervention Program on the Communicative Functions of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E.; Tannous, Juman

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of computer-based intervention for enhancing communication functions of children with autism. The software program was developed based on daily life activities in the areas of play, food, and hygiene. The following variables were investigated: delayed echolalia, immediate echolalia, irrelevant speech, relevant…

  7. Assessment of program implementation for the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living (MCHL) Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to assess program implementation (PI) using an implementation score composed of process evaluation (PE) components reach, dose delivered, dose received, and fidelity. This 9-month, multi-site nutrition intervention consisted of two treatment groups (N=319). Sixteen site...

  8. Impact of School Readiness Program Interventions on Children's Learning in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonoyama-Tarumi, Yuko; Bredenberg, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    To reduce the high repetition rates in early years of primary school, the government of Cambodia piloted a school readiness program (SRP) in the first two months of Grade 1 of primary school. This study examines whether such intervention has effects on students' immediate acquisition of school readiness skills as well as students' longer term…

  9. The Impact of a Nutritional Intervention Program on Academics in Selected Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative quasi-experimental study is to examine the effectiveness of the "Healthy Kids, Smart Kids" intervention program on academics. Extant data will be used to determine if a statistically significant difference in academics exist between experimental schools implementing the "Healthy Kids, Smart…

  10. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  11. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.…

  12. MENTAL-HEALTH INTERVENTION PROGRAMS IN PRIMARY CARE - THEIR SCIENTIFIC BASIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBRINK, W; LEENSTRA, A; ORMEL, J; VANDEWILLIGE, G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the scientific basis for mental health intervention programs in primary care. The validity of five underlying assumptions is evaluated, using the results of a naturalistic study covering a representative sample of 25 Dutch family practices and data from the literature. Our findin

  13. The development of social capital through football and running: studying an intervention program for inactive women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Laila; Jeppesen, Rikke Schou; Krustrup, Birgitte Rejkjær

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the development of social capital through the use and dynamics of different types of stories (“I,”“we” and “they”) as described by Robert D. Putnam. The data come from a research project in which inactive women participated in a 16-week intervention program of physical...

  14. Development of a Chronic Disease Management Program for Stroke Survivors Using Intervention Mapping: The Stroke Coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Brodie M; Lear, Scott A; Barr, Susan I; Benavente, Oscar; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Silverberg, Noah D; Yao, Jennifer; Eng, Janice J

    2017-06-01

    To describe the systematic development of the Stroke Coach, a theory- and evidence-based intervention to improve control of lifestyle behavior risk factors in patients with stroke. Intervention development. Community. Individuals who have had a stroke. We used intervention mapping to guide the development of the Stroke Coach. Intervention mapping is a systematic process used for intervention development and composed of steps that progress from the integration of theory and evidence to the organization of realistic strategies to facilitate the development of a practical intervention supported by empirical evidence. Social cognitive theory was the underlying premise for behavior change, whereas control theory methods were directed toward sustaining the changes to ensure long-term health benefits. Practical evidence-based strategies were linked to behavioral determinants to improve stroke risk factor control. Not applicable. The Stroke Coach is a patient-centered, community-based, telehealth intervention to promote healthy lifestyles after stroke. Over 6 months, participants receive seven 30- to 60-minute telephone sessions with a lifestyle coach who provides education, facilitates motivation for lifestyle modification, and empowers participants to self-management their stroke risk factors. Participants also receive a self-management manual and a self-monitoring kit. Through the use of intervention mapping, we developed a theoretically sound and evidence-grounded intervention to improve risk factor control in patients with stroke. If empirical evaluation of the Stroke Coach produces positive results, the next step will be to develop an implementation intervention to ensure successful uptake and delivery of the program in community and outpatient settings. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  15. Manualization of occupational therapy interventions: illustrations from the pressure ulcer prevention research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Toward the latter end, intervention manuals are essential for ensuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this article, we review the literature on the process of intervention manualization. We then illustrate the prescribed steps through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center's collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project. In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce the incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in adults with spinal cord injury.

