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Sample records for psychosocial care centers

  1. Psychology and psychosocial practices: narratives and conceptions of psychologists from the psychosocial care centers

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    Thais Thomé Seni da Silva e Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial care, current care model in mental health in Brazil, emphasizes interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral and territorial actions. This paper aims to present conceptions of psychologists from the Centers for Psychosocial Care of a city on Parana state, about the psychosocial practices developed in their daily actions. Semi-structured individual interviews and group meetings were conducted, using the technique of Operating Group of Pichón-Rivière. The interviews and groups were recorded, transcribed and qualitatively analyzed. Results point the dichotomy between clinical and psychosocial practices in psychology and the professional identity of the participants tied to traditional clinical psychology model. Some psychosocial practices are gradually being recognized by professionals as legitimate practice of psychology, and could be considered amplified clinic in psychology. It is concluded that for the effectiveness of psychosocial practices, it is essential to improve graduation courses and permanent education strategies for mental health professionals.

  2. Evaluation Of The Overload Of Care In Families Of Psychiatric Patients In Psychosocial Care Center

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    Mayron Morais Almeida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of care in family refers to the weight caused by the primary caregiver role to psychiatric patients and the difficulties encountered in performing this function in daily life. Objectives: Assessing the objective and subjective overload of family members who live with the reality of psychiatric disorder in a child day-care psychosocial care center. Methods: Cross-sectional study, descriptive-exploratory, of quantitative approach, with non-probabilistic samples of accidental type with 80 families of psychiatric patients held in a Psychosocial Care Center. For overload evaluation, the subscales "B" and "D" of the Family Overload Rating Scale (FBIS-BR were used. Results: The study was conducted with 80 families of psychiatric patients. The average age of female caregivers was 39,6 years old, and 40,7 years old for male caregivers, with female predominance (87,5% compared to men (12,5%, with low education for both genres. Family caregivers presented high objective burden due to excessive demand attention (p<0,001, heteroaggressiveness (p<0,001 and perplexing behavior of psychiatric patients regarding the supervision of problematic behaviors (p<0,001. The items on the impact on the family's daily routine have not helped to generate objective overload for the family members. On subjective overload, it was clear to observe familiar members with high degree of disturbance in all the dimensions assessed (p < 0,001. Conclusion: The high degree of care overload observed in family members indicates the need to develop contacts with the family of the psychiatric patient to answer questions, offer support and assistance to the family caregiver. Keywords: Caregivers. Patients. Mental Health Services.

  3. Day hospital and psychosocial care center: Expanding the discussion of partial hospitalization in mental health

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    César Augusto Trinta Weber

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Since the second half of the twentieth century the discussions about mental patient care reveal ongoing debate between two health care paradigms: the biomedical/biopsychosocial paradigm and the psychosocial paradigm. The struggle for hegemony over the forms of care, on how to deal optimally with the experience of becoming ill is underpinned by an intentionality of reorganizing knowledge about the health/disease dichotomy, which is reflected in the models proposed for the implementation of actions and services for the promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation of human health. Objective: To discuss the guidelines of care in mental health day hospitals (MHDH in contrast to type III psychosocial care centers (CAPS III. Method: Review of mental health legislation from 1990 to 2014. Results: A definition of therapeutic project could not be found, as well as which activities and techniques should be employed by these health services. Conclusion: The MHDH and PCC III are services that replace psychiatric hospital admission and are characterized by their complementarity in the care to the mentally ill. Due to their varied and distinctive intervention methods, which operate synergistically, the contributions from both models of care are optimized. Discussions on the best mental health care model reveal polarization between the biomedical/biopsychosocial and psychosocial paradigms. This reflects the supremacy of the latter over the former in the political-ideological discourse that circumscribes the reform of psychiatric care, which may hinder a better clinical outcome for patients and their families.

  4. [Physical activity in staff workers at Centers for Psychosocial Care in southern Brazil: temporal trends].

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    Jerônimo, Jeferson Santos; Jardim, Vanda Maria da Rosa; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze temporal trends of physical activity among staff workers in Centers for Psychosocial Care and associated factors in southern Brazil from 2006 to 2011. This cross-sectional study was part of the Evaluation of Centers for Psychosocial Care in Southern Brazil/CAPSUL. Physical and mental health variables were collected using the Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20), and physical activity was measured with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Participation included 435 staff workers in 2006 and 546 in 2011. Total prevalence rates were: physical activity (≥ 150 minutes/week) 23.2% in 2006 and 17.6% in 2011 and minor psychiatric disorders 11% and 8.4%. There was no statistically significant difference in physical activity between men and women. In 2006, individuals with less schooling (p = 0.03) and lower income (p = 0.01) showed higher levels of physical activity. In 2011, staff workers in larger cities showed higher levels of physical activity (p = 0.02). Interventions are needed to promote physical activity in this population, especially among staff workers at Centers for Psychosocial Care in smaller municipalities.

  5. [Intersubjectivity in Mental Health care: narratives of nursing technicians at a Psychosocial Care Center].

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    Campos, Rosana Onocko; Baccari, Ivana Preto

    2011-04-01

    Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps) were established as a result of the demand for Mental Health care and were an attempt to update psychiatric treatment for those afflicted with severe mental disorders. This article seeks to analyze subjective repercussions of work conducted in Caps on mid-level professionals and to contribute to healthcare planning. Two focal groups were conducted with workers of a Caps III. The methodology applied to the analysis was based on the critical hermeneutical approach proposed by Ricoeur and espoused by Gadamerian philosophy. Lack of appreciation in the workplace was revealed as being the main cause of suffering. Several themes stood out including the difficulty of obtaining the cooperation of users'; relatives, the tenuous interconnection between Caps and the health network, the attribution of responsibility for the night shift, controversies regarding overnight-stay patients and an excessive workload. Adequate structural planning and institutional organization is proposed when opening new Caps in order to reduce the workload of technicians and improve the clinical performance of the team.

  6. User embracement in practices care in psychosocial care centers the perspective of local managers

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    Andreza Kelly Cardoso da Silva Soares

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychosocial care centres (CAPS, strategic IN articulation of psychosocial care network and health system gateway, propose to the reorganization of health practices, by adopting a new ethic of care, based on respect to the singularity of the subjects and in the reception to the health needs of the users. Reception is a device for transforming practices and humanizing health care.  Objective: To analyse the operation of the host users of CAPS from the perspective of local coordinators in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil.  Method: Qualitative research with case study design, performed with CAPS coordinators of the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation, being submitted to the analysis of thematic content.  Results: The host constituted innovative device in mental health practices, as triggered the construction of new ways of dealing with the subject in psychological distress, by incorporating technologies such as qualified listening, building autonomy, with attention focused on the user. Provided a reorientation of work and service processes, requesting the articulation for network care. In addition, it was configured as a strategy for humanization in the CAPS. Was presented, however, operational difficulties related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of attention.  Final considerations: The host device configured for reorienting health practices, enhancing the consolidation of psychosocial care model, with humanization and increased solvability. However, challenges remain to be overcome, related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of care.

  7. [Work as a source of pleasure: evaluating a Psychosocial Care Center team].

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    Glanzner, Cecília Helena; Olschowsky, Agnes; Kantorski, Luciane Prado

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pleasure at work felt by the members of a Psychosocial Care Center team. This qualitative case study used Forth Generation Evaluation. This study was performed in Foz do Iguaçu, Parana, Brazil, in November and December 2006. Participants were 10 tem members. Data collection was performed through observation and individual interviews. The analysis was initiated at the same time as the data collection, and the final analysis was performed as per the following steps: data ordering, classification and final analysis. The following analysis themes were developed: work characteristics at the psychological care center, suffering and coping with suffering at work. During the evaluation, the participants showed pleasure and fulfillment with their work by expressing pride, fulfillment and appreciation of what they deliver. Pleasure occurs during the development of psychosocial care, because they always have the freedom to rearrange their manner of working, making possible to develop activities and attitudes capable of giving them pleasure.

  8. Psychosocial work environment and prediction of quality of care indicators in one Canadian health center.

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    Paquet, Maxime; Courcy, François; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Gagnon, Serge; Maillet, Stéphanie

    2013-05-01

    Few studies link organizational variables and outcomes to quality indicators. This approach would expose operant mechanisms by which work environment characteristics and organizational outcomes affect clinical effectiveness, safety, and quality indicators. What are the predominant psychosocial variables in the explanation of organizational outcomes and quality indicators (in this case, medication errors and length of stay)? The primary objective of this study was to link the fields of evidence-based practice to the field of decision making, by providing an effective model of intervention to improve safety and quality. The study involved healthcare workers (n = 243) from 13 different care units of a university affiliated health center in Canada. Data regarding the psychosocial work environment (10 work climate scales, effort/reward imbalance, and social support) was linked to organizational outcomes (absenteeism, turnover, overtime), to the nurse/patient ratio and quality indicators (medication errors and length of stay) using path analyses. The models produced in this study revealed a contribution of some psychosocial factors to quality indicators, through an indirect effect of personnel- or human resources-related variables, more precisely: turnover, absenteeism, overtime, and nurse/patient ratio. Four perceptions of work environment appear to play an important part in the indirect effect on both medication errors and length of stay: apparent social support from supervisors, appreciation of the workload demands, pride in being part of one's work team, and effort/reward balance. This study reveals the importance of employee perceptions of the work environment as an indirect predictor of quality of care. Working to improve these perceptions is a good investment for loyalty and attendance. In general, better personnel conditions lead to fewer medication errors and shorter length of stay. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. [The meanings constructed in the attention to a crisis in the territory: the psychosocial care center as a protagonist].

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    Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Chiavagatti, Fabieli Gopinger; Cortes, Jandro Moraes; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann

    2013-06-01

    The attention to a crisis is a strategic point in the process of paradigm changes proposed by the Brazilian psychiatric reform, requiring changes in alternative services and in the professionals that must use new technologies of care. This study aimed to identify the actions of attention to a crisis in the territory and the meanings as they evolved, beginning from the discursive practices of the professionals. It was a qualitative study that used the theoretical perspective of social constructionism. From the database of the research, Evaluation of the Psychosocial Care Centers in Southern Brazil (CAPSUL), 27 interviews were analyzed from the professionals of Psychosocial Care Center for Alegrete, along with field diaries with 390 hours of observation. Results showed patient engagement/welcoming and accountability for care. We concluded that freedom, reciprocity, contractuality and responsibility for care were the new meanings needed for the alternative care services to overcome the asylum and sense of exclusion and dangerousness.

  10. Building social participation with a support group users: challenges of care qualification in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS

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    Vitor Corrêa Detomini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature points out a lack of studies describing practical experiences approaching the role of social participation, even though, the subject Brazilian Health System (SUS as a principle is valued by theoretical-conceptual works. The lack of studies is especially observed in mental health care services, where the existing studies focus on the users’ management engagement as part of psychosocial rehabilitation. Thus, this article introduces an experience developed in a Center for Psycho-Social Attention (CAPS, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, aiming to address the issue of social participation in care qualification, in accordance to legislation and technical standards. Thisstudy focused on two types of sources. 1 Internship Final Report of a Psycology Student including 54 sessions of a support group, 2 technical and legal documents concerning the SUS and the National Mental Health Policy and Humanization. The service aspects were analyzed through technical and legislative foundations - focusing the needs and claims on group discussions, classified as structure and process, used to assess the health care quality. Most concerns were listed on normative Ordinances and Regulations. Achieving social participation was not an institutional premise and, among the main difficulties was the medical/outpatient centered model and the representation of “crazy”/”CAPS users” as incapable. It requires: i integration of “clinic” and “politics”; ii intensification of interdisciplinary and psychological care; iii respect the citizenship of mental health users, and, finally, iv that the collective participation spaces do not exhaust themselves. Therefore, the collective participation spaces need practical recommendations in order to improve the structures and work processes and meet the users’ needs.

  11. [(Dis)satisfaction with mental healthcare work: a study in Psychosocial Care Centers].

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    Guimarães, José Maria Ximenes; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa; Assis, Marluce Maria Araújo

    2011-04-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze satisfaction in the workplace of mental healthcare professionals who serve in Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps). The research is of a qualitative nature and the data-collecting medium was semistructured interviews with 19 workers of three Caps in Fortaleza, in the Northern Brazilian State of Ceará. The treatment of the empirical material was based upon the analysis of content with an emphasis on the thematic bias. The results revealed the determinants of (dis)satisfaction present in the daily routine of these workers. The relationships established with the users were singled out as the main source of satisfaction, whereas the work and wage conditions were the main motives for dissatisfaction. In addition to these aspects, consequences of (dis)satisfaction at work in the private, social and organizational field of the workers' life in the Caps were revealed, mainly in physical and mental health. Lastly, they emphasized the urgent need for implementation - on the part of public administration - of strategies that seek to reduce the precariousness of healthcare work, especially in mental health, with a view to mitigating damages potentially caused by such work.

  12. Mental health and solidarity economy: the experience of users and workers of a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Ioneide de Oliveira Campos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is within the context of discussions on mental health and solidarity economy. It is an account of the experience lived at the Tabatinga II Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS in the Federal District, Brazil, where projects designed to generate employment and income in the mental health area reaffirm their ability, as tools for social inclusion, to incorporate the principles and values of solidarity economy aiming at the empowerment and autonomy of citizens in mental distress. This work intended to support and encourage reflections on the possibilities for social inclusion arising from the generation of jobs and income through collective and cooperative actions developed and elaborated with the participation of users, family members, and workers of this service. Emphasis on participatory methodology guided the development of the experience, and the proposition of triggering actions on mental health and solidarity economy at different times, under the coordination of the performing team, afforded, concurrently, the realization of two actions/interventions: a group activity designed to service users and their relatives who gathered to learn and reflect on collective work and supportive venture; and three monthly training sessions, from August to December 2013, on cooperativism, solidarity economy, and mental health addressed to the professionals of that CAPS. At the end of these interventions, it was possible to observe that the involvement of people under mental distress in these projects contributes to overcome their current state of subordination and weakness. It is worth mentioning that, in general, the development of these actions favored reflections on the world of collective work and aggregated methodological knowledge on solidarity ventures.

  13. Identity of care in a Psychosocial Care Center for Children and Adolescents who uses drugs

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    Isabella Teixeira Bastos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To associate the territory of identity with the production of care within a PCC focusing on children and adolescents with drug abuse and their institutional identity. Method We used the “ process tracing methodology” in four research categories: focus groups, characterization of professionals, observing the everyday and interviewing two members of emblematic cases of the service. Results territory of identity of the institution, which operates the production of care is crossed by the difficulty of dealing with the complexity brought by the users and the performance of the PCC network. This paper is also permeated by different conceptions of care and small problematization of these issues in collective spaces of service. Conclusion The discussion in focus groups and other devices can be powerful resources to reframe the meaning of care and identity of collective service.

  14. Evaluation of adherence to treatment by patients seen in a psychosocial care center in northeastern Brazil

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    Thaís Teles Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mental disorders, nonadherence to medication, the main cause of psychiatric morbidity, is observed in about 50% of the cases and is responsible for numerous losses. This study evaluated adherence to drug treatment by patients seen in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS in northeastern Brazil. Adherence to treatment was evaluated using the Haynes-Sackett and Morisky-Green-Levine tests. All patients registered in the CAPS were included in the study (n= 101. Only 11.88% of the patients adhered to drug treatment. The main reasons not to use medication were: oblivion (68.83%, feeling unwell after taking the medication (54.22%, not having money to buy the medication (43.83%, not finding the medication in the public health service (39.94% and fear of harm that might be caused by the drug (28.90%. Furthermore, 85.1% of the patients did not know their diseases, 88.1% did not know their treatment, 86.4% did not feel good when they took their medication, and 88.1% took their medication incorrectly. The results revealed that the lack of information about diseases and drugs used, the nuisance posed by drug therapy and the low access to medications reduce adherence to treatment and, consequently, treatment effectiveness.No tratamento de desordens mentais, a não-adesão ao tratamento ocorre em cerca de 50% dos casos e é responsável por inúmeros prejuízos, além de ser a principal causa de morbidade psiquiátrica. O presente estudo objetivou avaliar a adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso de pacientes atendidos em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS no Nordeste do Brasil. A avaliação da adesão ao tratamento foi feita através dos testes de Haynes-Sackett e Morisky-Green-Levine. Todos os pacientes cadastrados no CAPS foram incluídos no estudo (n = 101. Observou-se que apenas 11,88% dos pacientes aderiram ao tratamento medicamentoso. As principais razões para o não uso dos medicamentos foram: esquecimento (68,83%, sentir-se mal ap

  15. Unequal Advances in the Coverage of Psychosocial Care Centers in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, From 2009 to 2010

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    Valdeci Degiampietro Vaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Psychosocial Care (CAPS are mental health services and community open the Unified Health System (SUS. With the advancement of public mental health in the reorientation of a care model that for decades was reduced to the supply of beds in psychiatric hospitals, generating segregation and exclusion of patients with mental disorders. Considering Ordinance of the Ministry of Health GM/MS No. 336 of February 19, 2002, laying down the rules and guidelines for the organization of services that provide mental health care. This objective of this study was to determine whether there was an increase in the coverage of CAPS in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from 2009 to 2010.

  16. Quality of life assessment of patients with schizophrenic spectrum disorders from Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Tatiana Fernandes Carpinteiro da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessing the quality of life and the clinical and social-demographic factors associated in schizophrenic spectrum patients (ICD-10 F20-F29 attending CAPS at the programmatic area 3.0. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of schizophrenic spectrum patients who have been enrolled in 2008 in CAPS in programmatic area (AP 3 at Rio de Janeiro city, using MINIPLUS to assess schizophrenia spectrum disorder and use of psychoactive substances, Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS to assess psychiatric symptoms and Quality of Life Scale (QLS-BR to assess the quality of life. RESULTS: Seventy nine patients were included, of whom 74 (93.7% presented some impairment in quality of life. The most frequently affected area was occupational performance. Variables that showed a significant association with severe impairment of quality of life were: marital status, race, occupation, who patients lived with, homelessness, having children, previous psychiatric hospitalization, negative symptoms and symptoms designated as not applicable (being characterized by a lack of typical positive and negative symptoms. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of these factors should be crucial to implement health policies and psychosocial rehabilitation programs focused on improving the quality of life of these patients.

  17. Stigma and violence in dealing with madness: narratives from psychosocial care centers in Bahia and Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil.

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    Nunes, Mônica; Torrenté, Maurice de

    2009-08-01

    To analyze stigmatization processes and types of violence experienced by individuals with mental disorders. A qualitative study was carried out, based on individual interviews with users and focus groups with family members and professionals at five psychosocial care centers in the municipalities of Itaberaba, Lauro de Freitas, Salvador, Vitória da Conquista, and Aracaju, Northeastern Brazil, in 2006-2007. The analysis categories were constructed based on the stigma concept proposed by Goffman, and four types of violence were systematized: interpersonal, institutional, symbolic and structural. Users and family members recounted examples of disqualification, reprimands, embarrassment, humiliation, negligence and physical aggression that had the aims of domination, exploitation and oppression. Professionals reported that people who suffer from mental disorders remain the target of prejudice that is culturally ingrained and naturalized. The main consequence is continuation of their isolation from social life as a form of 'treatment' or as an excluding attitude manifested by discriminatory reactions in the form of rejection, indifference and verbal or physical aggressiveness. The various ways of expressing stigma denote a sociocultural situation of violence against individuals with mental disorders. It is proposed that state monitoring bodies capable of planning and evaluating countermeasures against stigmatization should be set up.

  18. [Initiation and consumption of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults in an Anti-Drug Psychosocial Care Center].

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    Silva, Carolina Carvalho; Costa, Maria Conceição Oliveira; de Carvalho, Rosely Cabral; Amaral, Magali Teresópolis Reis; Cruz, Nilma Lázara de Almeida; da Silva, Mariana Rocha

    2014-03-01

    The study seeks to characterize the initiation and consumption pattern of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults enrolled in an Alcohol and Drug Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS-AD). This study was conducted with records of attendance and the consumption pattern was classified in accordance with WHO: infrequent use (lifetime use, per year or up to five days per month); frequent use (6 to 19 times in the past 30 days); heavy use (≥ 20 times in the last 30 days). In the age group comparison, the test for proportion and association analysis was used and the prevalence and prevalence ratio was calculated with a significance level of 5% and 95% confidence interval. Of the total of adolescents and young adults treated between 2003 and 2008 (475), most were male, single, poorly educated, live with relations and have psychic symptoms. Statistical significance was found for age at initiation of use: adolescents compared to young adults started earlier (≤ 14 years): tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, crack and other SPA consumption. Among adolescents, significant results were found for the less frequent consumption of tobacco, more frequent use of alcohol, and heavy consumption of marijuana. These findings may contribute to the preventive and therapeutic CAPS-AD programs.

  19. Psychosocial cancer care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family members to cancer is an increasing interest in education, ... all stages of the cancer journey and is passionate about enabling more professionals in South Africa to provide psychosocial cancer .... therapeutic support together with more.

  20. [Public health and mental health: methodological tools to evaluate the Brazilian Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS) in the Brazilian Unified Health System].

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    Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Furtado, Juarez Pereira

    2006-05-01

    This article presents a preliminary discussion of potential methodological tools for qualitative research on the Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS) in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). The relevance of mental health within the field of public health is examined. The study focuses on the high prevalence of mental disorders and the disproportionate lack of studies on the interface between mental health and public health. The establishment of an interdisciplinary field between public health and mental health is proposed to meet common needs by achieving similar perspectives in knowledge and practice. A particular group of tools is proposed, emphasizing the importance of reclaiming and guaranteeing the roles of various social actors to shape the assessment process, the need for collecting and standardizing academic studies on the topic, and the importance of promoting a new research field focusing on public health policies to support policymakers, managers, and health teams in reshaping their practices.

  1. Match of psychosocial risk and psychosocial care in families of a child with cancer.

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    Sint Nicolaas, S M; Schepers, S A; van den Bergh, E M M; de Boer, Y; Streng, I; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Grootenhuis, M A; Verhaak, C M

    2017-12-01

    The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) was developed to screen for psychosocial risk, aimed to be supportive in directing psychosocial care to families of a child with cancer. This study aimed to determine (i) the match between PAT risk score and provided psychosocial care with healthcare professionals blind to outcome of PAT assessment, and (ii) the match between PAT risk score and team risk estimation. Eighty-three families of children with cancer from four pediatric oncology centers in the Netherlands participated (59% response rate). The PAT and team risk estimation was assessed at diagnosis (M = 40.2 days, SD = 14.1 days), and the content of provided psychosocial care in the 5-month period thereafter resulting in basic or specialized care. According to the PAT, 65% of families were defined as having low (universal), 30% medium (targeted), and 5% high (clinical) risk for developing psychosocial problems. Thirty percent of patients from universal group got basic psychosocial care, 63% got specialized care, and 7% did not get any care. Fourteen percent of the families at risk got basic care, 86% got specialized care. Team risk estimations and PAT risk scores matched with 58% of the families. This study showed that families at risk, based on standardized risk assessment with the PAT, received more specialized care than families without risk. However, still 14% of the families with high risks only received basic care, and 63% of the families with standard risk got specialized care. Standardized risk assessment can be used as part of comprehensive care delivery, complementing the team. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care...... to elaborate the care to these patients. Method: In 2007 the nurses from our ward gained experience from the psychosocial care to these patients. These experiences are a starting point to the study of literature the group has made. A group of five nurses have from this literature study, substantiated...... the psychosocial perspective. Results: After the literature review, the psychosocial aspects have been divided into five main areas: 1. Diagnosis, hospitalisation, and treatment 2. The body with cancer 3. Psychological 4. Social 5. Existential/spiritual Primary results show that patients with MM in general respond...

  3. Association between severity of illicit drug dependence and quality of life in a psychosocial care center in BRAZIL: cross-sectional study.

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    Campêlo, Selva Rios; Barbosa, Maria Alves; Dias, Danilo Rocha; Caixeta, Camila Cardoso; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2017-11-17

    Quality of life must be one of the main purposes for the treatment of drug users, requiring a better understanding of the association between the quality of life and the severity of dependency. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between severity of substance use in various areas of human functioning and quality of life of illicit drug users in a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. This cross-sectional study included 60 participants - illicit drug users - treated at a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. Participants were evaluated with the short version of World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-Bref) instrument to measure the quality of life, the 6th version of Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6) to assess the severity of dependence in several areas and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to identify the presence of psychiatric disorders. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and linear regression were applied to verify the association between the severity of dependence and the quality of life, and Student's t-test to compare the mean quality of life between individuals with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Negative correlation was found between the severity of dependence on the drugs dimensions: alcohol, psychiatric, medical, legal, family/social support and family/social problems of ASI-6, and the quality of life domains measured by the WHOQOL-Bref. The evidence was strongest in the psychiatric and medical dimensions. There was a significant difference in the quality of life mean among participants presenting or not presenting psychiatric comorbidities, for the psychological domain in anxiety disorders, and for the physical and psychological domains in mood disorders. The quality of life decreased as the severity of dependence increased, with different results in the various areas of the participant's life. This result emphasizes the need for training the professional team which works in the

  4. Interdisciplinarity in work process at a Psychosocial Attention Center

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    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the work process of mental health professionals from a Psychosocial Attention Center (CAPS, from the knowledge and the practices applied in the production of care and its interface with user’s demands and the service offering. Methods: A case study with qualitative approach. Twenty-eight subjects joined in and were divided into three groups: I (eleven mental health workers, II (eleven users e III (six family members. The semistructured interview was used besides systematic observation, in the search for data about the work process of the professionals of the Psychosocial Attention Center, the relationship between team and user, offering and demand, access, technologies of care, knowledge and practices and interdisciplinarity. The investigation was based upon critical content analysis and was oriented by the flowchart analyzer. Results: The service organization and its work process are directed to the immediate supply of the population’s demands, which depicts a care based on prescriptive practices. Thus, the flow of assistance and the service offering complement each other in the need of a procedure and in its exhaustive offering by the service, dissolving interdisciplinary conductions of intervention shared with the user.Conclusion: Mental health care is still surrounded by biomedical hegemony centered in procedures directed to pharmacological prescription. Despite this reality, the work centered on the user and the utilization of soft technologies – communication, link, welcoming – begin to take part of the daily CAPS service offering, although it is only present in specific activities of certain procedures.

  5. Match of psychosocial risk and psychosocial care in families of a child with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sint Nicolaas, S. M.; Schepers, S. A.; van den Bergh, E. M. M.; de Boer, Y.; Streng, I.; van Dijk-Lokkart, E. M.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Verhaak, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) was developed to screen for psychosocial risk, aimed to be supportive in directing psychosocial care to families of a child with cancer. This study aimed to determine (i) the match between PAT risk score and provided psychosocial care with healthcare

  6. Delivery of care consistent with the psychosocial standards in pediatric cancer: Current practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Michele A; Canter, Kimberly S; Chen, Fang Fang; Kolb, E Anders; Sandler, Eric; Wiener, Lori; Kazak, Anne E

    2018-03-01

    With published evidence-based Standards for Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and their Families, it is important to know the current status of their implementation. This paper presents data on delivery of psychosocial care related to the Standards in the United States. Pediatric oncologists, psychosocial leaders, and administrators in pediatric oncology from 144 programs completed an online survey. Participants reported on the extent to which psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was implemented and was comprehensive and state of the art. They also reported on specific practices and services for each Standard and the extent to which psychosocial care was integrated into broader medical care. Participants indicated that psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was usually or always provided at their center for most of the Standards. However, only half of the oncologists (55.6%) and psychosocial leaders (45.6%) agreed or strongly agreed that their psychosocial care was comprehensive and state of the art. Types of psychosocial care provided included evidence-based and less established approaches but were most often provided when problems were identified, rather than proactively. The perception of state of the art care was associated with practices indicative of integrated psychosocial care and the extent to which the Standards are currently implemented. Many oncologists and psychosocial leaders perceive that the delivery of psychosocial care at their center is consistent with the Standards. However, care is quite variable, with evidence for the value of more integrated models of psychosocial services. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Deliberative devices in mental health and democratization peer exchanges: the case of a user's assembly of a psychosocial care center in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelland, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Several mental health public networks in Brazil focus on the participation of a plurality of actors in different collective methods of analysis and co-management of services in order to ensure improved efficiency and greater democratization of social relations. It is clear that the analysis of the effectiveness of these collectives is often done at the expense of the social relations of power they help produce. In other words, it is as if the participatory nature of the devices immediately ensure their democratic potential and their positive impact on the recovery of the users involved.Research is presented that seeks to understand the point of view of the actors involved and to determine whether or not collective spaces for the organization of mental health services contribute to the democratization of social relations that is, the construction of individual and collective capacities for debate, decision and public action. What and how people living with serious mental disorders are protagonists in the design of service and in the struggle for quality public services and how this is involved in their recovery? The research is drawn from an organizational ethnography carried out over nearly one year in Campinas, Brazil in 2012. The research focuses on a case study in a psychosocial care center (CAPS) housing for people living with serious mental disorders. To consolidate the internal validity of the case study, three collecting data techniques were applied: the shadowing over 17 institutionalize methods or devices involved in the organization of services of the CAPS, analysis of documents and forty-seven personal interviews with users, managers and workers. This article focuses on the data from the observation of one of these devices deliberation involving users, the user's assembly, as well as interviews with 15 of these participants. The results highlight how peer exchanges, emerging in the assembly of users and the convivencia space lead to collective

  8. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  9. Psychosocial issues in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    work of all involved in palliative care and understanding this will ... palliative care. The quality of life for patients and the manner of ... In palliative care, the creation of a safe space for families to talk is important. Communication ... family finds balance only with, and in your ... those relationships that are signifi- cant for the ...

  10. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  11. The comparative effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Emily C; Picklesimer, Amy H; Billings, Deborah L; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Farber, Naomi; Frongillo, Edward A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the psychosocial outcomes of the CenteringPregnancy (CP) model of group prenatal care to individual prenatal care, we conducted a prospective cohort study of women who chose CP group (N = 124) or individual prenatal care (N = 124). Study participants completed the first survey at study recruitment (mean gestational age 12.5 weeks), with 89% completing the second survey (mean gestational age 32.7 weeks) and 84% completing the third survey (6 weeks' postpartum). Multiple linear regression models compared changes by prenatal care model in pregnancy-specific distress, prenatal planning-preparation and avoidance coping, perceived stress, affect and depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related empowerment, and postpartum maternal-infant attachment and maternal functioning. Using intention-to-treat models, group prenatal care participants demonstrated a 3.2 point greater increase (p prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies. While group participants did not demonstrate significantly greater positive outcomes in other measures, women who were at greater psychosocial risk benefitted from participation in group prenatal care. Among women reporting inadequate social support in early pregnancy, group participants demonstrated a 2.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.03) in pregnancy-specific distress in late pregnancy and 5.6 point higher mean maternal functioning scores postpartum (p = 0.03). Among women with high pregnancy-specific distress in early pregnancy, group participants had an 8.3 point greater increase (p prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies in late pregnancy and a 4.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.02) in postpartum depressive symptom scores. This study provides further evidence that group prenatal care positively impacts the psychosocial well-being of women with greater stress or lower personal coping resources. Large randomized studies are needed to establish conclusively the biological and psychosocial benefits of group

  12. A experiência social da psicose no contexto de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial The social experience of psychosis in the context of a Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kimati Dias

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo discute as relações existentes entre os aspectos institucionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (Caps e a experiência de pacientes psicóticos. Com o referencial da experiência social da psicose, mais ampla do que a descrição da vivência de sintomas, mas considerando aspectos culturais da experiência, foram realizados três estudos de caso em dois momentos diferentes. Todos os pacientes estudados foram entrevistados tanto em 1995 quanto em 2003. Além dos próprios sujeitos, foram realizadas entrevistas abertas com seus familiares e profissionais que os atendem, considerando assim as redes de rela��ão social dos pacientes. Enfatizaram-se três planos principais: (1 estudo da história do adoecimento; (2 estudo das representações da doença; e (3 descrição do cotidiano e das relações sociais dos pacientes. A partir de uma abordagem antropológica, foram realizadas considerações a respeito do tratamento de pacientes psicóticos inseridos nos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial.This study discusses the relations existing between the institutional aspects of a Psychosocial Care Center (Caps and the experience of psychotic patients. Using the referential base of the social experience of psychosis, which is broader in scope than a description of the experience of symptoms, while considering cultural aspects of the experience, three case studies were conducted at two different times. All of the patients studied were interviewed in 1995 and again in 2003. In addition to interviews with the subjects themselves, open interviews were conducted with their families and their professional carers, thereby taking the social relationship networks of the patients into consideration. Three central aspects were emphasized: (1 study of the history of the illness; (2 study of the representations of the disease; and (3 description of the everyday life and social relationships of the patients. Aspects with respect to the treatment

  13. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazak, Anne E.; Abrams, Annah N.; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K.; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family

  14. Rehabilitation following pediatric traumatic brain injury: variability in adherence to psychosocial quality-of-care indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Stephanie K; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Konodi, Mark A; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Rivara, Frederick P

    2014-01-01

    To examine variations in processes of pediatric inpatient rehabilitation care related to family-centered care, management of neurobehavioral and psychosocial needs, and community reintegration after traumatic brain injury. Nine acute rehabilitation facilities from geographically diverse areas of the United States. A total of 174 children with traumatic brain injury. Retrospective chart review. Adherence to care indicators (the number of times recommended care was delivered or attempted divided by the number of times care was indicated). Across facilities, adherence rates (adjusted for difficulty of delivery) ranged from 33.6% to 73.1% (95% confidence interval, 13.4-53.9, 58.7-87.4) for family-centered processes, 21.3% to 82.5% (95% confidence interval, 6.6-36.1, 67.6-97.4) for neurobehavioral and psychosocial processes, and 22.7% to 80.3% (95% confidence interval, 5.3-40.1, 68.1-92.5) for community integration processes. Within facilities, standard deviations for adherence rates were large (24.3-34.9, family-centered domain; 22.6-34.2, neurobehavioral and psychosocial domain; and 21.6-40.5, community reintegration domain). The current state of acute rehabilitation care for children with traumatic brain injury is variable across different quality-of-care indicators addressing neurobehavioral and psychosocial needs and facilitating community reintegration of the patient and the family. Individual rehabilitation facilities demonstrate inconsistent adherence to different indicators and inconsistent performance across different care domains.

  15. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eGrassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this , the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g. life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g. psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life which are possibly implicated not only in classical psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools (e.g. and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g. the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research - DCPR represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis.

  16. Psychosocial Care Needs of Melanoma Survivors: Are They Being Met?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Fischbeck

    Full Text Available Patients who have survived malignant melanoma for more than five years may lack the opportunity to talk about their burden. As a consequence their psychosocial care needs remain undetected and available supportive interventions may not be utilised. Therefore, the psychosocial burden of this patient group needs to be assessed using specific screening instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial burden of long-term melanoma survivors, their psychosocial care needs and the determinants of these needs. We wanted to find out if the use of professional support corresponds to the care needs defined by experts. Using the cancer registry of Rhineland-Palatinate, melanoma patients diagnosed at least 5 years before the survey were contacted by physicians. N = 689 former patients completed the Hornheide Questionnaire (short form HQ-S to identify psychosocial support need (scale cut off ≥ 16 or item-based cut-off score and the potential psychosocial determinants of these needs. Additionally, they were asked about their utilisation of the professional support system. More than one third (36% of them was in need for professional psychosocial support. The highest burden scores concerned worry about tumour progression. Younger age (< 50, higher general fatigue, higher symptom burden, lower general health, negative social interactions and unfulfilled information needs were significant predictors of the need for psychosocial intervention. Related to the percentage of survivors identified as 'in need', the professional support system was underused. Further studies should investigate whether using the HQ-S to routinely identify burdened melanoma patients could lead to better fulfilment of their intervention needs, ultimately enhancing health-related quality of life.

  17. Personalized dementia care: proven effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, L.D.; van der Roest, H.G.; Meiland, F.J.M.; Dröes, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many psychosocial intervention studies report effects in subgroups of people with dementia. Insight into the characteristics of these subgroups is important for care practice. This study reviews personal characteristics of people with dementia (living in the community or in an institution) that are

  18. The Association Between Psychosocial Work Environment and Satisfaction With Old Age Care Among Care Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Dan; Ernsth Bravell, Marie; Börjesson, Ulrika; Kåreholt, Ingemar

    2018-06-01

    This study examines the association between nursing assistants' perceptions of their psychosocial work environment and satisfaction among older people receiving care in nursing homes and home care. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted among people receiving care ( N = 1,535) and nursing assistants ( N = 1,132) in 45 nursing homes and 21 home care units within municipal old-age care. Better psychosocial work environment was related to higher satisfaction in old-age care among the recipients. Significant and stronger associations were more common in nursing homes than in home care. Perception of mastery and positive challenges at work were associated with higher recipient satisfaction both in home care and in nursing homes: social climate, perception of group work, perception of mastery, and positive challenges at work only in nursing homes. Findings suggest that recipient satisfaction may be increased by improving the psychosocial work environment for nursing assistants, both in nursing homes and in home care.

  19. High-dependency care: experiences of the psychosocial work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hanif Abdul; Naing, Lin; Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah

    2017-11-23

    to explore high-dependency care nurses' experiences of their psychosocial work environment. four focus groups were conducted with 23 emergency and critical care hospital nurses in Brunei. All sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive-approach thematic analysis. three major themes were identified. 'Specialisation/specific skills' explained a fundamental requirement for the high-dependency care nurses to work effectively and efficiently in their workplace. 'Task completion' narrated the pressure they experienced to complete their tasks within time constraints exacerbated by a reduced number of staff. 'Acknowledgement' signified their need for fair and adequate reward for their hard work through career progression and promotion. this study facilitates the design of future interventions and policies that promote a healthy psychosocial work environment by ensuring nurses working in these areas have the required specialisation skills, there is a balance of workload and nurse-to-patient ratios, and they are offered fairness and equity in career progression and promotion.

  20. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nübling, Matthias; Vomstein, Martin; Schmidt, Sascha G; Gregersen, Sabine; Dulon, Madeleine; Nienhaus, Albert

    2010-07-21

    Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain.Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database).Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p worked in Home Care (HC), 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH), 164 in other professions (e.g. administration).Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity.A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of negative evaluation of psychosocial factors concerning demands was related to the amount of working hours per week and the

  1. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulon Madeleine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. Methods The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain. Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database. Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p Results In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC, 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH, 164 in other professions (e.g. administration. Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195 and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168, the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity. A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of

  2. Leadership and the psychosocial work environment in old age care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Dan; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie; Kåreholt, Ingemar

    2016-03-01

    To study leadership factors and their associations with psychosocial work environmental among nursing assistants who are engaged in old age care and to analyse (i) differences in the assessment of leadership factors and the assessment of psychosocial work environmental in nursing homes and home help services and (ii) the association between the psychosocial work environment and factors that are related to leadership in nursing homes and home help services. Leadership factors are an important element of the psychosocial work environment in old age care. The physical distance between leaders and nursing assistants is larger in home help services than in nursing homes. Therefore, it is important to study leadership separately in nursing homes and home help services. Assessments from 844 nursing assistants in nursing homes and 288 in home help services (45 nursing homes and 21 home help service units) were analysed. The data were analysed using linear regression. Age, gender, number of staff at the unit, number of years at the current working unit and educational level were controlled in Model 1. Summarised indexes that were based on all independent variables except the main independent variable were additionally controlled in Model 2. Psychosocial work environment was related to leadership factors, but stronger associations occurred more frequently in nursing homes than in home help services. Empowering leadership, support from superiors, the primacy of human resources and control over decisions were associated with higher assessments on all the variables that were related to the psychosocial work environment in both the nursing homes and home help services. Organisational differences in conducting leadership in old age care must be considered. Some leadership characteristics are better prerequisites for creating and maintaining a positive psychosocial work environment for nursing assistants in nursing homes and home help services. Due to the differences in

  3. Psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer and their families: A national survey of pediatric oncology social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Currin-Mcculloch, Jennifer; Pelletier, Wendy; Sardi-Brown, Vicki; Brown, Peter; Wiener, Lori

    2018-04-01

    In 2015, an interdisciplinary group of psychosocial experts developed The Standards of Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families. This paper presents data from a national survey of pediatric oncology social workers and their experiences in delivering psychosocial care to children and families. In total, 107 social workers from 81 cancer institutions participated in a 25-item online survey that mirrored the 15 Standards for Psychosocial Care. Both closed and open-ended questions were included. Social work participants reported that psychosocial support is being provided at most cancer centers surveyed, primarily by social workers and child life specialists, addressing adaptation to the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and transitions into survivorship or end-of-life care and bereavement. While social workers reported offering comprehensive services throughout the cancer trajectory, many of the 2015 Standards are not being systematically implemented. Areas for improvement include funding for psychosocial support staff and programs, incorporation of standardized assessment measures, assessment for financial burden throughout treatment and beyond, consistent access to psychology and psychiatry, integrated care for parents and siblings, and more inclusion of palliative care services from time of diagnosis.

  4. (Insatisfação com o trabalho em saúde mental: um estudo em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (Dissatisfaction with mental healthcare work: a study in Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Ximenes Guimarães

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo tem por objetivo analisar a satisfação de trabalhadores de saúde mental que atuam em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (Caps. A pesquisa é de natureza qualitativa. O instrumento de coleta de dados foi a entrevista semiestruturada, aplicada a 19 trabalhadores de três Caps em Fortaleza (Ceará. O tratamento do material empírico baseou-se na análise de conteúdo com ênfase em eixos temáticos. Os resultados revelaram os determinantes de (insatisfação presentes no cotidiano desses trabalhadores. As relações estabelecidas com os usuários foram referidas como principal causa de satisfação, enquanto as condições de trabalho e o salário se constituem nos principais motivos de insatisfação. Além desses aspectos, emergiram consequências da (insatisfação no trabalho no campo particular, social e organizacional da vida dos trabalhadores dos Caps, particularmente na saúde física e mental. Por fim, apontam para a urgência de implementação de estratégias, por parte da administração pública, que visem à desprecarização do trabalho em saúde e, mais particularmente, em saúde mental, tendo em vista a redução dos danos eventualmente causados pelo trabalho.The scope of this article is to analyze satisfaction in the workplace of mental healthcare professionals who serve in Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps. The research is of a qualitative nature and the data-collecting medium was semistructured interviews with 19 workers of three Caps in Fortaleza, in the Northern Brazilian State of Ceará. The treatment of the empirical material was based upon the analysis of content with an emphasis on the thematic bias. The results revealed the determinants of (dissatisfaction present in the daily routine of these workers. The relationships established with the users were singled out as the main source of satisfaction, whereas the work and wage conditions were the main motives for dissatisfaction. In addition to these

  5. INSOMNIA AND CORRELATION WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Made Gede Cahyadi Permana

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is regarded as sleep disorder that most often affects people in the world, both in primary and in the presence of comorbid conditions. Based on those facts, insomnia could be a serious problem at the level of primary health care. General Practitioner should be able to diagnose insomnia and able to perform the appropriate treatment for the patient. Psychosocial factors may related to the degree of severity of insomnia, among others are health status, depression, dysfunctional beliefs ...

  6. Gender stereotypes in psychosocial care for female crack and powder cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Érika Barbosa de Oliveira; Pereira, Adriana Lenho de Figueiredo; Penna, Lúcia Helena Garcia

    2018-05-10

    The study analyzed health professionals' conceptions toward female users of crack and powder cocaine currently receiving psychosocial care, based on a gender perspective. Seventeen health professionals were interviewed, and systematic observations were made of the spaces for collective care in a Center for Psychosocial Care specializing in alcohol and drug addiction in Greater Metropolitan Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Analysis of the interviews and field diaries using the hermeneutic-dialectic method revealed three categories: frailty as a constitutive attribute of women's condition, the women's emotional addiction to crack and powder cocaine use, and gender stereotypes during psychosocial care. The health professionals voiced a traditional view of the heterosexual, docile, and maternal woman and reproduced stereotypical concepts when addressing female crack and cocaine users as sensitive, frail individuals, emotionally dependent on men and more involved in the home and family. These professionals need a more refined understanding of gender issues in the mental health-disease process in order to allow overcoming preconceived notions and reductionist health care practices.

  7. Interdisciplinary care in disorders/differences of sex development (DSD): The psychosocial component of the DSD-Translational research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, David E; Gardner, Melissa; Callens, Nina; Mazur, Tom

    2017-06-01

    Scientific discovery and clinical management strategies for Disorders/Differences of Sex Development (DSD) have advanced in recent years. The 2006 Consensus Statement on Management of Intersex Disorders stated that a mental health component to care is integral to promote positive adaptation, yet the parameters of this element have not been described. The objective of this paper is threefold: to describe the psychosocial screening protocol adopted by the clinical centers of the DSD-Translational Research Network; to summarize psychosocial data collected at 1 of the 10 network sites; and to suggest how systematic behavioral health screenings can be employed to tailor care in DSD that results in better health and quality of life outcomes. Steps taken in developing the largely "noncategorical" screening protocol are described. These preliminary findings suggest that DSD, as one category of pediatric chronic conditions, is not associated with marked disturbances of psychosocial adaptation, either for the family or the child; however, screening frequently uncovered "risk factors" for individual families or patients that can potentially be addressed in the context of ongoing clinical care. Administration of the DSD-TRN psychosocial screening protocol was demonstrated to be feasible in the context of interdisciplinary team care and was acceptable to families on a longitudinal basis. The ultimate value of systematic screening will be demonstrated through a tailoring of psychosocial, medical and surgical services, based on this information that enhances the quality of patient and family-centered care and subsequent outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Brédart

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With advances in breast cancer (BC gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83% in France and 180 (97% in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively, returned the ‘Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer’ questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the “living with cancer” and “children-related issues” domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = −0.05, higher anxiety (b = 0.78, and having children (b = 1.51, but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  9. Sobre o significado das atividades de grupo para usuários de um centro de atenção psicossocial/On the meaning of group activities for users of a Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisely Gabrieli Avelar Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available No campo da saúde mental, os Centros de Atenção Psicossocial - CAPS  se destacam por serem um serviço de base territorial com diversas possibilidades de intervenção, dentre as quais destacamos as atividades grupais. Neste estudo, buscou-se compreender o significado das atividades de grupo para os usuários de um CAPS, baseado na perspectiva da Ciência Ocupacional. Realizou-se uma pesquisa qualitativa, utilizando a entrevista aberta com onze usuários do serviço, e observação livre com registro em diário de campo de cada atividade grupal. A análise do conteúdo das entrevistas indicou as atividades de grupo como estratégia importante na assistência em saúde mental, enquanto espaço de expressão e partilha de experiências e sentimentos, favorecimento das relações sociais e da autopercepção que influenciavam em sua saúde. Observou-se também que funcionavam como estratégia terapêutica relevante para o cuidado em saúde mental, pois permitiam satisfação pessoal e preenchiam o tempo dos usuários significativamente, de modo que viabilizou a discussão da possibilidade ocupacional veiculada por meio dos grupos. Nesse sentido, este estudo possibilitou a articulação entre as ações da Terapia Ocupacional, ancoradas na Ciência da Ocupação, impulsionando refletir sobre a fundamentação teórica e outros campos do conhecimento científico na área, sendo um horizonte que pode nortear as práticas dessa profissão, além de incitar a reflexão de modos distintos de compreender as ocupações humanas, nos quais as atividades em grupo podem se constituir como possibilidade ocupacional. In the field of mental health, the Psychosocial Care Centers - CAPS stand out as a territorial base service with several possibilities for intervention, among which we highlight the group activities, so in this study, we seek to understand the meaning of group activities for The users of a CAPS, based on the perspective of Occupational Science

  10. Interdisciplinarity in work process at a Psychosocial Attention Center - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the work process of mental health professionals from a Psychosocial Attention Center (CAPS, from the knowledge and the practices applied in the production of care and its interface with user’s demands and the service offering. Methods: A case study with qualitative approach. Twenty-eight subjects joined in and were divided into three groups: I (eleven mental health workers, II (eleven users e III (six family members. The semistructured interview was used besides systematic observation, in the search for data about the work process of the professionals of the Psychosocial Attention Center, the relationship between team and user, offering and demand, access, technologies of care, knowledge and practices and interdisciplinarity. The investigation was based upon critical content analysis and was oriented by the flowchart analyzer. Results: The service organization and its work process are directed to the immediate supply of the population’s demands, which depicts a care based on prescriptive practices. Thus, the flow of assistance and the service offering complement each other in the need of a procedure and in its exhaustive offering by the service, dissolving interdisciplinary conductions of intervention shared with the user. Conclusion: Mental health care is still surrounded by biomedical hegemony centered in procedures directed to pharmacological prescription. Despite this reality, the work centered on the user and the utilization of soft technologies – communication, link, welcoming – begin to take part of the daily CAPS service offering, although it is only present in specific activities of certain procedures.

