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Sample records for psychosocial care centers

  1. Care strategies used by occupational therapists in psychosocial care centers

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    Francine Baltazar Assad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The psychosocial rehabilitation centered care in experience with the suffering, thus breaking with the hegemonic logic of disease-focused care. Occupational therapy has supported this detachment, with actions targeting the daily life to achieve social inclusion and autonomy of people with a diagnosis of mental disorder. Objective: To identify the care strategies used by occupational therapists in psychosocial care centers and understand how these strategies contribute to psychosocial rehabilitation. Method: Descriptive Study of qualitative approach, with five occupational therapists of three psychosocial care centers that responded to an interview, which was recorded, transcribed and analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results: Were extracted the categories: Integral Care Strategies; Singular Care Strategies and Interdisciplinary Care Strategies. Another category, Understanding and expansion of everyday life, referred to the contribution in psychosocial rehabilitation. The specificity was diluted between the possibilities of actions, because the strategies are common to other professional groups, but are guided by a new conception of health care from the perspective of integrality and network. From the understanding and expansion of everyday life as a contribution of occupational therapy, emerged the specificity of the group and its contribution in psychosocial rehabilitation. Some strategies have been punctual and effectuated in the service itself; however, many have reached the territory. Conclusion: There is a need for reports of occupational therapists practices even if in care projects common to other groups, in order to keep up with the discussions on strengthening the professional institutionalization in country.

  2. [Evaluation of family care delivered at a psychosocial care center].

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    Duarte, Maria de Lourdes Custódio; Kantorski, Luciane Prado

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate qualitatively the care offered to families for a Center of Psychosocial Atention of type I, located in Southern Region of Brazil. The Dialectical hermeneutic circle was used as a technique of data collection, a method recommended by the Fourth Generation Evaluation proposed by Guba and Lincoln. Topics such as reception, family meetings, home visits and involvement of family emerged in interviews with family members of this health service. Interviews and observations were the techniques used to collect data. The way has been consolidated to care for families in services represents a challenge for health professionals, since it entails the restructuring and formation of a reflection of all the actors involved in this process of change.

  3. [Intersubjectivity in Mental Health care: narratives of nursing technicians at a Psychosocial Care Center].

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    Campos, Rosana Onocko; Baccari, Ivana Preto

    2011-04-01

    Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps) were established as a result of the demand for Mental Health care and were an attempt to update psychiatric treatment for those afflicted with severe mental disorders. This article seeks to analyze subjective repercussions of work conducted in Caps on mid-level professionals and to contribute to healthcare planning. Two focal groups were conducted with workers of a Caps III. The methodology applied to the analysis was based on the critical hermeneutical approach proposed by Ricoeur and espoused by Gadamerian philosophy. Lack of appreciation in the workplace was revealed as being the main cause of suffering. Several themes stood out including the difficulty of obtaining the cooperation of users'; relatives, the tenuous interconnection between Caps and the health network, the attribution of responsibility for the night shift, controversies regarding overnight-stay patients and an excessive workload. Adequate structural planning and institutional organization is proposed when opening new Caps in order to reduce the workload of technicians and improve the clinical performance of the team.

  4. Determinants of quality of life in elderly patients of a psychosocial care center in Brazil.

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    Bottan, Gabriela; Morais, Eliane Pinheiro de; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Trentini, Clarissa; Heldt, Elizeth

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the sociodemographic, clinical, and functional determinants of quality of life in elderly (older than 60 years) patients from a Psychosocial Care Center. The sample was randomly selected patients undergoing treatment at the center during the study period. Quality of life was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD). A total of 50 elderly individuals with a mean age of 67.5 (SD = 5.72) years were included in the study. A hierarchical linear regression showed that clinical characteristics, such as severe symptoms of depression and a higher number of comorbidities, were related to lower quality of life. Better functional capacity and more frequent visits to the center were determinants of higher quality of life. These findings underscore the importance of assessing quality of life and of taking this variable into account when planning health interventions for elderly patients at a Psychosocial Care Center.

  5. [Work as a source of pleasure: evaluating a Psychosocial Care Center team].

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    Glanzner, Cecília Helena; Olschowsky, Agnes; Kantorski, Luciane Prado

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pleasure at work felt by the members of a Psychosocial Care Center team. This qualitative case study used Forth Generation Evaluation. This study was performed in Foz do Iguaçu, Parana, Brazil, in November and December 2006. Participants were 10 tem members. Data collection was performed through observation and individual interviews. The analysis was initiated at the same time as the data collection, and the final analysis was performed as per the following steps: data ordering, classification and final analysis. The following analysis themes were developed: work characteristics at the psychological care center, suffering and coping with suffering at work. During the evaluation, the participants showed pleasure and fulfillment with their work by expressing pride, fulfillment and appreciation of what they deliver. Pleasure occurs during the development of psychosocial care, because they always have the freedom to rearrange their manner of working, making possible to develop activities and attitudes capable of giving them pleasure.

  6. Characterization of the clientele attended in a Psychosocial Care Center - alcohol and drugs

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    Eliany Nazaré Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This documentary and retrospective study aimed to analyze the profile of the clientele attended in the Psychosocial Care Center Alcohol and Other Drugs from Sobral, Ceará, Brazil in 2010, based on 300 records. Males predominated with 75% (n=225, with age ranging from 11 to 29 years old with 44.3% (n=133, single with 49% (n=147, and with elementary school 45.7% (n=137. The most commonly used drug among men was crack, 31.3% (n=94, and among women, tobacco, 12% (n=36. The losses associated with dependence, are mostly related to the family, with 31.3% (n=94. The highlight to crack requires changes in the care process implemented in institutions. One should remain alert to these new profiles related to chemical dependency, so that quality and integral care can be offered to this clientele.

  7. Social life of people with diagnosis of schizophrenia, attended at a psychosocial care center.

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    Moll, Marciana Fernandes; Saeki, Toyoko

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative research aimed to investigate the social life of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia at a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS), and identify how the therapeutic process offered by the CAPS has contributed to their social lives. The subjects of the study were patients with schizophrenia, between eighteen and forty years of age and registered at the CAPS in Uberaba, Brazil. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview. Three categories were identified: the patients' life before and after the illness, their everyday life outside CAPS and CAPS care contributing to their social life and stabilization of symptoms. The results showed that the CAPS regimen enhances treatment compliance and decreases hospitalization. However, social functioning for schizophrenic patients occurs within the family and treatment contexts. This reality evidences the need for a partnership with the Family Health Strategy and the community to improve socialization.

  8. Psychosocial work environment and prediction of quality of care indicators in one Canadian health center.

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    Paquet, Maxime; Courcy, François; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Gagnon, Serge; Maillet, Stéphanie

    2013-05-01

    Few studies link organizational variables and outcomes to quality indicators. This approach would expose operant mechanisms by which work environment characteristics and organizational outcomes affect clinical effectiveness, safety, and quality indicators. What are the predominant psychosocial variables in the explanation of organizational outcomes and quality indicators (in this case, medication errors and length of stay)? The primary objective of this study was to link the fields of evidence-based practice to the field of decision making, by providing an effective model of intervention to improve safety and quality. The study involved healthcare workers (n = 243) from 13 different care units of a university affiliated health center in Canada. Data regarding the psychosocial work environment (10 work climate scales, effort/reward imbalance, and social support) was linked to organizational outcomes (absenteeism, turnover, overtime), to the nurse/patient ratio and quality indicators (medication errors and length of stay) using path analyses. The models produced in this study revealed a contribution of some psychosocial factors to quality indicators, through an indirect effect of personnel- or human resources-related variables, more precisely: turnover, absenteeism, overtime, and nurse/patient ratio. Four perceptions of work environment appear to play an important part in the indirect effect on both medication errors and length of stay: apparent social support from supervisors, appreciation of the workload demands, pride in being part of one's work team, and effort/reward balance. This study reveals the importance of employee perceptions of the work environment as an indirect predictor of quality of care. Working to improve these perceptions is a good investment for loyalty and attendance. In general, better personnel conditions lead to fewer medication errors and shorter length of stay. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. [The meanings constructed in the attention to a crisis in the territory: the psychosocial care center as a protagonist].

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    Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Chiavagatti, Fabieli Gopinger; Cortes, Jandro Moraes; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann

    2013-06-01

    The attention to a crisis is a strategic point in the process of paradigm changes proposed by the Brazilian psychiatric reform, requiring changes in alternative services and in the professionals that must use new technologies of care. This study aimed to identify the actions of attention to a crisis in the territory and the meanings as they evolved, beginning from the discursive practices of the professionals. It was a qualitative study that used the theoretical perspective of social constructionism. From the database of the research, Evaluation of the Psychosocial Care Centers in Southern Brazil (CAPSUL), 27 interviews were analyzed from the professionals of Psychosocial Care Center for Alegrete, along with field diaries with 390 hours of observation. Results showed patient engagement/welcoming and accountability for care. We concluded that freedom, reciprocity, contractuality and responsibility for care were the new meanings needed for the alternative care services to overcome the asylum and sense of exclusion and dangerousness.

  10. [Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction].

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    Delfini, Patrícia Santos de Souza; Sato, Miki Takao; Antoneli, Patrícia de Paulo; Guimarães, Paulo Octávio da Silva

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The strategies used in this partnership were meetings with both teams with training, case discussion about the families assisted, support to workers' difficulties and elaboration of therapeutical projects, and joint domiciliary visits. Some difficulties had been found during the research: great demand for health services and lack of institutional guidelines to guarantee the effectiveness of the partnership. The look directed to the family and the social context presents positive results compared to the look directed only to the illness. The partnership enriches the practice and a larger network of care in the territory becomes possible. It is necessary to bring up new proposals and innovative enterprises.

  11. Building social participation with a support group users: challenges of care qualification in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS

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    Vitor Corrêa Detomini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature points out a lack of studies describing practical experiences approaching the role of social participation, even though, the subject Brazilian Health System (SUS as a principle is valued by theoretical-conceptual works. The lack of studies is especially observed in mental health care services, where the existing studies focus on the users’ management engagement as part of psychosocial rehabilitation. Thus, this article introduces an experience developed in a Center for Psycho-Social Attention (CAPS, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, aiming to address the issue of social participation in care qualification, in accordance to legislation and technical standards. Thisstudy focused on two types of sources. 1 Internship Final Report of a Psycology Student including 54 sessions of a support group, 2 technical and legal documents concerning the SUS and the National Mental Health Policy and Humanization. The service aspects were analyzed through technical and legislative foundations - focusing the needs and claims on group discussions, classified as structure and process, used to assess the health care quality. Most concerns were listed on normative Ordinances and Regulations. Achieving social participation was not an institutional premise and, among the main difficulties was the medical/outpatient centered model and the representation of “crazy”/”CAPS users” as incapable. It requires: i integration of “clinic” and “politics”; ii intensification of interdisciplinary and psychological care; iii respect the citizenship of mental health users, and, finally, iv that the collective participation spaces do not exhaust themselves. Therefore, the collective participation spaces need practical recommendations in order to improve the structures and work processes and meet the users’ needs.

  12. Mental health and solidarity economy: the experience of users and workers of a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Ioneide de Oliveira Campos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is within the context of discussions on mental health and solidarity economy. It is an account of the experience lived at the Tabatinga II Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS in the Federal District, Brazil, where projects designed to generate employment and income in the mental health area reaffirm their ability, as tools for social inclusion, to incorporate the principles and values of solidarity economy aiming at the empowerment and autonomy of citizens in mental distress. This work intended to support and encourage reflections on the possibilities for social inclusion arising from the generation of jobs and income through collective and cooperative actions developed and elaborated with the participation of users, family members, and workers of this service. Emphasis on participatory methodology guided the development of the experience, and the proposition of triggering actions on mental health and solidarity economy at different times, under the coordination of the performing team, afforded, concurrently, the realization of two actions/interventions: a group activity designed to service users and their relatives who gathered to learn and reflect on collective work and supportive venture; and three monthly training sessions, from August to December 2013, on cooperativism, solidarity economy, and mental health addressed to the professionals of that CAPS. At the end of these interventions, it was possible to observe that the involvement of people under mental distress in these projects contributes to overcome their current state of subordination and weakness. It is worth mentioning that, in general, the development of these actions favored reflections on the world of collective work and aggregated methodological knowledge on solidarity ventures.

  13. Identity of care in a Psychosocial Care Center for Children and Adolescents who uses drugs

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    Isabella Teixeira Bastos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To associate the territory of identity with the production of care within a PCC focusing on children and adolescents with drug abuse and their institutional identity. Method We used the “ process tracing methodology” in four research categories: focus groups, characterization of professionals, observing the everyday and interviewing two members of emblematic cases of the service. Results territory of identity of the institution, which operates the production of care is crossed by the difficulty of dealing with the complexity brought by the users and the performance of the PCC network. This paper is also permeated by different conceptions of care and small problematization of these issues in collective spaces of service. Conclusion The discussion in focus groups and other devices can be powerful resources to reframe the meaning of care and identity of collective service.

  14. Consequences of alcohol consumption among women cared for in a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the consumption of alcohol and its impact on the physical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal realms, as well on the impulse control and social responsibility of a group of women receiving specialized treatment. It is a descriptive qualitative study. The sample comprised 61 women, predominately adults, single, with low education levels and who were domestic workers. On average they consumed high quantities of distilled alcohol per day. The women were diagnosed with alcohol dependence syndrome and presented significant damages to their intrapersonal and impulse control areas. A minority sought treatment to stop drinking, and 59% had initiated a prior treatment for mental and psychiatric disorders. The results provided use with information on alcohol consumption, as well as on the consequences of drinking among women. Such data is essential for rethinking how to plan health care proposals for this population. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22712.

  15. [Psychiatric reform and substitutive mental health practices: an institutional reading of an experience at a psychosocial care center].

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    Koda, Mirna Yamazato; Fernandes, Maria Inês Assumpção

    2007-06-01

    This article discusses the development of mental health care services based on the Anti-Asylum Movement. Drawing on contributions from psychoanalysis and social psychology, the study analyzes the conflicts and dilemmas arising in a Psychosocial Care Center (NAPS) in Santos, São Paulo, Brazil. This study is part of Master's degree research at the Social and Occupational Psychology Department, Institute of Psychology, University of São Paulo. Semi-structured interviews were used with workers at the NAPS. According to the interviews, the transformation of the mental health care model mobilizes psychological issues among the workers. Various conflicts and anxieties were observed in relation to changes in the institutional support provided by the NAPS over time. The article analyzes difficulties in dealing with differences in the team or feelings of abandonment resulting from changes in the local administration in the interface between subjects and the institution.

  16. Psychosocial risk factors, interventions and comorbidity in patients with non-specific low back pain in primary care: need for comprehensive and patient-centered care.

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    Aline eRamond-Roquin

    2015-10-01

    psychosocial conditions, this suggests taking into account any potential comorbidity in patients with chronic LBP, as in other patients. All these results support the adoption of a more comprehensive and patient-centered approach when dealing with patients with LBP in primary care. As this condition is illustrative of many situations encountered in primary care, the strategies proposed here may benefit most patients consulting in this setting.

  17. Supervised practice in occupational therapy in a psychosocial care center: Challenges for the assistance and the teaching and learning process

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    Milton Carlos Mariotti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric reform in Brazil has replaced the hospital-centered model by the reintegration of users to their respective communities. The Center of Psychosocial Care (CAPS has been the main equipment in that scope. Objectives: To report the development of Supervised Practice in Occupational Therapy in a CAPS II unit in Curitiba, Parana state, Brazil. Methods: This is an experience report. It features the training field and describes the stages of the teaching and learning process which involved institutional observation, reporting and intervention proposal, collecting data about the users’ profile and attendances. The work focused the non-intensive users because they are close to hospital discharge. Results: We found that users of the non-intensive system, rather than crave the discharge, would like to return to the semi-intensive or intensive systems, aiming to regain sickness and transportation benefits, which are lost as users make progress. This fact denotes great contradictions in the system. We also attended intensive and semi-intensive systems users. Conclusions: The students’ learning included aspects such as direct contact with the institutional reality; knowledge about the health system, its limitations and contradictions; approach to users, their families, realities, socioeconomic conditions, desires, aspirations, or lack thereof; difficulties in engaging in meaningful occupations in their territories, limitations, and social stigma; working with frustrations, reflecting about ways to change the reality; in addition to expanded clinical practice, participating in the discussions and formulation of public policies on mental healthcare and social control.

  18. Mapping of occupational therapy practice in the psychosocial Care Centers of Alcohol and Drugs In Sao Paulo state

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    Carla Regina Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug use and the challenge of finding answers in assistance to the so called drug abuse is a current theme that challenges professionals, services and managers. This study aimed to map features, professionals and the activities carried out by occupational therapists of the Psychosocial Care Centers of Alcohol and other Drugs (Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Álcool e Drogas – CAPS ad in the state of Sao Paulo, through the application of a self-answerable questionnaire. During data collection, 45 CAPS ad were found in the interior of the state. Nineteen professionals cooperated with the research; 15 of them were occupational therapists. The results showed that these care centers present proposals regulated according to the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, but the complexity of the demand and its multiple facets with the social dimension require further discussion on the type of intervention that has been employed, as well as on its efficacy. Regarding the profile of the occupational therapists, most of them have at least five years of training, graduate degrees, and did not choose the area of mental health and drugs. The occupational therapists have different views of their actions, use different resources and strategies, especially in group activities and through workshops, and signify their actions in different ways, promoting new projects of life by joining treatment proposals from abstinence to harm reduction. We conclude that the assistance to the users of CAPS ad is extremely complex, because it involves social character themes with macro social determinants which require greater integration between sectors, areas and resources.

  19. Quality of life assessment of patients with schizophrenic spectrum disorders from Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Tatiana Fernandes Carpinteiro da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessing the quality of life and the clinical and social-demographic factors associated in schizophrenic spectrum patients (ICD-10 F20-F29 attending CAPS at the programmatic area 3.0. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of schizophrenic spectrum patients who have been enrolled in 2008 in CAPS in programmatic area (AP 3 at Rio de Janeiro city, using MINIPLUS to assess schizophrenia spectrum disorder and use of psychoactive substances, Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS to assess psychiatric symptoms and Quality of Life Scale (QLS-BR to assess the quality of life. RESULTS: Seventy nine patients were included, of whom 74 (93.7% presented some impairment in quality of life. The most frequently affected area was occupational performance. Variables that showed a significant association with severe impairment of quality of life were: marital status, race, occupation, who patients lived with, homelessness, having children, previous psychiatric hospitalization, negative symptoms and symptoms designated as not applicable (being characterized by a lack of typical positive and negative symptoms. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of these factors should be crucial to implement health policies and psychosocial rehabilitation programs focused on improving the quality of life of these patients.

  20. [Initiation and consumption of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults in an Anti-Drug Psychosocial Care Center].

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    Silva, Carolina Carvalho; Costa, Maria Conceição Oliveira; de Carvalho, Rosely Cabral; Amaral, Magali Teresópolis Reis; Cruz, Nilma Lázara de Almeida; da Silva, Mariana Rocha

    2014-03-01

    The study seeks to characterize the initiation and consumption pattern of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults enrolled in an Alcohol and Drug Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS-AD). This study was conducted with records of attendance and the consumption pattern was classified in accordance with WHO: infrequent use (lifetime use, per year or up to five days per month); frequent use (6 to 19 times in the past 30 days); heavy use (≥ 20 times in the last 30 days). In the age group comparison, the test for proportion and association analysis was used and the prevalence and prevalence ratio was calculated with a significance level of 5% and 95% confidence interval. Of the total of adolescents and young adults treated between 2003 and 2008 (475), most were male, single, poorly educated, live with relations and have psychic symptoms. Statistical significance was found for age at initiation of use: adolescents compared to young adults started earlier (≤ 14 years): tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, crack and other SPA consumption. Among adolescents, significant results were found for the less frequent consumption of tobacco, more frequent use of alcohol, and heavy consumption of marijuana. These findings may contribute to the preventive and therapeutic CAPS-AD programs.

  1. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

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    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care...

  2. Role of psychosocial care on ICU trauma

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    Usha Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Patients treated in intensive care units (ICU though receive the best medical attention are found to suffer from trauma typically attributed to the ICU environment. Biopsychosocial approach in ICUs is found to minimize ICU trauma. Aims: This study investigates the role of psychosocial care on patients in ICU after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Settings and Design: The study included 250 post-operative CABG patients from five corporate hospitals. The combination of between subject and correlation design was used. Materials and Methods: The ICU psychosocial care scale (ICUPCS and ICU trauma scale (ICUTS were used to measure the psychosocial care and trauma. Statistical Analysis: ANOVA and simple and multiple regression were applied. Results: Hospitals significantly differed in psychosocial care provided in ICUs. Higher the psychosocial care in ICU, lower was the ICU trauma experienced and vice versa. Psychosocial care was a significant major predictor of ICU trauma. Conclusions: The study suggests emphasis on psychosocial aspects in ICU care for optimizing prognosis.

  3. O trabalho do enfermeiro nos centros de atenção psicossocial The work of the nurse in psychosocial care centers

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    Luciane Prado Kantorski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo trata do perfil e atividades desenvolvidas por enfermeiros nos centros de atenção psicossocial (Caps. Consiste num estudo qualitativo do tipo descritivo. O instrumento de pesquisa utilizado foi a entrevista estruturada, realizada com 13 enfermeiros dos Caps I e II, pertencentes à área de abrangência da Terceira Coordenadoria Regional de Saúde do Rio Grande do Sul (3ª CRS/RS, onde foram apreendidas informações sobre a clientela atendida no serviço, composição da equipe, atividades realizadas e ações desenvolvidas pelo enfermeiro no Caps. Os enfermeiros elencaram suas atividades na prática cotidiana do Caps e estas foram contextualizadas a partir do referencial da reabilitação psicossocial no interior da reforma psiquiátrica.This study concerns the profile and activities carried out by nurses in the Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps. It is a qualitative study of the descriptive type. The research instrument used was the structured interview, conducted with 13 nurses of Caps I and II, belonging to the area covered by the Third Regional Health District of Rio Grande do Sul (3ª CRS/RS. From the interviews, information was obtained about the clientele of the Caps, the team's composition, and the activities the nurses carried out in the Caps. The nurses listed their activities in the routine of the Caps, and they were examined in reference to psychosocial rehabilitation within the psychiatric reform.

  4. Interdisciplinarity in work process at a Psychosocial Attention Center

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    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the work process of mental health professionals from a Psychosocial Attention Center (CAPS, from the knowledge and the practices applied in the production of care and its interface with user’s demands and the service offering. Methods: A case study with qualitative approach. Twenty-eight subjects joined in and were divided into three groups: I (eleven mental health workers, II (eleven users e III (six family members. The semistructured interview was used besides systematic observation, in the search for data about the work process of the professionals of the Psychosocial Attention Center, the relationship between team and user, offering and demand, access, technologies of care, knowledge and practices and interdisciplinarity. The investigation was based upon critical content analysis and was oriented by the flowchart analyzer. Results: The service organization and its work process are directed to the immediate supply of the population’s demands, which depicts a care based on prescriptive practices. Thus, the flow of assistance and the service offering complement each other in the need of a procedure and in its exhaustive offering by the service, dissolving interdisciplinary conductions of intervention shared with the user.Conclusion: Mental health care is still surrounded by biomedical hegemony centered in procedures directed to pharmacological prescription. Despite this reality, the work centered on the user and the utilization of soft technologies – communication, link, welcoming – begin to take part of the daily CAPS service offering, although it is only present in specific activities of certain procedures.

  5. Main mental disorders in crack-cocaine users treated at Psychosocial Care Centers for Alcohol and Drugs in the city of Recife, Brazil

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    Antonio Gomes de Castro Neto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Brazil's Northeast region has the highest crack-cocaine consumption in the country. Crack-cocaine has more intense effects than cocaine powder and can cause greater chemical dependence. Psychosocial Care Centers for Alcohol and Drugs (CAPSad are public health services that provide treatment for drug dependence. It is common for drug users, and particularly crack-cocaine users, to develop mental disorders. Objective: To evaluate the most common mental disorders in crack-cocaine dependents in treatment at CAPSad in the city of Recife, Brazil. Methods: The research database "Between rocks and shots: user profiles, consumption strategies, and social impact of crack cocaine" (CEP/CCS/UFPE no. 206/11 was consulted to establish the areas of crack cocaine consumption in the city of Recife. Results: There were 885 patients in treatment for crack-cocaine use, with a mean age of 29.8±9.4 years. The mean duration of drug use was 6.1±4.6 years. Most of the patients were males (80.3%, had left school at some point between the 1st and 9th grades (45.6%, were unemployed and/or seeking employment (52% and used drugs daily (56.4%. Cocaine chemical dependence was more significant when correlated with use of crack-cocaine and other drugs such as medications and hallucinogens (p = 0.01. Conclusions: Data from this study showed strong associations between crack-cocaine uses and development of mental disorders, particularly when abuse of multiple substances occurs. Based on these data, there is a clear need for coordination of related public policies for support and social reintegration to provide these people with comprehensive care.

  6. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care...... to this group of patients. Background: MM is the type of cancer, which over the past 50 years has increased the most in newly discovered cases, and is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. The statement above shows that this group of patients will increase in the future. It is therefore important...... to elaborate the care to these patients. Method: In 2007 the nurses from our ward gained experience from the psychosocial care to these patients. These experiences are a starting point to the study of literature the group has made. A group of five nurses have from this literature study, substantiated...

  7. Dimensões do objeto de trabalho em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial Dimensions of the scope of work in a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Christine Wetzel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta resultados parciais de uma pesquisa avaliativa desenvolvida em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial em Pelotas (RS no ano de 2005. O estudo, de abordagem qualitativa, utiliza o referencial teórico-metodológico da Avaliação de Quarta Geração. A coleta de dados contém observação e entrevistas com usuários, familiares e profissionais do serviço. A análise se baseou no Método Comparativo Constante, possibilitando a delimitação de núcleos temáticos. Um deles se refere às dimensões do objeto de trabalho, desdobrando-se em questões relacionadas à integralidade; aos velhos e novos crônicos; aos atendimentos às crises e à inserção da família. Da avaliação, a partir da inclusão de grupos diretamente envolvidos com o cotidiano do serviço, emergiram questões relevantes em um contexto de mudança no modelo de atenção em saúde mental.This article presents partial results of evaluative research conducted in 2005 at a Psychosocial Care Center in Pelotas, in the Southern Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul. The study adopts a qualitative approach and utilizes the theoretical and methodological referential of the Fourth Generation Evaluation. The data collected contains observation and interviews with users, family members and professionals of the care center. The analysis was based on the Constant Comparative Method that made the definition of the thematic nuclei possible. One of them refers to the dimensions of the scope of work broken down into issues related to integrality, to old and new chronicities, to dealing with crises and to family involvement. Considering the inclusion of groups directly involved with the daily routine services, relevant issues have emerged from the evaluation in a context of change in the model of mental healthcare.

  8. Cognitive, functional, and psychosocial outcome after severe traumatic brain injury: A cross-sectional study at a tertiary care trauma center

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    Sumit Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI constitutes a significant public health problem. Objectives: To assess cognitive, functional, and psychosocial outcome in patients with severe TBI (STBI. Materials and Methods: A total of 77 survivors of STBI treated at our center were prospectively assessed in the outpatient department 1 year after the injury. These patients were assessed for cognitive, functional, and psychosocial outcome using cognitive outcome tests, dysfunctional analysis questionnaire, and personality trait inventory, respectively. Cognitive and functional outcome was graded as average and above average recovery (good recovery or below average recovery (poor recovery. Psychosocial outcome was assessed as average recovery (good recovery or mild impairment and severe impairment (poor to very poor recovery. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests. Results: The ability to learn new things was most affected aspect of cognitive function and only 1% of patients had good recovery in this domain. However, 44% had good outcome for simple memory. A total of 61% showed good recovery in several aspects of functional status. At the end of 1 year, 62.5% patients still remained unemployed. 45.4% patients had good recovery, while 37% had severe impairment for various personality traits and 40% of patients had impaired emotional stability, while 57% patients showed impaired recovery in depressive tendency. Conclusion: In this study 61% patients with STBI had good recovery in functional outcome and 45.4% in psychosocial outcome at 1 year follow-up. However, improvement in cognitive outcome was not so optimistic with the ability to learn new things being most affected.

  9. Grupos operativos: Estrategia para el cuidado de enfermería en un centro de atención psicosocial Operative groups: A strategy for nursing care in a center for psychosocial care

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    Adriana Rotoli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivo describir el uso del Grupo Operativo como estrategia para el cuidado de enfermería en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial (CAPS. Cinco reuniones se realizaron con los usuarios de un CAPS de la región norte del Rio Grande do Sul, en el primer semestre de 2010. Los recursos utilizados fueron dinámicas de grupo, mensajes y materiales audiovisuales. Los grupos operativos constituyen estrategias de cuidado de enfermería que pueden ayudar la rehabilitación psicosocial de los pacientes adictos a las drogas y etílicos. La experiencia contribuye a una discusión más amplia sobre el tema, ofreciendo apoyo para la práctica de los enfermeros en el desarrollo de acciones en Salud Mental utilizando como instrumento el Grupo Operativo.This study aimed to report the use of operative group as a strategy for nursing care in a Center for Psychosocial Care (CAPS. Five meetings were conducted with users of CAPS in a town in the Northern Region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in the first half of 2010. The resources used were dynamic group messaging and audio-visual materials. The operative groups constitute nursing care strategies that can assist in psychosocial rehabilitation of drug addicts and ethyl. The report aims to contribute to broader discussions about the theme, offering support for the practice of nurses in the development of actions in Mental Health as a work tool using the Operative Group.

  10. A saúde mental dos profissionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial The mental health of workers in Psychosocial Care Centers

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    Vladimir Athayde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A saúde dos trabalhadores dos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS tem sido objeto de poucas pesquisas, apesar da implantação de centenas de CAPS em todo país. O objetivo geral deste estudo foi analisar situações de trabalho em um CAPS localizado no município do Rio de Janeiro, tendo como foco o processo saúde-doença-trabalho. Neste estudo de caso, foram adotadas as perspectivas analíticas da Ergologia e da Psicodinâmica do Trabalho e utilizados como técnicas observação, a entrevista e a análise documental. A atividade cotidiana dos profissionais de saúde mental demanda grande envolvimento subjetivo e revelou-se desgastante, gerando sofrimento e adoecimento. As condições de trabalho insatisfatórias repercutiram no serviço prestado e na saúde dos trabalhadores. Ainda assim, foi possível identificar potência criativa e aspectos de satisfação pelo trabalho desenvolvido. As principais estratégias utilizadas pelos sujeitos para o enfrentamento e a superação das adversidades envolveram o apego aos ideais do SUS e da Reforma Psiquiátrica, o suporte da equipe, e o reconhecimento do trabalho realizado.The health of workers in Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS has been studied by few researches, despite the deployment of hundreds of CAPS across the country. This study aims to analyze work situations in a CAPS located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, focusing on the health-disease-work process. In this case study, it was adopted the Ergology and Work Psychodynamics' analytical perspectives, using the techniques of observation, interview and document analysis. The daily activities of mental health workers require a lot of subjective involvement and proved to be overwhelming, producing suffering and disease. Unsatisfying working conditions have affected the service provided and the workers' health. Still, it was possible to identify creative potential and aspects of satisfaction at work. The main strategies used by the

  11. Avaliação do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial Infantil de Cascavel - PR Evaluation of the Child Psychosocial Care Center of Cascavel - PR

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    Ana Silvia Scandolara

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo relacionado à avaliação de serviços em saúde mental, neste caso, o Centro de Atenção Psicossocial Infantil - CAPSi, do município de Cascavel-PR, serviço substitutivo implementado a partir da transformação da assistência psiquiátrica no Brasil. Objetivou avaliar qualitativamente o CAPSi. Os participantes foram 10 profissionais de saúde que atuam no CAPSi, sendo que os dados foram analisados sob a técnica do Discurso do Sujeito Coletivo (DSC (Lefèvre & Lefèvre, 2003. Como resultado, construíram-se 06 DSC e destacaram-se 12 temas geradores de significações: bom atendimento, estrutura física, recursos humanos, rede de serviços, acesso, referência, organização do serviço, família, atende as políticas de saúde mental, demanda, capacitação, redefinição de serviços, qualidade do serviço, papel do CAPSi e rotatividade de recursos humanos. Com base nos DSC o atendimento prestado no CAPSi é de boa qualidade, porém existem dificuldades de estrutura administrativa.This study is related to the evaluation of mental health services, in this case, the Child Psychosocial Care Center - (Centro de Atenção Psicossocial Infantil - CAPSi, in the city of Cascavel-PR, that is a substitute service implemented from the transformation of the psychiatric assistance in Brazil. It objectified to evaluate CAPSi qualitatively. The participants have been 10 health professionals who act in CAPSi, and the data has been analyzed under the technique of the General Subject Speech ( Discurso do Sujeito Coletivo - DSC (Lefèvre & Lefèvre, 2003. As result, 06 DSC have been constructed and 12 meaning-generating themes have been distinguished: good attendance, physical structure, human resources, net of services, access, reference, organization of the service, family, respect for the mental health policies, demand, qualification, redefinition of services, quality of the service, role of the CAPSi and rotation of human resources. Based on the

  12. [Deliberative devices in mental health and democratization peer exchanges: the case of a user's assembly of a psychosocial care center in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelland, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Several mental health public networks in Brazil focus on the participation of a plurality of actors in different collective methods of analysis and co-management of services in order to ensure improved efficiency and greater democratization of social relations. It is clear that the analysis of the effectiveness of these collectives is often done at the expense of the social relations of power they help produce. In other words, it is as if the participatory nature of the devices immediately ensure their democratic potential and their positive impact on the recovery of the users involved.Research is presented that seeks to understand the point of view of the actors involved and to determine whether or not collective spaces for the organization of mental health services contribute to the democratization of social relations that is, the construction of individual and collective capacities for debate, decision and public action. What and how people living with serious mental disorders are protagonists in the design of service and in the struggle for quality public services and how this is involved in their recovery? The research is drawn from an organizational ethnography carried out over nearly one year in Campinas, Brazil in 2012. The research focuses on a case study in a psychosocial care center (CAPS) housing for people living with serious mental disorders. To consolidate the internal validity of the case study, three collecting data techniques were applied: the shadowing over 17 institutionalize methods or devices involved in the organization of services of the CAPS, analysis of documents and forty-seven personal interviews with users, managers and workers. This article focuses on the data from the observation of one of these devices deliberation involving users, the user's assembly, as well as interviews with 15 of these participants. The results highlight how peer exchanges, emerging in the assembly of users and the convivencia space lead to collective

  13. Role of Psychosocial Care on ICU Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Usha Chivukula; Meena Hariharan; Suvashisa Rana; Marlyn Thomas; Sunayana Swain

    2014-01-01

    Context: Patients treated in intensive care units (ICU) though receive the best medical attention are found to suffer from trauma typically attributed to the ICU environment. Biopsychosocial approach in ICUs is found to minimize ICU trauma. Aims: This study investigates the role of psychosocial care on patients in ICU after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Settings and Design: The study included 250 post-operative CABG patients from five corporate hospitals. The combination of between sub...

  14. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  15. The comparative effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Emily C; Picklesimer, Amy H; Billings, Deborah L; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Farber, Naomi; Frongillo, Edward A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the psychosocial outcomes of the CenteringPregnancy (CP) model of group prenatal care to individual prenatal care, we conducted a prospective cohort study of women who chose CP group (N = 124) or individual prenatal care (N = 124). Study participants completed the first survey at study recruitment (mean gestational age 12.5 weeks), with 89% completing the second survey (mean gestational age 32.7 weeks) and 84% completing the third survey (6 weeks' postpartum). Multiple linear regression models compared changes by prenatal care model in pregnancy-specific distress, prenatal planning-preparation and avoidance coping, perceived stress, affect and depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related empowerment, and postpartum maternal-infant attachment and maternal functioning. Using intention-to-treat models, group prenatal care participants demonstrated a 3.2 point greater increase (p prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies. While group participants did not demonstrate significantly greater positive outcomes in other measures, women who were at greater psychosocial risk benefitted from participation in group prenatal care. Among women reporting inadequate social support in early pregnancy, group participants demonstrated a 2.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.03) in pregnancy-specific distress in late pregnancy and 5.6 point higher mean maternal functioning scores postpartum (p = 0.03). Among women with high pregnancy-specific distress in early pregnancy, group participants had an 8.3 point greater increase (p prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies in late pregnancy and a 4.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.02) in postpartum depressive symptom scores. This study provides further evidence that group prenatal care positively impacts the psychosocial well-being of women with greater stress or lower personal coping resources. Large randomized studies are needed to establish conclusively the biological and psychosocial benefits of group

  16. Psychosocial care of persons with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeney, Patricia E; Rosenberg, Laura; Rosenberg, Marta; Faber, A W

    2008-06-01

    Treatment of people with burn injuries includes recovery of optimal function for survivors to fully participate in society, psychologically and physically. Increased likelihood of physical survival has led to greater concern for potential psychological morbidity for the burn survivor. Based on research and on many years of clinical experience in providing psychosocial care to burned children and adults, the authors outline their approach to assisting burn survivors and their families through the arduous process of recovery from admission through critical care, inpatient recuperation and reintegration upon hospital discharge. A philosophy of rehabilitation, a process that may occur for many months or years after patients' discharge from their acute hospitalization, is presented in the form of seven guidelines for working with burn survivors.

  17. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1).

  18. Facility Service Environments, Staffing, and Psychosocial Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Gammonley, Denise; Paek, Seung Chun; Frahm, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Using 2003 Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data for Medicare and Medicaid certified facilities (N=14, 184) and multinomial logistic regression this study investigated if (1) psychosocial care quality was better in facilities where State requirements for qualified social services staffing exceeded Federal minimum regulations and (2) facility service environments are associated with psychosocial care quality. For-profit status and higher percentage of Medicaid residents are associated with lower quality. Staffing, market demand, and market competition are associated with better quality. Psychosocial care quality is more associated with payer status and market forces and less with regulatory requirements. PMID:19361113

  19. Prevalence of mental disorders, psychosocial distress and need for psychosocial support in cancer patients – study protocol of an epidemiological multi-center study

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    Mehnert Anja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical studies investigating the prevalence of mental disorders and psychological distress in cancer patients have gained increasing importance during recent years, particularly with the objective to develop and implement psychosocial interventions within the cancer care system. Primary purpose of this epidemiological cross-sectional multi-center study is to detect the 4-week-, 12-month-, and lifetime prevalence rates of comorbid mental disorders and to further assess psychological distress and psychosocial support needs in cancer patients across all major tumor entities within the in- and outpatient oncological health care and rehabilitation settings in Germany. Methods/Design In this multicenter, epidemiological cross-sectional study, cancer patients across all major tumor entities will be enrolled from acute care hospitals, outpatient cancer care facilities, and rehabilitation centers in five major study centers in Germany: Freiburg, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Leipzig and Würzburg. A proportional stratified random sample based on the nationwide incidence of all cancer diagnoses in Germany is used. Patients are consecutively recruited in all centers. On the basis of a depression screener (PHQ-9 50% of the participants that score below the cutoff point of 9 and all patients scoring above are assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Oncology (CIDI-O. In addition, all patients complete validated questionnaires measuring emotional distress, information and psychosocial support needs as well as quality of life. Discussion Epidemiological data on the prevalence of mental disorders and distress provide detailed and valid information for the estimation of the demands for the type and extent of psychosocial support interventions. The data will provide information about specific demographic, functional, cancer- and treatment-related risk factors for mental comorbidity and psychosocial distress, specific

  20. A experiência social da psicose no contexto de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial The social experience of psychosis in the context of a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Marcelo Kimati Dias

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo discute as relações existentes entre os aspectos institucionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (Caps e a experiência de pacientes psicóticos. Com o referencial da experiência social da psicose, mais ampla do que a descrição da vivência de sintomas, mas considerando aspectos culturais da experiência, foram realizados três estudos de caso em dois momentos diferentes. Todos os pacientes estudados foram entrevistados tanto em 1995 quanto em 2003. Além dos próprios sujeitos, foram realizadas entrevistas abertas com seus familiares e profissionais que os atendem, considerando assim as redes de rela��ão social dos pacientes. Enfatizaram-se três planos principais: (1 estudo da história do adoecimento; (2 estudo das representações da doença; e (3 descrição do cotidiano e das relações sociais dos pacientes. A partir de uma abordagem antropológica, foram realizadas considerações a respeito do tratamento de pacientes psicóticos inseridos nos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial.This study discusses the relations existing between the institutional aspects of a Psychosocial Care Center (Caps and the experience of psychotic patients. Using the referential base of the social experience of psychosis, which is broader in scope than a description of the experience of symptoms, while considering cultural aspects of the experience, three case studies were conducted at two different times. All of the patients studied were interviewed in 1995 and again in 2003. In addition to interviews with the subjects themselves, open interviews were conducted with their families and their professional carers, thereby taking the social relationship networks of the patients into consideration. Three central aspects were emphasized: (1 study of the history of the illness; (2 study of the representations of the disease; and (3 description of the everyday life and social relationships of the patients. Aspects with respect to the treatment

  1. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Sabato, Silvana; Massarenti, Sara; Nanni, Maria G; The UniFe Psychiatry Working Group Coauthors

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this, the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g., life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes) and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g., psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life) which are possibly implicated not only in "classical" psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools [e.g., and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g., the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research)] represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis.

  2. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eGrassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this , the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g. life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g. psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life which are possibly implicated not only in classical psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools (e.g. and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g. the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research - DCPR represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis.

  3. [The role of the pharmacist in dispensing medication in Adult Psychosocial Care Centers in the city of São Paulo, Capital of the State of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Carolina Gomes; Aguiar, Patricia Melo; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the pharmacist in dispensing medication by conducting cross-sectional exploratory-descriptive research in eight Adult Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) in São Paulo. The pharmacists responsible for each of the dispensing units studied filled out a semi-structured questionnaire about the service provided. Two Adult CAPS units were selected from each of the North, South, Eastand West regions of São Paulo. The central region has no Adult CAPS, and was therefore not included in the study. Most of the respondents were aged between 35 and 40 years and were predominantly female. It was found that half of the respondents performed only 25% of dispensations and few conducted an analysis of all prescriptions before dispensing medication. All respondents contacted the prescriber if any medication-related problems a rose. However, few pharmaceutical interventions were commonly performed. Furthermore, one respondent indicated that all his/her functions in the pharmacy could be delegated to another professional. These findings reveal the pressing need for actions that ensure the ongoing training of pharmacists to enable them to be clinically prepared to deal with patients with mental disorders.