  16. Combining child social skills training with a parent early intervention program for inhibited preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Elizabeth X; Rapee, Ronald M; Coplan, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of early intervention for anxiety in preschoolers through parent-education. The current study evaluated a six-session early intervention program for preschoolers at high risk of anxiety disorders in which a standard educational program for parents was supplemented by direct training of social skills to the children. Seventy-two children aged 3-5 years were selected based on high behavioural inhibition levels and concurrently having a parent with high emotional distress. Families were randomly assigned to either the intervention group, which consisted of six parent-education group sessions and six child social skills training sessions, or waitlist. After six months, families on waitlist were offered treatment consisting of parent-education only. Relative to waitlist, children in the combined condition showed significantly fewer clinician-rated anxiety disorders and diagnostic severity and maternal (but not paternal) reported anxiety symptoms and life interference at six months. Mothers also reported less overprotection. These gains were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Parent only education following waitlist produced similar improvements among children. Quasi-experimental comparison between combined and parent-only interventions indicated greater reductions from combined intervention according to clinician reports, but no significant differences on maternal reports. Results suggest that this brief early intervention program for preschoolers with both parent and child components significantly reduces risk and disorder in vulnerable children. The inclusion of a child component might have the potential to increase effects over parent-only intervention. However, future support for this conclusion through long-term, randomised controlled trials is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of the MEND program: a family-based community intervention for childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, Paul M; Kolotourou, Maria; Chadwick, Paul M; Cole, Tim J; Lawson, Margaret S; Lucas, Alan; Singhal, Atul

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do it (MEND) Program, a multicomponent community-based childhood obesity intervention (www.mendcentral.org). One hundred and sixteen obese children (BMI >or= 98 th percentile, UK 1990 reference data) were randomly assigned to intervention or waiting list control (6-month delayed intervention). Parents and children attended eighteen 2-h group educational and physical activity sessions held twice weekly in sports centers and schools, followed by a 12-week free family swimming pass. Waist circumference, BMI, body composition, physical activity level, sedentary activities, cardiovascular fitness, and self-esteem were assessed at baseline and at 6 months. Children were followed up 12 months from baseline (0 and 6 months postintervention for the control and intervention group, respectively). Participants in the intervention group had a reduced waist circumference z-score (-0.37; P children in the intervention group had reduced their waist and BMI z-scores by 0.47 (P < 0.0001) and 0.23 (P < 0.0001), respectively, and benefits in cardiovascular fitness, physical activity levels, and self-esteem were sustained. High-attendance rates suggest that families found this intensive community-based intervention acceptable. Further larger controlled trials are currently underway to confirm the promising findings of this initial trial.

  19. Twin pregnancy: the impact of the Higgins Nutrition Intervention Program on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dubois, S

    1991-06-01

    Perinatal outcomes were compared between 354 twins treated with the Higgins Nutrition Intervention Program and 686 untreated twins. After differing distributions of key confounding variables were adjusted for, the twins in the intervention group weighed an average of 80 g more (P less than 0.06) than the nonintervention twins; their low-birth-weight rate was 25% lower (P less than 0.05) and their very-low-birth-weight rate was almost 50% lower (P less than 0.05). Although the rate of preterm delivery was 30% lower in the intervention group (P less than 0.05), the rates of intrauterine growth retardation were similar in the two groups. Fetal mortality was slightly higher (14 vs 12 per 1000, NS), but early neonatal mortality was fivefold lower (3 vs 19 per 1000, P less than 0.06) in the intervention group. Maternal morbidity was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) in the intervention group. There was a trend towards lower infant morbidity in the intervention group. These results suggest that nutritional intervention can significantly improve twin-pregnancy outcome.

  20. Behavioral and psychosocial interventions for HIV prevention in floating populations in China over the past decade: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Liu (Xiaona); V. Erasmus (Vicky); Q. Wu (Qing); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Floating populations have been repeatedly characterized as "the tipping point" for the HIV epidemic in China. This study aims to systematically summarize and assess the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions in floating populations in China over the past decade. Method

  1. Community supported agriculture programs: a novel venue for theory-based health behavior change interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Christopher M; Hughner, Renee Shaw; MacMillan, Lexi; Dumitrescu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Local foods programs such as community supported agriculture programs (CSAs) and farmers' markets have increased greatly in popularity. However, little research has been conducted regarding the effect of involvement in local foods programs on diet-related attitudes and behaviors. A series of focus groups was conducted to identify the motives that propel individuals to join a CSA, the experiences of belonging to a CSA, and the diet-related outcomes of CSA membership. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to categorize findings, data suggest the potential of CSAs as a viable intervention strategy for promoting healthful diets and behaviors.