  11. The perception of midwives regarding psychosocial risk assessment during antenatal care

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    Johanna M. Mathibe-Neke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physiological and psychological changes caused by pregnancy may increase a woman’s vulnerability to depression, which may in turn have adverse effects on both maternal and foetal wellbeing. Inadequate psychosocial risk assessment of women by midwives may lead to lack of psychosocial support during pregnancy and childbirth. Pregnant women who lack psychosocial support may experience stress, anxiety and depression that could possibly affect foetal wellbeing. Objective:The objective of this study was toexplore and describe the perception of psychosocial risk assessment and psychosocial care by midwives providing antenatal care to pregnant women. Method: An interpretive and descriptive qualitative approach was adopted. Three focus group interviews were conducted with midwives working in three Maternal Obstetric Units in Gauteng Province, using a semi-structured interview guide. The constant comparison data analysis approach was used. Results:Findings revealed that midwives are aware of and have encountered a high prevalence of psychosocial problems in pregnant women. Furthermore, they acknowledged the importance of psychosocial care for pregnant women although they stated that they were not equipped adequately to offer psychosocial assessment and psychosocial care. Conclusion:The findings provided a basis for incorporation of psychosocial care into routine antenatal care.

  12. Enhancing psychosocial and spiritual palliative care: Four-year results of the program of comprehensive care for people with advanced illnesses and their families in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Mateo-Ortega, Dolors; Lasmarías, Cristina; Novellas, Anna; Espinosa, Jose; Beas, Elba; Ela, Sara; Barbero, Javier

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to describe the overall quantitative and qualitative results of a "La Caixa" Foundation and World Health Organization Collaborating Center Program entitled "Comprehensive Care for Patients with Advanced Illnesses and their Families" after four years of experience. Qualitative and quantitative methods were employed to assess the program. Quasiexperimental, prospective, multicenter, single-group, and pretest/posttest methods were utilized to assess the quantitative data. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions was assessed at baseline (visit 1) and after four follow-up visits. The following dimensions were assessed: mood state, discomfort, anxiety, degree of adjustment or adaptation to disease, and suffering. We also assessed the four dimensions of the spiritual pain scale: faith or spiritual beliefs, valuable faith or spiritual beliefs, meaning in life, and peace of mind/forgiveness. Qualitative analyses were performed via surveys to evaluate stakeholder satisfaction. We built 29 psychosocial support teams involving 133 professionals-mainly psychologists and social workers. During the study period, 8,964 patients and 11,810 family members attended. Significant improvements were observed in the psychosocial and spiritual dimensions assessed. Patients, family members, and stakeholders all showed high levels of satisfaction. This model of psychosocial care could serve as an example for other countries that wish to improve psychosocial and spiritual support. Our results confirm that specific psychosocial interventions delivered by well-trained experts can help to ease suffering and discomfort in end-of-life and palliative care patients, particularly those with high levels of pain or emotional distress.

  13. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  14. Multidisciplinary family-centred psychosocial care for patients with CHD: consensus recommendations from the AEPC Psychosocial Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Callus, Edward; Levert, Eveline M; Groote, Katya De; Casey, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Because of the enormous advances in the medical treatment of CHD, the long-term survival of patients suffering from this disease has increased significantly. Currently, about 90% of patients reach adulthood, which entails many new challenges both for patients and their families and for healthcare professionals. The main objective of family-centred psychosocial care is to strengthen the emotional resilience of chronically ill patients and their families by adopting a holistic approach. During the biannual meeting of the psychosocial working group in 2012, participants expressed the need for general European guidelines. The present recommendations were written to support medical staff and psychosocial healthcare professionals to provide the best care for children and adolescents with CHD as well as for their families. This article describes in detail how the integrated family-centred psychological care modules work, involving different healthcare specialists, including a paediatric/congenital cardiologist or a general paediatrician. The different clinical implications and specific needs have been taken into account and recommendations have been provided on the following: structured follow-up screening; identification of stressful periods related to cardiac surgery or invasive medical procedures; evidence-based, disease-specific, and family-oriented psychosocial interventions; and interactive media links to medical and psychosocial information.

  15. Does routine psychosocial screening improve referral to psychosocial care providers and patient-radiotherapist communication? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeken, Anna P B M; Lechner, Lilian; Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Houben, Ruud M A; van Gils, Francis C J M; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2013-11-01

    This study tests whether using a screening instrument improves referral to psychosocial care providers (e.g. psychologist) and facilitates patient-radiotherapist communication. A cluster randomized controlled trial was used. Fourteen radiotherapists were randomly allocated to the experimental or control group and 568 of their patients received care in accordance with the group to which their radiotherapist was allocated. Patients in the experimental group were asked to complete a screening instrument before and at the end of the radiation treatment period. All patients were requested to complete questionnaires concerning patient-physician communication after the first consultation and concerning psychosocial care 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Patients who completed the screening instrument were referred to social workers at an earlier stage than patients who did not (Pcommunication. Our results suggest that a simple screening procedure can be valuable for the timely treatment of psychosocial problems in patients. Future efforts should be directed at appropriate timing of screening and enhancing physicians' awareness regarding the importance of identifying, discussing and treating psychosocial problems in cancer patients. Psychosocial screening can be enhanced by effective radiotherapist-patient communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An ethnographic exploration of the delivery of psychosocial care to children with cancer in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, Eugenia; Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia

    2017-08-01

    The integration of psychosocial care in the routine care of cancer patients has been set as an international standard, but there are healthcare contexts where these services are lacking as psychosocial care providers are not incorporated in multidisciplinary teams and screening for psychological distress is not carried out routinely or systematically. In this article, we discuss the findings from an ethnographic study that focused on exploring the working experiences of psychosocial care providers from one children's hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The study is based on 10 in-depth interviews with hospital staff members and participant observation in selected hospital areas. The transcripts from the interviews and fieldnotes from the observations were analyzed using thematic analysis. We found that psychosocial care providers encounter difficulties while attempting to deliver services to children and their families, produced mainly by their lack of collaboration with other professional groups, insufficient human resources, and a growing patient population. As a result of this situation, psychosocial care providers often prioritize some patients over others, leaving a considerable number of patients and family members without psychosocial support. The study highlighted the barriers psychosocial care providers encounter while attempting to deliver services to children and their families. Further work needs to be carried out to fully integrate psychosocial care in national health policies and ensure this type of support is available for all patients and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuing psychosocial care needs in children with new-onset epilepsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Cheryl P; Buelow, Janice M; Austin, Joan K; Johnson, Cynthia S

    2009-10-01

    Children with new-onset epilepsy and their parents have many psychosocial care needs, including concerns and fears and needs for information and support. No prospective studies address psychosocial care needs at 12 and 24 months after seizure onset. It is unknown if psychosocial care needs are associated with children's attitudes toward having epilepsy or with parental responses to their child's epilepsy. Our study addresses this knowledge gap. Members of 143 families took part in the study. Children were 8 to 14 years old and had at least two seizures. Parents and children completed Psychosocial Care Need Scales at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after the first seizure. Children also completed the Child Attitude Toward Illness Scale, and parents completed the Parent Response to Child Illness scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlations. Although psychosocial care needs were highest at the 3-month data collection for both parents and children, some worries and concerns and needs for information and support persisted for 24 months. In children, more psychosocial care needs were associated with more negative attitudes toward having epilepsy. In parents, high psychosocial care needs were associated with a more negative impact on family life. A substantial number of parents and children have unmet psychosocial care needs that are associated with more negative child attitudes and a negative impact on family life, even 24 months after the onset of seizures. Nurses should assess both children and parents for these needs at every encounter with the healthcare system to address their needs.

  18. Childhood cancer in the cinema: how the celluloid mirror reflects psychosocial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavisic, Jovana; Chilton, Julie; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa L; Martin, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the childhood cancer experience in commercially produced, readily available films that include a character with childhood cancer, with a particular focus on psychosocial care. We reviewed 29 films, using quantitative and qualitative content analysis, to identify the medical and psychosocial characteristics of the cinematic childhood cancer experience. We rated psychosocial support on a 5-point scale (0 to 4) based on the availability and efficacy of support characters in the categories of nonprofessional internal (eg, parent), nonprofessional external (eg, friend), professional medical (eg, oncologist), and professional psychosocial (eg, social worker) supports. Film depicts an unrealistic, bleak picture of childhood cancer, with a 66% mortality rate among the 35 characters evaluated. Psychosocial supports portrayed in film are generally limited to resources already available to families before the cancer diagnosis: mean ratings across films were 2.4 for both nonprofessional, 1.6 for professional medical, and 0.3 for professional psychosocial supports (Kruskal-Wallis χ3=43.1051, Plandscape. Film generally depicts images of an isolated family courageously battling cancer alone with limited support from a treatment team solely dedicated to medical care. Commercially available films minimize the importance of the psychosocial dimension of care, which can perpetuate stigma around psychosocial needs and interventions. These films can be used to encourage discussion about how to optimize psychosocial care in pediatric oncology so that such care is not abandoned in actual practice as it is, for entertainment purposes, on the screen.

  19. Localization of post-disaster psychosocial care in China

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    Sujuan Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Disaster is not independent of society and culture and always happens in specific cultural and social contexts. Cultural and social characteristics influence the responses of people affected by disaster, as well as the process of disaster relief.As one of the countries in the world that suffer most from natural disasters, various ethnic groups in China vary greatly in psychology and behavior characteristics after major disasters due to different geographical environments and economic and political conditions. To launch an effective post-disaster psychosocial care, 1 it is necessary to consider how to satisfy material, health, and other fundamental biological needs of affected people; 2 it is necessary to relieve disaster victims of their mental pain (spiritual in Chinese and help them restore their psychological health; 3 it is necessary to revitalize the seriously unbalanced communities affected by disasters so that these communities would burst with vitality again. In addition, it is necessary to take specific ethnic and regional culture into account when helping people in these areas gradually achieve social adaptation and cultural identification. All these require us to intensify our efforts in the following four aspects: 1 to strengthen legislation and institutional construction in this field; 2 to help citizens master the most fundamental psychological principles and methods of coping with disasters to enable timely self-aid and mutual-aid; 3 to build a national database of the post-disaster psychosocial care teams; 4 to continue the research on disaster psychology, so as to provide a scientific basis as well as techniques and methods for implementing disaster relief efforts in a scientific way.

  20. Os trabalhadores de enfermagem como acompanhantes terapêuticos de um centro de atenção psicossocial Los trabajadores de enfermería como acompañantes terapéuticos en un centro de atención psicosocial Therapeutic care by the nursing staff at a psychosocial care center

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    Débora Isane Ratner Kirschbaum

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar a atuação de auxiliares de enfermagem como acompanhantes terapêuticos do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial do município de Campinas-SP. Empregou-se a pesquisa documental, a observação participante e entrevistas semi-estruturadas gravadas como metodologia de pesquisa. Verificou-se que a atuação desses profissionais não se encontrava orientada pelo referencial teórico psicanalítico e que os mesmos utilizavam-se predominantemente de estratégias subjetivas para manejar as situações que emergiam durante as atividades de acompanhamento terapêutico.El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la actuación de los auxiliares de enfermería como acompañantes terapéuticos del Centro de Atención Psicosocial del Municipio de Campinas, SP. La metodologia de pesquisa utilizada incluyó la investigación documental, la observación participante, y la grabación de entrevistas semielaboradas. Se verificó que la actuación de esos profesionales no está orientada por la teoria psicoanalítica o hace referencia a la misma, y que dichos profesionales utilizan, predominantemente, estrategias subjetivas para lidiar con las situaciones surgidas durante las actividades de acompañamiento terapéutico.The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of nurses in relation to the therapeutic accompaniment provided at a Psychosocial Care Center in the Municipality of Campinas, SP. The methodology consisted of documental research and recorded semi structured interviews. It was verified that the nurses' performance was not based on any psychoanalytical theory and that they often used subjective strategies to handle situations that arose during therapeutic activities.

  1. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    OpenAIRE

    Havermans, B.M.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers can be explained by autonomy and social support. Methods In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate...

  2. Relationship between job burnout, psychosocial factors and health care-associated infections in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; D'Aloja, Ernesto; Mereu, Alessandra; Contu, Paolo; Coppola, Rosa Cristina; Finco, Gabriele; Campagna, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    Burnout is a serious problem for critical care unit workers because they are exposed to chronic psychosocial stressors, including high responsibility, advanced technology and high patient acuity. Recent evidence showed that staff burnout was directly associated with hospital infections, thus affecting quality and safety of care provided. The research aim was to investigate how burnout was associated with some psychosocial factors and with health care-associated infections in hospitalised patients. A total of 130 healthcare professionals from critical care units completed a self-reported questionnaire. The infection data were collected prospectively over a six-month period. The results showed that emotional exhaustion was related to cynicism due to high work demands. Cynicism affected team communication, which in turn was positively related to team efficacy, thus acting as a mediator. Finally, team efficacy was negatively related to infections. The study showed that emotional exhaustion and cynicism were related to psychosocial aspects, which in turn had a significant impact on healthcare-associated infections. Our findings suggest how burnout can indirectly affect healthcare-related infections as a result of the quality of teamwork. Thus, reducing burnout can be a good strategy to decrease infections, thus increasing workers' well-being while improving patient care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adolescent Care: Psychosocial and Medical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, Carly; Shumer, Daniel; Katz-Wise, Sabra L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Transgender individuals display incongruence between their assigned birth sex and their current gender identity, and may identify as male, female or elsewhere on the gender spectrum. Gender nonconformity describes an individual whose gender identity, role, or expression are not typical for individuals in a given assigned sex category. This update highlights recent literature pertaining to the psychosocial and medical care of transgender and gender nonconforming (TGN) adolescents with applications for the general practitioner. Recent findings The psychological risks and outcomes of TGN adolescents are being more widely recognized. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that social and medical gender transition reduces gender dysphoria, defined as distress that accompanies the incongruence between one’s birth sex and identified gender. Unfortunately, lack of education about TGN adolescents in medical training persists. Summary Recent literature highlights increased health risks in TGN adolescents and improved outcomes following gender dysphoria treatment. It is important for clinicians to become familiar with the range of treatment options and referral resources available to TGN adolescents in order to provide optimal and welcoming care to all adolescents. PMID:26087416

  4. Transgender and gender nonconforming adolescent care: psychosocial and medical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, Carly; Shumer, Daniel; Katz-Wise, Sabra L

    2015-08-01

    Transgender individuals display incongruence between their assigned birth sex and their current gender identity, and may identify as male, female, or being elsewhere on the gender spectrum. Gender nonconformity describes an individual whose gender identity, role, or expression is not typical for individuals in a given assigned sex category. This update highlights recent literature pertaining to the psychosocial and medical care of transgender and gender nonconforming (TGN) adolescents with applications for the general practitioner. The psychological risks and outcomes of TGN adolescents are being more widely recognized. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that social and medical gender transition reduces gender dysphoria, defined as distress that accompanies the incongruence between one's birth sex and identified gender. Unfortunately, lack of education about TGN adolescents in medical training persists. Recent literature highlights increased health risks in TGN adolescents and improved outcomes following gender dysphoria treatment. It is important for clinicians to become familiar with the range of treatment options and referral resources available to TGN adolescents in order to provide optimal and welcoming care to all adolescents.

  5. A intersubjetividade no cuidado à Saúde Mental: narrativas de técnicos e auxiliares de enfermagem de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial Intersubjectivity in Mental Health care: narratives of nursing technicians at a Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Onocko Campos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diante da demanda por atenção em Saúde Mental e na tentativa de se renovar o tratamento psiquiátrico destinado a portadores de transtornos mentais severos, surgiram os Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (Caps. Este artigo visa à análise de repercussões subjetivas do trabalho nos Caps nos profissionais de nível médio, buscandose contribuir para o planejamento em saúde. Realizaram-se dois grupos focais com trabalhadores de um Caps III. A metodologia utilizada para análise alicerça-se na abordagem hermenêutico-crítica proposta por Ricoeur e na filosofia gadameriana. Revelou-se como principal desencadeante de sofrimento a desvalorização do trabalho. Destacaram-se temas como dificuldade de cooperação com familiares de usuários, a fraca interligação do Caps com a rede de saúde, a responsabilização pelo plantão noturno, controvérsias sobre a liberação de pacientes em leito-noite e excesso de carga horária. Propõe-se adequado planejamento de estrutura e de organização institucional quando da abertura de novos Caps, visando diminuir impacto de trabalho nos técnicos e melhorar o desempenho clínico da equipe.Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps were established as a result of the demand for Mental Health care and were an attempt to update psychiatric treatment for those afflicted with severe mental disorders. This article seeks to analyze subjective repercussions of work conducted in Caps on mid-level professionals and to contribute to healthcare planning. Two focal groups were conducted with workers of a Caps III. The methodology applied to the analysis was based on the critical hermeneutical approach proposed by Ricoeur and espoused by Gadamerian philosophy. Lack of appreciation in the workplace was revealed as being the main cause of suffering. Several themes stood out including the difficulty of obtaining the cooperation of users'; relatives, the tenuous interconnection between Caps and the health network, the attribution of

  6. Physicians' Psychosocial Work Conditions and Quality of Care: A Literature Review

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    Peter Angerer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physician jobs are associated with adverse psychosocial work conditions. We summarize research on the relationship of physicians' psychosocial work conditions and quality of care. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO. All studies were classified into three categories of care quality outcomes: Associations between physicians' psychosocial work conditions and (1 the physician-patient-relationship, or (2 the care process and outcomes, or (3 medical errors were examined. Results: 12 publications met the inclusion criteria. Most studies relied on observational cross-sectional and controlled intervention designs. All studies provide at least partial support for physicians’ psychosocial work conditions being related to quality of care. Conclusions: This review found preliminary evidence that detrimental physicians’ psychosocial work conditions adversely influence patient care quality. Future research needs to apply strong designs to disentangle the indirect and direct effects of adverse psychosocial work conditions on physicians as well as on quality of care.Keywords: psychosocial work conditions, physicians, quality of care, physician-patient-relationship, hospital, errors, review, work stress, clinicians

  7. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care: views of parents and adolescents in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2016-01-01

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers regarding psychosocial care for the child, along with associated child and family characteristics. We obtained data on an age-stratified random sample of school children/pupils aged 4-18 via questionnaires (N = 666; response rate 70.3 %). Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care were measured with the "Barriers to Treatment Participation Scale-Expectancies" questionnaire (BTPS-exp). Results showed that 64 % of the parents of children below age 12, 59 % of the parents of adolescents (age 12-18), and 84 % of the adolescents expected one or more barriers. Parents and adolescents expected barriers most frequently with respect to irrelevance of treatment. Mainly parents with low educational level and their adolescents expected barriers regarding treatment, and quite a few characteristics of parents of adolescents were associated with expecting multiple barriers regarding treatment demands and issues, for example, single parents, parents of lower educational level and of adolescent boys, and parents of adolescents with psychosocial problems. We conclude that adolescents especially, but also their parents and parents of younger children, expect major barriers to psychosocial care, which may greatly hinder appropriate care seeking. This evidence may support professionals and policymakers in their attempts to improve access to psychosocial care.

  8. Psychosocial care and the role of clinical psychologists in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chun; Lin, I-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the works of clinical psychologists in palliative care in Taiwan. Clinical psychologists who were working or had experience in palliative care were recruited. A 2-stage qualitative method study was conducted, including semistructured interviews and a focus group. The following 4 main themes were identified: (1) the essential nature of the psychologists' care were caring and company; (2) the dynamic process included psychological assessment, intervention, and evaluation based on psychological knowledge; (3) they needed to modify their care using an integrative framework, by setting practical goals and using techniques with flexibility; and (4) they faced external and internal challenges in this field. Clinical psychologists have beneficial contributions but have to modify psychosocial care based on the patients' needs and clinical situations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. A qualitative exploration of psychosocial specialists' experiences of providing support in UK burn care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Ella; Griffiths, Catrin; Harcourt, Diana

    2018-01-01

    A burn can have a significant and long-lasting psychosocial impact on a patient and their family. The National Burn Care Standards (2013) recommend psychosocial support should be available in all UK burn services; however, little is known about how it is provided. The current study aimed to explore experiences of psychosocial specialists working in UK burn care, with a focus on the challenges they experience in their role. Semi-structured telephone interviews with eight psychosocial specialists (two psychotherapists and six clinical psychologists) who worked within UK burn care explored their experiences of providing support to patients and their families. Thematic analysis revealed two main themes: burn service-related experiences and challenges reflected health professionals having little time and resources to support all patients; reduced patient attendance due to them living large distances from service; psychosocial appointments being prioritised below wound-related treatments; and difficulties detecting patient needs with current outcome measures. Therapy-related experiences and challenges outlined the sociocultural and familial factors affecting engagement with support, difficulties treating patients with pre-existing mental health conditions within the burn service and individual differences in the stage at which patients are amenable to support. Findings provide an insight into the experiences of psychosocial specialists working in UK burn care and suggest a number of ways in which psychosocial provision in the NHS burn service could be developed.

  10. Psychosocial Intervention Use in Long-Stay Dementia Care: A Classic Grounded Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Andrew; Keady, John; Casey, Dympna; Grealish, Annmarie; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a substantive grounded theory of staff psychosocial intervention use with residents with dementia in long-stay care. "Becoming a person again" emerged as the core category accounting for staffs' psychosocial intervention use within long-stay care. Interview data were collected from participants in nine Irish long-stay settings: 14 residents with dementia, 19 staff nurses, one clinical facilitator, seven nurse managers, 21 nursing assistants, and five relatives. Constant comparative method guided the data collection and analysis. The researcher's theoretical memos, based on unstructured observation, and applicable extant literature were also included as data. By identifying the mutuality of the participants' experiences, this classic grounded theory explains staff motivation toward psychosocial intervention use within long-stay care. It also explains how institutional factors interact with those personal factors that incline individuals toward psychosocial intervention use. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Psychosocial Influences upon the Workforce and Professional Development Participation of Family Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; Wiley, Angela R.; A. Koziol, Natalie; Magerko, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family child care is commonly used in the US by families, including by those receiving child care subsidies. Psychosocial influences upon the workforce and professional development participation of family child care providers (FCCPs) have implications for the investment of public dollars that aim to improve quality and stability of…

  12. Psychosocial factors and mental work load: a reality perceived by nurses in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ceballos-Vásquez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse the perception of psychosocial factors and mental workload of nurses who work in intensive care units. It is hypothesised that nurses in these units could perceive psychosocial risks, manifesting in a high mental work load. The psychosocial dimension related to the position's cognitive demands is hypothesised to mostly explain mental work load. METHOD: Quantitative study, with a descriptive, cross-sectional, and comparative design. A total of 91% of the intensive care unit populations of three Chilean hospitals was surveyed, corresponding to 111 nurses. The instruments utilised included (A a biosociodemographic history questionnaire; (b the SUSESO-ISTAS 21 questionnaire; and (c the Mental Work Load Subjective Scale (ESCAM, in Spanish. RESULTS: In total, 64% and 57% of participants perceived high levels of exposure to the psychosocial risks Psychosocial demands and Double shift, respectively. In addition, a medium-high level of overall mental load was observed. Positive and significant correlations between some of the SUSESO-ISTAS 21 and ESCAM dimensions were obtained. Using a regression analysis, it was determined that three dimensions of the psychosocial risk questionnaire helped to explain 38% of the overall mental load. CONCLUSION: Intensive care unit nurses felt that inadequate psychosocial factors and mental work overload existed in several of the tested dimensions.

  13. Effectiveness of Psychosocial Interventions in Complex Palliative Care Patients: A Quasi-Experimental, Prospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Ortega, Dolors; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Maté, Jorge; Beas, Elba; Ela, Sara; Lasmarias, Cristina; Limonero, Joaquín T

    2018-03-13

    To determine whether specific psychosocial interventions can ease discomfort in palliative care (PC) patients, particularly in those with high levels of pain or emotional distress. Changes in the psychological parameters of 8333 patients were assessed in a quasi-experimental, prospective, multicenter, single group pretest/post-test study. Psychosocial care was delivered by 29 psychosocial care teams (PSTs; 137 professionals). Pre- and post-intervention changes in these variables were assessed: mood, anxiety, and emotional distress. Patients were classified as complex, when presented with high levels of anxiety, mood, suffering (or perception of time as slow), and distress (or unease, or discomfort), or noncomplex. These groups were compared to assess changes in suffering-related parameters from baseline. Psychosocial interventions reduced patients' suffering. These interventions were more effective in complex patients. After successive psychosocial interventions, the level of suffering in complex patients decreased until close to parity with noncomplex patients, suggesting that patients with major complexity could benefit most from specific psychosocial treatment. These findings support the importance of assessing and treating patients' psychosocial needs.

  14. Burnout and the provision of psychosocial care amongst Australian cancer nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, Kirsty; Butow, Phyllis; Turner, Jane; Yates, Patsy; White, Kate; Lambert, Sylvie; Stephens, Moira; Lawsin, Catalina

    2016-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of burnout amongst Australian cancer nurses as well as investigate the systemic and individual factors associated with burnout, including training and supervision for nurses in psychosocial care. Burnout amongst cancer nurses can have serious consequences for the individual nurse, the hospital and patients. Psychosocial care has been demonstrated in many studies to reduce distress in cancer patients; however, previous studies have suggested that providing psychosocial care can be stressful if nurses feel they lack appropriate training. Psychosocial skill training and supervision may be a way of improving job satisfaction and reducing burnout amongst nurses. Two hundred and thirty cancer nurses were recruited between November 2010 and April 2011 and completed an online questionnaire. Burnout levels within this population were found to be below nursing norms. Adequacy of training and supervision, frequency of supervision and percentage of role spent managing psychosocial care were found to be associated with burnout. Workload, Control, Reward and Community were independent predictors of burnout, and nurses with a greater mismatch in these areas identified as having High levels of burnout. Strategies to reduce burnout include providing cancer nurses with a varied and sustainable workload, awarding financial and social recognition of efforts and encouraging nurses to develop a sense of control over their work. Providing regular training and supervision in psychosocial care that is perceived to be adequate may also assist in reducing burnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Avaliação da atenção prestada aos familiares em um centro de atenção psicossocial Evaluación de la atención prestada a los familiares en un centro de atención psicosocial Evaluation of family care delivered at a psychosocial care center

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    Maria de Lourdes Custódio Duarte

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou avaliar qualitativamente a atenção oferecida aos familiares por um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS do tipo I, situado na Região Sul do Brasil. O Círculo Hermenêutico Dialético foi utilizado como técnica de coleta de dados, método preconizado pela Avaliação de Quarta Geração proposta por Guba e Lincoln. Temas como acolhimento, reuniões de familiares, visitas domiciliares e associação dos familiares surgiram nas entrevistas com os familiares do CAPS. Entrevistas e observações foram as técnicas utilizadas para a coleta de dados. A forma como vem sendo consolidada a atenção às famílias nos serviços representa um desafio para os profissionais de saúde, por implicar reestruturação na formação destes e um processo de reflexão de todos os atores sociais envolvidos neste processo de mudançaEste estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar cualitativamente la atención ofrecida a las familias para un tipo de Centro de Atención Psicosocial del tipo I, situada en el la Region Sur de Brasil. El círculo hermenéutico dialéctico se utilizó como técnica de recolección de datos, un método recomendado por la cuarta generación de evaluación propuesto por Guba y Lincoln. Temas tales como la recepción, reuniones familiares, visitas a domicilio y la participación de la familia surgieron en las entrevistas con los familiares de estos servicios de salud. Las entrevistas y observaciones fueron las técnicas utilizadas para recoger datos. El camino se ha consolidado a la atención de las familias en los servicios representa un reto para los profesionales de la salud, ya que implica la reestructuración y la formación de una reflexión de todos los actores involucrados en este proceso de cambioThis study aimed to evaluate qualitatively the care offered to families for a Center of Psychosocial Atention of type I, located in Southern Region of Brazil. The Dialectical hermeneutic circle was used as a technique of

  16. Práticas intersetoriais que favorecem a integralidade do cuidado nos centros de atenção psicossociais Prácticas intersectorial que promueven integridad de precaución de los centros de atención psicosocial Intersectoral practices that promote an integral care in Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Elisângela Braga de Azevedo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se descrever duas experiências de inclusão no trabalho desenvolvida pelos usuários e profissionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial de Campina Grande, Paraíba. Pesquisa descritiva-interpretativa realizada com 19 profissionais. A experiência aqui descrita foi relatada por um profissional. O material empírico foi coletado em junho e julho de 2010. A análise fundamentou-se na análise de conteúdo, tendo possibilitado a construção da categoria: a arte como modo de inclusão no trabalho. Constata-se que o curso de pintura em tela e o projeto cultural itinerante favoreceram a inclusão dos usuários no mercado de trabalho, a melhoria da autoestima, a inserção social, interação com outros serviços e usuários, tendo promovido a intersetorialidade e a integralidade do cuidado.Nuestro objetivo es describir dos experiencias de inclusión en el trabajo desarrollado por los usuarios y los proveedores de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial de Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brasil. Descriptivo-interpretativo y cualitativo, con 19 profesionales. Esta experiencia fue reportado por un profesional. El material empírico fue colectado en junio y julio de 2010. El análisis se basó en el análisis de contenido, y ha permitido la construcción de la categoría: el arte para su inclusión en el lugar de trabajo. Tomamos nota de que el curso de pintura sobre tela y proyecto cultural itinerante, a favor de la inclusión de usuarios en el mercado laboral, la mejora de la autoestima, la integración social, la interacción con otros servicios y usuarios, intersectorial y la atención integral.This research aimed to describe two experiences of inclusion in the work developed by users and providers of a Psychosocial Care Center of the city of Campina Grande, state of Paraíba, Brazil. This was a descriptive, interpretative and qualitative research, with 19 professionals. The experiment described here was reported by a professional. The empirical

  17. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

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    Ngutu M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariah Ngutu, Isaac K Nyamongo Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (IAGAS, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. Keywords: qualitative, illness trajectories, women, cervical cancer

  18. The Psychosocial and Independent Living Donor Advocate Evaluation and Post-surgery Care of Living Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Swartz, Kathleen; Phillips, Chelsea; Hollenberger, Jennifer; Smith, Taylor; Steel, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation as a treatment for end stage organ failure has been an accepted treatment option for decades. Despite advances in medicine and technology, and increased awareness of organ donation and transplantation, the gap between supply and demand continues to widen. Living donation has been an option that has increased the number of transplants despite the continued shortage of deceased organs. In the early 2000s live donor transplantation reached an all-time high in the United States. As a result, a consensus meeting was convened in 2000 to increase the oversight of living donor transplantation. Both the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the United Network for Organ Sharing developed regulations that transplant programs performing live donor transplantation. These regulations and guidelines involve the education, evaluation, informed consent process and living donor follow-up care. Two areas in which had significant changes included the psychosocial and the independent living donor advocate (ILDA) evaluation. The purpose of this paper was to outline the current regulations and guidelines associated with the psychosocial and ILDA evaluation as well as provide further recommendations for the administration of a high quality evaluation of living donors. The goals and timing of the evaluation and education of donors; qualifications of the health care providers performing the evaluation; components of the evaluation; education provided to donors; documentation of the evaluation; participation in the selection committee meeting; post-decline and post-donation care of donors is described. Caveats including the paired donor exchange programs and non-directed and directed donation are also considered.

  19. Psychosocial Distress of Patients with Psoriasis: Protocol for an Assessment of Care Needs and the Development of a Supportive Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Jördis Maria; Dirmaier, Jörg; Augustin, Matthias; Dwinger, Sarah; Christalle, Eva; Härter, Martin; Mrowietz, Ulrich

    2018-02-07

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is often associated with a number of somatic and mental comorbidity. Patients with psoriasis show an increased risk of depression and (social) anxiety. The aims of this study are 1) to explore the psychosocial distress of patients with psoriasis and to assess their care needs; and 2) to develop a supportive intervention based on the prior results. A multi-stage design with four phases combining quantitative and qualitative methodology will be used and conducted in two centers. 1) A scoping review and focus groups will be used to design a questionnaire to assess the psychosocial distress and care needs of the patients. 2) The questionnaire developed in phase 1 will be used in a cross-sectional survey to assess the extent of psychosocial distress and supportive care needs in 400 patients with psoriasis. 3) A systematic review and meta-analysis will be conducted to identify psychosocial and psychoeducational interventions for patients with psoriasis and to describe their effectiveness. 4) Based on the results of the phases 2 and 3 a manualized supportive intervention will be developed and the feasibility and acceptance of the intervention will be assessed. Currently, phase 1 of the project has been completed and the recruitment for phase 2 has been started. The systematic review and meta-analysis of phase 3 are conducted simultaneously to phase 2 and results are expected soon. Phase 4 has not been started yet. The expected results of this study will show the extent of psychosocial distress of patients with psoriasis in Germany and supplement previous research with findings about the supportive care needs of this patient group. Moreover, the developed intervention will help to address the psychosocial support needs of patients with psoriasis. Research shows that psychosocial support is strongly needed. ©Jördis Maria Zill, Jörg Dirmaier, Matthias Augustin, Sarah Dwinger, Eva Christalle, Martin Härter, Ulrich Mrowietz

  20. Disclosure of psychosocial stressors affecting diabetes care among uninsured young adults with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatak, E A; Sequeira, P; Peters, A L; Montoya, L; Weigensberg, M J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the disclosure rates of psychosocial issues affecting routine diabetes care. A total of 20 young adults were interviewed regarding the impact of psychosocial stressors on their diabetes care. The interviewer, endocrinologist and case manager reported the prevalence rates of psychosocial stressors. Disclosure rates were compared to determine the prevalence of psychosocial issues and the different patterns of disclosure. Participants reported a high number of psychosocial stressors, which were associated with poorer glycaemic control (r = 0.60, P = 0.005). Approximately half of all disclosed stressors (50.9%) were identified in routine care; other stressors were identified only through intensive case management and/or in-depth interviews. Identifying psychosocial stressors in routine care, and providing referrals to psychological or social services, is a significant unmet need and may improve glycaemic control among certain populations with diabetes. Systematic mechanisms of capturing this information, such as by screening surveys, should be considered. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  1. The Psychosocial Care Center on the users point of view El Centro de Atención Psicosocial sobre la óptica de los usuarios O Centro de Atenção Psicossocial sob a ótica dos usuários

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    Sandra Regina Rosolen Soares

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has as its aim to describe the daily work of a psychosocial care center and to aprehend how the users cared by such service experience the offered therapeutic process. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eleven users of the Psychosocial Care Center, located in the countryside of São Paulo state. The data were submitted to Theme Analysis, based on Minayo. The themes which came from the data analysis, allowed the configuration of three topics. In the first one, the user experiences the treatment on an organicist focus of the care, assessed by the medical professional value, in the medicine-based approach and the symptom control. The second topic brings the perception of the space in CAPS as a helping scenario of social exchanges. And the third topic is about the therapeutic process as being towards the daily life of the users. Based in these data, we could reflect on the directions of the new facilities in mental health, the CAPS.El presente estudio tiene por objetivo describir el funcionamiento de un centro de atención psicosocial y aprender como los usuarios atendidos por este servicio perciben el proceso terapéutico ofrecido. Fueron realizadas entrevistas semi-estructuradas, con once usuarios de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial, ubicado en el interior paulista. Los datos fueron sometidos a Análisis Temática, según Minayo. Los temas emergidos a partir del análisis de los datos, posibilitaron la configuración de tres temas. En el primero de ellos, el usuario percibe el tratamiento sobre un enfoque organicista del cuidado, relatado por medio de la valorización del profesional médico, en el abordaje medicamentoso y el control de los síntomas. El segundo tema trae la percepción del espacio del "CAPS", mientras el panorama propiciador de cambios sociales. Y el tercer tema se refiere al proceso terapéutico estar dirigido a la vida cotidiana de los usuarios. Con base en estos datos, podemos ponderar sobre

  2. Psychosocial care for cancer: a framework to guide practice, and actionable recommendations for Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull Macdonald, G.C.; Baldassarre, F.; Brown, P.; Hatton–Bauer, J.; Li, M.; Green, E.; Lebel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We set out to create a psychosocial oncology care framework and a set of relevant recommendations that can be used to improve the quality of comprehensive cancer care for Ontario patients and their families.meet the psychosocial health care needs of cancer patients and their families at both the provider and system levels. Data Sources and Methods The adapte process and the practice guideline development cycle were used to adapt the 10 recommendations from the 2008 U.S. Institute of Medicine standard Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs into the psychosocial oncology care framework. In addition, the evidence contained in the original document was used, in combination with the expertise of the working group, to create a set of actionable recommendations. Refinement after formal external review was conducted. Data Extraction and Synthesis The new framework consists of 8 defining domains. Of those 8 domains, 7 were adapted from recommendations in the source document; 1 new domain, to raise awareness about the need for psychosocial support of cancer patients and their families, was added. To ensure high-quality psychosocial care and services, 31 actionable recommendations were created. The document was submitted to an external review process. More than 70% of practitioners rated the quality of the advice document as high and reported that they would recommend its use. Conclusions This advice document advocates for a multidisciplinary approach to cancer care in response to the distress experienced by cancer patients and their families. The recommendations will be useful in future to measure performance, quality of practice, and access to psychosocial services. PMID:22876147

  3. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the

  4. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the

  5. [The Psychosocial Adaptation Process of Psychiatric Nurses Working in Community Mental Health Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, So Young

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify psychosocial issues faced by psychiatric and community mental health nurse practitioners (PCMHNP) working in community mental health centers, and to identify the adaptation processes used to resolve the issues. Data were collected through in-depth interviews between December 2013 and August 2014. Participants were 11 PCMHNP working in community mental health centers. Analysis was done using the grounded theory methodology. The first question was "How did you start working at a community mental health center; what were the difficulties you faced during your employment and how did you resolve them?" The core category was 'regulating within relationships.' The adaptation process was categorized into three sequential stages: 'nesting,' 'hanging around the nest,' and 'settling into the nest.' Various action/interaction strategies were employed in these stages. The adaptation results from using these strategies were 'psychiatric nursing within life' and 'a long way to go.' The results of this study are significant as they aid in understanding the psychosocial adaptation processes of PCMHNP working in community mental health centers, and indicate areas to be addressed in the future in order for PCMHNP to fulfill their professional role in the local community.

  6. Impact of Psychosocial Risk Factors on Prenatal Care Delivery: A National Provider Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Elizabeth E.; Moloci, Nicholas M.; Housey, Michelle T.; Davis, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate providers’ perspectives regarding the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors. Methods A random, national sample of 2095 prenatal care providers (853 obstetricians and gynecologists (Ob/Gyns), 270 family medicine (FM) physicians and 972 midwives) completed a mailed survey. We measured respondents’ practice and referral patterns regarding six psychosocial risk factors: adolescence (age ≤ 19), unstable housing, lack of paternal involvement and social support, late prenatal care (> 13 weeks gestation), domestic violence and drug or alcohol use. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses assessed the association between prenatal care provider characteristics and prenatal care utilization patterns. Results Approximately 60% of Ob/Gyns, 48.4% of midwives and 32.2% of FM physicians referred patients with psychosocial risk factors to clinicians outside of their practice. In all three specialties, providers were more likely to increase prenatal care visits with alternative clinicians (social workers, nurses, psychologists/psychiatrists) compared to themselves for all six psychosocial risk factors. Drug or alcohol use and intimate partner violence were the risk factors that most often prompted an increase in utilization. In multivariate analyses, Ob/Gyns who recently completed clinical training were significantly more likely to increase prenatal care utilization with either themselves (OR=2.15; 95% CI 1.14–4.05) or an alternative clinician (2.27; 1.00–4.67) for women with high psychosocial risk pregnancies. Conclusions Prenatal care providers frequently involve alternative clinicians such as social workers, nurses and psychologists or psychiatrists in the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors. PMID:24740719

  7. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  8. Análise do trabalho de referência em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Análisis del trabajo de referencia en Centros de Atención Psicosocial Analysis of reference work in Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Lilian Miranda

    2008-10-01

    referencia, y el sufrimiento del trabajador, que se puede sentir excesivamente responsabilizado por el caso de referencia. CONCLUSIONES: Los efectos del arreglo equipo/profesionales de referencia sobre los pacientes se basan en aspectos emocionales unidos a la confianza, la constancia y a la integridad de cuidados. Sin embargo, tales aspectos también presentaron problemas de relación, principalmente con la omnipotencia, que puede envolver el trabajador.OBJECTIVE: To analyze how psychosocial care center users, family members and workers assess related work by reference team and professionals. METHODS: Qualitative research based on Constructivist Paradigm and Gadamerian Hermeneutics. Two cycles of focus groups consisting of professionals, users and users' family members from all psychosocial care centers in the city of Campinas (Southeastern Brazil, in 2006, were analyzed. RESULTS: Reference work was assessed as an arrangement that has therapeutic effects and contributes to the work organization efficacy. However, risks related to power centralized by reference professionals and to workers' suffering, as these may feel overly responsible for the case they are reference for, were reported. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of the "reference team/professionals" arrangement on patients are based on emotional aspects associated with reliability, constancy and integrality of care. In contrast, such aspects also show relationship problems, especially as regards omnipotence, which may involve the worker.

  9. Psychosocial changes following transition to an aged care home: qualitative findings from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Pakpour, Vahid; Chenoweth, Lynnette Lorraine; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2017-06-01

    The study explored the psychosocial effects of transitioning from home to an aged care home for older Iranian people. Moving from one's own home to a communal aged care home is challenging for older people and may give rise to numerous psychosocial responses. The extent and intensity of such changes have rarely been explored in Middle Eastern countries. Data were collected through purposive sampling by in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 participants (17 people living in aged care homes and three formal caregivers). All the interviews were recorded and typed, and conventional qualitative content analysis was used, eliciting common themes. There were four common themes: communication isolation, resource change, monotone institutional life and negative emotional response. Participants lost their previous support systems when transitioning to an aged care home and were not able to establish new ones. Routine care was provided by formal caregivers with little attention to individual needs, and minimal support was given to help maintain the older person's independence. These losses gave rise to negative emotions in some of the participants, depending on their previous lifestyle and accommodation arrangements. The extent and intensity of psychosocial changes occurring in most of the participants following their transition to an aged care home indicates the need for a review of Iranian aged care services. To assist older Iranian people adapt more readily when making the transition to aged care home and to meet their unique psychosocial needs, a family-centred approach to service delivery is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A review on cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients

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    Femke Jansen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several psychosocial care interventions have been found effective in improving psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients. At present, there is increasingly being asked for information on the value for money of this type of intervention. This review therefore evaluates current evidence from studies investigating cost-effectiveness or cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science yielding 539 unique records, of which 11 studies were included in the study. Studies were mainly performed in breast cancer populations or mixed cancer populations. Studied interventions included collaborative care (four studies, group interventions (four studies, individual psychological support (two studies, and individual psycho-education (one study. Seven studies assessed the cost-utility of psychosocial care (based on quality-adjusted-life-years while three studies investigated its cost-effectiveness (based on profile of mood states [mood], Revised Impact of Events Scale [distress], 12-Item Health Survey [mental health], or Fear of Progression Questionnaire [fear of cancer progression]. One study did both. Costs included were intervention costs (three studies, intervention and direct medical costs (five studies, or intervention, direct medical, and direct nonmedical costs (three studies. In general, results indicated that psychosocial care is likely to be cost-effective at different, potentially acceptable, willingness-to-pay thresholds. Further research should be performed to provide more clear information as to which psychosocial care interventions are most cost-effective and for whom. In addition, more research should be performed encompassing potential important cost drivers from a societal perspective, such as productivity losses or informal care costs, in the analyses.

  11. South Florida Health Care Centers | NSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Optometric Care Complete range of personalized eye care delays or symptoms on the autism spectrum. Support services are also available for families with a child Segal Center provides programs for early childhood, parenting, and autism. Institutes Distance Education

  12. Percepção sobre a prática de enfermagem em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Percepción sobre la práctica de enfermería en Centros de Atención Sicosocial Perception about the nursing practice in the Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Francisca Bezerra de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    áctica que enfatiza el sentido de producción de vida, del aumento de la capacidad del usuario de establecer cambios sociales, posibilitándole mayor autonomía.The practice of nursing in the psychosocial care centers in mental health is something made in the institutions daily from established interactions among professionals, patients, and the patient`s family. This research is somewhat exploratory and has a qualitative approach. It aims to know the daily practice of professionals from psychosocial Care Centers on daily practice of the nurse in this kind of work. The collected data was made by means of-semi-structured interviews. From the thematic analysis of the data, two themes appeared: the nurse establishes the first contact with the patients; that is, the nurse is the link between doctors and patients. The results show that the practice of nursing in mental health searches to construct inventive actions, establish affective ties, welcome the patients, and contradict the different way by which some uncommon people are seen the "insane" as a threat. It is a practice that emphasizes the meaning of life production, that is, the increase of the patient’s capacity to establish social exchanges, giving him/her greater autonomy.

  13. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Mariza Alves Barbosa; Barbosa, Mirna Rossi; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Gomes, Viviane Elizângela; e Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição

    2014-01-01

    Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health...

