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Sample records for psychophysiological studies ii

  1. [The Psychomat computer complex for psychophysiologic studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, E V; Nadezhdin, D S; Shemsudov, A I; Kalinin, A V

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyze the principles of the design of a computed psychophysiological system for universal uses. Show the effectiveness of the use of computed technology as a combination of universal computation and control potentialities of a personal computer equipped with problem-oriented specialized facilities of stimuli presentation and detection of the test subject's reactions. Define the hardware and software configuration of the microcomputer psychophysiological system "Psychomat". Describe its functional possibilities and the basic medico-technical characteristics. Review organizational issues of the maintenance of its full-scale production.

  2. [Design, use and introduction of the practice of measureable complexes for psychophysiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokser, O Ia; Gurtovoĭ, E S

    1997-01-01

    The paper outlines a background of chronoreaction measurement, an important trend of psychophysiological studies. It mainly deals with the chronoreaction measuring methods and tools introduced into production.

  3. Use of psychophysiological measurements in communication research: teachings from two studies of corporate reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Salla-Maaria LAAKSONEN; Mikko SALMINEN; Alessio FALCO; Pekka AULA; Niklas RAVAJA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the possibilities psychophysiological study of emotions can offer to communication research, main focus being on studies of organizational reputation. We briefly discuss the study of emotion in communication sciences and then describe the experimental protocol for studying reputation and emotions with the psychophysiological methods and offer some empirical results from our first experiments. The results obtained from studies reviewed in this paper show that reputati...

  4. Integrating fMRI with psychophysiological measurements in the study of decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Savio W.H.; Xue, Gui; Bechara, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques have recently been used to examine the neural mechanism of decision-making. Nevertheless, most of the neuroimaging studies overlook the importance of emotion and autonomic response in modulating the process of decision-making. In this paper, we discussed how to integrating fMRI with psychophysiological measurements in studying decision-making. We suggested that psychophysiological data would complement with fMRI findings in providing a more comprehensive understanding ...

  5. [Experimental psychophysiological studies on the effects of fenetylline and mefenorex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, P; Janke, W; Vetter, J; Schultz-Vetter, S

    1978-01-01

    16 male subjects were tested 1--7 h after the application of either 40 mg of the anorectic mefenorex, 50 mg of the stimulant fenetylline or a placebo by a battery of psychophysiological and psychological methods. Two problems of basic psychological interest were investigated: 1. covariation of appetite and central stimulation; 2. indicators of activation assessed by different parameters. The results concerning the first problem were inconclusive. The results with respect to the second show that pharmacological substances may cause dissociation of different indicators of activation.

  6. Use of psychophysiological measurements in communication research: teachings from two studies of corporate reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla-Maaria LAAKSONEN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the possibilities psychophysiological study of emotions can offer to communication research, main focus being on studies of organizational reputation. We briefly discuss the study of emotion in communication sciences and then describe the experimental protocol for studying reputation and emotions with the psychophysiological methods and offer some empirical results from our first experiments. The results obtained from studies reviewed in this paper show that reputation is at least partly emotional appeal and hence can be measured on an individual level through bodily reactions. Secondly, the results show that the valence of company-related content (e.g., news also has emotional implications and thus consequences. After presenting the studies we discuss our findings and reflect our observations during the research collaboration from two different perspectives: methodological and theoretical.

  7. Pushing, pulling and manoeuvring an industrial cart: a psychophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagloglou, Evanthia; Radenkovic, Milan; Brankovic, Sasa; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Zivanovic-Macuzic, Ivana

    2017-09-18

    One of the most frequent manual occupational tasks involves the pushing and pulling of a cart. Although several studies have associated health risks with pushing and pulling, the effects are not clear since occupational tasks have social, cognitive and physical components. The present work investigates a real case of a pushing and pulling occupational task from a manufacturing company. The study initially characterizes the case in accordance with Standard No. ISO 11228-2:2007 as low risk. An experiment with 14 individuals during three modalities of pushing and pulling was performed in order to further investigate the task with the application of electrophysiology. At the end, a simple questionnaire was given. The results show electrophysiological differences among the three modalities of pushing and pulling, with a major difference between action with no load and fully loaded with a full range of motions on the cart to handle.