  2. Considering Student Voices: Examining the Experiences of Underrepresented Students in Intervention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibau, Gina Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative studies that examine the experiences of underrepresented minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are comparatively few. This study explores the self-reported experiences of underrepresented graduate students in the biomedical sciences of a large, midwestern, urban university. Document analysis of interview transcripts from program evaluations capture firsthand accounts of student experiences and reveal the need for a critical examination of current intervention programs designed to reverse the trend of underrepresentation in the biomedical sciences. Findings point to themes aligned around the benefits and challenges of program components, issues of social adjustment, the utility of supportive relationships, and environmental impacts.

  3. [Psychosocial stress and cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houppe, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Psychosocial stress is a major independent risk and prognostic factor of cardiovascular events. It includes psychological, sociological and socioeconomic factors. Cardiovascular diseases are important providers of psychosocial stress. The knowledge of the cerebral development throughout the time allows to a better understanding of the relationship between psychosocial stress and cardiovascular risk. Psychosocial stress leads, on top of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, to the development or to the worsening of an endothelial dysfunction, of an inflammatory response and prothrombotic phenomenon. Anxiolytics and antidepressors are not very effective against psychosocial stress. Physical activity and psychotherapy are much more indicated, particularly cognitve-behavioral therapy. The ESC recommends an evaluation of psychosocial stress through a short questionnaire.

  4. The youth alternative solutions program: evaluating a hospital-based intervention for adolescent substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Whitney N; D'Errico, Ellen; Morrell, Holly E R

    2015-01-01

    Issues of alcohol and drug use are more pronounced during adolescence than at any other period of the lifespan and represent a significant public health concern in the United States. As a result, there is currently a need for research on developmentally appropriate interventions for adolescent substance use (SU). Nurses and other mental health professionals working with adolescents need effective evidenced-based programs to refer clients having issues with SU. The current pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of the Youth Alternative Solutions Program, a hospital-based intervention program at a Level I trauma center in Southern California that partners with community stakeholders to accomplish its goals. A sample of 27 adolescents was recruited from August 2010 until October 2011. Twenty-seven total participants completed both pretest and posttest questionnaires; 14 of these participants also completed follow-up data collection. Results indicated a significant increase in negative alcohol outcome expectancies between the three study time points. More comprehensive studies of the Youth Alternative Solutions Program should be conducted in the future to determine the utility of hospital-based SU interventions and to provide evidence of the program's long-term effects.

  5. Effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy on physicians' referral behavior to an evidence-based psychosocial intervention in dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopp, C.M.E.; Graff, M.J.L.; Teerenstra, S.; Sanden, M.W.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy on physicians' referral rate to and knowledge on the community occupational therapy in dementia program (COTiD program). METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial with 28 experimental and 17 control clusters was

  6. Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policy Practice: Process Evaluation of a Group Randomized Controlled Intervention in Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Hutto, Brent; Saunders, Ruth P.; Moore, Justin B.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beighle, Aaron; Freedman, Darcy

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the link between level of implementation and outcomes from an intervention to increase afterschool programs' (ASPs) achievement of healthy eating and physical activity (HE-PA) Standards. Ten intervention ASPs implemented the Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), a multi-component, adaptive intervention framework identifying…

  7. Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policy Practice: Process Evaluation of a Group Randomized Controlled Intervention in Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Hutto, Brent; Saunders, Ruth P.; Moore, Justin B.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beighle, Aaron; Freedman, Darcy

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the link between level of implementation and outcomes from an intervention to increase afterschool programs' (ASPs) achievement of healthy eating and physical activity (HE-PA) Standards. Ten intervention ASPs implemented the Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), a multi-component, adaptive intervention framework identifying…