  14. [Psychosocial stress environment and health workers in public health: Differences between primary and hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Bellón-Saameño, Juan Ángel; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    To describe the psychosocial environment of health professionals in public health in primary and hospital care, and compare it with that of the general Spanish working population, as well as to evaluate the effect of psychosocial risk factors on symptoms related to perceived stress. Cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling. Health care workers in the province of Granada, distributed in 5 hospitals and 4 health districts. A total of 738 employees (medical and nursing staff) of the Andalusian Health Service (SAS) were invited to take part. CopSoQ/Istas21 questionnaire developed for the multidimensional analysis of the psychosocial work environment. Stress symptoms were measured with the Stress Profile questionnaire. The response rate was 67.5%. Compared with the Spanish workforce, our sample showed high cognitive, emotional, and sensory psychological demands, possibilities for development and sense of direction in their work. Primary care physicians were the group with a worse psychosocial work environment. All the groups studied showed high levels of stress symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that variables associated with high levels of stress symptom were younger and with possibilities for social relations, role conflict, and higher emotional demands, and insecurity at work. Our findings support that the psychosocial work environment of health workers differs from that of the Spanish working population, being more unfavorable in general practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [The Need for Psychosocial Support of Parents of Children in Neonatal Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Nicole; Karutz, Harald; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Background Advances in neonatal care have reduced mortality but increased morbidity in babies born pre-maturely or after high-risk pregnancies. However, this often increases the burden on the family and the parents in particular. A systematic review of the literature was conducted that demonstrated the importance of psychosocial support for parents of children in neonatal care. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed, Psyndex, CINAHI and medpilot was conducted. Reference lists of the included articles were also searched for relevant publications. A free-text search found further publications. Together, 78 publications (from 1975-2015) were included in our review. Results A shift from a biomedical model and child-centred treatment to family-centred care has already taken place in neonatal care. However, there is still a considerable gap between theory and practice. Although there is awareness of the need for psychosocial support of parents, the focus of day-to-day care is still on medical interventions and life-supporting treatment for the child. In particular, while the importance of an assessment of needs as a basis for family-centred psychosocial support appears to be well-known, validated screening instruments are rarely used. In addition, the demand for psychosocial support of parents is not just solely determined by the child's medical risk. Conclusions The results highlight the challenges of delivering individualised psychosocial support to families within a healthcare system of limited resources, with practitioners having to take into account the developing parent-child relationship as well as health economics. In future, psychosocial support should be based on evidence rather than intuition. Attachment theory and research, and health psychology can contribute to this development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Training of Professionals from the Family Health Strategy for Psychosocial Care for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Lourdes Lima Batista Maia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders of the elderly constitute a public health problem due to their high prevalence, shortage of specialized services offered in Brazil, difficulties of access by the population and deficiency in the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy for the identification, receptiveness and psychosocial assistance to the elderly. Objectives: To analyze the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy on psychosocial care for the elderly in the context of the Psychosocial Care Network – RAPS (Rede de Atenção Psicossocial, and to discuss how professional training influences the care provided to the elderly. Methodology: Descriptive, qualitative study carried out with 31 professionals, 13 physicians and 18 nurses, who work at the Family Health Strategy of the city of Picos, Piauí, Brazil. The data were collected in January 2016, through a semi-structured interview guide, processed by the IRAMUTEQ software and analyzed by means of the Descending Hierarchical Classification. Results: The results were presented in three segments, namely: 1. The practice of professionals from the Family Health Strategy in psychosocial care in the family context; 2. Training of specialized professionals, in the attention to the elderly, in the Family Health Strategy; 3. The Psychosocial Attention Network in the care of elderly users of alcohol and other drugs; Conclusion: Health professionals have difficulties in dealing with the elderly with mental disorders in basic care. In order to facilitate access to specialized health services and to develop actions for social reintegration, prevention and harm reduction, it is necessary to implement a policy of ongoing training and education for health professionals to improve care for the elderly. Keywords: Aging; Mental Health; Mental disorders; Family Health Strategy.

  17. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... information and patient-centred care as important. Fewer respondents (women 10.0-20.8%, men 4.1-8.9%) felt that professional psychosocial services were important and/or had the intention to use these services. The main predictor of perceived importance of patient-centred care and professional psychosocial...

  18. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Critical thinking in patient centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Shannon H; Overman, Pamela; Forrest, Jane L

    2014-06-01

    Health care providers can enhance their critical thinking skills, essential to providing patient centered care, by use of motivational interviewing and evidence-based decision making techniques. The need for critical thinking skills to foster optimal patient centered care is being emphasized in educational curricula for health care professions. The theme of this paper is that evidence-based decision making (EBDM) and motivational interviewing (MI) are tools that when taught in health professions educational programs can aid in the development of critical thinking skills. This paper reviews the MI and EBDM literature for evidence regarding these patient-centered care techniques as they relate to improved oral health outcomes. Comparisons between critical thinking and EBDM skills are presented and the EBDM model and the MI technique are briefly described followed by a discussion of the research to date. The evidence suggests that EBDM and MI are valuable tools; however, further studies are needed regarding the effectiveness of EBDM and MI and the ways that health care providers can best develop critical thinking skills to facilitate improved patient care outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dimensões organizacionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial para dependentes químicos Dimensiones organizativas de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial para dependientes químicos Organizational dimensions of a Psychosocial Care Center for chemical dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Aparecida Arena Ventura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Compreender a visão de profissionais sobre as dimensões estruturais e contextuais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial para dependentes de substâncias psicoativas do Estado de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudo qualitativo que utilizou a entrevista semiestruturada com nove profissionais e dois gestores para obter os dados que foram analisados por meio da análise temática. RESULTADOS: A estrutura interna do serviço foi influenciada pelo ambiente externo e fundamenta-se no cuidado individualizado. Como alternativa de enfrentamento dos desafios, ressalta-se o trabalho em equipe e sobrecarga como problema resultante da dinâmica de trabalho. CONCLUSÃO: Há necessidade da contratação de profissionais para melhorar o funcionamento interno, assegurar a qualidade no atendimento e integrar a organização com os atores externos.OBJETIVO: Comprender la visión de profesionales sobre las dimensiones estructurales y contextuales de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial para dependientes de sustancias psicoactivas del Estado de Sao Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudio cualitativo en el que se usó la entrevista semiestructurada con nueve profesionales y dos gestores para obtener los datos que fueron analizados por medio del análisis temático. RESULTADOS: La estructura interna del servicio fue influenciada por el ambiente externo y se fundamenta en cuidado individualizado. Como alternativa de enfrentamiento de los desafios, se resalta el trabajo en equipo y sobrecarga como problema resultante de la dinámica de trabajo. CONCLUSIÓN: Hay necesidad de la contratación de profesionales para mejorar el funcionamiento interno, asegurar la calidad en la atención e integrar la organización con los actores externos.OBJECTIVE: To understand the vision of professionals about the structural and contextual dimensions of a Psychosocial Care Center for those dependent on psychoactive substances in the state of São Paulo. METHODS: This qualitative study used

  1. Combining Formal and Informal Caregiving Roles: The Psychosocial Implications of Double- and Triple-Duty Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Nicole; Davis, Kelly D; Zarit, Steven H; Moen, Phyllis; Hammer, Leslie B; Almeida, David M

    2016-03-01

    Women who combine formal and informal caregiving roles represent a unique, understudied population. In the literature, healthcare employees who simultaneously provide unpaid elder care at home have been referred to as double-duty caregivers. The present study broadens this perspective by examining the psychosocial implications of double-duty child care (child care only), double-duty elder care (elder care only), and triple-duty care (both child care and elder care or "sandwiched" care). Drawing from the Work, Family, and Health Study, we focus on a large sample of women working in nursing homes in the United States (n = 1,399). We use multiple regression analysis and analysis of covariance tests to examine a range of psychosocial implications associated with double- and triple-duty care. Compared with nonfamily caregivers, double-duty child caregivers indicated greater family-to-work conflict and poorer partner relationship quality. Double-duty elder caregivers reported more family-to-work conflict, perceived stress, and psychological distress, whereas triple-duty caregivers indicated poorer psychosocial functioning overall. Relative to their counterparts without family caregiving roles, women with combined caregiving roles reported poorer psychosocial well-being. Additional research on women with combined caregiving roles, especially triple-duty caregivers, should be a priority amidst an aging population, older workforce, and growing number of working caregivers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Psychosocial Needs of Children in Foster Care and the Impact of Sexual Abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Annemarie; Ellingsen, Ingunn; van der Steen, Stephanie; Grietens, Hans

    Children in family foster care, especially those who have experienced sexual abuse, require a safe and nurturing environment in which their psychosocial needs are met. However, there is limited knowledge on how youth prioritize various needs and what impact previous experiences have on these needs.

  3. Biomedical and psychosocial factors influencing transtibial prosthesis fit : a Delphi survey among health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Erwin C.; Schrier, Ernst; Geertzen, Jan H.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to reach consensus among professionals caring for prosthesis users, on definitions of biomedical and psychosocial factors, to assess their influence on fit of transtibial prosthesis and to identify new factors. Method: A three-round, internet-based, Delphi survey was conducted

  4. Identification of children with psychosocial problems differed between preventive child health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, A.G.C.; Jacobusse, G.W.; Hoekstra, F.; Brugman, E.; Crone, M.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether differences between individual Preventive Child Health Care (PCH) professionals in the percentage of children they identify as having psychosocial problems are larger than expected based on chance and whether such differences can be explained by differences in

  5. Lack of motivation for treatment associated with greater care needs and psychosocial problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stobbe, J.; Wierdsma, A.I.; Kok, R.M.; Kroon, H.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Roosenschoon, B.J.; Mulder, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the care needs and severity of psychosocial problems in older patients with severe mental illness (SMI) between those who were and were not motivated for treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional study in which we enrolled 141 outpatients with SMI aged 55 and older. Needs were

  6. Primary health care physicians' treatment of psychosocial problems: implications for social work.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, R.; Rabinowitz, J.; Feldman, D.; Boerma, W.

    1996-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which primary care physicians serve as gatekeepers for the treatment of psychosocial problems and the extent to which they have contact with social workers. We also attempted to identify physician variables related to gatekeeping and amount of contact with social

  7. Discrepancies between adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication are associated with poorer client participation and learning processes in psychosocial care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J.; De Winter, Andrea F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication, and whether discrepancies in these are associated with clients' participation and learning processes in psychosocial care. Methods: Adolescents receiving psychosocial care (n = 211) completed measures of

  8. Patient Satisfaction with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    few are going to opt to change health plans. 14. SUBJECT TERMS PATIENT SATISFACTION; CONSUMER SATISFACTION; SURVEY 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16...to address is overall patient satisfaction with Kimbrough’s current health care system. I surveyed customers on: how satisfied or dissatisfied they...research project was designed to determine how satisfied customers are with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center. A patient satisfaction survey developed by

  9. Parent’s Mentally Retarded Child Psycho-Social Problems Covered by Welfare Centers Khorramabad 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Malekshahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background :Mentally retarded child, the family put in a lot of trouble that most of the parents felt. Therefore, understanding and correct identification of problems and related factors are essential to help and support them. Therefore, this study cross sectional analytical descriptive carried out to determine parent’s mentally retarded  child psycho-social problems under covering welfare centers Khorramabad 2013. Materials and Methods: In this study samples were collected from parents of all mental retarded children. The data collection tools were including demographic questionnaires, mental and social problems. 144 questionnaires were completed by every parent. Validity and reliability were got by content validity and were gathered of data in the one stage and data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16. Results: The results showed that all parent had psycho-social problems, but the mothers of the large number of roles in the family had an average of more mother’s emotional and social problems1/46±0/55, 1/54±0/69 and father’s 1/43±0/74, 1/36±0/55. There was significant relationship between parental education and disable child gender. Discussion: The effect of disability on parents depends on their potency and capacity. It seems to reduce of parents of children with mental retarded, they need to services and full support.

  10. Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care: more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between family social support, parenting skills and child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care. We obtained data on 1,331 children (response rate 56.6%), 4-18 years old, enrolled in preventive child health care, and child and adolescent social care and mental health care because of psychosocial problems, and on 463 children (response rate 70.3%) not enrolled in psychosocial care. Results showed that enrolment in psychosocial care was associated with low family social support (odds ratio; 95%-confidence interval: 3.2; 2.4-4.4), and with poor parenting skills, i.e. poor supervision (1.5; 1.1-2.1) and inconsistent disciplining (1.5; 1.1-2.1). Children's psychosocial problems partially mediated the associations with family social support and completely with parenting skills. Children's problems did not moderate the associations. Positive parenting was not associated with care enrolment. We conclude that low family social support and poor parenting are important factors associated with enrolment, in particular because they are associated with more frequent occurrence of children's psychosocial problems. This implies that professionals and policymakers need to be aware that factors in children's social environment are related with enrolment in psychosocial care, in addition to children's psychosocial problems.

  11. Family Care Map: Sustaining family-centered care in Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James H.; Wise, Meg; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Hall, Carmen; Sayer, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed sustainability of the Family Care Map, a family-centered approach to providing care for Veterans with polytrauma-related injuries, in four Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. We applied a mixed-methods approach. Staff surveys used standardized measures of sustainability, commitment to change, information, and participation during implementation. Qualitative inquiry assessed Family Care Map implementation and facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Staff sustainability perceptions had a significant positive correlation with affective commitment to change, participation, and information received about the change process. Family Care Map integration into standard practices and use of its concepts with patients and families related to staff perceptions about sustainability. The degree of use and integration of the Family Care Map in traumatic brain injury/polytrauma care varied among the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Some successful sustainability strategies included integration into daily workflow and organizational culture. Examples of sustainability barriers included staff awareness and use and outdated information. Some practices, such as measuring and documenting the use of the Family Care Map in treatment plans, may not routinely occur. The focus on family-centered care will require further evaluation of organization-, staff-, and innovation-level attributes that influence sustainability of changes designed to improve family-centered care. PMID:25671632

  12. O trabalho da equipe de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial na perspectiva da família El trabajo del equipo en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial en la perspectiva de la familia A Psychosocial Care Center team's work from a family's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Wagner Camatta

    2009-06-01

    en su trabajo.The objective of this study was to understand the experiences of family members of patients seen at a Psychosocial Care Center (PSCC in terms of the work performed by the mental health team. The theoretical-philosophical framework used was phenomenological sociology. Data collection took place by means of an interview performed with 13 family members in October and November, 2006 at a PSCC in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The comprehensive analysis yielded three categories. This article focuses on one of those categories: work as a project, action, and act. The analysis permitted to consider that the PSCC team's work has concrete results in mental health care; the team's actions are user-centered; and that the team's work should increase family-service integration. These considerations could serve as support for mental health teams to reflect about their practice regarding involving the patient's family in their work.

  13. A representação social de familiares nos centros de atenção psicossocial La representación social de la familia en centros de atencion psicosocial Social representation of family members in psychosocial care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulcian Medeiros de Azevedo

    2011-06-01

    comportamiento, con el apoyo de la presencia del espacio ambiental del CAPS. En las situaciones investigadas, la participación de la familia no cumple las condiciones para promover la inclusión del usuario, ya que la presencia física no existe aún suficiente.The Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS are foreseen as the ports of entry and regulation in mental health, and were created with the intention of replacing the hospitalization in asylum for the community care service. The objective was to understand the social representations of family members of the CAPS users from Natal-RN, about their participation in the activities of these services. Descriptive research with qualitative approach, developed with 28 family members, through semi-structured interviews between August and September 2007. The data received informational support of ALCESTE software. The family members build their social representation in the face of a need for change and hope in the health care of their relatives, crystallized by taking and positioning behavior, supported in the presence of the environmental space of CAPS. The family participation still does not gather, in the scenarios investigated, conditions to promote the inclusion of their relative, once the physical established presence is not yet enough.

  14. Utilization of Skills in the Care of Patients with Deviations in Psychosocial Adaptation (NS 207): Competency-Based Course Syllabus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Tanya G.

    "Utilization of Skills in the Care of Patients with Deviations in Psychosocial Adaptation" (NS 207) is an associate degree nursing course offered at Chattanooga State Technical Community College. The course stresses the individual as a system in his/her psychosocial adaptation to internal and external stressors, and highlights the…

  15. Designing robots for care: care centered value-sensitive design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wynsberghe, Aimee

    2013-06-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship--what I refer to as care robots--require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What's more, given the stage of their development and lack of standards provided by the International Organization for Standardization to guide their development, ethics ought to be included into the design process of such robots. The manner in which this may be accomplished, as presented here, uses the blueprint of the Value-sensitive design approach as a means for creating a framework tailored to care contexts. Using care values as the foundational values to be integrated into a technology and using the elements in care, from the care ethics perspective, as the normative criteria, the resulting approach may be referred to as care centered value-sensitive design. The framework proposed here allows for the ethical evaluation of care robots both retrospectively and prospectively. By evaluating care robots in this way, we may ultimately ask what kind of care we, as a society, want to provide in the future.

  16. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Bo M; Boot, Cécile R L; Houtman, Irene L D; Brouwers, Evelien P M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-06-08

    Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers can be explained by autonomy and social support. In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate, stress, autonomy, co-worker support, and supervisor support were assessed using questionnaires, in a sample of health care workers (N = 277). Linear mixed models analyses were performed to assess to what extent social support and autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. A lower psychosocial safety climate score was associated with significantly higher stress (B = -0.21, 95% CI = -0.27 - -0.14). Neither co-worker support, supervisor support, nor autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. Taken together, autonomy and both social support measures diminished the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress by 12% (full model: B = -0.18, 95% CI = -0.25 - -0.11). Autonomy and social support together seemed to bring about a small decrease in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers. Future research should discern whether other psychosocial work factors explain a larger portion of this relation. This study was registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register, trial code: NTR5527 .

  17. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo M. Havermans

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers can be explained by autonomy and social support. Methods In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate, stress, autonomy, co-worker support, and supervisor support were assessed using questionnaires, in a sample of health care workers (N = 277. Linear mixed models analyses were performed to assess to what extent social support and autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. Results A lower psychosocial safety climate score was associated with significantly higher stress (B = −0.21, 95% CI = −0.27 – -0.14. Neither co-worker support, supervisor support, nor autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. Taken together, autonomy and both social support measures diminished the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress by 12% (full model: B = −0.18, 95% CI = −0.25 – -0.11. Conclusions Autonomy and social support together seemed to bring about a small decrease in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers. Future research should discern whether other psychosocial work factors explain a larger portion of this relation. Trial registration This study was registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register, trial code: NTR5527 .

  18. Subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Tammy; Kimble, Laura P; Rubenstein, Cynthia

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care. Cognitive functioning is a critical component for nurses in the assurance of error prevention, identification and correction when caring for patients. Negative changes in nurses' cognitive and psychosocial functioning can adversely affect nursing care and patient outcomes. A descriptive correlational design with stratified random sampling. The sample included 96 nurses from the major geographic regions of the United States. Over 9 months in 2016-2017, data were collected using a web-based survey. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function. Overall, participants reported minimal work function impairment and low levels of subjective cognitive complaints, depression and stress. In multivariate analyses, depression was not associated with nurses' work function. However, perceived stress and subjective concerns about cognitive function were associated with greater impairment of work function. Nurses experiencing subjective cognitive complaints should be encouraged to address personal and environmental factors that are associated with their cognitive status. Additionally, stress reduction in nurses should be a high priority as a potential intervention to promote optimal functioning of nurses providing direct patient care. Healthcare institutions should integrate individual and institutional strategies to reduce factors contributing to workplace stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Provincial public center for crisis intervention and psycho-social rehabilitation. A path towards communitary suicidology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work on the systematic comprehensive approach towards the Prevention and Postvencion of Suicide started to develop back in mid 2011 in Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz Province. The first step on this development was a Pilot Plan for the Training of Professionals and also field intervention. The Center for Crisis Intervention and Psycho-social Rehabilitation was founded eight months later. The case-client in crisis plus family group- undergoes quantitative and qualitative evaluation by means of a triage system, all of which allows starting intensive face-to-face and also phone follow up according to the Crisis Intervention Model. Such intervention is developed by means of the participation in the "Grupo Sostén", the Adolescents Group if the client fits into that age, and also family relationship interviews as well as Multi-family meetings open to the Community. There is also a Community Team in the Center which performs collective assessment in schools, in conjunction with the "Equidad en Redes" Educational Specialty Team, belonging to the Provincial Education Council. The approach takes place on the field, and works as a screening step for the early detection of risk. Such risk is dealt with by means of short term intervention group programs involving the whole of the educational community. When facing situations of committed suicide there are interventions in communities to the interior of the province, fundamentally through the Hospital Team which works as the cluster convener for the social intersectoral frame-work.

  20. Evaluation of a Home-Based Hospice and Palliative Care Program in a Community Health Center in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hyun Kim

    2009-03-01

    Conclusions: A home-based palliative service program delivered by the community health center appears to be an appropriate care model for managing physical symptoms. Reinforcing services for psychosocial and spiritual counseling and encouraging affiliation with free-standing inpatient healthcare providers are warranted. [Asian Nursing Research 2009;3(1:24–30

  1. PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS CONSUMER PERCEPTION OF QUALITY DENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Надежда Алексеевна Кудинова

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose to examine the motivational space, values and health-social and psychological portrait of patients who rated the quality of dental care.Methodology historical, sociological, statistical. Results: In a market economy, patients’ satisfaction is of one of the most important regulators of demand.  Estimate of the quality of dental services (QDS depends on the patients having stable socio-psychological status being in a certain system of values, in space of some motives and needs. Got data have revealed that nearly 17.5% of patients dissatisfied with the quality of dental care, but the size of the motivational area of this group by nearly 20% higher than that of their opponents. With the structure of the motives are no such positions as "visiting the dentist enters my behavior stereotype", "I want to know the details of my dental health" and "The process of dental treatment gives me pleasure" In the group of patients who are satisfied QDS, relevance value orientation "good health" is 1.5 times the value of "education" in 2.5 times, and the value of "high social security" is 4.5 times higher than among the dissatisfied patients.Practical implications public health and health care.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-22

  2. PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS CONSUMER PERCEPTION OF QUALITY DENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudinova Nadezhda Alekseevna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose to examine the motivational space, values ​​and health-social and psychological portrait of patients who rated the quality of dental care. Methodology historical, sociological, statistical. Results: In a market economy, patients’ satisfaction is of one of the most important regulators of demand. Estimate of the quality of dental services (QDS depends on the patients having stable socio-psychological status being in a certain system of values, in space of some motives and needs. Got data have revealed that nearly 17.5% of patients dissatisfied with the quality of dental care, but the size of the motivational area of this group by nearly 20% higher than that of their opponents. With the structure of the motives are no such positions as "visiting the dentist enters my behavior stereotype", "I want to know the details of my dental health" and "The process of dental treatment gives me pleasure" In the group of patients who are satisfied QDS, relevance value orientation "good health" is 1.5 times the value of "education" in 2.5 times, and the value of "high social security" is 4.5 times higher than among the dissatisfied patients. Practical implications public health and health care.

  3. Percepção de profissionais de saúde de CAPS I quanto a demandas relativas ao consumo de crack Perception of health professionals from Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS I regarding the demands related to the use of crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lessa Horta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisa qualitativa que analisa dois grupos focais realizados em 2009 com vinte trabalhadores de dois CAPS I da região de Porto Alegre, para verificar a sua percepção diante do aumento de demandas que a expansão do crack tende a gerar sobre as redes locais de saúde mental. Propôs-se que debatessem o que lhes parecia fonte de sobrecarga e insatisfação em geral e, especificamente, em função das demandas de usuários de crack. Os resultados mostram forte preocupação com a instabilidade dos contratos de trabalho, levando à falta de projeção no futuro. Além disso, o acúmulo de tarefas para suprir carências das equipes, justificando-se o limitado interesse em planejar ações de longo prazo e a opção por tarefas menos complexas. Consideraram-se problemas na rotina de trabalho as ordens judiciais e a interferência de agentes públicos, pedido expresso de hospitalização, familiares sem postura cooperativa, querelantes e usuários desmotivados para o tratamento ou reingressando no serviço. As equipes parecem estar no centro um conflito entre a impossibilidade de se evitar o surgimento de demandas da população usuária das redes locais de saúde, o que se evidencia no contexto do uso de crack, e os limites da gestão, ampliando o desgaste e a sobrecarga percebidos.This paper presents qualitative research analyzing two focus groups with twenty workers in Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS I in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, in 2009. They were invited to discuss overwork and dissatisfaction with work in general and also recent demands of crack cocaine users on the local mental health networks. Workers in both groups reported a strong concern about the instability of employment contracts, leading to limited ability to plan their futures. In addition, the accumulation of tasks to replace absenteeism in teams leads to a limited interest in long-term action planning and the option for less complex tasks. Court orders, the interference of

  4. Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anskär, Eva; Lindberg, Malou; Falk, Magnus; Andersson, Agneta

    2018-03-07

    Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of

  5. The economics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Guy; Saynisch, Philip A; Smith-McLallen, Aaron

    2018-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a widely-implemented model for improving primary care, emphasizing care coordination, information technology, and process improvements. However, its treatment as an undifferentiated intervention in policy evaluation obscures meaningful variation in implementation. This heterogeneity leads to contracting inefficiencies between insurers and practices and may account for mixed evidence on its success. Using a novel dataset we group practices into meaningful implementation clusters and then link these clusters with detailed patient claims data. We find implementation choice affects performance, suggesting that generally-unobserved features of primary care reorganization influence patient outcomes. Reporting these features may be valuable to insurers and their members. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CMS Innovation Center Health Care Innovation Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sandra H.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Morganti, Kristy Gonzalez; Auerbach, David I.; Beckett, Megan K.; Chen, Peggy G.; Farley, Donna O.; Han, Bing; Harris, Katherine M.; Jones, Spencer S.; Liu, Hangsheng; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Marsh, Terry; Martsolf, Grant R.; Nelson, Christopher; Okeke, Edward N.; Pearson, Marjorie L.; Pillemer, Francesca; Sorbero, Melony E.; Towe, Vivian; Weinick, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation within the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has funded 108 Health Care Innovation Awards, funded through the Affordable Care Act, for applicants who proposed compelling new models of service delivery or payment improvements that promise to deliver better health, better health care, and lower costs through improved quality of care for Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Program enrollees. CMS is also interested in learning how new models would affect subpopulations of beneficiaries (e.g., those eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and complex patients) who have unique characteristics or health care needs that could be related to poor outcomes. In addition, the initiative seeks to identify new models of workforce development and deployment, as well as models that can be rapidly deployed and have the promise of sustainability. This article describes a strategy for evaluating the results. The goal for the evaluation design process is to create standardized approaches for answering key questions that can be customized to similar groups of awardees and that allow for rapid and comparable assessment across awardees. The evaluation plan envisions that data collection and analysis will be carried out on three levels: at the level of the individual awardee, at the level of the awardee grouping, and as a summary evaluation that includes all awardees. Key dimensions for the evaluation framework include implementation effectiveness, program effectiveness, workforce issues, impact on priority populations, and context. The ultimate goal is to identify strategies that can be employed widely to lower cost while improving care. PMID:28083297

  7. Psychosocial stress at work and perceived quality of care among clinicians in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von dem Knesebeck Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the association between job stress and job performance among surgeons, although physicians' well-being could be regarded as an important quality indicator. This paper examines associations between psychosocial job stress and perceived health care quality among German clinicians in surgery. Methods Survey data of 1,311 surgeons from 489 hospitals were analysed. Psychosocial stress at work was measured by the effort-reward imbalance model (ERI and the demand-control model (job strain. The quality of health care was evaluated by physicians' self-assessed performance, service quality and error frequency. Data were collected in a nationwide standardised mail survey. 53% of the contacted hospitals sent back the questionnaire; the response rate of the clinicians in the participating hospitals was about 65%. To estimate the association between job stress and quality of care multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results Clinicians exposed to job stress have an increased risk of reporting suboptimal quality of care. Magnitude of the association varies depending on the respective job stress model and the indicator of health care quality used. Odds ratios, adjusted for gender, occupational position and job experience vary between 1.04 (CI 0.70-1.57 and 3.21 (CI 2.23-4.61. Conclusion Findings indicate that theoretical models of psychosocial stress at work can enrich the analysis of effects of working conditions on health care quality. Moreover, results suggest interventions for job related health promotion measures to improve the clinicians' working conditions, their quality of care and their patients' health.

  8. Understanding the needs of professionals who provide psychosocial care for children and adults with disorders of sex development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessens, Arianne; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme; Kyriakou, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Disorders in sex development (DSD) can be treated well medically, but families will encounter many psychosocial challenges. Promoting counselling to facilitate acceptance and coping is important yet equality of access is unknown. This study investigated the modalities of psychosocial...... care provided in centres of DSD care. Methods: An international survey conducted among 93 providers of psychosocial care, identified through clinical networks, registries and professional forums. Results: Forty-six respondents from 22 different countries filled out the survey (49%). Most respondents...... related confusion about gender (54%), acceptance of cross gender behaviour (50%), anxiety (43%) and sadness and depression (38%). Conclusions: Most psychosocial care is provided to parents. It is assumed that parental support is important as acceptance is conditional to become affectionate caretakers...

  9. Physicians' perceptions of the impact of the EHR on the collection and retrieval of psychosocial information in outpatient diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senteio, Charles; Veinot, Tiffany; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Richardson, Caroline

    2018-05-01

    Psychosocial information informs clinical decisions by providing crucial context for patients' barriers to recommended self-care; this is especially important in outpatient diabetes care because outcomes are largely dependent upon self-care behavior. Little is known about provider perceptions of use of psychosocial information. Further, while EHRs have dramatically changed how providers interact with patient health information, the EHRs' role in collection and retrieval of psychosocial information is not understood. We designed a qualitative study. We used semi-structured interviews to investigate physicians' (N = 17) perspectives on the impact of EHR for psychosocial information use for outpatient Type II diabetes care decisions. We selected the constant comparative method to analyze the data. Psychosocial information is perceived as dissimilar from other clinical information such as HbA1c and prescribed medications. Its narrative form conveys the patient's story, which elucidates barriers to following self-care recommendations. The narrative is abstract, and requires interpretation of patterns. Psychosocial information is also circumstantial; hence, the patients' context determines influence on self-care. Furthermore, EHRs can impair the collection of psychosocial information because the designs of EHR tools make it difficult to document, search for, and retrieve it. Templates do not enable users from collecting the patient's 'story', and using free text fields is time consuming. Providers therefore had low use of, and confidence in, the accuracy of psychosocial information in the EHR. Workflows and EHR tools should be re-designed to better support psychosocial information collection and retrieval. Tools should enable recording and summarization of the patient's story, and the rationale for treatment decisions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychosocial stressors and depression at a Swedish primary health care centre. A gender perspective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strömberg Ranja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress may account for the higher prevalence of depression in women and in individuals with a low educational background. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between depression and socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and lifestyle circumstances from a gender perspective in a relatively affluent primary care setting. Methods Patients, aged 18- 75 years, visiting a drop-in clinic at a primary care health centre were screened with Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. The physicians used also targeted screening with BDI. A questionnaire on socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and use of alcohol and tobacco was distributed. Among patients, who scored BDI ≥10, DSM-IV-criteria were used to diagnose depression. Of the 404 participants, 48 men and 76 women were diagnosed with depression. The reference group consisted of patients with BDI score Results The same three psychosocial stressors: feeling very stressed, perceived poor physical health and being dissatisfied with one's family situation were associated with depression equally in men and women. The negative predictive values of the main effect models in men and women were 90.7% and 76.5%, respectively. Being dissatisfied with one's work situation had high ORs in both men and women. Unemployment and smoking were associated with depression in men only. Conclusions Three questions, frequently asked by physicians, which involve patient's family and working situation as well as perceived stress and physical health, could be used as depression indicators in early detection of depression in men and women in primary health care.

  11. Integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizes, Victoria; Rakel, David; Niemiec, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Integrative medicine has emerged as a potential solution to the American healthcare crisis. It provides care that is patient centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Initially driven by consumer demand, the attention integrative medicine places on understanding whole persons and assisting with lifestyle change is now being recognized as a strategy to address the epidemic of chronic diseases bankrupting our economy. This paper defines integrative medicine and its principles, describes the history of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in American healthcare, and discusses the current state and desired future of integrative medical practice. The importance of patient-centered care, patient empowerment, behavior change, continuity of care, outcomes research, and the challenges to successful integration are discussed. The authors suggest a model for an integrative healthcare system grounded in team-based care. A primary health partner who knows the patient well, is able to addresses mind, body, and spiritual needs, and coordinates care with the help of a team of practitioners is at the centerpiece. Collectively, the team can meet all the health needs of the particular patient and forms the patient-centered medical home. The paper culminates with 10 recommendations directed to key actors to facilitate the systemic changes needed for a functional healthcare delivery system. Recommendations include creating financial incentives aligned with health promotion and prevention. Insurers are requested to consider the total costs of care, the potential cost effectiveness of lifestyle approaches and CAM modalities, and the value of longer office visits to develop a therapeutic relationship and stimulate behavioral change. Outcomes research to track the effectiveness of integrative models must be funded, as well as feedback and dissemination strategies

  12. Pain, Work-related Characteristics, and Psychosocial Factors among Computer Workers at a University Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira; Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; Ribeiro da Silva, Dalila Terrinha; Vigário Dos Santos, Patrícia

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Complaint of pain is common in computer workers, encouraging the investigation of pain-related workplace factors. This study investigated the relationship among work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors, and pain among computer workers from a university center. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects (median age, 32.0 years; interquartile range, 26.8-34.5 years) were subjected to measurement of bioelectrical impedance; photogrammetry; workplace measurements; and pain complaint, quality of life, and motivation questionnaires. [Results] The low back was the most prevalent region of complaint (76.9%). The number of body regions for which subjects complained of pain was greater in the no rest breaks group, which also presented higher prevalences of neck (62.5%) and low back (100%) pain. There were also observed associations between neck complaint and quality of life; neck complaint and head protrusion; wrist complaint and shoulder angle; and use of a chair back and thoracic pain. [Conclusion] Complaint of pain was associated with no short rest breaks, no use of a chair back, poor quality of life, high head protrusion, and shoulder angle while using the mouse of a computer.

  13. Military nurses and combat-wounded patients: a qualitative analysis of psychosocial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Bonnie M; Williams, Reg Arthur; Bingham, Mona; Richard, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    The aims were to explore the lived experience of combat-wounded patients and the military nurses who care for them. The study was a qualitative phenomenological design, and focus groups were conducted with 20 nurses and 8 combat-wounded patients. Themes common to nurses and patients were coping, shared experiences, finding meaning, psychosocial nursing care, families, and bureaucratic structure. Thematic differences were the patients' perspectives "changed self" while nurses described "professional boundaries." The importance of finding meaning presents ideas that could help nurses and patients cope better with stressful situations regardless of the setting. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety...... and control groups after baseline adjustment. CONCLUSION: We observed higher physical well-being 9 months after randomization in the GSD-GYN-C group, as compared to women receiving usual care. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: The results suggest that the person-centered intervention GSD-GYN-C may improve...

  15. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics...

  16. Perfil dos idosos atendidos em um centro de atenção psicossocial: álcool e outras drogas Perfil de los ancianos asistido en el centro de atención psicosocial: alcohol y otras droga Profile of the elderly assisted in a psychosocial care center: alcohol and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2010-12-01

    Center for Psychosocial Care - alcohol and other drugs in Ribeirão Preto SP, in the period of 1996 to 2009. The methodological design was the descriptive retrospective study based on secondary data. The sample consisted of 191 (3.2% customer over 60 years assisted in the service. The sample was characterized by elders with a mean age of 64 years, predominantly male, with low educational level, 78.4% had primary school and 86% were retired. The most commonly drugs used were alcohol, marijuana, crack and cocaine. It concludes that the number of elderly who seeks for expert assistance is very low. Studies of this nature are important to assess the needs of this group in the clear growth as well as the use of psychoactive substances for planning effective practices.

  17. Tabagismo em usuários de um centro de atenção psicossocial alcool e drogas: um estudo piloto Tabaquismo en usuarios de un centro de atención psicosocial alcohol y drogas: un estudio piloto Smoking among users of a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2011-01-01

    servicio especializado ayudará a repensar sobre las acciones preventivas y educativas en el área de la salud.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pattern of tobacco consumption in clients of a service specializing in the treatment of psychoactive substance dependence. METHODS: This was a descriptive quantitative approach, undertaken in 2009, in an Alcohol and Drugs Psychosocial Care Center, located within the State of São Paulo. We used a questionnaire containing sociodemographic information and the Fargeström test in 48 attendees in a single day at this service. RESULTS: The sample was characterized as predominantly adult males, unmarried, with low educational levels, and who were currently employed. In relation to smoking, we identified a high frequency of current smokers, with moderate level of tobacco dependence, motivated to change their smoking habits. CONCLUSION: Knowing the smoking behavior among users of a specialized service can help professionals rethink preventive and educational actions in the area of health.

  18. Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram Quist, Helle; Christensen, Ulla; Christensen, Karl Bang; Aust, Birgit; Borg, Vilhelm; Bjorner, Jakob B

    2013-01-17

    Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/- 2 kg/m(2)) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models.

  19. [Design and validation of a questionnaire for psychosocial nursing diagnosis in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Sierra-López, Antonio; Rodríguez-Gómez, José Ángel; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando

    2012-01-01

    To develop a valid, reliable and easy-to-use questionnaire for a psychosocial nursing diagnosis. The study was performed in two phases: first phase, questionnaire design and construction; second phase, validity and reliability tests. A bank of items was constructed using the NANDA classification as a theoretical framework. Each item was assigned a Likert scale or dichotomous response. The combination of responses to the items constituted the diagnostic rules to assign up to 28 labels. A group of experts carried out the validity test for content. Other validated scales were used as reference standards for the criterion validity tests. Forty-five nurses provided the questionnaire to the patients on three separate occasions over a period of three weeks, and the other validated scales only once to 188 randomly selected patients in Primary Care centres in Tenerife (Spain). Validity tests for construct confirmed the six dimensions of the questionnaire with 91% of total variance explained. Validity tests for criterion showed a specificity of 66%-100%, and showed high correlations with the reference scales when the questionnaire was assigning nursing diagnoses. Reliability tests showed agreement of 56%-91% (PQuestionnaire for Psychosocial Nursing Diagnosis was called CdePS, and included 61 items. The CdePS is a valid, reliable and easy-to-use tool in Primary Care centres to improve the assigning of a psychosocial nursing diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Disparities in psychosocial cancer care: a report from the International Federation of Psycho-oncology Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Odyio, Philip; Asuzu, Chioma; Ashley, Laura; Bultz, Barry; Travado, Luzia; Fielding, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the characteristics of the International Federation of Psycho-oncology Societies (FPOS) and possible disparities in providing psychosocial care in countries where psycho-oncology societies exist. A survey was conducted among 29 leaders of 28 countries represented within the FPOS by using a questionnaire covering (i) characteristics of the society; (ii) characteristics of the national health care system; (iii) level of implementation of psycho-oncology; and (iv) main problems of psycho-oncology in the country. Twenty-six (90%) FPOS returned the questionnaires. One-third reported to have links with and support from their government, while almost all had links with other scientific societies. The FPOS varied in their composition of members' professions. Psychosocial care provision was covered by state-funded health services in a minority of countries. Disparities between countries arose from different causes and were problematic in some parts of the world (eg, Africa and SE Asia). Elsewhere (eg, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe), austerity policies were reportedly responsible for resource shortages with negative consequences on psychosocial cancer care. Half of FPOS rated themselves to be integrated into mainstream provision of care, although lack of funding was the most common complain. The development and implementation of psycho-oncology is fragmented and undeveloped, particularly in some parts of the world. More effort is needed at national level by strong coalitions with oncology societies, better national research initiatives, cancer plans, and patient advocacy, as well as by stronger partnership with international organizations (eg, World Health Organization and Union for International Cancer Control). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Assessment and Management of Psychosocial Needs: Social Work Utilization in Comprehensive Cleft Team Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Alison; Lybrand, Sandra; Chew, William L

    2018-01-01

    To determine family-reported psychosocial stressors and social worker assessments and interventions within a comprehensive cleft team. Single-institution prospective provider-completed survey. Four hundred one families seen by cleft team social worker over a 7-month period. Most families (n = 331; 83%) participated in the team social work assessment. At least 1 active psychosocial stressor was reported by 238 (72%) families, with 63 (19%) families reported 3 or more stressors. There were 34 types of stressors reported. Most common were financial strain, young age of patient, new cleft diagnosis, and distance from clinic (57% of families live over an hour away). Family structure and home environment were assessed in detail for 288 (87%) families. Detailed assessments for access to care and behavioral/developmental issues also figured prominently. Social work interventions were provided in 264 (80%) of the visits, of which 91 were for families of new patients with over half who had infants less than 3 months old. Of the 643 interventions provided, the most frequent were parent mental health screens and counseling, early intervention referrals, transportation assistance, securing local hotel discounts, orthodontic referrals, and orthodontic cost coverage. Approximately 10% of encounters required follow-up contact related to the psychosocial concerns identified in clinic. The inclusion of a cleft team social worker is a critical component of comprehensive cleft team care as evidenced by the large proportion of families who required assistance. Ongoing social work assessments are recommended for each patient to help address the variety of psychosocial stressors families face.

  2. Psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus in promoting self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaya Giarola Cecilio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus. Methods: a descriptive exploratory study with qualitative approach, made with 16 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The data were collected through telephone calls using a semi-structured script approaching the care in health, barriers and family support, analyzed by Bardin’s content. Results: two categories emerged related to the practice of self-care: Self-care, containing three sub-categories: diet, physical activity and emotional aspects and support networks. Conclusion: the results of the study showed the importance of understanding the emotional aspects and attitudes of patients regarding educational practices for self care, in order to establish strategies to prevent and control the disease.

  3. Psychosocial Care for Injured Children: Worldwide Survey among Hospital Emergency Department Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Hoysted, Claire; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Landolt, Markus A; Curtis, Sarah; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Lyttle, Mark D; Parri, Niccolò; Stanley, Rachel; Babl, Franz E

    2016-03-01

    To examine emergency department (ED) staff's knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes toward providing psychosocial care, and confidence in doing so, and also to examine differences in these outcomes according to demographic, professional, and organizational characteristics, and training preferences. We conducted an online survey among staff in ED and equivalent hospital departments, based on the Psychological First Aid and Distress-Emotional Support-Family protocols. Main analyses involved descriptive statistics and multiple regressions. Respondents were 2648 ED staff from 87 countries (62.2% physicians and 37.8% nurses; mean years of experience in emergency care was 9.5 years with an SD of 7.5 years; 25.2% worked in a low- or middle-income country). Of the respondents, 1.2% correctly answered all 7 knowledge questions, with 24.7% providing at least 4 correct answers. Almost all respondents (90.1%) saw all 18 identified aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Knowledge and confidence scores were associated with respondent characteristics (eg, years of experience, low/middle vs high-income country), although these explained no more than 11%-18% of the variance. Almost all respondents (93.1%) wished to receive training, predominantly through an interactive website or one-off group training. A small minority (11.1%) had previously received training. More education of ED staff regarding child traumatic stress and psychosocial care appears needed and would be welcomed. Universal education packages that are readily available can be modified for use in the ED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychosocial and professional characteristics of burnout in Swiss primary care practitioners: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Catherine; Bouvier Gallacchi, Martine; Künzi, Beat; Bovier, Patrick

    2005-02-19

    To measure the prevalence of burnout and explore its professional and psychosocial predictors among Swiss primary care practitioners. A cross-sectional postal survey was conducted to measure burnout, work-related stressors, professional and psychosocial characteristics among a representative sample of primary care practitioners. Answers to the Maslach burnout inventory were used to categorize respondents into moderate and high degree of burnout. 1784 physicians responded to the survey (65% response rate) and 1755 questionnaires could be analysed. 19% of respondents had a high score for emotional exhaustion, 22% had a high score for depersonalisation/cynicism and 16% had a low score for professional accomplishment; 32% had a high score on either the emotional exhaustion or the depersonalisation/cynicism scale (moderate degree of burnout) and 4% had scores in the range of burnout in all three scales (high degree of burnout). Predictors of moderate burnout were male sex, age 45-55 years and excessive perceived stress due to global workload, health-insurance-related work, difficulties to balance professional and private life, changes in the health care system and medical care uncertainty. A high degree of burnout was associated with male sex, practicing in a rural area, and excessive perceived stress due to global workload, patient's expectations, difficulties to balance professional and private life, economic constraints in relation to the practice, medical care uncertainty and difficult relations with non-medical staff at the practice. About one third of Swiss primary care practitioners presented a moderate or a high degree of burnout, which was mainly associated with extrinsic work-related stressors. Medical doctors and politicians in charge of redesigning the health care system should address this phenomenon to maintain an efficient Swiss primary care physician workforce in the future.

  5. Psychosocial Needs and Facilitators of Mothers Caring for Children with Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peay, Holly L; Meiser, Bettina; Kinnett, Kathleen; Tibben, Aad

    2018-02-01

    Care guidelines for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) include recommendations for assessment of caregivers of patients with DBMD followed by proactive psychosocial interventions. To inform clinical assessment, this study described appraisals of psychosocial needs and caregiving facilitators of mothers of individuals with DBMD. Two hundred and five mothers completed an online survey. More than 50% endorsed unmet needs for managing uncertainty about the future and managing DBMD fears. Higher levels of unmet need were associated with less disease progression/earlier stage of DBMD (rho = -0.166 p = 0.02). Twenty-one percent regularly used respite care and 57% worried about allowing others to care for their child. Highly-endorsed care facilitators included partner relationships (63%), child's approach to life (59%), and family relationships (49%). Our findings highlight the importance of psychological and social support for caregivers. Starting when children are young, clinicians should assess caregivers' unmet psychological needs, particularly uncertainty and fear. Exploring needs and facilitators may allow clinics to target and customize interventions that build upon existing strengths and supports. Our findings have implications for efforts to promote early diagnosis and newborn screening, in that increased needs in mothers of younger children should be anticipated and built into counseling. Further research can assess whether and how unmet needs change as new therapies become available.

  6. Impact of caring for people living with HIV on the psychosocial well-being of palliative caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavashni Valjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS continues to be a serious public health issue, and it is often the caregivers who carry the brunt of the epidemic. Caregivers of people with AIDS face distinctive demands that could make them more prone to occupational stress, with serious consequences for their psychosocial well-being. The impact of caring for people living with HIV infection on the psychosocial well-being of palliative caregivers was investigated using in-depth interviews and questionnaires in 28 participants. The results indicated no burnout, but occupational stress was prevalent. Factors impacting negatively on well-being were stressors inherent in AIDS care, such as suffering and dying of the persons being cared for, work-related stressors such as heavy workload, lack of support and ineffective coping mechanisms. Positive aspects of caring such as job satisfaction, holistic palliative care, effective coping mechanisms and psychosocial support were identified. Recommendations to curb the negative effects of caregiving are provided.