  8. Patient Characterization Protocols for Psychophysiological Studies of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-TBI Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Rapp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological investigations of traumatic brain injury (TBI are being conducted for several reasons, including the objective of learning more about the underlying physiological mechanisms of the pathological processes that can be initiated by a head injury. Additional goals include the development of objective physiologically based measures that can be used to monitor the response to treatment and to identify minimally symptomatic individuals who are at risk of delayed onset neuropsychiatric disorders following injury. Research programs studying TBI search for relationships between psychophysiological measures, particularly ERP component properties (e.g. timing, amplitude, scalp distribution, and a participant’s clinical condition. Moreover, the complex relationships between brain injury and psychiatric disorders are receiving increased research attention, and ERP technologies are making contributions to this effort. This review has two objectives supporting such research efforts. The first is to review evidence indicating that traumatic brain injury is a significant risk factor for post-injury neuropsychiatric disorders. The second objective is to introduce ERP researchers who are not familiar with neuropsychiatric assessment to the instruments that are available for characterizing traumatic brain injury, post-concussion syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Specific recommendations within this very large literature are made. We have proceeded on the assumption that, as is typically the case in an ERP laboratory, the investigators are not clinically qualified and that they will not have access to participant medical records.

  9. Empathy manipulation impacts music-induced emotions: a psychophysiological study on opera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C Miu

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of voluntarily empathizing with a musical performer (i.e., cognitive empathy on music-induced emotions and their underlying physiological activity. N = 56 participants watched video-clips of two operatic compositions performed in concerts, with low or high empathy instructions. Heart rate and heart rate variability, skin conductance level (SCL, and respiration rate (RR were measured during music listening, and music-induced emotions were quantified using the Geneva Emotional Music Scale immediately after music listening. Listening to the aria with sad content in a high empathy condition facilitated the emotion of nostalgia and decreased SCL, in comparison to the low empathy condition. Listening to the song with happy content in a high empathy condition also facilitated the emotion of power and increased RR, in comparison to the low empathy condition. To our knowledge, this study offers the first experimental evidence that cognitive empathy influences emotion psychophysiology during music listening.

  10. Psychophysiological interaction between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and cerebellum: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, A. N.; Teng, X. L.; Ng, S. B.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Mukari, S. Z. M.

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to model the psychophysiological interaction (PPI) between the bilateral STG and cerebellum (lobule VI and lobule VII) during an arithmetic addition task. Eighteen young adults participated in this study. They were instructed to solve single-digit addition tasks in quiet and noisy backgrounds during an fMRI scan. Results showed that in both hemispheres, the response in the cerebellum was found to be linearly influenced by the activity in STG (vice-versa) for both in-quiet and in-noise conditions. However, the influence of the cerebellum on STG seemed to be modulated by noise. A two-way PPI model between STG and cerebellum is suggested. The connectivity between the two regions during a simple addition task in a noisy condition is modulated by the participants’ higher attention to perceive.

  11. A Psychophysiologic Study of Weakening Traumatic Combat Memories With Post-Reactivation Propranolol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pitman, Roger K

    2008-01-01

    ...) propranolol, will show significantly smaller psychophysiologic responses during script-driven imagery testing a week later, indicative of weakening of the emotional memory, compared to those who receive (non-reactivation...

  12. Psycho-physiological reactions to violent video gaming : Experimental studies of heart rate variability, cortisol, sleep and emotional reactions in teenage boys

    OpenAIRE

    Ivarsson, Malena

    2014-01-01

    Playing violent video games may provoke aggression. Psycho-physiological methods may provide knowledge about the underlying psychological processes. Most previous studies have been performed in laboratory settings at daytime with adults. Thus the aim of this thesis was to investigate psycho-physiological (autonomic and HPA related reactions), sleep-related and emotional responses in teenage boys to playing a violent and a non-violent video game at home before going to sleep. In Study I the au...