  4. Trauma Collaborative Care Intervention: Effect on Surgeon Confidence in Managing Psychosocial Complications After Orthopaedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Stephen T; Carroll, Eben A; Gary, Joshua L; McKinley, Todd O; OʼToole, Robert V; Sietsema, Debra L; Castillo, Renan C; Frey, Katherine P; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Huang, Yanjie; Collins, Susan C J; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-08-01

    The impact of the Trauma Collaborative Care (TCC) program on surgeon confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae of orthopaedic trauma was evaluated as part of a larger prospective, multisite, cluster clinical trial. We compared confidence and perceived resource availability among surgeons practicing in trauma centers that implemented the TCC program with orthopaedic trauma surgeons in similar trauma centers that did not implement the TCC. Prospective cohort design. Level-I trauma centers. Attending surgeons and fellows (N = 95 Pre and N = 82 Post). Self-report 10-item measure of surgeon confidence in managing psychosocial issues associated with trauma and perceived availability of support resources. Analyses, performed on the entire sample and repeated on the subset of 52 surgeons who responded to the survey at both times points, found surgeons at intervention sites experienced a significantly greater positive improvement (P < 0.05) in their (1) belief that they have strategies to help orthopaedic trauma patients change their psychosocial situation; (2) confidence in making appropriate referrals for orthopaedic trauma patients with psychosocial problems; and (3) belief that they have access to information to guide the management of psychosocial issues related to recovery. Initial data suggest that the establishment of the TCC program can improve surgeons' perceived availability of resources and their confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae after injury. Further studies will be required to determine if this translates into beneficial patient effects. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. CURRICULUM GUIDE, CHILD CARE CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    CALIFORNIA CHILD CARE CENTERS WERE ESTABLISHED IN 1943 TO SUPPLY SERVICES TO CHILDREN OF WORKING MOTHERS. THE CHILD CARE PROGRAM PROVIDES, WITHIN NURSERY AND SCHOOLAGE CENTERS, CARE AND EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION FOR PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE CHILD CENTER PROGRAM IS BASED UPON THE BELIEF THAT EACH CHILD…

  6. Psychosocial Care Needs of Melanoma Survivors: Are They Being Met?

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    Sabine Fischbeck

    Full Text Available Patients who have survived malignant melanoma for more than five years may lack the opportunity to talk about their burden. As a consequence their psychosocial care needs remain undetected and available supportive interventions may not be utilised. Therefore, the psychosocial burden of this patient group needs to be assessed using specific screening instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial burden of long-term melanoma survivors, their psychosocial care needs and the determinants of these needs. We wanted to find out if the use of professional support corresponds to the care needs defined by experts. Using the cancer registry of Rhineland-Palatinate, melanoma patients diagnosed at least 5 years before the survey were contacted by physicians. N = 689 former patients completed the Hornheide Questionnaire (short form HQ-S to identify psychosocial support need (scale cut off ≥ 16 or item-based cut-off score and the potential psychosocial determinants of these needs. Additionally, they were asked about their utilisation of the professional support system. More than one third (36% of them was in need for professional psychosocial support. The highest burden scores concerned worry about tumour progression. Younger age (< 50, higher general fatigue, higher symptom burden, lower general health, negative social interactions and unfulfilled information needs were significant predictors of the need for psychosocial intervention. Related to the percentage of survivors identified as 'in need', the professional support system was underused. Further studies should investigate whether using the HQ-S to routinely identify burdened melanoma patients could lead to better fulfilment of their intervention needs, ultimately enhancing health-related quality of life.

  7. O papel de espelho em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial El papel del espejo en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial The role of the mirror at a Psychosocial Care Center

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    Cristiane Bach Franchini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho pretende refletir sobre o papel de espelho no tratamento oferecido em um centro de atenção psicossocial, o CAPS-T, utilizando-se o referencial psicanalítico com abordagem Winnicottiana. A mãe, que funciona como um espelho, reflete ao bebê, em seu olhar, algo que se refere a ele, e ser visto é uma das bases para o sentimento de existir, de forma que o "si-mesmo" verdadeiro, reconhecido, pode constituir-se. Quando o papel de espelho está ausente, o bebê não vê a si, o que pode levá-lo a uma existência reativa. No CAPS, com uma alta incidência de pacientes psicóticos, torna-se fundamental o oferecimento de uma provisão ambiental adequada, o que inclui o papel de espelho, facilitando o processo de amadurecimento. A equipe deve ser um espelho único e atuar no ambiente social do paciente, possibilitando o surgimento do papel de espelho nas pessoas e a construção de um ambiente mais adequado.Este artículo pretende hacer una reflexión sobre el papel del espejo en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial, Caps - T, utilizando el referencial Psicoanalitico de abordaje Winnicottiano. La madre que funciona como un espejo refleja al bebé con su mirada algo que a él se refiere. Ser visto es una de las bases para el sentimiento de existir, de manera que el verdadero si mismo, reconocido, puede constituirse. Cuando el papel de espejo esta ausente, el bebé no se puede ver a si mismo, lo que puede llevarlo a una existencia reactiva. En el CAPS es fundamental que se le ofrezca una provisión ambiental adecuada, lo que incluye el papel del espejo, facilitando el proceso de maduración. El equipo debe ser un único espejo y actuar en el ambiente social del paciente, propiciando el surgimiento del papel de espejo en las personas y la construcción de un ambiente más adecuado.The role of the mirror in the treatment at a Psychosocial Care Center called CAPS-T, using a Winnicottian psychoanalytical framework is provided. The mother, as a

  8. Physical and psychosocial nursing care for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, M E; Pheifer, W G

    1993-06-01

    As suggested earlier we have chosen in this article to discuss only a small group of key physical and psychosocial concerns and needs associated with HIV and AIDS. These were the issues most frequently discussed by a study group of people living with HIV. We recognize, however, that holistic nursing intervention considers the totality of the individual living with HIV: body, mind, and spirit. It is to that end that the discussed nursing diagnoses and interventions are directed. Ultimately, the successful identification of and intervention in HIV related problems rests in the unique relationship between nurse and patient sharing as collaborators in the healing experience. The body of contemporary nursing and behavioral science research in the area of HIV/AIDS continues to grow. Presently the National Center for Nursing Research is supporting studies focusing on such areas as the use of designated versus general care settings for HIV patient care, quality of nursing care in HIV/AIDS, the effects of nurse-managed home care for AIDS patients, stress and coping in caregivers of AIDS children, the testing of interventions for black women with AIDS, and prevention studies (National Center for Nursing Research, personal communication, 1992). Nevertheless, as the HIV pandemic continues to grow and expand its demographic parameters, more research, particularly with such populations as women and children, is urgently needed. Studies exploring prevention issues and symptom management also are most important. Some suggestions for future study include examination of cultural variables associated with coping with HIV and AIDS; longitudinal research on surviving HIV over time; intervention studies to test specific nursing therapeutics in various settings such as hospital, home, and clinic; and finally, research describing the impact of HIV and AIDS on family functioning and adaptation. It is only through continued study of the impact of HIV, on both the individual living with HIV

  9. Psychosocial staffing at National Comprehensive Cancer Network member institutions: data from leading cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshields, Teresa; Kracen, Amanda; Nanna, Shannon; Kimbro, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is comprised of 25 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers and arguably could thus set the standard for optimal psychosocial staffing for cancer centers; therefore, information was sought from NCCN Member Institutions about their current staffing for psychosocial services. These findings are put into perspective given the limited existing literature and consensus reports. The NCCN Best Practices Committee surveyed member institutions about their staffing for psychosocial services. The survey was administered electronically in the winter of 2012. The survey was completed by 20 cancer centers. Across institutions, case managers and mental health therapists, typically social workers, were utilized most frequently to provide psychosocial services (67% of full-time-equivalents (FTEs)), with other psychosocial professionals also represented but less consistently. Most psychosocial services are institutionally funded (ranging from 64 to 100%), although additional sources of support include fee for service and grant funding. Training of psychosocial providers is unevenly distributed across responding sites, ranging from 92% of institutions having training programs for psychiatrists to 36% having training programs for mental health therapists. There was variability among the institutions in terms of patient volume, psychosocial services provided, and psychosocial staff employed. As accreditation standards are implemented that provide impetus for psychosocial services in oncology, it is hoped that greater clarity will develop concerning staffing for psychosocial services and uptake of these services by patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Interdisciplinary psychosocial care for families with inherited cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleshu, Colleen; Kasparian, Nadine A; Edwards, Katharine S; Yeates, Laura; Semsarian, Christopher; Perez, Marco; Ashley, Euan; Turner, Christian J; Knowles, Joshua W; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Inherited cardiovascular diseases pose unique and complex psychosocial challenges for families, including coming to terms with life-long cardiac disease, risk of sudden death, grief related to the sudden death of a loved one, activity restrictions, and inheritance risk to other family members. Psychosocial factors impact not only mental health but also physical health and cooperation with clinical recommendations. We describe an interdisciplinary approach to the care of families with inherited cardiovascular disease, in which psychological care provided by specialized cardiac genetic counselors, nurses, and psychologists is embedded within the cardiovascular care team. We report illustrative cases and the supporting literature to demonstrate common scenarios, as well as practical guidance for clinicians working in the inherited cardiovascular disease setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care

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    Dulon Madeleine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. Methods The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain. Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database. Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p Results In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC, 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH, 164 in other professions (e.g. administration. Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195 and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168, the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity. A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of

  12. Parceria entre CAPS e PSF: o desafio da construção de um novo saber Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction

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    Patrícia Santos de Souza Delfini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo tem como objetivo relatar uma experiência de parceria entre um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial e três equipes do Programa Saúde da Família na região central de São Paulo. Conceitos teóricos de território, sujeito, subjetividade/coletivo, acolhimento, vínculo e co-responsabilização, além dos pressupostos da reforma psiquiátrica e sanitária, embasam e norteiam o trabalho. A parceria visa à promoção de cuidados em saúde mental a partir de ações articuladas com diferentes serviços. Assim, tanto as equipes de Saúde da Família como a equipe de saúde mental são responsáveis pelas demandas de um território. As estratégias utilizadas são reuniões de equipe, nas quais há capacitação, discussão de casos, acolhimento e elaboração de projetos terapêuticos, e visitas domiciliares conjuntas. Ao longo do trabalho, algumas dificuldades foram encontradas: grande demanda por serviços de saúde e falta de diretrizes institucionais para a efetivação da parceria. Em relação às pessoas atendidas, o olhar voltado à família e ao contexto social aponta resultados positivos em relação aqueles cujo olhar é voltado somente à doença. O trabalho conjunto enriquece ainda mais a prática e possibilita uma rede maior de cuidados no território. É necessário, portanto, criar novas propostas e iniciativas inovadoras.The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The

  13. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nübling, Matthias; Vomstein, Martin; Schmidt, Sascha G; Gregersen, Sabine; Dulon, Madeleine; Nienhaus, Albert

    2010-07-21

    Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain.Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database).Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity.A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of negative evaluation of psychosocial factors concerning demands was related to the amount of working hours per week and the number of on-call duties. Compared to employees in general hospital care and the COPSOQ overall mean value across all professions, geriatric care employees and especially home care workers evaluate their psychosocial working situation more positive for most aspects. However, this seems partly due to the very high proportion of part-time workers. Critical results for the two study groups are the relatively

  14. [Nursing care in ambulatory surgery at a teaching hospital: patients, procedures and biological and psychosocial needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tatiane Vegette; Araújo, Izilda Esmênia Muglia; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both genders; average age was 51 years and socioeconomic levels were poor. The most common surgical and anesthetic procedures were ophthalmologic procedures and use of local anesthesia with or without sedation. The biological needs were: altered arterial pressure, electrocardiographic alterations, use of medication, allergy to medication, prolonged fasting, nausea, vomiting and pain. The psychosocial needs were: worry, fear, anxiety, discomfort caused by waiting for the realization of procedures and doubts or lack of information concerning perioperative care.

  15. (Insatisfação com o trabalho em saúde mental: um estudo em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (Dissatisfaction with mental healthcare work: a study in Psychosocial Care Centers

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    José Maria Ximenes Guimarães

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo tem por objetivo analisar a satisfação de trabalhadores de saúde mental que atuam em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (Caps. A pesquisa é de natureza qualitativa. O instrumento de coleta de dados foi a entrevista semiestruturada, aplicada a 19 trabalhadores de três Caps em Fortaleza (Ceará. O tratamento do material empírico baseou-se na análise de conteúdo com ênfase em eixos temáticos. Os resultados revelaram os determinantes de (insatisfação presentes no cotidiano desses trabalhadores. As relações estabelecidas com os usuários foram referidas como principal causa de satisfação, enquanto as condições de trabalho e o salário se constituem nos principais motivos de insatisfação. Além desses aspectos, emergiram consequências da (insatisfação no trabalho no campo particular, social e organizacional da vida dos trabalhadores dos Caps, particularmente na saúde física e mental. Por fim, apontam para a urgência de implementação de estratégias, por parte da administração pública, que visem à desprecarização do trabalho em saúde e, mais particularmente, em saúde mental, tendo em vista a redução dos danos eventualmente causados pelo trabalho.The scope of this article is to analyze satisfaction in the workplace of mental healthcare professionals who serve in Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps. The research is of a qualitative nature and the data-collecting medium was semistructured interviews with 19 workers of three Caps in Fortaleza, in the Northern Brazilian State of Ceará. The treatment of the empirical material was based upon the analysis of content with an emphasis on the thematic bias. The results revealed the determinants of (dissatisfaction present in the daily routine of these workers. The relationships established with the users were singled out as the main source of satisfaction, whereas the work and wage conditions were the main motives for dissatisfaction. In addition to these

  16. Child Care Center Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-12

    shall include a screening test for tuberculosis, a VDRL and any other tests deemed necessary by appropriate A medical authorities. (2) Staff shall be...approval to care for children the provider shall have a physical examination including a screening test for tuberculosis, a * VDRL and other tests

  17. Psychosocial issues in palliative care: A review of five cases

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    Tonia C Onyeka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is not just vital in controlling symptoms of the patient′s disease condition, but also aims to extend the patient′s life, giving it a better quality. However, several times in the course of management, the psychosocial impact of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and other life-limiting disease conditions may not be noticed and dealt with during the admission period, thereby giving rise to a more complex situation than the disease condition itself. This article aims to review some psychosocial issues and measures that can be taken to address them. It highlights the various roles and the importance of the clinician, nurse, social worker, and other members of the multidisciplinary team in tackling these issues and will help healthcare professionals in this field achieve better practice in the future.

  18. [Psychosocial factors influencing the perinatal health care satisfaction of parturients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, L; Kodysová, E

    2011-06-01

    To give an overview of the main psychosocial factors influencing the perinatal health care satisfaction of parturients and present recommendations for good practice. Original study. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, Charles University, Prague. Qualitative methodology--content analysis of 189 childbirth narratives written by parturients and demi-structured interviews with 44 parturients. Seven dimensions of perinatal health care satisfaction of parturients were identified: 1. staff attitude and behavior; 2. staff communication; 3. parturient's participation in decision-making; 4. support of early mother-baby contact; 5. breastfeeding support; 6. mother-baby friendliness of maternity unit operation rules; 7. clarity of maternity unit operation rules. The most important dimensions include empathy and psychological support, respect for privacy and feelings of shame, relational symmetry/asymmetry and quality of provided information. Psychosocial aspects are a decisive criterion of perinatal health care satisfaction of parturients. Psychological competences of health care providers and staff make an inseparable part of their competence, with communication skills development and prevention and therapy of the burn-out syndrome deserving special attention.

  19. COORDINATION OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE NETWORK FOR MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS

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    Karoline Andrade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate the coordination of the psychosocial care network (RAPS for mental health crisis care, in its workers’ view. It is a descriptive exploratory study with qualitative approach. The study was carried out from 62 portfolios made by the students of the Mental Health Crisis and Urgency Course, who answered the reflective question: "Considering your workplace as a point of RAPS / RUE, describe, reflect and write a text with the synthesis regarding the articulation with the other network points in the reality of your municipality". The data were analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis method suggested by Bardin, which comprises three phases: Pre - analysis, Material Exploration and Treatment of the Information, inference and interpretation. As a result, three thematic categories were identified: Referral, the traditional way of referring to specialized care, which is associated to a more fragmented care process; Matrix support, the current proposal of collaborative care, a joint strategy that contributes to the complex care demanded by mental health services users; and new strategies for network care, exemplified by meetings or sessions that discuss new ways to enable the network care.

  20. The perception of midwives regarding psychosocial risk assessment during antenatal care

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    Johanna M. Mathibe-Neke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physiological and psychological changes caused by pregnancy may increase a woman’s vulnerability to depression, which may in turn have adverse effects on both maternal and foetal wellbeing. Inadequate psychosocial risk assessment of women by midwives may lead to lack of psychosocial support during pregnancy and childbirth. Pregnant women who lack psychosocial support may experience stress, anxiety and depression that could possibly affect foetal wellbeing. Objective:The objective of this study was toexplore and describe the perception of psychosocial risk assessment and psychosocial care by midwives providing antenatal care to pregnant women. Method: An interpretive and descriptive qualitative approach was adopted. Three focus group interviews were conducted with midwives working in three Maternal Obstetric Units in Gauteng Province, using a semi-structured interview guide. The constant comparison data analysis approach was used. Results:Findings revealed that midwives are aware of and have encountered a high prevalence of psychosocial problems in pregnant women. Furthermore, they acknowledged the importance of psychosocial care for pregnant women although they stated that they were not equipped adequately to offer psychosocial assessment and psychosocial care. Conclusion:The findings provided a basis for incorporation of psychosocial care into routine antenatal care.

  1. Interdisciplinarity in work process at a Psychosocial Attention Center - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the work process of mental health professionals from a Psychosocial Attention Center (CAPS, from the knowledge and the practices applied in the production of care and its interface with user’s demands and the service offering. Methods: A case study with qualitative approach. Twenty-eight subjects joined in and were divided into three groups: I (eleven mental health workers, II (eleven users e III (six family members. The semistructured interview was used besides systematic observation, in the search for data about the work process of the professionals of the Psychosocial Attention Center, the relationship between team and user, offering and demand, access, technologies of care, knowledge and practices and interdisciplinarity. The investigation was based upon critical content analysis and was oriented by the flowchart analyzer. Results: The service organization and its work process are directed to the immediate supply of the population’s demands, which depicts a care based on prescriptive practices. Thus, the flow of assistance and the service offering complement each other in the need of a procedure and in its exhaustive offering by the service, dissolving interdisciplinary conductions of intervention shared with the user. Conclusion: Mental health care is still surrounded by biomedical hegemony centered in procedures directed to pharmacological prescription. Despite this reality, the work centered on the user and the utilization of soft technologies – communication, link, welcoming – begin to take part of the daily CAPS service offering, although it is only present in specific activities of certain procedures.

  2. Official conceptualizations of person-centered care: which person counts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that a "psycho-social" person-centered care approach, involving the delivery of a compassionate, respectful model of care, leads to a high quality of life, particularly for older people living in residential care. This has prompted policy-makers to endorse this approach. Yet, some commentators have argued that the model of person-centered care in official government policies equates to a "consumer-based" rather than a psycho-social approach, as it focuses solely on offering service-users more choice and on promoting independence. However, as such arguments are made in the absence of any empirical analysis, it is unclear both whether such a distinction exists in practice, and, if so, how this alternative model developed. This study explores the development of minimum standards for residential care settings for older people in Ireland in order to address this gap in our understanding of person-centered care. Findings confirm that a consumer-driven model of person-centered care underpins the Irish Standards; residential care is portrayed as a hotel-like service and residents as discerning consumers, which may be unsuitable for older people in residential care with limited capacity to make key choices. Analysis indicates that this model can be seen both as an extension of consumer-driven policies endorsed by many neo-liberal governments, and also of policy-makers' fears of losing their autonomy when they reach the "Fourth Age". This study is particularly illuminating, given the similarities between the Irish care system with England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Australia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Os trabalhadores de enfermagem como acompanhantes terapêuticos de um centro de atenção psicossocial Los trabajadores de enfermería como acompañantes terapéuticos en un centro de atención psicosocial Therapeutic care by the nursing staff at a psychosocial care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Isane Ratner Kirschbaum

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar a atuação de auxiliares de enfermagem como acompanhantes terapêuticos do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial do município de Campinas-SP. Empregou-se a pesquisa documental, a observação participante e entrevistas semi-estruturadas gravadas como metodologia de pesquisa. Verificou-se que a atuação desses profissionais não se encontrava orientada pelo referencial teórico psicanalítico e que os mesmos utilizavam-se predominantemente de estratégias subjetivas para manejar as situações que emergiam durante as atividades de acompanhamento terapêutico.El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la actuación de los auxiliares de enfermería como acompañantes terapéuticos del Centro de Atención Psicosocial del Municipio de Campinas, SP. La metodologia de pesquisa utilizada incluyó la investigación documental, la observación participante, y la grabación de entrevistas semielaboradas. Se verificó que la actuación de esos profesionales no está orientada por la teoria psicoanalítica o hace referencia a la misma, y que dichos profesionales utilizan, predominantemente, estrategias subjetivas para lidiar con las situaciones surgidas durante las actividades de acompañamiento terapéutico.The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of nurses in relation to the therapeutic accompaniment provided at a Psychosocial Care Center in the Municipality of Campinas, SP. The methodology consisted of documental research and recorded semi structured interviews. It was verified that the nurses' performance was not based on any psychoanalytical theory and that they often used subjective strategies to handle situations that arose during therapeutic activities.

  4. Physicians' Psychosocial Work Conditions and Quality of Care: A Literature Review

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    Peter Angerer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physician jobs are associated with adverse psychosocial work conditions. We summarize research on the relationship of physicians' psychosocial work conditions and quality of care. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO. All studies were classified into three categories of care quality outcomes: Associations between physicians' psychosocial work conditions and (1 the physician-patient-relationship, or (2 the care process and outcomes, or (3 medical errors were examined. Results: 12 publications met the inclusion criteria. Most studies relied on observational cross-sectional and controlled intervention designs. All studies provide at least partial support for physicians’ psychosocial work conditions being related to quality of care. Conclusions: This review found preliminary evidence that detrimental physicians’ psychosocial work conditions adversely influence patient care quality. Future research needs to apply strong designs to disentangle the indirect and direct effects of adverse psychosocial work conditions on physicians as well as on quality of care.Keywords: psychosocial work conditions, physicians, quality of care, physician-patient-relationship, hospital, errors, review, work stress, clinicians

  5. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, J.; Dückers, M.; Brake, H. te; Kleber, R.; Dorgendijk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  6. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, M.; Te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  7. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care : Views of parents and adolescents in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers

  8. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care : Views of parents and adolescents in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2016-01-01

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers r

  9. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, M.; Te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  10. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, J.; Dückers, M.; Brake, H. te; Kleber, R.; Dorgendijk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  11. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care : Views of parents and adolescents in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2016-01-01

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers r

  12. Disparate patterns of prenatal care utilization stratified by medical and psychosocial risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Elizabeth E; Davis, Matthew M; Palladino, Christie L

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate patterns of prenatal care utilization stratified by medical and psychosocial risk. A retrospective cohort of 786 pregnant women who subsequently delivered live births from 1999 to 2003 at the University of Michigan were classified into high medical, high psychosocial, high medical and high psychosocial (dual high risk) and low-risk pregnancies. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses assessed the association between risk and prenatal care utilization using the Kotelchuck Index. Of 786 pregnancies, 202 (25.7%) were high medical risk, 178 (22.7%) were high psychosocial risk, 227 (28.9%) were dual high risk and 179 (22.8%) were low-risk. Over 31% of dual high risk and 25% of high medical risk pregnancies received "adequate plus" prenatal care versus 10% of high psychosocial risk pregnancies. In multivariate analyses, adjusted for risk, race and insurance, high psychosocial risk pregnancies (OR = 1.69; 95% CI 1.06-2.72) were significantly more likely to receive inadequate prenatal care than care of greater intensity. Many high psychosocial risk pregnancies do not receive adequate prenatal care.

  13. Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care: views of parents and adolescents in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Knorth, Erik J; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2016-01-01

    Parents with a child suffering from psychosocial problems frequently experience barriers to psychosocial care, which may hinder access. Expectations of barriers may have the same effect, but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine parents' and adolescents' expectations of barriers regarding psychosocial care for the child, along with associated child and family characteristics. We obtained data on an age-stratified random sample of school children/pupils aged 4-18 via questionnaires (N = 666; response rate 70.3 %). Expectations of barriers to psychosocial care were measured with the "Barriers to Treatment Participation Scale-Expectancies" questionnaire (BTPS-exp). Results showed that 64 % of the parents of children below age 12, 59 % of the parents of adolescents (age 12-18), and 84 % of the adolescents expected one or more barriers. Parents and adolescents expected barriers most frequently with respect to irrelevance of treatment. Mainly parents with low educational level and their adolescents expected barriers regarding treatment, and quite a few characteristics of parents of adolescents were associated with expecting multiple barriers regarding treatment demands and issues, for example, single parents, parents of lower educational level and of adolescent boys, and parents of adolescents with psychosocial problems. We conclude that adolescents especially, but also their parents and parents of younger children, expect major barriers to psychosocial care, which may greatly hinder appropriate care seeking. This evidence may support professionals and policymakers in their attempts to improve access to psychosocial care.

  14. O tipo vivido de familiares de usuários de um centro de atenção psicossocial infantil El tipo vivido de familiares de usuarios de un centro de atención psicosocial infantil The experience lived by clients' family members of a child psychosocial care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gicelle Galvan Machineski

    2013-03-01

    enfermería en Salud Mental a usuarios y familiares.The objective of this study was to understand the lived experiences of family members of children attending a Child Psychosocial Care Center. This study is a qualitative research with a phenomenological approach, developed at a Child Psychosocial Care Center (CAPSi as per its acronym in Portuguese located in the municipality of Cascavel, State of Paraná. Participants were eleven family members of clients attending the above mentioned service and who, more actively, took part in the clients' care. Semi-structured interviews were performed and the gathered data were then analyzed by means of social phenomenology methodology. The experience lived by the family members of children attending the Child Psychosocial Care Center included experiences in dealing with clients' behavior; seeking referrals to other services; waiting for treatment; hoping to see an improvement in the clinical profile of the patient and experiencing the service support provided to the family. Thus, this present study may contribute to a reflection on mental health nursing practice in caring for clients and their families.

  15. Counseling Services in Adult Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Gamal; Zaki, Sylvia

    Federal support for adult day care centers began in the United States approximately 10 years ago. To examine the counseling practices in the adult day care centers across the country and to explore how the services are affected by the staffing patterns at these centers, 135 centers completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed…

  16. Basic nursing care: retrospective evaluation of communication and psychosocial interventions documented by nurses in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvé-Udina, Maria-Eulàlia; Pérez, Esperanza Zuriguel; Padrés, Núria Fabrellas; Samartino, Maribel Gonzalez; García, Marta Romero; Creus, Mònica Castellà; Batllori, Núria Vila; Calvo, Cristina Matud

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of psychosocial aspects of basic nursing care, as e-charted by nurses, when using an interface terminology. An observational, multicentre study was conducted in acute wards. The main outcome measure was the frequency of use of the psychosocial interventions in the electronic nursing care plans, analysed over a 12 month retrospective review. Overall, 150,494 electronic care plans were studied. Most of the intervention concepts from the interface terminology were used by registered nurses to illustrate the psychosocial aspects of fundamentals of care in the electronic care plans. The results presented help to demonstrate that the interventions of this interface terminology may be useful to inform psychosocial aspects of basic and advanced nursing care. The identification of psychosocial elements of basic nursing care in the nursing documentation may lead to obtain a deeper understanding of those caring interventions nurses consider essential to represent nurse-patient interactions. The frequency of psychosocial interventions may contribute to delineate basic and advanced nursing care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  18. Continuing Psychosocial Care Needs in Children with New-Onset Epilepsy and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Cheryl P.; Buelow, Janice M.; Austin, Joan K.; Johnson, Cynthia S.

    2010-01-01

    Problem Children with new-onset epilepsy and their parents have many psychosocial care needs, including concerns and fears and needs for information and support. No prospective studies address psychosocial care needs at 12 and 24 months after seizure onset. It is unknown if psychosocial care needs are associated with children’s attitudes toward having epilepsy or with parental responses to their child’s epilepsy. Our study addresses this knowledge gap. Method Members of 143 families took part. Children were 8 to 14 years of age and had at least two seizures. Parents and children completed Psychosocial Care Need Scales at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after the first seizure. Children also completed the Child Attitude Toward Illness Scale, and parents completed the Parent Response to Child Illness scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlations. Results Although psychosocial care needs were highest at the 3-month data collection for both parents and children, some worries and concerns and needs for information and support persisted for 24 months. In children more psychosocial care needs were associated with more negative attitudes toward having epilepsy. In parents, high psychosocial care needs were associated with a more negative impact on family life. Implications A substantial number of parents and children have unmet psychosocial care needs that are associated with more negative child attitudes and a negative impact on family life, even 24 months after the onset of seizures. Nurses should assess both children and parents for these needs at every encounter with the health care system in order to address their needs. PMID:19835237

  19. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, Michel; te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, Annelieke

    2014-11-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in various recommendations and general guidelines. However, as CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) events form a distinctive theme in emergency planning and disaster preparedness, it is important to systematically explore their implications for psychosocial care. The aim of this study is to answer two questions: 1). To what extent does psychosocial care in the case of CBRN events differ from other types of events? 2). How strong is the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial care interventions in the context of a CBRN event? A systematic literature review was conducted. Searches were performed in Medline, PsychINFO, Embase and PILOTS. Studies since January 2000 were included and evaluated by independent reviewers. The 39 included studies contain recommendations, primarily based on unsystematic literature reviews, qualitative research and expert opinions. Recommendations address: 1) public risk- and crisis communication, 2) training, education and exercise of responders, 3) support, and 4) psychosocial counselling and care to citizens and responders. Although none of the studies meet the design criteria for effectiveness research, a substantial amount of consensus exists on aspects relevant to CBRN related psychosocial care. Recommendations are similar or complementary to general post-disaster psychosocial care guidelines. Notable differences are the emphasis on risk communication and specific preparation needs. Relevant recurring topics are uncertainty about contamination and health effects, how people will overwhelm health care systems, and the possibility that professionals are less likely to respond. However, the lack of evidence on

  20. Nursing Staffs' Views on Physical and Psychosocial Care Provision in Slovenian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjanić, Ana; Elo, Satu; Micetić-Turk, Dusanka; Isola, Arja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychological care needs of elderly residents, their views on the relative importance of these needs and their perceived ability to meet them. The literature reveals that the quality of elder care in nursing homes should comprise both physical and psychosocial care. Despite this, the nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychosocial care provision have not often been researched. As a method cross-sectional research design was used, with structured questionnaires and unstructured interviews. Our sample consisted of members of the nursing staff from four nursing homes in Slovenia (survey: N = 148; interview: N = 16). The resulting data was processed by means of statistical analysis and conventional content analysis. The nursing staff reported more knowledge of, skills with and willingness to meet residents'physical needs than psychosocial needs. On the other hand, communication, conversation, self-care and a home-like environment were considered by nursing staff as marking quality elder care. Consequently, nursing home administrators should try to strengthen psychosocial care provision to improve the residents' quality of life. Conversation, as the most often recognised aspect of psychosocial care, should be promoted, since improvements in this area would not be costly, and each nursing staff member may decide individually how best to include more conversation in the daily routines of elder care provision.

  1. Childhood cancer in the cinema: how the celluloid mirror reflects psychosocial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavisic, Jovana; Chilton, Julie; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa L; Martin, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the childhood cancer experience in commercially produced, readily available films that include a character with childhood cancer, with a particular focus on psychosocial care. We reviewed 29 films, using quantitative and qualitative content analysis, to identify the medical and psychosocial characteristics of the cinematic childhood cancer experience. We rated psychosocial support on a 5-point scale (0 to 4) based on the availability and efficacy of support characters in the categories of nonprofessional internal (eg, parent), nonprofessional external (eg, friend), professional medical (eg, oncologist), and professional psychosocial (eg, social worker) supports. Film depicts an unrealistic, bleak picture of childhood cancer, with a 66% mortality rate among the 35 characters evaluated. Psychosocial supports portrayed in film are generally limited to resources already available to families before the cancer diagnosis: mean ratings across films were 2.4 for both nonprofessional, 1.6 for professional medical, and 0.3 for professional psychosocial supports (Kruskal-Wallis χ3=43.1051, P<0.0001). Seven main themes emerged: disruption, social impact, psychological impact, physical toll, struggle/war/fight, coping, and barren landscape. Film generally depicts images of an isolated family courageously battling cancer alone with limited support from a treatment team solely dedicated to medical care. Commercially available films minimize the importance of the psychosocial dimension of care, which can perpetuate stigma around psychosocial needs and interventions. These films can be used to encourage discussion about how to optimize psychosocial care in pediatric oncology so that such care is not abandoned in actual practice as it is, for entertainment purposes, on the screen.

  2. Psychosocial rehabilitation in a chronic care hospital in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    psychosocial interventions for persons disabled by mental health ... Medicine, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, .... Of the participants 69 (60.5%) were women and 42 (36.8%).

  3. Experiências com a gestão autônoma da medicação: narrativa de usuários de saúde mental no encontro dos grupos focais em centros de atenção psicossocial Experiments with autonomous management of medication: narrative of mental health users in focus group meeting in psychosocial care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetiva-se analisar as experiências vivenciadas pelos usuários do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial no desenvolvimento do grupo para Gestão Autônoma da Medicação (GAM. Opta-se pela pesquisa qualitativa, dentro de uma perspectiva crítica que protagoniza a vivência dos participantes do grupo operativo GAM. Realizado nos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS Geral e Álcool e outras Drogas (AD do município de Maracanaú-CE. Os participantes foram 13 usuários de CAPS Geral e Ad do referido município. Técnica de coleta das narrativas foi constituída por três grupos narrativos e a análise pautada na hermenêutica. Segundo as narrativas desvelaram, em todo o processo de discussão sobre a medicação, fica evidente a importância da escuta e do acompanhamento individual. A abordagem singular dos usuários possibilitou melhoria significativa no estado de saúde mental e na compreensão do adoecimento. Assim, é possível ressignificar a utilização precípua do medicamento e interagir com inovações terapêuticas mais voltadas para hábitos de vida saudável.The study aimed to analyze the feelings experienced by users of the Center for Psychosocial Care in developing the group for Autonomous Management of Medication (AMM. It uses qualitative research within a critical perspective that carries the experience of participating in the operative AMM group. It was conducted at the General Center for Psychosocial Care (CAPS and Alcohol and other Drugs (AD in the city of Maracanau, state of Ceara, Brazil. The participants were 13 users of General and Ad CAPS of that city. The technique of narratives' collection consisted of three groups based in the narrative analysis and hermeneutics. According to the narratives, throughout the discussion process on the medication, it is evident the importance of listening and coaching. The unique approach of users allowed significant improvement in health status and understanding of mental illness. Thus, it

  4. Presenting prevalence and management of psychosocial problems in primary care in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannieuwenborg, Lena; Buntinx, Frank; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial problems are widespread but reliable data about management are sparse. An overall view is missing and there is a need for a wider framework to include the data available in health care and welfare practice, databases and research output. The question under scope is: how are psychosocial problems presented and handled in primary care in Flanders? A mixed method was used. Using a 'fishbone diagram' (1) we obtained a basic structure to visualize the main (problem) areas and challenges. A literature study (2) and semi-structured interviews with health care and welfare professionals in primary care (3) were performed. Finally, two interdisciplinary focus groups were organized (4). In Flanders, there is no tradition of multidisciplinary psychosocial research in primary care causing a lack of integrated data. Data only exist within disciplines without transdisciplinarity. The data are difficult to interpret due to different labeling and registration processes between disciplines and settings. However, we can find some general trends: assistance to patients with psychosocial problems is based on what can be offered, rather than on patient needs; drug treatment remains popular; referral of patients within primary care or to secondary care does not seem to be obvious. Among all disciplines, there is a great need for more collaboration and considerable advantages are to be expected from the growing emergence of multidisciplinary practices; multiculturalism appears to take an increasingly important place within primary care in Flanders and has implications for the care offered; and treatment effectiveness in psychosocial problems seems to be more related to the person of the caregiver than to a specific discipline, theory or type of treatment. Based on our results, we strongly advise stimulation and organization of integrated (multidisciplinary) research regarding psychosocial problems in primary care and a more consistent registration by the agencies in primary

  5. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngutu M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariah Ngutu, Isaac K Nyamongo Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (IAGAS, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. Keywords: qualitative, illness trajectories, women, cervical cancer

  6. Clinical perspective: Linking psychosocial care to the disease continuum in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabora, James; Buzaglo, Joanne; Kennedy, Vicki; Richards, Tiffany; Schapmire, Tara; Zebrack, Brad; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-08-01

    A model of psychosocial care specific for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers has not yet been proposed. We sought to develop a model of care that considers the specific profile of this disease. The authors, representing a multidisciplinary care team, met in December of 2012 to identify a model of psychosocial care for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers. This model was determined by consensus during the meeting and via total agreement following the meeting. The meeting was sponsored by Onyx Pharmaceuticals. The need for targeted psychosocial care for the multiple myeloma patient and caregiver throughout the disease process is essential to ensure quality of life and optimal treatment outcomes. We propose herein the first known model of care for the treatment of multiple myeloma that engages both the patient and their caregivers. Innovative partnerships between psychosocial providers and other entities such as pharmaceutical companies can maximize resources for comprehensive program development. This manuscript proposes a model of care that promotes active engagement in therapies for multiple myeloma while engaging the individual patient and their family caregivers. This treatment approach must be evidence based in terms of distress screening tools, comprehensive psychosocial assessments, and, most importantly, in the interventions and measurements of response that clinicians apply to this population.

  7. Biomedical and psychosocial factors influencing transtibial prosthesis fit: a Delphi survey among health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Erwin C; Schrier, Ernst; Geertzen, Jan H; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to reach consensus among professionals caring for prosthesis users, on definitions of biomedical and psychosocial factors, to assess their influence on fit of transtibial prosthesis and to identify new factors. A three-round, internet-based, Delphi survey was conducted among experts recruited via the Dutch National Amputee and Prosthesis Work Group. The main outcome measure was consensus among care professionals on statements concerning new and presented biomechanical and psychosocial factors that influence transtibial prosthesis fit. Fifty-four experts participated in the survey, and consensus was reached on 67% (46/69) of all statements. Consensus on statements relevant for good prosthesis fit was reached in most of the statements concerning psychosocial factors and on statements concerning the biomedical factors "prosthesis support and suspension". Least consensus was reached on statements concerning the biomedical factor "skin problems and pain in the residual limb". Biomedical and psychosocial factors influence transtibial prosthesis fit. Consensus was reached among care professionals in a majority of the presented statements concerning these factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Prosthesis fit and comfort is suboptimal in many prosthesis users. Both biomedical and psychosocial factors influence fit. Biomedical and psychosocial factors should be checked during transtibial prosthesis prescription to achieve and maintain an optimal fit. Consensus on many factors influencing prosthesis fit is achieved among care professionals. Consensus was largest regarding prosthesis support and suspension and least regarding skin problems and pain in the residual limb. This consensus contributes to systematic assessment of prosthesis fit.

  8. Quality Aspects of Swedish Family Day Care and Center Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerus, Kerstin

    This paper presents data concerning the use and costs of center and family day care programs in Sweden. The typical center provides full-time care and has 4 sections, each with 2 preschool teachers, 1 attendant, and up to 20 children. In the family day care system, municipalities employ caregivers and parents pay the municipality. This paper…

  9. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, H.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the re

  10. Práticas intersetoriais que favorecem a integralidade do cuidado nos centros de atenção psicossociais Prácticas intersectorial que promueven integridad de precaución de los centros de atención psicosocial Intersectoral practices that promote an integral care in Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Braga de Azevedo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se descrever duas experiências de inclusão no trabalho desenvolvida pelos usuários e profissionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial de Campina Grande, Paraíba. Pesquisa descritiva-interpretativa realizada com 19 profissionais. A experiência aqui descrita foi relatada por um profissional. O material empírico foi coletado em junho e julho de 2010. A análise fundamentou-se na análise de conteúdo, tendo possibilitado a construção da categoria: a arte como modo de inclusão no trabalho. Constata-se que o curso de pintura em tela e o projeto cultural itinerante favoreceram a inclusão dos usuários no mercado de trabalho, a melhoria da autoestima, a inserção social, interação com outros serviços e usuários, tendo promovido a intersetorialidade e a integralidade do cuidado.Nuestro objetivo es describir dos experiencias de inclusión en el trabajo desarrollado por los usuarios y los proveedores de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial de Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brasil. Descriptivo-interpretativo y cualitativo, con 19 profesionales. Esta experiencia fue reportado por un profesional. El material empírico fue colectado en junio y julio de 2010. El análisis se basó en el análisis de contenido, y ha permitido la construcción de la categoría: el arte para su inclusión en el lugar de trabajo. Tomamos nota de que el curso de pintura sobre tela y proyecto cultural itinerante, a favor de la inclusión de usuarios en el mercado laboral, la mejora de la autoestima, la integración social, la interacción con otros servicios y usuarios, intersectorial y la atención integral.This research aimed to describe two experiences of inclusion in the work developed by users and providers of a Psychosocial Care Center of the city of Campina Grande, state of Paraíba, Brazil. This was a descriptive, interpretative and qualitative research, with 19 professionals. The experiment described here was reported by a professional. The empirical

  11. Familiares de portadores de transtorno mental: vivenciando o cuidado em um centro de atenção psicossocial Familiares de portadores de trastorno mental: experimentando el cuidado en un centro de atención psicosocial Relatives of patients with mental disorders: experiencing care at a psychosocial care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Moreno

    2009-09-01

    medida que este debe estimular formas de inserción en la comunidad y de ampliación de los derechos de ciudadanía de los usuarios.This study aimed at learning how relatives of patients with mental disorders have experienced dealing with a mental health care service. The exploratory and descriptive method was used with a qualitative approach. Data collection was performed using semi-structured interviews. Subjects were six family members who had been living for over three years with the process of having a mentally ill relative. Data analysis allowed us to infer that relatives who closely follow the patient had to deal with the knowledge acquired from their day-to-day experience and were subject to rejection by other family and community members. As regards the psychosocial care center, the relatives felt welcomed in their complaints, receiving a unique treatment; however, they did not know the mechanisms for social participation, which points to a deficiency in the service as it should stimulate forms of insertion into the community and the strengthening of the patients' rights as citizens.

  12. Avaliação da atenção prestada aos familiares em um centro de atenção psicossocial Evaluación de la atención prestada a los familiares en un centro de atención psicosocial Evaluation of family care delivered at a psychosocial care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Custódio Duarte

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou avaliar qualitativamente a atenção oferecida aos familiares por um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS do tipo I, situado na Região Sul do Brasil. O Círculo Hermenêutico Dialético foi utilizado como técnica de coleta de dados, método preconizado pela Avaliação de Quarta Geração proposta por Guba e Lincoln. Temas como acolhimento, reuniões de familiares, visitas domiciliares e associação dos familiares surgiram nas entrevistas com os familiares do CAPS. Entrevistas e observações foram as técnicas utilizadas para a coleta de dados. A forma como vem sendo consolidada a atenção às famílias nos serviços representa um desafio para os profissionais de saúde, por implicar reestruturação na formação destes e um processo de reflexão de todos os atores sociais envolvidos neste processo de mudançaEste estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar cualitativamente la atención ofrecida a las familias para un tipo de Centro de Atención Psicosocial del tipo I, situada en el la Region Sur de Brasil. El círculo hermenéutico dialéctico se utilizó como técnica de recolección de datos, un método recomendado por la cuarta generación de evaluación propuesto por Guba y Lincoln. Temas tales como la recepción, reuniones familiares, visitas a domicilio y la participación de la familia surgieron en las entrevistas con los familiares de estos servicios de salud. Las entrevistas y observaciones fueron las técnicas utilizadas para recoger datos. El camino se ha consolidado a la atención de las familias en los servicios representa un reto para los profesionales de la salud, ya que implica la reestructuración y la formación de una reflexión de todos los actores involucrados en este proceso de cambioThis study aimed to evaluate qualitatively the care offered to families for a Center of Psychosocial Atention of type I, located in Southern Region of Brazil. The Dialectical hermeneutic circle was used as a technique of

  13. Center to Advance Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catalogue Membership Brochure Join CAPC Central Registry National Palliative Care Registry™ Enter your data to improve performance, prove ... Members Only) Identifying the Right Patients for Specialty Palliative Care Webinar Amy Kelley, MD and Arta Bakshandeh, DO, ...