  7. Articulação entre Centros de Atenção Psicossocial e Serviços de Atenção Básica de Saúde Articulación entre Centros de Atención Psicosocial y Servicios de Atención Básica de Salud Relationship between Psychosocial Care Centers and Services in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabieli Gopinger Chiavagatti

    2012-01-01

    salud mental depende de una construcción gradual de articulaciones orientadas por la corresponsabilización de los diferentes servicios que componen la red de atención.OBJECTIVE: To analyze forms of articulation that the Centers for Psychosocial Care (CAPS established with the Primary Health Care Services. METHODS: A descriptive, qualitative study conducted using document review of 23 Therapeutic Projects of the CAPS type I and II, of 23 cities in the southern region of Brazil (PR, SC and RS. RESULTS: It was observed that the structure of articulation occurs basically through the supervision and training of teams, and a reference and counter-reference system, often masked under the logic of the referrals. However, these actions are more suggestive, referred to in documents as objectives, than they are properly translated into actions and concrete operational logic of those in daily practice services. CONCLUSION: In fact, attention to the complexity of the demand for mental health is dependent on a gradual construction of joint responsibility guided by the various services that comprise the network of care.

  8. Meeting psychosocial needs for persons with dementia in home care services - a qualitative study of different perceptions and practices among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anette; Hauge, Solveig; Bergland, Ådel

    2017-09-11

    The majority of persons with dementia are home-dwelling. To enable these persons to stay in their own homes as long as possible, a holistic, individual and flexible care is recommended. Despite a requirement for meeting psychological, social and physical needs, home care services seem to focus on patients' physical needs. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to explore how the psychosocial needs of home-dwelling, older persons with dementia were perceived, emphasized and met by home care services. A descriptive, qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews with 24 health care providers in home care services from four municipalities. Data were analysed using systematic text condensation. This study showed major differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of older home-dwelling persons with dementia and how they perceived their responsibilities for meeting those psychosocial needs. The differences in the health care providers' perceptions seemed to significantly influence the provided care. Three co-existing logics of care were identified: the physical need-oriented logic, the renouncement logic and the integrated logic. The differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of persons with dementia and their responsibilities for meeting those needs, influenced how the psychosocial needs were met. These differences indicates a need for a clarification of how psychosocial needs should be conceptualized and who should be responsible for meeting these needs. Further, increased competence and increased consciousness of psychosocial needs and how those needs can be met, are essential for delivering high-quality holistic care that enables persons with dementia to live in their own home for as long as possible.

  9. The Association between Quality Improvement Initiatives in Dementia Care and Supportive Psychosocial Work Environments in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Tei-Tominaga, Maki

    2018-05-08

    Background : Quality improvement initiatives can help nursing homes strengthen psychosocial work environments. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between supportive psychosocial work environment, and professional and organizational characteristics regarding quality improvement initiatives in dementia care. Methods : A paper questionnaire survey was administered to a convenience sample of 365 professional caregivers in 12 special nursing homes in Japan. Psychosocial work environment was assessed using the Social Capital and Ethical Climate at the Workplace Scale to calculate a score of social capital in the workplace, ethical leadership, and exclusive workplace climate. Variables for quality improvement initiatives included type of home (unit-type or traditional), presence of additional benefit for dementia care, and professionalism in dementia care among caregivers evaluated using the Japanese version of the Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff Scale. Results : Elevated professionalism and unit-type home were significantly associated with high social capital, strong ethical leadership, and low exclusive workplace climate. The presence of dementia care benefit was not associated with any subscale of psychosocial work environment. Conclusions : Quality improvement initiatives to foster supportive psychosocial work environment should enhance professionalism in dementia care with unit-based team building of professional caregivers in special nursing homes.

  10. The Association between Quality Improvement Initiatives in Dementia Care and Supportive Psychosocial Work Environments in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miharu Nakanishi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality improvement initiatives can help nursing homes strengthen psychosocial work environments. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between supportive psychosocial work environment, and professional and organizational characteristics regarding quality improvement initiatives in dementia care. Methods: A paper questionnaire survey was administered to a convenience sample of 365 professional caregivers in 12 special nursing homes in Japan. Psychosocial work environment was assessed using the Social Capital and Ethical Climate at the Workplace Scale to calculate a score of social capital in the workplace, ethical leadership, and exclusive workplace climate. Variables for quality improvement initiatives included type of home (unit-type or traditional, presence of additional benefit for dementia care, and professionalism in dementia care among caregivers evaluated using the Japanese version of the Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff Scale. Results: Elevated professionalism and unit-type home were significantly associated with high social capital, strong ethical leadership, and low exclusive workplace climate. The presence of dementia care benefit was not associated with any subscale of psychosocial work environment. Conclusions: Quality improvement initiatives to foster supportive psychosocial work environment should enhance professionalism in dementia care with unit-based team building of professional caregivers in special nursing homes.

  11. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue-challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the "Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right" was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue–challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the “Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right” was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. PMID:27530206

  13. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate the burnout syndrome dimensions, and the Self Reporting Questionnaire was used to evaluate common mental disorders. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 55.3% (n = 72). In the quadrants of the demand-control model, low-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 64.5% of suspected cases of burnout, whereas high-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 72.5% of suspected cases (p = 0.006). The prevalence of suspected cases of common mental disorders was 27.7%; of these, 80.6% were associated with burnout syndrome (stress levels - active work (OR = 0.26; 95%CI = 0.09 - 0.69) and passive work (OR = 0.22; 95%CI = 0.07 - 0.63) - were protective factors for burnout syndrome. Psychosocial factors were associated with the development of burnout syndrome in this group. These results underscore the need for the development of further studies aimed at intervention and the prevention of the syndrome.

  14. Transgender identity and health care: implications for psychosocial and physical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria, Christine Aramburu

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to educate nurse practitioners (NPs) regarding: (a) the definition and range of transgenderism, (b) social influences on transgender persons, and (c) health care for transgender persons. Data sources include review of the literature in the areas of gender, gender identity, marginalized populations, and gender transition. Personal communication was also utilized. Transgender persons remain marginalized and may remain closeted and at risk for negative psychosocial consequences. For those that do come out, other issues present, including the navigation of gender transition and psychosocial and physical changes that may be positive and/or negative. Examples of positive effects may include satisfaction of living authentically and decrease in depression. Negative effects may include social discrimination and loss of relationships. To provide holistic care, NPs need to be aware of transgender lives in social context and of their healthcare needs. Suggestions for cultivating a supportive healthcare environment include the usage of sensitive language and an appropriate health history and physical examination. Further, to help rectify the knowledge deficit regarding transgender care among healthcare providers, NP educators and preceptors may utilize this article as a resource in their work with students. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Perceived early-life maternal care and the cortisol response to repeated psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Veronika; Efanov, Simona I; Dedovic, Katarina; Duchesne, Annie; Dagher, Alain; Pruessner, Jens C

    2010-11-01

    In the past decade, a body of animal and human research has revealed a profound influence of early-life experiences, ranging from variations in parenting behaviour to severe adversity, on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation in adulthood. In our own previous studies, we have shown how variations in early-life parental care influence the development of the hippocampus and modify the cortisol awakening response. In the present study, we investigated the influence of early-life maternal care on cortisol, heart rate and subjective psychological responses to the repeated administration of a psychosocial laboratory stressor in a population of 63 healthy young adults. Low, medium and high early-life maternal care groups were identified using the Parental Bonding Instrument. Controlling for the effect of sex, we found an inverted u-shaped relation between increasing levels of maternal care and cortisol stress responsivity. Specifically, overall and stress-induced cortisol levels went from below normal in the low maternal care, to normal in the medium care, back to below normal in the high maternal care groups. We found no group differences with respect to heart rate and subjective psychological stress measures. Whereas low and high maternal care groups exhibited similarly low endocrine stress responses, their psychological profiles were opposed with increased levels of depression and anxiety and decreased self-esteem in the low care group. Sex was unequally distributed among maternal care groups, whereby the number of men with low maternal care was too small to allow introducing sex as a second between-group variable. We discuss the potential significance of this dissociation between endocrine and psychological parameters with respect to stress vulnerability and resistance for each maternal care group.

  16. Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care : more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations

  17. How psychosocial factors affect well-being of practice assistants at work in general medical care?--a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Berger, Sarah; Gavartina, Amina; Zaroti, Stavria; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-11-11

    Well-being at work is an important aspect of a workforce strategy. The aim of the study was to explore and evaluate psychosocial factors and health and work-related outcomes of practices assistants depending on their employment status in general medical practices. This observational study was based on a questionnaire survey to evaluate psychosocial aspects at work in general medical practices. A standardized questionnaire was used, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Beside descriptive analyses linear regression analyses were performed for each health and work-related outcome scale of the COPSOQ. 586 practice assistants out of 794 respondents (73.8 %) from 234 general medical practices completed the questionnaire. Practice assistants reported the highest scores for the psychosocial factor 'sense of community' (mean = 85.9) and the lower score for 'influence at work' (mean = 41.2). Moreover, practice assistants who worked part-time rated their psychosocial factors at work and health-related outcomes more positively than full-time employees. Furthermore, the two scales of health related outcomes 'burnout' and 'job satisfaction' showed strong associations between different psychosocial factors and socio-demographic variables. Psychosocial factors at work influence well-being at work and could be strong risk factors for poor health and work-related outcomes. Effective management of these issues could have an impact on the retention and recruitment of health care staff.

  18. Psychosocial care for seriously injured children and their families: a qualitative study among emergency department nurses and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Conroy, Rowena; Magyar, Joanne; Babl, Franz E; O'Donnell, Meaghan L

    2014-09-01

    Approximately one in five children who sustain a serious injury develops persistent stress symptoms. Emergency Department nurses and physicians have a pivotal role in psychosocial care for seriously injured children. However, little is known about staff's views on this role. Our aim was to investigate Emergency Department staff's views on psychosocial care for seriously injured children. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 nurses and physicians working in an Australian Paediatric Emergency Department. We used purposive sampling to obtain a variety of views. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and major themes were derived in line with the summative analysis method. We also mapped participants' strategies for child and family support on the eight principles of Psychological First Aid (PFA). Five overarching themes emerged: (1) staff find psychosocial issues important but focus on physical care; (2) staff are aware of individual differences but have contrasting views on vulnerability; (3) parents have a central role; (4) staff use a variety of psychosocial strategies to support children, based on instinct and experience but not training; and (5) staff have individually different wishes regarding staff- and self-care. Staff elaborated most on strategies related to the PFA elements 'contact and engagement', 'stabilization', 'connection with social supports' and least on 'informing about coping'. The strong notion of individual differences in views suggests a need for training in psychosocial care for injured children and their families. In addition, further research on paediatric traumatic stress and psychosocial care in the ED will help to overcome the current paucity of the literature. Finally, a system of peer support may accommodate wishes regarding staff care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of psychosocial adaptation among elderly residents in long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Lan, Yii-Hwei; Tso, Hsiu-Ching; Chung, Chao-Ming; Neim, Yum-Mei; Clark, Mary Jo

    2008-06-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study explored psychosocial adaptation and its determinants among elderly residents of long-term care facilities. A convenience sample of 165 elderly residents was recruited from two nursing homes and two assisted living institutions in the Taichung area. All residents who met the criteria for this study were interviewed individually from April through June 2006. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on participant demographic characteristics, admission conditions, functional status, perceived family support, life attitudes, and psychosocial adaptation. The adaptation inventory incorporated three aspects of adaptation, including (1) sense of self-value, (2) sense of belonging and (3) sense of continuity. Findings, in general, did not indicate participants had achieved a high level of overall adaptation or significant adaptation in any of the three aspects targeted. Most participants were female. More than half were widowed and unable to fully finance their own institutional care. Nearly one-third was not admitted voluntarily. Having adequate funding for admission, voluntary admission, and number of roommates were the three most influential factors affecting overall adaptation, explaining 54% of variance. Study findings reflect the importance to residents' adaptation of self-determination, autonomy, and pre-institutionalization preparation and are intended to provide guidance for nursing intervention and social welfare policy making.

  20. Expanding the Andersen model: the role of psychosocial factors in long-term care use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; McGraw, Sarah A; Curry, Leslie; Buckser, Alison; King, Kinda L; Kasl, Stanislav V; Andersen, Ronald

    2002-10-01

    To examine a prevailing conceptual model of health services use (Andersen 1995) and to suggest modifications that may enhance its explanatory power when applied to empirical studies of race/ethnicity and long-term care. Twelve focus groups of African-American (five groups) and white (seven groups) individuals, aged 65 and older, residing in Connecticut during 2000. Using qualitative analysis, data were coded and analyzed in NUD-IST 4 software to facilitate the reporting of recurrent themes, supporting quotations, and links among the themes for developing the conceptual framework. Specific analysis was conducted to assess distinctions in common themes between African-American and white focus groups. Data were collected using a standardized discussion guide, augmented by prompts for clarification. Audio taped sessions were transcribed and independently coded by investigators and crosschecked to enhance coding validity. An audit trail was maintained to document analytic decisions during data analysis and interpretation. Psychosocial factors (e.g., attitudes and knowledge, social norms, and perceived control) are identified as determinants of service use, thereby expanding the Andersen model (1995). African-American and white focus group members differed in their reported accessibility of information about long-term care, social norms concerning caregiving expectations and burden, and concerns of privacy and self-determination. More comprehensive identification of psychosocial factors may enhance our understanding of the complex role of race/ethnicity in long-term care use as well as the effectiveness of policies and programs designed to address disparities in long-term care service use among minority and nonminority groups.

  1. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR = 1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR = 1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR = 2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR = 1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR = 1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR = 1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among

  2. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Mariza Alves Barbosa; Barbosa, Mirna Rossi; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Gomes, Viviane Elizângela; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira e; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição

    2014-05-15

    Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR = 1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR = 1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR = 2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR = 1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR = 1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR = 1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers.

  3. Medical-Legal Partnerships At Veterans Affairs Medical Centers Improved Housing And Psychosocial Outcomes For Vets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Middleton, Margaret; Villegas, Jennifer; Johnson, Cindy; Retkin, Randye; Seidman, Alison; Sherman, Scott; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-12-01

    Medical-legal partnerships-collaborations between legal professionals and health care providers that help patients address civil legal problems that can affect health and well-being-have been implemented at several Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers to serve homeless and low-income veterans with mental illness. We describe the outcomes of veterans who accessed legal services at four partnership sites in Connecticut and New York in the period 2014-16. The partnerships served 950 veterans, who collectively had 1,384 legal issues; on average, the issues took 5.4 hours' worth of legal services to resolve. The most common problems were related to VA benefits, housing, family issues, and consumer issues. Among a subsample of 148 veterans who were followed for one year, we observed significant improvements in housing, income, and mental health. Veterans who received more partnership services showed greater improvements in housing and mental health than those who received fewer services, and those who achieved their predefined legal goals showed greater improvements in housing status and community integration than those who did not. Medical-legal partnerships represent an opportunity to expand cross-sector, community-based partnerships in the VA health care system to address social determinants of mental health.

  4. A randomised trial of a psychosocial intervention for cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (promoting optimal outcomes in mood through tailored psychosocial therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolley Damien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence that up to 35% of patients with cancer experience significant distress, access to effective psychosocial care is limited by lack of systematic approaches to assessment, a paucity of psychosocial services, and patient reluctance to accept treatment either because of perceived stigma or difficulties with access to specialist psycho-oncology services due to isolation or disease burden. This paper presents an overview of a randomised study to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief tailored psychosocial Intervention delivered by health professionals in cancer care who undergo focused training and participate in clinical supervision. Methods/design Health professionals from the disciplines of nursing, occupational therapy, speech pathology, dietetics, physiotherapy or radiation therapy will participate in training to deliver the psychosocial Intervention focusing on core concepts of supportive-expressive, cognitive and dignity-conserving care. Health professional training will consist of completion of a self-directed manual and participation in a skills development session. Participating health professionals will be supported through structured clinical supervision whilst delivering the Intervention. In the stepped wedge design each of the 5 participating clinical sites will be allocated in random order from Control condition to Training then delivery of the Intervention. A total of 600 patients will be recruited across all sites. Based on level of distress or risk factors eligible patients will receive up to 4 sessions, each of up to 30 minutes in length, delivered face-to-face or by telephone. Participants will be assessed at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Patient outcome measures include anxiety and depression, quality of life, unmet psychological and supportive care needs. Health professional measures include psychological morbidity, stress and burnout. Process evaluation will be conducted to assess perceptions

  5. Distribution of specialized care centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Yealy, Donald M

    2012-11-01

    As a recommended strategy for optimally managing critical illness, regionalization of care involves matching the needs of the target population with available hospital resources. The national supply and characteristics of hospitals providing specialized critical care services is currently unknown. We seek to characterize the current distribution of specialized care centers in the United States. Using public data linked with the American Hospital Association directory and US Census, we identified US general acute hospitals providing specialized care for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (≥40 annual primary percutaneous coronary interventions reported in Medicare Hospital Compare), stroke (The Joint Commission certified stroke centers), trauma (American College of Surgeons or state-designated, adult or pediatric, level I or II), and pediatric critical care (presence of a pediatric ICU) services. We determined the characteristics and state-level distribution and density of specialized care centers (centers per state and centers per state population). Among 4,931 acute care hospitals in the United States, 1,325 (26.9%) provided one of the 4 defined specialized care services, including 574 STEMI, 763 stroke, 508 trauma, and 457 pediatric critical care centers. Approximately half of the 1,325 hospitals provided 2 or more specialized services, and one fifth provided 3 or 4 specialized services. There was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center in each state: STEMI median 7 interquartile range (IQR 2 to 14), stroke 8 (IQR 3 to 17), trauma 6 (IQR 3 to 11), pediatric specialized care 6 (IQR 3 to 11). Similarly, there was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center per population: STEMI median 1 center per 585,135 persons (IQR 418,729 to 696,143), stroke 1 center per 412,188 persons (IQR 321,604 to 572,387), trauma 1 center per 610,589 persons (IQR 406,192 to 917,588), and pediatric critical care 1 center per 665

  6. Promoting psychosocial adaptation of youths in residential care through animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluerka, Nekane; Muela, Alexander; Amiano, Nora; Caldentey, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) on the psychosocial adaptation of a group of adolescents in residential care who had suffered traumatic childhood experiences and who presented with mental health problems. This study recruited 63 youths (mean age=15.27, SD=1.63) who were divided into two groups: a treatment group of 39 youths (19 female and 20 male; mean age=15.03, SD=0.51) and a control group of 24 (five female and 19 male; mean age=15.67, SD=1.63). The youths who underwent the AAP program had higher school adjustment in comparison to their peers who did not receive treatment. Their hyperactive behavior decreased, and they showed better social skills, more leadership, and fewer attention problems. They also showed a more positive attitude toward their teachers in comparison to controls. No differences were observed in other variables associated with clinical symptoms or personal adjustment. These results suggest that AAP can be effective with teenagers who have suffered childhood traumas and who present with problems of psychosocial adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A comprehensive palliative care center implementation in S.B. Ulus State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kabalak

    2012-06-01

    Every people wants to best care and to die painless in their end-stage of life. This is a human right. Therefore, end-of-life care is considered an indicator of health quality all over the world. The ultimate goal of palliative care is to relieve the suffering of patients and their families by the comprehensive assessment and treatment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms experienced by patients. After the patient\\s death, palliative care focuses primarily on bereavement of the family. T.C. Ministry of Health to find a solution of this important issue as a first step, the preparations for the establishment of palliative care centers and units, training of health personnel started. S.B. Ulus State Hospital as a team we have set out to open a comprehensive palliative care center. Our goal is to contribute on take place of palliative care organization in health system and to the spread across the country. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 122-126

  8. Patient Care Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    blood diseases and conditions; parasitic infections; rheumatic and inflammatory diseases; and rare and neglected diseases. CMRP’s collaborative approach to clinical research and the expertise and dedication of staff to the continuation and success of the program’s mission has contributed to improving the overall standards of public health on a global scale. The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides comprehensive, dedicated clinical research, study coordination, and administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Urologic Oncology Branch (UOB) located at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - THIS POSITION IS CONTINGENT UPON FUNDING APPROVAL The Patient Care Coordinator III (PCC III) provides administrative services, as well as patient care coordination. Responsibilities will include: Communicates with various clinical administrative support offices/clinics/diagnostic centers concerning scheduling of patient appointments, new and existing work scopes and clinical protocols (Surgery, X-ray, etc.). Consults with the patient, chooses the appropriate appointment, and enters ID and demographic data supplied by patient to secure an appointment in order to update clinic and physician schedules. Composes correspondence on various administrative issues including patient letters and notices to the patient’s home and physicians. Provides patients with information about their appointments, including medical materials the patient will need to bring, dates and times, clinic information, hospital maps and appropriate travel and hotel information. Arranges Admission Travel Voucher (ATV) travel, including lodging, meals and direct bill requests and enters data in the ATV system daily. Obtains up-to-date patient records and other pertinent information prior to patient appointments or admission. Maintains a roster of all patients and tracks their appointments

  9. [Psychosocial aspects associated with excessive attendance in primary care paediatric clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martín, Raquel; Sánchez Bayle, Marciano; Teruel de Francisco, Carmen

    2018-04-20

    Hyper-attendance is a significant problem in paediatric Primary Care clinics. The aim of our study was to analyse the level of attendance in these clinics and its relationship with certain psychosocial aspects of the families attending them. Observational descriptive study was conducted using questionnaires collected during a period of 6months, as well as recording the frequency of attendance in the previous 6months. A total of 346 questionnaires of children between 6months and 13years of age belonging to 2 urban Primary Care clinics in Madrid were completed. The raw data was analysed, and comparisons between groups and multivariate analysis were performed. The mean number of consultations in the last 6months, of the total included in the study, was 3.06 in the Primary Care centre, and 0.77 in the emergency services. It was considered over-frequent for those who had attended the Primary Care health centre 6 or more times in this period (>p90), of which there were 33 children (9.53%). In the multivariate analysis, the variables related to being frequent users of Primary Care clinics were: the presence of high level of anxiety in the parents (OR=5.50; 95%CI: 2.49-12.17, P<.0001), and the age of the children (OR=0.73; 95%CI: 0.58-0.91, P=.005). The model presented an area under the curve of 0.761 (95%CI: 0.678-0.945, P<.0001). The frequency of visits in paediatric Primary Care clinics is directly related to the high level of anxiety of the parents, and inversely to the age of the children. It would be advisable to detect and, if possible, intervene in cases of high parental anxiety in order to try to reduce the over-frequency in the paediatric primary health care. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  11. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  12. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  13. Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) position statement: improving access to psychosocial care for individuals with persistent pain: supporting the National Pain Strategy's call for interdisciplinary pain care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, E Amy; Cheatle, Martin; Keefe, Francis J; Dhingra, Lara

    2018-03-01

    Policy makers have articulated a need for clear, evidence-based guidance to help inform pain policy. Persistent pain is common, expensive, and debilitating, and requires comprehensive assessment and treatment planning. Recently released opioid prescribing guidelines by the CDC (2016) emphasize the importance of using nonopioid therapies before considering opioid treatment for those without a malignant illness. The National Pain Strategy (2016) underscores the importance of comprehensive, interdisciplinary pain care. Unfortunately, despite persuasive evidence supporting the efficacy of psychosocial approaches, these interventions are inaccessible to the majority of Americans. Psychosocial approaches to pain management should be available for all individuals with persistent pain and in all health care settings and contexts as part of the comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to pain care as outlined in the National Pain Strategy. To achieve this, we must prioritize reimbursement of evidence-based psychosocial approaches for pain assessment and management and improve provider training and competencies to implement these approaches.

  14. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  15. Psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2016-02-01

    Most studies on euthanasia fail to explain the intentions of health professionals when faced with performing euthanasia and are atheoretical. The purpose of this study was to identify the psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care if it were legalised. A cross-sectional study using a validated anonymous questionnaire based on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A random sample of 445 nurses from the province of Quebec, Canada, was selected for participation in the study. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec. The response rate was 44.2% and the mean score for intention was 4.61 ± 1.90 (range: 1-7). The determinants of intention were the subjective (odds ratio = 3.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.50-6.35) and moral (odds ratio = 2.95; 95% confidence interval: 1.58-5.49) norms. Specific beliefs which could discriminate nurses according to their level of intention were identified. Overall, nurses have a slightly positive intention to practise euthanasia. Their family approval seems particularly important and also the approval of their medical colleagues. Nurses' moral norm was related to beneficence, an ethical principle. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify nurses' motivations to practise euthanasia in palliative care using a validated psychosocial theory. It also has the distinction of identifying the ethical principles underlying nurses' moral norm and intention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staffdagger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; Klerk, C. de; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; Broeck, U. Van den; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C.M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? SUMMARY ANSWER: Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human

  17. The psychosocial needs of children in foster care with a history of sexual abuse: Are they recognized?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Anne; Ellingsen, Ingunn; van der Steen, Stephanie; Grietens, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Youth in family foster care who have experienced sexual abuse have specific psychosocial needs. However, youth themselves are rarely asked about their needs, and it is unknown if caretakers recognize these needs as such. Using Q-methodology, this study aimed to describe what youth consider their

  18. Assessment of indoor environment in Paris child day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Célina; Barral, Sophie; Ravelomanantsoa, Hanitriniala; Dusséaux, Murielle; Tribout, Martin; Le Moullec, Yvon; Momas, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Children are sensitive to indoor environmental pollution. Up until now there has been a lack of data on air quality in child day care centers. The aim of this study is to document the indoor environment quality of Paris child day care centers by repeated measurements, and to compare pollutant levels in child day care centers with levels in Paris dwellings. We selected 28 child day care centers frequented by a random sample of babies who participated in the PARIS birth cohort environmental investigation, and visited the child day care centers for one week twice in one year. Biological contaminants assessed were fungi, endotoxin, dust mite allergens, and chemical pollutants: aldehydes, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Relative humidity, temperature, and carbon dioxide levels were measured simultaneously. A standardized questionnaire was used to gather information about the buildings and their inhabitants. Airborne endotoxin levels in child day care centers were higher than those found in Paris dwellings. Dust mite allergens in child day care centers were below the threshold level for sensitization in the majority of samples, and in common with dwelling samples. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most commonly identified genera fungi. The child day care center indoor/outdoor ratio for most chemical pollutants was above unity except for NO2, the levels for NO2 being significantly higher than those measured in homes. Chemical and biological contamination in child day care centers appears to be low, apart from endotoxin and NO2. Failure to take child exposure in child day care centers into account could result in an overestimation of children's exposure to other pollutants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How To Pick a Special Day Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Ronald P.

    This paper outlines seven specific areas that parents should examine when visiting a prospective child care center for their child. Parents should examine: (1) the center's staff; (2) the center's parent relations; (3) the physical and teaching environment; (4) the curriculum; (5) staff-child interaction; (6) the administration; and (7) their…

  20. Is the psychosocial profile of people with low back pain seeking care in Danish primary care different from those in secondary care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter; Albert, Hanne B

    2013-01-01

    was a cross-sectional comparison of LBP patients in Danish primary settings (405 general practitioner or physiotherapy patients) and a secondary care setting (311 outpatient spine centre patients). Psychosocial factors were measured with the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Tampa Scale...... of Kinesiophobia, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (catastrophisation subscale), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There were significantly higher scores in secondary care for movement-related fear (1.3 points (95%CI .1-2.5) p = .030) and catastrophisation (2.0 (95%CI 1.0-3.0) p ...

  1. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Strohschein, Fay J; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care.

  2. Provision of Patient-Centered Transgender Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selix, Nancy W; Rowniak, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Transgender individuals have unique health care needs and experience health disparities. There is an increased need for transgender health care services and primary care for this underserved population. However, provision of appropriate health care services for transgender persons requires cultural competency and skill on the part of the health care provider, and providers need specific skills to address the needs of this population. A review of the literature was performed by accessing CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PubMed databases. Pertinent research was extracted and reviewed for relevance. References in these publications were reviewed to identify additional publications that address primary prevention, secondary prevention, and tertiary care of transgender individuals. Articles that include prevention, screening, and treatment of health problems of transgender persons were identified. Research on the health needs of the transgender population is limited. Whenever available, research findings that address this unique population should be incorporated into clinical practice. When research evidence is not available to address the unique needs of transgender individuals, research and clinical care guidelines from the general population may be applied for health screening and maintenance. This article provides information about primary care services for transgender individuals and seeks to improve awareness of the health disparities this underserved population experiences. Simple solutions to modify clinical settings to enhance care are provided. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  3. Weaving the West Psychosocial Care Network of the municipality of São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro de Sousa; Domingos, Alessandra Matheus; Silveira, Ana Stella de Azevedo; Santos, Jussara Carvalho Dos

    2017-01-01

    to understand how health service professionals involved in the care of users in psychic distress perceive the organization of the Psychosocial Care Network (RAPS - Rede de Atenção Psicossocial) in the western region of the city of São Paulo. qualitative approach study conducted with 123 professionals with higher education who work in the care points of the network. A semi-structured interview was performed and data were submitted to the Alceste program for lexical analysis. the network is in process of alignment with the mental health policy and the psychosocial rehabilitation strategy. However, the weaknesses in the work process of teams are related to deficits in human resources, structure, and communication, and to the limited appropriation of their guidelines. there are intense efforts of workers to weave the network, and barriers need to be overcome to support successful actions in mental health care in the territory. compreender como profissionais de serviços de saúde envolvidos no cuidado dos usuários em sofrimento psíquico percebem a organização da Rede de Atenção Psicossocial (RAPS) da região Oeste do Município de São Paulo. abordagem qualitativa realizada com 123 profissionais de nível superior que atuam nos pontos de atenção da rede. Realizou-se entrevista semiestruturada e os dados foram submetidos ao programa Alceste com aplicação de análise lexical. A rede está em processo de alinhamento com a política de saúde mental e estratégia de reabilitação psicossocial. No entanto, há fragilidades no processo de trabalho das equipes relacionadas ao déficit de recursos humanos, estruturais, de comunicação, e à apropriação limitada sobre suas diretrizes. Compreendeu-se que há intensidade de esforços dos trabalhadores para tecer a rede e que é necessário superar barreiras para fomentar ações exitosas no cuidado em saúde mental no território.

  4. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Strohschein, Fay J.; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication i...

  5. Knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of caring for people living with HIV (PLWH in a low-resource setting has had a negative impact on the nursing profession, resulting in a shortage of skilled nurses. In response to this shortage and perceived negative impact, we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study to describe the level of knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for PLWH at a regional hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 233 nurses, the majority being female, participated and were stratified into professional nurses (n = 108, enrolled nurses (n = 58 and enrolled nursing auxiliaries (n = 66. Data were collected using HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory; AIDS Impact Scale and Beck's Depression Inventory. The total knowledge score obtained by all the participants ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 12.93 (SD = 1.92 on HIV/AIDS knowledge. Depersonalization (D (83.7% and emotional exhaustion (EE (53.2% were reported among participating nurses caring for PLWH. Burnout was higher among professional nurses as compared to both enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing auxiliaries. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between HIV knowledge with the nurses' emotional exhaustion (r = −0.592, depression (r = −0.584 and stigma and discrimination (r = −0.637. A moderate to high level of burnout was evident among all levels of nurses. These findings lead to the recommendations for support of nurses caring for PLWH that include structured nursing educational support, organisational support with respect to employee wellness programmes that address depression and work burnout, as well as social support. The provision of these support mechanisms has the potential of creating a positive practice environment for nurses in the Vhembe District of the Limpopo Province in particular, and South Africa in general, and in improved care for PLWH.

  6. Knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of caring for people living with HIV (PLWH in a low-resource setting has had a negative impact on the nursing profession, resulting in a shortage of skilled nurses. In response to this shortage and perceived negative impact, we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study to describe the level of knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for PLWH at a regional hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 233 nurses, the majority being female, participated and were stratified into professional nurses (n =108, enrolled nurses (n = 58 and enrolled nursing auxiliaries (n = 66. Data were collected using HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory; AIDS Impact Scale and Beck's Depression Inventory. The total knowledge score obtained by all the participants ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 12.93 (SD = 1.92 on HIV/AIDS knowledge. Depersonalization (D (83.7% and emotional exhaustion (EE (53.2% were reported among participating nurses caring for PLWH. Burnout was higher among professional nurses as compared to both enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing auxiliaries. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between HIV knowledge with the nurses' emotional exhaustion (r = 0.592, depression (r = 0.584 and stigma and discrimination (r = 0.637. A moderate to high level of burnout was evident among all levels of nurses. These findings lead to the recommendations for support of nurses caring for PLWH that include structured nursing educational support, organisational support with respect to employee wellness programmes that address depression and work burnout, as well as social support. The provision of these support mechanisms has the potential of creating a positive practice environment for nurses in the Vhembe District of the Limpopo Province in particular, and South Africa in general, and in improved care for PLWH.

  7. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors (KAPb) of nurses and the effectiveness of a training program in psychosocial cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Rathi; Chua, Joanne; Peh, Chao Xu; Lim, Haikel A; Ang, Emily N K; Lim, Siew Eng; Kua, Ee Heok

    2014-08-01

    Psychosocial distress in oncology patients may significantly interfere with their health outcomes and quality of life. Nurses work closely with their patients and are in the best position to screen for distress and provide timely intervention. It is thus important for nurses working in oncology settings to be equipped and prepared to address distressing psychosocial issues. The present study aims to investigate the impact of a training program in psychosocial care on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice behaviors. A total of 180 nurses working in medical oncology and radiation oncology departments at the National University Cancer Institute Singapore underwent a training program in psychosocial care as part of their continuing nursing education curriculum. One hundred fifty four of these nurses completed a self-designed questionnaire on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors (KAPb) at all four time points: baseline, post-training, and at 6 and 12 weeks post-training, respectively. The self-designed KAPb questionnaire proved adequate for this study. Positive gains on applied knowledge and practice behaviors were sustained over a 12-week period. There were no changes in theoretical knowledge. A decreasing trend in attitudes was noted, although this was specific to the participants' attitudes toward the importance of emotional concerns as compared to physical concerns in cancer treatment. Enrolled nurses seemed to have higher starting levels of theoretical knowledge than their registered counterparts were. There were no other differences on demographic variables in relation to the efficacy of the training program. The training program was successful in improving the applied knowledge and practice behaviors of nurses in providing psychosocial care for cancer patients. However, further refinement to the program, with particular attention to nurses' existing training and years of clinical nursing experience, would enhance staff empowerment

  8. Planning an Effective Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rodney; Wright, Sydney

    This conference presentation offers general guidelines for planning a new child care facility. Particular attention is given to site selection, space requirements, functional requirements, materials, climate, and choosing an architect. (RH)

  9. [The profile and professional practice of nurses in a psychosocial care services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cristiane Bergues; Aranha e Silva, Ana Luisa

    2010-06-01

    This qualitative study was performed with fourteen nurses of eleven psychosocial care services. The objectives of the study were the following: to characterize the professional profile of the nurses who work in community psychiatric services and to verify those nurses' practice according to the current model of mental health care. there was a prevalence of females; most had over 10 years since their graduation; their entrance in the mental health area is late and is associated with the lack of job opportunities and the fact that the service is close to their home. One part of the nurses found it difficult to define their work at an extra-hospital environment. On the other hand, another group of nurses believes that the nursing work in mental health services is flexible and it is shared with other workers of the multidisciplinary team. Low salaries, poor infrastructure and the lack of team member acknowledgement generate dissatisfaction at work. The Brazilian Psychiatric Reform is associated with dehospitalization.

  10. [Psychosocial care following the firework disaster in Enschede; the lessons from the Bijlmer airline disaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersons, B P R; Huijsman-Rubingh, R R R; Olff, M

    2004-07-17

    When the psychosocial-care scheme for victims of the firework explosion in Enschede, the Netherlands (2000) was set up, lessons learned from the Bijlmer airline disaster (Amsterdam 1992) were put into practice. The aftermath of this incident showed that psychological and physical health problems can still occur many years later. The main failure of the aftercare of the Bijlmer disaster lay in the coordination of aid and the monitoring of health problems. In Enschede steps were taken to redress these problems. An information and advice centre (IAC) was set up to monitor the well-being of the victims, and to provide them with information and, where necessary, assistance. It is responsible for limiting the effects of the disaster. A total of 13,000 people have consulted the IAC. A residents' association was formed. This gave the victims a common voice during the process of attempting to restore normality in their lives. A specialized mental health-care unit was founded to treat disaster-related disorders using evidence-based treatments. So far approximately 1,300 people have consulted this body. A longitudinal study has been set up to map the consequences of the disaster and to advise aid organizations. This will also give information on the extent to which these methods have been able to limit the long-term consequences.

  11. Psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms among HIV-positive persons receiving care and treatment in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Puja; Kidder, Daniel; Pals, Sherri; Parent, Julie; Mbatia, Redempta; Chesang, Kipruto; Mbilinyi, Deogratius; Koech, Emily; Nkingwa, Mathias; Katuta, Frieda; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Bachanas, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the prevalence of depressive symptoms among people living with HIV (PLHIV) is considerably greater than that among members of the general population. It is particularly important to treat depressive symptoms among PLHIV because they have been associated with poorer HIV care-related outcomes. This study describes overall psychosocial functioning and factors associated with depressive symptoms among PLHIV attending HIV care and treatment clinics in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania. Eighteen HIV care and treatment clinics (six per country) enrolled approximately 200 HIV-positive patients (for a total of 3,538 participants) and collected data on patients' physical and mental well-being, medical/health status, and psychosocial functioning. Although the majority of participants did not report clinically significant depressive symptoms (72 %), 28 % reported mild to severe depressive symptoms, with 12 % reporting severe depressive symptoms. Regression models indicated that greater levels of depressive symptoms were associated with: (1) being female, (2) younger age, (3) not being completely adherent to HIV medications, (4) likely dependence on alcohol, (5) disclosure to three or more people (versus one person), (6) experiences of recent violence, (7) less social support, and (8) poorer physical functioning. Participants from Kenya and Namibia reported greater depressive symptoms than those from Tanzania. Approximately 28 % of PLHIV reported clinically significant depressive symptoms. The scale-up of care and treatment services in sub-Saharan Africa provides an opportunity to address psychosocial and mental health needs for PLHIV as part of comprehensive care.

  12. Ethics in psychosocial and biomedical research – A training experience at the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics (CIEB) of the University of Chile1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas, Fernando; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience in training Latin American professionals and scientists in the ethics of biomedical and psychosocial research at the Interdisciplinary Center for Studies in Bioethics (CIEB) of the University of Chile, aided by a grant from Fogarty International Center (FIC) – National Institutes of Health from 2002 to 2011. In these 10 years of experience, 50 trainees have completed a 12-month training combining on-line and in-person teaching and learning activities, with further support for maintaining contact via webmail and personal meetings. The network formed by faculty and former trainees has published extensively on issues relevant in the continent and has been instrumental in promoting new master level courses at different universities, drafting regulations and norms, and promoting the use of bioethical discourse in health care and research. Evaluation meetings have shown that while most trainees did benefit from the experience and contributed highly to developments at their home institutions and countries, some degree of structuring of demand for qualified personnel is needed in order to better utilize the human resources created by the program. Publications and other deliverables of trainees and faculty are presented. PMID:22754084

  13. St. Luke's Medical Center: technologizing health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanguil, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The computerization of the St. Luke's Medical Center improved the hospital administration and management, particularly in nuclear medicine department. The use of computer-aided X-ray simulator machine and computerized linear accelerator machine in diagnosing and treating cancer are the most recent medical technological breakthroughs that benefited thousands of Filipino cancer patients. 4 photos

  14. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  15. Day Care Centers, US, 2010, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This database contains locations of day care centers for 39 states which include the states of AZ, CA, , NV, NY, HI. This is a work in progress and data for...

  16. Psychosocial stress and multi-site musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembajwe, Grace; Tveito, Torill Helene; Hopcia, Karen; Kenwood, Christopher; O'Day, Elizabeth Tucker; Stoddard, Anne M; Dennerlein, Jack T; Hashimoto, Dean; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between psychosocial factors at work and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care workers. In a survey of 1,572 workers from two hospitals, occupational psychosocial factors and health outcomes of workers with single and multi-site pain were evaluated using items from the Job Content Questionnaire that was designed to measure psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support. An adapted Nordic Questionnaire provided data on the musculoskeletal pain outcome. Covariates included body mass index, age, gender, and occupation. The analyses revealed statistically significant associations between psychosocial demands and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care associates, nurses, and administrative personnel, both men and women. Supervisor support played a significant role for nurses and women. These results remained statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. These results highlight the associations between workplace psychosocial strain and multi-site musculoskeletal pain, setting the stage for future longitudinal explorations. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Worker assessments of organizational practices and psychosocial work environment are associated with musculoskeletal injuries in hospital patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reme, Silje Endresen; Shaw, William S; Boden, Leslie I; Tveito, Torill H; O'Day, Elizabeth Tucker; Dennerlein, Jack T; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-07-01

    Hospital patient care (PC) workers have high rates of workplace injuries, particularly musculoskeletal injuries. Despite a wide spectrum of documented health hazards, little is known about the association between psychosocial factors at work and OSHA-recordable musculoskeletal injuries. PC-workers (n = 1,572, 79%) completed surveys assessing a number of organizational, psychosocial and psychological variables. Associations between the survey responses and injury records were tested using bivariate and multivariate analyses. A 5% of the PC-workers had at least one OSHA-recordable musculoskeletal injury over the year, and the injuries were significantly associated with: organizational factors (lower people-oriented culture), psychosocial factors (lower supervisor support), and structural factors (job title: being a patient care assistant). The results show support for a multifactorial understanding of musculoskeletal injuries in hospital PC-workers. An increased focus on the various dimensions associated with injury reports, particularly the organizational and psychosocial factors, could contribute to more efficient interventions and programs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Avaliação da rede de centros de atenção psicossocial: entre a saúde coletiva e a saúde mental Evaluación de la red de atención psicosocial en la perspectiva de la salud colectiva, Campinas, Sureste de Brasil Evaluation of the network of psychosocial care centers: between collective and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Teresa Onocko Campos

    2009-08-01

    the transcription of each group's recorded material, narratives were constructed following Ricoeur's theoretical framework. At the second stage of the focus groups, these narratives were presented to the participants, who could contest, correct and validate them. The preliminary results were discussed in workshops, with the aim of developing a good practice guide in CAPS III. RESULTS: The study identified strong points and weaknesses concerning the care provided during the crisis, articulation with the primary care network, formulation of therapeutic projects, management and organization in reference teams, educational background and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: The network of psychosocial care centers in Campinas stands out due to its originality in the implementation of six CAPS III and to its efficacy in providing comprehensive assistance to users and family members in the moment of crisis and in rehabilitation. The organization in reference technician and/or team prevails, as well as the development of therapeutic projects. Night teams reduction is the most important problem and the main source of workers' stress. The professionals' education proved to be insufficient to deal with the challenges faced by these services.

  19. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Sau Fong Leung, Frederick KK Yeung, Wai Kit Wong School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major healthcare databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy, psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of

  20. Patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Patient centeredness means providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions’.The concept assumes that both physicians and patients are experts; physicians in diagnostic and

  1. Quality-Adjusted Cost Functions for Child-Care Centers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mocan, H Naci

    1995-01-01

    Using a newly compiled data set, this paper estimates multi- product translog cost functions for 399 child care centers from California, Colorado, Connecticut, and North Carolina. Quality of child care is controlled by a quality index, which has been shown to be positively related to child outcomes by previous research. Nonprofit centers that receive public money, either from the state or federal government, (which is tied to higher standards), have total variable costs that are 18 percent hi...

  2. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  3. Mass conflict and care in war affected areas. In search of assessment and psychosocial intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Research in this thesis is focused on the relevance of psychosocial programs in areas of mass violence. Central questions are: how to assess needs in terms of psychosocial health, how to best address those needs, and what is the effectiveness of these mental health interventions? Our findings in

  4. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  5. An Analysis of the Child and Adult Care Food Programs in Child Care Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kapur, Kanika

    1999-01-01

    ...) that provides healthy meals and snacks in child and adult day care facilities. This report uses the Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes study to analyze the characteristics of three types of child care centers: (1...

  6. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided...... tools. CONCLUSION: Each approach has a primary application: MI, when ambivalence threatens positive change; IIS, when integrating newly diagnosed chronic conditions; and GSD, when problem solving is difficult, or deadlocked. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Professionals must critically consider the context...

  7. Comparing CenteringPregnancy® to standard prenatal care plus prenatal education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is significant evidence to support the importance of prenatal care in preventing adverse outcomes such as preterm birth and low infant birth weight. Previous studies have indicated that the benefits of prenatal care are not evenly distributed throughout the social strata. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that among particular populations, rates of preterm birth are unchanged or increasing. This suggests that an alternate care model is necessary, one that seeks to addresses some of the myriad of social factors that also contribute to adverse birth outcomes. In previous studies, the group prenatal care model CenteringPregnancy® had been shown to reduce adverse birth outcomes, but to date, no comparison had been made with a model that included prenatal education. This study sought to investigate whether any significant difference remained within the comparison groups when both models accounted for social factors. Methods This analysis was based on survey data collected from a prospective cohort of pregnant women through the All Our Babies Study in Calgary, Alberta. Results At baseline, there were significant differences between the comparison groups in their psychosocial health, with the women in the CenteringPregnancy® group scoring higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress and anxiety. At four months postpartum, the differences between the groups were no longer significant. Conclusions: These results suggest that CenteringPregnancy® can recruit and retain a demographically vulnerable group of women with a constellation of risk factors for poor pregnancy and birth outcomes, including poverty, language barriers and poor mental health. Post program, the rates of stress, anxiety and depression were similar to other women with more social and financial advantage. These findings suggest that CenteringPregnancy® may be a community based care strategy that contributes to improved mental health, knowledge, and behaviours to optimize outcomes

  8. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Regan

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma. Interviews were analysed using the framework approach.Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening and

  9. Seeking Humanizing Care in Patient-Centered Care Process: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Esmaeili, Maryam; Salsali, Mahvash

    Patient-centered care is both a goal in itself and a tool for enhancing health outcomes. The application of patient-centered care in health care services globally however is diverse. This article reports on a study that sought to introduce patient-centered care. The aim of this study is to explore the process of providing patient-centered care in critical care units. The study used a grounded theory method. Data were collected on 5 critical care units in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Purposive and theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using 29 semistructured interviews with 27 participants (nurses, patients, and physician). Data obtained were analyzed according to the analysis stages of grounded theory and constant comparison to identify the concepts, context, and process of the study. The core category of this grounded theory is "humanizing care," which consisted of 4 interrelated phases, including patient acceptance, purposeful patient assessment and identification, understanding patients, and patient empowerment. A core category of humanizing care integrated the theory. Humanizing care was an outcome and process. Patient-centered care is a dynamic and multifaceted process provided according to the nurses' understanding of the concept. Patient-centered care does not involve repeating routine tasks; rather, it requires an all-embracing understanding of the patients and showing respect for their values, needs, and preferences.