  8. Behavior modification of aggressive children in child welfare: evaluation of a combined intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitkowski, Dennis; Petermann, Franz; Büttner, Peter; Krause-Leipoldt, Carsten; Petermann, Ulrike

    2009-07-01

    Children and adolescents with aggressive disorders are prevalent in child welfare settings. Therefore, the assumption is that child welfare services would benefit from a cognitive-behavioral intervention. This study investigates whether implementation of the training with aggressive children (TAC) could improve the outcome of child welfare. Twelve children (average age 10 years), diagnosed with an oppositional defiant disorder or a conduct disorder, are treated either with a child welfare program or with a combined intervention of child welfare program and TAC. Before and immediately after completion of the combined treatment, parent and teacher ratings are collected. Parents report children participating in child welfare and TAC to show a stronger decline in social and conduct problems as well as a clearer increase in prosocial behavior. Teachers see a better improvement in social problems and tended to report a decrease in aggressive behavior. Results confirm that the TAC can enhance effects of a child welfare program.

  9. [Influence of psychosocial factors on adherence to antihypertensive drug therapy: results from a Cardiovascular Health Program cohort followed in the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Daniela; Chacón, Javier; Muñoz, Reinaldo; Henríquez, Óscar; Koch, Elard; Romero, Tomás

    2014-10-01

    Inadequate blood pressure control in hypertensive patients remains a persistent health problem in Chile and worldwide. Poor adherence to antihypertensive drug therapy is one of the frequently cited factors. To determine the influence of psychosocial factors in the adherence to drug therapy in hypertensive patients followed through a Cardiovascular Health Program (CHP) that provides free access to primary care centers located in the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile. Cross sectional study. A randomized sample of 513 hypertensive patients (30 to 68 years) was obtained from a universe of 1.484 patients. Adherence to treatment was determined by the Morisky-Green-Levine test. Demographic, socioeconomic and average values of blood pressure were recorded. Validated questionnaires were utilized to assess the patient-physician relationship, awareness of being hypertensive, patient perception of social support, family cohesion, patient self-health assessment and symptoms of emotional stress and depression. The drug therapy adherence was 36.6%, higher in women (38.4% vs 28.9%; p < 0.001). After multivariate analysis, absence of adherence was associated with male gender (OR: 1.76 [95% CI 1.21-2.56]), low education (OR: 1.72 [95% CI 1.18 to 2.53]), inadequate patient-physician relationship (OR: 1.56 [95% CI 1.13 to 2.27]), and high level of emotional stress and depression (OR: 1.93 [95% CI 1.27 to 2.94]). Our study highlights the influence of inadequate patient-physician relation, high level of emotional stress and depression, low education level and income and male gender in the lack of adherence to antihypertensive drug therapy in hypertensive patients followed throughout the CHP.

  10. Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummery W Kerry

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face, and internet-only program delivery. Methods Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that commenced the RT were included (n = 192. Exposure was defined as either face-to-face attendance, website usage, or a combination of both for the internet-mediated group. Characteristics of participants who were exposed to at least 75% of the program material were explored. Descriptive analysis and logistical regression were used to examine differences between groups for program exposure. Results All groups showed decrease in program exposure over time. Differences were also observed (χ2 = 10.37, p Conclusion These results suggest that the internet groups were as effective as the face-to-face delivery mode in engaging participants in the program material. However, different delivery methods may be more useful to different sub-populations. It is important to explore which target groups that internet-based programs are best suited, in order to increase their impact.