  14. Avaliação de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial: a realidade em Foz do Iguaçu Evaluación de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial Evaluation of a Psychosocial Care Center in Foz do Iguaçú, Brazil: la realidad en Foz del Iguaçu, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Olschowsky

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um recorte da pesquisa Avaliação dos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial da Região Sul do Brasil. Temos o objetivo de avaliar a ambiência enquanto espaço de conforto e subjetividade em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial II (CAPS. Pesquisa qualitativa, tipo estudo de caso, que utilizou a Avaliação de Quarta Geração. Os instrumentos de coleta de dados foram: entrevistas com dez profissionais da equipe, 11 usuários e 11 familiares e 297 horas de observação de campo. A porta fechada e a equipe reduzida foram problematizadas, ocasionando repercussões no processo de trabalho do serviço. Esses nós críticos interferem diretamente na ambiência e consistem em tensão e antagonismo às proposições de um serviço como CAPS. Identificamos que as questões apresentadas são temas que demonstram o compromisso com um ambiente saudável, que considera o conforto e a subjetividade no trabalho do CAPS.Se trata de una parte de la investigación Evaluación de los Centros de Atención Psicosocial de la Región Sul del Brasil. Tenemos el objetivo de evaluar el ambiente en cuanto espacio de confort y subjetividad en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial II. Investigación cualitativa, tipo estudio de caso, que utilizó la Evaluación de Cuarta Generación. Los instrumentos de recolección de datos fueron: entrevistas con diez profesionales del equipo, 11 usuarios y 11 familiares y 297 horas de observación de campo. A puerta cerrada y con equipo reducido fueron problematizadas, ocasionando repercusiones en el proceso de trabajo del servicio. Estos nudos críticos interfieren directamente en el ambiente y consisten en tensión y antagonismo a las proposiciones de un servicio como el CAPS. Identificamos que las cuestiones presentadas son temas que demuestran el compromiso con un ambiente saludable, que considera el confort y la subjetividad en el trabajo del CAPS.This is an excerpt of the study An evaluation of the Psychosocial Care Centers in

  15. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  16. The Role of the Psychosocial Dimension in the Improvement of Quality of Care: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makivić, Irena; Kersnik, Janko; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our systematic review was to analyse the published literature on the psychosocial dimension of care in family medicine and its relationship with quality of care. We wanted to find out whether there is any evidence on the psychosocial approach in (family) medicine. The recommended bio-psycho-social approach, besides the biomedical model of illness, takes into account several co-influencing psychological, sociological and existential factors. An online search of nine different databases used Boolean operators and the following selection criteria: the paper contained information on the holistic approach, quality indicators, family medicine, patient-centred care and/or the bio-psycho-social model of treatment. We retrieved 743 papers, of which 36 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Including the psychosocial dimension in patient management has been found to be useful in the prevention and treatment of physical and psychiatric illness, resulting in improved social functioning and patient satisfaction, reduced health care disparities, and reduced annual medical care charges. The themes of patient-centred, behavioural or psychosocial medicine were quite well presented in several papers. We could not find any conclusive evidence of the impact of a holistic bio-psycho-social-approach. Weak and variable definitions of psychosocial dimensions, a low number of well-designed intervention studies, and low numbers of included patients limited our conclusions.

  17. The Psychosocial Care Center on the users point of view El Centro de Atención Psicosocial sobre la óptica de los usuarios O Centro de Atenção Psicossocial sob a ótica dos usuários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Rosolen Soares

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has as its aim to describe the daily work of a psychosocial care center and to aprehend how the users cared by such service experience the offered therapeutic process. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eleven users of the Psychosocial Care Center, located in the countryside of São Paulo state. The data were submitted to Theme Analysis, based on Minayo. The themes which came from the data analysis, allowed the configuration of three topics. In the first one, the user experiences the treatment on an organicist focus of the care, assessed by the medical professional value, in the medicine-based approach and the symptom control. The second topic brings the perception of the space in CAPS as a helping scenario of social exchanges. And the third topic is about the therapeutic process as being towards the daily life of the users. Based in these data, we could reflect on the directions of the new facilities in mental health, the CAPS.El presente estudio tiene por objetivo describir el funcionamiento de un centro de atención psicosocial y aprender como los usuarios atendidos por este servicio perciben el proceso terapéutico ofrecido. Fueron realizadas entrevistas semi-estructuradas, con once usuarios de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial, ubicado en el interior paulista. Los datos fueron sometidos a Análisis Temática, según Minayo. Los temas emergidos a partir del análisis de los datos, posibilitaron la configuración de tres temas. En el primero de ellos, el usuario percibe el tratamiento sobre un enfoque organicista del cuidado, relatado por medio de la valorización del profesional médico, en el abordaje medicamentoso y el control de los síntomas. El segundo tema trae la percepción del espacio del "CAPS", mientras el panorama propiciador de cambios sociales. Y el tercer tema se refiere al proceso terapéutico estar dirigido a la vida cotidiana de los usuarios. Con base en estos datos, podemos ponderar sobre

  18. A review on cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Jansen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several psychosocial care interventions have been found effective in improving psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients. At present, there is increasingly being asked for information on the value for money of this type of intervention. This review therefore evaluates current evidence from studies investigating cost-effectiveness or cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science yielding 539 unique records, of which 11 studies were included in the study. Studies were mainly performed in breast cancer populations or mixed cancer populations. Studied interventions included collaborative care (four studies, group interventions (four studies, individual psychological support (two studies, and individual psycho-education (one study. Seven studies assessed the cost-utility of psychosocial care (based on quality-adjusted-life-years while three studies investigated its cost-effectiveness (based on profile of mood states [mood], Revised Impact of Events Scale [distress], 12-Item Health Survey [mental health], or Fear of Progression Questionnaire [fear of cancer progression]. One study did both. Costs included were intervention costs (three studies, intervention and direct medical costs (five studies, or intervention, direct medical, and direct nonmedical costs (three studies. In general, results indicated that psychosocial care is likely to be cost-effective at different, potentially acceptable, willingness-to-pay thresholds. Further research should be performed to provide more clear information as to which psychosocial care interventions are most cost-effective and for whom. In addition, more research should be performed encompassing potential important cost drivers from a societal perspective, such as productivity losses or informal care costs, in the analyses.

  19. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Psychosocial Care in Adolescents with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarbegloo, Masoomeh; Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jabarzadeh, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Studies about epilepsy are more associated with physiological aspects and drug therapy and far too little attention has been paid to psychological and social care, especially in teens. Hence, the present study aimed to assess relationship between self-efficacy and psychosocial care in adolescents with epilepsy. Methods. A cross-sectional association study was conducted on 74 consecutive adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with general attacks of epilepsy referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinics affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Data were collected by interview using multisegment tools including demographic characteristics, self-efficacy scaling in children with epilepsy, and reporting tools for children psychosocial care. Results. Our study showed a significant association of self-efficacy with "information received" (P psychosocial supports and collecting more information about this disorder for adolescents will be helpful.

  20. Análise do trabalho de referência em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Análisis del trabajo de referencia en Centros de Atención Psicosocial Analysis of reference work in Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Miranda

    2008-10-01

    referencia, y el sufrimiento del trabajador, que se puede sentir excesivamente responsabilizado por el caso de referencia. CONCLUSIONES: Los efectos del arreglo equipo/profesionales de referencia sobre los pacientes se basan en aspectos emocionales unidos a la confianza, la constancia y a la integridad de cuidados. Sin embargo, tales aspectos también presentaron problemas de relación, principalmente con la omnipotencia, que puede envolver el trabajador.OBJECTIVE: To analyze how psychosocial care center users, family members and workers assess related work by reference team and professionals. METHODS: Qualitative research based on Constructivist Paradigm and Gadamerian Hermeneutics. Two cycles of focus groups consisting of professionals, users and users' family members from all psychosocial care centers in the city of Campinas (Southeastern Brazil, in 2006, were analyzed. RESULTS: Reference work was assessed as an arrangement that has therapeutic effects and contributes to the work organization efficacy. However, risks related to power centralized by reference professionals and to workers' suffering, as these may feel overly responsible for the case they are reference for, were reported. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of the "reference team/professionals" arrangement on patients are based on emotional aspects associated with reliability, constancy and integrality of care. In contrast, such aspects also show relationship problems, especially as regards omnipotence, which may involve the worker.

  1. [Psychosocial stress environment and health workers in public health: Differences between primary and hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Bellón-Saameño, Juan Ángel; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    To describe the psychosocial environment of health professionals in public health in primary and hospital care, and compare it with that of the general Spanish working population, as well as to evaluate the effect of psychosocial risk factors on symptoms related to perceived stress. Cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling. Health care workers in the province of Granada, distributed in 5 hospitals and 4 health districts. A total of 738 employees (medical and nursing staff) of the Andalusian Health Service (SAS) were invited to take part. CopSoQ/Istas21 questionnaire developed for the multidimensional analysis of the psychosocial work environment. Stress symptoms were measured with the Stress Profile questionnaire. The response rate was 67.5%. Compared with the Spanish workforce, our sample showed high cognitive, emotional, and sensory psychological demands, possibilities for development and sense of direction in their work. Primary care physicians were the group with a worse psychosocial work environment. All the groups studied showed high levels of stress symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that variables associated with high levels of stress symptom were younger and with possibilities for social relations, role conflict, and higher emotional demands, and insecurity at work. Our findings support that the psychosocial work environment of health workers differs from that of the Spanish working population, being more unfavorable in general practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [The Need for Psychosocial Support of Parents of Children in Neonatal Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Nicole; Karutz, Harald; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-06-07

    Background Advances in neonatal care have reduced mortality but increased morbidity in babies born pre-maturely or after high-risk pregnancies. However, this often increases the burden on the family and the parents in particular. A systematic review of the literature was conducted that demonstrated the importance of psychosocial support for parents of children in neonatal care. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed, Psyndex, CINAHI and medpilot was conducted. Reference lists of the included articles were also searched for relevant publications. A free-text search found further publications. Together, 78 publications (from 1975-2015) were included in our review. Results A shift from a biomedical model and child-centred treatment to family-centred care has already taken place in neonatal care. However, there is still a considerable gap between theory and practice. Although there is awareness of the need for psychosocial support of parents, the focus of day-to-day care is still on medical interventions and life-supporting treatment for the child. In particular, while the importance of an assessment of needs as a basis for family-centred psychosocial support appears to be well-known, validated screening instruments are rarely used. In addition, the demand for psychosocial support of parents is not just solely determined by the child's medical risk. Conclusions The results highlight the challenges of delivering individualised psychosocial support to families within a healthcare system of limited resources, with practitioners having to take into account the developing parent-child relationship as well as health economics. In future, psychosocial support should be based on evidence rather than intuition. Attachment theory and research, and health psychology can contribute to this development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The center of caring: adult day care & the VNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C L

    1994-08-01

    Day care services in conjunction with home care aide services provide a cost-effective, humane solution to caregiver burnout and/or the possible financial and emotional devastation of institutionalization. One adult day care center makes the most of community resources, including the local VNA.

  4. Percepção sobre a prática de enfermagem em Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Percepción sobre la práctica de enfermería en Centros de Atención Sicosocial Perception about the nursing practice in the Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Bezerra de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    áctica que enfatiza el sentido de producción de vida, del aumento de la capacidad del usuario de establecer cambios sociales, posibilitándole mayor autonomía.The practice of nursing in the psychosocial care centers in mental health is something made in the institutions daily from established interactions among professionals, patients, and the patient`s family. This research is somewhat exploratory and has a qualitative approach. It aims to know the daily practice of professionals from psychosocial Care Centers on daily practice of the nurse in this kind of work. The collected data was made by means of-semi-structured interviews. From the thematic analysis of the data, two themes appeared: the nurse establishes the first contact with the patients; that is, the nurse is the link between doctors and patients. The results show that the practice of nursing in mental health searches to construct inventive actions, establish affective ties, welcome the patients, and contradict the different way by which some uncommon people are seen the "insane" as a threat. It is a practice that emphasizes the meaning of life production, that is, the increase of the patient’s capacity to establish social exchanges, giving him/her greater autonomy.

  5. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  6. Identification and management of psychosocial problems by preventive child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, E.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the degree to which physicians and nurses working in preventive child health care (child health professionals [CHPs]) identify and manage psychosocial problems in children, and to determine its association with parent-reported behavioral and emotional problems, sociodemographic

  7. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics...

  8. Biomedical and psychosocial factors influencing transtibial prosthesis fit : a Delphi survey among health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Erwin C.; Schrier, Ernst; Geertzen, Jan H.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to reach consensus among professionals caring for prosthesis users, on definitions of biomedical and psychosocial factors, to assess their influence on fit of transtibial prosthesis and to identify new factors. Method: A three-round, internet-based, Delphi survey was conducted amon

  9. Biomedical and psychosocial factors influencing transtibial prosthesis fit : a Delphi survey among health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Erwin C.; Schrier, Ernst; Geertzen, Jan H.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to reach consensus among professionals caring for prosthesis users, on definitions of biomedical and psychosocial factors, to assess their influence on fit of transtibial prosthesis and to identify new factors. Method: A three-round, internet-based, Delphi survey was conducted amon

  10. Identification and management of psychosocial problems by preventive child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, E.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the degree to which physicians and nurses working in preventive child health care (child health professionals [CHPs]) identify and manage psychosocial problems in children, and to determine its association with parent-reported behavioral and emotional problems, sociodemographic

  11. [nursing Care In Ambulatory Surgery At A Teaching Hospital: Patients, Procedures And Biological And Psychosocial Needs].

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto,Tatiane Vegette; Araújo,Izilda Esmênia Muglia; Gallani,Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both ge...

  12. PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE CENTER IN VIEW OF FAMILY CAREGIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Coutinho Sampaio Lima

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar a vivência do familiar cuidador da pessoa com esquizofrenia, frente à reforma psiquiátrica. Métodos: Estudo descritivo-exploratório de abordagem qualitativa, realizado no Centro de Atenção Psicossocial II de Teresina-PI, com nove familiares cuidadores de pessoas com tal doença e que aceitaram participar do estudo. Resultados: Os dados abordam a visão do familiar cuidador frente à desinstitucionalização da doença mental. Constatou-se que este centro vem modificando a concepção da família e da sociedade sobre a reclusão do doente metal, pelas melhoras alcançadas através das terapias medicamentosas e psicoterápicas, uma vez que, houve a melhora da qualidade de vida de ambas as partes. Conclusões: O Centro de Atenção Psicossocial é uma alternativa efetiva e eficaz ao modelo manicomial diante da vivência dos cuidadores. 

  13. Patients' readiness to receive psychosocial care during nurse-led routine diabetes consultations in primary care : A mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk-de Vries, Anneke; van Bokhoven, Marloes A.; de Jong, Sabine; Metsemakers, Job F. M.; Verhaak, Peter P. M.; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Eijk, Jacques Th. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus face several emotional and social consequences of their chronic illness in their everyday life. Symptoms of distress and depression are prevalent. For providing psychosocial self-management support, nurses in primary care were trained to identify pa

  14. Patients' readiness to receive psychosocial care during nurse-led routine diabetes consultations in primary care: A mixed methods study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk-de Vries, A. van; Bokhoven, M.A. van; Jong, S. de; Metsemakers, J.F.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Weijden, T. van der; Eijk, J.T.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus face several emotional and social consequences of their chronic illness in their everyday life. Symptoms of distress and depression are prevalent. For providing psychosocial self-management support, nurses in primary care were trained to identify pa

  15. Transtornos psiquiátricos menores em cuidadores familiares de usuários de Centros de Atenção Psicossocial do Sul do Brasil Minor psychiatric disorders in family caregivers of users of Psychosocial Care Centers in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenice de Castro Muniz de Quadros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de descrever a prevalência de transtornos psiquiátricos menores e sua associação com variáveis sociodemográficas, sobrecarga e eventos estressores autorreferidos, foi conduzido um estudo transversal com 936 familiares cuidadores de usuários de Centros de Atenção Psicossocial. Transtornos psiquiátrico menor foi identificado pelo Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20, utilizando para definição de caso o ponto de corte de oito ou mais respostas positivas para mulheres e seis ou mais para homens. Realizaram-se análises bivariada e multivariada por regressão de Poisson. A prevalência de transtornos psiquiátricos menores foi de 49% (IC95%: 46%-52%. Na análise ajustada, maiores prevalências foram observadas nos familiares com menor escolaridade, com relato de problemas de saúde, com maior número de ocorrência de eventos estressores, aposentados, que são os únicos cuidadores e que referiram sobrecarga. Os resultados indicam uma elevada prevalência de transtornos psiquiátricos menores, identificando algumas associações, o que poderá instrumentalizar serviços de Saúde Mental e Atenção Básica.A cross-sectional study was conducted with 936 family caregivers of users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS with the aim of describing the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders and the association with socio-demographic variables, self-reported overload, and stressful events. Minor psychiatric disorder was identified with the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20, using as case definition a cutoff of eight or more positive answers for women and six or more for men. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted by Poisson regression. Prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders was 49% (95%CI: 46%-52%. In the adjusted analysis, higher prevalence was observed in families with less schooling, health problems, more stressful life events, retirees, and single caregivers who reported overload. The results indicate a high

  16. Dimensões organizacionais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial para dependentes químicos Dimensiones organizativas de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial para dependientes químicos Organizational dimensions of a Psychosocial Care Center for chemical dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Aparecida Arena Ventura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Compreender a visão de profissionais sobre as dimensões estruturais e contextuais de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial para dependentes de substâncias psicoativas do Estado de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudo qualitativo que utilizou a entrevista semiestruturada com nove profissionais e dois gestores para obter os dados que foram analisados por meio da análise temática. RESULTADOS: A estrutura interna do serviço foi influenciada pelo ambiente externo e fundamenta-se no cuidado individualizado. Como alternativa de enfrentamento dos desafios, ressalta-se o trabalho em equipe e sobrecarga como problema resultante da dinâmica de trabalho. CONCLUSÃO: Há necessidade da contratação de profissionais para melhorar o funcionamento interno, assegurar a qualidade no atendimento e integrar a organização com os atores externos.OBJETIVO: Comprender la visión de profesionales sobre las dimensiones estructurales y contextuales de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial para dependientes de sustancias psicoactivas del Estado de Sao Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudio cualitativo en el que se usó la entrevista semiestructurada con nueve profesionales y dos gestores para obtener los datos que fueron analizados por medio del análisis temático. RESULTADOS: La estructura interna del servicio fue influenciada por el ambiente externo y se fundamenta en cuidado individualizado. Como alternativa de enfrentamiento de los desafios, se resalta el trabajo en equipo y sobrecarga como problema resultante de la dinámica de trabajo. CONCLUSIÓN: Hay necesidad de la contratación de profesionales para mejorar el funcionamiento interno, asegurar la calidad en la atención e integrar la organización con los actores externos.OBJECTIVE: To understand the vision of professionals about the structural and contextual dimensions of a Psychosocial Care Center for those dependent on psychoactive substances in the state of São Paulo. METHODS: This qualitative study used

  17. Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care: more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between family social support, parenting skills and child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care. We obtained data on 1,331 children (response rate 56.6%), 4-18 years old, enrolled in preventive child health care, and child and adolescent social care and mental health care because of psychosocial problems, and on 463 children (response rate 70.3%) not enrolled in psychosocial care. Results showed that enrolment in psychosocial care was associated with low family social support (odds ratio; 95%-confidence interval: 3.2; 2.4-4.4), and with poor parenting skills, i.e. poor supervision (1.5; 1.1-2.1) and inconsistent disciplining (1.5; 1.1-2.1). Children's psychosocial problems partially mediated the associations with family social support and completely with parenting skills. Children's problems did not moderate the associations. Positive parenting was not associated with care enrolment. We conclude that low family social support and poor parenting are important factors associated with enrolment, in particular because they are associated with more frequent occurrence of children's psychosocial problems. This implies that professionals and policymakers need to be aware that factors in children's social environment are related with enrolment in psychosocial care, in addition to children's psychosocial problems.

  18. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  19. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for family carers of palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kristina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being a family carer to a patient nearing the end of their life is a challenging and confronting experience. Studies show that caregiving can have negative consequences on the health of family carers including fatigue, sleep problems, depression, anxiety and burnout. One of the goals of palliative care is to provide psychosocial support to patients and families facing terminal illness. A systematic review of interventions for family carers of cancer and palliative care patients conducted at the start of this millennium demonstrated that there was a dearth of rigorous inquiry on this topic and consequently limited knowledge regarding the types of interventions likely to be effective in meeting the complex needs of family carers. We wanted to discern whether or not the evidence base to support family carers has improved. Furthermore, undertaking this review was acknowledged as one of the priorities for the International Palliative Care Family Carer Research Collaboration http://www.centreforpallcare.org. Methods A systematic review was undertaken in order to identify developments in family carer support that have occurred over the last decade. The focus of the review was on interventions that targeted improvements in the psychosocial support of family carers of palliative care patients. Studies were graded to assess their quality. Results A total of fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The focus of interventions included psycho-education, psychosocial support, carer coping, symptom management, sleep promotion and family meetings. Five studies were randomised controlled trials, three of which met the criteria for the highest quality evidence. There were two prospective studies, five pre-test/post-test projects and two qualitative studies. Conclusions The systematic review identified a slight increase in the quality and quantity of psychosocial interventions conducted for family carers in the last decade. More rigorous

  20. Psychosocial problems in pre-school children : Recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care objective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, SA; Brugman, E; Verhulst, FC; Verloove-Vanhorick, SP

    2005-01-01

    Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care Objective. To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among pre-school children in the general populatio

  1. Perfil dos familiares cuidadores de usuários de centros de atenção psicossocial do sul do Brasil Perfil de los familiares cuidadores de los usuarios de los centros de atención psicosocial en el sur de Brasil Profile of family caregivers of users of psychosocial care centers of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Prado Kantorski

    2012-03-01

    psychosocial care centers (CAPS in southern Brazil. This is a quantitative, cross-sectional study, with a descriptive approach. It is connected to the research "Evaluation of CAPS in southern Brazil (CAPSUL". Data collection was conducted from May to June, 2006. 936 families of CAPS users answered a structured questionnaire. A database in the computer program Epi-info 6.04 was built, and statistical analysis was performed through Software Stata 7. It was evident that family caregivers are predominantly women averaging 49.2 years of age, with low education, married, without a paid job and taking care by themselves of the family member with mental disorders. These results underscore the need for health services to develop actions in order to include these families in the focus of care of the multiprofessional patient care team

  2. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Bo M; Boot, Cécile R L; Houtman, Irene L D; Brouwers, Evelien P M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-06-08

    Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers can be explained by autonomy and social support. In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate, stress, autonomy, co-worker support, and supervisor support were assessed using questionnaires, in a sample of health care workers (N = 277). Linear mixed models analyses were performed to assess to what extent social support and autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. A lower psychosocial safety climate score was associated with significantly higher stress (B = -0.21, 95% CI = -0.27 - -0.14). Neither co-worker support, supervisor support, nor autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. Taken together, autonomy and both social support measures diminished the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress by 12% (full model: B = -0.18, 95% CI = -0.25 - -0.11). Autonomy and social support together seemed to bring about a small decrease in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers. Future research should discern whether other psychosocial work factors explain a larger portion of this relation. This study was registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register, trial code: NTR5527 .

  3. The relationship between psychosocial care and attitudes toward illness in adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Barzegar, Mohammad; Akbarbegloo, Masumeh; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahiminia, Elahe; Ferguson, Caleb

    2013-04-01

    Epilepsy is a significant health problem in Iran and other countries. Previous epilepsy studies conducted in Iran have often focused on physiological aspects and pharmacological therapy, and little attention has been paid to the psychological and social aspects of care, particularly in adolescence. This paper aims to fill this gap by assessing the relationship between psychosocial care and attitudes toward illness in adolescents with epilepsy. A descriptive correlational design was adopted, and 74 adolescents who experienced generalized seizures and were treated at the neurology clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2010 were examined. The data were collected using instruments including (1) the patient demographic characteristics, (2) the Child Report of Psychosocial Care Scale, and (3) the Child's Attitude Toward Illness Scale. There was a significant positive correlation between psychosocial care and attitudes toward illness (p<.05). There is no evidence for routine psychological consultation for our sample; it would be helpful if psychological consultation with and without parents made available to adolescents with epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CYCLES OF POVERTY, FOOD INSECURITY, AND PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS AMONG AIDS CARE VOLUNTEERS IN URBAN ETHIOPIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Kenneth; Shifferaw, Selamawit

    2011-05-01

    With the rollout of AIDS therapies, volunteer AIDS care has been promoted across Africa under the assumption that volunteerism is economically imperative in settings of health professional and resource scarcity. As low-income volunteers have become a major part of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment workforces, it is imperative to question how poverty impacts their well-being. This chapter presents epidemiologic data collected during the 2008 food crisis from a sample of 110 AIDS care volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as narratives offered by HIV-positive volunteers, highlighting a widely overlooked way in which food insecurity and mental distress impact efforts to treat AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Food insecurity and elevated common mental disorder (CMD) symptom loads were common and tightly linked among the volunteers in the sample. Volunteers who were HIV-positive (17 percent) fared slightly worse in terms of food insecurity and psychosocial well-being. However, positive HIV serostatus was not associated with CMD in multivariate analyses accounting for food insecurity. Narratives illustrate how being HIV-positive shaped experiences of psychosocial stress, which involved unemployment and lack of prospects for marital relationships or strife within them. Our focus demonstrates the potential for mixing ethnographic and epidemiological methods to inform policy questions regarding poverty-reduction through compensation for volunteers' valuable labor, as well as AIDS care program sustainability. [volunteerism, AIDS care, food insecurity, livelihoods, HIV, psychosocial health].

  5. O trabalho da equipe de um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial na perspectiva da família El trabajo del equipo en un Centro de Atención Psicosocial en la perspectiva de la familia A Psychosocial Care Center team's work from a family's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Wagner Camatta

    2009-06-01

    en su trabajo.The objective of this study was to understand the experiences of family members of patients seen at a Psychosocial Care Center (PSCC in terms of the work performed by the mental health team. The theoretical-philosophical framework used was phenomenological sociology. Data collection took place by means of an interview performed with 13 family members in October and November, 2006 at a PSCC in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The comprehensive analysis yielded three categories. This article focuses on one of those categories: work as a project, action, and act. The analysis permitted to consider that the PSCC team's work has concrete results in mental health care; the team's actions are user-centered; and that the team's work should increase family-service integration. These considerations could serve as support for mental health teams to reflect about their practice regarding involving the patient's family in their work.

  6. A representação social de familiares nos centros de atenção psicossocial La representación social de la familia en centros de atencion psicosocial Social representation of family members in psychosocial care center

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    Dulcian Medeiros de Azevedo

    2011-06-01

    comportamiento, con el apoyo de la presencia del espacio ambiental del CAPS. En las situaciones investigadas, la participación de la familia no cumple las condiciones para promover la inclusión del usuario, ya que la presencia física no existe aún suficiente.The Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS are foreseen as the ports of entry and regulation in mental health, and were created with the intention of replacing the hospitalization in asylum for the community care service. The objective was to understand the social representations of family members of the CAPS users from Natal-RN, about their participation in the activities of these services. Descriptive research with qualitative approach, developed with 28 family members, through semi-structured interviews between August and September 2007. The data received informational support of ALCESTE software. The family members build their social representation in the face of a need for change and hope in the health care of their relatives, crystallized by taking and positioning behavior, supported in the presence of the environmental space of CAPS. The family participation still does not gather, in the scenarios investigated, conditions to promote the inclusion of their relative, once the physical established presence is not yet enough.

  7. Family Care Map: Sustaining family-centered care in Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers

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    James H. Ford II, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed sustainability of the Family Care Map, a family-centered approach to providing care for Veterans with polytrauma-related injuries, in four Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. We applied a mixed-methods approach. Staff surveys used standardized measures of sustainability, commitment to change, information, and participation during implementation. Qualitative inquiry assessed Family Care Map implementation and facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Staff sustainability perceptions had a significant positive correlation with affective commitment to change, participation, and information received about the change process. Family Care Map integration into standard practices and use of its concepts with patients and families related to staff perceptions about sustainability. The degree of use and integration of the Family Care Map in traumatic brain injury/polytrauma care varied among the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Some successful sustainability strategies included integration into daily workflow and organizational culture. Examples of sustainability barriers included staff awareness and use and outdated information. Some practices, such as measuring and documenting the use of the Family Care Map in treatment plans, may not routinely occur. The focus on family-centered care will require further evaluation of organization-, staff-, and innovation-level attributes that influence sustainability of changes designed to improve family-centered care.

  8. Family care map: Sustaining family-centered care in Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James H; Wise, Meg; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Hall, Carmen; Sayer, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed sustainability of the Family Care Map, a family-centered approach to providing care for Veterans with polytrauma-related injuries, in four Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. We applied a mixed-methods approach. Staff surveys used standardized measures of sustainability, commitment to change, information, and participation during implementation. Qualitative inquiry assessed Family Care Map implementation and facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Staff sustainability perceptions had a significant positive correlation with affective commitment to change, participation, and information received about the change process. Family Care Map integration into standard practices and use of its concepts with patients and families related to staff perceptions about sustainability. The degree of use and integration of the Family Care Map in traumatic brain injury/polytrauma care varied among the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Some successful sustainability strategies included integration into daily workflow and organizational culture. Examples of sustainability barriers included staff awareness and use and outdated information. Some practices, such as measuring and documenting the use of the Family Care Map in treatment plans, may not routinely occur. The focus on family-centered care will require further evaluation of organization-, staff-, and innovation-level attributes that influence sustainability of changes designed to improve family-centered care.

  9. "We prefer greeting rather than eating:" life in an elder care center in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teka, Alemnesh; Adamek, Margaret E

    2014-12-01

    In Ethiopia where family care is a centuries-long tradition, living in an elder care institution invariably brings social devaluation. Accordingly, this study explored the psychosocial needs of older adults in a residential elder care center in Ethiopia from the perspective of both staff and residents. Three focus group discussions of 24 residents and interviews with 5 staff persons revealed that elders were living a subsistence lifestyle, eating the same meal every day, mostly cutoff from the surrounding community, and lacking basic amenities. Despite the absence of basic amenities, residents yearned even more so for meaningful social interaction. Psychosocial support was both undervalued and underutilized by staff members, and thus, residents' psychosocial well-being appeared to be at risk. The addition of social workers in institutional care in Ethiopia may help to promote improved living standards. Advocacy is needed on behalf of residents to establish and implement guidelines on care and support of residents in old age homes. As elders in developing countries are living longer--a growing number with disabilities--at the same time that informal supports are waning, the need for developing long term care policies is becoming critical.

  10. Psychosocial stress at work and perceived quality of care among clinicians in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jens; Grosse Frie, Kirstin; Blum, Karl; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2011-05-20

    Little is known about the association between job stress and job performance among surgeons, although physicians' well-being could be regarded as an important quality indicator. This paper examines associations between psychosocial job stress and perceived health care quality among German clinicians in surgery. Survey data of 1,311 surgeons from 489 hospitals were analysed. Psychosocial stress at work was measured by the effort-reward imbalance model (ERI) and the demand-control model (job strain). The quality of health care was evaluated by physicians' self-assessed performance, service quality and error frequency. Data were collected in a nationwide standardised mail survey. 53% of the contacted hospitals sent back the questionnaire; the response rate of the clinicians in the participating hospitals was about 65%. To estimate the association between job stress and quality of care multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Clinicians exposed to job stress have an increased risk of reporting suboptimal quality of care. Magnitude of the association varies depending on the respective job stress model and the indicator of health care quality used. Odds ratios, adjusted for gender, occupational position and job experience vary between 1.04 (CI 0.70-1.57) and 3.21 (CI 2.23-4.61). Findings indicate that theoretical models of psychosocial stress at work can enrich the analysis of effects of working conditions on health care quality. Moreover, results suggest interventions for job related health promotion measures to improve the clinicians' working conditions, their quality of care and their patients' health.

  11. Psychosocial stress at work and perceived quality of care among clinicians in surgery

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    von dem Knesebeck Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the association between job stress and job performance among surgeons, although physicians' well-being could be regarded as an important quality indicator. This paper examines associations between psychosocial job stress and perceived health care quality among German clinicians in surgery. Methods Survey data of 1,311 surgeons from 489 hospitals were analysed. Psychosocial stress at work was measured by the effort-reward imbalance model (ERI and the demand-control model (job strain. The quality of health care was evaluated by physicians' self-assessed performance, service quality and error frequency. Data were collected in a nationwide standardised mail survey. 53% of the contacted hospitals sent back the questionnaire; the response rate of the clinicians in the participating hospitals was about 65%. To estimate the association between job stress and quality of care multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results Clinicians exposed to job stress have an increased risk of reporting suboptimal quality of care. Magnitude of the association varies depending on the respective job stress model and the indicator of health care quality used. Odds ratios, adjusted for gender, occupational position and job experience vary between 1.04 (CI 0.70-1.57 and 3.21 (CI 2.23-4.61. Conclusion Findings indicate that theoretical models of psychosocial stress at work can enrich the analysis of effects of working conditions on health care quality. Moreover, results suggest interventions for job related health promotion measures to improve the clinicians' working conditions, their quality of care and their patients' health.

  12. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Psychosocial Care in Adolescents with Epilepsy

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    Masoomeh Akbarbegloo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Studies about epilepsy are more associated with physiological aspects and drug therapy and far too little attention has been paid to psychological and social care, especially in teens. Hence, the present study aimed to assess relationship between self-efficacy and psychosocial care in adolescents with epilepsy. Methods. A cross-sectional association study was conducted on 74 consecutive adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with general attacks of epilepsy referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinics affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Data were collected by interview using multisegment tools including demographic characteristics, self-efficacy scaling in children with epilepsy, and reporting tools for children psychosocial care. Results. Our study showed a significant association of self-efficacy with “information received’’ (P<0.02 and also with “need for information or support’’ (P<0.01 as well as “concerns and fears’’ (P<0.01. The comments of doctor or nurse were directly associated with higher self-efficacy and patients’ information needs were inversely associated with higher self-efficacy. Conclusion. For adolescents with epilepsy, providing educational materials such as pamphlets and booklets, designing especial websites, and setting especial meetings with and without parents separately are recommended. Scheduling psychosocial supports and collecting more information about this disorder for adolescents will be helpful.

  13. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvesson Hanna; Eklund Mona

    2014-01-01

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosoc...

  14. Evaluation of a Home-Based Hospice and Palliative Care Program in a Community Health Center in Korea

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    Su Hyun Kim

    2009-03-01

    Conclusions: A home-based palliative service program delivered by the community health center appears to be an appropriate care model for managing physical symptoms. Reinforcing services for psychosocial and spiritual counseling and encouraging affiliation with free-standing inpatient healthcare providers are warranted. [Asian Nursing Research 2009;3(1:24–30

  15. Designing robots for care: care centered value-sensitive design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wynsberghe, Aimee

    2013-06-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship--what I refer to as care robots--require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What's more, given the stage of their development and lack of standards provided by the International Organization for Standardization to guide their development, ethics ought to be included into the design process of such robots. The manner in which this may be accomplished, as presented here, uses the blueprint of the Value-sensitive design approach as a means for creating a framework tailored to care contexts. Using care values as the foundational values to be integrated into a technology and using the elements in care, from the care ethics perspective, as the normative criteria, the resulting approach may be referred to as care centered value-sensitive design. The framework proposed here allows for the ethical evaluation of care robots both retrospectively and prospectively. By evaluating care robots in this way, we may ultimately ask what kind of care we, as a society, want to provide in the future.

  16. Psychosocial stressors and depression at a Swedish primary health care centre. A gender perspective study

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    Strömberg Ranja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress may account for the higher prevalence of depression in women and in individuals with a low educational background. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between depression and socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and lifestyle circumstances from a gender perspective in a relatively affluent primary care setting. Methods Patients, aged 18- 75 years, visiting a drop-in clinic at a primary care health centre were screened with Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. The physicians used also targeted screening with BDI. A questionnaire on socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and use of alcohol and tobacco was distributed. Among patients, who scored BDI ≥10, DSM-IV-criteria were used to diagnose depression. Of the 404 participants, 48 men and 76 women were diagnosed with depression. The reference group consisted of patients with BDI score Results The same three psychosocial stressors: feeling very stressed, perceived poor physical health and being dissatisfied with one's family situation were associated with depression equally in men and women. The negative predictive values of the main effect models in men and women were 90.7% and 76.5%, respectively. Being dissatisfied with one's work situation had high ORs in both men and women. Unemployment and smoking were associated with depression in men only. Conclusions Three questions, frequently asked by physicians, which involve patient's family and working situation as well as perceived stress and physical health, could be used as depression indicators in early detection of depression in men and women in primary health care.

  17. Percepção de profissionais de saúde de CAPS I quanto a demandas relativas ao consumo de crack Perception of health professionals from Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS I regarding the demands related to the use of crack

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    Cristina Lessa Horta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisa qualitativa que analisa dois grupos focais realizados em 2009 com vinte trabalhadores de dois CAPS I da região de Porto Alegre, para verificar a sua percepção diante do aumento de demandas que a expansão do crack tende a gerar sobre as redes locais de saúde mental. Propôs-se que debatessem o que lhes parecia fonte de sobrecarga e insatisfação em geral e, especificamente, em função das demandas de usuários de crack. Os resultados mostram forte preocupação com a instabilidade dos contratos de trabalho, levando à falta de projeção no futuro. Além disso, o acúmulo de tarefas para suprir carências das equipes, justificando-se o limitado interesse em planejar ações de longo prazo e a opção por tarefas menos complexas. Consideraram-se problemas na rotina de trabalho as ordens judiciais e a interferência de agentes públicos, pedido expresso de hospitalização, familiares sem postura cooperativa, querelantes e usuários desmotivados para o tratamento ou reingressando no serviço. As equipes parecem estar no centro um conflito entre a impossibilidade de se evitar o surgimento de demandas da população usuária das redes locais de saúde, o que se evidencia no contexto do uso de crack, e os limites da gestão, ampliando o desgaste e a sobrecarga percebidos.This paper presents qualitative research analyzing two focus groups with twenty workers in Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS I in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil, in 2009. They were invited to discuss overwork and dissatisfaction with work in general and also recent demands of crack cocaine users on the local mental health networks. Workers in both groups reported a strong concern about the instability of employment contracts, leading to limited ability to plan their futures. In addition, the accumulation of tasks to replace absenteeism in teams leads to a limited interest in long-term action planning and the option for less complex tasks. Court orders, the interference of

  18. Social life of people with diagnosis of schizophrenia, attended at a psychosocial care center La vida social de personas con diagnóstico de esquizofrenia: usuarios de un centro de atención psicosocial A vida social de pessoas com diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, usuárias de um centro de atenção psicossocial

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    Marciana Fernandes Moll

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research aimed to investigate the social life of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia at a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS, and identify how the therapeutic process offered by the CAPS has contributed to their social lives. The subjects of the study were patients with schizophrenia, between eighteen and forty years of age and registered at the CAPS in Uberaba, Brazil. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview. Three categories were identified: the patients' life before and after the illness, their everyday life outside CAPS and CAPS care contributing to their social life and stabilization of symptoms. The results showed that the CAPS regimen enhances treatment compliance and decreases hospitalization. However, social functioning for schizophrenic patients occurs within the family and treatment contexts. This reality evidences the need for a partnership with the Family Health Strategy and the community to improve socialization.Esta es una investigación cualitativa, cuyos objetivos fueron investigar la vida social de personas con diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, usuarias de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial (CAPS e identificar como el proceso terapéutico, ofrecido por el CAPS, colabora con la vida social de esas personas. Participaron del estudio individuos con esquizofrenia, con edades entre los 18 y 40 años, matriculados en el CAPS de Uberaba, Brasil. Se utilizó la entrevista semiestructurada que originó tres categorías: vida de los pacientes antes y después de enfermarse, cotidiano de los usuarios en el ambiente fuera del CAPS y asistencia del CAPS, colaborando en la vida social y en la estabilización de síntomas. Se detectó que la terapéutica empleada colabora para la adhesión al tratamiento y reduce las internaciones psiquiátricas, sin embargo la vida social de esas personas ocurre en el contexto familiar y en el ambiente de tratamiento. Esa realidad muestra la necesidad de trabajar en

  19. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  20. [Cystic fibrosis: centers and care networks organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, G

    2012-05-01

    More than 20 years after the gene discovery, without specific treatment, the observed improvement of the cystic fibrosis prognosis appears due to management's organization as well as early diagnosis (neonatal screening) or progress in symptomatic treatment. The CF Centers (CRCM) official recognition was a necessary step before generalization of routine neonatal screening (October, 2002). Actually French CF management relies on three levels of organization: CF centers, regional care networks and French CF Society, in close relationship with patients association (Vaincre la Mucoviscidose). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Provincial public center for crisis intervention and psycho-social rehabilitation. A path towards communitary suicidology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work on the systematic comprehensive approach towards the Prevention and Postvencion of Suicide started to develop back in mid 2011 in Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz Province. The first step on this development was a Pilot Plan for the Training of Professionals and also field intervention. The Center for Crisis Intervention and Psycho-social Rehabilitation was founded eight months later. The case-client in crisis plus family group- undergoes quantitative and qualitative evaluation by means of a triage system, all of which allows starting intensive face-to-face and also phone follow up according to the Crisis Intervention Model. Such intervention is developed by means of the participation in the "Grupo Sostén", the Adolescents Group if the client fits into that age, and also family relationship interviews as well as Multi-family meetings open to the Community. There is also a Community Team in the Center which performs collective assessment in schools, in conjunction with the "Equidad en Redes" Educational Specialty Team, belonging to the Provincial Education Council. The approach takes place on the field, and works as a screening step for the early detection of risk. Such risk is dealt with by means of short term intervention group programs involving the whole of the educational community. When facing situations of committed suicide there are interventions in communities to the interior of the province, fundamentally through the Hospital Team which works as the cluster convener for the social intersectoral frame-work.

  2. Psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus in promoting self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaya Giarola Cecilio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the psychosocial aspects of living with diabetes mellitus. Methods: a descriptive exploratory study with qualitative approach, made with 16 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The data were collected through telephone calls using a semi-structured script approaching the care in health, barriers and family support, analyzed by Bardin’s content. Results: two categories emerged related to the practice of self-care: Self-care, containing three sub-categories: diet, physical activity and emotional aspects and support networks. Conclusion: the results of the study showed the importance of understanding the emotional aspects and attitudes of patients regarding educational practices for self care, in order to establish strategies to prevent and control the disease.

  3. Perfil dos idosos atendidos em um centro de atenção psicossocial: álcool e outras drogas Perfil de los ancianos asistido en el centro de atención psicosocial: alcohol y otras droga Profile of the elderly assisted in a psychosocial care center: alcohol and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2010-12-01

    Center for Psychosocial Care - alcohol and other drugs in Ribeirão Preto SP, in the period of 1996 to 2009. The methodological design was the descriptive retrospective study based on secondary data. The sample consisted of 191 (3.2% customer over 60 years assisted in the service. The sample was characterized by elders with a mean age of 64 years, predominantly male, with low educational level, 78.4% had primary school and 86% were retired. The most commonly drugs used were alcohol, marijuana, crack and cocaine. It concludes that the number of elderly who seeks for expert assistance is very low. Studies of this nature are important to assess the needs of this group in the clear growth as well as the use of psychoactive substances for planning effective practices.

  4. Tabagismo em usuários de um centro de atenção psicossocial alcool e drogas: um estudo piloto Tabaquismo en usuarios de un centro de atención psicosocial alcohol y drogas: un estudio piloto Smoking among users of a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2011-01-01

    servicio especializado ayudará a repensar sobre las acciones preventivas y educativas en el área de la salud.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pattern of tobacco consumption in clients of a service specializing in the treatment of psychoactive substance dependence. METHODS: This was a descriptive quantitative approach, undertaken in 2009, in an Alcohol and Drugs Psychosocial Care Center, located within the State of São Paulo. We used a questionnaire containing sociodemographic information and the Fargeström test in 48 attendees in a single day at this service. RESULTS: The sample was characterized as predominantly adult males, unmarried, with low educational levels, and who were currently employed. In relation to smoking, we identified a high frequency of current smokers, with moderate level of tobacco dependence, motivated to change their smoking habits. CONCLUSION: Knowing the smoking behavior among users of a specialized service can help professionals rethink preventive and educational actions in the area of health.