  10. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  11. METHODS OF PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION IN PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTIONS OF THE ORYOL REGION AT THE MODERN STAGE OF ORGANIZATION OF PSYCHIATRIC CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Gardanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers actual issues of psychosocial rehabilitation at the present stage of psychiatric care to the population of the Oryol region.The purpose. Study and generalize the experience of the use of methods of psychosocial rehabilitation in several psychiatric institutions of the Oryol region.Materials and methods. 1. The analysis of activity of out-patient departments, where we developed a new "development Program of sociorehabilitation service in regional psychoneurologic dispensary". 2. Analysis of the activity of hospital services, where the main role is played by psycho-social rehabilitation. 3. The analysis of new forms of psychosocial rehabilitation: in terms of the specifics of Oryol oblast psychiatric hospital of specialized type with intensive supervision (OPHSTIO.Results. As a result of the analysis we identified the most effective methods of sociorehabilitation: outpatient: "Social card of the outpatient" is intended for persons in need of social, psychological, legal and other professional assistance, that allows to plan and control the types of assistance provided. The organization of a hostel for patients at the outpatient stage, which allowed to introduce a "full" recovery cycle. In OPHSTIO — implementation of multiprofessional teams and "sick tips" and the opening of an Orthodox chapel of the Mother of God icon "All grieving pleasures".Conclusions. Methods of psychosocial rehabilitation allowed to optimize the work of the main stages of treatment and rehabilitation processes, to provide in a timely manner the necessary comprehensive care to patients based on individual needs of the mentally ill in the outpatient and inpatient therapy in the Oryol region.

  12. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  13. Baseline Physiologic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Transgender Youth Seeking Care for Gender Dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Johanna; Schrager, Sheree M; Belzer, Marvin; Simons, Lisa K; Clark, Leslie F

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe baseline characteristics of participants in a prospective observational study of transgender youth (aged 12-24 years) seeking care for gender dysphoria at a large, urban transgender youth clinic. Eligible participants presented consecutively for care at between February 2011 and June 2013 and completed a computer-assisted survey at their initial study visit. Physiologic data were abstracted from medical charts. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, with limited comparisons between transmasculine and transfeminine participants. A total of 101 youth were evaluated for physiologic parameters, 96 completed surveys assessing psychosocial parameters. About half (50.5%) of the youth were assigned a male sex at birth. Baseline physiologic values were within normal ranges for assigned sex at birth. Youth recognized gender incongruence at a mean age of 8.3 years (standard deviation = 4.5), yet disclosed to their family much later (mean = 17.1; standard deviation = 4.2). Gender dysphoria was high among all participants. Thirty-five percent of the participants reported depression symptoms in the clinical range. More than half of the youth reported having thought about suicide at least once in their lifetime, and nearly a third had made at least one attempt. Baseline physiologic parameters were within normal ranges for assigned sex at birth. Transgender youth are aware of the incongruence between their internal gender identity and their assigned sex at early ages. Prevalence of depression and suicidality demonstrates that youth may benefit from timely and appropriate intervention. Evaluation of these youth over time will help determine the impact of medical intervention and mental health therapy. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychosocial determinants of physicians' intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2015-01-22

    Euthanasia remains controversial in Canada and an issue of debate among physicians. Most studies have explored the opinion of health professionals regarding its legalization, but have not investigated their intentions when faced with performing euthanasia. These studies are also considered atheoretical. The purposes of the present study were to fill this gap in the literature by identifying the psychosocial determinants of physicians' intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care and verifying whether respecting the patient's autonomy is important for physicians. A validated anonymous questionnaire based on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behavior was mailed to a random sample of 445 physicians from the province of Quebec, Canada. The response rate was 38.3% and the mean score for intention was 3.94 ± 2.17 (range: 1 to 7). The determinants of intention among physicians were: knowing patients' wishes (OR = 10.77; 95%CI: 1.33-86.88), perceived behavioral control-physicians' evaluation of their ability to adopt a given behavior-(OR = 4.35; 95%CI: 1.44-13.15), moral norm-the appropriateness of adopting a given behavior according to one's personal and moral values-(OR = 3.22; 95%CI: 1.29-8.00) and cognitive attitude-factual consequences of the adoption of a given behavior-(OR = 3.16; 95%CI: 1.20-8.35). This model correctly classified 98.8% of physicians. Specific beliefs that might discriminate physicians according to their level of intention were also identified. For instance, physicians' moral norm was related to the ethical principle of beneficence. Overall, physicians have weak intentions to practice euthanasia in palliative care. Nevertheless, respecting patients' final wishes concerning euthanasia seems to be of particular importance to them and greatly affects their motivation to perform euthanasia.

  15. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    OpenAIRE

    van Wynsberghe, Aimee

    2012-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship?what I refer to as care robots?require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What?s more, given the stage of their develo...

  16. Experiencing emotional and psychosocial support during preparation for re-integration: a study of street children under the care of Retrak Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Eslaminejad, Paria

    2016-01-01

    Erasmus Mundus Master’s Programme in Social Work with Families and Children This thesis investigates children’s experience of psychosocial and emotional support of (non-parental) caregivers in residential facilities in preparation for their re-integration into family based care. The thesis urges that successful preparation of ‘street children’ for re-integration into family based care requires professional psychosocial and emotional support.The author uses Bowlby’s attachment theory as wel...

  17. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wynsberghe, Amy Louise

    2013-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship—what I refer to as care robots—require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a

  18. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  19. Patient-centered Fertility Care: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Healthcare areas, especially fertility care (commonly accompanied with high emotions, as well as long-term and recurring treatment periods could exclusively benefit from patient-centered care (PCC. Despite evident advantages of PCC, this approach has not been practiced as a routine procedure in current clinical environments yet, even in western developed countries. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate the significance and different aspects of PCC, while emphasizing on patient-centered fertility care, its challenges, and applicable recommendations in this regard. Methods: This narrative review was conducted on 29 relevant medical and clinical papers (published during 1990-2015 collected using various national and international databases (e.g., SID, Magiran, Medlib, Google scholar, Proquest, Pubmed, Wiley, Science direct, and Scopus. Key words and phrases used in this review were “infertility”, “fertility care”, “childlessness”, “patient-centered care”, “patient-centered fertility care” “shared decision-making”, “infertile patient preferences”, and “patient involvement in fertility care”. Results: According to the literature, implementation challenges of patient-centered fertility care were reported as different individual and organizational factors. These factors include lack of professional motivation to change, underestimating the significance of patient-centeredness by healthcare professionals, difficulty in translation of feedback into concrete measures, lack of time and financial resources, insufficient experience of healthcare professionals with regard to identification of needs and preferences of patients, traditional organizational culture, and common misconceptions. Conclusion: Promotion of patient-centered fertility services requires the identification of infertile needs and priorities of individuals, designation of interventional and supportive programs based on sociocultural

  20. Patient guardians as an instrument for person centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Lopa; Frescas, Ruben; Kiwelu, Humphrey

    2014-05-08

    Person-centered care involves keeping the person at the center of the care planning and decision-making process. While the theory behind person-centered care is commonly shared, its application in healthcare settings is more challenging. In a number of African countries, a lesson emerges involving the application of person-centered care through the use of patient guardians. Patient guardians, often family or close friends, act as an extension of the patient's hospital care team. Medical teams engage with these self-designated individuals who invest their time and efforts in the care of the patient. More importantly, the guardian continues this role and relationship when the patient is released from the hospital to return home. Healthcare workers view patient guardians as a valuable resource. In a structured manner, guardians become stewards of information regarding topics such as hand hygiene and infection control. The knowledge gained can help the recovering patient upon discharge and potentially spread the information to others in the community. Further study of this model may show clear applicability to help improve health literacy in underserved settings in both low-income and high-income countries.

  1. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  2. Physical and psychosocial function in residential aged-care elders: effect of Nintendo Wii Sports games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Power, Nicola; Wooller, Leslie; Lucas, Patricia; Whatman, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental pilot study examined whether the Nintendo Wii Sports (NWS) active video game (exergame) system could significantly improve the functional ability, physical activity levels, and quality of life of 34 older adults (4 men and 30 women, 83 ± 8 yr) living in 2 residential aged-care (RAC) centers. Change score analyses indicated the intervention group had significantly greater increases in bicep curl muscular endurance, physical activity levels, and psychological quality of life than the control group (p games were fun and provided an avenue for greater socialization. These results add some further support to the utilization of NWS exergames in the RAC context.

  3. Psychosocial work characteristics of personal care and service occupations: a process for developing meaningful measures for a multiethnic workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Annekatrin; Heaney, Catherine A; Fujishiro, Kaori; Gong, Fang; Baron, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Despite their rapid increase in number, workers in personal care and service occupations are underrepresented in research on psychosocial work characteristics and occupational health. Some of the research challenges stem from the high proportion of immigrants in these occupations. Language barriers, low literacy, and cultural differences as well as their nontraditional work setting (i.e., providing service for one person in his/her home) make generic questionnaire measures inadequate for capturing salient aspects of personal care and service work. This study presents strategies for (1) identifying psychosocial work characteristics of home care workers that may affect their occupational safety and health and (2) creating survey measures that overcome barriers posed by language, low literacy, and cultural differences. We pursued these aims in four phases: (Phase 1) Six focus groups to identify the psychosocial work characteristics affecting the home care workers' occupational safety and health; (Phase 2) Selection of questionnaire items (i.e., questions or statements to assess the target construct) and first round of cognitive interviews (n = 30) to refine the items in an iterative process; (Phase 3) Item revision and second round of cognitive interviews (n = 11); (Phase 4) Quantitative pilot test to ensure the scales' reliability and validity across three language groups (English, Spanish, and Chinese; total n = 404). Analysis of the data from each phase informed the nature of subsequent phases. This iterative process ensured that survey measures not only met the reliability and validity criteria across groups, but were also meaningful to home care workers. This complex process is necessary when conducting research with nontraditional and multilingual worker populations.

  4. Evaluation of Managerial Needs for Palliative Care Centers: Perspectives of Medical Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafadar, Didem; Ince, Nurhan; Akcakaya, Adem; Gumus, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    Palliative therapies have an important role in increasing the quality of healthcare and in dealing with physical and psychosocial problems due to cancer. We here aimed to evaluate the managerial perspectives and opinions of the hospital managers and clinical directors about specialized palliative care centers. This study was conducted in two large-scale hospitals in which oncology care is given with medical directors (n:70). A questionnaire developed by the researchers asking about demographic characteristics and professional experience, opinions and suggestions of medical directors about providing and integrating palliative care into healthcare was used and responses were analyzed. Potential barriers in providing palliative care (PC) and integrating PC into health systems were perceived as institutional by most of the doctors (97%) and nurses (96%). Social barriers were reported by 54% of doctors and 82% of nurses. Barriers due to interest and knowledge of health professionals about PC were reported by 76% of doctors and 75% of nurses. Among encouragement ideas to provide PC were dealing with staff educational needs (72%), improved working conditions (77%) and establishing a special PC unit (49)%. An independent PC unit was suggested by 27.7% of participants and there was no difference between the hospitals. To overcome the barriers for integration of PC into health systems, providing education for health professionals and patient relatives, raising awareness in society, financial arrangements and providing infrastructure were suggested. The necessity for planning and programming were emphasized. In our study, the opinions and perspectives of hospital managers and clinical directors were similar to current approaches. Managerial needs for treating cancer in efficient cancer centers, increasing the capacity of health professionals to provide care in every stage of cancer, effective education planning and patient care management were emphasized.

  5. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Fecal coliforms on environmental surfaces in two day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weniger, B G; Ruttenber, A J; Goodman, R A; Juranek, D D; Wahlquist, S P; Smith, J D

    1983-01-01

    A survey of environmental surfaces in two Atlanta area day care centers was conducted to determine the prevalence of fecal coliform bacteria, considered a marker for the presence of fecal contamination which might contain pathogenic parasites, bacteria, or viruses. Fecal coliforms were found in 17 (4.3%) of 398 representative samples of building surfaces, furniture, and other objects. These surfaces may be involved in the chain of transmission of enteric diseases among children. Therefore, disinfection of inanimate objects, in addition to good handwashing, may be important in controlling the spread of enteric diseases in day care centers. PMID:6830225

  7. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  8. Human resource management in patient-centered pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J

    1994-04-01

    Patient-centered care may have the pharmacists and technicians reporting either directly or in a matrix to other than pharmacy administration. The pharmacy administrative people will need to be both effective leaders and managers utilizing excellent human resource management skills. Significant creativity and innovation will be needed for transition from departmental-based services to patient care team services. Changes in the traditional methods of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, developing, inspiring, evaluating, and disciplining are required in this new environment.

  9. Using Prenatal Advocates to Implement a Psychosocial Education Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder during Pregnancy: Feasibility, Care Engagement, and Predelivery Behavioral Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole C; Wenz-Gross, Melodie; Weinreb, Linda; Moffitt, Jennifer Jo Averill

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) engage in more high-risk behavior and use less prenatal care. Although treating depression in pregnancy is becoming widespread, options for addressing PTSD are few. This study was designed to test the feasibility of implementing a manualized psychosocial PTSD intervention, Seeking Safety, delivered by prenatal advocates. All women entering prenatal care at two federally qualified health centers were screened for current symptoms of PTSD. One site was selected randomly to have prenatal care advocates deliver eight Seeking Safety topics for women that indicated clinical or subclinical PTSD symptoms. Baseline and pre-delivery interviews were conducted, which collected background characteristics and assessed PTSD severity and coping skills. Medical records were collected to document care visits. Documentation of participation rates, fidelity to the treatment, and qualitative feedback from advocates and participants was collected. More than one-half (57.3%) of the intervention women received all Seeking Safety sessions and fidelity ratings of the session showed acceptable quality. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, intervention women participated in significantly more prenatal care visits (M = 11.7 versus 8.9; p accounting for baseline differences, intervention women also reduced negative coping skills but not PTSD symptoms. Using prenatal care advocates to deliver Seeking Safety sessions to women screening positive for PTSD symptoms at entry to prenatal care is a promising intervention that seems to increase prenatal care participation and may reduce negative coping strategies. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [A basic health care center. Care oriented at the community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquilles Bonet, C; Quesada Santaulaira, L; Florensa Roca, C; Piñol Jové, M A; Cruz Esteve, I; Rodríguez Rosich, A

    1997-01-01

    Principle problems of a basic health care area (Lérida) are identified. This area, which has a patient case load of 22,244 people, was studied during the winter of 1993-94 by using information from various sources. Results indicate that the population of this community are basically young, urban, have a high cultural and social level, and are mostly employed. The principle causes of mortality are the same as in the rest of Cataluña. Diseases that cause the most working days lost to illness are: respiratory, mental and bone-joint problems. The most frequent diseases seen in the clinic are: hypertension, respiratory infections, endocrine and mental. An overall look at the state of health of these patients show that the principle problems are: tobacco use, high blood pressure, arthritis, lumbago, depression, stroke, diabetes and breast cancer.

  11. Care workers health in Swiss nursing homes and its association with psychosocial work environment: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaini, Suzanne R; Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Simon, Michael; Kunz, Regina; De Geest, Sabina; Schwendimann, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated poor health of care workers in nursing homes. Yet, little is known about the prevalence of physical and mental health outcomes, and their associations with the psychosocial work environment in nursing homes. (1) To explore the prevalence of physical and mental health outcomes of care workers in Swiss nursing homes, (2) their association with psychosocial work environment. This is a secondary data analysis of the cross-sectional Swiss Nursing Home Human Resources Project (SHURP). We used survey data on socio-demographic characteristics and work environment factors from care workers (N=3471) working in Swiss nursing homes (N=155), collected between May 2012 and April 2013. GEE logistic regression models were used to estimate the relationship between psychosocial work environment and physical and mental health outcomes, taking into account care workers' age. Back pain (19.0%) and emotional exhaustion (24.2%) were the most frequent self-reported physical and mental health. Back pain was associated with increased workload (odds ratios (OR) 1.52, confidence interval (CI) 1.29-1.79), conflict with other health professionals and lack of recognition (OR 1.72, CI 1.40-2.11), and frequent verbal aggression by residents (OR 1.36, CI 1.06-1.74), and inversely associated with staffing adequacy (OR 0.69, CI 0.56-0.84); emotional exhaustion was associated with increased workload (OR 1.96, CI 1.65-2.34), lack of job preparation (OR 1.41, CI 1.14-1.73), and conflict with other health professionals and lack of recognition (OR 1.68, CI 1.37-2.06), and inversely associated with leadership (OR 0.70, CI 0.56-0.87). Physical and mental health among care workers in Swiss nursing homes is of concern. Modifying psychosocial work environment factors offer promising strategies to improve health. Longitudinal studies are needed to conduct targeted assessments of care workers health status, taking into account their age, along with the exposure to all four

  12. Influence of psychosocial factors on self-care behaviors and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosansu, Gulhan; Erdogan, Semra

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the direct and indirect effects of psychosocial factors on self-care behavior and glycemic control in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study used a cross-sectional questionnaire survey design (N = 350). Data were collected using the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale and the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire. The relationship between the study variables was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and structural equation modeling. Self-efficacy was associated with social support, outcome expectancies, perceived interference, educational level, and self-care and A1C. According to the structural equation model, self-efficacy was the predictor variable that influenced both self-care and glycemic control. Self-efficacy in achieving desired health outcomes was found to play a central role in Turkish patients. Although interventions are planned and implemented to achieve and maintain self-management in individuals with diabetes, strengthening psychosocial factors, particularly self-efficacy, may contribute to adjustment to disease and good glycemic control in the long term.

  13. Care Coordination with Schools: The Role of Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Carpenter, Julianna

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Family-centered care has been associated with positive outcomes for children with special health care needs. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship of family-centered care as associated with care coordination with schools and school absences (e.g., missed days) as reported by parents of children with special health care needs. Methods The current study utilized data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs 2009-201 (N = 40,242) to achieve this purpose. The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs may be considered a nationally-representative and community-based sample of parent responses for children with special health care needs across the United States. Results Results from the current study indicate that family-centered care is associated with fewer absences and improved care coordination with schools when applicable. The variables of functional difficulties, poverty level, and the number of conditions were statistically controlled. Conclusions We suggest that the positive influence of family-centered care when practiced extends beyond the family and interacts with educational outcomes. We also suggest that the role of schools appears to be under-studied given the role that schools can play in family-centered care.

  14. Obesity perceptions and documentation among primary care clinicians at a rural academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Sohaib; Lasky, Rosalind; Brooks, W Blair; Batsis, John A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity recognition in primary care is important to address the epidemic. We aimed to evaluate primary care clinician-reported documentation, management practices, beliefs and attitudes toward obesity compared to body mass index (BMI) calculation, obesity prevalence and actual documentation of obesity as an active problem in electronic health record in a rural academic center. Our target population for previously validated clinician survey was 56 primary care providers working at 3 sites. We used calendar year 2012 data for assessment of baseline system performance for metrics of documentation of BMI in primary care visits, and proportion of visits in patients with obesity with obesity as a problem. Standard statistical methods assessed the data. Survey response rate was 91%. Average age of respondents was 48.9 years and 62.7% were females. 72.5% clinicians reported having normal BMI. The majority of clinicians reported regularly documenting obesity as an active problem, and utilized motivational interviewing and basic good nutrition and healthy exercise. Clinicians identified lack of discipline and exercise time, access to unhealthy food and psychosocial issues as major barriers. Most denied disliking weight loss discussion or patients taking up too much time. In 21,945 clinic visits and 11,208 annual preventive care visits in calendar year 2012, BMI was calculated in 93% visits but obesity documentation as an active problem only 27% of patients meeting BMI criteria for obesity. Despite high clinician-reported documentation of obesity as an active problem, actual obesity documentation rates remained low in a rural academic medical center. Copyright © 2015 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MULTIMEDIA CONCENTRATIONS OF PAH IN SEVERAL DAY CARE CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in nine day care centers in the spring of 1997. Indoor and outdoor air, food and beverages, indoor dust, and outdoor play area soil were sampled. The mean sums of 20 target PAH concentrations were 265 and 199 ng...

  16. Barriers for domestic violence screening in primary health care centers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iman Y. Alotaby

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... the field work of the study in the selected centers were the target population of this ... program; several methods were used to verify data entry. ..... asked about abuse.18 Based on the synthesis and interpretation of data from 25 ... in a primary care setting: the validity of ''feeling safe at home'' and prevalence ...

  17. Outcome evaluation of a community center-based program for mothers at high psychosocial risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, María José; Máiquez, María Luisa; Correa, Ana Delia; Martín, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Guacimara

    2006-09-01

    This study reported the outcome evaluation of the "Apoyo Personal y Familiar" (APF) program for poorly-educated mothers from multi-problem families, showing inadequate behavior with their children. APF is a community-based multi-site program delivered through weekly group meetings in municipal resource centers. A total of 340 mothers referred by the municipal social services of Tenerife, Spain were assessed; 185 mothers participated in the APF program that lasted 8 months, and 155 mothers were in the control group. Pre-post test comparisons for the intervention group and post-test comparisons with the control group on self-rating measures of maternal beliefs, personal agency and child-rearing practices were performed. Multivariate tests, t tests and effect sizes (ES) were calculated to determine the program effectiveness on the outcome measures. Mothers' support of nurturist and nativist beliefs and the reported use of Neglect-permissive and Coercive practices significantly decreased after program completion whereas the reported use of Inductive practices significantly increased. Increases in self-efficacy, internal control and role difficulty were also significant in relation to those of the control group. The program was especially effective for older mothers, with fewer children, living in a two-parent family, in urban areas and with either low or medium educational levels. The program was very effective in changing the mothers' perceived competences and modestly effective in changing their beliefs about child development and education and reported child-rearing practices. Changes in personal agency are very important for at-risk parents who feel helpless and with no control over their lives.

  18. Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care - A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John

    2017-09-25

    Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning "digitalisation" of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinated and individualized integrated care. Yet the promise has been greater than the benefits, and progress has been slow compared to other industries. This paper describes for non-technical readers how information technology was used to support integrated care schemes in six EU services, and suggests practical ways forward to use the new opportunities to build person-centered integrated care.

  19. Accessing patient-centered care using the advanced access model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantau, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Waits and delays for healthcare are legendary. These delays are not only frustrating and potentially hazardous for patients and providers but also represent significant cost to office practices. The traditional medical model that defines urgent care versus routine care is a vain and futile attempt to sort demand. This approach is at constant odds with patients' definition of urgency. Trusting patients to determine when and how they want to access care makes sense from a customer service perspective. If approached systematically using the principles of Advanced Access, patient demand patterns can be tracked to forecast demand. These demand patterns become the template for deploying the resources necessary to meet patients' needs. Although not a simple journey, the transformation to Advanced Access provides an entree to patient-centered care where patients can say, "I get exactly the care I want and need, when I want and need it."

  20. Patient-centered care, nurse work environment and implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss acute care hospitals: A cross-sectional multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachnick, Stefanie; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Baernholdt, Marianne; Simon, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Patient-centered care is a key element of high-quality healthcare and determined by individual, structural and process factors. Patient-centered care is associated with improved patient-reported, clinical and economic outcomes. However, while hospital-level characteristics influence patient-centered care, little evidence is available on the association of patient-centered care with characteristic such as the nurse work environment or implicit rationing of nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe patient-centered care in Swiss acute care hospitals and to explore the associations with nurse work environment factors and implicit rationing of nursing care. This is a sub-study of the cross-sectional multi-center "Matching Registered Nurse Services with Changing Care Demands" study. We included 123 units in 23 acute care hospitals from all three of Switzerland's language regions. The sample consisted of 2073 patients, hospitalized for at least 24 h and ≥18 years of age. From the same hospital units, 1810 registered nurses working in direct patient care were also included. Patients' perceptions of patient-centered care were assessed using four items from the Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire. Nurses completed questionnaires assessing perceived staffing and resource adequacy, adjusted staffing, leadership ability and level of implicit rationing of nursing care. We applied a Generalized Linear Mixed Models for analysis including individual-level patient and nurse data aggregated to the unit level. Patients reported high levels of patient-centered care: 90% easily understood nurses, 91% felt the treatment and care were adapted for their situation, 82% received sufficient information, and 70% felt involved in treatment and care decisions. Higher staffing and resource adequacy was associated with higher levels of patient-centered care, e.g., sufficient information (β 0.638 [95%-CI: 0.30-0.98]). Higher leadership ratings were associated with

  1. Personally tailored activities for improving psychosocial outcomes for people with dementia in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Ralph; Renom, Anna; Renom, Helena; Meyer, Gabriele

    2018-02-13

    People with dementia who are being cared for in long-term care settings are often not engaged in meaningful activities. Offering them activities which are tailored to their individual interests and preferences might improve their quality of life and reduce challenging behaviour. ∙ To assess the effects of personally tailored activities on psychosocial outcomes for people with dementia living in long-term care facilities.∙ To describe the components of the interventions.∙ To describe conditions which enhance the effectiveness of personally tailored activities in this setting. We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register, on 16 June 2017 using the terms: personally tailored OR individualized OR individualised OR individual OR person-centred OR meaningful OR personhood OR involvement OR engagement OR engaging OR identity. We also performed additional searches in MEDLINE (Ovid SP), Embase (Ovid SP), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Web of Science (ISI Web of Science), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP, to ensure that the search for the review was as up to date and as comprehensive as possible. We included randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials offering personally tailored activities. All interventions included an assessment of the participants' present or past preferences for, or interests in, particular activities as a basis for an individual activity plan. Control groups received either usual care or an active control intervention. Two authors independently checked the articles for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of included studies. For all studies, we assessed the risk of selection bias, performance bias, attrition bias and detection bias. In case of missing information, we contacted the study authors. We included eight studies with 957 participants. The mean age of participants in the studies ranged from 78 to 88

  2. O psiquiatra na atenção psicossocial: entre o luto e a liberdade The psychiatrist in psychosocial care: between grief and liberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardônio Menezes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, vemos surgir, a partir da década de setenta, diversas propostas inovadoras no campo da atenção à saúde mental. A partir de então, multiplicam-se no país ambulatórios de psicologia e psiquiatria, hospitais-dia, residências terapêuticas e diversos núcleos/centros de atenção psicossocial. Transformados em política pública, os centros de atenção psicossocial espalham-se pelo país, preconizando um atendimento ambulatorial, interdisciplinar e de orientação territorial. Geralmente formado sob os auspícios de um grande hospital, o psiquiatra que se propõe a trabalhar, a partir da ótica psicossocial, imerso em uma pequena cidade, vê-se exposto às diversas contradições e ilogicidades do discurso psiquiátrico clássico. Os variados saberes locais são uma ameaça ao saber psiquiátrico medicamente constituído. Respostas, antes fáceis no interior do hospital, têm variadas implicações no território e adquirem uma complexidade para a qual o psiquiatra não se encontra preparado. Assim, este trabalho tenta demonstrar a dissonância entre essas duas espécies de psiquiatria: a clássica (afinada com a biologia, com a normatividade e com a instituição e a psicossocial (que se volta para respostas localmente construídas e que se afina com o homem, em uma dimensão muito além do seu corpo.Since the seventies Brazil has witnessed a diversity of new proposals in the field of mental health care. Since then, the psychology and psychiatry ambulatories, day-hospitals, therapeutical shelters and psychosocial care centers have multiplied. Transformed into a public policy, the psychosocial care centers are spread all over the country, offering outpatient care with interdisciplinary and territorial orientation. Generally established under the auspices of a great hospital, the psychiatrist who considers working from a psychosocial perspective in a small city, has to deal with the classic contradictions of the psychiatric

  3. Pattern of disability among persons who availed half-way home-care services for psychosocial rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is dearth of studies related to pattern of disability among persons who availed psychosocial rehabilitation services in India. We studied the pattern of disability among persons who availed half-way home-care services for psychosocial rehabilitation. Materials and Methods: Out of 130 case files of discharged patients, 50 files were randomly selected for data collection. Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Schedule was used to assess the pattern of disability in the sample. Results: The study revealed that only one-third (35% of the residents had disability in self-care, 41% in communication and understanding and 47% in interpersonal relationship. Overall, majority (76% of the respondents had moderate level of psychiatric disability at the time of discharge from half-way home. There was no significant relationship between gender and type of psychiatric illness with the level of disability. The overall disability correlated positively with the duration of illness (rs=0.39. Conclusion: Three-fourth of the residents who availed half-way home-care services had moderate level of disability.

  4. The Chinese family-centered care survey for adult intensive care unit: A psychometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ling; Feng, Jui-Ying; Wang, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jing-Huei

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a family-centered care survey for Chinese adult intensive care units and to establish the survey's psychometric properties. Family-centered care (FCC) is widely recognized as an ideal model of care. Few studies have explored FCC perceptions among family members of adult critical care patients in Asian countries, and no Chinese FCC measurement has been developed. An English version of the 3-factor family-centered care survey for adult intensive care units (FCCS-AICU) was translated into Chinese using a modified back translation procedure. Based on the literature review, two additional concepts, information and empowerment, were added to the Chinese FCCS-AICU. The psychometric properties of the Chinese FCCS-AICU were determined with 249 family members from a medical center in Taiwan and were tested for construct and convergent validity, and internal consistency. Both the monolingual and bilingual equivalence tests of the English and Chinese versions of the 3-factor FCCS-AICU were supported. Exploratory factor analysis supported the 5-factor structure of the Chinese FCCS-AICU with a total explained variance of 58.34%. The Chinese FCCS-AICU was correlated with the Chinese Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Internal consistency, determined by Cronbach's α, for the overall scale was .94. The Chinese FCCS-AICU is a valid and reliable tool for measuring perceptions of FCC by family members of adult intensive care patients within Chinese-speaking communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center Network: Improving Care and Outcomes in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Sandeep; Melendres-Groves, Lana; Pawar, Leena; Cajigas, Hector R

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a chronic, progressive, life-threatening disease that requires expert multidisciplinary care. To facilitate this level of care, the Pulmonary Hypertension Association established across the United States a network of pulmonary hypertension care centers (PHCCs) with special expertise in PH, particularly pulmonary arterial hypertension, to raise the overall quality of care and outcomes for patients with this life-threatening disease. Since the inception of PHCCs in September 2014, to date 35 centers have been accredited in the United States. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. PHCCs also offer additional opportunities for improvements in PH care. The patient registry offered through the PHCCs is an organized system by which data are collected to evaluate the outcomes of patients with PH. This registry helps in detecting variations in outcomes across centers, thus identifying opportunities for improvement. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan, training, and tools throughout the PHCC network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care center staff and individuals with PH and their families are the cornerstone of the PHCCs. The Pulmonary Vascular Network of the American College of Chest Physicians believes this to be a positive step that will improve the quality of care delivered in the United States to patients with PH. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Life Cycle of the Child Care Center -- Understanding Center Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Gary; Ratekin, Cindy

    2001-01-01

    Identifies the seven stages of the life cycle for child care centers: entrepreneurial; development; formalization; maturity; stagnation; death; and renewal. Suggests that critical transition points exist for organizational development, and that, if they are aware of and understand each stage of development, administrators may intervene at those…

  7. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Combining Intensive Care and Family Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Shunsuke; Saito, Tomoko; Ichikawa, Saori; Saito, Kaori; Takada, Tsuzumi; Noguchi, Satoko; Yamada, Miki; Nakagawa, Fumi

    Advances in treatment in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for preterm and sick newborns have improved the mortality rate of patients, but admission to the NICU may disrupt parent-infant interaction, with adverse consequences for infants and their families because of physical, psychological, and emotional separation. The concept of family centered care (FCC), in which family members are part of the care team and infants are close to the family, is important and has become popular in NICU. In 2013, we created a team called "Kodomo-Kazoku Mannaka" to promote FCC in Japan, and visited the NICU at Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, which is internationally famous for FCC. Since this fruitful visit, we have been promoting FCC in Japan by exhibitions and presentations of the FCC ideas at academic conferences and using internet services. A questionnaire survey conducted in 2015 revealed that the importance and the benefits of FCC in NICU are recognized, although there are some barriers to FCC in each facility. It is hard to change facilities and social systems right away, but it is easier and more important to change people's minds. Our role is to spread the concept of FCC and to help each facility find its own way to adopt it. We will continue to make efforts encourage to promote FCC in Japan.

  9. Psychosocial Correlates of Burnout and Depression in HIV Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalimi, Hamid; Roffe, Michael W.

    Job stress in health care professionals who provide care to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients has been a subject of interest to a number of health center and hospital physicians, administrators, and to some extent, behavioral scientists. In this study psychosocial correlates of burnout and depression in HIV counselors were…

  10. The role of health centers in preventive care provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemetova G.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess the importance of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, in the early detection of risk factors for the development of chronic non-communicable diseases and the development of a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. On the basis of the Health Center of Engels Center for Medical Prevention in the Saratov Region, the detection of risk factors for 2011-2015 was analyzed according to statistical reporting (form No. 68 and health cards (form025-CZ/y of 207 patients. To assess the satisfaction of visitors with the work of the Center, a specially developed questionnaire was conducted, which included 22 questions that characterize the patient profile, his attitude to the organization and the results of the survey, and the motivation to modify the way of life. Results. The study confirmed the important role of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, the formation of a healthy lifestyle and the early detection of diseases and risk factors for their development. Conclusion. Only joint efforts of medical institutions, authorities, educational organizations, mass media can lead to the formation of the population's responsibility for their health and readiness to modify the way of life.

  11. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  12. Adult care transitioning for adolescents with special health care needs: a pivotal role for family centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Naomi N; Scal, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    To examine the relationship between having a usual source of care, family centered care, and transition counseling for adolescents with special health care needs. Data are from 18,198 parents/guardians, of youth aged 12-17 years, who participated in the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Linear and logistic regression models were used to define relationships between parent report of identification of a usual place and provider of medical care for their child and counseling on four transition issues: transfer to adult providers, review of future health needs, maintaining health insurance in adulthood, and youth taking responsibility for care. The direct mediating effect of family centered care was evaluated. Youth having a usual source of care (vs. not) were more likely to receive counseling on future health needs (47.4 vs. 33.6%, P needs (56.3 vs. 39.6%, P needs and 94.9% of the effect of a usual source of care on encouragement to take responsibility for care. Study findings support the development of health care delivery models focusing on family centered care to the same degree as other health care access issues.

  13. Improving Pain Care with Project ECHO in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren; Zlateva, Ianita; Davis, Bennet; Bifulco, Lauren; Giannotti, Tierney; Coman, Emil; Spegman, Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Pain is an extremely common complaint in primary care, and patient outcomes are often suboptimal. This project evaluated the impact of Project ECHO Pain videoconference case-based learning sessions on knowledge and quality of pain care in two Federally Qualified Health Centers. Quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention, with comparison group. Two large, multisite federally qualified health centers in Connecticut and Arizona. Intervention (N = 10) and comparison (N = 10) primary care providers. Primary care providers attended 48 weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions between January and December 2013, led by a multidisciplinary pain specialty team. Surveys and focus groups assessed providers' pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Electronic health record data were analyzed to evaluate opioid prescribing and specialty referrals. Compared with control, primary care providers in the intervention had a significantly greater increase in pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Providers who attended ECHO were more likely to use formal assessment tools and opioid agreements and refer to behavioral health and physical therapy compared with control providers. Opioid prescribing decreased significantly more among providers in the intervention compared with those in the control group. Pain is an extremely common and challenging problem, particularly among vulnerable patients such as those cared for at the more than 1,200 Federally Qualified Health Centers in the United States. In this study, attendance at weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions not only improved knowledge and self-efficacy, but also altered prescribing and referral patterns, suggesting that knowledge acquired during ECHO sessions translated into practice changes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  14. A comprehensive approach in hospice shared care in Taiwan: Nonelderly patients have more physical, psychosocial and spiritual suffering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Hsien Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While symptomatic differences exist between younger and older advanced cancer patients, few studies have examined the differences in their care with respect to age. Our goals were to examine the influences of age differences on physical, psychosocial and spiritual distress among advanced cancer patients. Advanced cancer patients who resided in Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital during 2007–2008 were recruited. Data were collected through professional consultants. The influences of age variations on physical, psychosocial and spiritual distress in nonelderly (<60 years old and elderly (≧60 years old patients were analyzed. A total of 1013 advanced cancer patients were included in the analyses with 467 nonelderly patients and 546 elderly patients. Nonelderly patients were identified to have a higher baseline pain level (4.0 vs. 2.8, p<0.001, breakthrough pain (19.3% vs. 9.9%, p<0.01, insomnia (6.4% vs. 2.7%, p=0.006, emotional distress (69.0% vs. 60.6%, p=0.013, and unwillingness to pass away because of concern for loved ones (18.8% vs. 11.9%, p=0.003 with significant difference. Elderly ones were concerned about unfulfilled wishes (29.7% vs. 18.4%, p<0.001 in spiritual concerns. After adjustments in regression models, nonelderly age (<60 years old still revealed significant positive or negative impact on all categories of distress. Patients aged under 60 years have more physical, psychosocial and spiritual suffering. This study suggested that professional practitioners should provide intensive care for vulnerable terminally ill cancer patients.

  15. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    OpenAIRE

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori; Zélia Maria Mendes Biasoli Alves

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying f...

  16. A Cost Analysis of Day Care Centers in Pennsylvania. Center for Human Service Development Report No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-Wei; Wise, Karl

    The purpose of this study is to provide day care center management and government funding agencies with empirical estimates of the costs of day care centers in Pennsylvania. Based on cost data obtained from the Department of Public Welfare and survey information from the Pennsylvania Day Care Study Project, average and marginal costs of day care…

  17. [Feasibility and acceptance of computer-based assessment for the identification of psychosocially distressed patients in routine clinical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlen, Susanne; Ott, Martin; Marten-Mittag, Birgitt; Haimerl, Wolfgang; Dinkel, Andreas; Duehmke, Eckhart; Klein, Christian; Schaefer, Christof; Herschbach, Peter

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated feasibility and acceptance of computer-based assessment for the identification of psychosocial distress in routine radiotherapy care. 155 cancer patients were assessed using QSC-R10, PO-Bado-SF and Mach-9. The congruence between computerized tablet PC and conventional paper assessment was analysed in 50 patients. The agreement between the 2 modes was high (ICC 0.869-0.980). Acceptance of computer-based assessment was very high (>95%). Sex, age, education, distress and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) did not influence acceptance. Computerized assessment was rated more difficult by older patients (p = 0.039) and patients with low KPS (p = 0.020). 75.5% of the respondents supported referral for psycho-social intervention for distressed patients. The prevalence of distress was 27.1% (QSC-R10). Computer-based assessment allows easy identification of distressed patients. Level of staff involvement is low, and the results are quickly available for care providers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Value Based Care and Patient-Centered Care: Divergent or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Eric K; Hicks, Lisa K

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but overlapping care philosophies have emerged in cancer care: patient-centered care (PCC) and value-based care (VBC). Value in healthcare has been defined as the quality of care (measured typically by healthcare outcomes) modified by cost. In this conception of value, patient-centeredness is one important but not necessarily dominant quality measure. In contrast, PCC includes multiple domains of patient-centeredness and places the patient and family central to all decisions and evaluations of quality. The alignment of PCC and VBC is complicated by several tensions, including a relative lack of patient experience and preference measures, and conceptions of cost that are payer-focused instead of patient-focused. Several strategies may help to align these two philosophies, including the use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials and value determinations, and the purposeful integration of patient preference in clinical decisions and guidelines. Innovative models of care, including accountable care organizations and oncology patient-centered medical homes, may also facilitate alignment through improved care coordination and quality-based payment incentives. Ultimately, VBC and PCC will only be aligned if patient-centered outcomes, perspectives, and preferences are explicitly incorporated into the definitions and metrics of quality, cost, and value that will increasingly influence the delivery of cancer care.

  19. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care.

  20. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  1. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Developing a Family-Centered Care Model for Critical Care After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Robinson, Gabrielle; Mink, Richard; Hudson, Kimberly; Dotolo, Danae; Gooding, Tracy; Ramirez, Alma; Zatzick, Douglas; Giordano, Jessica; Crawley, Deborah; Vavilala, Monica S

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the family experience of critical care after pediatric traumatic brain injury in order to develop a model of specific factors associated with family-centered care. Qualitative methods with semi-structured interviews were used. Two level 1 trauma centers. Fifteen mothers of children who had an acute hospital stay after traumatic brain injury within the last 5 years were interviewed about their experience of critical care and discharge planning. Participants who were primarily English, Spanish, or Cantonese speaking were included. None. Content analysis was used to code the transcribed interviews and develop the family-centered care model. Three major themes emerged: 1) thorough, timely, compassionate communication, 2) capacity building for families, providers, and facilities, and 3) coordination of care transitions. Participants reported valuing detailed, frequent communication that set realistic expectations and prepared them for decision making and outcomes. Areas for capacity building included strategies to increase provider cultural humility, parent participation in care, and institutional flexibility. Coordinated care transitions, including continuity of information and maintenance of partnerships with families and care teams, were highlighted. Participants who were not primarily English speaking reported particular difficulty with communication, cultural understanding, and coordinated transitions. This study presents a family-centered traumatic brain injury care model based on family perspectives. In addition to communication and coordination strategies, the model offers methods to address cultural and structural barriers to meeting the needs of non-English-speaking families. Given the stress experienced by families of children with traumatic brain injury, careful consideration of the model themes identified here may assist in improving overall quality of care to families of hospitalized children with traumatic brain injury.

  3. Application of theory to family-centered care: a role for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered care is an emerging trend in health care settings today. An explanation, principles, and a definition of family-centered care are offered and discussed. A theoretical framework, Balance Theory of Coordination, which can be utilized by social workers to develop and enhance family-centered care practices, is explained and discussed. Various family-centered care practices are examined within the context of Balance Theory of Coordination as examples.

  4. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  5. Psychosocial care for persons affected by emergencies and major incidents: a Delphi study to determine the needs of professional first responders for education, training and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John; Kemp, Verity; Newman, Jonathan; Novelli, David; Doyle, Christopher; Walter, Darren; Williams, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The role of ambulance clinicians in providing psychosocial care in major incidents and emergencies is recognised in recent Department of Health guidance. The study described in this paper identified NHS professional first responders' needs for education about survivors' psychosocial responses, training in psychosocial skills, and continuing support. Ambulance staff participated in an online Delphi questionnaire, comprising 74 items (Round 1) on 7-point Likert scales. Second-round and third-round participants each received feedback based on the previous round, and responded to modified versions of the original items and to new items for clarification. One hundred and two participants took part in Round 1; 47 statements (64%) achieved consensus. In Round 2, 72 people from Round 1 participated; 15 out of 39 statements (38%) achieved consensus. In Round 3, 49 people from Round 2 participated; 15 out of 27 statements (59%) achieved consensus. Overall, there was consensus in the following areas: 'psychosocial needs of patients' (consensus in 34/37 items); 'possible sources of stress in your work' (8/9); 'impacts of distress in your work' (7/10); 'meeting your own emotional needs' (4/5); 'support within your organisation' (2/5); 'needs for training in psychosocial skills for patients' (15/15); 'my needs for psychosocial training and support' (5/6). Ambulance clinicians recognise their own education needs and the importance of their being offered psychosocial training and support. The authors recommend that, in order to meet patients' psychosocial needs effectively, ambulance clinicians are provided with education and training in a number of skills and their own psychosocial support should be enhanced.

  6. The potential of crowdsourcing to improve patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Crowdsourcing (CS) is the outsourcing of a problem or task to a crowd. Although patient-centered care (PCC) may aim to be tailored to an individual's needs, the uses of CS for generating ideas, identifying values, solving problems, facilitating research, and educating an audience represent powerful roles that can shape both allocation of shared resources and delivery of personalized care and treatment. CS can often be conducted quickly and at relatively low cost. Pitfalls include bias, risks of research ethics, inadequate quality of data, inadequate metrics, and observer-expectancy effect. Health professionals and consumers in the US should increase their attention to CS for the benefit of PCC. Patients' participation in CS to shape health policy and decisions is one way to pursue PCC itself and may help to improve clinical outcomes through a better understanding of patients' perspectives. CS should especially be used to traverse the quality-cost curve, or decrease costs while preserving or improving quality of care.

  7. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying for primary needs, in the view of the educators, tends to decrease as the average age increases, whilst crying for secondary needs tends to increase. Most of the time, the educators try to eliminate the needs that provoke crying, giving priority to the baby’s welfare. The article discusses the caretakers’ educative practices with data found in literature. Keywords: day care; educative practices; educators.

  8. Estigma e violências no trato com a loucura: narrativas de centros de atenção psicossocial, Bahia e Sergipe Estigma y violencias en el trato con la locura: narrativas de centros de atención psicosocial, Bahia y Sergipe (Noreste de Brasil Stigma and violence in dealing with madness: narratives from psychosocial care centers in Bahia and Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Nunes

    2009-08-01

    el concepto de estigma propuesto por Goffman y fueron sistematizadas cuatro tipos de violencia: interpersonal, institucional, simbólica y estructural. RESULTADOS: Usuarios y familiares relataron ejemplos de descalificaciones, reprensiones, desagrados, humillaciones, negligencia y agresiones físicas, con fines de dominación, explotación y opresión. Profesionales refirieron que personas que sufren trastornos mentales permanecen como centro de prejuicios arraigados y naturalizados en la cultura. La principal consecuencia fue el mantenimiento del aislamiento, de la vida social como forma de "tratamiento" o como actitud excluyente manifestada por reacciones discriminatorias, que se presentan como rechazo, indiferencia y agresividad verbal o física. CONCLUSIONES: Las variadas formas de expresión del estigma denotan una situación sociocultural de violencias contra los portadores de trastornos mentales. Se propone la constitución de observatorios estatales capaces de planificar y evaluar contra-acciones a las estigmatizaciones.OBJECTIVE: To analyze stigmatization processes and types of violence experienced by individuals with mental disorders. METHODS: A qualitative study was carried out, based on individual interviews with users and focus groups with family members and professionals at five psychosocial care centers in the municipalities of Itaberaba, Lauro de Freitas, Salvador, Vitória da Conquista, and Aracaju, Northeastern Brazil, in 2006-2007. The analysis categories were constructed based on the stigma concept proposed by Goffman, and four types of violence were systematized: interpersonal, institutional, symbolic and structural. RESULTS: Users and family members recounted examples of disqualification, reprimands, embarrassment, humiliation, negligence and physical aggression that had the aims of domination, exploitation and oppression. Professionals reported that people who suffer from mental disorders remain the target of prejudice that is culturally

  9. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência – CAPSi in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1 pre-intervention observation; 2 meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3 developing materials for training and evaluation; 4 meetings to discuss program implementation; 5 a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6 distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP questionnaire; ii videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii a satisfaction survey. Results: Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. Conclusion: The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  10. Impact of a provider training program on the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder at psychosocial care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana C; Teixeira, Maria C T V; Ribeiro, Edith L; Paula, Cristiane S

    2017-12-18

    To develop, implement, and verify the impact of a training program for health care providers working with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in psychosocial care centers for children and adolescents (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial à Infância e à Adolescência - CAPSi) in São Paulo, Brazil. This quasi-experimental study was conducted with 14 professionals from four CAPSi units. The training program consisted of six phases: 1) pre-intervention observation; 2) meeting with staff to assess the main needs of the training program; 3) developing materials for training and evaluation; 4) meetings to discuss program implementation; 5) a final meeting for case discussion and evaluation; and 6) distance supervision. Three measures were used to evaluate the training program: i) the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) questionnaire; ii) videos containing questions designed to assess program comprehension; and iii) a satisfaction survey. Thirteen videos were produced to as visual aids for use during the training program, and a further 26 videos were developed to evaluate it. The program was well evaluated by the participants. The video responses and KAP questionnaire scores suggest that staff knowledge and attitudes improved after training. The positive findings of this study suggest that the tested training program is feasible for use with multidisciplinary teams working in the CAPSi environment.