  11. The influence of newborn early literacy intervention programs in three canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Nicole; Whitty, Pam; Watson, Barry; Phillips, Jennifer; Joschko, Justin; Gillis, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of literacy in early childhood can have lasting effects on children's educational and intellectual development. Many countries have implemented newborn literacy programs designed to teach parents pre-literacy promoting activities to share with their children. We conducted 2 quasi-experimental studies using 1) a pre-test/post-test design and 2) a non-equivalent control group design to examine the effect of newborn literacy programs on parents' self-reported literacy intentions/behaviors, values toward literacy, and parent-child interactions. Parents were recruited from 3 provinces, 2 with newborn literacy programs (intervention) and 1 without (control). Parents in the intervention group completed prenatal and postnatal (after participation in program) questionnaires. Parents in the control group completed 1 questionnaire. Questionnaires were designed to capture parents' literacy intentions (prenatal), behaviors (postnatal), values, and parent-child interactions (postnatal). A total of 98 parents were included in study one and 174 were included in study two. Parents' self-reported prenatal intentions and values were higher than their postnatal behaviors and values. Parents in the intervention group exhibited higher literacy behaviors and values and greater enjoyment reading to their children than parents in the control group, though they also reported reading to their children less frequently. Parents in the intervention group had significantly higher Positive Interactive scores than controls. Overall, we found participation in newborn literacy programs positively impacted parenting behaviors and attitudes. Lower postnatal within-group scores (intentions and values versus behaviors and values) may have been the result of participants' high expectations. Given our findings, we recommend that these programs continue.

  12. Psychosocial rehabilitation in a chronic care hospital in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    psychosocial interventions for persons disabled by mental health ... Medicine, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, .... Of the participants 69 (60.5%) were women and 42 (36.8%).

  13. The effect of a "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention in a home care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald; Godin, Lori

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a unique "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention for community-dwelling elderly individuals in a home care program. A combined propensity-based covariate-matching procedure was used to pair each individual who received the intervention ("treatment" condition, nT = 930) to a similar individual who did not receive the intervention ("control" condition, nC1 = 930) from among a large pool of potential control individuals (nC0 = 4656). The intervention consisted of regularly scheduled telephone calls from a surveillance nurse to proactively assess the individual's well-being, care plan status, use of and need for services (home support, adult day program, physiotherapy, etc.) and home environment (e.g., informal caregiver support). Treatment and control conditions were compared with respect to four service utilization outcomes: (1) rate of survival in the community before institutionalization in an assisted living or nursing home facility or death, (2) rate of emergency room registrations, (3) rate of acute care hospitalizations, and (4) rate of days in hospital, during home care enrollment. Results indicated a beneficial effect of the surveillance nurse intervention on reducing rate of service utilization by increasing the duration of the home care episode.

  14. Post-disaster psychosocial services across Europe: The TENTS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witteveen, A. B.; Bisson, J. I.; Ajdukovic, D.

    2012-01-01

    of a cross-sectional web-based survey completed in 2008 by two hundred and eighty-six representatives of organizations involved in psychosocial responses to trauma and disaster from thirty-three different countries across Europe. The survey addressed planning and delivery of psychosocial care after disaster......, methods of screening and diagnosis, types of interventions used, and other aspects of psychosocial care after trauma. The findings showed that planning and delivery of psychosocial care was inconsistent across Europe. Countries in East Europe seemed to have less central coordination of the post......At present post-disaster activities and plans seem to vary widely. An adequate estimation of the availability of post-disaster psychosocial services across Europe is needed in order to compare them with recently developed evidence-informed psychosocial care guidelines. Here we report on the results...

  15. Effectiveness of a Lifestyle Intervention Program among Persons at High Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes in a Rural Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadheim, Liane M.; Brewer, Kari A.; Kassner, Darcy R.; Vanderwood, Karl K.; Hall, Taryn O.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Harwell, Todd S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of translating the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention into practice in a rural community. Methods: In 2008, the Montana Diabetes Control Program worked collaboratively with Holy Rosary Healthcare to implement an adapted group-based DPP lifestyle intervention. Adults at high risk for…

  16. A Systematic Investigation of Program Differentiation within a Kindergarten Reading Intervention Study: The Importance of Accounting for Implementation across Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civetelli, Christina

    2012-01-01

    This study examined dimensions of treatment integrity, specifically program differentiation, within the context of a kindergarten reading intervention study. The study explored the relationship between program differentiation and student outcomes. The study was conducted within the context of Project Early Reading Intervention (ERI), a four-year…