  13. Loneliness and acute stress reactivity: A systematic review of psychophysiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eoin G; Gallagher, Stephen; Creaven, Ann-Marie

    2018-05-01

    Physiological reactivity to acute stress has been proposed as a potential biological mechanism by which loneliness may lead to negative health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease. This review was conducted to investigate the association between loneliness and physiological responses to acute stress. A series of electronic databases were systematically searched (PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Medline, CINAHL Plus, EBSCOhost, PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Science Direct) for relevant studies, published up to October 2016. Eleven studies were included in the review. Overall, the majority of studies reported positive associations between loneliness and acute stress responses, such that higher levels of loneliness were predictive of exaggerated physiological reactions. However, in a few studies, loneliness was also linked with decreased stress responses for particular physiological outcomes, indicating the possible existence of blunted relationships. There was no clear pattern suggesting any sex- or stressor-based differences in these associations. The available evidence supports a link between loneliness and atypical physiological reactivity to acute stress. A key finding of this review was that greater levels of loneliness are associated with exaggerated blood pressure and inflammatory reactivity to acute stress. However, there was some indication that loneliness may also be related to blunted cardiac, cortisol, and immune responses. Overall, this suggests that stress reactivity could be one of the biological mechanisms through which loneliness impacts upon health. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. The Emotional Movie Database (EMDB): a self-report and psychophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2012-12-01

    Film clips are an important tool for evoking emotional responses in the laboratory. When compared with other emotionally potent visual stimuli (e.g., pictures), film clips seem to be more effective in eliciting emotions for longer periods of time at both the subjective and physiological levels. The main objective of the present study was to develop a new database of affective film clips without auditory content, based on a dimensional approach to emotional stimuli (valence, arousal and dominance). The study had three different phases: (1) the pre-selection and editing of 52 film clips (2) the self-report rating of these film clips by a sample of 113 participants and (3) psychophysiological assessment [skin conductance level (SCL) and the heart rate (HR)] on 32 volunteers. Film clips from different categories were selected to elicit emotional states from different quadrants of affective space. The results also showed that sustained exposure to the affective film clips resulted in a pattern of a SCL increase and HR deceleration in high arousal conditions (i.e., horror and erotic conditions). The resulting emotional movie database can reliably be used in research requiring the presentation of non-auditory film clips with different ratings of valence, arousal and dominance.

  15. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Hua; Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-10-24

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized.

  16. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  17. Studying emotion theories through connectivity analysis: Evidence from generalized psychophysiological interactions and graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-An; Jastorff, Jan; Van den Stock, Jan; Van de Vliet, Laura; Dupont, Patrick; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2018-05-15

    Psychological construction models of emotion state that emotions are variable concepts constructed by fundamental psychological processes, whereas according to basic emotion theory, emotions cannot be divided into more fundamental units and each basic emotion is represented by a unique and innate neural circuitry. In a previous study, we found evidence for the psychological construction account by showing that several brain regions were commonly activated when perceiving different emotions (i.e. a general emotion network). Moreover, this set of brain regions included areas associated with core affect, conceptualization and executive control, as predicted by psychological construction models. Here we investigate directed functional brain connectivity in the same dataset to address two questions: 1) is there a common pathway within the general emotion network for the perception of different emotions and 2) if so, does this common pathway contain information to distinguish between different emotions? We used generalized psychophysiological interactions and information flow indices to examine the connectivity within the general emotion network. The results revealed a general emotion pathway that connects neural nodes involved in core affect, conceptualization, language and executive control. Perception of different emotions could not be accurately classified based on the connectivity patterns from the nodes of the general emotion pathway. Successful classification was achieved when connections outside the general emotion pathway were included. We propose that the general emotion pathway functions as a common pathway within the general emotion network and is involved in shared basic psychological processes across emotions. However, additional connections within the general emotion network are required to classify different emotions, consistent with a constructionist account. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psycho-physiological assessment of a prosthetic hand sensory feedback system based on an auditory display: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Soma, Hirokazu; Sekine, Masashi; Yu, Wenwei

    2012-06-09

    Prosthetic hand users have to rely extensively on visual feedback, which seems to lead to a high conscious burden for the users, in order to manipulate their prosthetic devices. Indirect methods (electro-cutaneous, vibrotactile, auditory cues) have been used to convey information from the artificial limb to the amputee, but the usability and advantages of these feedback methods were explored mainly by looking at the performance results, not taking into account measurements of the user's mental effort, attention, and emotions. The main objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using psycho-physiological measurements to assess cognitive effort when manipulating a robot hand with and without the usage of a sensory substitution system based on auditory feedback, and how these psycho-physiological recordings relate to temporal and grasping performance in a static setting. 10 male subjects (26+/-years old), participated in this study and were asked to come for 2 consecutive days. On the first day the experiment objective, tasks, and experiment setting was explained. Then, they completed a 30 minutes guided training. On the second day each subject was tested in 3 different modalities: Auditory Feedback only control (AF), Visual Feedback only control (VF), and Audiovisual Feedback control (AVF). For each modality they were asked to perform 10 trials. At the end of each test, the subject had to answer the NASA TLX questionnaire. Also, during the test the subject's EEG, ECG, electro-dermal activity (EDA), and respiration rate were measured. The results show that a higher mental effort is needed when the subjects rely only on their vision, and that this effort seems to be reduced when auditory feedback is added to the human-machine interaction (multimodal feedback). Furthermore, better temporal performance and better grasping performance was obtained in the audiovisual modality. The performance improvements when using auditory cues, along with vision