  5. Integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizes, Victoria; Rakel, David; Niemiec, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Integrative medicine has emerged as a potential solution to the American healthcare crisis. It provides care that is patient centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Initially driven by consumer demand, the attention integrative medicine places on understanding whole persons and assisting with lifestyle change is now being recognized as a strategy to address the epidemic of chronic diseases bankrupting our economy. This paper defines integrative medicine and its principles, describes the history of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in American healthcare, and discusses the current state and desired future of integrative medical practice. The importance of patient-centered care, patient empowerment, behavior change, continuity of care, outcomes research, and the challenges to successful integration are discussed. The authors suggest a model for an integrative healthcare system grounded in team-based care. A primary health partner who knows the patient well, is able to addresses mind, body, and spiritual needs, and coordinates care with the help of a team of practitioners is at the centerpiece. Collectively, the team can meet all the health needs of the particular patient and forms the patient-centered medical home. The paper culminates with 10 recommendations directed to key actors to facilitate the systemic changes needed for a functional healthcare delivery system. Recommendations include creating financial incentives aligned with health promotion and prevention. Insurers are requested to consider the total costs of care, the potential cost effectiveness of lifestyle approaches and CAM modalities, and the value of longer office visits to develop a therapeutic relationship and stimulate behavioral change. Outcomes research to track the effectiveness of integrative models must be funded, as well as feedback and dissemination strategies

  6. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue-challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the "Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right" was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue–challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the “Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right” was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. PMID:27530206

  8. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate the burnout syndrome dimensions, and the Self Reporting Questionnaire was used to evaluate common mental disorders. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 55.3% (n = 72). In the quadrants of the demand-control model, low-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 64.5% of suspected cases of burnout, whereas high-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 72.5% of suspected cases (p = 0.006). The prevalence of suspected cases of common mental disorders was 27.7%; of these, 80.6% were associated with burnout syndrome (burnout syndrome. Psychosocial factors were associated with the development of burnout syndrome in this group. These results underscore the need for the development of further studies aimed at intervention and the prevention of the syndrome.

  9. Valley Interfaith Child Care Center CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Kramolisch, Andrew; Mack, Nate

    2012-01-01

    Included files: viccc.zip, viccc2.zip, viccc3.zip, viccc_final_paper.doc. The project consisted of revamping Valley Interfaith Child Care Center's website to be more modern and feature media. The goal was to cater to two diverse audiences: the families that needed their services and the investors who helped them keep running. This system is the result of efforts to do that. To run this software locally requires: Ruby 1.9.2 or newer, the bundler gem and either SQLite or PostgreSQL. The ...

  10. Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care : more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations

  11. Enrolment of children and adolescents in psychosocial care : more likely with low family social support and poor parenting skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Marieke; Jansen, Danielle E M C; Knorth, Erik J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about determinants of child and adolescent enrolment in psychosocial care concerns only single types of care and usually only socio-demographic factors. The social environment is also a likely key determinant but evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the associations be

  12. Effects of Psychosocial Day Care Programme on Quality of Life in Patients Affected with Schizophrenia - a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretić, Tanja Grahovac; Ružić, Klementina; Letica-Crepulja, Marina; Petrić, Daniela; Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Frančišković, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The basic aim of this prospective research was to establish the effect of psychosocial day care programme on the therapy outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. While 115 patients with schizophrenia were invited to participate, 100 of them completed the study and were subdivided into two groups. In addition to pharmacotherapy, the experimental group only (N=50) was integrated into a day-hospital-based psychosocial day care programme. The instruments were applied in three phases: the first measurement for experimental group subjects took place on the first day of psychosocial day-care programme, while for the control group subjects the same was performed on the last day of inpatient care. The second measurement for the experimental group was performed in the end of psychosocial day-care programme, while for the control group patients it occurred four months after inpatient treatment. The third measurement was carried out six months after the second one. The following instruments were applied: General Demographic Questionnaire at the first measurement, Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life-MANSA both at the first and third measurement, and Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale-PANSS at all three measurements. Experimental group patients showed a statistically significant increase in quality of life outcomes as well as statistically significant decrease in positive symptoms and general psychopathology at all three measurements and with regard to the control group. As to the negative symptoms, only the third measurement revealed a statistically significant difference. The results obtained indicate that the adjuvant treatment of psychosocial day care programme has a positive effect on treatment outcomes: on the increase of the patients' quality of life, and, to some extent, on the decrease of symptom intensity in positive symptoms in schizophrenia spectrum. However, the effect of psychosocial day-care programme on the negative symptoms was proved to be

  13. [Problems in reforming health care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetova, M V; Blokhin, A B; Polzik, E V

    2000-01-01

    Reformation of therapeutic and prophylactic institutions attached to various institutions and ministries is and important problem of public health at the modern stage of its development. A model developed and tried in Magnitogorsk can serve as a perspective trend of such reforms. A medical institution with mixed form of property has been created. The institution was set up by administration of the territory and a plant (Magnitogorsk metallurgical plant). Creation of a new health center as a non-commercial institution promoted its integration in the municipal public health system; the institution possesses all the potentialities of a budget organization and retains close contact with the plant. Such a solution of the problem improved the financial status of the health center and promoted its adaptation to marketing conditions. Attraction of additional finances from industry to municipal public health allowed the administration of the health center start and carry out internal restructuring aimed at priority development of outpatient care, restructuring of the bed fund, technological updating, and, in general, more rational utilization of the available resources.

  14. A randomized-control trial for the teachers' diploma programme on psychosocial care, support and protection in Zambian government primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaljee, Linda; Zhang, Liying; Langhaug, Lisa; Munjile, Kelvin; Tembo, Stephen; Menon, Anitha; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Xiaoming; Malungo, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Orphaned and vulnerable children (OVC) experience poverty, stigma, and abuse resulting in poor physical, emotional, and psychological outcomes. The Teachers' Diploma Programme on Psychosocial Care, Support, and Protection is a child-centered 15-month long-distance learning program focused on providing teachers with the knowledge and skills to enhance their school environments, foster psychosocial support, and facilitate school-community relationships. A randomized controlled trial was implemented in 2013-2014. Both teachers (n=325) and students (n=1378) were assessed at baseline and 15-months post-intervention from randomly assigned primary schools in Lusaka and Eastern Provinces, Zambia. Multilevel linear mixed models (MLM) indicate positive significant changes for intervention teachers on outcomes related to self-care, teaching resources, safety, social support, and gender equity. Positive outcomes for intervention students related to future orientation, respect, support, safety, sexual abuse, and bullying. Outcomes support the hypothesis that teachers and students benefit from a program designed to enhance teachers' psychosocial skills and knowledge.

  15. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Mariza Alves Barbosa; Barbosa, Mirna Rossi; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Gomes, Viviane Elizângela; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira e; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição

    2014-05-15

    Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR = 1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR = 1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR = 2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR = 1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR = 1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR = 1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers.

  16. Psychosocial needs of families of intensive care patients: Perceptions of nurses and families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Jannati, Yadollah; Moghaddam, Hossein Roohi; Yazdani-Charati, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) is not only stressful to the patients but the patients' family members. Families are believed not to receive their required attention because their needs are incorrectly and inaccurately evaluated by the health care team. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the perceptions of ICU nurses and families regarding the psychosocial needs of families of intensive care patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted on a randomly selected population of 80 nurses and 80 family members of ICU patients. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire containing sociodemographic characteristics and the Critical Care Family Need Inventory (CCFNI). Results: The rank order of the five most important CCFNI item needs identified by families were as follows: “To feel that the hospital personnel care about the patient”, “to be assured that the best care possible is being given to the patient”, “to have questions answered honestly”, “to know specific facts concerning patient's progress”, and “to be called at home about changes in the patient's condition.” The top five CCFNI item needs identified by nurses were in the following order: “To be assured that the best care possible is being given to the patient”, “to be told about transfer plans while they are being made”, “to feel that the hospital personnel care about the patient”, “to have questions answered honestly”, and “to know specific facts concerning patient's progress.” Conclusion: The present study showed there are similarities and dissimilarities between nurses and family members in their perceived importance of some family needs in the ICU. It can thus be inferred from our results that the participating nurses misestimated the needs of family members, attested by their wrong estimation of the most need statements. PMID:27185973

  17. A randomised trial of a psychosocial intervention for cancer patients integrated into routine care: the PROMPT study (promoting optimal outcomes in mood through tailored psychosocial therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolley Damien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence that up to 35% of patients with cancer experience significant distress, access to effective psychosocial care is limited by lack of systematic approaches to assessment, a paucity of psychosocial services, and patient reluctance to accept treatment either because of perceived stigma or difficulties with access to specialist psycho-oncology services due to isolation or disease burden. This paper presents an overview of a randomised study to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief tailored psychosocial Intervention delivered by health professionals in cancer care who undergo focused training and participate in clinical supervision. Methods/design Health professionals from the disciplines of nursing, occupational therapy, speech pathology, dietetics, physiotherapy or radiation therapy will participate in training to deliver the psychosocial Intervention focusing on core concepts of supportive-expressive, cognitive and dignity-conserving care. Health professional training will consist of completion of a self-directed manual and participation in a skills development session. Participating health professionals will be supported through structured clinical supervision whilst delivering the Intervention. In the stepped wedge design each of the 5 participating clinical sites will be allocated in random order from Control condition to Training then delivery of the Intervention. A total of 600 patients will be recruited across all sites. Based on level of distress or risk factors eligible patients will receive up to 4 sessions, each of up to 30 minutes in length, delivered face-to-face or by telephone. Participants will be assessed at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Patient outcome measures include anxiety and depression, quality of life, unmet psychological and supportive care needs. Health professional measures include psychological morbidity, stress and burnout. Process evaluation will be conducted to assess perceptions

  18. Evaluation Study of Day-Care Centers in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korazim, Malka; Trachtenberg, Silvia

    In recent years, day-care centers for the elderly have been playing an increasingly important role in the community service system for the elderly in Israel. ESHEL, one of the leading agencies in developing day-care services in Israel initiated a comprehensive evaluation study of day-care centers to identify variations among different types of…

  19. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-20

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  20. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  1. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety......, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being were assessed before randomization and at 3 and 9 months after randomization using t tests. Bonferroni and Pipper corrections were applied for multiple testing adjustments. RESULTS: At 9 months, the GSD-GYN-C plus UC group scored significantly higher on the QOL...

  2. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staffdagger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; Klerk, C. de; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; Broeck, U. Van den; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C.M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? SUMMARY ANSWER: Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human

  3. Psychosocial Care in Complementary Feeding of Children: A Comparative Study of the Urban and Rural Communities of Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunba, Beatrice Olubukola

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial care in complementary feeding of children under two years of age. The cross-sectional study was carried out in Osun State of Nigeria within Sub-Saharan Africa, and 450 mothers were interviewed of which 337 were from the urban and 113 from the rural communities. Results revealed that 37.4% of the respondents…

  4. Psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2016-02-01

    Most studies on euthanasia fail to explain the intentions of health professionals when faced with performing euthanasia and are atheoretical. The purpose of this study was to identify the psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care if it were legalised. A cross-sectional study using a validated anonymous questionnaire based on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A random sample of 445 nurses from the province of Quebec, Canada, was selected for participation in the study. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec. The response rate was 44.2% and the mean score for intention was 4.61 ± 1.90 (range: 1-7). The determinants of intention were the subjective (odds ratio = 3.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.50-6.35) and moral (odds ratio = 2.95; 95% confidence interval: 1.58-5.49) norms. Specific beliefs which could discriminate nurses according to their level of intention were identified. Overall, nurses have a slightly positive intention to practise euthanasia. Their family approval seems particularly important and also the approval of their medical colleagues. Nurses' moral norm was related to beneficence, an ethical principle. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify nurses' motivations to practise euthanasia in palliative care using a validated psychosocial theory. It also has the distinction of identifying the ethical principles underlying nurses' moral norm and intention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Strohschein, Fay J; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care.

  6. A comprehensive palliative care center implementation in S.B. Ulus State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kabalak

    2012-06-01

    Every people wants to best care and to die painless in their end-stage of life. This is a human right. Therefore, end-of-life care is considered an indicator of health quality all over the world. The ultimate goal of palliative care is to relieve the suffering of patients and their families by the comprehensive assessment and treatment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms experienced by patients. After the patient\\s death, palliative care focuses primarily on bereavement of the family. T.C. Ministry of Health to find a solution of this important issue as a first step, the preparations for the establishment of palliative care centers and units, training of health personnel started. S.B. Ulus State Hospital as a team we have set out to open a comprehensive palliative care center. Our goal is to contribute on take place of palliative care organization in health system and to the spread across the country. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 122-126

  7. Weaving the West Psychosocial Care Network of the municipality of São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro de Sousa; Domingos, Alessandra Matheus; Silveira, Ana Stella de Azevedo; Santos, Jussara Carvalho Dos

    2017-01-01

    to understand how health service professionals involved in the care of users in psychic distress perceive the organization of the Psychosocial Care Network (RAPS - Rede de Atenção Psicossocial) in the western region of the city of São Paulo. qualitative approach study conducted with 123 professionals with higher education who work in the care points of the network. A semi-structured interview was performed and data were submitted to the Alceste program for lexical analysis. the network is in process of alignment with the mental health policy and the psychosocial rehabilitation strategy. However, the weaknesses in the work process of teams are related to deficits in human resources, structure, and communication, and to the limited appropriation of their guidelines. there are intense efforts of workers to weave the network, and barriers need to be overcome to support successful actions in mental health care in the territory. compreender como profissionais de serviços de saúde envolvidos no cuidado dos usuários em sofrimento psíquico percebem a organização da Rede de Atenção Psicossocial (RAPS) da região Oeste do Município de São Paulo. abordagem qualitativa realizada com 123 profissionais de nível superior que atuam nos pontos de atenção da rede. Realizou-se entrevista semiestruturada e os dados foram submetidos ao programa Alceste com aplicação de análise lexical. A rede está em processo de alinhamento com a política de saúde mental e estratégia de reabilitação psicossocial. No entanto, há fragilidades no processo de trabalho das equipes relacionadas ao déficit de recursos humanos, estruturais, de comunicação, e à apropriação limitada sobre suas diretrizes. Compreendeu-se que há intensidade de esforços dos trabalhadores para tecer a rede e que é necessário superar barreiras para fomentar ações exitosas no cuidado em saúde mental no território.

  8. Knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of caring for people living with HIV (PLWH in a low-resource setting has had a negative impact on the nursing profession, resulting in a shortage of skilled nurses. In response to this shortage and perceived negative impact, we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study to describe the level of knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for PLWH at a regional hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 233 nurses, the majority being female, participated and were stratified into professional nurses (n = 108, enrolled nurses (n = 58 and enrolled nursing auxiliaries (n = 66. Data were collected using HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory; AIDS Impact Scale and Beck's Depression Inventory. The total knowledge score obtained by all the participants ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 12.93 (SD = 1.92 on HIV/AIDS knowledge. Depersonalization (D (83.7% and emotional exhaustion (EE (53.2% were reported among participating nurses caring for PLWH. Burnout was higher among professional nurses as compared to both enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing auxiliaries. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between HIV knowledge with the nurses' emotional exhaustion (r = −0.592, depression (r = −0.584 and stigma and discrimination (r = −0.637. A moderate to high level of burnout was evident among all levels of nurses. These findings lead to the recommendations for support of nurses caring for PLWH that include structured nursing educational support, organisational support with respect to employee wellness programmes that address depression and work burnout, as well as social support. The provision of these support mechanisms has the potential of creating a positive practice environment for nurses in the Vhembe District of the Limpopo Province in particular, and South Africa in general, and in improved care for PLWH.

  9. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  10. Demographic characteristics, psychosocial measures, and pain in a sample of patients with persistent pain referred to a new zealand tertiary pain medicine center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipton, Edward; Ponnamperuma, Don; Wells, Elisabeth; Trewin, Bronwyn

    2013-07-01

    Little is known on epidemiology of chronic pain in New Zealand. Its management has been based on data and models in North American/European studies. This project evaluated demographic and psychosocial correlates of pain severity, duration, and disability (PSDD) in chronic pain patients for assessment at a New Zealand tertiary care Pain Medicine Center. This study was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis on existing clinical assessment data (audit) collected over an 18-month period. Pre-admission data were collected on a consecutive series of 874 patients presenting for assessment. This included demographic (gender, educational attainment, ethnicity) and psychosocial data. Pain severity was measured by numerical rating scale and present pain intensity using McGill Pain Questionnaire. Duration was measured in months. Disability was measured by using Pain Disability Index and depression using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Distress was measured using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and self-efficacy using the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Catastrophizing was measured by Coping Strategies Questionnaire and pain acceptance by the Pain Solutions Questionnaire. No difference was found in mean values of all PSDD between genders and between ethnicities. Years of education did not form an important correlate of PSDD. Catastrophizers experienced more pain and were more disabled. Patients with severe pain experienced greater distress. Depressed patients were more disabled. Patients presenting with a high degree of self-efficacy were likely to have lower pain levels and to be less disabled. Level of acceptance of pain was positively associated with reported duration of pain and negatively associated with total disability. Through this study, more is now known about effects of chronic pain on New Zealanders. The use of validated psychometric testing enables proper assessment and informs clinical management for chronic pain patients

  11. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  12. Efficacy of primary care in a nursing center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvie, C O

    1999-01-01

    Nursing opportunities have expanded beyond the traditional bedside role. Nurses serve in a variety of roles such as administrators, teachers, or primary care givers in a variety of settings. The role of primary care giver is a more recent role; it involves relatively independent nursing practice with clients who have acute or chronic illnesses. Client groups may include the elderly in high rise buildings, mothers and children at schools, or homeless and low-income populations at homeless shelters. This care is often provided in a nursing center. Nursing centers are nurse-managed centers in which nurses are accountable and responsible for care of clients; they are the primary provider of care and the one most seen by clients. Case managers may be in a position to refer patients to nursing centers or to work directly with nurse practitioners in nursing centers. However, questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be addressed for healthcare providers, insurance companies, and patients to be confident in the efficacy of this delivery system. Is the primary care comprehensive? Is it of high quality? Is it cost effective? Is it satisfactory to clients? These and other questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be answered to effect political and other changes needed to fulfill the role of nursing centers envisioned by early leaders of the movement. This article addresses questions related to the efficacy of primary care provided in nursing centers by family nurse practitioners. After defining efficacy, the discussion focuses on the components identified and studied in one nursing center and includes information on opportunities for case managers to utilize nursing centers for referral and appropriate follow-up of their patients.

  13. Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: Recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care objective. Abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, SA; Brugman, E; Verhulst, FC; Verloove-Vanhorick, SP

    2005-01-01

    Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care Objective. To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among pre-school children in the general

  14. Kinship care at community is better model to ensure psychosocial and economic security to orphans living with HIV than from care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S L; Pokhrel, B R; Ayer, R; Belbase, P; Ghimire, M; Gurung, O

    2013-01-01

    There were about 24,000 children affected by AIDS living in Nepal in 2010; of these 5,000 AIDS orphans were in need of immediate support. The objective of this study was to investigate which model of care and support is more appropriate for improving psychosocial and economic security of AIDS orphans. With the documented 5200 cases of AIDS orphans from 42 districts at National Association of People Living with HIV, we purposively selected five districts - one from each development region, based on the highest number of AIDS orphans reported. From five districts, 56 HIV positive double orphans aged 8-18 years and their 42 caregivers were interviewed to find their psychosocial and economic situation. Thirty nine (70%) orphans were found living in kinship care, while 17(30%) were living in institutional care homes. Orphans living in kinship were more optimistic, as they were backed by their close relatives 35 (90%), had birth certificates 35 (90%), ensured inherent family property 21 (54%), obtained basic needs like food, education and shelter from grandparents 23 (59%), and had more than five friends who visited their homes 26 (67%). While, the orphans living in institutional care homes 17(30%) had no birth certificates, fewer contacts with siblings 2 (12%), and none had friends outside the care homes. Kinship care is better model for psychosocial and economic security for AIDS orphans in Nepal, rather than institutional care. Families can provide good protection to AIDS orphans if government provides minimum support to them.

  15. Psychosocial stress and multi-site musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembajwe, Grace; Tveito, Torill Helene; Hopcia, Karen; Kenwood, Christopher; O'Day, Elizabeth Tucker; Stoddard, Anne M; Dennerlein, Jack T; Hashimoto, Dean; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between psychosocial factors at work and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care workers. In a survey of 1,572 workers from two hospitals, occupational psychosocial factors and health outcomes of workers with single and multi-site pain were evaluated using items from the Job Content Questionnaire that was designed to measure psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support. An adapted Nordic Questionnaire provided data on the musculoskeletal pain outcome. Covariates included body mass index, age, gender, and occupation. The analyses revealed statistically significant associations between psychosocial demands and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care associates, nurses, and administrative personnel, both men and women. Supervisor support played a significant role for nurses and women. These results remained statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. These results highlight the associations between workplace psychosocial strain and multi-site musculoskeletal pain, setting the stage for future longitudinal explorations. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Sau Fong Leung, Frederick KK Yeung, Wai Kit Wong School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major healthcare databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy, psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of

  17. Patient- and family-centered care and the pediatrician's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Drawing on several decades of work with families, pediatricians, other health care professionals, and policy makers, the American Academy of Pediatrics provides a definition of patient- and family-centered care. In pediatrics, patient- and family-centered care is based on the understanding that the family is the child's primary source of strength and support. Further, this approach to care recognizes that the perspectives and information provided by families, children, and young adults are essential components of high-quality clinical decision-making, and that patients and family are integral partners with the health care team. This policy statement outlines the core principles of patient- and family-centered care, summarizes some of the recent literature linking patient- and family-centered care to improved health outcomes, and lists various other benefits to be expected when engaging in patient- and family-centered pediatric practice. The statement concludes with specific recommendations for how pediatricians can integrate patient- and family-centered care in hospitals, clinics, and community settings, and in broader systems of care, as well.

  18. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  19. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai Tong; Leung, Sau Fong; Yeung, Frederick Kk; Wong, Wai Kit

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major health care databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy), psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of functioning, and/or relapse rate. However, the comparative effects between these five approaches have not been well studied; thus, we are not able to clearly understand the superiority of any of these interventions. With the

  20. Mass conflict and care in war affected areas. In search of assessment and psychosocial intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Research in this thesis is focused on the relevance of psychosocial programs in areas of mass violence. Central questions are: how to assess needs in terms of psychosocial health, how to best address those needs, and what is the effectiveness of these mental health interventions? Our findings in Che

  1. Mass conflict and care in war affected areas. In search of assessment and psychosocial intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Research in this thesis is focused on the relevance of psychosocial programs in areas of mass violence. Central questions are: how to assess needs in terms of psychosocial health, how to best address those needs, and what is the effectiveness of these mental health interventions? Our findings in Che

  2. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...

  3. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals’, Patients’ and Partners’ Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Tim; Levesque, Janelle V.; Lambert, Sylvie D.; Kelly, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs) regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples’ psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals) and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma). Interviews were analysed using the framework approach. Results Three core themes were identified: “How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?” emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. “What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?” described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. “How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?” described couples’ view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying

  4. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Regan

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma. Interviews were analysed using the framework approach.Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening and

  5. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Tim; Levesque, Janelle V; Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs) regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals) and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma). Interviews were analysed using the framework approach. Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening) and referring

  6. A patient-centered care ethics analysis model for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R; Ells, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    There exists a paucity of ethics resources tailored to rehabilitation. To help fill this ethics resource gap, the authors developed an ethics analysis model specifically for use in rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a process model to guide careful moral reasoning for particularly complex or challenging matters in rehabilitation. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation was developed over several iterations, with feedback at different stages from rehabilitation professionals and bioethics experts. Development of the model was explicitly informed by the theoretical grounding of patient-centered care and the context of rehabilitation, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Being patient centered, the model encourages (1) shared control of consultations, decisions about interventions, and management of the health problems with the patient and (2) understanding the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts. Although the major process headings of the Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation resemble typical ethical decision-making and problem-solving models, the probes under those headings direct attention to considerations relevant to rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a suitable tool for rehabilitation professionals to use (in real time, for retrospective review, and for training purposes) to help arrive at ethical outcomes.

  7. Entre a saúde coletiva e a saúde mental: um instrumental metodológico para avaliação da rede de Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS do Sistema Único de Saúde Public health and mental health: methodological tools to evaluate the Brazilian Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS in the Brazilian Unified Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Teresa Onocko-Campos

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de discussão preliminar sobre possível instrumental metodológico para pesquisa avaliativa da rede de Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS do SUS. Problematiza-se a relevância que a área da saúde mental deveria ter para a saúde coletiva, considerando a alta prevalência de transtornos psíquicos e relativa carência de estudos da interface dessas áreas. Destacam-se as características dos CAPS para demonstrar que são serviços particularmente complexos. Considera-se imprescindível a aproximação das duas áreas para a constituição de um campo interdisciplinar de saberes e práticas, e aponta-se a necessidade dessa convergência para o desenvolvimento de um processo avaliativo sistemático dos CAPS. Levando-se em conta a complexidade do objeto e visando gerar subsídios para a Reforma Psiquiátrica Brasileira, com base em instrumentos da pesquisa avaliativa, propõe-se: a importância de se resgatar a participação de diversos atores no processo avaliativo, a necessidade de coletar e sistematizar diversos estudos desenvolvidos na academia sobre o tema, e a importância de promover um novo território de pesquisa no âmbito das políticas públicas de saúde, que possa subsidiar formuladores, gestores e equipes na reformulação de suas práticas.This article presents a preliminary discussion of potential methodological tools for qualitative research on the Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS. The relevance of mental health within the field of public health is examined. The study focuses on the high prevalence of mental disorders and the disproportionate lack of studies on the interface between mental health and public health. The establishment of an interdisciplinary field between public health and mental health is proposed to meet common needs by achieving similar perspectives in knowledge and practice. A particular group of tools is proposed, emphasizing

  8. METHODS OF PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION IN PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTIONS OF THE ORYOL REGION AT THE MODERN STAGE OF ORGANIZATION OF PSYCHIATRIC CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Gardanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers actual issues of psychosocial rehabilitation at the present stage of psychiatric care to the population of the Oryol region.The purpose. Study and generalize the experience of the use of methods of psychosocial rehabilitation in several psychiatric institutions of the Oryol region.Materials and methods. 1. The analysis of activity of out-patient departments, where we developed a new "development Program of sociorehabilitation service in regional psychoneurologic dispensary". 2. Analysis of the activity of hospital services, where the main role is played by psycho-social rehabilitation. 3. The analysis of new forms of psychosocial rehabilitation: in terms of the specifics of Oryol oblast psychiatric hospital of specialized type with intensive supervision (OPHSTIO.Results. As a result of the analysis we identified the most effective methods of sociorehabilitation: outpatient: "Social card of the outpatient" is intended for persons in need of social, psychological, legal and other professional assistance, that allows to plan and control the types of assistance provided. The organization of a hostel for patients at the outpatient stage, which allowed to introduce a "full" recovery cycle. In OPHSTIO — implementation of multiprofessional teams and "sick tips" and the opening of an Orthodox chapel of the Mother of God icon "All grieving pleasures".Conclusions. Methods of psychosocial rehabilitation allowed to optimize the work of the main stages of treatment and rehabilitation processes, to provide in a timely manner the necessary comprehensive care to patients based on individual needs of the mentally ill in the outpatient and inpatient therapy in the Oryol region.

  9. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  10. Avaliação da rede de centros de atenção psicossocial: entre a saúde coletiva e a saúde mental Evaluación de la red de atención psicosocial en la perspectiva de la salud colectiva, Campinas, Sureste de Brasil Evaluation of the network of psychosocial care centers: between collective and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Teresa Onocko Campos

    2009-08-01

    the transcription of each group's recorded material, narratives were constructed following Ricoeur's theoretical framework. At the second stage of the focus groups, these narratives were presented to the participants, who could contest, correct and validate them. The preliminary results were discussed in workshops, with the aim of developing a good practice guide in CAPS III. RESULTS: The study identified strong points and weaknesses concerning the care provided during the crisis, articulation with the primary care network, formulation of therapeutic projects, management and organization in reference teams, educational background and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: The network of psychosocial care centers in Campinas stands out due to its originality in the implementation of six CAPS III and to its efficacy in providing comprehensive assistance to users and family members in the moment of crisis and in rehabilitation. The organization in reference technician and/or team prevails, as well as the development of therapeutic projects. Night teams reduction is the most important problem and the main source of workers' stress. The professionals' education proved to be insufficient to deal with the challenges faced by these services.

  11. [Teaching patient-centered holistic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Hwang-Ling; Chen, Huei-Ling; Hwu, Yueh-Juen

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education aims to help students understand concepts and gain competencies in holistic care. The purpose of this paper was to present a nursing curriculum that adapted and introduced holistic care into an adult nursing curriculum taught at a university of science and technology. The course framework included both holistic and nursing domains. The holistic aspect addressed client physical psychological-spiritual needs and related factors, health related factors, and the status of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related factors. The nursing aspect addressed the way in which nursing was applied to identify client problems and provide individualized, integrated and continuous care in hospital, family or community based settings employing primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention. Scenario with problem based learning and concept mapping were used in class to guide students to consider in depth the concepts that underpin holistic care.

  12. [The psychosocial aspects of perinatal care and their relationship to selected medical interventions and health complications during parturition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, L; Kodyšová, E; Seidlerová, J

    2012-06-01

    Find association between psychosocial factors of perinatal care and selected childbirth complications and interventions. Original study. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Charles University, Prague. Statistical data analysis of questionnaire survey of low-risk parturients (n=657) was carried out. Respondents were divided into experimental groups (EG) according to experienced interventions and complications (hemorrhage, failure to progress, fetal distress, forceps/VEX delivery, caesarean birth, failure to progress followed by caesarean birth, labour acceleration infusion, other infusion, epidural anesthesia, other form of pharmacological analgesia, episiotomy, amniotomy). EG were compared with a control group (CG) of women with no complications and interventions (n=107) in evaluation of psychosocial factors of perinatal care (healthcare provider attitude; control; communication; woman-friendliness of hospital rules) and physical comfort and services, presence of other persons at birth, prevailing emotional reaction and overall satisfaction with maternity care. The interpretation of results draws from qualitative analysis of open-ended question answers. EG and CG differed significantly in control (all EGs scored lower) and healthcare provider attitude evaluation (significantly more negative perception at EGs: hemorrhage, failure to progress, fetal distress, forceps/VEX delivery, labour acceleration infusion, episiotomy). Significant differences were noted also for woman-friendliness of hospital rules (lower scores for EGs: hemorrhage, failure to progress, failure to progress followed by caesarean birth) and for presence of other persons at birth. Possible interpretations of the above results are discussed. Psychosocial factors of perinatal care constitute important childbirth process determinants, while playing a key role for parturients ability to cope with anxiety and stress connected with childbirth complications and interventions

  13. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  14. Psychosocial determinants of physicians' intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2015-01-22

    Euthanasia remains controversial in Canada and an issue of debate among physicians. Most studies have explored the opinion of health professionals regarding its legalization, but have not investigated their intentions when faced with performing euthanasia. These studies are also considered atheoretical. The purposes of the present study were to fill this gap in the literature by identifying the psychosocial determinants of physicians' intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care and verifying whether respecting the patient's autonomy is important for physicians. A validated anonymous questionnaire based on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behavior was mailed to a random sample of 445 physicians from the province of Quebec, Canada. The response rate was 38.3% and the mean score for intention was 3.94 ± 2.17 (range: 1 to 7). The determinants of intention among physicians were: knowing patients' wishes (OR = 10.77; 95%CI: 1.33-86.88), perceived behavioral control-physicians' evaluation of their ability to adopt a given behavior-(OR = 4.35; 95%CI: 1.44-13.15), moral norm-the appropriateness of adopting a given behavior according to one's personal and moral values-(OR = 3.22; 95%CI: 1.29-8.00) and cognitive attitude-factual consequences of the adoption of a given behavior-(OR = 3.16; 95%CI: 1.20-8.35). This model correctly classified 98.8% of physicians. Specific beliefs that might discriminate physicians according to their level of intention were also identified. For instance, physicians' moral norm was related to the ethical principle of beneficence. Overall, physicians have weak intentions to practice euthanasia in palliative care. Nevertheless, respecting patients' final wishes concerning euthanasia seems to be of particular importance to them and greatly affects their motivation to perform euthanasia.

  15. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R

    2015-01-01

    Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Concept Analysis. Synthesis of literature on family-centered care and its application in for rehabilitation nurses. Family-centered care is a model of collaborative healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers' knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  16. Physical discomfort and psychosocial job stress among male and female operators at telecommunication call centers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Chen, Chih-Yong; Lu, Shih-Yi

    2009-07-01

    The prevalence of job stress, distributions of major job stressors, and associations between perceived job stress levels and multiple physical discomforts are assessed via a cross-sectional study of 1023 male and female operators at telecommunication call centers in Taiwan. Cases of discomfort are identified via questionnaire surveys requiring respondents to self-reported symptoms of discomfort. Information is obtained on demographics, health status, perceived job stress levels, major job stressors and psychosocial job characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression models are developed to predict physical discomfort in nine body areas. 'Eye strain', 'hoarse or painful throat' and 'musculoskeletal discomfort' are the most pronounced and prevalent complaints after prolonged work time at call centers. Female operators had higher prevalence of physical discomfort than male operators for all body areas. 'Encountering difficult customers' ranked as the most important job stress factor among both male and female operators. Working in a call center for more than 4 years is strongly associated with discomfort in all body areas (odds ratio ranges from 1.65 to 2.15). Analysis of risk factors vs. physical discomfort reveals that operators who perceive higher job stress have significantly increased risk of several health complaints, including eye strain, tinnitus, hoarse or painful throat, chronic cough with phlegm, chest tightness, irritable stomach or peptic ulcers, frequent urination and musculoskeletal discomfort.

  17. Differences in the relationship between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with chronic low back pain in six pain rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst Preuper, H.R.; Boonstra, Antje; Wever, D.; Heuts, P.H.T.G.; Dekker, J.H.M.; Smeets, R.J.E.M.; Brouwer, Sandra; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design. A cross sectional multicenter study in six outpatient Rehabilitation Centers (RCs) in the Netherlands. Objective. This study aims to confirm or refute the finding that a strong relationship exists between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with nonspecific c

  18. Differences in the relationship between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with chronic low back pain in six pain rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst Preuper, H.R.; Boonstra, Antje; Wever, D.; Heuts, P.H.T.G.; Dekker, J.H.M.; Smeets, R.J.E.M.; Brouwer, Sandra; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design. A cross sectional multicenter study in six outpatient Rehabilitation Centers (RCs) in the Netherlands. Objective. This study aims to confirm or refute the finding that a strong relationship exists between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with nonspecific

  19. Differences in the relationship between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with chronic low back pain in six pain rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst Preuper, H.R.; Boonstra, Antje; Wever, D.; Heuts, P.H.T.G.; Dekker, J.H.M.; Smeets, R.J.E.M.; Brouwer, Sandra; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design. A cross sectional multicenter study in six outpatient Rehabilitation Centers (RCs) in the Netherlands. Objective. This study aims to confirm or refute the finding that a strong relationship exists between psychosocial distress and self-reported disability in patients with nonspecific c

  20. Obstetric care providers assessing psychosocial risk factors during pregnancy: validation of a short screening tool - the KINDEX Spanish Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridou, Andria; Schauer, Maggie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina

    2014-01-01

    High levels of stress due to diverse psychosocial factors have a direct impact on the mothers' wellbeing during pregnancy and both direct and indirect effects on the fetus. In most cases, psychosocial risk factors present during pregnancy will not disappear after delivery and might influence the parent-child relationship, affecting the healthy development of the offspring in the long term. We introduce a short innovative prenatal assessment to detect psychosocial risk factors through an easy to use instrument for obstetrical medical staff in the daily clinical practice, the KINDEX Spanish Version. In the present study midwives and gynecologists interviewed one hundred nineteen pregnant women in a public health center using the KINDEX Spanish Version. Sixty-seven women were then randomly selected to participate in an extended standardized validation interview conducted by a clinical psychologist using established questionnaires to assesses current stress (ESI, PSS-14), symptoms of psychopathology (HSCL-25, PDS) and traumatic experiences (PDS, CFV). Ethical approval was granted and informed consent was required for participation in this study. The KINDEX sum score, as assessed by medical staff, correlated significantly with stress, psychopathology and trauma as measured during the clinical expert interview. The KINDEX shows strong concurrent validity. Its use by medical staff in daily clinical practice is feasible for public health contexts. Certain items in the KINDEX are related to the respective scales assessing the same risks (e.g.PSS-4 as the shorter version of the PSS-14 and items from the ESI) used in the validation interview. The KINDEX Spanish Version is a valid tool in the hands of medical staff to identify women with multiple psychosocial risk factors in public health settings. The KINDEX Spanish Version could serve as a base-instrument for the referral of at-risk women to appropriate psychosocial intervention. Such early interventions could prove pivotal

  1. Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal; Lane, Susan; Myint-U, Khinlei; Havasy, Robert; Carter, Michael; Kvedar, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the history, current status, and future plans of the Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health (the Center). Established in 1995 by Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals, the Center develops strategies to move healthcare from the hospital and doctor's office into the day-to-day lives of patients. It leverages information technology to help manage chronic conditions, maintain health and wellness, and improve adherence to prescribed regimen, patient engagement, and clinical outcomes. Since inception, it has served over 30,000 patients. The Center's core functions include videoconference-based real-time virtual visits, home vital sign monitoring, store-and-forward online consultations, social media, mobile technology, and other novel methods of providing care and enabling health and wellness remotely and independently of traditional time and geographic constraints. It offers a wide range of services, programs, and research activities. The Center comprises over 40 professionals with various technical and professional skills. Internally within Partners HealthCare, the role of the Center is to collaborate, guide, advise, and support the experimentation with and the deployment and growth of connected health technologies, programs, and services. Annually, the Center engages in a deliberative planning process to guide its annual research and operational agenda. The Center enjoys a diversified revenue stream. Funding sources include institutional operating budget/research funds from Partners HealthCare, public and private competitive grants and contracts, philanthropic contributions, ad hoc funding arrangements, and longer-term contractual arrangements with third parties.

  2. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  3. Healthcare professionals' views on patient-centered care in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Berghout (Mathilde); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); L. Leensvaart (Laszlo); J.M. Cramm (Jane)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patient-centered care (PCC) is a main determinant of care quality. Research has shown that PCC is a multi-dimensional concept, and organizations that provide PCC well report better patient and organizational outcomes. However, little is known about the relative importance of

  4. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A rede social de indivíduos sob tratamento em um CAPS ad: o ecomapa como recurso La red social de individuos bajo tratamiento en un centro de atención psicosocial de alcohol y drogas (CAPS ad: el ecomapa como recurso The social network of individuals under treatment at a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs (CAPS ad: the ecomap as a resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Souza

    2009-06-01

    , familiar e individual a ser contempladas en la planificación de los cuidados de la salud, sobre todo en salud mental.This study assessed individuals undergoing treatment at a Psychosocial Care Center for Alcohol and Drugs Abuse (CAPS ad in Southern Brazil. There were 300 hours of participant observation and focal groups, in which the ecomap was used as an instrument to describe social support sources. The study objective was to identify the social network of individuals undergoing treatment due to drug abuse, promoting a reflection about the quality and situation of the bonds established with the people they considered important. The results showed a trajectory of separations and losses. The ecomap permitted to identify points of vulnerability in these subjects' bonds, and is thus an ethical strategy that allows for a joint identification (between professionals and users of the needs regarding the social, family, and individual contexts that should be addressed when planning health care, especially concerning mental health.

  6. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  7. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship—what I refer to as care robots—require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What’s more, given the stage of their develo...

  8. Psychosocial Influences on Disaster Preparedness in San Francisco Recipients of Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Robyn R; Portacolone, Elena; Nwankwo, Ezinne M; Zhi, Qi; Qureshi, Kristine A; Raveis, Victoria H

    2016-12-27

    Disasters disproportionately impact certain segments of the population, including children, pregnant women, people living with disabilities and chronic conditions and those who are underserved and under-resourced. One of the most vulnerable groups includes the community-dwelling elderly. Post-disaster analyses indicate that these individuals have higher risk of disaster-related morbidity and mortality. They also have suboptimal levels of disaster preparedness in terms of their ability to shelter-in-place or evacuate to a shelter. The reasons for this have not been well characterized, although impaired health, financial limitations, and social isolation are believed to act as barriers to preparedness as well as to adaptability to changes in the environment both during and in the immediate aftermath of disasters. In order to identify strategies that address barriers to preparedness, we recently conducted a qualitative study of 50 elderly home care recipients living in San Francisco. Data were collected during in-home, in-person interviews using a semi-structured interview guide that included psychosocial constructs based on the social cognitive preparedness model and a new 13-item preparedness checklist. The mean preparedness score was 4.74 (max 13, range 1-11, SD. 2.11). Over 60 % of the participants reported that they had not made back-up plans for caregiver assistance during times of crisis, 74 % had not made plans for transportation to a shelter, 56 % lacked a back-up plan for electrical equipment in case of power outages, and 44 % had not prepared an emergency contacts list-the most basic element of preparedness. Impairments, disabilities, and resource limitations served as barriers to preparedness. Cognitive processes that underlie motivation and intentions for preparedness behaviors were lacking. There were limitations with respect to critical awareness of hazards (saliency), self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and perceived responsibility. There was also a

  9. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynsberghe, van A.

    2013-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship—what I refer to as care robots—require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vu

  10. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided...... self-determination [GSD]. METHODS: Comparative analysis included eight components: (1) philosophical origin; (2) development in original clinical setting; (3) theoretical underpinnings; (4) overarching goal and supportive processes; (5) general principles, strategies or tools for engaging peoples; (6...... on managing ambivalence. IIS and GSD were based on grounded theories, and MI was intuitively developed. All apply processes and strategies to advance professionals' communication skills and engagement; GSD includes context-specific reflection sheets. All offer training programs; MI and GSD include fidelity...

  11. [Family-centered care and post-traumatic stress disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Huei; Sun, Yin-Jhen; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2012-06-01

    A year has passed since a major earthquake and tsunami hit northeastern Honshu, Japan in March 2011. Amidst mourning for the tens of thousands of victims, survivors have just begun the difficult and urgent tasks of rebuilding. Many survivors suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD causes chronic, long-term suffering for patients and their families and inevitably burdens social and medical care systems. This article tries to integrate PTSD evidence-based treatment experiences into a practical and detailed nursing intervention protocol for PTSD. We also elicit the function and effect of "family-centered care." We hope that nursing professionals apply family-centered care principles to PTSD treatment and care approaches in order to promote PTSD patient resilience. Nurses can thus enhance PTSD care efficacy and improve the opportunity for PTSD patients to overcome their symptoms and recover their life.

  12. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  13. Evaluation of Managerial Needs for Palliative Care Centers: Perspectives of Medical Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafadar, Didem; Ince, Nurhan; Akcakaya, Adem; Gumus, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    Palliative therapies have an important role in increasing the quality of healthcare and in dealing with physical and psychosocial problems due to cancer. We here aimed to evaluate the managerial perspectives and opinions of the hospital managers and clinical directors about specialized palliative care centers. This study was conducted in two large-scale hospitals in which oncology care is given with medical directors (n:70). A questionnaire developed by the researchers asking about demographic characteristics and professional experience, opinions and suggestions of medical directors about providing and integrating palliative care into healthcare was used and responses were analyzed. Potential barriers in providing palliative care (PC) and integrating PC into health systems were perceived as institutional by most of the doctors (97%) and nurses (96%). Social barriers were reported by 54% of doctors and 82% of nurses. Barriers due to interest and knowledge of health professionals about PC were reported by 76% of doctors and 75% of nurses. Among encouragement ideas to provide PC were dealing with staff educational needs (72%), improved working conditions (77%) and establishing a special PC unit (49)%. An independent PC unit was suggested by 27.7% of participants and there was no difference between the hospitals. To overcome the barriers for integration of PC into health systems, providing education for health professionals and patient relatives, raising awareness in society, financial arrangements and providing infrastructure were suggested. The necessity for planning and programming were emphasized. In our study, the opinions and perspectives of hospital managers and clinical directors were similar to current approaches. Managerial needs for treating cancer in efficient cancer centers, increasing the capacity of health professionals to provide care in every stage of cancer, effective education planning and patient care management were emphasized.