  11. Psychosocial Work Stressors, Work Fatigue, and Musculoskeletal Disorders: Comparison between Emergency and Critical Care Nurses in Brunei Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hanif; Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah; Naing, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Little evidence estimated the exposure of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders for nurses working in South-East Asian region, and research on this subject is almost nonexistent in Brunei. The main aim of our study was to provide a comprehensive exploration and estimate exposure of the study variables amongst emergency (ER) and critical care (CC) nurses in Brunei. The study also aims to compare whether experiences of ER nurses differ from those of CC nurses. This cross-sectional study was implemented in the ER and CC departments across Brunei public hospitals from February to April 2016 by using Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II, Occupational Fatigue Exhaustion Recovery scale, and Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. In total, 201 ER and CC nurses (82.0% response rate) participated in the study. Quantitative demands of CC nurses were significantly higher than ER nurses. Even so, ER nurses were 4.0 times more likely [95% confidence interval (2.21, 7.35)] to experience threats of violence, and 2.8 times more likely [95% confidence interval: (1.50, 5.29)] to experience chronic fatigue. The results revealed that nurses experienced high quantitative demands, work pace, stress, and burnout. High prevalence of chronic and persistent fatigue, threats of violence and bullying, and musculoskeletal pain at the neck, shoulder, upper and lower back, and foot region, was also reported. This study has provided good estimates for the exposure rate of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Brunei. It provided important initial insight for nursing management and policymakers to make informed decisions on current and future planning to provide nurses with a conducive work environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Management of Psychosocial Distress by Oncologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Anna C.; Hwang, Vivian S.; Kornblith, Alice; Greer, Joseph; Greenberg, Donna B.; Temel, Jennifer; Schapira, Lidia; Pirl, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the nature of psychosocial care delivered by oncologists. The goal of this study was to survey oncologists about their management of psychosocial distress, referencing the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Methods A random sample of 1,000 oncologists were sent an e-mail requesting their participation in an online survey; nonrespondents were sent the survey through postal mail. Regression analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of care. Results Forty-six percent (448 of 965) of oncologists responded. Practice locations included: community (63%), cancer center (25%), and hospital (7%). Respondents estimated that over one-third of their patients (mean± SD=38%±22%) experience psychosocial distress warranting intervention, although only 225 of 447 (50%) indicated having mental health services affiliated with their practice. Nearly half (212 of 447, 47%) reported only initiating a referral for psychosocial services, and 214 of 447 (48%) reported both making a referral and starting psychiatric medications, mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and benzodiazepines. Conclusions Most oncologists delivered some level of psychosocial care, although only half had affiliated mental health services. PMID:19648204

  13. Moving from "optimal resources" to "optimal care" at trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Gentilello, Larry M; Ballard, David

    2012-04-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Program has shown that risk-adjusted mortality rates at some centers are nearly 50% higher than at others. This "quality gap" may be due to different clinical practices or processes of care. We have previously shown that adoption of processes called core measures by the Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not improve outcomes of trauma patients. We hypothesized that improved compliance with trauma-specific clinical processes of care (POC) is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. Records of a random sample of 1,000 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center who met Trauma Quality Improvement Program criteria (age ≥ 16 years and Abbreviated Injury Scale score 3) were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific POC (T-POC) that were evidence-based or expert consensus panel recommendations. Multivariate regression was used to determine the relationship between T-POC compliance and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, gender, injury type, and severity. Median age was 41 years, 65% were men, 88% sustained a blunt injury, and mortality was 12%. Of these, 77% were eligible for at least one T-POC and 58% were eligible for two or more. There was wide variation in T-POC compliance. Every 10% increase in compliance was associated with a 14% reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality. Unlike adoption of core measures, compliance with T-POC is associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients. Trauma centers with excess in-hospital mortality may improve patient outcomes by consistently applying T-POC. These processes should be explored for potential use as Core Trauma Center Performance Measures.

  14. Palliative Care Leadership Centers Are Key To The Diffusion Of Palliative Care Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, J Brian; Bowman, Brynn; Rogers, Maggie; Spragens, Lynn H; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    Between 2000 and 2015 the proportion of US hospitals with more than fifty beds that had palliative care programs tripled, from 25 percent to 75 percent. The rapid adoption of this high-value program, which is voluntary and runs counter to the dominant culture in US hospitals, was catalyzed by tens of millions of dollars in philanthropic support for innovation, dissemination, and professionalization in the palliative care field. We describe the dissemination strategies of the Center to Advance Palliative Care in the context of the principles of social entrepreneurship, and we provide an in-depth look at its hallmark training initiative, Palliative Care Leadership Centers. Over 1,240 hospital palliative care teams have trained at the Leadership Centers to date, with 80 percent of them instituting palliative care services within two years. We conclude with lessons learned about the role of purposeful technical assistance in promoting the rapid diffusion of high-value health care innovation.

  15. Similarity Analysis About The Training Of Family Health Strategy Professionals For The Psychosocial Care Of The Elderly

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    Verônica Lourdes Lima Batista Maia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elderly mental health is an important topic of discussion to Brazilian public health because it involves factors related to the training of health professionals focused on these demands in the Family Health Strategy. Objectives: To make a similarity analysis about the training of the Family Health Strategy professionals for psychosocial care for the elderly. Methodology: Qualitative research carried out with 31 professionals from the Family Health Strategy in the city of Picos, Piauí, Brazil. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview script. The interviews were performed in a reserved room and recorded with the aid of an MP4 player. The data were processed by the IRAMUTEQ software and analyzed through similarity analysis that is based on graph theory. Results: The study participants were 13 doctors and 18 nurses, 27 (87.09% were female. The training time of these professionals was comprised between 2 to 32 years of training and the duration of the Health Strategy from 1 year to 16 years. According to the co-occurrence tree, the data indicate that: the word "elderly" is at the heart of the ramifications and expresses how family and professionals can contribute to treatment; another demonstrated representation is that it is difficult for professionals to carry out their activities with the elderly due to lack of training in the specific area of ​​mental health. Conclusion: the family plays a fundamental role in the elderly care with psychosocial needs and the professionals of the Family Health Strategy present difficulties to carry out comprehensive care due to deficiencies in their training. Keywords: Mental health. Family Health. Elderly.

  16. Longitudinal Trajectories of Metabolic Control across Adolescence: Associations with Parental Involvement, Adolescents’ Psychosocial Maturity, and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela S.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Butner, Jonathan; Drew, Linda M.; Foster, Carol; Donaldson, David; Murray, Mary; Swinyard, Michael; Wiebe, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To predict trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence from parental involvement and adolescent psychosocial maturity, and to link metabolic control trajectories to health care utilization. Methods 252 adolescents (M age at study initiation = 12.5, SD=1.5, range 10–14 years) with type 1 diabetes (54.4% female, 92.8% Caucasian, length of diagnosis M=4.7 years, SD=3.0, range 1–12) participated in a 2-year longitudinal study. Metabolic control was gathered from medical records every three months. Adolescents completed measures of self-reliance (functional autonomy and extreme peer orientation), self-control (self-control and externalizing behavior), and parental involvement in diabetes care (acceptance, monitoring, and frequency of help). At the end of the study, mothers reported health care utilization (diabetes-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations) over the past six months. Results Latent class growth analyses indicated two distinct trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: moderate control with slight deterioration (92% of the sample; average HbA1c = 8.18%) and poor control with rapid deterioration (8% of the sample; average HbA1c of 12.09%). Adolescents with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control reported lower paternal monitoring and frequency of help with diabetes management, lower functional autonomy, and lower self-control than others. Those with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control were 6.4 times more likely to report diabetes-related emergency room visits, and 9.3 times more likely to report diabetes-related hospitalizations near the end of the study. Conclusions Parental involvement and adolescents’ psychosocial maturity predict patterns of deteriorating metabolic control across adolescence and could be targeted for intervention. PMID:22525113

  17. Hygiene of Toys in Day Care Centers: a Care With Children

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    Evelise Pires Cogo Simão

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate how the hygiene of the toys used in day care centers and the possible tendencies in the processes are done. Method: descriptive, cross-sectional study, having as a unit of observation 51 day care centers. The object of investigation was the toy hygiene procedure, in which the information on the variables was obtained by interview and recorded in an online questionnaire. Results: It was observed that water and soap was the most used method of hygiene (72.5% and the periodicity of cleaning was 2 times a month or more in 50% of the units interviewed, and six nurseries declared no Such procedure. Conclusion: there was no standardized procedures in the toy hygiene technique used in the sample of nurseries studied. Although most institutions demonstrate intent to carry out the toy hygiene procedure, it is necessary to equip practitioners to deal with this issue. Descriptors: Day Care Centers; Fomites; Disinfection; Play Sets and Toys; Nursing.

  18. The correlation between ostomy knowledge and self-care ability with psychosocial adjustment in Chinese patients with a permanent colostomy: a descriptive study .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Meng, Ai-feng; Yang, Li-Fang; Zhang, Yi-nan

    2013-07-01

    A colostomy can have a negative impact on patient quality of life. Research suggests that psychosocial adaptation is positively associated with quality of life, but few reports address this adaptation and its related factors in patients with a permanent colostomy. A 4-month, descriptive study was conducted to assess the impact of ostomy knowledge and ability to self-care on the psychosocial adjustment of 54 Chinese outpatients (47 men, 14 participants 40 to 50 years old, 40 participants 50 to 70 years old) with a permanent colostomy to investigate the correlation between stoma knowledge, self-care ability, and psychosocial adjustment. Assessment instruments included a sociodemographic data questionnaire and a Chinese translation of the Ostomy Adjustment Inventory-23 that comprises 20 items in three domains (positive emotions, negative emotions, and social life). Participants rated statements on a scale from 0 (totally disagree) to 4 (totally agree); a score of 40 indicates a low level of psychosocial adjustment. Participants also completed the Stoma-related Knowledge Scale, comprising 14 5-point Likert scale questions where low scores indicate low knowledge, and they answered one question regarding self-care ability. Data were analyzed using statistical software for social science. The average stoma-related knowledge score suggested moderate levels of knowledge (45.112 ± 13.358). Twenty (20) participants managed all stoma care aspects independently, 30 required some assistance, and four (4) required care by someone else. The three domains of psychosocial adjustment scores (positive emotions, negative emotions, and social life) were 17.60 ± 4.093,12.92 ± 3.440, and 19.15 ± 6.316, respectively. Knowledge and the three domains of psychosocial adjustment were positively correlated with positive emotion (r = .610, P = 0.001), negative emotion (r = .696, P = 0.000), and social life adjustment (r = .617, P = 0.001). A significant difference in psychosocial adjustment

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life of Latin-American Immigrants and Spanish-Born Attended in Spanish Primary Health Care: Socio-Demographic and Psychosocial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Bragado-Alvárez, Carmen; Abánades-Herranz, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compares the health-related quality of life of Spanish-born and Latin American-born individuals settled in Spain. Socio-demographic and psychosocial factors associated with health-related quality of life are analyzed. Methods A cross-sectional Primary Health Care multi center-based study of Latin American-born (n = 691) and Spanish-born (n = 903) outpatients from 15 Primary Health Care Centers (Madrid, Spain). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess health-related quality of life. Socio-demographic, psychosocial, and specific migration data were also collected. Results Compared to Spanish-born participants, Latin American-born participants reported higher health-related quality of life in the physical functioning and vitality dimensions. Across the entire sample, Latin American-born participants, younger participants, men and those with high social support reported significantly higher levels of physical health. Men with higher social support and a higher income reported significantly higher mental health. When stratified by gender, data show that for men physical health was only positively associated with younger age. For women, in addition to age, social support and marital status were significantly related. Both men and women with higher social support and income had significantly better mental health. Finally, for immigrants, the physical and mental health components of health-related quality of life were not found to be significantly associated with any of the pre-migration factors or conditions of migration. Only the variable “exposure to political violence” was significantly associated with the mental health component (p = 0.014). Conclusions The key factors to understanding HRQoL among Latin American-born immigrants settled in Spain are age, sex and social support. Therefore, strategies to maintain optimal health outcomes in these immigrant communities should include public policies on

  20. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of “excellent” pediatric healthcare providers – a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers. PMID:24244105

  1. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  2. Institutional capacity to provide psychosocial oncology support services: A report from the Association of Oncology Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrack, Brad; Kayser, Karen; Padgett, Lynne; Sundstrom, Laura; Jobin, Chad; Nelson, Krista; Fineberg, Iris C

    2016-06-15

    This study reports cancer-treating institutions' capacity to deliver comprehensive psychosocial support services. Oncology care providers at 60 cancer-treating institutions completed surveys assessing the capacity of their institutions to provide psychosocial care. Capacity was assessed with the Cancer Psychosocial Care Matrix (CPCM) from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Scores represented individuals' perceptions of their cancer program's performance with respect to 10 fundamental elements of psychosocial care. Among 2134 respondents, 62% reported a mid-level capacity for ≥5 of 10 CPCM items. In comparison with other types of cancer programs (eg, NCI-designated, academic, or comprehensive centers), providers at community cancer programs reported a significantly greater capacity with respect to patient-provider communication, psychosocial needs assessment, and continuity in the delivery of psychosocial care over time. Nurses and primary medical providers reported a significantly lower capacity for linking patients and families with needed psychosocial services within their respective cancer programs. They also reported a significantly higher capacity for conducting follow-up, re-evaluations, and adjustments of psychosocial treatment plans. Cancer programs are performing moderately well in terms of communicating to patients the importance of psychosocial care, identifying patient psychosocial needs, and referring patients and families to psychosocial services. They are doing less well with respect to the provision of that care over time. Findings suggest that gaps in psychosocial service capacity are a function of patient, provider, and system characteristics. These results may be useful in formulating strategies to enhance psychosocial care delivery. Cancer 2016;122:1937-45. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Contribution of the psychosocial work environment to psychological distress among health care professionals before and during a major organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Lesage, Alain D; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Laroche, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between 4 dimensions of the psychosocial work environment (psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and effort-reward) among health care professionals as well as their psychological distress during a reorganization process. A correlational descriptive design was used for this quantitative study. A total of 159 health care professionals completed the questionnaire at T1, and 141 at T2. First, before the work reorganization, effort-reward imbalance was the sole variable of the psychological work environment that significantly predicted psychological distress. Second, the high overall level of psychological distress increased during the process of organizational change (from T1 to T2). Finally, effort-reward imbalance, high psychological demands, and low decision latitude were all significant predictors of psychological distress at T2, during the organizational change. In conclusion, to reduce the expected negative outcomes of restructuring on health care practitioners, managers could increase the number of opportunities for rewards, carefully explain the demands, and clarify the tasks to be performed by each of the employees to reduce their psychological burden and increase their perceptions of autonomy.

  4. The impact of managed care and current governmental policies on an urban academic health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J L; Peterson, D J; Muehlstedt, S G; Zera, R T; West, M A; Bubrick, M P

    2001-10-01

    Managed care and governmental policies have restructured hospital reimbursement. We examined reimbursement trends in trauma care to assess the impact of this market driven change on an urban academic health center. Patients injured between January 1997 and December 1999 were analyzed for Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of hospital stay, hospital cost, payer, and reimbursement. Between 1997 and 1999, the volume of patients with an ISS less than 9 increased and length of stay decreased. In addition, overall cost, payment, and profit margin increased. Commercially insured patients accounted for this margin increase, because the margins of managed care and government insured patients experienced double-digit decreases. Patients with ISS of 9 or greater also experienced a volume increase and a reduction in length of stay; however, costs within this group increased greater than payments, thereby reducing profit margin. Whereas commercially insured patients maintained their margin, managed care and government insured patients did not (double- and triple-digit decreases). Managed care and current governmental policies have a negative impact on urban academic health center reimbursement. Commercial insurers subsidize not only the uninsured but also the government insured and managed care patients as well. National awareness of this issue and policy action are paramount to urban academic health centers and may also benefit commercial insurers.

  5. Viewpoints of the members of the workers' retirement centers in Tehran about elderly day care centers (2012

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    Hosein Rohani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no documented evidence regarding elderly day care centers in Iran. This needs analysis study was conducted to investigate the demand for elderly day care centers in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted recruiting 210 participants aged over 60 who were members of the elderly retirement centers in Tehran in 2012. Data were gathered by Kansas state university questionnaire and analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: About 80% of participants were men with the mean age of 67.5±5.23 years. Results showed that male (P<0.001, married (P=0.01 and literate elderly (P<0.001, and those living in rental homes (P<0.001 expressed a greater need for elderly day care centers. There was no statistically significant relationship between the lifestyle (P=0.051 and income (P=0.08 of the participants and demand for elderly day care centers. Conclusion: Given the rising population of the elderly and their high demand for day care centers, it is necessary to establish well-equipped day care centers for this group of people. Also, these centers may reduce the burden of care for the aged people on public services and family care givers.

  6. Hypertension care at primary health care centers: a report from Abha, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Homrany, Mohammed A; Khan, Mohd Yunus; Al-Khaldi, Yahia Mater; Al-Gelban, Khalid S; Al-Amri, Hasan Saed

    2008-11-01

    It is well known that effective management of hypertension reduces the incidence of myo-cardial infarction, stroke and vascular complications. The Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, introduced the Quality Assurance Guidelines with the hope to improve the management of hypertension in its centers. We conducted an audit of two Primary Health Care Centers namely, Al-Manhal (MPHCC) and Al-Numais (NPHCC), to evaluate how well hypertension was managened at these centers. A check list was derived from the Quality Assurance Manual to audit the process and to assess the health outcome. A retrospective study on a chosen sample of 120 files of hypertensive patients, out of 256 from both the Primary Health Care Centers was performed, during the last three months of the year 2000. Results showed that 61% of the patients were between 45-64 years of age, 56% were females, 85% were married, 54% were illiterate and 7.5% were smokers. A total of 92% of the patients had primary hypertension and 25% had a positive family history of hypertension. Beta-blockers were the most commonly used drugs in both the centers. Although the recording of the information was not perfect, there was no statistical difference in the socio-demongraphic data and also the means of the total score in both the centres. On the other hand, carrying out the important procedures for hypertensive patients was found to be better at MPHCC in comparison to NPHCC (p compliance to appointment in both the centers. Our study reveals that the process of hypertension care at the two Primary Health Care Centres in Aseer region was not in accordance with the recommended national standards. The reasons include lack of updating systems, recall system and provision of laboratory services and all these factors need to be addressed to improve care.

  7. [Psychosocial disintegration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, S

    1994-08-01

    Among the patients referred for rehabilitation in the latter half of their working life, many are notable due to considerable discrepancies between their objectively ascertainable performance and its subjectively perceived decline. In these cases, the "substantial threat to earning capacity" cannot be explained by measurable organ deficiencies. Similarly, treatment efforts focussed solely at improved somatic functioning remain inefficient in terms of stabilization of earning capacity, because they do not bring about changes in the cause of subjective performance deterioration. The author in these circumstances assumes the presence of an independent syndrome, called "psychosocial disintegration". He describes the full picture of this disease entity, and suggests causal mechanisms as well as potential for remedial intervention. On account of the considerable social dimension of the disorder outlined, early identification of these gradually developing changes as well as qualified care of the insurants are indispensable. All those involved in treatment and care of the patients or working in some branch of the social security system should be familiar with this psychosocial disintegration syndrome in order to avoid the guidance and counselling mistakes that are frequently the case. As rehabilitation is impossible in case of inhibiting personal attitudes of an insurant, it is advisable to verify the individual's readiness for rehabilitation and/or to strengthen it by appropriate measures before engaging in costly in-patient service provision. If the needed motivation is to be achieved during participation in a rehabilitation measure, extended service provision will invariably be required.

  8. In-Service Teacher Training to Provide Psychosocial Support and Care in High-Risk and High-Need Schools: School-Based Intervention Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersöhn, Liesel; Loots, Tilda; Eloff, Irma; Ferreira, Ronél

    2015-01-01

    This article uses a South African case study to argue that postcolonial, emerging economy societies in transition often contain schools characterised as high risk and high need. Such schools require teachers to adapt to roles other than facilitating learning, such as psychosocial support and care, and which requires additional professional…

  9. Customer Quality during Prenatal Care in Health Care Centers in Tabriz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives :  Customer Quality (CQ refers to customer’s characteristics and is concerned with the knowledge, skills and confidence of health services customers who actively participate with health team in proper decision-making, appropriate activities and changing environment and health related behaviors. The purpose of this study was measuring customer quality of pregnant women during prenatal care. Materials and Methods :  This is a cross- sectional study which was conducted with the participation of 185 pregnant women who received prenatal care from urban health centers in Tabriz city. All participants were selected randomly from 40 health centers. Customer quality was measured based on CQMH-CQ questionnaire.  Questionnaire content validity was reviewed and confirmed by 10 experts and its reliability was confirmed based on Cronbach's alpha index (α = 0.714. Spss v.17 was used for data analysis. Results : According to the results, the mean score of customer quality among pregnant women was (11.29± 67.79   and only %14 of the participants reported the highest customer quality score and ability of continuity of care under stressful situations. There was a positive relationship between customer quality score and visiting midwife and a better evaluation of overall quality of care, but there was inverse relationship with early registration at health centers. Conclusion :  The participation of pregnant women in service delivery process and decision-making can promote costumer quality. Furthermore, training health care providers in empowering patients and using their abilities to improve quality of care and paying attention to patient-centered care will be helpful. ​

  10. Studies of Day Care Center Climate and Its Effect on Children's Social and Emotional Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Bodil; Hedin, Anna

    School climates at 12 day care centers in Sweden were compared to investigate effects of center climates on children's social and emotional behavior. Observations and interviews conducted at the day care centers revealed differences in center climates related to child-rearing patterns, patterns of interaction, the distribution of power, and in…

  11. Waiting for transplant: physical, psychosocial, and nutritional status considerations for pediatric candidates and implications for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Samantha J; Annunziato, Rachel A; Fairey, Elise; Kelly, Vicky L; So, Stephanie; Wray, Jo

    2014-08-01

    The waiting period for an organ transplant has been described as a time of tremendous uncertainty and vulnerability, posing unique challenges and stressors for pediatric transplant candidates and their families. It has been identified as the most stressful stage of the transplant journey, yet little attention has been given to the physical, psychological, or social impact of the waiting period in the literature. In this review, we discuss the physical, nutritional, and psychosocial implications of the waiting period for child and adolescent transplant candidates and the impact on their parents and siblings. We identify areas for future research and provide recommendations for clinical practice to support children, adolescents, and families during the waiting period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Financial impact of tertiary care in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, T S; Carlton, L M; O'Hern, D G; Hardt, N S; Keith Ozaki, C; Flynn, T C; Seeger, J M

    2000-06-01

    To analyze the financial impact of three complex vascular surgical procedures to both an academic hospital and a department of surgery and to examine the potential impact of decreased reimbursements. The cost of providing tertiary care has been implicated as one potential cause of the financial difficulties affecting academic medical centers. Patients undergoing revascularization for chronic mesenteric ischemia, elective thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, and treatment of infected aortic grafts at the University of Florida were compared with those undergoing elective infrarenal aortic reconstruction and carotid endarterectomy. Hospital costs and profit summaries were obtained from the Clinical Resource Management Office. Departmental costs and profit summary were estimated based on the procedural relative value units (RVUs), the average clinical cost per RVU ($33.12), surgeon charges, and the collection rate for the vascular surgery division (30.2%) obtained from the Faculty Group Practice. Surgeon work effort was analyzed using the procedural work RVUs and the estimated total care time. The analyses were performed for all payors and the subset of Medicare patients, and the potential impact of a 15% reduction in hospital and physician reimbursement was analyzed. Net hospital income was positive for all but one of the tertiary care procedures, but net losses were sustained by the hospital for the mesenteric ischemia and infected aortic graft groups among the Medicare patients. In contrast, the estimated reimbursement to the department of surgery for all payors was insufficient to offset the clinical cost of providing the RVUs for all procedures, and the estimated losses were greater for the Medicare patients alone. The surgeon work effort was dramatically higher for the tertiary care procedures, whereas the reimbursement per work effort was lower. A 15% reduction in reimbursement would result in an estimated net loss to the hospital for each of the tertiary

  13. [Talk to them: Narrative care within a person-centered care framework].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of narrative care in the attention of older people who receive care in institutions, underlining how its use provides a better understanding of the Person Centered Care (PCC) model and valuable strategies to put it into practice. To achieve this goal, firstly, we describe the relevance of a narrative approach for understanding the experience of the old person who receive care in institutions, with regards to individual aspects as well as to her/his relationships with professionals and the institutional discourse which contextualize these relationships. Secondly, we specify different ways in which the use of narratives could have an impact on the improvement of the quality of attention and well-being of older people receiving care in institutions. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of Prenatal Care Services in Karabuk Community Health Center

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    Binali Catak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality and quantity of prenatal care services according to gestastional week in Karabuk Community Health Center (CHC. Methods: In this descriptive study 365 pregnant women was selected as sample among 753 pregnant women registered at Karabuk CHC in 18/01/2011. 93.0% of women in the selected sample has been visited in their homes and the face to face interviews were done. The questionnaire was prepared according to Prenatal Care Management Guidelines (PCMG of Ministry of Health. Findings The number of follow-ups was not complete in 23.7% of 15-24 month, 34.4% of 25-32 month, 52,1% of 33-42 month pregnant women. At least four follow-up visits were completed only in 66,7% of postpartum women. Timing of first visit was after 15th week in 15,6% of women. In follow up visits 62.5% of of women’s height were never measured, in 13,0% the women hearth sound of infants didn’t monitored at least once. Laboratory test numbers were under the level required by PCMG. The delivery conditions weren’t planned in 41,8% of last trimester and postpartum women and training about breastfeeding wasn’t given to 15,5 of the same group. Result In family medicine model in Karabuk CHC developments in number of prenatal follow-up visits were observed, but no substantial improvements were found in quality of prenatal visits. Regular in service trainings shoud be given to family doctors and midwives. The use of prenatal care guideline published by MoH should be increased. Keywords: Prenatal care, pregnancy, timing of first visit, qality of prenatal care [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 153-162

  15. Study protocol: translating and implementing psychosocial interventions in aged home care the lifestyle engagement activity program (LEAP) for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Tailored psychosocial activity-based interventions have been shown to improve mood, behaviour and quality of life for nursing home residents. Occupational therapist delivered activity programs have shown benefits when delivered in home care settings for people with dementia. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of LEAP (Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program) for Life, a training and practice change program on the engagement of home care clients by care workers. Secondary aims are to evaluate the impact of the program on changes in client mood and behaviour. Methods/design The 12 month LEAP program has three components: 1) engaging site management and care staff in the program; 2) employing a LEAP champion one day a week to support program activities; 3) delivering an evidence-based training program to care staff. Specifically, case managers will be trained and supported to set meaningful social or recreational goals with clients and incorporate these into care plans. Care workers will be trained in and encouraged to practise good communication, promote client independence and choice, and tailor meaningful activities using Montessori principles, reminiscence, music, physical activity and play. LEAP Champions will be given information about theories of organisational change and trained in interpersonal skills required for their role. LEAP will be evaluated in five home care sites including two that service ethnic minority groups. A quasi experimental design will be used with evaluation data collected four times: 6-months prior to program commencement; at the start of the program; and then after 6 and 12 months. Mixed effect models will enable comparison of change in outcomes for the periods before and during the program. The primary outcome measure is client engagement. Secondary outcomes for clients are satisfaction with care, dysphoria/depression, loneliness, apathy and agitation; and work satisfaction for care workers. A process

  16. Improving coordination of care centers for the elderly through IT support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Andreas Kaas; Lauridsen, Frederik Vahr Bjarnø; Manea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, care of elderly people involves numerous and relatively autonomous care providers, including care centers, activity centers, physiotherapists, doctors, and other specialists. However, due to a poor coordination of activities, many elderly experience a lack of continuity of care, misse...... the disruptions in the existing routines, minimize the inherent articulation work, and coherently unify their coordination mechanisms....

  17. Testing for lead in toys at day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha; Stolz, Julie; Chacon-Baker, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to lead-based paint or material has been found to impact children's cognitive and behavioral development at blood lead levels far below current standards. The purpose of the project was to screen for lead in toy items in daycare centers in order to raise awareness of inside environmental lead exposures and minimize lead-based exposures for children. Occupational therapy students in a service learning class tested for lead in ten daycare or public centers using the XRF Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t, a method accepted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). A total of 460 items were tested over a two-month period for an average of 66 toys per setting. Fifty six (56) items tested > 100 ppm, which represented 12% of the entire sample. Items with high lead levels included selected toys constructed with lead-based paint, lead metals, plastics using lead as a color enhancer, and decorative objects. While the actual number of lead-based products is small, the cumulative exposure or habitual use may pose an unnecessary risk to children. Indoor exposures occurred for all day care centers regardless of socio-economic levels. Recommendations to minimize exposures are provided.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001. Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP with upper GI symptoms and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints, matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psychopharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year. Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs ranging from 1.37 to 3.45. Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90, including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or

  19. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Is it beneficial to involve family member? A literature review to psychosocial interventions in family-centered nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Bruylands, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Families influence the wellbeing of patients and are influenced by illness themselves. Involving caregivers in patient care was examined in multiple studies. The aim of this literature review was to investigate the different approaches to family-centered interventions (FI) and to evaluate the tested outcomes as well as the detected effect sizes. This search for a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials and metaanalyses revealed three Meta Analyses with studies until 2007 and six randomized controlled studies from 2007 to 2012. FI showed small to middle positive effects on the outcomes depression, mental health, anxiety of patients and family members and on caregiver burden. A conclusive effect on physical health could not be shown. The results strongly depend on the enrolled patient population, the targeted participants of FI, as well as the focus, type and dose of FI. The studies showed vast differences in the length and type of intervention, the target population and the selection of outcomes. Comparing outcomes was difficult due to the use of different outcome measures. Further research with various populations, different FI intensity but with same, valid outcome measures is needed.

  1. Dancing as a psychosocial intervention in care homes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-García, A; Hughes, J C; James, I A; Rochester, L

    2013-09-01

    There is a need to find meaningful and engaging interventions to improve mood and behaviour for residents of care homes. The demand on care staff might diminish opportunities for them to encourage these activities. Staff anecdotal information attests that dancing as an activity improves mood in residents and staff. Hence, the importance of investigating what dancing brings to the care home social environment. To provide a systematic review of the evidence from studies related to dancing interventions for older people with dementia living in care homes. Electronic databases were searched. Previous reviews were also included, and recognised experts were consulted up to January 2012. Inclusion criteria considered study methodology and evidence that the impact of the dance intervention had been measured. Ten studies were identified that satisfied the inclusion criteria: seven qualitative and three quantitative. Studies used different approaches such as therapeutic dance, dance movement therapy, dance therapy, social dancing and psychomotor dance-based exercise. There was evidence that problematic behaviours decreased; social interaction and enjoyment in both residents and care staff improved. A few adverse effects were also acknowledged. The evidence on the efficacy of dancing in care homes is limited in part owing to the methodological challenges facing such research. This review aims to raise awareness of the possibility of implementing dance work as an engaging activity in care homes. We shall also consider options for future dance work research as a means to encourage relationships and sensory stimulation for both residents and staff. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A.; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m 3 (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  3. [Local planning: the speech of basic health care center manager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, Márcia Regina

    2005-01-01

    As planning is understood as a management tool, this article offers an argument through the speech framework of Basic Health Care Center Managers in the city of Curitiba-PR, by means of the Collective Subject Speech Methodology on local planning aspects. Its purpose is to bring local managers to a reflection concerning their styles, practices and experiences, as well as to collaborate with central level leading teams towards building their planning processes in an upward, participatory, communicative and strategic way. Considerations of the speeches built from central ideas are presented: planning methodology; inter-sectoriality; territorial basis; team and community participation; training, autonomy and particular profile of local managers; the manager's agenda; and institutional culture.

  4. Improving the wellbeing of staff who work in palliative care settings: A systematic review of psychosocial interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca C; Dempster, Martin; Donnelly, Michael; McCorry, Noleen K

    2016-10-01

    Staff in palliative care settings perform emotionally demanding roles which may lead to psychological distress including stress and burnout. Therefore, interventions have been designed to address these occupational risks. To investigate quantitative studies exploring the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions that attempt to improve psychological wellbeing of palliative care staff. A systematic review was conducted according to methodological guidance from UK Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. A search strategy was developed based on the initial scans of palliative care studies. Potentially eligible research articles were identified by searching the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE (Ovid), PsycINFO and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently screened studies against pre-set eligibility criteria. To assess quality, both researchers separately assessed the remaining studies using the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. A total of 1786 potentially eligible articles were identified - nine remained following screening and quality assessment. Study types included two randomised controlled trials, two non-randomised controlled trial designs, four one-group pre-post evaluations and one process evaluation. Studies took place in the United States and Canada (5), Europe (3) and Hong Kong (1). Interventions comprised a mixture of relaxation, education, support and cognitive training and targeted stress, fatigue, burnout, depression and satisfaction. The randomised controlled trial evaluations did not improve psychological wellbeing of palliative care staff. Only two of the quasi-experimental studies appeared to show improved staff wellbeing although these studies were methodologically weak. There is an urgent need to address the lack of intervention development work and high-quality research in this area. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges.

  6. Stroke Mortality in Intensive Care Unit from Tertiary Care Neurological Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhjung Thapa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. About a quarter of stroke patients are dead within a month, about a third by 6 months, and a half by 1 year. Although the most substantial advance in stroke has been the routine management of patients in stroke care units, intensive care unit has remained the choice for stroke patients’ care in developing countries. This study explores the mortality of stroke patients in intensive care unit setting in tertiary care neurological centre in a developing country. Methods: We collected data of stroke patients admitted in our ICU from August 2009 to Aug 2010 and analyzed. Results: Total 44 (10.25% patients were admitted for acute stroke. Age ranged from 17-93 years. Low GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale, uncontrolled hypertension and aspiration pneumonia were common indications for admission in ICU. Total 23 (52.3% patients had hemorrhagic stroke and 21(47.7% patients had ischemic stroke. 13 (29.54% patients of stroke died within 7 days, 9 (69.23% patients of hemorrhagic stroke died within 6 days, and 4 patients (30.76% of ischemic stroke died within 7 days. 6 (13.63% patients left hospital against medical advice. All of these patients had ischemic stroke. Conclusions: Stroke mortality in intensive care unit remains high despite of care in tertiary neurological center in resource poor settings. Stroke care unit, which would also help dissemination of knowledge of stroke management, is an option for improved outcome in developing countries Keywords: intensive care unit; mortality; stroke; stroke care unit.

  7. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  8. Prevention of low back pain in the military cluster randomized trial: effects of brief psychosocial education on total and low back pain-related health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, John D; Wu, Samuel S; Teyhen, Deydre S; Robinson, Michael E; George, Steven Z

    2014-04-01

    Effective strategies for preventing low back pain (LBP) have remained elusive, despite annual direct health care costs exceeding $85 billion dollars annually. In our recently completed Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military (POLM) trial, a brief psychosocial education program (PSEP) that reduced fear and threat of LBP reduced the incidence of health care-seeking for LBP. The purpose of this cost analysis was to determine if soldiers who received psychosocial education experienced lower health care costs compared with soldiers who did not receive psychosocial education. The POLM trial was a cluster randomized trial with four intervention arms and a 2-year follow-up. Consecutive subjects (n=4,295) entering a 16-week training program at Fort Sam Houston, TX, to become a combat medic in the U.S. Army were considered for participation. In addition to an assigned exercise program, soldiers were cluster randomized to receive or not receive a brief psychosocial education program delivered in a group setting. The Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool was used to extract total and LBP-related health care costs associated with LBP incidence over a 2-year follow-up period. After adjusting for postrandomization differences between the groups, the median total LBP-related health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred LBP-related costs during the 2-year follow-up period were $26 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($60 vs. $86, respectively, p=.034). The adjusted median total health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred at least some health care costs during the 2-year follow-up period were estimated at $2 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($2,439 vs. $2,441, respectively, p=.242). The results from this analysis demonstrate that a brief psychosocial education program was only marginally effective in reducing LBP-related health care costs and was not effective in reducing

  9. Hypertension care at primary health care centers: A report from Abha, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Homrany Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that effective management of hypertension reduces the incidence of myo-cardial infarction, stroke and vascular complications. The Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, introduced the Quality Assurance Guidelines with the hope to improve the management of hypertension in its centers. We conducted an audit of two Primary Health Care Centers namely, Al-Manhal (MPHCC and Al-Numais (NPHCC, to evaluate how well hypertension was managened at these centers. A check list was derived from the Quality Assurance Manual to audit the process and to assess the health outcome. A retrospective study on a chosen sample of 120 files of hypertensive patients, out of 256 from both the Primary Health Care Centers was performed, during the last three months of the year 2000. Results showed that 61% of the patients were between 45-64 years of age, 56% were females, 85% were married, 54% were illiterate and 7.5% were smokers. A total of 92% of the patients had primary hypertension and 25% had a positive family history of hypertension. Beta-blockers were the most commonly used drugs in both the centers. Although the recording of the information was not perfect, there was no statistical difference in the socio-demongraphic data and also the means of the total score in both the centres. On the other hand, carrying out the important procedures for hypertensive patients was found to be better at MPHCC in com-parison to NPHCC (p < 0.05. The commonly missed procedures were chest x-rays, electrolytes and ECG. Hypertension was well controlled in 63% of the patients, 58% were found to have obesity, 9% suffered from hypertension-related complications while almost 50% had good compliance to appointment in both the centers. Our study reveals that the process of hypertension care at the two Primary Health Care Centres in Aseer region was not in accordance with the recommended national standards. The reasons include lack of updating systems, recall system and

  10. The transplant center and business unit as a model for specialized care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, A Osama; Schwartz, Roberta L; Bernard, David P; Zylicz, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Transplant centers are valuable assets to a transplantation hospital and essential to organize the delivery of patient care. A transplant center defined around physicians and activities of caring for patients with organ failure creates a team better equipped to manage care across the continuum of the diseases treated by transplantation. Through monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes, the transplant center can better respond to the changing regulatory and financial landscape of health care. This article seeks to explain the major organizational challenges facing the transplant center and how a transplant center can best serve its patients and parent organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Validating office-based screening for psychosocial strengths and difficulties among youths in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Sandra H; Szilagyi, Moira; Conn, Anne-Marie; Nilsen, Wendy; Toth, Sheree; Baldwin, Constance D; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness of social-emotional screening in the primary care setting for youths in foster care. The setting was a primary care practice for all youth in home-based foster care in 1 county. Subjects were youths, aged 11 to 17 years, and their foster parents; both completed a Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at well-child visits. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire is a previously validated 25-item tool that has 5 domains: emotional symptoms; conduct problems; hyperactivity/inattention; peer problems; and prosocial behaviors and an overall total difficulties score. We first compared youth versus parent Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores and then assessed the accuracy of these Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores by comparing them in a subsample of youths (n = 50) with results of home-based structured clinical interviews using the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes. Of 138 subjects with both youth and parent reports, 78% had prosocial behaviors (strengths), and 70% had 1 or more social-emotional problems. Parents reported significantly more conduct problems (38% vs 16%; P youth. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire had better agreement with the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (n = 50) for any Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire-identified problem for combined youth and foster-parent reports (93%), compared with youth report alone (54%) or parent report alone (71%). Although most youths in foster care have social-emotional problems, most have strengths as well. Youth and foster-parent perspectives on these problems differ. Systematic social-emotional screening in primary care that includes both youth and parent reports can identify youths who may benefit from services.

  12. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

  14. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  15. Cyberbullying Bystanders and Moral Engagement: A Psychosocial Analysis for Pastoral Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, Chris; Zuin, Antônio

    2018-01-01

    One of the new challenges facing pastoral care in schools is dealing with the rapid growth of cyberbullying by school-aged children. Within digital cyberspace, cyberbullies are finding more opportunities to express their aggression towards others as social networks become technologically more sophisticated. An important feature of cyberbullying is…

  16. The Examination of The Outdoors of Family Health-Care Center: A Case Study In Çanakkale City Center

    OpenAIRE

    SAĞLIK, Alper; KELKİT, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    The gardens of the health-care centers are areas of fear, anxiety and stress based. In the process of the treatment of patients, these areas have psychological, physical and social significance. For this reason, health-care center gardens should be designed to help treatment of patients. Well designed gardens are important for elimination of adverse effects of clinical environments on patients and helping patients to stay away from the stress by ensuring their socia...

  17. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  18. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  19. Associations of family-centered care with health care outcomes for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Dennis Z; Bird, T Mac; Tilford, J Mick

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association of family-centered care (FCC) with specific health care service outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The study is a secondary analysis of the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Receipt of FCC was determined by five questions regarding how well health care providers addressed family concerns in the prior 12 months. We measured family burden by reports of delayed health care, unmet need, financial costs, and time devoted to care; health status, by stability of health care needs; and emergency department and outpatient service use. All statistical analyses used propensity score-based matching models to address selection bias. FCC was reported by 65.6% of respondents (N = 38,915). FCC was associated with less delayed health care (AOR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.66), fewer unmet service needs (AOR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.60), reduced odds of ≥1 h/week coordinating care (AOR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.93) and reductions in out of pocket costs (AOR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.96). FCC was associated with more stable health care needs (AOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.21), reduced odds of emergency room visits (AOR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.99) and increased odds of doctor visits (AOR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.37). Our study demonstrates associations of positive health and family outcomes with FCC. Realizing the health care delivery benefits of FCC may require additional encounters to build key elements of trust and partnership.

  20. A Canadian Cross-Sectional Survey on Psychosocial Supports for People Living Type 1 or 2 Diabetes: Health-Care Providers' Awareness, Capacity, and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennica; Vallis, Michael; Boutette, Stephanie; Gall Casey, Carolyn; Yu, Catherine H

    2017-11-09

    Addressing psychosocial issues is critical for diabetes self-management. This work explores health-care professionals' (HCPs') 1) perceived relevance of various psychosocial issues in diabetes management and 2) confidence in working on these issues within their services. An online cross-sectional survey was developed based on the Capacity-Opportunity-Motivation Behaviour Model. It assessed self-rated confidence in supporting patients with psychosocial issues (capability), perceived relevance of these issues (motivation) and facilitators of skill development (opportunity). An e-mail invitation was sent to all Diabetes Canada's professional members, conference delegates and committee members. Qualitative responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Of the 260 responses received (25% response rate), many were Diabetes Canada professional members (83%) and/or certified diabetes educators (66%). The largest professional groups in the sample were registered nurses (44%) and registered dietitians (33%). All psychosocial issues were perceived as somewhat or extremely important by at least 80% of respondents (range, 80% to 97%). However, HCPs were less confident in supporting their patients with these psychosocial issues; significantly fewer respondents reported that they felt somewhat or extremely confident (range, 26% to 62%). Depression (80%) and anxiety (80%) were the issues in which guidance was most desired. Most respondents wanted some form of formal self-management support training (83%). Preferred training methods included in-person workshops (56%), webinars (56%) and conference sessions (51%). Motivation to address psychosocial issues in diabetes was high, but capacity to do so and opportunity to learn how were both low. These findings can be used to develop a targeted strategy to help address this gap. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Schedule Control and Nursing Home Quality: Exploratory Evidence of a Psychosocial Predictor of Resident Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, David A; Berkman, Lisa F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Okechukwu, Cassandra A

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether nursing homes' quality of care was predicted by schedule control (workers' ability to decide work hours), independently of other staffing characteristics. Prospective ecological study of 30 nursing homes in New England. Schedule control was self-reported via survey in 2011-2012 (N = 1,045). Quality measures included the prevalence of decline in activities of daily living, residents' weight loss, and pressure ulcers, indicators systematically linked with staffing characteristics. Outcomes data for 2012 were retrieved from Medicare.gov. Robust Linear Regressions showed that higher schedule control predicted lower prevalence of pressure ulcers (β = -0.51, p job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Higher schedule control might enhance the planning and delivery of strategies to prevent or cure pressure ulcers. Further research is needed to identify potential causal mechanisms by which schedule control could improve quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Evaluation of Student Care Process in Urban and Rural Health Care Centers and Health House in Tabriz Using Tracer Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Kabiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Tracer methodology is a novel evaluation method which its purpose is to provide an accurate assessment of systems and processes for the delivery of care, treatment, and services at a health care organization. This study aimed to assess student care process in Tabriz using Tracer methodology. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted in autumn 1391. Population study consisted of all the students who were covered by Tabriz health care center and study sample included an urban health care center, a rural health care center, a health house, and two schools in urban and rural areas which were selected by simple sampling method. Also, all the complicated and problematic processes were chosen to be assessed. Data were collected by interviewing, observing, and surveying documents and were compared with current standards. Results : The results of this study declared the percentage of points that each target group gained from tracer evaluation in student care process was 77% in health house, 90% in rural health care center and 83% in urban health care center. Findings indicated that documentation was the main weak point. Conclusion : According to the results of this study, student care process is sufficient; despite the fact that there are some deficiencies in caring process, as it may be improved through appropriate strategies. Furthermore, tracer methodology seems to be a proper method to evaluate various levels of health care system. ​

  3. New Pathways for Primary Care: An Update on Primary Care Programs From the Innovation Center at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Those in practice find that the fee-for-service system does not adequately value the contributions made by primary care. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) was created by the Affordable Care Act to test new models of health care delivery to improve the quality of care while lowering costs. All programs coming out of the Innovation Center are tests of new payment and service delivery models. By changing both payment and delivery models and moving to a payment model that rewards physicians for quality of care instead of volume of care, we may be able to achieve the kind of health care patients want to receive and primary care physicians want to provide. PMID:22412007

  4. Transforming doctor-patient relationships to promote patient-centered care: lessons from palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Palliative care was studied for its potential to yield lessons for transforming doctor-patient relationships to promote patient-centered care. Examination of patient and provider experiences of the transition from curative to palliative care promises valuable insights about establishing and maintaining trust as the goals of care shift and about addressing a broad spectrum of patient needs. The study was guided by a conceptual framework grounded in existing models to address five dimensions of doctor-patient relationships: range of needs addressed, source of authority, maintenance of trust, emotional involvement, and expression of authenticity. Data collection included observation of the care of 40 patients in the inpatient hospice unit and at home, interviews with patients and family members, and in-depth interviews with 22 physicians and two nurses providing end-of-life care. Standard qualitative procedures were used to analyze the data, incorporating techniques for maximizing the validity of the results and broadening their relevance to other contexts. Findings provide evidence for challenging prominent assumptions about possibilities for doctor-patient relationships: questioning the merits of the prohibition on emotional involvement, dependence on protocols for handling difficult communication issues, unqualified reliance on consumer empowerment to assure that care is responsive to patients' needs, and adoption of narrowly defined boundaries between medical and social service systems in caring for patients. Medical education can play a role in preparing doctors to assume new roles by openly addressing management of emotions in routine clinical work, incorporating personal awareness training, facilitating reflection on interactions with patients through use of standardized patients and videotapes, and expanding capacity to effectively address a broad range of needs through teamwork training.