  19. Psycho-physiological assessment of a prosthetic hand sensory feedback system based on an auditory display: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Jose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic hand users have to rely extensively on visual feedback, which seems to lead to a high conscious burden for the users, in order to manipulate their prosthetic devices. Indirect methods (electro-cutaneous, vibrotactile, auditory cues have been used to convey information from the artificial limb to the amputee, but the usability and advantages of these feedback methods were explored mainly by looking at the performance results, not taking into account measurements of the user’s mental effort, attention, and emotions. The main objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using psycho-physiological measurements to assess cognitive effort when manipulating a robot hand with and without the usage of a sensory substitution system based on auditory feedback, and how these psycho-physiological recordings relate to temporal and grasping performance in a static setting. Methods 10 male subjects (26+/-years old, participated in this study and were asked to come for 2 consecutive days. On the first day the experiment objective, tasks, and experiment setting was explained. Then, they completed a 30 minutes guided training. On the second day each subject was tested in 3 different modalities: Auditory Feedback only control (AF, Visual Feedback only control (VF, and Audiovisual Feedback control (AVF. For each modality they were asked to perform 10 trials. At the end of each test, the subject had to answer the NASA TLX questionnaire. Also, during the test the subject’s EEG, ECG, electro-dermal activity (EDA, and respiration rate were measured. Results The results show that a higher mental effort is needed when the subjects rely only on their vision, and that this effort seems to be reduced when auditory feedback is added to the human-machine interaction (multimodal feedback. Furthermore, better temporal performance and better grasping performance was obtained in the audiovisual modality. Conclusions The performance

  20. Psychophysiological Responsivity to Script-Driven Imagery: An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Eye Movements on Public Speaking Flashforwards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Michelle; Engelhard, Iris M

    2015-01-01

    A principle characteristic of public speaking anxiety relates to intrusive mental images of potential future disasters. Previous research has found that the self-reported emotionality of such "flashforwards" can be reduced by a cognitively demanding, dual-task (e.g., making eye movements) performed whilst holding the mental image in-mind. The outcome measure in these earlier studies was participants' self-reported emotional intensity of the mental image. The current study (N = 34) explored whether an objective measure of emotionality would yield similar results in students with public speaking anxiety. A script-driven imagery procedure was used to measure psychophysiological responsivity to an audio script depicting a feared (public speaking) scenario before and after an eye movement intervention. Relative to the control condition (imagery only), those who made eye movements whilst holding a mental image of this scenario in-mind demonstrated a significant decrease in heart rate, which acted as a measure of emotionality. These findings add to a previous body of research demonstrating the beneficial qualities of dual-tasks and their potential for treatment of both past and future-oriented anxieties.

  1. Self-Report and Psychophysiological Responses to Fear Appeals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonana, Juan R.; Gonzalez-Javier, Francisca; Espin-Lopez, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the relationship between self-report and psychophysiological responses to fear appeals and behavioral changes elicited by these. Ninety-two subjects watched one of four messages that varied in level of threat (high vs. low) and efficacy (high vs. low). Concomitantly, psychophysiological measures (heart rate and…

  2. Cognitive psychophysiology: a window to cognitive development and brain maturation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.C.M.; van der Molen, M.W.; Dawson, G.; Fischer, K.W.