  17. Psychosocial intervention proposal in self-determination, social skills and entrepreneurial capacity: contribution from psychology to the integration of entrepreneurs women with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Poblete Toloza, Yohanna del Pilar; Universidad de Talca; Jiménez Figueroa, Andrés Eduardo; Universidad de Talca

    2013-01-01

    It constructs an intervention on subjective well-being, self-determination, social skills and entrepreneurship in women microentrepreneurs with intellectual disabilities from a diagnosis realized in 20 women with intellectual disabilities.It administered a battery of five instruments: Satisfaction Scale life Diener et ál (1984), subjective happiness scale Lyubomirsky and Lepper (1999), Self-Concept Scale (La Rosa y Díaz, 1999), Questionnaire social skills Goldstein (1999) and En...

  18. Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS): a pilot intervention to reduce anhedonia and apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrod, Jérôme; Nguyen, Alexandra; Fankhauser, Caroline; Ismailaj, Alban; Hasler, Jean-David; Ringuet, Abel; Rexhaj, Shyhrete; Bonsack, Charles

    2015-09-29

    Recent literature has distinguished the negative symptoms associated with a diminished capacity to experience (apathy, anhedonia) from symptoms associated with a limited capacity for expression (emotional blunting, alogia). The apathy-anhedonia syndrome tends to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the symptoms related to diminished expression. The efficacy of drug-based treatments and psychological interventions for these symptoms in schizophrenia remains limited. There is a clear clinical need for new treatments. This pilot study tested the feasibility of a program to reduce anhedonia and apathy in schizophrenia and assessed its impact on 37 participants meeting the ICD-10 criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. Participants were pre- and post-tested using the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). They took part in eight sessions of the Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS)--an intervention that teaches participants skills to help overcome defeatist thinking and to increase the anticipation and maintenance of positive emotions. Thirty-one participants completed the program; those who dropped out did not differ from completers. Participation in the program was accompanied by statistically significant reductions in the total scores for Avolition-Apathy and Anhedonia-Asociality on the SANS, with moderate effect sizes. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant reduction of depression on the CDSS, with a large effect size. Emotional blunting and alogia remain stable during the intervention. Findings indicate that PEPS is both a feasible intervention and is associated with an apparently specific reduction of anhedonia and apathy. However, these findings are limited by the absence of control group and the fact that the rater was not blind to the treatment objectives. PEPS is a promising intervention to improve anhedonia and apathy which need to be

  19. Mothers' and fathers' involvement in intervention programs for deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Haddad, Eliana

    2017-03-12

    Parental involvement in the rehabilitation process of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children is considered vital to children's progress. Today, fathers are more likely to be involved in their children's care. Nevertheless, father involvement has been understudied and relatively little is known about their involvement in families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In addition, there are scant data on the correlates of parents' involvement. This study explored similarities and differences in parental involvement between mothers and fathers in intervention programs for their D/HH children and tested a set of personal and social contextual variables that posited to affect parental involvement in a unique socio-cultural group. Thirty Israeli-Arab couples (mothers and fathers) of young D/HH children took part. Each parent completed four self-report measures of parental involvement, parenting stress, parental self-efficacy, and social support. Mothers were significantly more involved than fathers in their child's intervention. Specifically, they report on higher interest and attendance and overall being more actively engaged with professionals in the child's intervention. Both mothers and fathers had a rather passive style of involvement in their child's intervention. Parental self-efficacy and informal and formal social support were associated with father involvement. For mothers, only formal social support was associated with involvement. For the Israeli-Arab population, the findings underscore the differences between mothers' and fathers' multiple dimensions of involvement in the intervention program of their D/HH children and their predictors. The results suggest important avenues for prevention and intervention activities when working with families of children who are D/HH. Implications for rehabilitation Parental involvement in intervention programs for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) is vital to children's progress and an essential

  20. Clinical outcomes of an early intervention program for preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a community group setting

    OpenAIRE

    Eapen, Valsamma; Črnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Background Available evidence indicates that early intervention programs, such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), can positively affect key outcomes for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, programs involving resource intensive one-to-one clinical intervention are not readily available or deliverable in the community, resulting in many children with ASD missing out on evidence-based intervention during their early and most critical preschool years. This study evaluated ...