  14. Patient-centered Fertility Care: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Healthcare areas, especially fertility care (commonly accompanied with high emotions, as well as long-term and recurring treatment periods could exclusively benefit from patient-centered care (PCC. Despite evident advantages of PCC, this approach has not been practiced as a routine procedure in current clinical environments yet, even in western developed countries. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate the significance and different aspects of PCC, while emphasizing on patient-centered fertility care, its challenges, and applicable recommendations in this regard. Methods: This narrative review was conducted on 29 relevant medical and clinical papers (published during 1990-2015 collected using various national and international databases (e.g., SID, Magiran, Medlib, Google scholar, Proquest, Pubmed, Wiley, Science direct, and Scopus. Key words and phrases used in this review were “infertility”, “fertility care”, “childlessness”, “patient-centered care”, “patient-centered fertility care” “shared decision-making”, “infertile patient preferences”, and “patient involvement in fertility care”. Results: According to the literature, implementation challenges of patient-centered fertility care were reported as different individual and organizational factors. These factors include lack of professional motivation to change, underestimating the significance of patient-centeredness by healthcare professionals, difficulty in translation of feedback into concrete measures, lack of time and financial resources, insufficient experience of healthcare professionals with regard to identification of needs and preferences of patients, traditional organizational culture, and common misconceptions. Conclusion: Promotion of patient-centered fertility services requires the identification of infertile needs and priorities of individuals, designation of interventional and supportive programs based on sociocultural

  15. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  16. Pattern of disability among persons who availed half-way home-care services for psychosocial rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is dearth of studies related to pattern of disability among persons who availed psychosocial rehabilitation services in India. We studied the pattern of disability among persons who availed half-way home-care services for psychosocial rehabilitation. Materials and Methods: Out of 130 case files of discharged patients, 50 files were randomly selected for data collection. Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Schedule was used to assess the pattern of disability in the sample. Results: The study revealed that only one-third (35% of the residents had disability in self-care, 41% in communication and understanding and 47% in interpersonal relationship. Overall, majority (76% of the respondents had moderate level of psychiatric disability at the time of discharge from half-way home. There was no significant relationship between gender and type of psychiatric illness with the level of disability. The overall disability correlated positively with the duration of illness (rs=0.39. Conclusion: Three-fourth of the residents who availed half-way home-care services had moderate level of disability.

  17. Self-reported patient psychosocial needs in integrated primary health care: A role for social work in interdisciplinary teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Shelley; Frankford, Rachel; Allan, Kate; Williams, Charmaine; Schwartz, Celia; Yaworski, Andrea; Janz, Gwen; Malek-Saniee, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Despite being identified as significant determinants of health, depression and anxiety continue to be underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. This study examined the psychosocial health needs of patients at four urban interdisciplinary primary health teams. Quantitative analysis revealed that nearly 80% of patients reported anxiety and/or depression. Self-reported anxiety and depression was correlated with poor social relationships, compromised health status and underdeveloped problem-solving skills. These findings suggest that social workers have a vital role to play within interdisciplinary primary health teams in the amelioration of factors associated with anxiety and depression.

  18. O psiquiatra na atenção psicossocial: entre o luto e a liberdade The psychiatrist in psychosocial care: between grief and liberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardônio Menezes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, vemos surgir, a partir da década de setenta, diversas propostas inovadoras no campo da atenção à saúde mental. A partir de então, multiplicam-se no país ambulatórios de psicologia e psiquiatria, hospitais-dia, residências terapêuticas e diversos núcleos/centros de atenção psicossocial. Transformados em política pública, os centros de atenção psicossocial espalham-se pelo país, preconizando um atendimento ambulatorial, interdisciplinar e de orientação territorial. Geralmente formado sob os auspícios de um grande hospital, o psiquiatra que se propõe a trabalhar, a partir da ótica psicossocial, imerso em uma pequena cidade, vê-se exposto às diversas contradições e ilogicidades do discurso psiquiátrico clássico. Os variados saberes locais são uma ameaça ao saber psiquiátrico medicamente constituído. Respostas, antes fáceis no interior do hospital, têm variadas implicações no território e adquirem uma complexidade para a qual o psiquiatra não se encontra preparado. Assim, este trabalho tenta demonstrar a dissonância entre essas duas espécies de psiquiatria: a clássica (afinada com a biologia, com a normatividade e com a instituição e a psicossocial (que se volta para respostas localmente construídas e que se afina com o homem, em uma dimensão muito além do seu corpo.Since the seventies Brazil has witnessed a diversity of new proposals in the field of mental health care. Since then, the psychology and psychiatry ambulatories, day-hospitals, therapeutical shelters and psychosocial care centers have multiplied. Transformed into a public policy, the psychosocial care centers are spread all over the country, offering outpatient care with interdisciplinary and territorial orientation. Generally established under the auspices of a great hospital, the psychiatrist who considers working from a psychosocial perspective in a small city, has to deal with the classic contradictions of the psychiatric

  19. [Surgical Center environment and its elements: implications for nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denise Conceição; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to characterize the elements that constitute the environment of the Surgical Center and to analyze its implications for dynamic of care and nursing care. Based on the Environmental Theory's principals. Participated twelve nurses from the Surgical Center of a College Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Data were gathered through the creativity and sensitivity technique "Map-Speaker", semi-structered interviews and participant observation, and were analyzed by thematic categories. The results showed that care can happen directly and indirectly in favor of full client recovery, counting the environment that the integrate in purpose to maintain harmonic and balanced. The nurse interventions aim to maintain the environment in favorable conditions so that a higher standard of care can be promoted.

  20. Identification and management of psychosocial problems among toddlers in Dutch preventive child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Brugman, E.; Verhulst, F.C.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among preschool children in the general population and to determine the association with parent-reported behavioral and emotional problems, sociodemographic factors, and m

  1. Identification and management of psychosocial problems among toddlers in Dutch preventive child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Brugman, E.; Verhulst, F.C.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among preschool children in the general population and to determine the association with parent-reported behavioral and emotional problems, sociodemographic factors, and m

  2. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  3. Psychosocial Correlates of Burnout and Depression in HIV Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalimi, Hamid; Roffe, Michael W.

    Job stress in health care professionals who provide care to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients has been a subject of interest to a number of health center and hospital physicians, administrators, and to some extent, behavioral scientists. In this study psychosocial correlates of burnout and depression in HIV counselors were…

  4. Obesity perceptions and documentation among primary care clinicians at a rural academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Sohaib; Lasky, Rosalind; Brooks, W Blair; Batsis, John A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity recognition in primary care is important to address the epidemic. We aimed to evaluate primary care clinician-reported documentation, management practices, beliefs and attitudes toward obesity compared to body mass index (BMI) calculation, obesity prevalence and actual documentation of obesity as an active problem in electronic health record in a rural academic center. Our target population for previously validated clinician survey was 56 primary care providers working at 3 sites. We used calendar year 2012 data for assessment of baseline system performance for metrics of documentation of BMI in primary care visits, and proportion of visits in patients with obesity with obesity as a problem. Standard statistical methods assessed the data. Survey response rate was 91%. Average age of respondents was 48.9 years and 62.7% were females. 72.5% clinicians reported having normal BMI. The majority of clinicians reported regularly documenting obesity as an active problem, and utilized motivational interviewing and basic good nutrition and healthy exercise. Clinicians identified lack of discipline and exercise time, access to unhealthy food and psychosocial issues as major barriers. Most denied disliking weight loss discussion or patients taking up too much time. In 21,945 clinic visits and 11,208 annual preventive care visits in calendar year 2012, BMI was calculated in 93% visits but obesity documentation as an active problem only 27% of patients meeting BMI criteria for obesity. Despite high clinician-reported documentation of obesity as an active problem, actual obesity documentation rates remained low in a rural academic medical center. Copyright © 2015 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical and psychosocial function in residential aged-care elders: effect of Nintendo Wii Sports games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Power, Nicola; Wooller, Leslie; Lucas, Patricia; Whatman, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental pilot study examined whether the Nintendo Wii Sports (NWS) active video game (exergame) system could significantly improve the functional ability, physical activity levels, and quality of life of 34 older adults (4 men and 30 women, 83 ± 8 yr) living in 2 residential aged-care (RAC) centers. Change score analyses indicated the intervention group had significantly greater increases in bicep curl muscular endurance, physical activity levels, and psychological quality of life than the control group (p < .05). Analysis of the quotes underlying the 3 themes (feeling silly, feeling good; having fun; and something to look forward to) suggested that intervention group participants developed a sense of empowerment and achievement after some initial reluctance and anxiousness. They felt that the games were fun and provided an avenue for greater socialization. These results add some further support to the utilization of NWS exergames in the RAC context.

  6. Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, R; Brisson, C; Vinet, A; Vézina, M; Lower, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects. Methods The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was performed, using a quantitative approach, to determine the prevalence of adverse psychosocial work factors and of psychological distress in the hospital compared to an appropriate reference population. In addition, a qualitative approach included observation in the care units, interviews with key informants, and collaborative work with an intervention team (IT) including all stakeholders. Results The prior risk evaluation showed a high prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors and psychological distress among care providers compared to a representative sample of workers from the general population. Psychosocial variables at work associated with psychological distress in the prior risk evaluation were high psychological demands (prevalence ratio (PR) = 2.27), low social support from supervisors and co‐workers (PR = 1.35), low reward (PR = 2.92), and effort‐reward imbalance (PR = 2.65). These results showed the empirical relevance of an intervention on the four selected adverse psychosocial factors among care providers. Qualitative methods permitted the identification of 56 adverse conditions and of their solutions. Targets of intervention were related to team work and team spirit, staffing processes, work organisation, training, communication, and ergonomy. Conclusion This study adds to the scarce literature describing the development and implementation of preventive intervention aimed at reducing psychosocial factors at work and their health effects. Even if adverse conditions in the psychosocial environment and

  7. A comprehensive approach in hospice shared care in Taiwan: Nonelderly patients have more physical, psychosocial and spiritual suffering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Hsien Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While symptomatic differences exist between younger and older advanced cancer patients, few studies have examined the differences in their care with respect to age. Our goals were to examine the influences of age differences on physical, psychosocial and spiritual distress among advanced cancer patients. Advanced cancer patients who resided in Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital during 2007–2008 were recruited. Data were collected through professional consultants. The influences of age variations on physical, psychosocial and spiritual distress in nonelderly (<60 years old and elderly (≧60 years old patients were analyzed. A total of 1013 advanced cancer patients were included in the analyses with 467 nonelderly patients and 546 elderly patients. Nonelderly patients were identified to have a higher baseline pain level (4.0 vs. 2.8, p<0.001, breakthrough pain (19.3% vs. 9.9%, p<0.01, insomnia (6.4% vs. 2.7%, p=0.006, emotional distress (69.0% vs. 60.6%, p=0.013, and unwillingness to pass away because of concern for loved ones (18.8% vs. 11.9%, p=0.003 with significant difference. Elderly ones were concerned about unfulfilled wishes (29.7% vs. 18.4%, p<0.001 in spiritual concerns. After adjustments in regression models, nonelderly age (<60 years old still revealed significant positive or negative impact on all categories of distress. Patients aged under 60 years have more physical, psychosocial and spiritual suffering. This study suggested that professional practitioners should provide intensive care for vulnerable terminally ill cancer patients.

  8. Barriers for domestic violence screening in primary health care centers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iman Y. Alotaby

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... A self- administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: Barriers ... spite frequent visits to the health care centers, to disclose their experience of IPV .... domain dealing with the victim herself showed similar patterns ... Guidelines recommended that all adolescent and adult patients should be ...

  9. The web site of the center to advance palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    The web site of the Center to Advance Palliative Care is reviewed. This is an excellent resource containing resources that address financial tutorials and customizable Excel worksheets, development and marketing tools, particularly the decision checklists, satisfaction tools, the information on tracking and reporting outcomes, bereavement tools and a press kit.

  10. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of "excellent" pediatric healthcare providers - a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers.

  11. Adverse psychosocial consequences: Compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious traumatization: Are nurses who provide palliative and hematological cancer care vulnerable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Sabo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The work environment significantly affects the physical, psychological, emotional and/or spiritual wellbeing of individuals is unquestionable. Adverse effects have been noted among healthcare professionals working with clients experiencing pain and suffering often associated with cancer, palliative or end-of-life care; however, little is known about how or in which manner the nurse-patient-family relationship may affect the psychosocial health and wellbeing of nurses working in these areas. Three concepts have been highlighted as most frequently associated with the adverse consequences of caring work: these are compassion fatigue (secondary traumatic stress, burnout and vicarious traumatization. The following discussion investigates these concepts and their implications on palliative and hematological cancer nursing practice.

  12. Adverse childhood experiences and psychosocial well-being of women who were in foster care as children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskas, Delilah; Tessin, Dale H

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that many children in foster care later have psychosocial problems as adults; this is often attributed to cumulative adversities and a lack of supportive caregivers. The risk factors associated with foster care, such as maternal separation and multiple placements, often counteract many protective factors that can ameliorate the effects of childhood adversities. This study assessed the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and psychosocial well-being in women who were in foster care as children. A total of 101 women aged 18-71 years (mean, 36.83 [12.95] years) completed an anonymous online survey based on the 10-item ACE Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire. More than 56% of respondents were identified as experiencing current psychological distress. Sense of coherence scores (mean, 54.26 [15.35]) showed a significant inverse association with both General Health Questionnaire (mean, 14.83 [5.88]) and ACE (mean, 5.68 [2.90]) scores (r = -0.64 and -0.31, respectively) and 97% reported at least 1 ACE, 70% reported ≥ 5 and 33% reported ≥ 8. Linear regressions indicated that ACEs reported to occur before foster care were associated with lower levels of sense of coherence (8%) and higher levels of psychological distress (6%). Physical neglect and living in a dysfunctional household (parental loss, maternal abuse, or household member associated with substance abuse or prison) significantly decreased during foster care by 16 and 19 percentage points, respectively. Rates of emotional and physical abuse did not change. The number of ACEs was associated with the level of psychological distress. Our findings suggest that children entering the foster care system are already vulnerable and at risk of experiencing ACEs during foster care and psychological distress during adulthood. Measures implemented to protect children must not cause more harm than good. Social services that preserve

  13. Psychosocial determinants of physicians’ intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Background Euthanasia remains controversial in Canada and an issue of debate among physicians. Most studies have explored the opinion of health professionals regarding its legalization, but have not investigated their intentions when faced with performing euthanasia. These studies are also considered atheoretical. The purposes of the present study were to fill this gap in the literature by identifying the psychosocial determinants of physicians’ intention to practice euthanasia in palliative ...

  14. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  15. Psychosocial Work Stressors, Work Fatigue, and Musculoskeletal Disorders: Comparison between Emergency and Critical Care Nurses in Brunei Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hanif; Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah; Naing, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Little evidence estimated the exposure of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders for nurses working in South-East Asian region, and research on this subject is almost nonexistent in Brunei. The main aim of our study was to provide a comprehensive exploration and estimate exposure of the study variables amongst emergency (ER) and critical care (CC) nurses in Brunei. The study also aims to compare whether experiences of ER nurses differ from those of CC nurses. This cross-sectional study was implemented in the ER and CC departments across Brunei public hospitals from February to April 2016 by using Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II, Occupational Fatigue Exhaustion Recovery scale, and Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. In total, 201 ER and CC nurses (82.0% response rate) participated in the study. Quantitative demands of CC nurses were significantly higher than ER nurses. Even so, ER nurses were 4.0 times more likely [95% confidence interval (2.21, 7.35)] to experience threats of violence, and 2.8 times more likely [95% confidence interval: (1.50, 5.29)] to experience chronic fatigue. The results revealed that nurses experienced high quantitative demands, work pace, stress, and burnout. High prevalence of chronic and persistent fatigue, threats of violence and bullying, and musculoskeletal pain at the neck, shoulder, upper and lower back, and foot region, was also reported. This study has provided good estimates for the exposure rate of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Brunei. It provided important initial insight for nursing management and policymakers to make informed decisions on current and future planning to provide nurses with a conducive work environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The correlation between ostomy knowledge and self-care ability with psychosocial adjustment in Chinese patients with a permanent colostomy: a descriptive study .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Meng, Ai-feng; Yang, Li-Fang; Zhang, Yi-nan

    2013-07-01

    A colostomy can have a negative impact on patient quality of life. Research suggests that psychosocial adaptation is positively associated with quality of life, but few reports address this adaptation and its related factors in patients with a permanent colostomy. A 4-month, descriptive study was conducted to assess the impact of ostomy knowledge and ability to self-care on the psychosocial adjustment of 54 Chinese outpatients (47 men, 14 participants 40 to 50 years old, 40 participants 50 to 70 years old) with a permanent colostomy to investigate the correlation between stoma knowledge, self-care ability, and psychosocial adjustment. Assessment instruments included a sociodemographic data questionnaire and a Chinese translation of the Ostomy Adjustment Inventory-23 that comprises 20 items in three domains (positive emotions, negative emotions, and social life). Participants rated statements on a scale from 0 (totally disagree) to 4 (totally agree); a score of 40 indicates a low level of psychosocial adjustment. Participants also completed the Stoma-related Knowledge Scale, comprising 14 5-point Likert scale questions where low scores indicate low knowledge, and they answered one question regarding self-care ability. Data were analyzed using statistical software for social science. The average stoma-related knowledge score suggested moderate levels of knowledge (45.112 ± 13.358). Twenty (20) participants managed all stoma care aspects independently, 30 required some assistance, and four (4) required care by someone else. The three domains of psychosocial adjustment scores (positive emotions, negative emotions, and social life) were 17.60 ± 4.093,12.92 ± 3.440, and 19.15 ± 6.316, respectively. Knowledge and the three domains of psychosocial adjustment were positively correlated with positive emotion (r = .610, P = 0.001), negative emotion (r = .696, P = 0.000), and social life adjustment (r = .617, P = 0.001). A significant difference in psychosocial adjustment

  17. Primary brain tumor patients' supportive care needs and multidisciplinary rehabilitation, community and psychosocial support services: awareness, referral and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbecker, Danette; Yates, Patsy

    2016-03-01

    Primary brain tumors are associated with significant physical, cognitive and psychosocial changes. Although treatment guidelines recommend offering multidisciplinary rehabilitation and support services to address patients' residual deficits, the extent to which patients access such services is unclear. This study aimed to assess patients' supportive care needs early after diagnosis, and quantify service awareness, referral and utilization. A population-based sample of 40 adults recently diagnosed with primary brain tumors was recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry, representing 18.9 % of the eligible population of 203 patients. Patients or carer proxies completed surveys of supportive care needs at baseline (approximately 3 months after diagnosis) and 3 months later. Descriptive statistics summarized needs and service utilization, and linear regression identified predictors of service use. Unmet supportive care needs were highest at baseline for all domains, and highest for the physical and psychological needs domains at each time point. At follow-up, participants reported awareness of, referral to, and use of 32 informational, support, health professional or practical services. All or almost all participants were aware of at least one informational (100 %), health professional (100 %), support (97 %) or practical service (94 %). Participants were most commonly aware of speech therapists (97 %), physiotherapists (94 %) and diagnostic information from the internet (88 %). Clinician referrals were most commonly made to physiotherapists (53 %), speech therapists (50 %) and diagnostic information booklets (44 %), and accordingly, participants most commonly used physiotherapists (56 %), diagnostic information booklets (47 %), diagnostic information from the internet (47 %), and speech therapists (43 %). Comparatively low referral to and use of psychosocial services may limit patients' abilities to cope with their condition and the changes they

  18. Does poor school performance cause later psychosocial problems among children in foster care? Evidence from national longitudinal registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Hilma; Brännström, Lars; Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders

    2016-07-01

    Research has shown that children in foster care are a high-risk group for adverse economic, social and health related outcomes in young adulthood. Children's poor school performance has been identified as a major risk factor for these poor later life outcomes. Aiming to support the design of effective intervention strategies, this study examines the hypothesized causal effect of foster children's poor school performance on subsequent psychosocial problems, here conceptualized as economic hardship, illicit drug use, and mental health problems, in young adulthood. Using the potential outcomes approach, longitudinal register data on more than 7500 Swedish foster children born 1973-1978 were analyzed by means of doubly robust treatment-effect estimators. The results show that poor school performance has a negative impact on later psychosocial problems net of observed background attributes and potential selection on unobservables, suggesting that the estimated effects allow for causal interpretations. Promotion of school performance may thus be a viable intervention path for policymakers and practitioners interested in improving foster children's overall life chances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life of Latin-American Immigrants and Spanish-Born Attended in Spanish Primary Health Care: Socio-Demographic and Psychosocial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Bragado-Alvárez, Carmen; Abánades-Herranz, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compares the health-related quality of life of Spanish-born and Latin American-born individuals settled in Spain. Socio-demographic and psychosocial factors associated with health-related quality of life are analyzed. Methods A cross-sectional Primary Health Care multi center-based study of Latin American-born (n = 691) and Spanish-born (n = 903) outpatients from 15 Primary Health Care Centers (Madrid, Spain). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess health-related quality of life. Socio-demographic, psychosocial, and specific migration data were also collected. Results Compared to Spanish-born participants, Latin American-born participants reported higher health-related quality of life in the physical functioning and vitality dimensions. Across the entire sample, Latin American-born participants, younger participants, men and those with high social support reported significantly higher levels of physical health. Men with higher social support and a higher income reported significantly higher mental health. When stratified by gender, data show that for men physical health was only positively associated with younger age. For women, in addition to age, social support and marital status were significantly related. Both men and women with higher social support and income had significantly better mental health. Finally, for immigrants, the physical and mental health components of health-related quality of life were not found to be significantly associated with any of the pre-migration factors or conditions of migration. Only the variable “exposure to political violence” was significantly associated with the mental health component (p = 0.014). Conclusions The key factors to understanding HRQoL among Latin American-born immigrants settled in Spain are age, sex and social support. Therefore, strategies to maintain optimal health outcomes in these immigrant communities should include public policies on

  20. Estigma e violências no trato com a loucura: narrativas de centros de atenção psicossocial, Bahia e Sergipe Estigma y violencias en el trato con la locura: narrativas de centros de atención psicosocial, Bahia y Sergipe (Noreste de Brasil Stigma and violence in dealing with madness: narratives from psychosocial care centers in Bahia and Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Nunes

    2009-08-01

    el concepto de estigma propuesto por Goffman y fueron sistematizadas cuatro tipos de violencia: interpersonal, institucional, simbólica y estructural. RESULTADOS: Usuarios y familiares relataron ejemplos de descalificaciones, reprensiones, desagrados, humillaciones, negligencia y agresiones físicas, con fines de dominación, explotación y opresión. Profesionales refirieron que personas que sufren trastornos mentales permanecen como centro de prejuicios arraigados y naturalizados en la cultura. La principal consecuencia fue el mantenimiento del aislamiento, de la vida social como forma de "tratamiento" o como actitud excluyente manifestada por reacciones discriminatorias, que se presentan como rechazo, indiferencia y agresividad verbal o física. CONCLUSIONES: Las variadas formas de expresión del estigma denotan una situación sociocultural de violencias contra los portadores de trastornos mentales. Se propone la constitución de observatorios estatales capaces de planificar y evaluar contra-acciones a las estigmatizaciones.OBJECTIVE: To analyze stigmatization processes and types of violence experienced by individuals with mental disorders. METHODS: A qualitative study was carried out, based on individual interviews with users and focus groups with family members and professionals at five psychosocial care centers in the municipalities of Itaberaba, Lauro de Freitas, Salvador, Vitória da Conquista, and Aracaju, Northeastern Brazil, in 2006-2007. The analysis categories were constructed based on the stigma concept proposed by Goffman, and four types of violence were systematized: interpersonal, institutional, symbolic and structural. RESULTS: Users and family members recounted examples of disqualification, reprimands, embarrassment, humiliation, negligence and physical aggression that had the aims of domination, exploitation and oppression. Professionals reported that people who suffer from mental disorders remain the target of prejudice that is culturally

  1. Contribution of the psychosocial work environment to psychological distress among health care professionals before and during a major organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Lesage, Alain D; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Laroche, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between 4 dimensions of the psychosocial work environment (psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and effort-reward) among health care professionals as well as their psychological distress during a reorganization process. A correlational descriptive design was used for this quantitative study. A total of 159 health care professionals completed the questionnaire at T1, and 141 at T2. First, before the work reorganization, effort-reward imbalance was the sole variable of the psychological work environment that significantly predicted psychological distress. Second, the high overall level of psychological distress increased during the process of organizational change (from T1 to T2). Finally, effort-reward imbalance, high psychological demands, and low decision latitude were all significant predictors of psychological distress at T2, during the organizational change. In conclusion, to reduce the expected negative outcomes of restructuring on health care practitioners, managers could increase the number of opportunities for rewards, carefully explain the demands, and clarify the tasks to be performed by each of the employees to reduce their psychological burden and increase their perceptions of autonomy.

  2. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  3. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of theory to family-centered care: a role for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered care is an emerging trend in health care settings today. An explanation, principles, and a definition of family-centered care are offered and discussed. A theoretical framework, Balance Theory of Coordination, which can be utilized by social workers to develop and enhance family-centered care practices, is explained and discussed. Various family-centered care practices are examined within the context of Balance Theory of Coordination as examples.

  5. Improving the financial viability of primary care health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, S A; Knickman, J R; Hanson, K L

    1994-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national demonstration program to improve the long-term financial viability of small not-for-profit primary care health centers. The program initiatives and their implementation are described in some detail. A standard pre/post study design was used to measure the impact of the initiatives on general outcome measures, financial ratios, and the utilization of management techniques. Overall, demonstration centers showed improvement over the study period. Notable short-term improvements included significant growth in the volume of patient visits and increased profit. Observed changes also revealed an increased use of sophisticated management techniques, expected to positively affect longer-term financial health. The findings suggest that improving the financial viability of health centers need not be expensive.

  6. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  7. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  9. Barriers along the care cascade of HIV-infected men in a large urban center of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael; MacCarthy, Sarah; Batson, Ashley; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Rasanathan, Jennifer; Nunn, Amy; Silva, Luis Augusto; Dourado, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Global and national HIV/AIDS policies utilize the care cascade to emphasize the importance of continued engagement in HIV services from diagnosis to viral suppression. Several studies have documented barriers that men experience in accessing services at specific stages of care, but few have analyzed how these barriers operate along the care cascade. Brazil offers a unique setting for analyzing barriers to HIV care because it is a middle-income country with a large HIV epidemic and free, universal access to HIV/AIDS services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2011 with HIV-infected men (n = 25) receiving care at the only HIV/AIDS state reference center in Salvador, Brazil, the third largest city in the country. Interviews were transcribed and coded for analysis. Researchers identified barriers to services along the care cascade: health service-related obstacles (poor-quality care, lengthy wait times, and drug supply problems); psychosocial and emotional challenges (fear of disclosure and difficulty accepting HIV diagnosis); indirect costs (transportation and absenteeism at work or school); low perceived risk of HIV; and toxicity and complexity of antiretroviral drug (ARV) regimens. The stages of the care cascade interrupted by each barrier were also identified. Most barriers affected multiple, and often all, stages of care, while toxicity and complexity of ARV regimens was only present at a single care stage. Efforts to eliminate more prevalent barriers have the potential to improve care continuity at multiple stages. Going forward, assessing the relative impact of barriers along one's entire care trajectory can help tailor improvements in service provision, facilitate achievement of viral suppression, and improve access to life-saving testing, treatment, and care.

  10. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  11. Patient-centered care: turning the rhetoric into reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Joel S; Millenson, Michael L; Haring, R Sterling

    2017-01-01

    Although patient-centered care (PCC) was proclaimed a core health system aim in a 2001 Institute of Medicine report, it remains one of the most-used and least-understood terms in healthcare. We interviewed leaders at 15 Medicare accountable care organizations (ACOs) across the country that have been the most successful in putting patient-centeredness into actual practice to develop an operational definition. The ACOs we spoke with had a 3-pronged practical approach of: 1) patients as partners, 2) proactive customer-service orientation, and 3) care coordination with a whole-person approach. We believe this framework can serve as a guide as the healthcare system moves "from volume to value" and a true partnership becomes increasingly critical both to patients and the healthcare system as a whole.

  12. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Dissemination Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Buchman, Timothy G; Harmon, Lori; Nielsen, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Awareness of patient-centered and family-centered care research can assist clinicians to promote patient and family engagement in the intensive care unit. Project Dispatch (Disseminating Patient-Centered Outcomes Research to Healthcare Professionals) was developed to disseminate patient- and family-centered care research and encourage its application in clinical practice. The 3-year project involved the development of an interactive website platform, online educational programming, social media channels, a podcast and webcast series, and electronic and print media. The project's webpages received more than 5200 page views with over 4000 unique visitors from 36 countries. The podcast series has download numbers ranging from 35 596 for "Family Presence in the ICU" to 25 843 for "Improving Patient and Family satisfaction in the ICU" and 22 148 for "Family Satisfaction in the ICU." The project therefore successfully developed resources for critical care health care professionals to promote the patient- and family-centric perspective. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Physicians' psychosocial barriers to different modes of withdrawal of life support in critical care: A qualitative study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Kaoruko; Kai, Ichiro

    2010-02-01

    Despite a number of guidelines issued in Anglo-American countries over the past few decades for forgoing treatment stating that there is no ethically relevant difference between withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatments (LST), it is recognized that many healthcare professionals in Japan as well as some of their western counterparts do not agree with this statement. This research was conducted to investigate the barriers that prevent physicians from withdrawing specific LST in critical care settings, focusing mainly on the modes of withdrawal of LST, in what the authors believe was the first study of its kind anywhere in the world. In 2006-2007, in-depth, face-to-face, semistructured interviews were conducted with 35 physicians working at emergency and critical care facilities across Japan. We elicited their experiences, attitudes, and perceptions regarding withdrawal of mechanical ventilation and other LST. The process of data analysis followed the grounded theory approach. We found that the psychosocial resistance of physicians to withdrawal of artificial devices varied according to the modes of withdrawal, showing a strong resistance to withdrawal of mechanical ventilation that requires physicians to halt the treatment when continuation of its mechanical operation is possible. However, there was little resistance to the withdrawal of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support and artificial liver support when their continuation was mechanically or physiologically impossible. The physicians shared a desire for a "soft landing" of the patient, that is, a slow and gradual death without drastic and immediate changes, which serves the psychosocial needs of the people surrounding the patient. For that purpose, vasopressors were often withheld and withdrawn. The findings suggest what the Japanese physicians avoid is not what they call a life-shortening act but an act that would not lead to a soft landing, or a slow death that looks 'natural' in the eyes of those

  14. Psychosocial adjustment process of mothers caring for young men with traumatic brain injury: focusing on the mother-son relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumiyo, Ishikawa; Sumie, Suzuki; Akiko, Okumiya; Yasuko, Shimizu

    2009-10-01

    This study focuses on the mother-son relationship of 13 mothers caring for single sons between the ages of 15 and 30 years who have higher brain dysfunction due to a traumatic brain injury. We aimed to elucidate the psychosocial adjustment process of mothers for 5 years following the injury to facilitate the social rehabilitation of both mother and son. Data obtained through a semistructured interview method were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. After 56 concepts were identified, 18 categories and then 8 core categories were semantically created. The 8 core categories were (a) avoid contact with son, (b) support son based on mother's own desire, (c) support son alone without external support, (d) realize mother's care limits and seek external support sources, (e) request and utilize external support, (f) support and work toward son's independence while monitoring his interactions with others, (g) mother considers own feelings and reenters society, and (h) strive for continued care of son with mother's acquired energy and efficient management skills. These were grouped into the following five stages: (a) avoidance, (b-c) closed, (d) support seeking, (e-f) withdrawal, and (g-h) reconstruction.

  15. Study protocol: translating and implementing psychosocial interventions in aged home care the lifestyle engagement activity program (LEAP) for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lee-Fay; Baker, Jess R; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Camp, Cameron; Haertsch, Maggie; Skropeta, Margaret

    2013-11-16

    Tailored psychosocial activity-based interventions have been shown to improve mood, behaviour and quality of life for nursing home residents. Occupational therapist delivered activity programs have shown benefits when delivered in home care settings for people with dementia. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of LEAP (Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program) for Life, a training and practice change program on the engagement of home care clients by care workers. Secondary aims are to evaluate the impact of the program on changes in client mood and behaviour. The 12 month LEAP program has three components: 1) engaging site management and care staff in the program; 2) employing a LEAP champion one day a week to support program activities; 3) delivering an evidence-based training program to care staff. Specifically, case managers will be trained and supported to set meaningful social or recreational goals with clients and incorporate these into care plans. Care workers will be trained in and encouraged to practise good communication, promote client independence and choice, and tailor meaningful activities using Montessori principles, reminiscence, music, physical activity and play. LEAP Champions will be given information about theories of organisational change and trained in interpersonal skills required for their role. LEAP will be evaluated in five home care sites including two that service ethnic minority groups. A quasi experimental design will be used with evaluation data collected four times: 6-months prior to program commencement; at the start of the program; and then after 6 and 12 months. Mixed effect models will enable comparison of change in outcomes for the periods before and during the program. The primary outcome measure is client engagement. Secondary outcomes for clients are satisfaction with care, dysphoria/depression, loneliness, apathy and agitation; and work satisfaction for care workers. A process evaluation will also be

  16. Recommendations for the Critical Care Management of Devastating Brain Injury: Prognostication, Psychosocial, and Ethical Management : A Position Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souter, Michael J; Blissitt, Patricia A; Blosser, Sandralee; Bonomo, Jordan; Greer, David; Jichici, Draga; Mahanes, Dea; Marcolini, Evie G; Miller, Charles; Sangha, Kiranpal; Yeager, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Devastating brain injuries (DBIs) profoundly damage cerebral function and frequently cause death. DBI survivors admitted to critical care will suffer both intracranial and extracranial effects from their brain injury. The indicators of quality care in DBI are not completely defined, and despite best efforts many patients will not survive, although others may have better outcomes than originally anticipated. Inaccuracies in prognostication can result in premature termination of life support, thereby biasing outcomes research and creating a self-fulfilling cycle where the predicted course is almost invariably dismal. Because of the potential complexities and controversies involved in the management of devastating brain injury, the Neurocritical Care Society organized a panel of expert clinicians from neurocritical care, neuroanesthesia, neurology, neurosurgery, emergency medicine, nursing, and pharmacy to develop an evidence-based guideline with practice recommendations. The panel intends for this guideline to be used by critical care physicians, neurologists, emergency physicians, and other health professionals, with specific emphasis on management during the first 72-h post-injury. Following an extensive literature review, the panel used the GRADE methodology to evaluate the robustness of the data. They made actionable recommendations based on the quality of evidence, as well as on considerations of risk: benefit ratios, cost, and user preference. The panel generated recommendations regarding prognostication, psychosocial issues, and ethical considerations.

  17. Person-centered care--ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Inger; Swedberg, Karl; Taft, Charles; Lindseth, Anders; Norberg, Astrid; Brink, Eva; Carlsson, Jane; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve; Johansson, Inga-Lill; Kjellgren, Karin; Lidén, Eva; Öhlén, Joakim; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Rosén, Henrik; Rydmark, Martin; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2011-12-01

    Long-term diseases are today the leading cause of mortality worldwide and are estimated to be the leading cause of disability by 2020. Person-centered care (PCC) has been shown to advance concordance between care provider and patient on treatment plans, improve health outcomes and increase patient satisfaction. Yet, despite these and other documented benefits, there are a variety of significant challenges to putting PCC into clinical practice. Although care providers today broadly acknowledge PCC to be an important part of care, in our experience we must establish routines that initiate, integrate, and safeguard PCC in daily clinical practice to ensure that PCC is systematically and consistently practiced, i.e. not just when we feel we have time for it. In this paper, we propose a few simple routines to facilitate and safeguard the transition to PCC. We believe that if conscientiously and systematically applied, they will help to make PCC the focus and mainstay of care in long-term illness. Copyright © 2011 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of mental disorders one year after exposure to psychosocial stressors; a cohort study in primary care patients with a physical complaint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzig Lilli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders, common in primary care, are often associated with physical complaints. While exposure to psychosocial stressors and development or presence of principal mental disorders (i.e. depression, anxiety and somatoform disorders defined as multisomatoforme disorders is commonly correlated, temporal association remains unproven. The study explores the onset of such disorders after exposure to psychosocial stressors in a cohort of primary care patients with at least one physical symptom. Method The cohort study SODA (SOmatization, Depression and Anxiety was conducted by 21 private-practice GPs and three fellow physicians in a Swiss academic primary care centre. GPs included patients via randomized daily identifiers. Depression, anxiety or somatoform disorders were identified by the full Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ, a validated procedure to identify mental disorders based on DSM-IV criteria. The PHQ was also used to investigate exposure to psychosocial stressors (before the index consultation and during follow up and the onset of principal mental disorders after one year of follow up. Results From November 2004 to July 2005, 1020 patients were screened for inclusion. 627 were eligible and 482 completed the PHQ one year later and were included in the analysis (77%. At one year, prevalence of principal mental disorders was 30/153 (19.6% CI95% 13.6; 26.8 for those initially exposed to a major psychosocial stressor and 26/329 (7.9% CI95% 5.2; 11.4 for those not. Stronger association exists between psychosocial stressors and depression (RR = 2.4 or anxiety (RR = 3.5 than multisomatoforme disorders (RR = 1.8. Patients who are “bothered a lot” (subjective distress by a stressor are therefore 2.5 times (CI95% 1.5; 4.0 more likely to experience a mental disorder at one year. A history of psychiatric comorbidities or psychological treatment was not a confounding factor for developing a principal mental

  19. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Linda E; Hurenkamp, Gerard JB; ter Riet, Gerben; Schellevis, François G; Grundmeijer, Hans G; van Weert, Henk C

    2009-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001). Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP) with upper GI symptoms) and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints), matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psycho)pharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year). Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.37 to 3.45). Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90), including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or social co

  20. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001. Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP with upper GI symptoms and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints, matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psychopharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year. Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs ranging from 1.37 to 3.45. Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90, including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or

  1. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, September 15th and... second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care...

  2. Patient-centered care interventions for the management of alcohol use disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Gual, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Issues Patient-centered care (PCC) is increasingly accepted as an integral component of good health care, including addiction medicine. However, its implementation has been controversial in people with alcohol use disorders. Approach A systematic search strategy was devised to find completed randomized controlled trials enrolling adults (>18 years) with alcohol use disorders. Studies had to use a PCC approach such that they should have been individualized, respectful to the patients’ own goals, and empowering. Studies until September 2015 were searched using PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and Web of Knowledge. Key findings In total, 40 studies enrolling 16,020 patients met the inclusion criteria. Assessment revealed two main categories of study: psychosocial (n=35 based on motivational interviewing) and pharmacological (n=5 based on an as needed dosing regimen). Psychosocial interventions were further classified according to the presence or absence of an active comparator. When no active comparator was present, studies were classified according to the number of sessions (≥1). Results from single sessions of motivational interviewing showed no clear benefit on alcohol consumption outcomes, with few studies indicating benefit of PCC versus control. Although the results for studies of multiple sessions of counseling were also mixed, many did show a significant benefit of the PCC intervention. By contrast, studies consistently demonstrated a benefit of pharmacologically supported PCC interventions, with most of the differences reaching statistical significance. Implications PCC-based interventions may be beneficial for reducing alcohol consumption in people with alcohol use disorders. PMID:27695301

  3. Psychosocial Interventions for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care: Review of Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsverk, John A.; Burns, Barbara J.; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Rolls Reutz, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Between one-half and three-fourths of children entering foster care exhibit behavioral or social-emotional problems warranting mental health care. This paper, condensed and updated from a technical report prepared for Casey Family Programs in 2005, reviews evidence-based and promising interventions for the most prevalent mental conditions found…

  4. Patient-centered care interventions for the management of alcohol use disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrio P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Barrio, Antoni Gual Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques Agustí Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain Issues: Patient-centered care (PCC is increasingly accepted as an integral component of good health care, including addiction medicine. However, its implementation has been controversial in people with alcohol use disorders. Approach: A systematic search strategy was devised to find completed randomized controlled trials enrolling adults (>18 years with alcohol use disorders. Studies had to use a PCC approach such that they should have been individualized, respectful to the patients’ own goals, and empowering. Studies until September 2015 were searched using PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and Web of Knowledge. Key findings: In total, 40 studies enrolling 16,020 patients met the inclusion criteria. Assessment revealed two main categories of study: psychosocial (n=35 based on motivational interviewing and pharmacological (n=5 based on an as needed dosing regimen. Psychosocial interventions were further classified according to the presence or absence of an active comparator. When no active comparator was present, studies were classified according to the number of sessions (≥1. Results from single sessions of motivational interviewing showed no clear benefit on alcohol consumption outcomes, with few studies indicating benefit of PCC versus control. Although the results for studies of multiple sessions of counseling were also mixed, many did show a significant benefit of the PCC intervention. By contrast, studies consistently demonstrated a benefit of pharmacologically supported PCC interventions, with most of the differences reaching statistical significance. Implications: PCC-based interventions may be beneficial for reducing alcohol consumption in people with alcohol use disorders. Keywords: psychosocial intervention, pharmacological intervention, motivational interviewing, as-needed

  5. [Fusing empowerment concept into patient-centered collaborative care model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Chronic diseases are incurable, long-term illnesses. To improve quality of life, patients with chronic diseases must adjust their own personal lifestyle to cope with their diseases and eventually learn to achieve a balance between disease control and daily life. Therefore, self-management necessarily plays a key role in chronic disease management. Different from physician-centered healthcare, the self-management practiced by chronic disease patients is more patient-centered with a greater emphasis on active patient participation. The main goal of this article is to elucidate the essence of the empowerment concept. An example of diabetes care, this article introduces a detailed five-step application as a basic model for incorporating the empowerment concept into the healthcare of patients with chronic disease. The author suggests that healthcare providers apply the empowerment model in clinical practice to assist patients to maintain an optimal balance between their health status and personal lives.

  6. [Systematization of nursing care in the obstetrical center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Raquel Bezerra; Ramos, Karla da Silva

    2012-01-01

    This is a descriptive and exploratory study with a quantitative approach, aiming to propose a protocol for the systematization of nursing care to women in the process of giving birth in the Obstetrical Center of a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A semi-structured instrument was applied to forty women in the process of giving birth, in order to obtaining the nursing history; from which the nursing diagnoses were identified, having as a basis the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®), version 1, and their respective results and nursing interventions were established. The protocol consists in two stages: the first one is the nursing consultation, which involves the anamnesis and physical examination; and the second, involves the judicious identification of the nursing diagnoses, which will guide the planning of the nursing care to provide the individualized attention to women in the process of giving birth, using a universal terminology.