  5. Decreased mental health care utilization following a psychosocial intervention in caregivers of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ouseph

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Caregivers are known to experience increased morbidity when compared to non-caregivers. Does an intervention targeting caregiver distress affect their health care utilization? One hundred forty-eight caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU or a psychoeducation, paced respiration, and relaxation (PEPRR intervention. Assessments of caregivers’ service utilization were collected at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months post-transplant. During the first 30 days after patient transplant, caregiver medical and mental health professional service use decreased while support group attendance peaked. Mixed model regressions showed a significant decrease in mental health service use by the PEPRR group (P=0.001. At six months caregivers in TAU had predicted marginal probabilities of mental health services utilization over 10 times as high as caregivers in PEPRR (18.1% vs 1.5%. Groups failed to differ in medical service (P=0.861 or support group (P=0.067 use. We can conclude that participation in PEPRR compared to TAU was associated with reduced mental health service utilization. Caregiver psychosocial support services are critical to improve caregiver outcomes.

  6. Psychosocial determinants of self-reported hand hygiene behaviour: a survey comparing physicians and nurses in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lengerke, T; Lutze, B; Graf, K; Krauth, C; Lange, K; Schwadtke, L; Stahmeyer, J; Chaberny, I F

    2015-09-01

    Research applying psychological behaviour change theories to hand hygiene compliance is scarce, especially for physicians. To identify psychosocial determinants of self-reported hand hygiene behaviour (HHB) of physicians and nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire that applied concepts from the Health Action Process Approach on hygienic hand disinfection was conducted in 10 ICUs and two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation units at Hannover Medical School, Germany. Self-reported compliance was operationalized as always disinfecting one's hands when given tasks associated with risk of infection. Using seven-point Likert scales, behavioural planning, maintenance self-efficacy and action control were assessed as psychological factors, and personnel and material resources, organizational problems and cooperation on the ward were assessed as perceived environmental factors. Multiple logistic regression analysis was employed. In total, 307 physicians and 348 nurses participated in this study (response rates 70.9% and 63.4%, respectively). Self-reported compliance did not differ between the groups (72.4% vs 69.4%, P = 0.405). While nurses reported stronger planning, self-efficacy and action control, physicians indicated better personnel resources and cooperation on the ward (P Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ...] Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for... (CMS). This two-day training session is the second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS.... Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions (ADLS), the Innovation Center will test whether...

  8. The effects of multi-disciplinary psycho-social care on socio-economic problems in cancer patients: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Roick, Julia; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Schiefke, Franziska; Briest, Susanne; Dietz, Andreas; Papsdorf, Kirsten; Mössner, Joachim; Berg, Thomas; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Niederwieser, Dietger; Keller, Annette; Kersting, Anette; Danker, Helge

    2018-06-01

    We examined whether multi-disciplinary stepped psycho-social care decreases financial problems and improves return-to-work in cancer patients. In a university hospital, wards were randomly allocated to either stepped or standard care. Stepped care comprised screening for financial problems, consultation between doctor and patient, and the provision of social service. Outcomes were financial problems at the time of discharge and return-to-work in patients financial problems at baseline were less likely to have financial problems at discharge when they had received stepped care (odds ratio (OR) 0.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1, 0.7; p = 0.01). There was no evidence for an effect of stepped care on financial problems in patients without such problems at baseline (OR 1.1, CI 0.5, 2.6; p = 0.82). There were 399 patients Financial problems can be avoided more effectively with multi-disciplinary stepped psycho-social care than with standard care in patients who have such problems.

  9. Perception on Informed Consent Regarding Nursing Care Practices in a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, B; Shrestha, G K

    Background Consent for care procedures is mandatory after receipt of adequate information. It maintains patient's rights and autonomy to make thoughtful decisions. Poor communication often leads to poor health quality. Objective To assess hospitalized patients' perception on informed consent regarding nursing care practices in a tertiary care center. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study among 113 admitted patients conducted in February 2012 at Dhulikhel Hospital, Nepal. Patients of various wards were selected using purposive non-probability sampling with at least 3 days of hospitalization. Close ended structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' perception on three different areas of informed consent (information giving, opportunity to make decision and taking prior consent). Result Among the participants 71.6% perceived positively regarding informed consent towards nursing care practices with a mean score of 3.32 ± 1.28. Patients' perception on various areas of informed consent viz. information giving, opportunities to make specific decision and taking prior consent were all positive with mean values of 3.43±1.12, 2.88±1.23, 3.65±1.49 respectively. Comparison of mean perception of informed consent with various variables revealed insignificant correlation (p-value >0.05) for age, educational level and previous hospitalization while it was significant (p-value perception on informed consent towards nursing care practices. Communication skills of nurses affect the perception of patients' regardless of age, education level and past experiences.

  10. Person-centered care and engagement via technology of residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anita M Y; Loi, Samantha M; Westphal, Alissa; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-12-01

    Touchscreen technology (TT) is a resource that can improve the quality of life of residents with dementia, and care staff, in residential aged care facilities (RACF) through a person-centered care approach. To enable the use of TTs to engage and benefit people with dementia in RACFs, education is needed to explore how these devices may be used, what facilitates use, and how to address barriers. We sought to provide education and explore RACF staff views and barriers on using TT to engage their residents with dementia. An educational session on using TT with residents with dementia was given to staff from three long-term RACFs in Melbourne, Australia. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 17 staff members (personal care attendants, registered nurses, enrolled nurses, allied health clinicians, and domestic staff) who attended were administered questionnaires pre- and post-sessions. As a result of the education seminar, they were significantly more confident in their ability to use TT devices with residents. TT, and education to staff about its use with residents with dementia, is a useful strategy to enhance RACF staff knowledge and confidence, thereby enhancing the use of technology in RACFs in order to improve care standards in people with dementia.

  11. Patient-Physician Communication in Oncology Care : The character of, barriers against, and ways to evaluate patient-physician communication, with focus on the psychosocial dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlind, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to characterize patient-physician communication in oncology care with focus on the content and quality of the consultations from the perspectives of patients, oncologists and observer. Further, the aim was to explore oncologists’ perceived barriers against psychosocial communication in out-patient consultations. Finally, the aim was to evaluate different methods for evaluating communication in this setting. Routine oncology out-patient consultations from two...

  12. The development of the nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities at Tawanchai Cleft Center, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2012-11-01

    The highest incidence of cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in Thailand occur in the Northeastern Region. There is the necessity for an interdisciplinary care team as well as the specialized care center with systematic coordinated care, thus "Tawanchai Cleft Center" is becoming a superior medical center for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities. Therefore, the development of the nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities at Tawanchai Cleft Center, Srinagarind Hospital is extremely important and necessary. To develop the nursing care system appropriate for a super tertiary hospital (Tawanchai Cleft Center). It is a participation study which has 3 steps as follows, 1) Analyzing the situations and collecting the opinions of the 22 Out-patient Surgery Department staff and Tawanchai Cleft Center staff by using 6 questions, 2) Summarizing of the situation analysis from the meetings and the questionnaires, then using such summary as the guidelines for developing the nursing care system from January 2011 onwards, 3) evaluating the satisfaction after the 4 month development period (May-August 2011) with 106 caregivers by using 8 questions and being analyzed by the average value, percentage and standard deviation. 1) The nursing care system consisted of psychosocial care, breast feeding, counseling and other assistance as required. This various assistance responded to the patient/family problems by following the treatment guideline of the multidisciplinary team which uses the continuous evaluation processes for the holistic patient/family care. 2) The patients with complete cleft lip-palate were the most common type, found in 44 cases or 41.53 percent. The highest number of caregivers were mothers which were 68 percent; the average age of those mothers was 36 years old. The highest number of them finished elementary school at 43 percent and 40 percent were farmers. The satisfaction for the services of

  13. [Patient-centered care. Improvement of communication between university medical centers and general practitioners for patients in neuro-oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renovanz, M; Keric, N; Richter, C; Gutenberg, A; Giese, A

    2015-12-01

    Communication between university medical centers and general practitioners (GP) is becoming increasingly more important in supportive patient care. A survey among GPs was performed with the primary objective to assess their opinion on current workflow and communication between GPs and the university medical center. The GPs were asked to score (grades 1-6) their opinion on the current interdisciplinary workflow in the care of patients with brain tumors, thereby rating communication between a university medical center in general and the neuro-oncology outpatient center in particular. Questionnaires were sent to1000 GPs and the response rate was 15 %. The mean scored evaluation of the university medical center in general was 2.62 and of the neuro-oncological outpatient clinic 2.28 (range 1-6). The most often mentioned issues to be improved were easier/early telephone information (44 %) and a constantly available contact person (49 %). Interestingly, > 60 % of the GPs indicated they would support web-based tumor boards for interdisciplinary and palliative neuro-oncological care. As interdisciplinary care for neuro-oncology patients is an essential part of therapy, improvement of communication between GPs and university medical centers is indispensable. Integrating currently available electronic platforms under data protection aspects into neuro-oncological palliative care could be an interesting tool in order to establish healthcare networks and could find acceptance with GPs.

  14. Daily activities and living at a Therapeutic Residential Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Prado Kantorki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes and analyzes day-to-day issues in a Therapeutic Residential Care Center and the daily life characteristics of its residents. This case study was conducted in Caxias do Sul, based on an evaluation of the fourth generation together with a Methodology for Analyzing Everyday Life Networks. The following categories emerged: possibilities in the territory, participation and flexibility in household tasks, situations that mark living, employees who are mediators in conflict resolution, staff committed to the resident, freedom as a therapeutic tool, difficulties in daily life, and building of alliances. This study helped to get to know the structure of everyday life experienced by the residents, identifying some difficulties they face and the mechanisms used to overcome them, in addition to noticing that the professionals can be instrumental in strengthening a daily living that can be pluralized, busy, and enriched, while still respecting the uniqueness of each resident. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i4.22923.

  15. Fungal contamination assessment in Portuguese elderly care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, C; Almeida-Silva, M; Gomes, A Quintal; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend 80-90% of their day indoors and elderly subjects are likely to spend even a greater amount of time indoors. Thus, indoor air pollutants such as bioaerosols may exert a significant impact on this age group. The aim of this study was to characterize fungal contamination within Portuguese elderly care centers. Fungi were measured using conventional as well as molecular methods in bedrooms, living rooms, canteens, storage areas, and outdoors. Bioaerosols were evaluated before and after the microenvironments' occupancy in order to understand the role played by occupancy in fungal contamination. Fungal load results varied from 32 colony-forming units CFU m(-3) in bedrooms to 228 CFU m(-3) in storage areas. Penicillium sp. was the most frequently isolated (38.1%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (16.3%) and Chrysonilia sp. (4.2%). With respect to Aspergillus genus, three different fungal species in indoor air were detected, with A. candidus (62.5%) the most prevalent. On surfaces, 40 different fungal species were isolated and the most frequent was Penicillium sp. (22.2%), followed by Aspergillus sp. (17.3%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction did not detect the presence of A. fumigatus complex. Species from Penicillium and Aspergillus genera were the most abundant in air and surfaces. The species A. fumigatus was present in 12.5% of all indoor microenvironments assessed. The living room was the indoor microenvironment with lowest fungal concentration and the storage area was highest.

  16. Xeroderma pigmentosum at a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwatban, Lenah; Binamer, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective DNA repair that results in extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Depending on the type of XP, the disease may affect the skin, eyes and nervous system. Describe the dermatologic manifestations in patients suffering from XP. Retrospective, descriptive review of medical records. Dermatology clinic at tertiary care center in Riyadh. This study included Saudi patients with clinically confirmed XP. Demographic and clinical data including pathology and associated conditions and outcomes. Of 21 patients with XP, the most common manifestation was lentigines, affecting 18 patients (86%). The most common skin cancer was basal cell carcinoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) affecting 15 (71.4%) and 9 (42.8%), respectively. Other skin findings included neurofibroma, trichilemmoma and seborrheic keratosis. Ocular involvement included photophobia, which was the most common finding followed by dryness and ocular malignancies. Two patients showed neurological involvement, which correlated with the type of mutation. Considering that XP is a rare genetic disease, this description of our patient population will aid in early recognition and diagnosis. Retrospective and small number of patients. Genetic analyses were done for only 5 of the 21 patients.

  17. Impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales Psychosocial impact of demential syndrome in crucial care givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos LLibre Guerra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Las demencias, entidades de elevada frecuencia en el adulto mayor, constituyen un creciente problema de salud en países con una alta expectativa de vida como el nuestro, no solo por su magnitud, sino por su repercusión a nivel individual, familiar y social. Se presenta un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, realizado en el período comprendido entre enero de 2003 y enero de 2005, en las áreas de salud del municipio Marianao, con el objetivo de determinar el impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales. Se visitaron 110 cuidadores de pacientes con demencia y enfermedad de Alzheimer diagnosticados de acuerdo con los criterios del DSM-IV. Los cuidadores cruciales de los pacientes con demencia correspondieron en su mayoría a mujeres casadas, esposa o hijas del paciente, en la quinta década de la vida, amas de casa, y con un nivel medio de escolaridad. El cuidador dedica alrededor de 12 h diarias al cuidado del paciente, la mayor parte en la supervisión. Se evidenció afectación psicológica en el 89 % de los cuidadores. El nivel de sobrecarga o estrés en la muestra es significativamente elevado. Los cuidadores consideran como primera prioridad información acerca de la enfermedad y atención al paciente. Se recomienda realizar un plan de intervención educativa dirigido a los cuidadores, que permita reducir la sobrecarga física, psicológica y económica del cuidado y mejorar su calidad de vida.The dementias, entities of an elevated frequency in the older adult, are an increasing health problem in countries with a high life expectancy at birth as ours, not only because of their magnitude, but also because of their repercussion at the individual, familiar and social levels. A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken from January 2003 to January 2005 in the health areas of Marianao municipality with the objective of determining the psychosocial impact of the demential syndrome in crucial care givers. 110

  18. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for... Services (CMS). This two-day training session is the third and final Accelerated Development Learning... the quality of care for beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions (ADLS), the...

  19. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Social intelligence deficits in autistic children and adolescents--subjective theories of psychosocial health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krech, M; Probst, P

    1998-10-01

    The paper is concerned with personal theories of health care professionals about deficiencies in social intelligence of autistic persons. In the component-model of social intelligence means the ability of individuals or groups, to interact with each other in social situations. This contains social perception, social behavior as well as social conceptions and refers to emotional, cognitive and normative aspects. 33 interviewees, working as psychologists or teachers in kindergartens, schools or therapy institutions, are questioned by a half-standardized single interview concerning their beliefs about nonverbal social abilities, social perspective taking, and construction of a theory of mind in autistic persons. The major finding is: The impairments can be found in all aspects of social intelligence. Especially emotional handicaps, which are quoted by more than 80% of the interviewees, and low cognitive preconditions of mastering social stimuli, which are quoted by nearly all interviewees, are relevant. The subjective theories of the interviewees are in accordance to the models of parents as well as the models of the leading experts. The professional relationship to autistic persons and the practical experiences of the health care professionals lead to their specific personal theories of deficiencies in social intelligence of autistic people with wide consequences in respect to the professional contact with the autistic children and young adults.

  1. Role of traditional healers in psychosocial support in caring for the orphans: A case of Dar-es Salaam City, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massila Mariam

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orphans are an increasing problem in developing countries particularly in Africa; due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic; and needs collective effort in intervention processes by including all stakeholders right from the grass roots level. This paper attempts to present the role of traditional healers in psychosocial support for orphan children in Dar-es-Salaam City with special focus on those whose parents have died because of HIV/AIDS. Six traditional healers who were involved in taking care of orphans were visited at their "vilinge" (traditional clinics. In total they had 72 orphans, 31 being boys and 41 being girls with age range from 3 years to 19. It was learned that traditional healers, besides providing remedies for illnesses/diseases of orphans, they also provided other basic needs. Further, they even provided psychosocial support allowing children to cope with orphan hood life with ease. Traditional healers are living within communities at the grass roots level; and appear unnoticed hidden forces, which are involved in taking care of orphans. This role of traditional healers in taking care of orphans needs to be recognised and even scaling it up by empowering them both in financial terms and training in basic skills of psychosocial techniques in how to handle orphans, in order to reduce discrimination and stigmatisation in the communities where they live.

  2. Role of traditional healers in psychosocial support in caring for the orphans: a case of Dar-es Salaam City, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayombo, Edmund J; Mbwambo, Zakaria H; Massila, Mariam

    2005-07-29

    Orphans are an increasing problem in developing countries particularly in Africa; due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic; and needs collective effort in intervention processes by including all stakeholders right from the grass roots level. This paper attempts to present the role of traditional healers in psychosocial support for orphan children in Dar-es-Salaam City with special focus on those whose parents have died because of HIV/AIDS. Six traditional healers who were involved in taking care of orphans were visited at their "vilinge" (traditional clinics). In total they had 72 orphans, 31 being boys and 41 being girls with age range from 3 years to 19. It was learned that traditional healers, besides providing remedies for illnesses/diseases of orphans, they also provided other basic needs. Further, they even provided psychosocial support allowing children to cope with orphan hood life with ease. Traditional healers are living within communities at the grass roots level; and appear unnoticed hidden forces, which are involved in taking care of orphans. This role of traditional healers in taking care of orphans needs to be recognised and even scaling it up by empowering them both in financial terms and training in basic skills of psychosocial techniques in how to handle orphans, in order to reduce discrimination and stigmatisation in the communities where they live.

  3. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  4. Psychosocial resiliency is associated with lower emotional distress among dyads of patients and their informal caregivers in the neuroscience intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Kelly M; Riklin, Eric; Jacobs, Jamie M; Rosand, Jonathan; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the associations of patients' and their informal caregivers' psychosocial resiliency factors with their own and their partners' emotion domains (distress, anxiety, depression, and anger) after admission to the neuroscience intensive care unit (Neuro-ICU). Eighty-three dyads of patients (total n = 87) and their informal caregivers (total n = 99) participated in this observational, cross-sectional study by self-reporting demographics and measures of resiliency factors (mindfulness [Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale Revised], coping [Measure of Coping Status-A], intimate bond [Intimate Bond Measure], self-efficacy [patients: General Self-Efficacy Scale; caregivers: Revised Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale]) and emotion domains (Emotion Thermometers) within 2 weeks of Neuro-ICU admission. There were no differences between patients' and caregivers' levels of psychosocial resiliency, distress, or anxiety. Patients reported greater depression and anger relative to their caregivers. Overall, roughly half of patients (50.6%) and caregivers (42.4%) reported clinically significant emotional distress. Patients' and caregivers' own psychosocial resiliency factors were associated with their own, but not their partner's, emotion domains. Findings of high distress among both patients and caregivers at admission emphasize the importance of attending to the mental health of both patients and caregivers in the Neuro-ICU. As modifiable psychosocial resiliency factors were associated with emotion domains for both patients and caregivers, interventions to enhance these factors may ameliorate emotional distress among these vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Centering Pregnancy and Traditional Prenatal Care: A Comparison of Health Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Shakespear, Kaylynn

    2008-01-01

    Centering Pregnancy is an alternative method of providing prenatal care with increased education and social support with health assessment in a group setting. This study, a cross-sectional, correlational, convenience-sample design, sought to determine the difference between women who receive prenatal care in Centering Pregnancy prenatal care and those in traditional prenatal care in regards to health behaviors. Adult pregnant women (n = 125) were surveyed from at least 28 weeks gestation. The...

  6. Carefree in child care ?: child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in center child care and to answer the question whether narrow-focused caregiver interventions are effective in improving child care quality. The reported meta-analysis shows that narrow-focus interv...

  7. Guidelines for conducting rigorous health care psychosocial cross-cultural/language qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances; Lee, Hee Yun; Martin, Shadi S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize and chronicle the authors' experiences as four bilingual and bicultural researchers, each experienced in conducting cross-cultural/cross-language qualitative research. Through narrative descriptions of experiences with Latinos, Iranians, and Hmong refugees, the authors discuss their rewards, challenges, and methods of enhancing rigor, trustworthiness, and transparency when conducting cross-cultural/cross-language research. The authors discuss and explore how to effectively manage cross-cultural qualitative data, how to effectively use interpreters and translators, how to identify best methods of transcribing data, and the role of creating strong community relationships. The authors provide guidelines for health care professionals to consider when engaging in cross-cultural qualitative research.

  8. Creating New Child Care Slots in Mini Child Care Centers: Big Bang for the Buck in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Small grants of $7,500 with technical assistance were offered to the child care community of New Jersey to either start or increase licensed capacity in mini-child care centers. Results of a subsequent analysis showed that 26 grantees created 481 new child care slots at an average cost of $561 per slot. (Author/SM)

  9. Carefree in child care ? : child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in

  10. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received by patients/families and to ultimately change physician practice to reflect patient family–centered principles. We conducted a clinician survey and found promising results indicating that patient/family narratives can be effective at educating physicians about patient family–centered care.

  11. MUSICAL INTERVENTION AS A NURSING CARE STRATEGY FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER AT A PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana André Honorato Franzoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available La música se ha utilizado cada vez más en el cuidado de los niños con trastorno del espectro autista. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo informar sobre la aplicación de la experiencia de la música como tecnología del cuidado de estos niños en un Servicio de Salud Mental Infanto-Juvenil. Se trata de un proyecto de intervención basado en la idea de acción-reflexión acción a través de las etapas de diagnóstico de la realidad, la teoría y la aplicación en la realidad. La intervención musical facilitó nuevas experiencias recreativas, sensorial, motora, del lenguaje y de la interacción de los niños, actuando sobre la tríada de alteraciones - comunicación, comportamiento e interacción. Los profesionales deben profundizar sus conocimientos sobre los métodos y estrategias del uso de la musicoterapia en la salud mental con el fin de extender su uso en el cuidado de estos niños y evaluar los efectos de esta intervención.

  12. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  13. Improving the transition of care in patients transferred through the ochsner medical center transfer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedee, Ronald G; Maronge, Genevieve F; Pinsky, William W

    2012-01-01

    Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (Pkaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects.

  14. Nurses take center stage in private duty home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Nicole

    2013-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act gives America's largest group of health care providers--nurses--a unique chance to lead in improving outcomes, increasing patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Nurses' roles continue to grow in settings from hospitals and long-term care facilities to home health and hospice agencies. Nurses are also key players in private duty home care, where they serve as care coordinators for clients. Working directly with doctors, therapists, in-home caregivers, and families, nurses are critical in delivering quality, seamless in-home care.

  15. A dimensional analysis of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jennifer Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care (PCC) is a poorly conceptualized phenomenon and can indicate anything from soothing room design, emotional support of patients, customization of meals, to support of patient decision making. This inconsistency across the clinical and research literature makes the application of PCC difficult. The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of PCC as found in the literature. A dimensional analysis of PCC was conducted from 69 clinical and research articles published from 2000 to 2006. Coding of the literature for the perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences of PCC was completed. These codes were used to determine literature selected for inclusion, organize article content, and frame the delineation of PCC. Alleviating vulnerabilities, consisting of both compromised physiological states and threats to individual identity, was constant throughout the literature. Therapeutic engagement was the process sustaining the patient during an illness episode that necessitated service use and involved allocating time, carrying out information practices, knowing the patient, and developing a relationship. This process occurs during nurse-patient interaction, sustained during successive interactions, and reinforced by the information practices of a particular setting. The interaction between nurse and patient is central to the effective study and application of PCC. Appropriate use of PCC can improve study outcomes and measurements by clarifying the variables involved, and PCC holds great promise to frame patient outcome and satisfaction research by analyzing how and with what effect nurses alleviate patient vulnerability. Moreover, consideration of information practices as a critical supporting structure of nurse-patient interaction can be explored.

  16. Biological air contamination in elderly care centers: geria project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Lívia; Mendes, Ana; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Mendes, Diana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) affects health particularly in susceptible individuals such as the elderly. It has been estimated that the older population spends approximately 19-20 h/d indoors, and the majority of the elderly spend all of their time indoors in elderly care centers (ECC). Older individuals may be particularly at risk of exposure to detrimental effects from pollutants, even at low concentrations, due to common and multiple underlying chronic diseases that increase susceptibility. This study, aimed to assess the impact of indoor biological agents in 22 ECC located in Porto, was conducted during summer and winter from November 2011 to August 2013 at a total of 141 areas within dining rooms, drawing rooms, medical offices, and bedrooms (including the bedridden). Air sampling was carried out with a microbiological air sampler (Merck MAS-100) and using tryptic soy agar for bacteria and malt extract agar for fungi. The results obtained were compared with the recently revised Portuguese standards. In winter, mean fungi concentration exceeded reference values, while bacteria concentrations were within the new standards in both seasons. The main fungi species found indoors were Cladosporium (73%) in summer and Penicillium (67%) in winter. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus, known potential pathogenic/toxigenic species, were also identified. Although the overall rate and mean values of bacteria and fungi found in ECC indoor air met Portuguese legislation, some concern is raised by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Simple measures, like opening windows and doors to promote air exchange and renewal, may improve effectiveness in enhancing IAQ.

  17. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  18. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  19. Adaptive leadership and person-centered care: a new approach to solving problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Successfully transitioning to person-centered care in nursing homes requires a new approach to solving care issues. The adaptive leadership framework suggests that expert providers must support frontline caregivers in their efforts to develop high-quality, person-centered solutions.

  20. Predicting Early Center Care Utilization in a Context of Universal Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Janson, Harald; Naerde, Ane

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports predictors for center care utilization prior to 18 months of age in Norway, a country with a welfare system providing up to one-year paid parental leave and universal access to subsidized and publicly regulated center care. A community sample of 1103 families was interviewed about demographics, family, and child characteristics…

  1. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  2. Physical Activity in Child-Care Centers: Do Teachers Hold the Key to the Playground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Saelens, Brian E.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Sherman, Susan N.

    2012-01-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49…

  3. National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) at the University of Colorado College of ... National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education Email: info@NRCKids.org Please read our disclaimer ...

  4. Women with Heart Failure Are at High Psychosocial Risk: A Systematic Review of How Sex and Gender Influence Heart Failure Self-Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody R. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve patient support, it is important to understand how people view and experience Heart Failure (HF self-care. This systematic review of qualitative studies included all published studies that examine the influence of sex and gender on HF self-care. A systematic search was done for papers (1995–2010 indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, OVID AARP Ageline, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO SocINDEX, ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. After screening of 537 citations, six qualitative studies identified that differences existed in perceptions of symptoms with women having less family involvement and psychosocial support around self-care. Moreover, women had considerably more negative views of the future, themselves and their ability to fulfill social self-care roles. Women with HF represent a highly vulnerable population and need more support for psychosocial wellbeing and self-care.

  5. Patient- and family-centered care coordination: a framework for integrating care for children and youth across multiple systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Understanding a care coordination framework, its functions, and its effects on children and families is critical for patients and families themselves, as well as for pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists/surgical specialists, and anyone providing services to children and families. Care coordination is an essential element of a transformed American health care delivery system that emphasizes optimal quality and cost outcomes, addresses family-centered care, and calls for partnership across various settings and communities. High-quality, cost-effective health care requires that the delivery system include elements for the provision of services supporting the coordination of care across settings and professionals. This requirement of supporting coordination of care is generally true for health systems providing care for all children and youth but especially for those with special health care needs. At the foundation of an efficient and effective system of care delivery is the patient-/family-centered medical home. From its inception, the medical home has had care coordination as a core element. In general, optimal outcomes for children and youth, especially those with special health care needs, require interfacing among multiple care systems and individuals, including the following: medical, social, and behavioral professionals; the educational system; payers; medical equipment providers; home care agencies; advocacy groups; needed supportive therapies/services; and families. Coordination of care across settings permits an integration of services that is centered on the comprehensive needs of the patient and family, leading to decreased health care costs, reduction in fragmented care, and improvement in the patient/family experience of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. An Employee-Centered Care Model Responds to the Triple Aim: Improving Employee Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kelly; McCorkle, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Health care expenditures, patient satisfaction, and timely access to care will remain problematic if dramatic changes in health care delivery models are not developed and implemented. To combat this challenge, a Triple Aim approach is essential; Innovation in payment and health care delivery models is required. Using the Donabedian framework of structure, process, and outcome, this article describes a nurse-led employee-centered care model designed to improve consumers' health care experiences, improve employee health, and increase access to care while reducing health care costs for employees, age 18 and older, in a corporate environment.

  7. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  8. Continuing stability of center differences in pediatric diabetes care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Beaufort, Carine E.; Swift, Peter G.F.; Skinner, Chas T.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- To reevaluate the persistence and stability of previously observed differences between pediatric diabetes centers and to investigate the influence of demography, language communication problems, and changes in insulin regimens on metabolic outcome, hypoglycemia, and ketoacidosis....... CONCLUSIONS - Despite many changes in diabetes management, major differences in metabolic outcome between 21 international pediatric diabetes centers persist. Different application between centers in the implementation of insulin treatment appears to be of more importance and needs further exploration....

  9. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownie S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Brownie, Susan NancarrowSchool of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff.Methods: We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes.Results: The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4. The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents' levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses' sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an

  10. Relationship-centered health care as a Lean intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsford, Jennifer; Reimer, Laura E

    2017-12-01

    Continuous improvement efforts, recognized in much literature as Lean management techniques have been used in efforts to improve efficiency in democratic health care contexts for some time to varying degrees of success. The complexity of the health care system is magnified by the sheer number of processes and sub processes required to deliver value within a bureaucratic environment, while maintaining some level of compassionate and personalized care. There is inherent tension between what is required to be efficient and what is required to be caring and this conflict presses against Lean practice at the level of delivery.Administration and care intersect at the point of the patient's experience. In order to achieve the dual goals of improved value and lower costs, the application of Lean thinking for meaningful health care reform must acknowledge the fundamental dichotomy between the impersonal tasks required to provide health services, and human interactions. Meaningful health care reform requires an acknowledgement of this distinction, currently not recognized in literature. While administrative process improvements are necessary, they are insufficient to achieve a sustainable and caring health care system. Lean thinking must be applied differently for administrative processes and patient care encounters, because these are fundamentally different processes. In this way, Lean principles will effectively contribute to sustainable health system improvements. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. How Interdisciplinary Teamwork Contributes to Psychosocial Cancer Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daem, Michiel; Verbrugghe, Mathieu; Schrauwen, Wim; Leroux, Silvian; Van Hecke, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria

    2018-03-30

    The organization of psychosocial care is rather complex, and its provision diverse. Access is affected by the acceptance and attitude of patients and professional caregivers toward psychosocial care. The aims of this study were to examine when patients with cancer experience quality psychosocial care and to identify circumstances in collaboration that contribute to patient-perceived positive psychosocial care. This study used a qualitative design in which semistructured interviews were conducted with patients, hospital workers, and primary health professionals. Psychosocial care is often requested but also refused by patients with cancer. Based on this discrepancy, a distinction is made between psychosocial support and psychosocial interventions. Psychosocial support aims to reduce the chaos in patients' lives caused by cancer and is not shunned by patients. Psychosocial interventions comprise the formal care offered in response to psychosocial problems. Numerous patients are reluctant to use psychosocial interventions, which are often provided by psychologists. Psychosocial care aims to assist patients in bearing the difficulties of cancer and its treatment. Patients prefer informal support, given often in conjunction with physical care. This study confirms the important role of nurses in promoting psychosocial care. Patients perceive much support from nurses, although nurses are not considered to be professional psychosocial caregivers. Being perceived as approachable and trustworthy offers nurses a significant opportunity to bring more intense psychosocial interventions within reach of cancer patients.

  12. How can healthcare organizations implement patient-centered care? Examining a large-scale cultural transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhour, Barbara G; Fix, Gemmae M; Mueller, Nora M; Barker, Anna M; Lavela, Sherri L; Hill, Jennifer N; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2018-03-07

    Healthcare organizations increasingly are focused on providing care which is patient-centered rather than disease-focused. Yet little is known about how best to transform the culture of care in these organizations. We sought to understand key organizational factors for implementing patient-centered care cultural transformation through an examination of efforts in the US Department of Veterans Affairs. We conducted multi-day site visits at four US Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers designated as leaders in providing patient-centered care. We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 108 employees (22 senior leaders, 42 middle managers, 37 front-line providers and 7 staff). Transcripts of audio recordings were analyzed using a priori codes based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. We used constant comparison analysis to synthesize codes into meaningful domains. Sites described actions taken to foster patient-centered care in seven domains: 1) leadership; 2) patient and family engagement; 3) staff engagement; 4) focus on innovations; 5) alignment of staff roles and priorities; 6) organizational structures and processes; 7) environment of care. Within each domain, we identified multi-faceted strategies for implementing change. These included efforts by all levels of organizational leaders who modeled patient-centered care in their interactions and fostered willingness to try novel approaches to care amongst staff. Alignment and integration of patient centered care within the organization, particularly surrounding roles, priorities and bureaucratic rules, remained major challenges. Transforming healthcare systems to focus on patient-centered care and better serve the "whole" patient is a complex endeavor. Efforts to transform healthcare culture require robust, multi-pronged efforts at all levels of the organization; leadership is only the beginning. Challenges remain for incorporating patient-centered approaches in the

  13. Glaucoma Blindness at a Tertiary Eye Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jordan S; Muir, Kelly W; Stinnett, Sandra S; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is an important cause of irreversible blindness. This study describes the characteristics of a large, diverse group of glaucoma patients and evaluates associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and blindness. Data were gathered via retrospective chart review of patients (N = 1,454) who were seen between July 2007 and July 2010 by glaucoma service providers at Duke Eye Center. Visual acuity and visual field criteria were used to determine whether patients met the criteria for legal blindness. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were performed on the glaucoma patients who were not blind (n = 1,258) and those who were blind (n = 196). A subgroup analysis of only those patients with primary open-angle glaucoma was also performed. In this tertiary care population, 13% (n = 196) of glaucoma patients met criteria for legal blindness, nearly one-half of whom (n = 94) were blind from glaucoma, and another one-third of whom (n = 69) had glaucoma-related blindness. The most common glaucoma diagnosis at all levels of vision was primary open-angle glaucoma. A larger proportion of black patients compared with white patients demonstrated vision loss; the odds ratio (OR) for blindness was 2.25 (95% CI, 1.6-3.2) for black patients compared with white patients. The use of systemic antihypertensive medications was higher among patients who were blind compared with patients who were not blind (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.1). A subgroup analysis including only patients with primary open-angle glaucoma showed similar results for both black race and use of systemic antihypertensive medications. The relationship between use of systemic antihypertensive medications and blindness was not different between black patients and white patients (interaction P = .268). Data were based on chart review, and associations may be confounded by unmeasured factors. Treated systemic hypertension may be correlated with blindness, and the cause cannot be explained solely

  14. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children. All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. RESULTS: Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. CONCLUSION: The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers.

  15. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  16. Patient centered decision making in palliative cancer treatment: a world of paradoxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haes, Hanneke; Koedoot, Nelleke

    2003-01-01

    Patient centered palliative cancer care would imply, first, the introduction of psychosocial endpoints when evaluating treatment and making decisions. Second, patient control would have to be enhanced by information giving and increased decision involvement. We have indicated that paradoxes exist

  17. Absenteeism and Presenteeism among Care Workers in Swiss Nursing Homes and Their Association with Psychosocial Work Environment: A Multi-Site Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaini, Suzanne; Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Simon, Michael; Kunz, Regina; De Geest, Sabina; Schwendimann, René

    2016-01-01

    Worker productivity is central to the success of organizations such as healthcare institutions. However, both absenteeism and presenteeism impair that productivity. While various hospital studies have examined the prevalence of presenteeism and absenteeism and its associated factors among care workers, evidence from nursing home settings is scarce. To explore care workers' self-reported absenteeism and presenteeism in relation to nursing homes' psychosocial work environment factors. We performed a cross-sectional study utilizing survey data of 3,176 professional care workers in 162 Swiss nursing homes collected between May 2012 and April 2013. A generalized estimating equation ordinal logistic regression model was used to explore associations between psychosocial work environment factors (leadership, staffing resources, work stressors, affective organizational commitment, collaboration with colleagues and supervisors, support from other personnel, job satisfaction, job autonomy) and self-reported absenteeism and presenteeism. Absenteeism and presenteeism were observed in 15.6 and 32.9% of care workers, respectively. While absenteeism showed no relationship with the work environment, low presenteeism correlated with high leadership ratings (odds ratio [OR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.48) and adequate staffing resources (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.02-1.38). Self-reported presenteeism is more common than absenteeism in Swiss nursing homes, and leadership and staffing resource adequacy are significantly associated with presenteeism, but not with absenteeism. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Investing in CenteringPregnancy™ Group Prenatal Care Reduces Newborn Hospitalization Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Amy; Heberlein, Emily C; Glasscock, Leah; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Shea, Karen; Khan, Imtiaz A

    CenteringPregnancy™ group prenatal care is an innovative model with promising evidence of reducing preterm birth. The outpatient costs of offering CenteringPregnancy pose barriers to model adoption. Enhanced provider reimbursement for group prenatal care may improve birth outcomes and generate newborn hospitalization cost savings for insurers. To investigate potential cost savings for investment in CenteringPregnancy, we evaluated the impact on newborn hospital admission costs of a pilot incentive project, where BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid managed care organization paid an obstetric practice offering CenteringPregnancy $175 for each patient who participated in at least five group prenatal care sessions. Using a one to many case-control matching without replacement, each CenteringPregnancy participant was matched retrospectively on propensity score, age, race, and clinical risk factors with five individual care participants. We estimated the odds of newborn hospital admission type (neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] or well-baby admission) for matched CenteringPregnancy and individual care cohorts with four or more visits using multivariate logistic regression. Cost savings were calculated using mean costs per admission type at the delivery hospital. Of the CenteringPregnancy newborns, 3.5% had a NICU admission compared with 12.0% of individual care newborns (p Investing in CenteringPregnancy for 85 patients ($14,875) led to an estimated net savings for the managed care organization of $67,293 in NICU costs. CenteringPregnancy may reduce costs through fewer NICU admissions. Enhanced reimbursement from payers to obstetric practices supporting CenteringPregnancy sustainability may improve birth outcomes and reduce associated NICU costs. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adolescent Health Care in School-Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2008

    2008-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are considered one of the most effective strategies for delivering preventive care, including reproductive and mental health care services, to adolescents--a population long considered difficult to reach. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies to assure…

  20. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  1. Patient-centered Care to Address Barriers for Pregnant Women with Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Gopman, Sarah; Leeman, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Pregnant women affected by substance use often encounter barriers to treatment, including housing insecurity, poverty, mental health issues, social stigma, and access to health care. Providers may lack the resources needed to provide quality care. Clinicians offering prenatal care to women with substance use disorder are encouraged to support family-centered, multidisciplinary care to women and their infants, focusing on harm reduction. Collaboration between providers of maternity care, substance abuse treatment, case management, family primary care, and pediatric developmental care can improve outcomes during pregnancy and through the early years of parenting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparison of health behaviors of women in centering pregnancy and traditional prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespear, Kaylynn; Waite, Phillip J; Gast, Julie

    2010-03-01

    Researchers sought to determine the difference in health behaviors between women who receive prenatal care via the Centering Pregnancy approach and those involved in traditional prenatal care. Using a cross-sectional design, adult pregnant women (n = 125) were surveyed from at least 28 weeks gestation to delivery. The sample was comprised of primarily white low income women. Using multiple linear regression it was determined that women in Centering Pregnancy had significantly lower index health behavior scores compared with the traditional care group showing that those in Centering Pregnancy reported engaging in fewer health promoting behaviors. Furthermore, no differences were observed for smoking or weight gain behaviors between groups. Additionally, those in Centering Pregnancy reported a lower perceived value of prenatal care. The results of this study suggest that Centering Pregnancy is not adequately aiding its patients in adopting healthy behaviors during pregnancy.

  3. Nutritional quality and patterns of lunch menus at child care centers in South Korea and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyoun; Yeoh, Yoonjae; Abe, Satoko

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the nutritional quality and patterns of lunch menus provided by child care centers in South Korea and Japan. The weekly lunch menus from Monday to Saturday that child care centers provided in November 2014 in South Korea and Japan were analyzed. For Korea, a total of 72 meals provided by 12 centers in Seoul were analyzed by referring to the homepage of the Center for Children's Foodservice Management, which serviced menus for child care centers. For Japan, a total of 30 meals provided by 5 child care centers in Tokyo were analyzed. Nutrient content and pattern in lunch menus were evaluated. The lunch menus in Korea and Japan provided 359.5 kcal (25.7% of the estimated energy requirement) and 376.3 kcal (29.5% of the estimated energy requirement), respectively. 'Rice + Soup + Main dish + Side dish I + Side dish II' were provided in 66.7% of meals in Korea, while various patterns with rice and soup as their bases were provided in Japan. The lunch menus of child care centers in Korea and Japan provide similar amounts of energy, protein, carbohydrate, vitamin A, calcium, and other nutrients. However, there were significant differences in the lunch menu patterns in Korea and Japan. This study provides information about the nutritional content and pattern of lunch menus at child care centers in Asian countries with rice as a staple food.

  4. Establishing a national research center on day care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Tomas

    The paper presents and discusses the current formation of a national research center on ECEC. The center is currently being established. It is partly funded by the Danish union of early childhood and youth educators. It is based on cooperation between a number of Danish universities and this nati...... current new public management policies. However there is also more conflicting issues that emerge in this enterprise – especially on interests, practice relevance and knowledge paradigms....

  5. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  6. Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

  7. The influence of demographic and psychosocial factors on the intensity of pain among chronic patients receiving home-based nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Antony

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the influence of the demographic and the psychosocial factors on the intensity of pain manifestation among the chronic ill patients. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out among 328 chronic patients under home-based nursing care in Southern State of Kerala, India, from July to August 2015. Each patient was interviewed during a scheduled home visit by a trained health professional. The translated version of the assessment tool questionnaire "Medical Outcome Study-Short Form Health Survey" was used for the data collection. Results: Sixty-four (19.5% out of 328 patients reported pain as one of the primary symptoms of their disease. The percentage of the patients who were suffering from pain increases with the improvements in both the educational level and the monthly income (P = 0.002 and 0.019, respectively. The social interaction with the relatives and other community members was significantly related to pain manifestation (P = 0.013. A higher degree of social interaction was associated with lower pain intensity (P = 0.019. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that certain demographic and psychosocial factors carry a significant level of influence on the pain manifestation and its intensity among the chronic patients. Hence, improvements in education, economic status, and psychosocial support should be considered for the management of the chronic patients.

  8. [Psycho-oncology care in rural areas : Results from a cross-sectional survey on the utilisation of community-based psychosocial support services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Markus W; Sklenarova, Halina; Zimmermann-Schlegel, Verena; Herzog, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Mechthild

    2018-01-01

    Clinically relevant distress and unmet psychosocial needs frequently occur in the course of cancer diseases. Particularly for thinly populated rural areas in Germany rates of distressed patients and uptake of community-based psycho-oncology services are unknown. Determination of a) the proportion of cancer patients with psychosocial distress and unmet needs and b) the utilisation of community-based psycho-oncology services in thinly populated rural areas. Prospective cross-sectional study of 229 cancer patients (colon, breast, prostate cancer) living in thinly populated rural areas. Indicators for clinically relevant distress and utilisation of psychosocial services were assessed by applying screening instruments. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses. More than one third of all cancer patients (39.3%) in thinly populated areas exhibited clinically relevant distress. However, only 15.6% of distressed patients consulted community-based psycho-oncology services. Most frequently, medical or psychological psychotherapists were contacted. Information deficits of patients and attending physicians alongside dispositional factors emerged as the main reasons for non-utilisation. This study presents first data on psycho-oncology care in rural areas in Germany stratifying the degree of urbanisation in line with the standards of the European Commission. Concerning limitations, we only accounted for structural service coverage, leaving aside other indicators for socio-spatial deprivation.

  9. Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Among Child Care Center Directors in 2008 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Timothy R; Walker, Benjamin H; Aird, Laura D; Southward, Linda; McCown, John S; Martin, Judith M

    2017-06-01

    Children in child care centers represent an important population to consider in attempts to mitigate the spread of an influenza pandemic. This national survey, conducted in 2008 and 2016, assessed directors' reports of their child care centers' pandemic influenza preparation before and after the 2009 H1N1 novel influenza pandemic. This was a telephone-based survey of child care center directors randomly selected from a national database of licensed US child care centers who were queried about their preparedness for pandemic influenza. We grouped conceptually related items in 6 domains into indexes: general infection control, communication, seasonal influenza control, use of health consultants, quality of child care, and perceived barriers. These indexes, along with other center and director characteristics, were used to predict pandemic influenza preparedness. Among 1500 and 518 child care center directors surveyed in 2008 and 2016, respectively, preparation for pandemic influenza was low and did not improve. Only 7% of directors had taken concrete actions to prepare their centers. Having served as a center director during the 2009 influenza pandemic did not influence preparedness. After adjusting for covariates, child care health consultation and years of director's experience were positively associated with pandemic influenza preparation, whereas experiencing perceived barriers such as lack of knowing what to do in the event of pandemic influenza, was negatively associated with pandemic influenza preparedness. Pandemic influenza preparedness of child care center's directors needs to improve. Child care health consultants are likely to be important collaborators in addressing this problem. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  11. Day Care Centers for Seniors in Singapore: Looking Back and Looking Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Germaine; Yap, Philip; Wong, Gabriel H Z; Wei, Heng Xiao; Hua, Ee Chye

    2015-07-01

    The burden of care for frail elderly persons on families and the society is ever real as our population ages. Given the dual-income nature of many working families, day care centers offer a strong alternative to nursing homes for families wishing to provide custodial care and meaningful engagement for seniors while continuing to uphold their filial duties. Recognizing this, several initiatives, such as SPICE (Singapore Programme for Integrated Care for the Elderly) and Weekend Respite Care, have been launched to enhance the services of Singapore's day care centers. This article traces the evolution of this process, distills current challenges, and offers policy recommendations to improve Singapore's day care services for seniors. Copyright © 2015 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  13. Care Management Medical Home Center Model: Preliminary Results of a Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Care Quality for Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Rivo, Julie; Varghese, Asha; James, Terisa; Rivo, Marc; Williams, Mark L

    2015-07-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of the impact of an innovative care management model for diabetic patients. The model was implemented by seven Federally Qualified Health Centers serving 10,000 diabetic patients in Miami-Dade County. A primary intervention of this model is a centralized care management team that makes previsit phone calls to diabetic patients who have scheduled appointments. These previsit phone calls optimize patient knowledge and self-management goals, and provide patient care coordinators with relevant clinical information to optimize the office visit and help to ensure completion of recommended diabetic preventive and chronic care services. Data suggest that following the implementation of this care management model, more diabetic patients are receiving regular care, and compliance with recommended tests and screenings has improved. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be more easily delivered than specialty and inpatient care, and if properly distributed could be effective ... services : Include education about asthma, diet and nutrition, exercise, growth and development, injury prevention, stress management, tobacco ...

  15. Implementing the Obesity Care Model at a Community Health Center in Hawaii to Address Childhood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Okihiro, May; Pillen, Michelle; Ancog, Cristeta; Inda, Christy; Sehgal, Vija

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, the most common chronic disease of childhood, is prevalent among economically disadvantaged children. The Chronic Care and Obesity Care Models are comprehensive health care strategies to improve outcomes by linking primary care best practices and community-based programs. Pediatric providers and community health centers are well positioned to design and implement coordinated and synergistic programs to address childhood health disparities. This article describes a comprehensive proje...

  16. Holistic Health Care for the Medically Uninsured: The Church Health Center of Memphis

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, G. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Church Health Center (CHC) in Memphis was founded in 1987 to provide quality, affordable health care for working, uninsured people and their families. With numerous, dedicated financial supporters and health care volunteers, CHC has become the largest faith-based health care organization of its type nationally, serving >61,000 patients. CHC embraces a holistic approach to health by promoting wellness in every dimension of life. It offers on-site services including medical care, dentistry,...

  17. Discrepancies between adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication are associated with poorer client participation and learning processes in psychosocial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Margot; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J; De Winter, Andrea F

    2014-12-01

    To examine adolescents' attributed relevance and experiences regarding communication, and whether discrepancies in these are associated with clients' participation and learning processes in psychosocial care. Adolescents receiving psychosocial care (n=211) completed measures of communication in three domains: affective communication, information provision, and shared decision-making. Participation involved clients' attendance and adherence (professional-reported). Learning processes involved clients' improved understanding and improved confidence (client and professional-reported). Important but less often experienced affective communication was associated with low adherence (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 2.8, 1.1-6.8), less improvement in understanding (3.7, 1.5-9.0), and less improvement in confidence (4.5, 1.8-11.6). If information provision or shared decision-making was important but less often experienced, adolescents were more likely to demonstrate less improvement in understanding (3.1, 1.1-8.5; 4.2, 1.7-10.8). The combination "less important but experienced" only had an effect regarding affective communication; these adolescents were more likely to demonstrate less improvement in confidence (6.0, 2.3-15.4). Discrepancies between attributed relevance and experiences frequently occur. These discrepancies negatively affect adolescents' participation and their learning processes, although the pattern differs across communication domains. Care professionals should pay considerable attention to their clients' communication preferences and adapt their communication style when necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Concerns voiced by patients and GPs’ responses during psychosocial visits in primary care: a historical cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butalid, L.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a recent study comparing psychosocial consultations prior to and after the implementation of national clinical guidelines in the Netherlands, we found that general practitioners (GPs) showed less empathy in the more recent consultations. As a consequence, patients possibly have less

  19. Concerns voiced by patients and GPs' responses during psychosocial visits in primary care : a historical cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butalid, Ligaya; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Dulmen, Sandra; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a recent study comparing psychosocial consultations prior to and after the implementation of national clinical guidelines in the Netherlands, we found that general practitioners (GPs) showed less empathy in the more recent consultations. As a consequence, patients possibly have less

  20. Psychosocial Work Stressors, Work Fatigue, and Musculoskeletal Disorders: Comparison between Emergency and Critical Care Nurses in Brunei Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Abdul Rahman, BHSc

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: This study has provided good estimates for the exposure rate of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Brunei. It provided important initial insight for nursing management and policymakers to make informed decisions on current and future planning to provide nurses with a conducive work environment.

  1. How the psychosocial context of clinical trials differs from usual care: A qualitative study of acupuncture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative studies of participants' experiences in randomised clinical trials (RCTs suggest that the psychosocial context of treatment in RCTs may be quite different to the psychosocial context of treatment in usual practice. This is important, as the psychosocial context of treatment is known to influence patient outcomes in chronic illness. Few studies have directly compared the psychosocial context of treatment across RCTs and usual practice. In this study, we explored differences in psychosocial context between RCT and usual practice settings, using acupuncture as our model. Methods We undertook a secondary analysis of existing qualitative interviews with 54 patients. 27 were drawn from a study of western and traditional acupuncture in usual practice (for a range of painful conditions. 27 were drawn from a qualitative study nested in an RCT of western acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. We used qualitative analysis software to facilitate an inductive thematic analysis in which we identified three main themes. Results In usual practice, starting acupuncture was more likely to be embedded in an active and ongoing search for pain relief, whereas in the RCT starting acupuncture was opportunistic. Usual practice patients reported few uncertainties and these had minimal consequences for them. In the RCT, patients experienced considerable uncertainties about their treatment and its effectiveness, and were particularly concerned about whether they were receiving real (or fake acupuncture. Patients stopped acupuncture only at the end of the fixed course of treatment in the RCT, which was similar to those receiving acupuncture in the public sector National Health Service (NHS. In comparison, private sector patients re-evaluated and re-negotiated treatments particularly when starting to use acupuncture. Conclusions Differences in psychosocial context between RCTs and usual practice could reduce the impact of

  2. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Availability of Care Concordant With Patient-centered Medical Home Principles Among Those With Chronic Conditions: Measuring Care Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Charles, Shana A; Snyder, Sophie

    2016-03-01

    Care delivery redesign in the form of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is considered as a potential solution to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs, particularly for patients with chronic conditions. But studies of prevalence or impact at the population level are rare. We aimed to assess whether desired outcomes indicating better care delivery and patient-centeredness were associated with receipt of care according to 3 important PCMH principles. We analyzed data from a representative population survey in California in 2009, focusing on a population with chronic condition who had a usual source of care. We used bivariate, logistic, and negative-binomial regressions. The indicators of PCMH concordant care included continuity of care (personal doctor), care coordination, and care management (individual treatment plan). Outcomes included flu shots, count of outpatient visits, any emergency department visit, timely provider communication, and confidence in self-care. We found that patients whose care was concordant with all 3 PCMH principles were more likely to receive flu shots, more outpatient care, and timely response from providers. Concordance with 2 principles led to some desired outcomes. Concordance with only 1 principle was not associated with desired outcomes. Patients who received care that met 3 key aspects of PCMH: coordination, continuity, and management, had better quality of care and more efficient use of the health care system.

  4. U.S. academic medical centers under the managed health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, K

    1999-06-01

    This research investigates the impact of managed health care on academic medical centers in the United States. Academic medical centers hold a unique position in the U.S. health care system through their missions of conducting cutting-edge biomedical research, pursuing clinical and technological innovations, providing state-of-the-art medical care and producing highly qualified health professionals. However, policies to control costs through the use of managed care and limiting resources are detrimental to academic medical centers and impede the advancement of medical science. To survive the threats of managed care in the health care environment, academic medical centers must rely on their upper level managers to derive successful strategies. The methods used in this study include qualitative approaches in the form of key informants and case studies. In addition, a survey questionnaire was sent to 108 CEOs in all the academic medical centers in the U.S. The findings revealed that managers who perform the liaison, monitor, entrepreneur and resource allocator roles are crucial to ensure the survival of academic medical centers, so that academic medical centers can continue their missions to serve the general public and promote their well-being.

  5. Family-centered bereavement practices in Danish intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Kaldan, Gudrun; Coombs, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    : Self-administered computerized cross-sectional nation-wide survey of Danish ICUs. RESULTS: Nurses at 46 of 48 (96%) ICUs in Denmark responded. Bereavement care at the time of patient death included viewing the patient in ICU (100%), and in the hospital mortuary (59%). Information about hospital...... of death, a letter of condolence, a phone call to the family, referral to a priest or clergyman, or referral to other counseling. Although many interventions were common, there were variations within the elements offered. Nurses and physicians were the most consistent health care staff involved...

  6. Cost Benefit Analysis of Providing Level II Trauma Care at William Beaumont Army Medical Center (WBAMC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerepka, Peter

    2002-01-01

    .... During the period from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001, WBAMC, a designated Level II trauma center by the American College of Surgeons, provided care for 410 patients of which 181 were civilian emergencies...

  7. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  8. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reduced price meals or were title XX beneficiaries. However, children who only receive snacks in an... following meal types—breakfast; lunch; supper; and snack. Reimbursement must not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack or one meal and two snacks provided daily to each child. (4) Each child care...

  9. Malaria microscopy in primary health care centers in Khartoum State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adequate diagnosis of Malaria is achieved by detection and identification of malaria parasites through examination of Giemsa's stained blood films by competent personnel. Objective: To identify the competency of laboratory personnel of the clinical laboratories attached to primary health care centres at ...

  10. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care

    OpenAIRE

    Dubbin, Leslie A.; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a speci...

  11. Evaluation of employees in public day care centers knowledge about breastfeeding and complementary feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Joelânia Pires de O.; Prudente, Amanda Moura; Silva, Dyene Aparecida; Pereira, Leandro Alves; Rinaldi, Ana Elisa M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the knowledge of public day care centers employees about breastfeeding and complementary feeding. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 public day care centers randomly selected in the city of Uberlandia, Southeast Brazil. A questionnaire applied to school principals, teachers, educators and general services assistants (GSA) included demographic and socioeconomic variables and questions about knowledge on breastfeeding, complementary feeding besides ...

  12. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special?children?s center

    OpenAIRE

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children?s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the ...

  13. Viral etiology and incidence of acute gastroenteritis in young children attending day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Vesikari, Timo; Pang, Xiao-Li

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to investigate the frequency, morbidity and cause of acute gastroenteritis in children attending day-care centers in Denmark. METHODS: Children with acute diarrhea (> or =2 consecutive loose stools in 24 hours, with duration of ... 19 day-care centers, were included. Gastroenteritis viruses, group A rotavirus, sapoviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, stool specimens were cultured for bacterial pathogens. Children who were brought...

  14. Missed Opportunities for Chronic Diseases Prevention in a Primary Health Care Center in Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Topuzoglu; Seyhan Hidiroglu; M.Fatih Onsuz; Gulsen Polat

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate missed opportunities about chronic diseases and related risk factors in a primary health care center in Istanbul. Method: This cross sectional study was held in a Primary Health Care Center in Istanbul with the study population consisted of 500 people which were applicated in one month period. Participants were asked; if they were questioned by their physician about major risk factors (smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coroner hear...

  15. Evaluation of an educational "toolbox" for improving nursing staff competence and psychosocial work environment in elderly care: results of a prospective, non-randomized controlled intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, J E; Hasson, H

    2007-07-01

    Lack of professional development opportunities among nursing staff is a major concern in elderly care and has been associated with work dissatisfaction and staff turnover. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies evaluating the effects of educational interventions on nursing competence and work satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of an educational "toolbox" intervention on nursing staff ratings of their competence, psychosocial work environment and overall work satisfaction. The study was a prospective, non-randomized, controlled intervention. Nursing staff in two municipal elderly care organizations in western Sweden. In an initial questionnaire survey, nursing staff in the intervention municipality described several areas in which they felt a need for competence development. Measurement instruments and educational materials for improving staff knowledge and work practices were then collated by researchers and managers in a "toolbox." Nursing staff ratings of their competence and work were measured pre and post-intervention by questionnaire. Staff ratings in the intervention municipality were compared to staff ratings in the reference municipality, where no toolbox was introduced. Nursing staff ratings of their competence and psychosocial work environment, including overall work satisfaction, improved significantly over time in the intervention municipality, compared to the reference group. Both competence and work environment ratings were largely unchanged among reference municipality staff. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction effect between municipalities over time for nursing staff ratings of participation, leadership, performance feedback and skills' development. Staff ratings for these four scales improved significantly in the intervention municipality as compared to the reference municipality. Compared to a reference municipality, nursing staff ratings of their competence and the

  16. Person-centered care planning and service engagement: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Tondora, Janis; Davidson, Larry; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-04-22

    Service disengagement is a pervasive challenge the mental health care system faces. Mental health services are of little value should persons with mental illnesses continue to opt out of receiving them. Consumers attribute disengagement from care to an absence of choice in their treatment. In response, the mental health system is adopting a person-centered model, based upon recovery principles, to engage consumers more actively in their care. Person-centered care planning is a promising practice involving collaboration to develop and implement an actionable plan to assist the person in achieving personal recovery goals. This study design combines a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of community mental health organizations with qualitative methods to assess the effectiveness of person-centered care planning. Participants at 14 sites in Delaware and Connecticut will be randomized to treatment as usual or the person-centered care planning intervention. Participants will be in leadership (n = 70) or supervisory or direct care (n = 210) roles. The person-centered care planning intervention involves intensive staff training and 12 months of ongoing technical assistance. Quantitative survey data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months measuring person-centered care planning competency and organizational factors. Consumer outcomes (engagement, medication adherence, functioning and consumer satisfaction) will be assessed by Medicaid and state-level data. Qualitative data focused on process factors will include staff and consumer interviews and focus groups. In this intent-to-treat analysis, we will use mixed-effects multivariate regression models to evaluate the differential impact of the person-centered care planning intervention on each consumer and implementation outcome as well as the extent to which clinician assessments of organizational factors are associated with the implementation outcome. Mixed methods will triangulate and strengthen the

  17. Organizational dimensions of relationship-centered care. Theory, evidence, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Dana Gelb; Miller, William; Beckman, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Four domains of relationship have been highlighted as the cornerstones of relationship-centered health care. Of these, clinician-patient relationships have been most thoroughly studied, with a rich empirical literature illuminating significant linkages between clinician-patient relationship quality and a wide range of outcomes. This paper explores the realm of clinician-colleague relationships, which we define to include the full array of relationships among clinicians, staff, and administrators in health care organizations. Building on a stream of relevant theories and empirical literature that have emerged over the past decade, we synthesize available evidence on the role of organizational culture and relationships in shaping outcomes, and posit a model of relationship-centered organizations. We conclude that turning attention to relationship-centered theory and practice in health care holds promise for advancing care to a new level, with breakthroughs in quality of care, quality of life for those who provide it, and organizational performance.

  18. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Work-related acute physical injuries, chronic overuse complaints, and the psychosocial work environment in Danish primary care chiropractic practice - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mille Charlotte; Aagaard, Tine; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and psychosocial work environment of chiropractors and their work-related health complaints, and this has never been described for Danish chiropractors. The aim of this study was, therefore, to describe work-related acute physical injuries, overuse complaints, and psychosocial stress in Danish chiropractic work settings. We developed a questionnaire specifically for this study and distributed it electronically in August 2016 using SurveyXact to all 575 members of the Danish Chiropractors' Association working in primary care clinics. Chiropractors were asked about their work-related acute physical injuries and overuse complaints as well as any psychosocial stress they experienced at work during the previous year. We described our sample and variables using means, medians, ranges, and confidence intervals where appropriate. Statistically significant differences between genders, types of complaints and injuries, and between clinic owners and associates were examined using Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests, where appropriate, or by examining confidence intervals for non-overlap. 355 (65.2%) chiropractors answered the survey. Of these, 216 (61%, 95% CI 56-66) had experienced a work-related acute physical injury and/or overuse complaint during the previous year. Work-related overuse complaints were most commonly reported in the low back, wrist, thumb, and shoulder, and were more common among women (63%, 95% CI 56-70) than men (51%, 95% CI 43-59). Chiropractors with more than five years in practice (59%, 95% CI 52-64) reported significantly fewer work-related acute injuries and overuse complaints during the previous year compared with chiropractors with less than five years in practice (83%, 95% CI 73-91). In general, these practicing Danish chiropractors reported having a good psychosocial work environment, and 90% of chiropractors "always" or "often" felt that they were motivated and committed to their work. This sample of Danish

  20. Mercury Poisoning at a Home Day Care Center - Hillsborough County, Florida, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewell, Mackenzie; Spoto, Samantha; Wiese, Michael; Aleguas, Alfred; Peredy, Tamas

    2017-05-05

    On November 12, 2015, the Florida Poison Information Center Tampa notified the Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County of a boy aged 3 years with a urine mercury level of 79 μg/L (normal broken sphygmomanometer (blood pressure monitor) at the home day care center attended by the child.

  1. Integrated Pest Management Intervention in Child Care Centers Improves Knowledge, Pest Control, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Nouredini, Sahar; Swartz, Alicia; Sutherland, Andrew Mason; Stephens, Michelle; Davidson, Nita A; Rose, Roberta

    To reduce young children's exposure to pests and pesticides, an integrated pest management (IPM) intervention was provided for child care center staff. The 7-month IPM education and consultation intervention was conducted by trained nurse child care health consultants in 44 child care centers in California. IPM knowledge surveys were completed by child care staff, objective IPM assessments were completed by research assistants pre- and postintervention, and activity logs were completed by the nurses. There were significant increases in IPM knowledge for the child care staff who attended workshops. There were reductions in the prevalence of pests and increases in IPM practices at the postintervention compared with the preintervention time point. The nurses consulted an average of 5.4 hours per center. A nurse-led IPM intervention in child care centers can reduce exposure to harmful substances for young children attending child care centers. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral food challenge outcomes in a pediatric tertiary care center

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Elissa M.; Becker, Allan B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral food challenges are the clinical standard for diagnosis of food allergy. Little data exist on predictors of oral challenge failure and reaction severity. Methods A retrospective chart review was done on all pediatric patients who had oral food challenges in a tertiary care pediatric allergy clinic from 2008 to 2010. Results 313 oral challenges were performed, of which the majority were to peanut (105), egg (71), milk (41) and tree nuts (29). There were 104 (33%) oral challenge...

  3. Reality TV positions heart center as cardiac care leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Saint Thomas Heart Institute, Nashville, Tenn., has a long history of successful cardiac care. More than 200,000 patients have been treated at Saint Thomas. Earlier this year the hospital launched a new branding campaign that features former patients who have bonded with the institution. These former patients were provided MiniDV video cameras to record their stories. The campaign has attracted considerable attention, including newspaper and TV news coverage.

  4. An access to care center as a learning organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, U

    2000-01-01

    The Durham Access to Care (DATC) is one of the new streamlined vehicles for the delivery of integrated home-based and community-based health services across Ontario. Management and staff in this change transition have undertaken to become a learning organization. To implement this visionary process leadership qualities and style is key. This article gives a brief account of DATC and its move to becoming a learning organization and the author's observational reflections of an effective leadership style.

  5. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland based on related standards. We also premeditate the indoor environment from planning perspective, analyze patients, their families, medical staff and space requirement to conduct research in ICU desi...

  6. Product and service design for patient centered diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitri Varadarajan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Design plays a marginal part in the discourse of diabetes care, mainly in visualizing the form and packaging of medical technologies. The authors however have a practice that advocates that design orientated solutions can add much needed dimensions to problems that havetraditionally been the exclusive preserve of expert discourses. This position has for long been a validated and largely accepted approach in design’s engagement withissues in sustainability and development studies. A similar approach in the area of medicine has been constructed bythe authors and marks out a position of advocacy where the designer takes on agency to intervene on behalf of the user community. This position contains a healthy critique of thetraditional approach of product design for manufacture while simultaneously amplifying a desire to intervene and make a substantial improvement in the quality of life ofpeople with diabetes. This article first opens out contemporary diabetes care as a contested domain and then goes on to sketch out the key aspects of a design practice focussed upon delivering positive health outcomes in diabetes care. The specific context of discussion for this article is the practice of teaching in design studios wherestudents of design listen to the voices of people with diabetes and visualize ways for design to provide products and service solutions that transform the lived experiences of people with diabetes.

  7. Envisioning Women-Centered HIV Care: Perspectives from Women Living with HIV in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nadia; Greene, Saara; Carter, Allison; Lewis, Johanna; Nicholson, Valerie; Kwaramba, Gladys; Ménard, Brigitte; Kaufman, Elaina; Ennabil, Nourane; Andersson, Neil; Loutfy, Mona; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaida, Angela

    Women comprise nearly one-quarter of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Canada. Compared with men, women living with HIV experience inequities in HIV care and health outcomes, prompting a need for gendered and tailored approaches to HIV care. Peer and academic researchers from the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study conducted focus groups to understand women's experience of seeking care, with the purpose of identifying key characteristics that define a women-centered approach to HIV care. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 77 women living with HIV across Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, Canada. Women envisioned three central characteristics of women-centered HIV care, including i) coordinated and integrated services that address both HIV and women's health care priorities, and protect against exclusion from care due to HIV-related stigma, ii) care that recognizes and responds to structural barriers that limit women's access to care, such as violence, poverty, motherhood, HIV-related stigma, and challenges to safe disclosure, and iii) care that fosters peer support and peer leadership in its design and delivery to honor the diversity of women's experiences, overcome women's isolation, and prioritize women's ownership over the decisions that affect their lives. Despite advances in HIV treatment and care, the current care landscape is inadequate to meet women's comprehensive care needs. A women-centered approach to HIV care, as envisioned by women living with HIV, is central to guiding policy and practice to improve care and outcomes for women living with HIV in Canada. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  9. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  10. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  11. PESTICIDE MEASUREMENT RESULTS FROM THE FIRST NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEY OF CHILD CARE CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 13 million children are placed in non-parental child care during the work day; however, children's exposures to chemicals in child care centers have not been characterized. To address this data gap, three federal agencies teamed to characterize contaminants in child...

  12. PESTICIDE RESULTS FROM AN INTERAGENCY EFFORT TO CHARACTERIZE CONTAMINANTS IN CHILD CARE CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 13 million children are placed in non-parental child care during the work day; but, children's exposures to chemicals in child care centers have not been characterized. To address this data gap, three federal agencies teamed to characterize contaminants in child ...

  13. Implementing the obesity care model at a community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okihiro, May; Pillen, Michelle; Ancog, Cristeta; Inda, Christy; Sehgal, Vija

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, the most common chronic disease of childhood, is prevalent among economically disadvantaged children. The Chronic Care and Obesity Care Models are comprehensive health care strategies to improve outcomes by linking primary care best practices and community-based programs. Pediatric providers and community health centers are well positioned to design and implement coordinated and synergistic programs to address childhood health disparities. This article describes a comprehensive project based on the Obesity Care Model initiated at a rural community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity including: (1) the health care delivery changes constituting the quality improvement project; (2) capacity and team-building activities; (3) use of the project community level data to strengthen community engagement and investment; and (4) the academic-community partnership providing the project framework. We anticipate that these efforts will contribute to the long-term goal of reducing the prevalence of obesity and obesity associated morbidity in the community.

  14. The patient-centered medical home neighbor: A primary care physician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsky, Christine A

    2011-01-04

    The American College of Physicians' position paper on the patient-centered medical home neighbor (PCMH-N) extends the work of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a means of improving the delivery of health care. Recognizing that the PCMH does not exist in isolation, the PCMH-N concept outlines expectations for comanagement, communication, and care coordination and broadens responsibility for safe, effective, and efficient care beyond primary care to include physicians of all specialties. As such, it is a fitting follow-up to the PCMH and moves further down the road toward improved care for complex patients. Yet, there is more work to be done. Truly transforming the U.S. health care system around personalized medical homes embedded in highly functional medical neighborhoods will require better staffing models; more robust electronic information tools; aligned incentives for quality and efficiency within payment and regulatory policies; and a culture of greater engagement of patients, their families, and communities.

  15. Health care and social issues of immigrant rescue and recovery workers at the World Trade Center site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz, Rafael E; Hill, Scottie; Chasan, Rachel; Bienenfeld, Laura A; Afilaka, Aboaba A; Wilk-Rivard, Elizabeth; Herbert, Robin

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews the experience of a unique occupational group of World Trade Center (WTC) workers: immigrant workers. This group is comprised largely of men, laborers, who are first-generation immigrants. The majority of these workers are from Latin America (predominantly from Ecuador and Colombia) or from Eastern Europe (predominantly from Poland). Our data shows that the disease profile observed in these workers was what we have previously reported for WTC working population as a whole. Recent reports have begun to document the disproportionate burden of occupational hazards, injuries, and illnesses experienced by immigrant workers in the United States. The WTC experience of immigrants exemplified this burden but, additionally, highlighted that this burden is exacerbated by limitations in access to appropriate health care, disability and compensation benefits, and vocational rehabilitation services. A clinical program that was designed to address the complex medical and psychosocial needs of these workers in a comprehensive manner was successfully established. Full justice for these workers depends on larger societal changes.

  16. Self-Perceived End-of-Life Care Competencies of Health-Care Providers at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnini, Marcos; Smith, Heather M; Price, Deborah M; Ghosh, Bidisha; Strodtman, Linda

    2018-01-01

    In the United States, most deaths occur in hospitals, with approximately 25% of hospitalized patients having palliative care needs. Therefore, the provision of good end-of-life (EOL) care to these patients is a priority. However, research assessing staff preparedness for the provision of EOL care to hospitalized patients is lacking. To assess health-care professionals' self-perceived competencies regarding the provision of EOL care in hospitalized patients. Descriptive study of self-perceived EOL care competencies among health-care professionals. The study instrument (End-of-Life Questionnaire) contains 28 questions assessing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to the provision of EOL care. Health-care professionals (nursing, medicine, social work, psychology, physical, occupational and respiratory therapist, and spiritual care) at a large academic medical center participated in the study. Means were calculated for each item, and comparisons of mean scores were conducted via t tests. Analysis of variance was used to identify differences among groups. A total of 1197 questionnaires was completed. The greatest self-perceived competency was in providing emotional support for patients/families, and the least self-perceived competency was in providing continuity of care. When compared to nurses, physicians had higher scores on EOL care attitudes, behaviors, and communication. Physicians and nurses had higher scores on most subscales than other health-care providers. Differences in self-perceived EOL care competencies were identified among disciplines, particularly between physicians and nurses. The results provide evidence for assessing health-care providers to identify their specific training needs before implementing educational programs on EOL care.

  17. An office or a bedroom? Challenges for family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Liben, Stephen; Carnevale, Franco A; Cohen, S Robin

    2012-09-01

    Although the modern pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has followed general pediatrics and adopted the family-centered care model, little is known about how families prospectively experience PICU care. The authors' goal was to better understand the experiences of families whose child was hospitalized in a PICU. They conducted a 12-month prospective ethnographic study in a PICU in a tertiary care hospital in a large North American urban center. Data were obtained via participant-observation and formal and informal interviews with 18 families and staff key informants. Findings revealed a disconnect between the espoused model of family-centered care and quotidian professional practices. This divergence emerged in the authors' analysis as a heuristic that contrasts a professional "office" to a sick child's "bedroom." PICU practices and protocols transformed the child into a patient and parents into visitors; issues such as noise, visitation, turf, and privacy could favor staff comfort and convenience over that of the child and family. The authors' discussion highlights suggestions to overcome this divergence in order to truly make the PICU family centered.

  18. Practice versus politics in Danish day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Line; Jensen de López, Kristine M.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that early educators in day-care services possess adequate pedagogical tools for supporting children’s communicative development. Early literacy programmes (ELPs) are potential tools. However, studies investigating the effects of ELPs seldom address implementation processes......’ (NNS) political statements on early learning. This study presents results from 18 pre-programme interviews with pedagogues and illustrates their daily practices prior to the ELP implementation. Results suggest that: (1) there is a potential gap between practice and politics concerning Danish practices...... for promoting early learning; and (2) certain aspects related to existing pedagogical practices may be foreseen as potential challenges for the implementation of structured ELPs....

  19. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the H...

  20. Crossing the patient-centered divide: transforming health care quality through enhanced faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Inui, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    In the report "Crossing the Quality Chasm," the Institute of Medicine asserted that patient-centered care is one of the six domains of quality. In this article, the authors consider how the patient- and relationship-centered components of quality can be achieved in all aspects of medical care. They suggest that faculty development in three key areas-mindful practice, formation, and training in communication skills-is necessary to achieve patient- and relationship-centeredness.The authors first review the philosophical and scientific foundations of patient-centered and relationship-centered care. They next describe and provide concrete examples to illustrate the underlying theory and practices associated with each of the three faculty development areas. They then propose five key areas for faculty development in patient- and relationship-centered care: (1) making it a central competency in all health care interactions, (2) developing a national curriculum framework, (3) requiring performance metrics for professional development, (4) partnering with national health care organizations to disseminate the curriculum framework, and (5) preserving face-to-face educational methods for delivering key elements of the curriculum. Finally, the authors consider the issues faced in faculty development today in light of the medical education issues Abraham Flexner identified more than a century ago. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  1. Rationale and study design of a patient-centered intervention to improve health status in chronic heart failure: The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Allen, Larry A; Peterson, Jamie; Hattler, Brack; Havranek, Edward P; Fairclough, Diane L; McBryde, Connor F; Meek, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    While contemporary heart failure management has led to some improvements in morbidity and mortality, patients continue to report poor health status (i.e., burdensome symptoms, impaired function, and poor quality of life). The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) trial is a NIH-funded, three-site, randomized clinical trial that examines the effect of the CASA intervention compared to usual care on the primary outcome of patient-reported health status at 6months in patients with heart failure and poor health status. The CASA intervention involves a nurse who works with patients to treat symptoms (e.g., shortness of breath, fatigue, pain) using disease-specific and palliative approaches, and a social worker who provides psychosocial care targeting depression and adjustment to illness. The intervention uses a collaborative care team model of health care delivery and is structured and primarily phone-based to enhance reproducibility and scalability. This article describes the rationale and design of the CASA trial, including several decision points: (1) how to design a patient-centered intervention to improve health status; (2) how to structure the intervention so that it is reproducible and scalable; and (3) how to systematically identify outpatients with heart failure most likely to need and benefit from the intervention. The results should provide valuable information to providers and health systems about the use of team care to manage symptoms and provide psychosocial care in chronic illness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Critical Care Organizations in Academic Medical Centers in North America: A Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastores, Stephen M; Halpern, Neil A; Oropello, John M; Kostelecky, Natalie; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    With the exception of a few single-center descriptive reports, data on critical care organizations are relatively sparse. The objectives of our study were to determine the structure, governance, and experience to date of established critical care organizations in North American academic medical centers. A 46-item survey questionnaire was electronically distributed using Survey Monkey to the leadership of 27 identified critical care organizations in the United States and Canada between September 2014 and February 2015. A critical care organization had to be headed by a physician and have primary governance over the majority, if not all, of the ICUs in the medical center. We received 24 responses (89%). The majority of the critical care organizations (83%) were called departments, centers, systems, or operations committees. Approximately two thirds of respondents were from larger (> 500 beds) urban institutions, and nearly 80% were primary university medical centers. On average, there were six ICUs per academic medical center with a mean of four ICUs under critical care organization governance. In these ICUs, intensivists were present in-house 24/7 in 49%; advanced practice providers in 63%; hospitalists in 21%; and telemedicine coverage in 14%. Nearly 60% of respondents indicated that they had a separate hospital budget to support data management and reporting, oversight of their ICUs, and rapid response teams. The transition from the traditional model of ICUs within departmentally controlled services or divisions to a critical care organization was described as gradual in 50% and complete in only 25%. Nearly 90% indicated that their critical care organization governance structure was either moderately or highly effective; a similar number suggested that their critical care organizations were evolving with increasing domain and financial control of the ICUs at their respective institutions. Our survey of the very few critical care organizations in North American

  3. Profiles of sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics among primary care patients with comorbid obesity and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to characterize profiles of obese depressed participants using baseline data collected from October 2014 through December 2016 for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (n=409 in Bay Area, California, USA. Four comorbidity severity categories were defined by interaction of the binary levels of body mass index (BMI and depression Symptom Checklist 20 (SCL20 scores. Sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics were measured. Mean (SD age was 51 (12.1 years, BMI 36.7 (6.4 kg/m2, and SCL20 1.5 (0.5. Participants in the 4 comorbidity severity categories had similar sociodemographic characteristics, but differed significantly in the other characteristics. Two statistically significant canonical dimensions were identified. Participants with BMI≥35 and SCL20≥1.5 differed significantly from those with BMI<35 and SCL20<1.5 on dimension 1, which primarily featured high physical health (e.g., central obesity, high blood pressure and impaired sleep and mental health comorbidities (e.g., post-traumatic stress and anxiety, poor health-related quality of life (in general and problems specifically with obesity, anxiety, depression, and usual daily activities, and an avoidance problem-solving style. Participants with BMI<35 and SCL20≥1.5 differed significantly from those with BMI≥35 and SCL20<1.5 on dimension 2, which primarily included fewer Hispanics, less central obesity, and more leisure-time physical activity, but greater anxiety and post-traumatic stress and poorer obesity- or mental health-related quality of life. In conclusion, patients with comorbid obesity and depression of varying severity have different profiles of behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics. This insight may inform analysis of treatment heterogeneity and development of targeted intervention strategies.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT02246413 Keywords: Obesity, Depression, Behavior, Clinical

  4. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Pteam processes). A stressful/chaotic clinic environment was associated with higher barriers to patient centered care (β=0.16-0.34, P=Team process and effectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling of the Influences of Family-Centered Care on Parent and Child Psychological Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Family-centered care is now practiced throughout the world by physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. The call for adoption of family-centered care is based on the contention that the physical and psychological health of a child is influenced by parents' psychological health where family-centered care enhances parent well-being which in turn influences child well-being. We empirically assessed whether these relationships are supported by available evidence. M...

  6. Oral food challenge outcomes in a pediatric tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Elissa M; Becker, Allan B

    2017-01-01

    Oral food challenges are the clinical standard for diagnosis of food allergy. Little data exist on predictors of oral challenge failure and reaction severity. A retrospective chart review was done on all pediatric patients who had oral food challenges in a tertiary care pediatric allergy clinic from 2008 to 2010. 313 oral challenges were performed, of which the majority were to peanut (105), egg (71), milk (41) and tree nuts (29). There were 104 (33%) oral challenge failures. Children were more likely to fail an oral challenge if they were older (P = .04), had asthma (P = .001) or had atopic dermatitis (P = .03). Risk of challenge failure was significantly different between food allergens, with more failures noted for peanut than for tree nuts, milk or egg (P = .001). Among challenge failures, 19% met criteria for anaphylaxis. Significantly more tree nut and peanut challenges met criteria for anaphylaxis than milk or egg (P Skin test size and specific IgE level were significantly higher in those who failed oral challenges (P < .001). The highest rate of challenge failure and severity of failure was to cashew, with 63% of cashew challenges reacting, of which 80% met clinical criteria for anaphylaxis. The risk of challenge failure differed with type of food studied, with peanut and tree nut having a higher risk of challenge failure and anaphylaxis. Cashew in particular carried a high risk and caution must be exercised when performing these types of oral challenges in children.

  7. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  9. Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain (PATH-Pain): A Psychosocial Intervention for Older Adults with Chronic Pain and Negative Emotions in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Dimitris N; Ravdin, Lisa D; Stern, Amy; Bolier, Ruth; Kenien, Cara; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults, contributes to activity restriction and social isolation, disrupts family and interpersonal relationships, and poses a significant economic burden to society. Negative emotions such as sadness, anxiety, helplessness, and hopelessness are associated with chronic pain and contribute to poor quality of life, impaired interpersonal and social functioning, and increased disability. Psychosocial interventions for older adults with chronic pain have been historically developed for, and are almost exclusively delivered to, cognitively intact patients. Therefore, many older adults with chronic pain and comorbid cognitive deficits have limited treatment options. Our multidisciplinary team developed Problem Adaptation Therapy for Pain in Primary Care (PATH-Pain), a psychosocial intervention for older adults with chronic pain, negative emotions, and a wide range of cognitive functioning, including mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. In the current article, we describe the principles underlying PATH-Pain, review the steps taken to adapt the original PATH protocol, outline the treatment process, and present a case illustrating its potential value.

  10. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Alison J; Bogner, Hillary R; Cronholm, Peter F; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F de Vries; Kaye, Elise M; Gabbay, Robert

    2016-02-25

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in hypertension control. The PCMH transformation initiative conducted 118 semistructured interviews at 17 primary care practices in southeastern Pennsylvania between January 2011 and January 2012. Clinicians (n = 47), medical assistants (n = 26), office administrators (n = 12), care managers (n = 11), front office staff (n = 7), patient educators (n = 4), nurses (n = 4), social workers (n = 4), and other administrators (n = 3) participated in interviews. Study personnel used thematic analysis to identify themes related to hypertension care. Clinicians described difficulties in expanding services under PCMH to meet the needs of the growing number of patients with hypertension as well as how perceptions of hypertension control differed from actual performance. Staff and office administrators discussed achieving patient-centered hypertension care through patient education and self-management support with personalized care plans. They indicated that patient report cards were helpful tools. Participants across all groups discussed a team- and systems-based approach to hypertension care. Practices undergoing PCMH transformation may consider stakeholder perspectives about patient-centered, team-based, and systems-based approaches as they work to optimize hypertension care.

  11. Comparing the quality of preconception care provided in healthcare centers in Mashhad in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardasht, Fatemeh Ghaffari; Shourab, Nahid Jahani; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2015-01-01

    Improving the quality of healthcare services is considered as the main strategy to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Providing appropriate healthcare for mothers and their newborn children is facilitated significantly by considering the mothers' health and welfare before pregnancy occurs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the quality of preconception care provided to women of reproductive age provided by five health centers in Mashhad in 2012 and 2013. Multi-stage sampling was used to select the participants in this descriptive study. As a result, 360 women of reproductive age and 39 healthcare providers from 24 healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected to participate. The data gathering tool was a checklist based on the Donabedian model that includes the three dimensions of structure, process, and outcome. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5), Kruskal-Wallis tests, ANOVA, and Spearman rank correlation. The results showed that preconception care at the 24 healthcare centers had essentially the same conditions. But in the process and outcome components, the quality of the preconception care at five of the health centers was significantly different (p=0.008). The highest quality of care processes was identified at health center number 3. The difference in the component of outcomes being followed up by the healthcare providers at five of the health centers was statistically significant (p=0.000); however, there were no significant differences found among the satisfaction and awareness of the women who participated at the five health centers. The results showed that the performance of health personnel in providing preconception care and providing follow-up care was not satisfactory.

  12. The Phoenix Physician: defining a pathway toward leadership in patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Robert G; Bulger, John B; Hasty, Robert T; Hubbard, Kevin P; Schwartz, Elliott R; Sutton, John R; Troutman, Monte E; Nelinson, Donald S

    2012-08-01

    Health care delivery has evolved in reaction to scientific and technological discoveries, emergent patient needs, and market forces. A current focus on patient-centered care has pointed to the need for the reallocation of resources to improve access to and delivery of efficient, cost-effective, quality care. In response to this need, primary care physicians will find themselves in a new role as team leader. The American College of Osteopathic Internists has developed the Phoenix Physician, a training program that will prepare primary care residents and practicing physicians for the changes in health care delivery and provide them with skills such as understanding the contributions of all team members (including an empowered and educated patient), evaluating and treating patients, and applying performance metrics and information technology to measure and improve patient care and satisfaction. Through the program, physicians will also develop personal leadership and communication skills.

  13. Trends in Publications in Radiology Journals Designated as Relating to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Rawson, James V

    2017-05-01

    To assess trends in publications in radiology journals designated as dealing with patient-centered care. PubMed was searched for articles in radiology journals for which the article's record referenced patient-centered/patient-centric care. Among these, original research articles were identified and assigned major themes. Trends were assessed descriptively. A total of 115 articles in radiology journals designated as dealing with patient-centered care were identified, including 40 original research articles. The number of articles annually ranged from 0 to 4 in 2000-2008, 5 to 9 in 2010-2012, 14 to 15 in 2013-2014, and 25 in 2015. Only four radiology journals had published more than one of the original research articles. Original research articles' most common themes were: optimization of patients' access to reports and images (n=7); patients' examination experience (5); image evaluation (n=4); radiologists meeting with patients (n=4); improving patients' knowledge of imaging (n=3); examination wait times/efficiency (n=3); examination utilization/appropriateness (n=3); and IT enhancements (n=3). A total of 13 of 40 original research articles solicited opinions from patients. One study involved patients in educating trainees regarding patient-centered care. No study involved patients in system-level decisions regarding health care design and delivery. Articles dealing with patient-centered care in radiology are increasing, though they remain concentrated in a limited number of journals. Though major themes included image/report access, patient experiences, and radiologists meeting with patients, many studies dealt with less clearly patient-centric topics such as examination interpretation, while inclusion of patients in systems design was lacking. Further research in radiology is encouraged to target a broader range of ideals of patient-centered care, such as diversity, autonomy, and compassion, and to incorporate greater patient engagement. Copyright © 2016

  14. [Study of the work and of working in Family Health Care Support Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, Selma; Gonçalves, Rita Maria de Abreu; Cordone, Nicole Guimarães; Barros, Juliana de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    To understand the organization of and the working conditions in family health care support centers, as well as subjective experiences related to work in two of these centers. This was a case study carried out during 2011 and 2012 in two family health care support centers in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Data were collected and analyzed using two theoretical-methodological references from ergonomics and work psychodynamics influenced, respectively, by ergonomic work analysis, developed based on open observations of a variety of tasks and on interviews and in practice in work psychodynamics, carried out using think tanks about the work. The work of the Family Health Care Support Centers in question is constituted on the bases of complex, diversified actions to be shared among the various professionals and teams involved. Innovative technological tools, which are not often adopted by primary health care professionals, are used and the parameters and productivity measures do not encompass the specificity and the complexity of the work performed. These situations require constant organizational rearrangement, especially between the Family Health Care Support Centers and the Family Health Care Teams, causing difficulties in carrying out the work as well as in constituting the identity of the professionals studied. The study attempts to lend greater visibility to the work processes at the Family Health Care Support Centers in order to contribute to advances in public policy on primary healthcare. It is important to stress that introducing changes at work, which affect both its organization and work conditions, is above all a commitment, which to be effective, must be permanent and must involve the different levels of hierarchy.

  15. Psychosocial factors associated with early initiation and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) visits in a rural and urban setting in South Africa: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhwava, Lorrein Shamiso; Morojele, Neo; London, Leslie

    2016-01-25

    Late booking and infrequent antenatal care (ANC) are common but avoidable patient-related risk factors for maternal deaths in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the association of psychosocial factors with early initiation of ANC and adequate frequency of attendance of ANC clinics among women in an urban and rural location in South Africa. Data from a 2006 cross-sectional household survey of 363 women from the rural Western Cape and 466 women from urban Gauteng provinces of South Africa for risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancy were analysed. We examined associations between psychosocial variables (self-esteem, cultural influences, religiosity, social capital, social support, pregnancy desire (wanted versus unwanted pregnancy), partner characteristics and mental health) and both early ANC first visit (before 16 weeks) and adequate frequency of ANC visits (4 or more visits) for respondents' last pregnancy. Overall prevalence among urban women of early ANC initiation was 46% and 84% for adequate ANC frequency. Overall prevalence among rural women of early ANC initiation was 45% and 78% for adequate ANC frequency. After adjusting for clustering, psychosocial factors associated with early ANC initiation in the urban site were being employed (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0-2.5) and wanted pregnancy (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.0). For the rural site, early ANC initiation was significantly associated with being married (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.0-3.6) but inversely associated with high religiosity (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.8). Adequate frequency of ANC attendance in the rural site was associated with wanted pregnancy (OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.9-9.3) and the father of the child being present in the respondent's life (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) but inversely associated with having a previous miscarriage (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.8). There were no significant associations between adequate ANC attendance and the psychosocial factors in the urban site. The majority of women from both sites attended ANC

  16. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Care coordination, the family-centered medical home, and functional disability among children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S; McCormick, Marie C

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are at increased risk for functional disabilities. Care coordination has been shown to decrease unmet health service use but has yet been shown to improve functional status. We hypothesize that care coordination services lower the odds of functional disability for CSHCN and that this effect is greater within the context of a family-centered medical home. A secondary objective was to test the mediating effect of unmet care needs on functional disability. Our sample included children ages 0 to 17 years participating the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Care coordination, unmet needs, and disability were measured by parent report. We used logistic regression models with covariate adjustment for confounding and a mediation analysis approach for binary outcomes to assess the effect of unmet needs. There were 34,459 children in our sample. Care coordination was associated with lower odds of having a functional disability (adjusted odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.77, 0.88). This effect was greater for care coordination in the context of a medical home (adjusted odds ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.66, 0.76). The relationship between care coordination and functional disability was mediated by reducing unmet services. Care coordination is associated with lower odds of functional disability among CSHCN, especially when delivered in the setting of a family-centered medical home. Reducing unmet service needs mediates this effect. Our findings support a central role for coordination services in improving outcomes for vulnerable children. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of health care services provided for older adults in primary health care centers and its internal environment. A step towards age-friendly health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamdan, Adel A; Alshammari, Sulaiman A; Al-Amoud, Maysoon M; Hameed, Tariq A; Al-Muammar, May N; Bindawas, Saad M; Al-Orf, Saada M; Mohamed, Ashry G; Al-Ghamdi, Essam A; Calder, Philip C

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the health care services provided for older adults by primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), and the ease of use of these centers by older adults. Between October 2013 and January 2014, we conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 15 randomly selected PHCCs in Riyadh City, KSA. The evaluation focused on basic indicators of clinical services offered and factors indicative of the ease of use of the centers by older adults. Evaluations were based upon the age-friendly PHCCs toolkit of the World Health Organization. Coverage of basic health assessments (such as blood pressure, diabetes, and blood cholesterol) was generally good. However, fewer than half of the PHCCs offered annual comprehensive screening for the common age-related conditions. There was no screening for cancer. Counseling on improving lifestyle was provided by most centers. However, there was no standard protocol for counseling. Coverage of common vaccinations was poor. The layout of most PHCCs and their signage were good, except for lack of Braille signage. There may be issues of access of older adults to PHCCs through lack of public transport, limited parking opportunities, the presence of steps, ramps, and internal stairs, and the lack of handrails. Clinical services and the internal environment of PHCCs can be improved. The data will be useful for health-policy makers to improve PHCCs to be more age-friendly.

  19. Evaluation of health care services provided for older adults in primary health care centers and its internal environment. A step towards age-friendly health centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Alhamdan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the health care services provided for older adults by primary health care centers (PHCCs in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, and the ease of use of these centers by older adults. Methods: Between October 2013 and January 2014, we conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 15 randomly selected PHCCs in Riyadh City, KSA. The evaluation focused on basic indicators of clinical services offered and factors indicative of the ease of use of the centers by older adults. Evaluations were based upon the age-friendly PHCCs toolkit of the World Health Organization. Results: Coverage of basic health assessments (such as blood pressure, diabetes, and blood cholesterol was generally good. However, fewer than half of the PHCCs offered annual comprehensive screening for the common age-related conditions. There was no screening for cancer. Counseling on improving lifestyle was provided by most centers. However, there was no standard protocol for counseling. Coverage of common vaccinations was poor. The layout of most PHCCs and their signage were good, except for lack of Braille signage. There may be issues of access of older adults to PHCCs through lack of public transport, limited parking opportunities, the presence of steps, ramps, and internal stairs, and the lack of handrails. Conclusions: Clinical services and the internal environment of PHCCs can be improved. The data will be useful for health-policy makers to improve PHCCs to be more age-friendly.

  20. Wound Care Center of Excellence: A Process for Continuous Monitoring and Improvement of Wound Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Raelina S; Kohan, Lauren S; Woods, Jon S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Gillette, Brian M; Donovan, Virginia; Gorenstein, Scott

    2018-05-01

    To provide information about a study using a new process for continuous monitoring to improve chronic wound care quality.This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care.After completing this continuing education activity, you should be better able to:1. Recognize problems associated with chronic wound care.2. Identify methods used in this project to improve care.3. Illustrate the findings from this and similar projects and implications for providing improved wound care.Patients with chronic wounds require complex care because of comorbidities that can affect healing. Therefore, the goal of this project was to develop a system of reviewing all hospitalized patients seen by the study authors' wound care service on a weekly basis to decrease readmissions, morbidity, and mortality. Weekly multidisciplinary conferences were conducted to evaluate patient data and systematically assess for adherence to wound care