  7. Why Patient Centered Care Coordination Is Important in Developing Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, D.; Marcelo, A.; Househ, M.; Mandirola, H.; Curioso, W.; Pazos, P.; Villalba, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient Centered Care Coordination (PCCC) focuses on the patient health care needs. PCCC involves the organization, the patients and their families, that must coordinate resources in order to accomplish the goals of PCCC. In developing countries, where disparities are frequent, PCCC could improve clinical outcomes, costs and patients satisfaction. Objective the IMIA working group Health Informatics for Development analyzes the benefits, identifies the barriers and proposes strategies to reach PCCC. Methods Discussions about PCCC emerged from a brief guide that posed questions about what is PCCC, why consider PCCC important, barriers to grow in this direction and ask about resources considered relevant in the topic. Results PCCC encompasses a broad definition, includes physical, mental, socio-environmental and self care. Even benefits are proved, in developing countries the lack of a comprehensive and integrated healthcare network is one of the main barriers to reach this objective. Working hard to reach strong health policies, focus on patients, and optimizing the use of resources could improve the performance in the devolvement of PCCC programs. International collaboration could bring benefits. We believe information IT, and education in this field will play an important role in PCCC. Conclusion PCCC in developing countries has the potential to improve quality of care. Education, IT, policies and cultural issues must be addressed in an international collaborative context in order to reach this goal. PMID:26123907

  8. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  9. Customer Quality during Prenatal Care in Health Care Centers in Tabriz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives :  Customer Quality (CQ refers to customer’s characteristics and is concerned with the knowledge, skills and confidence of health services customers who actively participate with health team in proper decision-making, appropriate activities and changing environment and health related behaviors. The purpose of this study was measuring customer quality of pregnant women during prenatal care. Materials and Methods :  This is a cross- sectional study which was conducted with the participation of 185 pregnant women who received prenatal care from urban health centers in Tabriz city. All participants were selected randomly from 40 health centers. Customer quality was measured based on CQMH-CQ questionnaire.  Questionnaire content validity was reviewed and confirmed by 10 experts and its reliability was confirmed based on Cronbach's alpha index (α = 0.714. Spss v.17 was used for data analysis. Results : According to the results, the mean score of customer quality among pregnant women was (11.29± 67.79   and only %14 of the participants reported the highest customer quality score and ability of continuity of care under stressful situations. There was a positive relationship between customer quality score and visiting midwife and a better evaluation of overall quality of care, but there was inverse relationship with early registration at health centers. Conclusion :  The participation of pregnant women in service delivery process and decision-making can promote costumer quality. Furthermore, training health care providers in empowering patients and using their abilities to improve quality of care and paying attention to patient-centered care will be helpful. ​

  10. Dancing as a psychosocial intervention in care homes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-García, A; Hughes, J C; James, I A; Rochester, L

    2013-09-01

    There is a need to find meaningful and engaging interventions to improve mood and behaviour for residents of care homes. The demand on care staff might diminish opportunities for them to encourage these activities. Staff anecdotal information attests that dancing as an activity improves mood in residents and staff. Hence, the importance of investigating what dancing brings to the care home social environment. To provide a systematic review of the evidence from studies related to dancing interventions for older people with dementia living in care homes. Electronic databases were searched. Previous reviews were also included, and recognised experts were consulted up to January 2012. Inclusion criteria considered study methodology and evidence that the impact of the dance intervention had been measured. Ten studies were identified that satisfied the inclusion criteria: seven qualitative and three quantitative. Studies used different approaches such as therapeutic dance, dance movement therapy, dance therapy, social dancing and psychomotor dance-based exercise. There was evidence that problematic behaviours decreased; social interaction and enjoyment in both residents and care staff improved. A few adverse effects were also acknowledged. The evidence on the efficacy of dancing in care homes is limited in part owing to the methodological challenges facing such research. This review aims to raise awareness of the possibility of implementing dance work as an engaging activity in care homes. We shall also consider options for future dance work research as a means to encourage relationships and sensory stimulation for both residents and staff. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Community therapy at psychosocial care centers: (dis)connecting relevant points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Filha, Maria de Oliveira; de Carvalho, Mariana Albernaz Pinheiro

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the implementation of community therapy (CT) at a mental health service (MHS); to identify coping strategies and problems experienced by its users and their families; and to analyze CT's contributions to user's social inclusion. The technique of semi-structured interview and CT's assessment sheets were used in this predominantly qualitative study. Family conflicts, insomnia and abandonment were the major problems cited, and several coping strategies were mentioned, such as: family support, religious belief professional help, etc. It was proved that the user's participation on CT have contributed to their social inclusion, as they reported behavioral changes in their interpersonal relationships. This experience has been showing excellent results, for it works with an approach that comprehends neglected social aspects.

  12. Psychiatric Admissions: meanings for the patients of a psychosocial care center

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Zenatti Ely; Marlene Gomes Terra; Adão Ademir da Silva; Fernanda Franceschi de Freitas; Stela Maris de Mello Padoin; Michele Pivetta de Lara

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Comprender los significados de la internación psiquiátrica para usuarios de un Centro de Atención Psicosocial. Metodología: Investigación cualitativa de abordaje fenomenológica. El escenario fue un Centro de Atención Psicosocial, en el sur de Brasil, en el período de enero a marzo/2010. Fueron entrevistados 10 usuarios, siendo la cuestión orientadora: ¿Me diga, cómo fue estar internado en una Unidad de Internación Psiquiátrica?, ¿Se utilizó el análisis hermenéutica y pensamiento Fou...

  13. The National Palliative Care Research Center and the Center to Advance Palliative Care: a partnership to improve care for persons with serious illness and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2011-10-01

    families must know to request palliative care, medical professionals must have the knowledge and skills to provide palliative care, and hospitals and other healthcare institutions must be equipped to deliver and support palliative care services. The Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) and the National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC) are accomplishing this three-part mission by working in partnership to: 1) Develop research to serve as the knowledge base for quality clinical care and the foundation on which to build palliative care programs and systems; 2) Disseminate this knowledge to patients, families, professionals, and institutions throughout the United States and ensure that it is integrated within mainstream healthcare; and 3) Influence and collaborate with policy makers , regulatory bodies, and federal funding agencies to ensure that the healthcare infrastructure supports the continued growth and development of palliative care.

  14. [Talk to them: Narrative care within a person-centered care framework].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of narrative care in the attention of older people who receive care in institutions, underlining how its use provides a better understanding of the Person Centered Care (PCC) model and valuable strategies to put it into practice. To achieve this goal, firstly, we describe the relevance of a narrative approach for understanding the experience of the old person who receive care in institutions, with regards to individual aspects as well as to her/his relationships with professionals and the institutional discourse which contextualize these relationships. Secondly, we specify different ways in which the use of narratives could have an impact on the improvement of the quality of attention and well-being of older people receiving care in institutions. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient-centered care or cultural competence: negotiating palliative care at home for Chinese Canadian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Angus, Jan E; Howell, Doris; Husain, Amna; Gastaldo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The literature about Chinese attitudes toward death and dying contains frequent references to strong taboos against open discussion about death; consequently, there is an assumption that dying at home is not the preferred option. This focused ethnographic study examined the palliative home care experiences of 4 Chinese immigrants with terminal cancer, their family caregivers, and home care nurses and key informant interviews with 11 health care providers. Three main themes emerged: (1) the many facets of taboo; (2) discursive tensions between patient-centered care and cultural competence; and (3) rethinking language barriers. Thus, training on cultural competence needs to move away from models that portray cultural beliefs as shared, fixed patterns, and take into account the complicated reality of everyday care provision at end of life in the home.

  16. Viewpoints of the members of the workers' retirement centers in Tehran about elderly day care centers (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Rohani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no documented evidence regarding elderly day care centers in Iran. This needs analysis study was conducted to investigate the demand for elderly day care centers in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted recruiting 210 participants aged over 60 who were members of the elderly retirement centers in Tehran in 2012. Data were gathered by Kansas state university questionnaire and analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: About 80% of participants were men with the mean age of 67.5±5.23 years. Results showed that male (P<0.001, married (P=0.01 and literate elderly (P<0.001, and those living in rental homes (P<0.001 expressed a greater need for elderly day care centers. There was no statistically significant relationship between the lifestyle (P=0.051 and income (P=0.08 of the participants and demand for elderly day care centers. Conclusion: Given the rising population of the elderly and their high demand for day care centers, it is necessary to establish well-equipped day care centers for this group of people. Also, these centers may reduce the burden of care for the aged people on public services and family care givers.

  17. Premenstrual Distress Among Japanese High School Students: Self-Care Strategies and Associated Physical and Psychosocial Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka-Ono, Hiroko; Sato, Iori; Ikeda, Mari; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify self-care strategies and assess physical and psychosocial factors associated with premenstrual distress among high school students. A cross-sectional survey of 217 adolescent girls aged 15 to 18 years was conducted in October 2009. Most (84.3 percent) had at least one or more symptoms of premenstrual distress. Premenstrual distress interfered with normal school activity in 51.2 percent. Most participants (57.1 percent) did not perform any self-care strategies for premenstrual distress. A hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was conducted. Comprehension of one's own physical and mental states during premenstrual phases mediated the relationship between neuroticism and premenstrual distress. Activity restrictions due to menstrual distress mediated the relationship between the family's understanding of one's behavior during premenstrual phases and premenstrual distress. Findings suggest that, even if girls have neuroticism, it will be important to teach them to address the comprehension of one's own physical and mental states so that perceptions of both premenstruation and menstruation become more positive. Findings also suggest that the family's understanding was associated with alleviation of premenstrual distress. This study suggests the need for education to help adolescent girls and their families manage premenstrual distress and increase awareness of the benefit of managing its associated symptoms.

  18. Prevention of low back pain in the military cluster randomized trial: effects of brief psychosocial education on total and low back pain-related health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, John D; Wu, Samuel S; Teyhen, Deydre S; Robinson, Michael E; George, Steven Z

    2014-04-01

    Effective strategies for preventing low back pain (LBP) have remained elusive, despite annual direct health care costs exceeding $85 billion dollars annually. In our recently completed Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military (POLM) trial, a brief psychosocial education program (PSEP) that reduced fear and threat of LBP reduced the incidence of health care-seeking for LBP. The purpose of this cost analysis was to determine if soldiers who received psychosocial education experienced lower health care costs compared with soldiers who did not receive psychosocial education. The POLM trial was a cluster randomized trial with four intervention arms and a 2-year follow-up. Consecutive subjects (n=4,295) entering a 16-week training program at Fort Sam Houston, TX, to become a combat medic in the U.S. Army were considered for participation. In addition to an assigned exercise program, soldiers were cluster randomized to receive or not receive a brief psychosocial education program delivered in a group setting. The Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool was used to extract total and LBP-related health care costs associated with LBP incidence over a 2-year follow-up period. After adjusting for postrandomization differences between the groups, the median total LBP-related health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred LBP-related costs during the 2-year follow-up period were $26 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($60 vs. $86, respectively, p=.034). The adjusted median total health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred at least some health care costs during the 2-year follow-up period were estimated at $2 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($2,439 vs. $2,441, respectively, p=.242). The results from this analysis demonstrate that a brief psychosocial education program was only marginally effective in reducing LBP-related health care costs and was not effective in reducing

  19. Improving coordination of care centers for the elderly through IT support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Andreas Kaas; Lauridsen, Frederik Vahr Bjarnø; Manea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, care of elderly people involves numerous and relatively autonomous care providers, including care centers, activity centers, physiotherapists, doctors, and other specialists. However, due to a poor coordination of activities, many elderly experience a lack of continuity of care, misse...

  20. Quality of Prenatal Care Services in Karabuk Community Health Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binali Catak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality and quantity of prenatal care services according to gestastional week in Karabuk Community Health Center (CHC. Methods: In this descriptive study 365 pregnant women was selected as sample among 753 pregnant women registered at Karabuk CHC in 18/01/2011. 93.0% of women in the selected sample has been visited in their homes and the face to face interviews were done. The questionnaire was prepared according to Prenatal Care Management Guidelines (PCMG of Ministry of Health. Findings The number of follow-ups was not complete in 23.7% of 15-24 month, 34.4% of 25-32 month, 52,1% of 33-42 month pregnant women. At least four follow-up visits were completed only in 66,7% of postpartum women. Timing of first visit was after 15th week in 15,6% of women. In follow up visits 62.5% of of women’s height were never measured, in 13,0% the women hearth sound of infants didn’t monitored at least once. Laboratory test numbers were under the level required by PCMG. The delivery conditions weren’t planned in 41,8% of last trimester and postpartum women and training about breastfeeding wasn’t given to 15,5 of the same group. Result In family medicine model in Karabuk CHC developments in number of prenatal follow-up visits were observed, but no substantial improvements were found in quality of prenatal visits. Regular in service trainings shoud be given to family doctors and midwives. The use of prenatal care guideline published by MoH should be increased. Keywords: Prenatal care, pregnancy, timing of first visit, qality of prenatal care [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 153-162

  1. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants.

  3. Multiple syndemic psychosocial factors are associated with reduced engagement in HIV care among a multinational, online sample of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biello, Katie B; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Safren, Steven A; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Novak, David S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Latin America has some of the highest levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage of any developing region in the world. Early initiation and optimal adherence to ART are necessary for improved health outcomes and reduction in onward transmission. Previous work has demonstrated the role of psychosocial problems as barriers to uptake and adherence to ART, and recently, a syndemic framework has been applied to the role of multiple psychosocial syndemic factors and adherence to ART, in the USA. However, to our knowledge, these associations have not been investigated outside of the USA, nor in a multi-country context. To address these gaps, we assessed the association between multiple co-occurring psychosocial factors and engagement in HIV-related medical care and adherence to ART among a large, multinational sample of sexually-active HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Latin America. Among the 2020 respondents, 80.7% reported currently receiving HIV-related medical care, 72.3% reported currently receiving ART; among those, 62.5% reported 100% adherence. Compared with experiencing no psychosocial health problems, experiencing five or more psychosocial health problems is associated with 42% lower odds of currently receiving HIV-related medical care (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.36, 0.95) and of currently receiving ART (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.38, 0.91). The number of psychosocial health problems experienced was associated with self-reported ART adherence in a dose-response relationship; compared to those with none of the factors, individuals with one syndemic factor had 23% lower odds (aOR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.60, 0.97) and individuals with five or more syndemic factors had 72% lower odds (aOR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.14, 0.55) of reporting being 100% adherent to ART. Addressing co-occurring psychosocial problems as potential barriers to uptake and adherence of ART in Latin America may improve the effectiveness of secondary prevention interventions.

  4. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  5. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  6. A qualitative evaluation of the psychosocial impact of family history screening in Australian primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gabrielle T; Walter, Fiona M; Emery, Jon D

    2015-04-01

    Whilst the family history is perceived as a routine part of the medical family history it is not used in a systematic way to tailor disease prevention in primary care. Family history questionnaires (FHQs) may have an important role in primary care as a screening tool to support tailored disease prevention. The potential harms and benefits of family history screening in primary care require investigation before routine adoption. This study aimed: first to explore the experience and impact of family history collection via a novel family history questionnaire and subsequent familial risk assessment, and secondly, to assess the acceptability and feasibility of using the questionnaire in Australian primary care. Twenty-eight semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with patients already enrolled in a family history screening study through their family physician. Qualitative constant comparative analysis was undertaken of transcript data. Common themes included the way in which the family unit, individual stage of life and a number of external triggers interact and contribute to how an individual comes to terms with familial disease risk. Unique findings emerged relating to the Australian perspective of participants. Living in Australia created a barrier to effective communication amongst family members about family health, and family history collection. In addition to the vast geographical distance both within Australia, and between Australia and other countries, there was an additional sense of isolation described within an historical context. The family history screening questionnaire was considered user-friendly and a worthwhile approach to supporting disease prevention in primary care, although some participants did not retain an accurate understanding of their familial cancer risk. In conclusion, a person's response to family history screening is reliant on a complex interplay of family, personal and external factors, which in turn are driven by their

  7. Schedule Control and Nursing Home Quality: Exploratory Evidence of a Psychosocial Predictor of Resident Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, David A; Berkman, Lisa F; Buxton, Orfeu M; Okechukwu, Cassandra A

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether nursing homes' quality of care was predicted by schedule control (workers' ability to decide work hours), independently of other staffing characteristics. Prospective ecological study of 30 nursing homes in New England. Schedule control was self-reported via survey in 2011-2012 (N = 1,045). Quality measures included the prevalence of decline in activities of daily living, residents' weight loss, and pressure ulcers, indicators systematically linked with staffing characteristics. Outcomes data for 2012 were retrieved from Medicare.gov. Robust Linear Regressions showed that higher schedule control predicted lower prevalence of pressure ulcers (β = -0.51, p schedule control might enhance the planning and delivery of strategies to prevent or cure pressure ulcers. Further research is needed to identify potential causal mechanisms by which schedule control could improve quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Partners in Care: A Psychosocial Approach to Music Therapy and Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a syndrome that affects memory, thinking, behavior, and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Therefore caregiving gradually becomes an essential part of the lives for people with dementia. This chapter draws on literature and research in order to understand the “family......” caregiver role and the implications of caregiving on wellbeing and health. With this as the starting point, the role of music therapy in communication and interaction in the caregiver-care recipient dyad is elaborated....

  9. Risk of antenatal psychosocial distress in indigenous women and its management at primary health care centres in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausia, Kaniz; Thompson, Sandra C; Nagel, Tricia; Schierhout, Gill; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the risk of antenatal psychosocial distress (APD) and associated potential factors and examined management aspects of risk of APD in women attending Aboriginal primary health care services in Australia. Audits of medical records of 797 pregnant women from 36 primary health centres in five jurisdictions (NSW, QLD, SA, WA and NT) were undertaken as part of a quality improvement programme. Information collected included mental health assessed by a standard screening tools, enquiry regarding social and emotional well-being (SEWB), depression management (including antidepressant medications) and referral. Around 18% (n=141) of women were at risk of APD based on assessment using a standard screening tool or by SEWB enquiry. There was a significant association between risk of distress and women's life style behaviours (e.g., alcohol, illicit drug use) and health centre characteristics. Of the 141 women, 16% (n= 22) were prescribed antidepressant drugs during pregnancy. A range of nonpharmaceutical mental health interventions were also recorded, including brief intervention of 61% (n=86), counselling of 57% (n=80) and cognitive behaviour therapy of 5% (n=7). About 39% (n=55) of women with APD were referred to external services for consultations with a psychiatrist, psychologist or social worker or to a women's refuge centre. The higher risk of APD associated with women's life style behaviour indicates that the better understanding of mental health in its cultural context is essential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychologists' views of inter-disciplinary psychosocial communication within the cancer care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Butow, P; Davis, E; Turner, J; Mason, C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about how psychologists working in cancer care centres communicate clinical information to other members of the multidisciplinary team or what information is communicated. This study surveyed Australian cancer care psychologists regarding their communication practices and their views on barriers to and facilitators of effective inter-disciplinary communication. Psychologists were invited to complete an online survey containing purpose-designed items that addressed study aims. Forty-four psychologists completed the survey. Psychologists' most common method of recording initial consultations was in patient medical records, with 69 % of respondents recording notes in either most of the time or all of the time. Twenty-two percent of psychologists said they did not regularly feedback the results of an initial assessment to a referrer and more than 40 % used verbal and e-mail communication to do so. This study provides data that will assist in the development of guidelines for inter-professional communication between psychologists and other members of the cancer care team.

  11. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges.

  12. Psychosocial care Center for Alcohol and Drugs (CAPS ad: nursing insertion and practices in São Paulo City, Brazil Inclusión y prácticas del enfermero en los Centros de Atención Psicosocial para alcohol y drogas (CAPS AD de la ciudad de Sao Paulo, Brasil A inserção e as práticas do enfermeiro no contexto dos Centros de Atenção Psicossocial em Álcool e Drogas (CAPS AD da cidade de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divane de Vargas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study with a qualitative approach aimed to identify nurses' insertion and practices at Psychosocial Care Centers for alcohol and drugs in São Paulo City, Brazil. Sixteen nurses participated in the study. Data were recorded and were analyzed by dialectic hermeneutics and guided by Brazilian psychiatric reform premises. The results evidenced nurses' difficulties to take part in the care recommended at these services, as their practices are more linked up with the traditional mental health care model. Causes of this phenomenon include nurses' lack of preparation to act in psychoactive substance-related issues and lack of knowledge on specific contents that would favor their insertion into care practice in these scenarios. It is concluded that more attention should be paid to these contents in nursing education, as the legal requirement of nursing presence at these services is insufficient as a strategy to guarantee their actual insertion.Estudio exploratorio de abordaje cualitativo que objetivó identificar la inclusión y las prácticas del enfermero en los Centros de Atención Psicosocial para alcohol y drogas de la ciudad de Sao Paulo, Brasil. Participaron del estudio 16 enfermeros, los datos fueron recolectados por medio de registro autograbado y fueron analizados por la hermenéutica dialéctica orientada por los presupuestos teóricos de la Reforma Psiquiátrica Brasileña. Se evidenciaron dificultades del enfermero para ingresar en el campo de la atención preconizada en esos servicios, siendo sus prácticas más orientadas por el modelo tradicional de atención a la salud mental. Se apuntan como causas de ese fenómeno la carencia de preparación del enfermero para actuación en esa área y el poco conocimiento de contenidos específicos que favorecen su inclusión en el campo de las prácticas. Se concluyó que debe ser dada mayor atención a esos contenidos en la formación del enfermero, ya que la exigencia legal del

  13. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; Zlateva, Ianita; Coman, Emil N; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs) receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM) at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention) cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009). There was no significant change in opioid prescribing. Conclusion Implementation of the SCM-PM resulted in clinically significant improvements in several quality of pain care outcomes. These findings, if sustained, may translate into improved patient outcomes. PMID:27881926

  14. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  15. Role of traditional healers in psychosocial support in caring for the orphans: A case of Dar-es Salaam City, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massila Mariam

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orphans are an increasing problem in developing countries particularly in Africa; due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic; and needs collective effort in intervention processes by including all stakeholders right from the grass roots level. This paper attempts to present the role of traditional healers in psychosocial support for orphan children in Dar-es-Salaam City with special focus on those whose parents have died because of HIV/AIDS. Six traditional healers who were involved in taking care of orphans were visited at their "vilinge" (traditional clinics. In total they had 72 orphans, 31 being boys and 41 being girls with age range from 3 years to 19. It was learned that traditional healers, besides providing remedies for illnesses/diseases of orphans, they also provided other basic needs. Further, they even provided psychosocial support allowing children to cope with orphan hood life with ease. Traditional healers are living within communities at the grass roots level; and appear unnoticed hidden forces, which are involved in taking care of orphans. This role of traditional healers in taking care of orphans needs to be recognised and even scaling it up by empowering them both in financial terms and training in basic skills of psychosocial techniques in how to handle orphans, in order to reduce discrimination and stigmatisation in the communities where they live.

  16. Impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales Psychosocial impact of demential syndrome in crucial care givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos LLibre Guerra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Las demencias, entidades de elevada frecuencia en el adulto mayor, constituyen un creciente problema de salud en países con una alta expectativa de vida como el nuestro, no solo por su magnitud, sino por su repercusión a nivel individual, familiar y social. Se presenta un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, realizado en el período comprendido entre enero de 2003 y enero de 2005, en las áreas de salud del municipio Marianao, con el objetivo de determinar el impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales. Se visitaron 110 cuidadores de pacientes con demencia y enfermedad de Alzheimer diagnosticados de acuerdo con los criterios del DSM-IV. Los cuidadores cruciales de los pacientes con demencia correspondieron en su mayoría a mujeres casadas, esposa o hijas del paciente, en la quinta década de la vida, amas de casa, y con un nivel medio de escolaridad. El cuidador dedica alrededor de 12 h diarias al cuidado del paciente, la mayor parte en la supervisión. Se evidenció afectación psicológica en el 89 % de los cuidadores. El nivel de sobrecarga o estrés en la muestra es significativamente elevado. Los cuidadores consideran como primera prioridad información acerca de la enfermedad y atención al paciente. Se recomienda realizar un plan de intervención educativa dirigido a los cuidadores, que permita reducir la sobrecarga física, psicológica y económica del cuidado y mejorar su calidad de vida.The dementias, entities of an elevated frequency in the older adult, are an increasing health problem in countries with a high life expectancy at birth as ours, not only because of their magnitude, but also because of their repercussion at the individual, familiar and social levels. A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken from January 2003 to January 2005 in the health areas of Marianao municipality with the objective of determining the psychosocial impact of the demential syndrome in crucial care givers. 110

  17. Medical and psychosocial factors associated with antibiotic prescribing in primary care: survey questionnaire and factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tau-Hong; Wong, Joshua Gx; Lye, David Cb; Chen, Mark Ic; Loh, Victor Wk; Leo, Yee-Sin; Lee, Linda K; Chow, Angela Lp

    2017-03-01

    Acute upper respiratory infections (AURI) are the leading causes of antibiotic prescribing in primary care although antibiotics are often not indicated. To gain an understanding of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of GPs in Singapore and the associated latent factors to guide the implementation of an effective programme to reduce antibiotic use in primary care. An anonymous survey on the KAP of antibiotic use in AURI of GPs in Singapore. KAP survey questionnaires were posted to all GPs from a database. To ascertain the latent factors affecting prescribing patterns, exploratory factor analysis was performed. Among 427 responses, 351 (82.2%) were from GPs working in private practice. It was found that 58.4% of GPs in the private versus 72.4% of those in the public sector recognised that >80% of AURIs were caused by viruses (P = 0.02). The majority of GPs (353/427; 82.7%) felt that antibiotics were overprescribed in primary care. Significant factors associated with low antibiotic prescribing were good medical knowledge and clinical competency (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4 to 4.3), good clinical practice (aOR 2.7 [95% CI = 2.0 to 3.6]), availability of diagnostic tests (aOR 1.4 [95% CI = 1.1 to 1.8]), and desire to improve clinical practice (aOR 1.5 [95% CI = 1.2 to 1.9]). The conservative practice of giving antibiotics 'to be on the safe side' is significantly less likely to be associated with low antibiotic prescribing (aOR 0.7 [95% CI = 0.5 to 0.9]). This is the first KAP survey on antibiotic prescribing for AURI among GPs in Singapore. With the latent factors identified, future interventions should be directed at addressing these factors to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  18. Pattern of Breast Cancer in a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Jha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Breast Cancer is the second commonest cause of cancer death in women. Almost all women survive breast cancer if it is detected before it starts to spread. The aim of the study is to analyze the demographical profile, stage of presentation, histological type, and treatment modalities of breast cancer in a tertiary care setting. METHODS: Total 1141 cases of breast cancer had been followed retrospectively from 1999 to 2006 A.D. in a tertiary care center and their patterns were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of presentation of breast cancer was 47.30 +/- 11.57 years in female and 59.03 +/- 14.63 in male, 31 (2.1% cases of breast cancer were male. There were 123 (10.78% stage I, 281 (24.62% stage II, 466 (40.84% stage III, and 271 (23.75% stage IV patients. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest variety 610 (53.5%. Chemotherapy was the mainstay for treatment of breast cancer 341 (29.9% followed by surgery 287 (25.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer trend is rising with more in late and advanced stages, mostly due to lack of awareness. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the commonest variety. Chemotherapy is the most commonly used modality of treatment. Male breast cancer present late and is not so uncommon. Keywords: breast cancer; chemotherapy; infiltrating ductal carcinoma; staging.

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis Infection in a Tertiary Care Vaginitis Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Maria A; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection (TVI) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. We sought to determine the features of TVI in a referral-based vaginitis center, focusing on diagnosis and treatment of difficult cases. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with TVI, based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes, seen at the Drexel Vaginitis Center between January 2008 and November 2013. Information collected on each subject included demographics, symptoms, examination findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment regimens. Of approximately 4000 new patient visits during our study period, 80 subjects were identified with TVI. Twenty subjects presented with known TVI, with most having clinically resistant infections. Diagnosis was confirmed by saline microscopy in 45%, OSOM rapid test in 40%, and clinical history in the remaining 15%. Treatment regimens varied: 20% received single 2-g dosing of either metronidazole or tinidazole, 50% received high-dose regimens, 20% received therapy with vaginal paromomycin, and 10% underwent desensitization for nitroimidazole allergy. Sixty subjects had newly diagnosed TVI, with 35% diagnosed by saline microscopy, 41.7% by OSOM rapid test, and 23.3% by APTIMA. Treatment regimens for these subjects included single 2-g dosing in 88.3%, high-dose regimen in 8.3%, and other formulations in the remaining 3.4%. In total, 80% of our subjects returned for follow-up; all of whom were cured. T. vaginalis infection is a rare condition in a tertiary care vaginitis center and often requires nonstandard treatments. Among those who returned for follow-up, the cure rate was 100%.

  20. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Shriyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs, especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. Aims: To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient′s blood or body fluids among health care workers. Materials and Methods: A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW′s was done after three and six months of exposure. Results: Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. Conclusion: So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  1. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriyan, Amrita; Roche, R; Annamma

    2012-07-01

    Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs), especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient's blood or body fluids among health care workers. A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI) and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs) were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW's was done after three and six months of exposure. Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  2. Screening of Developmental Problem, Day care Centers, Sari, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kosaryan, M.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: There has not been enough attention towards the domains of development in pediatrics,so there are many deficiencies in monitoring the achievement of developmental milestones in our country.One of the important ways for the improvement of this problem is to use screening method. PEDS questionnaire is one of the screening tools for development. The aim of this study was to investigate about parents' evaluation of developmental status for their children.Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The population included infants and children under the age of 6 in day care centers of Sari. Sampling method was clustering. The tool for data collection was PEDS questionnaire (Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status which consisted of 38 questions about demographic data and medical history of children as well as parents' concern about different developmental domains along with ''Yes'' , ''No'' and ''little'' answers. The data were analysed using SPSS11 software. Chi square and Wilcoxon were used. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Out of 829 questionnaires, 736 were returned (88.7%. The Sample age was 4.23 ± 1.32 gl . Fifty percent of participants were male. By average, in each developmental domains, 3.2% of parents had major concern and 9.5% had partial concern. The most common domains of concern were communication with others (6.4%, behavior (6.1%, speaking (4.3%, preschool and school education (3.1%, children's understanding (2.5%, the self care (2.1%, the use of fingers (1.4%, the use of legs and arms (1.1%. Parents' concern had a significant relationship with parent's education, residence and history of illness in children (P<0.05. Out of 23.4% of the infants and children who had later returned to the diagnosis center, 80% had behavioral disorder, 87.6% had speech disorder and 16.6% had hearing impairment..Conclusion: A considerable percentage of parents was concerned about developmental

  3. [Social intelligence deficits in autistic children and adolescents--subjective theories of psychosocial health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krech, M; Probst, P

    1998-10-01

    The paper is concerned with personal theories of health care professionals about deficiencies in social intelligence of autistic persons. In the component-model of social intelligence means the ability of individuals or groups, to interact with each other in social situations. This contains social perception, social behavior as well as social conceptions and refers to emotional, cognitive and normative aspects. 33 interviewees, working as psychologists or teachers in kindergartens, schools or therapy institutions, are questioned by a half-standardized single interview concerning their beliefs about nonverbal social abilities, social perspective taking, and construction of a theory of mind in autistic persons. The major finding is: The impairments can be found in all aspects of social intelligence. Especially emotional handicaps, which are quoted by more than 80% of the interviewees, and low cognitive preconditions of mastering social stimuli, which are quoted by nearly all interviewees, are relevant. The subjective theories of the interviewees are in accordance to the models of parents as well as the models of the leading experts. The professional relationship to autistic persons and the practical experiences of the health care professionals lead to their specific personal theories of deficiencies in social intelligence of autistic people with wide consequences in respect to the professional contact with the autistic children and young adults.

  4. Religiosity, psychosocial adjustment, and subjective burden of persons who care for those with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Swank, Aaron B; Lucksted, Alicia; Medoff, Deborah R; Yang, Ye; Wohlheiter, Karen; Dixon, Lisa B

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature of religious and spiritual support received by family caregivers of persons with serious mental illness and to test hypotheses that religiosity would be associated with caregiver adjustment. Eighty-three caregivers who participated in a study of the Family to Family Education Program of the National Alliance on Mental Illness were assessed at baseline in terms of their religiosity and receipt of spiritual support in coping. They also completed measures of depression, self-esteem, mastery, self-care, and subjective burden. Hierarchical regression was used to test hypotheses that religiosity would be associated with better adjustment, with confounding variables controlled for. Thirty-seven percent of participants reported that they had received spiritual support in coping with their relative's illness in the previous three months. When age, race, education, and gender were controlled for, religiosity was associated with less depression and better self-esteem and self-care. Personal religiosity was a stronger predictor of adjustment than religious service attendance. Family caregivers of persons with serious mental illness often turn to spirituality for support, and religiosity may be an important contributor to caregiver adjustment. Collaborative partnerships between mental health professionals and religious and spiritual communities represent a powerful and culturally sensitive resource for meeting the support needs of family members of persons with serious mental illness.

  5. A visão da família sobre o trabalho de profissionais de saúde mental de um centro de atenção psicossocial La visión de la familia sobre el trabajo de los profesionales de la salud mental en un Centro de Atención Psico-social The vision from the family about the work of the mental health professionals in a Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Wagner Camatta

    2009-09-01

    consolidación de las políticas públicas sobre salud mental.This study aimed in understanding the vision from the family members of a Psychosocial Attention Center' (CAPS users about the work of the mental health professionals. It's a qualitative research, based on Alfred Schutz' Social Phenomenology framework. Data were collected through interviews with 13 family members in 2006 at a CAPS unit in Porto Alegre. The comprehensive analysis allowed considering that the family members don't feel fully recognized in their life experience about the team's actions. Moreover, the management of municipal policies on mental health has reflected negatively in the daily work of the team. To know and to understand the biography of the family is indispensable to the CAPS team work. Recognizing the family as a partner can be an important strategy to the team work, contributing to the consolidation of public policies on mental health.

  6. Integrating Mental Health In Care For Noncommunicable Diseases: An Imperative For Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Chatterji, Somnath

    2015-09-01

    Mental disorders such as depression and alcohol use disorders often co-occur with other common noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. Furthermore, noncommunicable diseases are frequently encountered in patients with severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia. The pathways underlying the comorbidity of mental disorders and noncommunicable diseases are complex. For example, mental and physical noncommunicable diseases may have common environmental risk factors such as unhealthy lifestyles, and treatments for one condition may have side effects that increase the risk of another condition. Building on the robust evidence base for effective treatments for a range of mental disorders, there is now a growing evidence base for how such treatments can be integrated into the care of people with noncommunicable diseases. The best-established delivery model is a team approach that features a nonspecialist case manager who coordinates care with primary care physicians and specialists. This approach maximizes efficiencies in person-centered care, which are essential for achieving universal health coverage for both noncommunicable diseases and mental disorders. A number of research gaps remain, but there is sufficient evidence for policy makers to immediately implement measures to integrate mental health and noncommunicable disease care in primary care platforms.

  7. Reduction of psycho-spiritual distress of an elderly with advanced congestive heart failure by life review interview in a palliative care day center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Ying Chan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Major depression is common in patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure and is independently associated with increased re-hospitalization and mortality. Methods: Hereby, we report the treatment for an elderly congestive heart failure patient with frequent emergency department visits having major depression and hopelessness. Results: Treatment outcomes measured showed that depressed scores of psychosocial needs were reduced with life review interview therapy in a palliative care day center. Conclusion: We hypothesize that multidisciplinary team’s approach to treatment was important for this case.

  8. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  9. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  10. Guidelines for conducting rigorous health care psychosocial cross-cultural/language qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances; Lee, Hee Yun; Martin, Shadi S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize and chronicle the authors' experiences as four bilingual and bicultural researchers, each experienced in conducting cross-cultural/cross-language qualitative research. Through narrative descriptions of experiences with Latinos, Iranians, and Hmong refugees, the authors discuss their rewards, challenges, and methods of enhancing rigor, trustworthiness, and transparency when conducting cross-cultural/cross-language research. The authors discuss and explore how to effectively manage cross-cultural qualitative data, how to effectively use interpreters and translators, how to identify best methods of transcribing data, and the role of creating strong community relationships. The authors provide guidelines for health care professionals to consider when engaging in cross-cultural qualitative research.

  11. Obstetric care providers are able to assess psychosocial risks, identify and refer high-risk pregnant women: validation of a short assessment tool - the KINDEX Greek version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridou, Andria; Schauer, Maggie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina

    2015-02-21

    Prenatal assessment for psychosocial risk factors and prevention and intervention is scarce and, in most cases, nonexistent in obstetrical care. In this study we aimed to evaluate if the KINDEX, a short instrument developed in Germany, is a useful tool in the hands of non-trained medical staff, in order to identify and refer women in psychosocial risk to the adequate mental health and social services. We also examined the criterion-related concurrent validity of the tool through a validation interview carried out by an expert clinical psychologist. Our final objective was to achieve the cultural adaptation of the KINDEX Greek Version and to offer a valid tool for the psychosocial risk assessment to the obstetric care providers. Two obstetricians and five midwives carried out 93 KINDEX interviews (duration 20 minutes) with pregnant women to assess psychosocial risk factors present during pregnancy. Afterwards they referred women who they identified having two or more psychosocial risk factors to the mental health attention unit of the hospital. During the validation procedure an expert clinical psychologist carried out diagnostic interviews with a randomized subsample of 50 pregnant women based on established diagnostic instruments for stress and psychopathology, like the PSS-14, ESI, PDS, HSCL-25. Significant correlations between the results obtained through the assessment using the KINDEX and the risk areas of stress, psychopathology and trauma load assessed in the validation interview demonstrate the criterion-related concurrent validity of the KINDEX. The referral accuracy of the medical staff is confirmed through comparisons between pregnant women who have and have not been referred to the mental health attention unit. Prenatal screenings for psychosocial risks like the KINDEX are feasible in public health settings in Greece. In addition, validity was confirmed in high correlations between the KINDEX results and the results of the validation interviews. The

  12. [Ambient noise comparison in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organization has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise level in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care center. In an cross-sectional design, the maximum noise level was analyzed within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit with a digital meter. A measurement in 4 different points of each room with 5minute intervals for a period of 60minutes were performed at 7:30, 14:30 and 20:30. Average of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to average noise. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had an average of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08); something analogous happened in the coronary intensive care room with an average of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). 25% or more of the measurements exceeded up to 20 points the level recommended by the World Health Organization. Noise levels in intensive care wards that were studied exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of ambient noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. DISTRIBUTION OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES AT TERTIARY CARE CENTER: SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current study was undertaken at a tertiary care center, Bhopal, MP, India, with the objective of establishing frequency of occurrence of congenital heart diseases by echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHOD 10,000 consecutive cases undergoing Echo Color Doppler in the Cardiology Department Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between 1st Jan 2009 and July 2011 were analysed. Echo CD was performed by consultant cardiologist using Acuson Aspen Color Doppler machine following the ASE guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study out of 10,000consecutive cases undergoing echo 648 were identified to having congenital heart diseases. Isolated VSD (30.5%, isolated ASD (23.6% PDA (9% and TOF (8.3% were commonest defect observed. Most common congenital heart disease found in the present study is VSD and is most prevalent in males and is highest among 0-5 yrs.

  14. [Motivations of parents taking their children to the hospital in emergencies. Results of a psychosocial survey at the Regional University Hospital Center of Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguet, M C; Lejosne, G; Berthier, N; Bost, M

    1988-01-01

    A psycho-social survey by questionnaire was conducted among parents accompanying their children to the Pediatric Emergency Ward of the Medical Center of Grenoble, in order to identify the motivations of those who do not seek a medical advice prior to their coming to the hospital. From this survey, several motivating factors were identified: an economical factor, the difficulty to rapidly call a physician, the place of residence, an insufficient knowledge of the medical services, the familiarity of parents with the hospital, the advice of relatives, the anxiety caused by the child's illness and the comforting image of the hospital. In a synthetic analysis, several types of parents are distinguished according to their behavior.

  15. Psychosocial Aspects of Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszycki, Lee H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of heart transplantation, with a focus on the program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Describes social workers' interventions which help patients and families to achieve optimal psychosocial functioning before and after transplantation. (Author/ABL)

  16. The importance of Resilience to Primary Care Practitioners: an Interactive Psycho-Social Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Robert Muller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is argued that an understanding of the factors that make up resilience canenhance communication and concordance between practitioner and patient. A model ispresented demonstrating that resilience is an interaction between factors in the internaldomain, comprising psychological characteristics and resources, and the external domain,comprising the social environment surrounding the individual. As resilience manifests itselfin different ways across the life-cycle, and according to individual circumstances, time is alsoan important part of the model presented in this paper. Understanding this model of resiliencecan lead to an insight that there are factors that can be influenced whereby the primary carepractitioner can treat the patient, or refer them after a process of concordance through adeeper understanding of the factors that surround a patient’s current health status. Underlyingthe model is the view that resilience is linked to the assets model of health, seeking topromote and maintain health and prevent illness. Therefore, primary care practitioners,through a deeper understanding of the circumstances of the patient, and throughunderstanding the factors that promote resilience, may be better able to take action in healthpromotion and maintenance.

  17. Less reduction of psychosocial problems among adolescents with unmet communication needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Margot; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Almansa, Josue; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J; De Winter, Andrea F

    2017-04-01

    Patient-professional communication has been suggested to be a major determinant of treatment outcomes in psychosocial care for children and adolescents. However, the mechanisms involved are largely unknown and no longitudinal studies have been performed. Our aim was, therefore, to assess over the course of 1 year, the impact of patient-centered communication on psychosocial problems of adolescents in psychosocial care, including the routes mediating this impact. We obtained data on 315 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, enrolled in child and adolescent social or mental health care. We assessed patient-centered communication by comparing the needs and experiences of adolescents with regard to three aspects of communication: affective quality, information provision, and shared decision-making. Changes in psychosocial problems comprised those reported by adolescents and their parents between baseline and 1 year thereafter. Potential mediators were treatment adherence, improvement of understanding, and improvement in self-confidence. We found a relationship between unmet needs for affective quality, information provision, and shared decision-making and less reduction of psychosocial problems. The association between the unmet need to share in decision-making and less reduction of psychosocial problems were partially mediated by less improvement in self-confidence (30 %). We found no mediators regarding affective quality and information provision. Our findings confirm that patient-centered communication is a major determinant of treatment outcomes in psychosocial care for adolescents. Professionals should be aware that tailoring their communication to individual patients' needs is vital to the effectiveness of psychosocial care.

  18. Diabetes in a primary care center among Spaniards and immigrants

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    Roca Vilalta M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a disease with different prevalence in different populations. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to describe diabetic patients in a primary care center with regard to their geographic origin, and to determine the status of their disease. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study, with data available from clinical records in South Tarrasa primary care center (Barcelona, Spain in 2004. Results: A total of 1215 diabetic patients with an average age of 65 years, 51% female, were included in the study. Regarding their origin, 97% were from Spain, 2% from Morocco, 0.8% from Latin America, and 0.2% from the rest of Europe. The average Hb1AC was 6.9%. In type 2 diabetic patients, treatment consisted of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA for 46.6%, only dietetic restrictions for 36.5%, OHA + insulin for 7.9%, and only insulin for 9%. In the age group 30-39 years, 0.7% of Moroccans suffer from diabetes versus 0.5% of Spaniards. The values in the 40-49 year group are 3.9% of Moroccans, 3% of Spaniards, and 2.1% of Latin Americans. The values in the 50-59 year group are 13.5% of Moroccans, 10.6% of Spaniards, and 7.7% of Latin Americans. The values in the 60-69 year group are 40% of Moroccans, 18.8% of Spaniards, and 44.5% of Latin Americans. The values in the 70-79 year group are 67% of Moroccans, 26% of Spaniards, and 50% of Latin Americans. The average Hb1AC was 6.3% in Latin Americans, 6.9% in Spaniards, and 8.1% in Moroccans. In type 1 diabetic patients, the average Hb1AC was 10.2% in Moroccans and 8% in Spaniards; while in type 2 diabetes, the average Hb1AC was 7.8% in Moroccans and 6.9% in Spaniards. Gestational diabetes was observed in 6.1% of the Spanish, 10.9% of the Moroccan and 4.2% of the Latin American women. Conclusions: A higher prevalence of diabetes was detected in Moroccans than in patients from other countries. These patients present poor control of the disease.

  19. [Trials for early intervention in Mie Prefectural Mental Care Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masanori; Adachi, Takako; Iwasa, Takashi; Kurita, Kouji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Hama, Yukinobu; Yamamoto, Ayako; Maegawa, Sanae

    2013-01-01

    Mie Prefectural Mental Care Center is a public psychiatric hospital that has 400 beds and 250 outpatients a day. The main catchment area is Tsu City (population: 290,000). Our hospital started early intervention in Aug 2008, and opened the Youth Mental Support Center MIE (YMSC MIE) in Oct 2008. This article reports an early intervention trial in a regional area of Japan. The mission of YMSC MIE is the education, consultation, staff training, and intervention for mental health problems and early psychosis of youths. In Jul 2009, we set up the Youth Assist Clinic (YAC) to support youths with mental health problems and early psychoses. Our activities consist of school-based, community-based, and hospital-based approaches. Specific programs are as follows: 1) School-based approaches: Outreach consultation to school. Mental health lessens. Creating mental health textbooks. Education for parents and teachers. 2) Community-based approaches: To enlighten primary physicians and mental clinic psychiatrists about the importance of early psychosis. To survey their concerns regarding early psychosis. Promoting awareness of community staff and the general public. 3) Hospital-based approaches: YAC. Case manager system. Family meetings for the family including the young with mental disorders. Peer group. Looking back over our 3-year trials, especially in school and the community, we find several problems, as follows: 1) Lack of consultation skills of medical staff outside the hospital. 2) Limiting number of schools which have mental support system. 3) Support for school attendance and learning. 4) Lack of concern about early psychosis of primary physicians and mental clinic psychiatrists. 5) Staff training for early intervention. We are now getting close to improving these issues.

  20. Women with heart failure are at high psychosocial risk: a systematic review of how sex and gender influence heart failure self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jody R; Clark, Alexander M

    2011-03-06

    To improve patient support, it is important to understand how people view and experience Heart Failure (HF) self-care. This systematic review of qualitative studies included all published studies that examine the influence of sex and gender on HF self-care. A systematic search was done for papers (1995-2010) indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, OVID AARP Ageline, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO SocINDEX, ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. After screening of 537 citations, six qualitative studies identified that differences existed in perceptions of symptoms with women having less family involvement and psychosocial support around self-care. Moreover, women had considerably more negative views of the future, themselves and their ability to fulfill social self-care roles. Women with HF represent a highly vulnerable population and need more support for psychosocial wellbeing and self-care.

  1. Women with Heart Failure Are at High Psychosocial Risk: A Systematic Review of How Sex and Gender Influence Heart Failure Self-Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody R. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve patient support, it is important to understand how people view and experience Heart Failure (HF self-care. This systematic review of qualitative studies included all published studies that examine the influence of sex and gender on HF self-care. A systematic search was done for papers (1995–2010 indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, OVID AARP Ageline, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO SocINDEX, ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. After screening of 537 citations, six qualitative studies identified that differences existed in perceptions of symptoms with women having less family involvement and psychosocial support around self-care. Moreover, women had considerably more negative views of the future, themselves and their ability to fulfill social self-care roles. Women with HF represent a highly vulnerable population and need more support for psychosocial wellbeing and self-care.

  2. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach...

  3. The experience of palliative patients and their families of a family meeting utilised as an instrument for spiritual and psychosocial care: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olver Ian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study explores the experience of palliative patients and their family members of a family meeting model, utilised as an instrument for the provision of spiritual and psychosocial care. In doing so the study embraces a broad understanding of spirituality which may or may not include formal religious practice and a concept of psychosocial care that includes: social and emotional well-being, communication, self esteem, mental health and adaptation to illness. The meeting of spiritual and psychosocial needs is considered to be an important aspect of palliative care. Methods This qualitative study, philosophically underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology, investigates the participatory experience of palliative care patients and their significant family members of such a family meeting. People registered with two large metropolitan palliative care services, who met selection criteria, were referred by medical staff. Twelve of the 66 referred took part in family meetings which also included significant others invited by the patient. A total of 36 family members participated. The number of participants of individual family meetings ranged from two to eleven. After the family meeting every participant was invited to take part in an individual in-depth interview about their experience of the meeting. Forty seven interviews were conducted. These were audio recorded and transcribed. Results Data analysis, utilising Ricoeur's theory of interpretation, revealed seven main themes: personal experience of the meeting, personal outcomes, observation of others' experience, observation of experience and outcomes for the family unit, meeting facilitation, how it could have been different and general applicability of the family meeting. Throughout these themes were numerous references to aspects of the web of relationships which describe the concept of spirituality as it is defined for the purpose of this study. Conclusions The findings

  4. Evaluation of an Intervention to Reduce Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child-Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Revisits 58 child care centers in Atlanta (Georgia) that had received interventions alerting directors to playground safety hazards. Comparison with 71 control centers randomly selected found averages of 9.4 hazards at intervention center playgrounds and 8.0 hazards at control centers. These results indicate the ineffectiveness of the…

  5. Population based study of noncardiac chest pain in southern Chinese:Prevalence, psychosocial factors and health care utilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wai Man Wong; Chi Kuen Chan; Annie O.O. Chan; Shiu Kum Lam; Benjamin Chun-Yu Wong; Kwok Fai Lam; Cecilia Cheng; Wai Mo Hui; Harry Hua-Xiang Xia; Kam Chuen Lai; Wayne H.C. Hu; Jia Qing Huang; Cindy L.K. Lam

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Population-based assessment of noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, psychosocial factors and health seeking behaviour of NCCP in southern Chinese.METHODS: A total of 2 209 ethnic Hong Kong Chinese households were recruited to participate in a telephone survey to study the epidemiology of NCCP using the Rose angina questionnaire, a validated gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire and the hospital anxietydepression scale. NCCP was defined as non-exertional chest pain according to the Rose angina questionnaire and had not been diagnosed as ischaemic heart diseases by a physician.RESULTS: Chest pain over the past year was present in 454 subjects (20.6%, 95% CI 19-22), while NCCP was present in 307 subjects (13.9%, 95% CI 13-15). GERD was present in 51% of subjects with NCCP and 34% had consulted a physician for chest pain. Subjects with NCCP had a significantly higher anxiety (P<0.001) and depression score (P=0.007), and required more days off (P=0.021) than subjects with no chest pain. By multiple logistic regression analysis, female gender (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), presence of GERD (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.6-4.8), and social life being affected by NCCP (OR 6.9, 95% CI 3.3-15.9) were independent factors associated with health seeking behaviour in southern Chinese with NCCP.CONCLUSION: NCCP is a common problem in southern Chinese and associated with anxiety and depression. Female gender, GERD and social life affected by chest pain were associated with health care utilization in subjects with NCCP.

  6. Demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors identify a high-risk group for depression screening among predominantly Hispanic patients with Type 2 diabetes in safety net care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Katon, Wayne; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey; Wu, Shinyi

    2015-01-01

    Identify biopsychosocial factors associated with depression for patients with Type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental clinical trial of 1293 patients was predominantly Hispanic (91%) female (62%), mean age 53 and average diabetes duration 10 years; 373 (29%) patients were depressed and assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Demographic, baseline clinical and psychosocial variables were compared between depressed and nondepressed patients. Bivariate analyses found depression significantly associated (pidentified six key risk factors: greater disability, diabetes symptoms and regimen distress, female gender, less diabetes self-care and lack of A1C. In addition, after controlling for identified six factors, the number of psychosocial stressors significantly associated with increased risk of depression (adjusted odds ratio=1.37, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18-1.58, pidentify a high-risk group of patients needing depression screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Creating New Child Care Slots in Mini Child Care Centers: Big Bang for the Buck in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Small grants of $7,500 with technical assistance were offered to the child care community of New Jersey to either start or increase licensed capacity in mini-child care centers. Results of a subsequent analysis showed that 26 grantees created 481 new child care slots at an average cost of $561 per slot. (Author/SM)

  8. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Centers, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described as...

  9. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Center point layer, combined with pre-school points., Published in 2005, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Reno County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2005. It is...

  10. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Centers in Thomas County, GA, Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Thomas County BOC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2010. It is described as 'Day...

  11. MUSICAL INTERVENTION AS A NURSING CARE STRATEGY FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER AT A PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana André Honorato Franzoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available La música se ha utilizado cada vez más en el cuidado de los niños con trastorno del espectro autista. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo informar sobre la aplicación de la experiencia de la música como tecnología del cuidado de estos niños en un Servicio de Salud Mental Infanto-Juvenil. Se trata de un proyecto de intervención basado en la idea de acción-reflexión acción a través de las etapas de diagnóstico de la realidad, la teoría y la aplicación en la realidad. La intervención musical facilitó nuevas experiencias recreativas, sensorial, motora, del lenguaje y de la interacción de los niños, actuando sobre la tríada de alteraciones - comunicación, comportamiento e interacción. Los profesionales deben profundizar sus conocimientos sobre los métodos y estrategias del uso de la musicoterapia en la salud mental con el fin de extender su uso en el cuidado de estos niños y evaluar los efectos de esta intervención.

  12. MUSICAL INTERVENTION AS A NURSING CARE STRATEGY FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER AT A PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE CENTER

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariana André Honorato Franzoi; José Luís Guedes do Santos; Vânia Marli Schubert Backes; Flávia Regina Souza Ramos

    2016-01-01

    ... a través de las etapas de diagnóstico de la realidad, la teoría y la aplicación en la realidad. La intervención musical facilitó nuevas experiencias recreativas, sensorial, motora, del lenguaje y de la...

  13. Pediatric Mortality in a Rural Tertiary Care Center in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Carmelle; Walters, Camila B.; Sampson, John; Kateh, Francis; Chang, Mary P.

    2017-01-01

    Liberia is a low-income country in West Africa that has faced significant challenges, including a civil war and the recent Ebola epidemic. Little data exists on the more current post-war and pre-Ebola trends of child health in Liberia in the rural setting. This study is a retrospective chart review of pediatric mortality in 2013 at a rural tertiary care center in Liberia, 10 years post-war. From January 2013 to December 2013, there were 50 pediatric deaths, or 5.4% of the 920 total pediatric admissions. The most common cause of neonatal death was sepsis, and the most common cause of death under five years of age was malaria. The majority (82.0%) of the deaths were in children under five. Pediatric mortality at this hospital was similar to other reported mortality six years post-war, and lower than that reported immediately post-war. Neonatal sepsis and malaria are two significant causes of pediatric mortality in this community and, therefore, further efforts to decrease childhood mortality should focus on these causes. PMID:28146099

  14. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC; Celene Wong MHA; Martha B Carnie AS; Stanley W Ashley MD; Jacqueline G Somerville RN, PhD

    2015-01-01

    With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received...

  15. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received by patients/families and to ultimately change physician practice to reflect patient family–centered principles. We conducted a clinician survey and found promising results indicating that patient/family narratives can be effective at educating physicians about patient family–centered care.

  16. Physical activity levels and supportive care needs for physical activity among breast cancer survivors with different psychosocial profiles: a cluster-analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, C; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Spittaels, H; Bourgois, J; DE Bourdeaudhuij, I; VAN Hoof, E

    2012-11-01

    The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is associated with many treatment-related and psychosocial factors, which can influence health behaviour and associated needs. First, this study aimed to identify clusters of treatment-related and psychosocial factors among breast cancer survivors. Second, clusters' physical activity levels and care needs for physical activity were evaluated. Breast cancer survivors (n= 440; 52 ± 8 years) (3 weeks to 6 months post treatment) completed self-reports on physical and psychological symptoms; illness representations; social support and coping; physical activity and care needs for physical activity. Analyses identified four clusters: (1) a low distress-active approach group; (2) a low distress-resigned approach group; (3) a high distress-active approach group; and (4) a high distress-emotional approach group. Physical activity levels were higher in the low distress groups than in the high distress-emotional approach group. However, women with low distress and an active approach reported equal care needs for physical activity than women with high distress and an emotional approach. These findings suggest that care needs for physical activity are unrelated to distress and actual physical activity levels. The results emphasise the importance of screening for needs and provide a framework supporting the referral of breast cancer survivors to tailored interventions.

  17. Psychosocial Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Watkins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay advocates for a paradigm shift in psychology toward the activity and ethics of accompaniment. Accompaniment requires a reorientation of the subjectivity, interpersonal practices, and critical understanding of the accompanier so that (she can stand alongside others who desire listening, witnessing, advocacy, space to develop critical inquiry and research, and joint imagination and action to address desired and needed changes. The idea of “accompaniment” emerged in liberation theology in Latin America, and migrated into liberatory forms of psychology as “psychosocial accompaniment.” This essay explores accompaniment and its ethics from a phenomenological perspective, highlighting differences from mainstream stances in psychology. Attention is also given to the effects of accompaniment on the accompanier. Efforts to decolonize psychology require careful attention to the psychic decolonization of its practitioners and to the cultivation of decolonizing interpersonal practices that provide a relational and ethical foundation for joint research, restorative healing, and transformative action. Such practices endeavor through dialogue to build mutual respect and understanding, promote effective solidarity, and contribute to the empowerment of those marginalized. The decolonization of psychology should enable practitioners to be more effective in working for increased social, economic, and environmental justice; peace building and reconciliation; and local and global ecological sustainability.

  18. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  19. Factors Related to Psychosocial Quality of Life for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Tessier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Current health services interventions focus on the treatment of the musculoskeletal impairments of cerebral palsy (CP. The goal of this study was to explore whether the severity of physical symptoms correlates with psychosocial quality of life (QOL among pediatric patients with CP. Methods. A sample of 53 caregivers of children with CP was surveyed and health status information was extracted from patient medical records. Descriptive analysis explored the association between the main outcome variable, psychosocial QOL (CP QOL-child, and patient demographics, comorbidity (e.g., visual, hearing and feeding impairments, language delays, and epilepsy, CP severity (GMFCS, and the receipt of family centered care (MPOC-20. Results. Child psychosocial QOL decreased with increasing comorbidity but was not associated with CP symptom severity or any measured demographic factors. Reporting high levels of family centered care (FCC was associated with higher psychosocial QOL in univariate analysis but was not significant when controlling for comorbidities. Conclusion. There is no clear connection between symptom severity and psychosocial QOL in children with CP. Comorbidity however is strongly associated with psychosocial QOL. Focusing on reducing CP comorbidities could have a positive impact on psychosocial QOL.

  20. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  1. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter; Conrad, Douglas A; Hernandez, Susan E; Watts, Carolyn; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2012-12-14

    Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations - from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets and addressing conditions for innovation.

  2. Patient- and family-centered care coordination: a framework for integrating care for children and youth across multiple systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Understanding a care coordination framework, its functions, and its effects on children and families is critical for patients and families themselves, as well as for pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists/surgical specialists, and anyone providing services to children and families. Care coordination is an essential element of a transformed American health care delivery system that emphasizes optimal quality and cost outcomes, addresses family-centered care, and calls for partnership across various settings and communities. High-quality, cost-effective health care requires that the delivery system include elements for the provision of services supporting the coordination of care across settings and professionals. This requirement of supporting coordination of care is generally true for health systems providing care for all children and youth but especially for those with special health care needs. At the foundation of an efficient and effective system of care delivery is the patient-/family-centered medical home. From its inception, the medical home has had care coordination as a core element. In general, optimal outcomes for children and youth, especially those with special health care needs, require interfacing among multiple care systems and individuals, including the following: medical, social, and behavioral professionals; the educational system; payers; medical equipment providers; home care agencies; advocacy groups; needed supportive therapies/services; and families. Coordination of care across settings permits an integration of services that is centered on the comprehensive needs of the patient and family, leading to decreased health care costs, reduction in fragmented care, and improvement in the patient/family experience of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Biological air contamination in elderly care centers: geria project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Lívia; Mendes, Ana; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Mendes, Diana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) affects health particularly in susceptible individuals such as the elderly. It has been estimated that the older population spends approximately 19-20 h/d indoors, and the majority of the elderly spend all of their time indoors in elderly care centers (ECC). Older individuals may be particularly at risk of exposure to detrimental effects from pollutants, even at low concentrations, due to common and multiple underlying chronic diseases that increase susceptibility. This study, aimed to assess the impact of indoor biological agents in 22 ECC located in Porto, was conducted during summer and winter from November 2011 to August 2013 at a total of 141 areas within dining rooms, drawing rooms, medical offices, and bedrooms (including the bedridden). Air sampling was carried out with a microbiological air sampler (Merck MAS-100) and using tryptic soy agar for bacteria and malt extract agar for fungi. The results obtained were compared with the recently revised Portuguese standards. In winter, mean fungi concentration exceeded reference values, while bacteria concentrations were within the new standards in both seasons. The main fungi species found indoors were Cladosporium (73%) in summer and Penicillium (67%) in winter. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus, known potential pathogenic/toxigenic species, were also identified. Although the overall rate and mean values of bacteria and fungi found in ECC indoor air met Portuguese legislation, some concern is raised by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Simple measures, like opening windows and doors to promote air exchange and renewal, may improve effectiveness in enhancing IAQ.

  4. Improving the transition of care in patients transferred through the ochsner medical center transfer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedee, Ronald G; Maronge, Genevieve F; Pinsky, William W

    2012-01-01

    Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (Pkaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects.

  5. "Blue flags", development of a short clinical questionnaire on work-related psychosocial risk factors - a validation study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post Sennehed, Charlotte; Gard, Gunvor; Holmberg, Sara; Stigmar, Kjerstin; Forsbrand, Malin; Grahn, Birgitta

    2017-07-24

    Working conditions substantially influence health, work ability and sick leave. Useful instruments to help clinicians pay attention to working conditions are lacking in primary care (PC). The aim of this study was to test the validity of a short "Blue flags" questionnaire, which focuses on work-related psychosocial risk factors and any potential need for contacts and/or actions at the workplace. From the original"The General Nordic Questionnaire" (QPSNordic) the research group identified five content areas with a total of 51 items which were considered to be most relevant focusing on work-related psychosocial risk factors. Fourteen items were selected from the identified QPSNordic content areas and organised in a short questionnaire "Blue flags". These 14 items were validated towards the 51 QPSNordic items. Content validity was reviewed by a professional panel and a patient panel. Structural and concurrent validity were also tested within a randomised clinical trial. The two panels (n = 111) considered the 14 psychosocial items to be relevant. A four-factor model was extracted with an explained variance of 25.2%, 14.9%, 10.9% and 8.3% respectively. All 14 items showed satisfactory loadings on all factors. Concerning concurrent validity the overall correlation was very strong rs = 0.87 (p development of the "Blue flags" questionnaire. In summary, the overall validity is considered acceptable. Testing in clinical contexts and in other patient populations is recommended to ensure predictive validity and usefulness.

  6. [Association between demographic characteristics and psychosocial factors of job stress in a sample of health care workers employed in two Italian hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, C G; Gerbaudo, Laura; Benso, P G; Violante, B

    2009-01-01

    Job stress has negative effects on both health care work ers' (HCW) health and on work organization. To assess whether the presence of stressful conditions, individually considered, or combined in the iso-strain model, is significantly associated with specific socio-demographic characteristics, also with the aim of providing organizational tools for management to reduce stress in the working environment according to Italian law 81/2008. The extended version of the Job Content Questionnaire was administered to 265 healthy HCW in seven paired wards of two hospitals. The five psychosocial scales Job Demand (JD), Job Control (JC), Social Support (SS), Skill Underutilization (SuS), and Job Insecurity (JI) were calculated. The factors JD, JC, and SS were combined together to separate a group of 33 HCW in iso-strain conditions from another group of 232 HCW not in iso-strain conditions. Several socio-demographic variables were collected. Statistically significant associations were found between socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial factors, whereas the iso-strain conditions were not related to any socio-demographic parameter. Data suggest the need for alternative policies to reduce job stress: for example, actions addressed to operative units or HCW with specific socio-demographic characteristics could be effective in improving individual psychosocial factors; however, integrated actions aimed at reorganizing the working environment as a whole should be implemented to correct iso-strain conditions.

  7. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  8. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  9. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  10. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants’ cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, E.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was rate

  11. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation November 17 and 18... third and final Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care...

  12. Differences Between Highly Satisfied and Not Highly Satisfied Clients of Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Ellen; Fredlund, Janet

    This study analyzes the differences between those customers in two types of day care centers who are highly satisfied and who are not. Half were supported by client fees, and half used other sources of funding, e.g. tax support, and private philanthropic support. Parents and teachers of 100 children in day care centers in four different…

  13. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants’ cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, E.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was

  14. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  15. Focus on the Psychosocial Dimensions of Talent Development: An Important Potential Role for Consultee-Centered Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Jeffrey; Subotnik, Rena; Knotek, Steven; Rayhack, Kristin; Gorgia, Jason

    2007-01-01

    The American Psychological Association's Center for Gifted Education Policy (CGEP) reviewed the literature on current talent development models and conducted research on music conservatory students, high IQ students, and science-talented students as sources for a new developmental model called scholarly productivity/artistry (SP/A).The third stage…

  16. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  17. Psychosocial assessment of nursing home residents via MDS 3.0: recommendations for social service training, staffing, and roles in interdisciplinary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Kelsey; Connolly, Robert P; Bonifas, Robin; Allen, Priscilla D; Bailey, Kathleen; Downes, Deirdre; Galambos, Colleen

    2012-02-01

    The Minimum Data Set 3.0 has introduced a higher set of expectations for assessment of residents' psychosocial needs, including new interviewing requirements, new measures of depression and resident choice, and new discharge screening procedures. Social service staff are primary providers of psychosocial assessment and care in nursing homes; yet, research demonstrates that many do not possess the minimum qualifications, as specified in federal regulations, to effectively provide these services given the clinical complexity of this client population. Likewise, social service caseloads generally exceed manageable levels. This article addresses the need for enhanced training and support of social service and interdisciplinary staff in long term care facilities in light of the new Minimum Data Set 3.0 assessment procedures as well as new survey and certification guidelines emphasizing quality of life. A set of recommendations will be made with regard to training, appropriate role functions within the context of interdisciplinary care, and needs for more realistic staffing ratios. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the need for an online decision-support tool to promote evidence-based practices of psychosocial counseling in HIV care

    OpenAIRE

    Kukafka, Rita; Millery, Mari; Chan, Connie; LaRock, William; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial counselors have a vital and challenging role in supporting persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) to better manage their disease. However, gaps in training, education, and skills limit the effectiveness of counselors’ efforts. We propose that the use of a decision-support tool for counselors at the point of care can support them in their work as well as help alleviate many training and practice gaps. Decision-support tools aimed at reducing knowledge and practice gaps are used ext...

  19. Optimizing Patient-centered Communication and Multidisciplinary Care Coordination in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Merck, Lisa H; Froemming, Adam T; Vaughan, William; Brown, Michael D; Hess, Erik P; Applegate, Kimberly E; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-12-01

    Patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging relies on efficient communication and multispecialty care coordination to ensure optimal imaging utilization. The construct of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination cycle with three main phases (pretest, test, and posttest) provides a useful framework to evaluate care coordination in patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. This article summarizes findings reached during the patient-centered outcomes session of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The primary objective was to develop a research agenda focused on 1) defining component parts of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination process, 2) identifying gaps in communication that affect emergency diagnostic imaging, and 3) defining optimal methods of communication and multidisciplinary care coordination that ensure patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. Prioritized research questions provided the framework to define a research agenda for multidisciplinary care coordination in emergency diagnostic imaging.

  20. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members.

  1. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This ch...

  2. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  3. Effectiveness of Primary Care Triple P on child psychosocial problems in preventive child healthcare : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkers, Edwin; Jansen, Danielle; Reijneveld, Menno

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychosocial problems in children have adverse effects on the children, their families, and society, thus early intervention is important. Community pediatric services offer an ideal setting to detect problem behaviour in children and provide support to parents. The objective of this stu

  4. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children. All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. RESULTS: Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. CONCLUSION: The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers.

  5. How the psychosocial context of clinical trials differs from usual care: A qualitative study of acupuncture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative studies of participants' experiences in randomised clinical trials (RCTs suggest that the psychosocial context of treatment in RCTs may be quite different to the psychosocial context of treatment in usual practice. This is important, as the psychosocial context of treatment is known to influence patient outcomes in chronic illness. Few studies have directly compared the psychosocial context of treatment across RCTs and usual practice. In this study, we explored differences in psychosocial context between RCT and usual practice settings, using acupuncture as our model. Methods We undertook a secondary analysis of existing qualitative interviews with 54 patients. 27 were drawn from a study of western and traditional acupuncture in usual practice (for a range of painful conditions. 27 were drawn from a qualitative study nested in an RCT of western acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. We used qualitative analysis software to facilitate an inductive thematic analysis in which we identified three main themes. Results In usual practice, starting acupuncture was more likely to be embedded in an active and ongoing search for pain relief, whereas in the RCT starting acupuncture was opportunistic. Usual practice patients reported few uncertainties and these had minimal consequences for them. In the RCT, patients experienced considerable uncertainties about their treatment and its effectiveness, and were particularly concerned about whether they were receiving real (or fake acupuncture. Patients stopped acupuncture only at the end of the fixed course of treatment in the RCT, which was similar to those receiving acupuncture in the public sector National Health Service (NHS. In comparison, private sector patients re-evaluated and re-negotiated treatments particularly when starting to use acupuncture. Conclusions Differences in psychosocial context between RCTs and usual practice could reduce the impact of

  6. Quality of antenatal care in primary health care centers of bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M S A Mansur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To find out the quality of ANC in the Upazila Health Complexes (PHC centres of Bangladesh.This cross sectional study was done in purposively selected three upazilas among the clients receiving antenatal care (ANC. Data were collected with questionnaire cum checklist in the context of two aspects of quality issues, namely assessment of physical arrangements for ANC (input and services rendered by the providers (process.The mean age of respondents was 24.6±4.5 years. Majority of the respondents were with primary level education (60.3%. About half (52.8% of the families had monthly income ranging from 3000-5000 taka (38-64 US$. Nearly half (48.9% had no child, little more than one third (42.3% were primigravida and 528 (57.7% were multigravida. Out of 528 multigravid respondents 360 (68.2% took ANC in their previous pregnancy whereas 168 (31.8% did not take ANC Pregnancy outcome was found to be associated with receiving ANC (χ(2=73.599; p=0.000. Respondents receiving ANC had more good pregnancy outcome. The mean waiting time for receiving ANC was 0.77±.49 hours. Out of the 13 centers, only 3 (23.1% have sufficient instruments to render ANC services. Findings showed that where the modes of ANC service delivery in the ANC centers are fairly satisfactory. Though some of the points of standard operation procedures (SOPs on ANC are not covered by some ANC centers, those were not considered necessary. But, regarding the physical facilities available for rendering ANC services, it is seen that facilities are not quite satisfactory. Number of doctors and nurses are not very satisfactory. One of the centers under this study has no doctor, where ANC services are given by nurses.It can be concluded that the ANC services at the primary health care level is not adequate in Bangladesh. To ensure further improvement of the quality of ANC services, instruments used in logistics and supplies should be enhanced.

  7. What is Patient-Centered Care? A Typology of Models and Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Recently adopted health care practices and policies describe themselves as "patient-centered care." The meaning of the term, however, remains contested and obscure. This paper offers a typology of "patient-centered care" models that aims to contribute to greater clarity about, continuing discussion of, and further advances in patient-centered care. The paper imposes an original analytic framework on extensive material covering mostly US health care and health policy topics over several decades. It finds that four models of patient-centered care emphasize: patients versus their parts; patients versus providers; patients/providers/states versus "the system"; and patients and providers as persons. Each type is distinguishable along three dimensions: epistemological orientations, practical accommodations, and policy tools. Based on this analysis, the paper recommends that four questions be asked of any proposal that claims to provide patient-centered care: Is this care a means to an end or an end in itself? Are patients here subjects or objects? Are patients here individuals or aggregates? How do we know what patients want and need? The typology reveals that models are neither entirely compatible nor entirely incompatible and may be usefully combined in certain practices and policies. In other instances, internal contradictions may jeopardize the realization of coherent patient-centered care.

  8. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  9. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  10. Commitment, Community, and Passion: Dimensions of a Care-Centered Approach to Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lisa S.

    2002-01-01

    Builds on Nel Noddings' work on caring encounters to develop a care-centered approach to teacher education. This model emphasizes the important contributions to the process of preparing caring teachers made by enhanced interpersonal commitment, membership in a community of learners, and passion for the creative, intellectual aspects of teaching.…

  11. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  12. Healthcare Professionals' Knowledge of Family Psychosocial Problems in Pediatric Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Maru; Rokeach, Alan; Yogalingam, Priyanga; Hancock, Kelly; Johnston, Donna L; Cataudella, Danielle; Cassidy, Marilyn; Punnett, Angela S; Shama, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Best practice guidelines for the treatment of cancer now advocate for a child- and family-centered model of care and a psychosocial model of risk prevention. However, healthcare professionals (HCPs) report a number of barriers preventing the implementation of psychosocial care, including an absence of tools to help identify psychosocial problems within the family. The aims of this study are to (1) explore the psychometric properties of the Psychosocial Care Checklist (PCCL) and (2) test if the PCCL can differentiate the degree to which HCPs are aware of psychosocial problems within the family (patient, siblings, parents) of a child with cancer. Thirty-seven HCPs caring for a child with cancer completed the PCCL at time 1 (2-4 weeks after diagnosis) and 29 HCPs completed the PCCL at time 2 (2-3 weeks after). The PCCL had strong test-retest reliability for all domains (α > .60) and strong internal consistency for the total PCCL (α = .91). Interrater reliability was moderate for the oncologist-nurse dyad with regard to sibling knowledge (r = 0.56) and total psychosocial knowledge (r = 0.65). Social workers were significantly more knowledgeable than both nurses and oncologists about total family problems (P = .01) and sibling problems (P = .03). Preliminary findings suggest that the PCCL has adequate test-retest reliability and validity and is useful in differentiating the degree to which HCPs are aware of psychosocial problems within the family, with social workers being the most knowledgeable. Using the PCCL may help HCPs to identify psychosocial problems within the family and appropriately allocate psychosocial resources.

  13. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  14. Student-Centered Deliberations of Ethical Care & Use of Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa; Frantz, Kyle

    2007-01-01

    Most biology teachers implement animal dissection (real or virtual) and often lead discussions on research involving animal subjects. Such activities provide excellent opportunities to explore ideas about ethical conduct in the care and use of animals. The challenge for teachers is to present information about animal care and use that enables…

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Person-centered care is a multidimensional concept describing good care, especially within aged care and care for people with dementia. Research studies evaluating person-centered care interventions seldom use direct measurement of levels of person-centeredness. Existing scales that measure person-centeredness need further testing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Methods: A cross-sectional...

  16. Extending residential care through telephone counseling: Initial results from the Betty Ford Center Focused Continuing Care protocol

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a chronic care model may be effective when treating substance use disorders. In 1996, the Betty Ford Center (BFC) began implementing a telephone-based continuing care intervention now called Focused Continuing Care (FCC) to assist and support patients in their transition from residential treatment to longer-term recovery in the “real world”. This article reports on patient utilization and outcomes of FCC. FCC staff placed clinically directed telephone calls t...

  17. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  18. Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

  19. Integrating Primary Care Into Community Mental Health Centers: Impact on Utilization and Costs of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I; Scharf, Deborah M; Hopfenbeck, James; Andrus, Graydon; Joesch, Jutta M; Snowden, Mark

    2016-11-01

    This evaluation was designed to assess the impact of providing integrated primary and mental health care on utilization and costs for outpatient medical, inpatient hospital, and emergency department treatment among persons with serious mental illness. Two safety-net, community mental health centers that received a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grant were the focus of this study. Clinic 1 had a ten-year history of providing integrated services whereas clinic 2 began integrated services with the PBHCI grant. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses were used to compare individuals enrolled in the PBHCI programs (N=373, clinic 1; N=389, clinic 2) with propensity score-matched comparison groups of equal size at each site by using data obtained from medical records. Relative to the comparison groups, a higher proportion of PBHCI clients used outpatient medical services at both sites following program enrollment (p<.003, clinic 1; p<.001, clinic 2). At clinic 1, PBHCI was also associated with a reduction in the proportion of clients with an inpatient hospital admission (p=.04) and a trend for a reduction in inpatient hospital costs per member per month of $217.68 (p=.06). Hospital-related cost savings were not observed for PBHCI clients at clinic 2 nor were there significant differences between emergency department use or costs for PBHCI and comparison groups at either clinic. Investments in PBHCI can improve access to outpatient medical care for persons with severe mental illness and may also curb hospitalizations and associated costs in more established programs.

  20. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  1. Establishing a national research center on day care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Tomas

    The paper presents and discusses the current formation of a national research center on ECEC. The center is currently being established. It is partly funded by the Danish union of early childhood and youth educators. It is based on cooperation between a number of Danish universities and this nati...... current new public management policies. However there is also more conflicting issues that emerge in this enterprise – especially on interests, practice relevance and knowledge paradigms....

  2. Gender-affirming Surgeries in the Era of Insurance Coverage: Developing a Framework for Psychosocial Support and Care Navigation in the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Transgender people have a gender identity different from their birth-assigned sex. Transgender people may seek gender-affirming surgeries to align their body with their identified gender. With increasing visibility of transgender identities, and recognition of the importance of gender-affirming care, has come a policy shift toward mandated coverage or provision of blanket exclusions of these procedures by insurance companies and Medicaid. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health provides guidance to mental health professionals evaluating patients for gender-affirming surgeries, including making a diagnosis and assessing for capacity to consent. However the expansion of covered gender-affirming surgeries to safety-net populations has highlighted the need for an expanded presurgical process which includes a psychosocial assessment and care navigation. The proposed framework expands the preoperative assessment to include these components, and can be used to guide both health systems and insurance providers in the development of transgender medicine programs.

  3. Expanding The Rubric of "Patient-Centered Care" (PCC) to "Patient and Professional Centered Care" (PPCC) to Enhance Provider Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Stephen G; Roess, Michael

    2017-04-29

    Burnout among physicians, nurses, and students is a serious problem in U.S. healthcare that reflects inattentive management practices, outmoded images of the "good" provider as selflessly ignoring the care of the self, and an overarching rubric of Patient Centered Care (PCC) that leaves professional self-care out of the equation. We ask herein if expanding PCC to Patient and Professional Centered Care (PPCC) would be a useful idea to make provider self-care an explicit part of mission statements, a major part of management strategies and institutional goal setting, and of educational programs. We offer several practical suggestions for PPCC implementation, including structuring healthcare systems so as to nurture professional meaning, integrity, and inter-personal reflective emotional processing as a buffer against burnout and as a key to better patient care. It should not bring into question the primacy of practitioner commitment to the good of patients, nor should it be taken to suggest in any way a shift in focus away from patients' values and respect for patient autonomy. PPCC asserts that the respect for patient's values and autonomous choices properly remains the ethical benchmark of modern healthcare systems, along with altruistic professional commitment to the optimal care of patients. However, it enunciates an explicit commitment to structuring systems that allow for and actively encourage the professional well-being and wellness upon which good patient care depends.

  4. Cancer Care Initiative: Creation of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at Naval Medical Center Dan Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    clinic had Cancer Care Initiative 6 a dedicated satellite pharmacy staffed by a part-time pharmacist who prepared chemotherapy solutions...patient education information; 80% want clinical research trials; and 79% want end-of-life palliative care to be included as part of a CCC. Physicians...prevention, early detection, staging evaluation, initial and subsequent treatment, long-term follow-up, palliative and hospice care , and supportive

  5. Is the psychosocial profile of people with low back pain seeking care in Danish primary care different from those in secondary care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter; Albert, Hanne B;

    2013-01-01

    not been investigated. The aim of the study was to determine: (1) if movement-related fear, catastrophisation, anxiety and/or depression in LBP patients are different between primary and secondary care settings, and (2) if those differences are retained when stratified by SBT subgroup. This study...... of Kinesiophobia, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (catastrophisation subscale), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There were significantly higher scores in secondary care for movement-related fear (1.3 points (95%CI .1-2.5) p = .030) and catastrophisation (2.0 (95%CI 1.0-3.0) p ...

  6. A Patient-Centered Understanding of the Referral System in Ethiopian Primary Health Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Abrahim

    Full Text Available Primary healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa have undergone substantial development in an effort to expand access to appropriate facilities through a well-functioning referral system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current patterns of seeking prior care before arriving at a health center or a hospital as a key aspect of the referral system of the primary health care unit (PHCU in three regions in Ethiopia. We examined what percentage of patients had either sought prior care or had been referred to the present facility and identified demographic and clinical factors associated with having sought prior care or having been referred.We conducted a cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews in the local language with 796 people (99% response rate seeking outpatient care in three primary health care units serving approximately 100,000 people each and reflecting regional and ethnic diversity; 53% (N = 418 of the sample was seeking care at hospital outpatient departments, and 47% of the sample was seeking care at health centers (N = 378. We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to identify factors associated with having been referred or sought prior care. Our findings indicated that only 10% of all patients interviewed had been referred to their current place of care. Among those in the hospital population, 14% had been referred; among those in the health center population, only 6% had been referred. Of those who had been referred to the hospital, most (74% had been referred by a health center. Among those who were referred to the health center, the plurality portion (32% came from a nearby hospital (most commonly for continued HIV treatment or early childhood vaccinations; only 18% had come from a health post. Among patients who had not been formally referred, an additional 25% in the hospital sample and 10% in the health center sample had accessed some prior source of care for their present health concern. In

  7. 12 Daghem: Beskrivning av uppfostringsklimat och sociala relationer (Twelve Day Care Centers: A Multisite Comparison of Day-Care Climate and Social Relations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Bodil; Hedin, Anna

    Twelve day care centers in a Swedish commune were systematically observed. Centers were selected on the basis of responses to a questionnaire on attitudes about upbringing which was answered by all the personnel at the 104 day care centers in the commune. Four of the selected centers represented a so-called "present-focused" upbringing…

  8. Family psychosocial risk screening guided by the Pediatric Psychosocial Preventative Health Model (PPPHM) using the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Anne E; Schneider, Stephanie; Didonato, Stephen; Pai, Ahna L H

    2015-05-01

    Although families of children with cancer and other serious medical conditions have documented psychosocial needs, the systematic identification of needs and delivery of evidence-based care remain challenges. Screening for multifaceted family psychosocial risk is a means by which psychosocial treatment needs for pediatric patients and their families can be identified in an effective and inclusive manner. The Pediatric Psychosocial Preventative Health Model (PPPHM) is a model that can guide systematic assessment of family psychosocial risk. The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) is a brief parent report screener of psychosocial risk based on the PPPHM that can be used for families of infants through adolescents. The PPPHM and the PAT are described in this paper, along with a summary of data supporting systematic risk assessment. The PPPHM outlines three tiers of family psychosocial risk - Universal (low), Targeted (medium), and Clinical (high). The PAT is a validated measure of psychosocial risk. Scores on the PAT, derived from multiple sites and disease conditions, map on to the PPPHM with indications that one-half to two-thirds of families score at the Universal level of risk based on the PAT. The PAT is a unique screener of psychosocial risk, both in terms of its breadth and underlying model (PPPHM), and its length and format. As an example of a means by which families can be screened early in the treatment process, PAT scores and corresponding PPPHM levels can provide direction for the delivery of evidence-based psychosocial care.

  9. Provider perceptions of patient psychosocial needs after orofacial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzali, James L; Marshall, Grant N; Shetty, Vivek; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; Sinha, Uttam K; Rayburn, Nadine R

    2007-08-01

    Vulnerable populations are at particular risk for developing psychosocial sequelae after they experience orofacial injury. To enhance understanding of awareness, perspectives, and beliefs regarding attendant psychosocial issues, surgeons who provide orofacial injury care to indigent patients were surveyed. We surveyed 26 oral and maxillofacial surgeons and 15 otolaryngology surgeons at a large, urban, Level 1 trauma center. The survey, which measured providers' perceptions of pertinent contextual elements and patients' psychosocial needs after assaultive orofacial injury, was based on semistructured interviews with 15 oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The overall survey response rate was 85.4% (35 of 41). Respondents ranked interpersonal violence as the dominant cause of orofacial injury among patients. Anxiety (eg, post-traumatic stress), depression, and legal issues were the most significant psychosocial sequelae identified by respondents. Alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and homelessness were identified as the most important contributors to orofacial reinjury and patient noncompliance with postsurgical instructions. Less than half of respondents (44.7%) believed that patients' problems with depression, anxiety, or substance abuse were currently addressed in an adequate way in the hospital. The vast majority (94.7%) believed that a psychosocial aftercare program was needed, and most agreed that such a program would decrease the risk of reinjury and would promote patient compliance with aftercare instructions and return for scheduled follow-up care. Respondents identified the specialty mental health service in their hospital or a community-based setting as the preferred locations for such a program, and they indicated that lack of financial resources and trained personnel were the most significant barriers to implementation of such a program within the setting of trauma services. Surgeons who provide care to indigent patients with orofacial injury perceive a great need

  10. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants' cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Esther M; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Weerth, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was rated for sensitivity and for stimulation of infant development during one-to-one caregiving interactions. Infant cognitive development was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (Mental Development Index). Higher levels of developmental stimulation in the centers predicted higher levels of infant cognitive development at 9 months, beyond infant cognitive development at 3 months (just before entering child care), parental education, and maternal sensitivity. The results suggest that even small increases in developmental stimulation provided in child care centers in the first year of life may foster infants' cognitive development.

  11. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach program on nutrition that helped child care center teachers gain increased nutrition literacy. The teachers indicated that they gained increased personal understanding of formerly confusing nutrition issues (e.g., how to read a nutrition label and what defines a whole grain). Teachers were also able to identify aspects of web sites linked from MedlinePlus that indicated the sites served as reliable sources of health information.

  12. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effects from the Person Centered-Care Model on quality of life of cognitive impaired persons from gerontological centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Veiga, Pura; Sancho, Mayte; García, Álvaro; Rivas, Esther; Abad, Elixabet; Suárez, Nerea; Mondragón, Gabriela; Buiza, Cristina; Orbegozo, Ana; Yanguas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The Model of Person Centered Care has attracted increasing interest for use in gerontology centers. Therefore, the contributions about its impact are scarce in our context. The objective of this paper is to establish the impact that the interventions associated with the Model of Person Centered Care in the «Etxean Ondo» Project have on the quality of life of residents with cognitive impairment. One hundred and ninetten residents with cognitive impairment were selected: 59 in the control group and 60 in the experimental group. Subjects in each group were sorted by cognitive impairment: mild or severe. Changes were implemented in the physical and organizational environments for the promotion of autonomy and wellbeing. Quality of life was assessed before and 6 months after intervention using the Fumat Scales (mild cognitive impairment) and Qualid (severe cognitive impairment). The t-Student test was used for comparison of means. In intergroup comparisons, significant differences in the Fumat Scale for the control group with mild cognitive impairment were initially identified. These differences were not recorded in the post assessment. The experimental group with severe cognitive impairment was significantly improved in the Qualid Scale post assessment. In intragroup comparisons, significant improvements were evident in the quality of life of experimental subjects, both with severe cognitive impairment (Qualid) and mild (Fumat). The findings support the effectiveness of the interventions and identify methodological and conceptual issues that have been considered to analyze the Model of Person Centered Care efects. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  14. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Mariana M.; Carolina Corsi; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Nelci A. C. F. Rocha

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of...

  15. Use of narrative as an awareness strategy for a Family-Centered Care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Doulavince Amador

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to comprehend the meaning of using illness narratives to raise awareness among nursing students and healthcare professionals toward the family-centred care model. The adopted methodological framework was Qualitative Content Analysis based on the philosophy of Family-Centered Care. Data were collected by means of assessments provided by 29 participants at an event in 2013, in São Paulo. The resulting analytical category was "transformed by the family narrative", which consisted of three sub-categories: Favours a better understanding of the family's experience; facilitates learning of family issues; and triggers thought on family-centered care. Results showed that hearing the family narrative on experiences with illness and hospitalization raises awareness among nursing students and healthcare professionals toward the family-centered care model, and facilitates learning of this model of care.

  16. The use of participatory action research to design a patient-centered community health worker care transitions intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangovi, Shreya; Grande, David; Carter, Tamala; Barg, Frances K; Rogers, Marisa; Glanz, Karen; Shannon, Richard; Long, Judith A

    2014-07-01

    Policymakers, patients and clinicians are increasingly eager to foster patient involvement in health care innovation. Our objective was to use participatory action research with high-risk hospitalized patients to design a post-hospital transition intervention. We conducted qualitative interviews with sixty-five low-income, recently hospitalized patients exploring their perceptions of barriers to post-hospital recovery and ideas for improvement. We then used a modified grounded theory approach to design an intervention that would address each barrier using patients׳ suggestions. Five key themes were translated into design elements. First, patients wished to establish a relationship with healthcare personnel to whom they could relate. The intervention was provided by an empathic community health worker (CHW) who established rapport during hospitalization. Second, patients suggested tailoring support to their needs and goals. CHWs and patients designed individualized action plans for achieving their goals for recovery. Third, patient goals were misaligned with those of the inpatient team. CHW facilitated patient-provider discharge communication to align goals. Fourth, patients lacked post-discharge support for predominantly psychosocial or financial issues that undermined recovery. CHWs provided support tailored to patient needs. Finally, patients faced numerous barriers in obtaining post-hospital primary care. CHWs helped patients to obtain timely care with a suitable provider. Low-income hospitalized patients voiced needs and suggestions that were directly translated into the design of a scalable patient-centered CHW intervention. The approach of using participatory action research to tightly mapping patient input into intervention design is rapid and systematic strategy for operationalizing patient involvement in innovation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Hospice Concept of Care: A Family Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Marilyn

    This description of the Cedar Valley Hospice program emphasizes palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The history of the hospice movement is outlined along with a description of the Cedar Valley program and the results of a 1980 program evaluation. The appendices contain a statement of the hospice goals and…

  18. Supporting Children's Participation in Finnish Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venninen, Tuulikki; Leinonen, Jonna; Lipponen, Lasse; Ojala, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Children's participation in the early childhood education context is a multidimensional issue and educators have a significant role in enhancing participation. In this paper, we focus on the existing challenges to children's participation and the ways that child care educators can work as teams to meet those challenges. The data were collected…

  19. Directory of Child Day Care Centers. Volume 2: North Central.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986

    Part of a four-volume reference series on licensed child day care facilities across the United States, this volume targets nearly 13,000 facilities in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Arranged alphabetically by state and city, entries include…

  20. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland ba

  1. Emergency care center turnaround time--an improvement story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelrud, Joan; Burroughs, Helen; Koterwas, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a nationally recognized barrier to patient safety. Other obstacles to efficiency and adequate care in emergency rooms include lengthy patient waits and side-tracked ambulances. This article explores one community hospital's approach to significantly decreasing emergency visit turnaround times while increasing patient satisfaction.

  2. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Peffectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Rationale and study design of a patient-centered intervention to improve health status in chronic heart failure: The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Allen, Larry A; Peterson, Jamie; Hattler, Brack; Havranek, Edward P; Fairclough, Diane L; McBryde, Connor F; Meek, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    While contemporary heart failure management has led to some improvements in morbidity and mortality, patients continue to report poor health status (i.e., burdensome symptoms, impaired function, and poor quality of life). The Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness (CASA) trial is a NIH-funded, three-site, randomized clinical trial that examines the effect of the CASA intervention compared to usual care on the primary outcome of patient-reported health status at 6months in patients with heart failure and poor health status. The CASA intervention involves a nurse who works with patients to treat symptoms (e.g., shortness of breath, fatigue, pain) using disease-specific and palliative approaches, and a social worker who provides psychosocial care targeting depression and adjustment to illness. The intervention uses a collaborative care team model of health care delivery and is structured and primarily phone-based to enhance reproducibility and scalability. This article describes the rationale and design of the CASA trial, including several decision points: (1) how to design a patient-centered intervention to improve health status; (2) how to structure the intervention so that it is reproducible and scalable; and (3) how to systematically identify outpatients with heart failure most likely to need and benefit from the intervention. The results should provide valuable information to providers and health systems about the use of team care to manage symptoms and provide psychosocial care in chronic illness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Assessing the need for an online decision-support tool to promote evidence-based practices of psychosocial counseling in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukafka, Rita; Millery, Mari; Chan, Connie; LaRock, William; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial counselors have a vital and challenging role in supporting persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) to better manage their disease. However, gaps in training, education, and skills limit the effectiveness of counselors' efforts. We propose that the use of a decision-support tool for counselors at the point of care can support them in their work as well as help alleviate many training and practice gaps. Decision-support tools aimed at reducing knowledge and practice gaps are used extensively to assist clinical providers at the point of care; however, there is a need for decision-support tools designed specifically for HIV/AIDS counselors. To identify requirements for such a tool, we conducted a needs assessment through interviews of 19 HIV/AIDS clinic counselors who provide 20 or more hours per week of psychosocial support to PLWH/A. The assessment explored their education and training backgrounds, the extent to which evidence-based practices are implemented, and how a decision-support tool can support counselor work practices. Qualitative analysis was organized around seven main categories: counselor characteristics, patient characteristics, barriers, definitions of key concepts, use of guidelines, client assessments, and resources. The resulting coding schemes revealed knowledge and practice gaps among the interviewees, as well as barriers and challenges of counseling. Education and training background of the counseling staff varied widely. When asked to define five key concepts related to HIV counseling, 26-47% of respondents were unable to articulate an adequate definition. Less than half of the interviewees recalled sources of guidelines used in their work and specific models of care introduced during trainings. Interviews identified environmental barriers, language and literacy, patient education, and patient communication as the most prominent challenges to counseling work. The results from this study inform the need for and development of a

  5. [Policies and standards applied to municipal day care centers in Rio de Janeiro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Rafaela Moledo; Tancredi, Rinaldini Coralini Philippo; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2013-11-01

    Day care centers were first established in Brazil with the aim of reducing infant mortality rates, however the incidence of foodborne disease transmission has been on the increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that each year 1.8 million deaths worldwide occur in children under 5 years of age, which is attributed to the consumption of contaminated food. However, Brazilian legislation does not provide specific rules of operation for day care center kitchens. Thus, the scope of this study is to research the standards relating to the operation of day care centers, discussing the health regulations related to food production. By means of a review of electronic pages of various government organs, the regulations inherent to the operation and production of food in day care centers were examined. After scrutiny of the twenty-seven pieces of legislation found, there is a concern with water quality, supply of food, the control of pests and vectors, structural conditions and food policies. In spite of this, it was seen that not all the surveillance policies for the quality of food offered in day care centers are effective. Also observed was the lack of a specific regulation that establishes the quality criteria for safe handling of food in day care centers.

  6. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  7. Envisioning Women-Centered HIV Care: Perspectives from Women Living with HIV in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nadia; Greene, Saara; Carter, Allison; Lewis, Johanna; Nicholson, Valerie; Kwaramba, Gladys; Ménard, Brigitte; Kaufman, Elaina; Ennabil, Nourane; Andersson, Neil; Loutfy, Mona; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaida, Angela

    2017-09-05

    Women comprise nearly one-quarter of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Canada. Compared with men, women living with HIV experience inequities in HIV care and health outcomes, prompting a need for gendered and tailored approaches to HIV care. Peer and academic researchers from the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study conducted focus groups to understand women's experience of seeking care, with the purpose of identifying key characteristics that define a women-centered approach to HIV care. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 77 women living with HIV across Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, Canada. Women envisioned three central characteristics of women-centered HIV care, including i) coordinated and integrated services that address both HIV and women's health care priorities, and protect against exclusion from care due to HIV-related stigma, ii) care that recognizes and responds to structural barriers that limit women's access to care, such as violence, poverty, motherhood, HIV-related stigma, and challenges to safe disclosure, and iii) care that fosters peer support and peer leadership in its design and delivery to honor the diversity of women's experiences, overcome women's isolation, and prioritize women's ownership over the decisions that affect their lives. Despite advances in HIV treatment and care, the current care landscape is inadequate to meet women's comprehensive care needs. A women-centered approach to HIV care, as envisioned by women living with HIV, is central to guiding policy and practice to improve care and outcomes for women living with HIV in Canada. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health care and social issues of immigrant rescue and recovery workers at the World Trade Center site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz, Rafael E; Hill, Scottie; Chasan, Rachel; Bienenfeld, Laura A; Afilaka, Aboaba A; Wilk-Rivard, Elizabeth; Herbert, Robin

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews the experience of a unique occupational group of World Trade Center (WTC) workers: immigrant workers. This group is comprised largely of men, laborers, who are first-generation immigrants. The majority of these workers are from Latin America (predominantly from Ecuador and Colombia) or from Eastern Europe (predominantly from Poland). Our data shows that the disease profile observed in these workers was what we have previously reported for WTC working population as a whole. Recent reports have begun to document the disproportionate burden of occupational hazards, injuries, and illnesses experienced by immigrant workers in the United States. The WTC experience of immigrants exemplified this burden but, additionally, highlighted that this burden is exacerbated by limitations in access to appropriate health care, disability and compensation benefits, and vocational rehabilitation services. A clinical program that was designed to address the complex medical and psychosocial needs of these workers in a comprehensive manner was successfully established. Full justice for these workers depends on larger societal changes.

  9. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided.

  10. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  11. Factors Related to Depression among Higher Income Mothers with Young Children in Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jay

    1994-01-01

    Examined the association between maternal depression, maternal separation anxiety, social support, and maternal involvement in the day-care center among 54 upper-income mothers and their infants. Found that higher levels of maternal involvement in day care were associated with lower levels of maternal depression. (MDM)

  12. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... beneficiaries. Menus and any other nutritional records required by the State agency shall be maintained to... day care centers shall have Federal, State or local licensing or approval to provide day care services... participate in the Program during the renewal process, unless the State agency has information which...

  13. 7 CFR 226.19 - Outside-school-hours care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 226.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational... precondition for any outside-school-hours care center's eligibility for CACFP nutrition benefits. In...

  14. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  15. Partnership and empowerment program: a model for patient-centered, comprehensive, and cost-effective care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corinne; Bornstein, Elizabeth; Wilcox, Catina

    2012-02-01

    The Partnership and Empowerment Program model offers a comprehensive, patient-centered, and cost-effective template for coordinating care for underinsured and uninsured patients with cancer. Attention to effective coordination, including use of internal and external resources, may result in decreased costs of care and improved patient compliance and health outcomes.

  16. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundPatient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating o

  17. Profit centers in clinical care departments: an idea whose time has gone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David W

    2008-03-01

    If a hospital is to use profit centers successfully, it should resolve several philosophical, organizational, and accounting matters, including: How much decisionmaking latitude clinical care chiefs should have. Whether to take a cross-subsidization approach. What role clinical care departments should take in a service line strategy.

  18. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  19. Reality TV positions heart center as cardiac care leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Saint Thomas Heart Institute, Nashville, Tenn., has a long history of successful cardiac care. More than 200,000 patients have been treated at Saint Thomas. Earlier this year the hospital launched a new branding campaign that features former patients who have bonded with the institution. These former patients were provided MiniDV video cameras to record their stories. The campaign has attracted considerable attention, including newspaper and TV news coverage.

  20. Product and service design for patient centered diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitri Varadarajan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Design plays a marginal part in the discourse of diabetes care, mainly in visualizing the form and packaging of medical technologies. The authors however have a practice that advocates that design orientated solutions can add much needed dimensions to problems that havetraditionally been the exclusive preserve of expert discourses. This position has for long been a validated and largely accepted approach in design’s engagement withissues in sustainability and development studies. A similar approach in the area of medicine has been constructed bythe authors and marks out a position of advocacy where the designer takes on agency to intervene on behalf of the user community. This position contains a healthy critique of thetraditional approach of product design for manufacture while simultaneously amplifying a desire to intervene and make a substantial improvement in the quality of life ofpeople with diabetes. This article first opens out contemporary diabetes care as a contested domain and then goes on to sketch out the key aspects of a design practice focussed upon delivering positive health outcomes in diabetes care. The specific context of discussion for this article is the practice of teaching in design studios wherestudents of design listen to the voices of people with diabetes and visualize ways for design to provide products and service solutions that transform the lived experiences of people with diabetes.

  1. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  2. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    OpenAIRE

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating office-based medical assistant (MA) panel management and community health worker (CHW) community-based management into routine care for diabetic patients. Methods Mixed m...

  3. [Certified prostate cancer centers and second opinion centers for testicular cancer: successful models of uro-oncology cancer care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Schrader, M

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of organ site-specific cancer centers by the German Cancer Society (GCS) is part of the basic politically driven reform of oncology care in Germany. Since 2007 an increasing number of prostate cancer centers have been guided toward certification by the OnkoZert GmbH of the GCS. Currently 68 centers are certified and together with ongoing certification proceedings will amount to 81 prostate cancer centers, which cover about one fourth of cases of primary prostate cancer. Urology is of particular importance in the management of these centers. For the most part, urologists belonging to a clinical unit are the initiators of the certification process, thus ensuring that uro-oncology is firmly entrenched in the specialty with involvement of outpatient service providers. Fears that authority will be lost are unfounded as long as responsibility for this task is taken seriously and active use is made of the possibilities for creativity. A similarly important function is fulfilled by the testicular cancer centers that offer second opinion services, which were initiated by urology conjointly with German Cancer Aid to pursue the goal of quality assurance for this tumor entity and therefore likewise secure the position of this tumor in the realm of urologists. By applying such strategic approaches, urologists will succeed in sustainably safeguarding their future importance in a very competitive environment and in counteracting the encroachments of other specialties by exhibiting clear orientation.

  4. Connecting teens to caring adults in a school-based health center: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksin, Beth A; Kelly, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    The traditional medical care system is generally unable to provide the broad health and wellness services needed by many adolescents, especially those from low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities. Using a theoretical framework adapted from Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of multiple influencers, this case study examined how a school-based health center was able to provide a network of connections for adolescents to caring adults within the school and the local community. Contributors to this network were the creation of a student-centered community with access to adolescent-friendly services, providers acting as connectors, and care of the whole adolescent.

  5. "Stay, give me your paw." The benefits of family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Aditee P; Litman, Ronald S; Schwartz, Alan Jay

    2013-06-01

    The value of family-centered care in general and subspecialty pediatrics has been well documented in the literature. Translation of these principles into perioperative medicine has its logistical challenges; however, there are theoretical benefits. Specifically, pediatric patients with psychiatric diagnoses or special needs related to autism benefit from the incorporation of service animals into their daily routines. We describe the presence of one such service dog, at the request of our patient, during induction of general anesthesia. Consideration of the service dog as part of our family-centered care model improved the quality of care we provided this anxious teenager and her mother.

  6. CenteringParenting: an innovative dyad model for group mother-infant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Joanna; Rising, Sharon Schindler

    2013-01-01

    CenteringParenting is a group model that brings a cohort of 6 to 7 mothers and infants together for care during the first year of life. During 9 group sessions the clinician provides well-baby care and also attends to the health, development, and safety issues of the mother. Ideally, CenteringParenting provides continuity of care for a cohort of women who have received care in CenteringPregnancy, group prenatal care that is 10 sessions throughout the entire pregnancy and that leads to community building, better health outcomes, and increased satisfaction with prenatal care. The postpartum year affects the entire family, but especially the mother, who is redefining herself and her own personal goals. Issues of weight/body image, breastfeeding, depression, contraception, and relationship issues all may surface. In traditional care, health resources for support and intervention are frequently lacking or unavailable. Women's health clinicians also note the loss of contact with women they have followed during the prenatal period, often not seeing a woman again until she returns for another pregnancy. CenteringParenting recognizes that the health of the mother is tied to the health of the infant and that assessment and interventions are more appropriate and efficient when done in a dyad context. Facilitative leadership, rather than didactic education, encourages women to fully engage in their care, to raise issues of importance to them, and to discuss concerns within an atmosphere that allows for the surfacing of culturally appropriate values and beliefs. Implementing the model calls for system changes that are often significant. It also requires the building of a substantial team relationship among care providers. This overview describes the CenteringParenting mother-infant dyad care model with special focus on the mother and reviews the perspectives and experiences of staff from several practice sites.

  7. Market-Based Health Care in Specialty Surgery: Finding Patient-Centered Shared Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Cote, David; Cybulski, George; Laws, Edward R

    2015-10-01

    : The US health care system is struggling with rising costs, poor outcomes, waste, and inefficiency. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act represents a substantial effort to improve access and emphasizes value-based care. Value in health care has been defined as health outcomes for the patient per dollar spent. However, given the opacity of health outcomes and cost, the identification and quantification of patient-centered value is problematic. These problems are magnified by highly technical, specialized care (eg, neurosurgery). This is further complicated by potentially competing interests of the 5 major stakeholders in health care: patients, doctors, payers, hospitals, and manufacturers. These stakeholders are watching with great interest as health care in the United States moves toward a value-based system. Market principles can be harnessed to drive costs down, improve outcomes, and improve overall value to patients. However, there are many caveats to a market-based, value-driven system that must be identified and addressed. Many excellent neurosurgical efforts are already underway to nudge health care toward increased efficiency, decreased costs, and improved quality. Patient-centered shared value can provide a philosophical mooring for the development of health care policies that utilize market principles without losing sight of the ultimate goals of health care, to care for patients.

  8. The effect of a diabetes education, coping skills training, and care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in black women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Chyun, Deborah; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Newlin, Kelley; Jefferson, Vanessa; Langerman, Susan

    2010-07-01

    An 11-week culturally relevant group diabetes self-management training (DSMT), coping skills training (CST), and diabetes care intervention was compared to a 10-week usual diabetes education and diabetes care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in 109 Black women (aged 48 +/- 10 years) with type 2 diabetes in primary care (PC). Strong time effects for hemoglobin A1c improvement were seen in both groups from baseline to 3 months and remained similar at 12 and 24 months (p < .0001). Systolic blood pressure (p =.01) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = .05) improved in both groups from baseline to 24 months. Baseline quality of life ([QOL]; Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36) was low. Social function, role-emotional, and mental health domains increased initially in both groups then declined slightly, with less decline for the experimental group at 12 months. At 24 months, experimental group scores increased. General health (p = .002), vitality (p = .01), role-physical, and bodily pain (p = .02) domains increased in both groups over time. Perceived provider support for diet (p = .0001) and exercise (p = .0001) increased in both groups over time. Diabetes-related emotional distress decreased in the experimental compared to the control group (group x time, p = .01). Findings suggest that both methods of diabetes education combined with care can improve metabolic control, QOL, and perceptions of provider care. CST may further assist in long-term improvements in health outcomes. Behavioral interventions are needed in addition to routine diabetes care, particularly in PC.

  9. Health Care Systems Support to Enhance Patient-Centered Care: Lessons from a Primary Care-Based Chronic Pain Management Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Charles R; Debar, Lynn L; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Rumptz, Maureen H; Patterson, Charlotte; Bonifay, Allison; Cowan, Penney; Lancaster, Lindsay; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Supporting day-to-day self-care activities has emerged as a best practice when caring for patients with chronic pain, yet providing this support may introduce challenges for both patients and primary care physicians. It is essential to develop tools that help patients identify the issues and outcomes that are most important to them and to communicate this information to primary care physicians at the point of care. We describe our process to engage patients, primary care physicians, and other stakeholders in the context of a pilot randomized controlled trial of a patient-centered assessment process implemented in an everyday practice setting. We identify lessons on how to engage stakeholders and improve patient-centered care for those with chronic conditions within the primary care setting. A qualitative analysis of project minutes, interviews, and focus groups was conducted to evaluate stakeholder experiences. Stakeholders included patients, caregivers, clinicians, medical office support staff, health plan administrators, an information technology consultant, and a patient advocate. Our stakeholders included many patients with no prior experience with research. This approach enriched the applicability of feedback but necessitated extra time for stakeholder training and meeting preparation. Types of stakeholders varied over the course of the project, and more involvement of medical assistants and Information Technology staff was required than originally anticipated. Meaningful engagement of patient and physician stakeholders must be solicited in a well-coordinated manner with broad health care system supports in place to ensure full execution of patient-centered processes.

  10. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling of the Influences of Family-Centered Care on Parent and Child Psychological Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dunst, Carl J.; Carol M. Trivette

    2009-01-01

    Background. Family-centered care is now practiced throughout the world by physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. The call for adoption of family-centered care is based on the contention that the physical and psychological health of a child is influenced by parents' psychological health where family-centered care enhances parent well-being which in turn influences child well-being. We empirically assessed whether these relationships are supported by available evidence. Metho...

  11. Goodness-of-Fit in Center Day Care: Relations of Temperament, Stability, and Quality of Care with the Child's Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Van Zeijl, Jantien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the concept of "goodness-of-fit" between the child's temperament and the environment, introduced by Thomas and Chess [Temperament and Development, Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1977], is applied within the setting of center day care. Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this…

  12. A nurse practitioner-led urgent care center: meeting the needs of the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, Tracy A

    2013-08-01

    Providing comprehensive care for patients with cancer is complex with regard to severe treatment-related side effects. Hundreds of thousands of patients with cancer visit the emergency department (ED) each year, and more than half report multiple visits. In the United States, few of the National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have an ED specifically for patients with cancer. EDs often are an overcrowded and expensive way in which to care for the urgent needs of patients with cancer. In addition, a looming shortage exists for both primary care providers and oncologists who can address symptom issues. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented, more patients will enter the healthcare system, placing a demand on providers that the current supply cannot meet. A report from the Institute of Medicine advocates that nurse practitioners (NPs) are more than competent to provide for the unique urgent care needs of patients with cancer. The aim of this article is to describe an NP-led urgent care center for patients with cancer and how that care center provides access to vital, expeditious, and cost-effective care.

  13. Profiles of sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics among primary care patients with comorbid obesity and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Xiao, Lan; Lv, Nan; Rosas, Lisa G; Lewis, Megan A; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Venditti, Elizabeth M; Snowden, Mark B; Lesser, Lenard; Ward, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize profiles of obese depressed participants using baseline data collected from October 2014 through December 2016 for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (n = 409) in Bay Area, California, USA. Four comorbidity severity categories were defined by interaction of the binary levels of body mass index (BMI) and depression Symptom Checklist 20 (SCL20) scores. Sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics were measured. Mean (SD) age was 51 (12.1) years, BMI 36.7 (6.4) kg/m(2), and SCL20 1.5 (0.5). Participants in the 4 comorbidity severity categories had similar sociodemographic characteristics, but differed significantly in the other characteristics. Two statistically significant canonical dimensions were identified. Participants with BMI ≥ 35 and SCL20 ≥ 1.5 differed significantly from those with BMI physical health (e.g., central obesity, high blood pressure and impaired sleep) and mental health comorbidities (e.g., post-traumatic stress and anxiety), poor health-related quality of life (in general and problems specifically with obesity, anxiety, depression, and usual daily activities), and an avoidance problem-solving style. Participants with BMI physical activity, but greater anxiety and post-traumatic stress and poorer obesity- or mental health-related quality of life. In conclusion, patients with comorbid obesity and depression of varying severity have different profiles of behavioral, clinical and psychosocial characteristics. This insight may inform analysis of treatment heterogeneity and development of targeted intervention strategies. Trial registration:ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT02246413.

  14. PREVALENCE AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS OF ALCOHOL USE DISORDER– A PROSPECTIVE STUDY FROM A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE OF ASSAM, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallab Kumar Bhattacharjee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Alcohol dependence, also known as alcoholism or alcohol use disorder, is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in many diseases and various psychosocial problems. There are many complications in managing as well as critical treatment in the study area. The number of alcohol use disorder is increasing in Northeast India day by day. This study was conducted with an aim to study the prevalence and psychosocial factors of alcohol use disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present study was a hospital-based, cross-sectional study from 1st December, 2015 to 30th November, 2016. A mixed research method of both qualitative and quantitative approaches, nonprobability purposive sampling and three different types of standard scales were applied among cases of age 20 and above. RESULTS 100 alcohol use disorder patients were assessed. Most of the patients were of 20-39 years age group. Majority (96% of total respondents were male. 48 percent of alcoholic dependence cases were from HSLC and HS standard, 98 percent of alcoholic dependence cases were from Hindu religion. Interestingly, 34 percent respondents were severely alcohol dependent, 48 percent of them suffered from high perceived stress, 66 percent of their families were problematic but the findings of hypotheses i.e., x2= 0.489 and x2= 0.097 depict there is no association between the levels of alcohol dependency and family functioning. It cannot be said ‘higher the level of stress higher the severity of alcohol dependency’. CONCLUSION There are many health and social problems which are related to alcohol use disorder. Alcohol use disorder leads to mental illnesses such as problems of stress, depression, aggression, anxiety, alienation, revenge, shock, indifference, frustration and sleeplessness.

  15. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-31

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination.

  16. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Alison J; Bogner, Hillary R; Cronholm, Peter F; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F de Vries; Kaye, Elise M; Gabbay, Robert

    2016-02-25

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in hypertension control. The PCMH transformation initiative conducted 118 semistructured interviews at 17 primary care practices in southeastern Pennsylvania between January 2011 and January 2012. Clinicians (n = 47), medical assistants (n = 26), office administrators (n = 12), care managers (n = 11), front office staff (n = 7), patient educators (n = 4), nurses (n = 4), social workers (n = 4), and other administrators (n = 3) participated in interviews. Study personnel used thematic analysis to identify themes related to hypertension care. Clinicians described difficulties in expanding services under PCMH to meet the needs of the growing number of patients with hypertension as well as how perceptions of hypertension control differed from actual performance. Staff and office administrators discussed achieving patient-centered hypertension care through patient education and self-management support with personalized care plans. They indicated that patient report cards were helpful tools. Participants across all groups discussed a team- and systems-based approach to hypertension care. Practices undergoing PCMH transformation may consider stakeholder perspectives about patient-centered, team-based, and systems-based approaches as they work to optimize hypertension care.

  17. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  18. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Simphronio Balbino

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. Results: there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05 and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041 and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050. There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048. Conclusion: the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress.

  19. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Septic arthritis in adults in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To describe the history, clinical features and microorganisms involved in a group of adult subjects with and without septic arthritis (SA) at a tertiary care in Mexico. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 96 adults with clinical suspicion of AS in one or more joints. In all cases synovial fluid arthrocentesis and culture was performed. The comparison group subjects were culture negative. A descriptive statistical analysis and binary logistic regression model was performed between the variables associated with the development of AS. A value of P≤.05 was significant. A total of 49 out of 96 subjects had a positive culture, mostly of the monoarticular type (96%; P=.02). The knee was the most common site (61%; P=.06) and pain was the main clinical manifestation (59%; P=.001). Staphylococcus was the most common etiological agent (65%; P<.001). The risk factors revealed in the final regression model were SA the history of joint disease (OR=25; P=.03) and volume increase (OR=13.16; P=.06). Functional limitation (OR=8.54; P=.04) showed a significant risk among borderline for SA. Our results are consistent with previous studies, and can be generalized to geographical areas with similar clinical features to those observed in this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Outcomes of Colonic Stent in a Tertiary Care Center

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    Mahesh Gajendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colonic obstruction is one of the manifestations of colon cancer for which self-expanding metal stents (SEMS have been effectively used, to restore the luminal patency either for palliative care or as a bridge to resective surgery. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of large diameter SEMS in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Methods and Results. A four-year retrospective review of the Medical Archival System was performed and identified 16 patients. The average age was 70.8 years, of which 56% were females. The most common cause of obstruction was colon cancer (9/16, 56%. Rectosigmoid was the main site of obstruction (9/16 and complete obstruction occurred in 31% of cases. The overall technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 87%, respectively. There were no immediate complications (<24 hours, but stent stenosis due to kinking occurred within one week of stent placement in 2 patients. Stent migration occurred in 2 patients at 34 and 91 days, respectively. There were no perforations or bleeding complications. Conclusion. Large diameter SEMS provide a safe method for palliation or as a bridge to therapy in patients with malignant colonic obstruction with high technical success and very low complication rates.

  2. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  3. Partnering Urban Academic Medical Centers And Rural Primary Care Clinicians To Provide Complex Chronic Disease Care

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Many of the estimated thirty-two million Americans expected to gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act are likely to have high levels of unmet need for various chronic illnesses and to live in areas that are already underserved. In New Mexico an innovative new model of health care education and delivery known as Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) provides high-quality primary and specialty care to a comparable population. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technolog...

  4. Using the "customer service framework" to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Bhat, Anita; Seol, Yoon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing momentum toward patient- and family-centered care at the federal policy level, the organizational literature remains divided on its effectiveness, especially in regard to its key dimension of involving patients and families in treatment decisions and safety practices. Although some have argued for the universal adoption of patient involvement, others have questioned both the effectiveness and feasibility of patient involvement. In this article, we apply a well-established theoretical perspective, that is, the Service Quality Model (SQM) (also known as the "customer service framework") to the health care context, to reconcile the debate related to patient involvement. The application helps support the case for universal adoption of patient involvement and also question the arguments against it. A key contribution of the SQM lies in highlighting a set of fundamental service quality determinants emanating from basic consumer service needs. It also provides a simple framework for understanding how gaps between consumer expectations and management perceptions of those expectations can affect the gap between "expected" and "perceived" service quality from a consumer's perspective. Simultaneously, the SQM also outlines "management requirements" for the successful implementation of a customer service strategy. Applying the SQM to the health care context therefore, in addition to reconciling the debate on patient involvement, helps identify specific steps health care managers could take to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care. Correspondingly, the application also provides insights into strategies for the successful implementation of policy recommendations related to patient- and family-centered care in health care organizations.

  5. Oral health services in primary care nursing centers: opportunities for dental hygiene and nursing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellona, M O; DeVore, L R

    1999-01-01

    The basic oral health needs of more than 100 million Americans are not being met, which places them at an increased risk for serious oral and systemic health consequences. Primary care nursing centers, a comparatively new method of health care delivery, provide health care screening, education, and referral services to person typically underserved in the traditional health care delivery system. Primary care nursing centers were surveyed to determine to what extent they provide oral health screening, education, and referral services for clients, and to identify factors that discourage and encourage the integration of these services. Nurses from 158 primary care nursing centers in the United States made up the study population. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data from 59 primary care nursing centers were analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency. Almost half of the responding nurses at primary care nursing centers "almost always" screen their clients for gum infections (49%) and oral lesions (48%). Fewer teach their clients how to perform oral cancer self-examinations (20%); or educate them regarding use of athletic mouth protectors (15%), the effects of xerostomia (19%), and the benefits of fluoride (38%). The majority do not always refer clients needing treatment for dental decay (55%), gum infections (61%), missing teeth (80%), oral lesions (67%), oral pain (64%), or oral trauma (65%). Lack of referral sources (64%) and unavailability of oral health professionals to provide on site basic oral health services (63%) were the leading factors that discourage the integration of oral health services in the centers. An appreciation for the benefits of oral health (73%) and a knowledgeable clinician to perform oral health services (68%) were the leading factors that encourage the integration of oral health services into primary care nursing centers. These data could be useful in planning, implementing, and

  6. 78 FR 22911 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Sioux City, IA... workers and former workers of Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call...

  7. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m(3) (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  8. Patient-Centered Care and Patient-Reported Measures: Let's Look Before We Leap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel; Steele Gray, Carolyn; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2015-08-01

    This commentary focuses on patient-reported measures as tools to support patient-centered care for patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). We argue that those using patient-reported measures in care management or evaluation of services for MCC patients should do so in recognition of the challenges involved in treating them. MCC patient care is challenging because (1) it is difficult to specify the causes of particular symptoms; (2) assessment of many important symptoms relies on subjective report; and (3) patients require care from a variety of providers. Due to the multiple domains of health affected in single individuals, and the large variation in needs, care that is holistic and individualized (i.e. patient-centered) is appropriate for MCC patients. However, due to the afore-mentioned challenges, it is important to carefully consider what this care entails and how practical contexts shape it. Patient-centered care for MCC patients implies continuous, dialogic patient-provider relationships, and the formulation of coherent and adaptive multi-disciplinary care protocols. We identify two broadly defined contextual influences on the nature and quality of these processes and their outputs: (1) busy practice settings and (2) fragmented information technology. We then identify several consequences that may result from inattention to these contextual influences upon introduction of patient-reported measure applications. To maximize the benefits, and minimize the harms of patient-reported measure use, we encourage policy makers and providers to attend carefully to these and other important contextual factors before, during and after the introduction of patient-reported measure initiatives.

  9. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population, and represent a segment of the population that is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR. However, until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the U.S. utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.

  10. [Management of type 2 diabetes patients in community health care centers in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Patrice; Pichon, Philippe; Poulizac, Morgan; Cruaud, Anna; Bal, Gaelle; Hirsch, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Community health care centers in Grenoble aim to provide quality primary health care, including prevention, to populations living in disadvantaged urban areas. The objective of the study was to assess the quality of follow-up provided by physicians in health care centers in Grenoble to patients with diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted for an observation period of one week in june 2007. All type 2 diabetes patients seen in community health care centers during this given week were included in the study's sample (n=121). During the consultation, the physician collected the data on diabetes follow-up recorded in the patient's medical record over the last year. The data were compared with the recommendations and guidance published by the French National Authority for Health in 2006. The result of a hemoglobin A1c test dated less that three months-old was present in 80% of patients' medical records. Serum creatinine concentration, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria levels were obtained and confirmed with annual tests, and were present and recorded in the last year in 95%, 91%, and 77% of cases, respectively. The patient's weight, recorded within the last year, was noted in all cases. An ophthalmology consultation had been provided within the year for 57% of patients and 55% had received an electrocardiogram. Compliance with French National Authority for Health recommendations for the follow-up of diabetics in the community health care centers was satisfactory. Thus, it seems relevant to analyze their organizational methods.

  11. Child Day Care Centers, Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2006. It is described as 'Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database.'. The extent...

  12. Spanish validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Teresa; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Yanguas, Javier; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered Care (PCC) is an innovative approach which seeks to improve the quality of care services given to the care-dependent elderly. At present there are no Spanish language instruments for the evaluation of PCC delivered by elderly care services. The aim of this work is the adaptation and validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT) for a Spanish population. The P-CAT was translated and adapted into Spanish, then given to a sample of 1339 front-line care professionals from 56 residential elderly care homes. The reliability and validity of the P-CAT were analyzed, within the frameworks of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory models. The Spanish P-CAT demonstrated good reliability, with an alpha coefficient of .88 and a test-retest reliability coefficient of .79. The P-CAT information function indicates that the test measures with good precision for the majority of levels of the measured variables (θ values between -2 and +1). The factorial structure of the test is essentially one-dimensional and the item discrimination indices are high, with values between .26 and .61. In terms of predictive validity, the correlations which stand out are between the P-CAT and organizational climate (r = .689), and the burnout factors; personal accomplishment (r = .382), and emotional exhaustion (r = - .510). The Spanish version of the P-CAT demonstrates good psychometric properties for its use in the evaluation of elderly care homes both professionally and in research.

  13. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah

    2015-10-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice.

  14. Setting up a health care quality management system in a multidisciplinary clinical research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Laktionova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issues of setting up a quality management system in a multidisciplinary specialized clinical research center. It describes the experience with information technologies used in a prophylactic facility to set up effective out- and inpatient health care control. Measures to optimize work under present-day conditions to upgrade the quality of health care are given using the federal health facility as an example.

  15. The impact of managed care on graduate medical education and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Wintroub, B U

    1996-09-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the present and future impact of managed care on graduate medical education (GME) and academic medical centers. Obviously, the later 2 entities are closely intertwined and will share in the consequences of changes in our medical care systems. However, there are differences in the funding of medical schools as compared with GME provided by teaching hospitals, and an appreciation of the vital issues and concerns requires that each be discussed separately.

  16. GATEWAY Report Brief: Tunable-White Lighting at the ACC Care Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-09-30

    Summary of a GATEWAY program report that documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  17. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  18. Can consumer choice replace trust in the National Health Service in England? Towards developing an affective psychosocial conception of trust in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2014-11-01

    Trust has long been regarded as a vitally important aspect of the relationship between health service providers and patients. Recently, consumer choice has been increasingly advocated as a means of improving the quality and effectiveness of health service provision. However, it is uncertain how the increase of information necessary to allow users of health services to exercise choice, and the simultaneous introduction of markets in public health systems, will affect various dimensions of trust, and how changing relations of trust will impact upon patients and services. This article employs a theory-driven approach to investigate conceptual and material links between choice, trust and markets in health care in the context of the National Health Service in England. It also examines the implications of patient choice on systemic, organisational and interpersonal trust. The article is divided into two parts. The first argues that the shift to marketisation in public health services might lead to an over-reliance on rational-calculative aspects of trust at the expense of embodied, relational and social attributes. The second develops an alternative psychosocial conception of trust: it focuses on the central role of affect and accounts for the material and symbolic links between choice, trust and markets in health care.

  19. Trauma Healing in Refugee Camps in Guinea: A Psychosocial Program for Liberian and Sierra Leonean Survivors of Torture and War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepakoff, Shanee; Hubbard, Jon; Katoh, Maki; Falk, Erika; Mikulu, Jean-Baptiste; Nkhoma, Potiphar; Omagwa, Yuvenalis

    2006-01-01

    From 1999 to 2005, the Minneapolis-based Center for Victims of Torture (CVT) served Liberian and Sierra Leonean survivors of torture and war living in the refugee camps of Guinea. A psychosocial program was developed with 3 main goals: (1) to provide mental health care; (2) to train local refugee counselors; and (3) to raise community awareness…

  20. Integrating patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the application of patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice, illustrate the process in a case study, and promote change in the current healthcare clinical ethics model. Nutrition support clinicians have an opportunity to add another dimension to their practice with the incorporation of patient-centered care and clinical ethics. This represents a culture change for healthcare professionals, including nutrition support clinicians, patients and their family. All of these individuals are stakeholders in the process and have the ability to modify the current healthcare system to improve communication and facilitate a change by humanizing nutrition support practice. Nutrition support is a medical, life-sustaining treatment, and the use of this therapy requires knowledge by the nutrition support clinician of patient-centered care concepts, preventive clinical ethics, religion/spirituality and cultural diversity, palliative care team role, and advance care planning. Integrating these into the practice of nutrition support is an innovative approach and results in new knowledge that requires a change in the culture of care and engagement and empowerment of the patient and their family in the process. This is more than a healthcare issue; it involves a social/family conversation movement that will be enhanced by the nutrition support clinician's participation.

  1. Health Care Preferences Among Nursing Home Residents: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Abbott, Katherine; Heid, Allison R; Klumpp, Rachel E; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2016-02-01

    Although much research has examined end-of-life care preferences of nursing home (NH) residents, little work has examined resident preferences for everyday health care. The current study conducted interviews with 255 residents recruited from 35 NHs. Content analysis identified barriers (i.e., hindrances to the fulfillment of resident preferences) and situational dependencies (i.e., what would make residents change their mind about the importance of these preferences) associated with preferences for using mental health services, choosing a medical care provider, and choosing individuals involved in care discussions. Barriers and situational dependencies were embedded within the individual, facility environment, and social environment. Approximately one half of residents identified barriers to their preferences of choosing others involved in care and choosing a medical care provider. In contrast, the importance of mental health services was situationally dependent on needs of residents. Results highlight opportunities for improvement in practice and facility policies that promote person-centered care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 11-16.].

  2. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes.

  3. Pharmaceutical care as narrative practice? Rethinking patient-centered care through a pharmacist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naß, Janine; Banerjee, Mita; Efferth, Thomas; Wohlmann, Anita

    2016-12-01

    Illness is a disruptive experience that requires high-quality care. The best evidence-based medical treatment risks losing some of its efficacy, however, when patients feel misunderstood when faced with the complexity of their experiences. They might stop treatment, refuse to disclose relevant information or seek unsound alternatives. A narrative-based approach to health care understands the patient's case history as a narrative that can be read or analyzed like a story. In other words, this approach honors individual illness experiences through the stories that patients tell. While programs that train 'narrative competence' have been successfully implemented in medical education, an application to pharmaceutical training is missing so far. We argue for the necessity to complement evidence-based pharmaceutical practice with narrative-based approaches to ensure high-quality care. Using the perspective of a pharmacist in a case scenario, we exemplify the centrality of "narrative pharmacy" for improving the quality and safety of pharmaceutical health care.

  4. Ventilation, indoor air quality, and human health and comfort in dwellings and day-care centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruotsalainen, R.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the study was to assess the actual ventilation and indoor air quality in the Finnish building stock (dwellings and day-care centers) with special reference to the existing guideline values. Furthermore, the objective was to evaluate the occurrence of symptoms and perceptions among occupants (adult residents, children, workers) in relation to ventilation system, ventilation rate and dampness. The measurements of ventilation and indoor air quality in the dwellings and day-care centers included ventilation rate, CO{sub 2} concentration, and temperature and humidity. Self- and parent-administered questionnaires were distributed to the occupants inquiring their personal characteristics, occurrence of symptoms of interest, perceived indoor air quality and details of their home and work environments. Airflows and air change rates varied remarkably both in the dwellings and day-care centers. In the majority of the dwellings and day-care centers, the Finnish guideline values of ventilation rates were not achieved. No consistent associations were observed between the magnitude of mechanical ventilation rates and the occurrence of eye, respiratory, skin and general symptoms, that is, symptoms of sick building syndrome (SBS) among the day-care workers. The results indicate that there is much room for improvement in the ventilation and indoor air quality of Finnish dwellings and day-care centers. The control of ventilation, temperature and humidity and the prevention of water damage are important issues on which to concentrate in the future. There is need to improve the quality in all phases of construction: design, installation, adjustment, operation, and maintenance

  5. The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    E M B E R 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More...Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight Objective Our audit objective was to determine whether the

  6. [Adolescent psychosocial development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly necessary that pediatricians have greater knowledge of adolescent health. To begin with they should be familiar with the psychosocial development of this period, an issue which is imperative for the health care of the age group. With that purpose, this article reviews the normal adolescent psychosocial development. Adolescence is a stage that has been progressively prolonged, during which fast and big changes occur, that lead human beings to become biologically, psychologically and socially mature, and potentially able to live independently. Developmental tasks of this period are the establishment of identity and the achievement of autonomy. Although it is a process of high individual variability in terms of its beginning and end, the progression through stages, the synchrony of development between the various areas, and in other aspects, the psychosocial development of this period usually have common characteristics and a progressive pattern of 3 phases: early, middle and late adolescence. Psychological, cognitive, social, sexual and moral development of young people in each of them are described in this article. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  8. Language Discordance and Patient-Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service. PMID:26460475

  9. Increasing access--a qualitative study of homelessness and palliative care in a major urban center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowsky, Yonah; Gofine, Mirriam; Brown, Pnina; Danziger, Jana; Knowles, Holly

    2013-05-01

    Rates of morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in homeless populations. Homeless people experience many barriers to receive adequate palliative care. This qualitative study examines how a major urban city's palliative care resources can be improved to increase access and better serve the homeless. Audiotaped interviews were preformed with 7 homeless care providers in Toronto, Canada, and their transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings of the study suggest that in order to increase access and to serve the city's terminally ill homeless better, the following 4 areas must be addressed: (1) increasing positive interaction between the health care system and the homeless, (2) training staff to deal with the unique issues confronting the homeless, (3) providing patient-centered care, and (4) diversifying the methods of delivery.

  10. Language Discordance and Patient- Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service.

  11. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson's Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Monari, Erin H; Eilers, Amanda; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Hwynn, Nelson H; Sriram, Ashok; Haq, Ihtsham; Hardwick, Angela; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective. (1) To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a rural setting. (2) To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s) of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work). One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS). Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program.

  12. Role for a Labor-Management Partnership in Nursing Home Person-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, Walter; Bishop, Christine E.; Dodson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how a partnership between labor and management works to change the organization and focus of nursing home frontline work, supporting a transition toward person-centered care (PCC) in participating nursing homes. Design and Methods: Using a participatory research approach, we conducted case studies of 2 nursing homes…

  13. Care in a birth center according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Maria Barbosa da Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Birth centers are maternal care models that use appropriate technology when providing care to birthing women. This descriptive study aimed to characterize intrapartum care in a freestanding birth center, in light of the practices recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO, with 1,079 assisted births from 2006 to 2009 in the Sapopemba Birth Center, São Paulo, Brazil. Results included the use of intermittent auscultation (mean=7 controls; maternal positions during delivery: semi-sitting (82.3%, side-lying (16.0%, other positions (1.7%, oral intake (95.6%; companionship (93.3%; exposure to up to three vaginal examinations (85.4%, shower bathing (84.0%, walking (68.0%, massage (60.1%, exercising with a Swiss ball (51.7%; amniotomy (53.4%, oxytocin use during the first (31.0% and second stages of labor (25.8%, bath immersion (29.3% and episiotomy (14.1%. In this birth center, care providers used practices recommended by the WHO, although some practices might have been applied less frequently.

  14. The Role of Attending Center-Based Care for Kindergarten-Aged Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: Families have been increasingly utilizing center-based care both during prekindergarten as well as before/after school during kindergarten (CBC-K), and the literature has addressed the relative effectiveness of attending the former on early schooling outcomes. However, missing in the field is an analysis of the efficacy of…

  15. 5 CFR 792.211 - What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center? 792.211 Section 792.211 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.211 What is the definition of a Federally...

  16. Use of Child Centered Play Therapy Responses in a Child Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Joel H.; Muro, Lilia Lamar; Rose, Katherine Kensinger; Webster, Lindsey; Allen, Cassie

    2017-01-01

    The communication process between care providers and children can, at times, be complex. Young children typically lack the verbal language necessary for complex emotional expression. In this article, the authors contend that using some basic "child centered play therapy" (CCPT) techniques would be beneficial in enhancing communicative…

  17. Reenacted Case Scenarios for Undergraduate Healthcare Students to Illustrate Person-Centered Care in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sandra L.; De Bellis, Anita; Guerin, Pauline; Walters, Bonnie; Wotherspoon, Alison; Cecchin, Maggie; Paterson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners have suggested that interpreting person-centered care for people who have dementia to undergraduate students requires guidance in practical application. This article describes the production of a written and digital interdisciplinary educational resource for tertiary students. It uses real-life case scenarios provided by…

  18. Etiological beliefs of patients with neurological disorders attending a tertiary care center: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupender Kumar Bajaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The understanding and management of neurological disorders is undergoing revolutionary changes over the last three decades in the background of ever increasing advances in medical technologies, diagnostic techniques, therapeutic processes and, molecular and genetic medicine. The fruits of these a