    1994-01-01

    Focus of this chapter is on cognitive psychophysiology as a bridge for two-way interaction between the study of cognitive development and research on the developing nervous system. Demonstrates how psychophysiological measures can be used to understand cognitive development in relation to brain

  3. Sustained mental workload in chronic patients with very severe concussions : A psychophysiological study of menial fatiguability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, W; Riese, H; Hoedemaeker, M; Mulder, B; Veldman, H; Withaar, F

    After severe concussion, return to work is often problematic. Our study focuses on a persistent complaint of these patients, namely mental fatiguableness. To study mental fatiguableness the effect of sustained work load is assessed in a continuous divided attention task at two levels of workload, 50

  4. Are psychophysiological arousal and self-reported emotional stress during an oncological consultation related to memory of medical information? An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Leonie N C; Tollenaar, Marieke S; Bosch, Jos A; van Doornen, Lorenz J P; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2017-01-01

    Patients forget 20-80% of information provided during medical consultations. The emotional stress often experienced by patients during consultations could be one of the mechanisms that lead to limited recall. The current experimental study therefore investigated the associations between (analog) patients' psychophysiological arousal, self-reported emotional stress and their (long term) memory of information provided by the physician. One hundred and eighty one cancer-naïve individuals acted as so-called analog patients (APs), i.e. they were instructed to watch a scripted video-recoding of an oncological bad news consultation while imagining themselves being in the patient's situation. Electrodermal and cardiovascular activity (e.g. skin conductance level and heart rate) were recorded during watching. Self-reported emotional stress was assessed before and after watching, using the STAI-State and seven Visual Analog Scales. Memory, both free recall and recognition, was assessed after 24-28 h. Watching the consultation evoked significant psychophysiological and self-reported stress responses. However, investigating the associations between 24 psychophysiological arousal measures, eight self-reported stress measures and free recall and recognition of information resulted in one significant, small (partial) correlation (r = 0.19). Considering multiple testing, this significant result was probably due to chance. Alternative analytical methods yielded identical results, strengthening our conclusion that no evidence was found for relationships between variables of interest. These null-findings are highly relevant, as they may be considered to refute the long-standing, but yet untested assumption that a relationship between stress and memory exists within this context. Moreover, these findings suggest that lowering patients' stress levels during the consultation would probably not be sufficient to raise memory of information to an optimal level. Alternative

  5. A Psychophysiologic Study of Weakening Traumatic Combat Memories with Post-Reactivation Propranolol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Research Protection Office, subjects gave written informed consent. Study medication Propranolol hydrochloride is a non-selective synthetic β1...confounding substances, including opiates, barbiturates, and methadone , at the time of the script-driven imagery procedure. When the analyses were repeated

  6. The Positive Effects of Trait Emotional Intelligence during a Performance Review Discussion – A Psychophysiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Performance review discussions of real manager–subordinate pairs were examined in two studies to investigate the effects of trait emotional intelligence (EI) on dyad member’s felt and expressed emotions. Altogether there were 84 managers and 122 subordinates in two studies using 360 measured and self-reported trait EI. Facial electromyography, and frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry were collected continuously. Manager’s high trait EI was related to increased positive valence emotional facial expressions in the dyad during the discussions. The managers also had more EEG frontal asymmetry indicating approach motivation, than the subordinates. In addition, actor and partner effects and actor × partner interactions, and interactions between the role and actor or partner effect of trait EI were observed. Both actor and partner trait EI were related to more positive self-reported emotional valence. The results imply that trait EI has a role in organizational social interaction. PMID:28400747

  7. [Psychophysiological study of the information theory of emotions using the model of positive emotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusalova, M N; Kostiunina, M B

    2003-01-01

    The pattern of inter-hemisphere distribution of EEG amplitude and frequency as a function of the levels of emotional experience and motivation as well as probability of the goal achievement was studied in 20 subjects. An emotional state was evoked by simulating emotionally colored events. A modified test of Prise et al. (1985) was used to evaluate the level of motivation for the simulated event as well as the probability of goal achievement from the lengths of line segments marked by the subjects. Here we studied simulated emotion of joy. The highest correlation coefficients were observed between the awareness and alpha activity in the both hemispheres. The levels of emotional experience and motivation inversely correlated with the delta and theta activity mostly in the left hemisphere. The beta activity correlated with both the emotional and motivation levels.

  8. Effects of hypnosis during pregnancy: A psychophysiological study on maternal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Fabien; Grévin-Laroche, Corinne; Josse, Elisabeth; Polidori, Guillaume; Quinart, Hervé; Taïar, Redha

    2017-05-01

    Because it induces a state of reduced awareness and deep relaxation, hypnosis is thought to be efficient at relieving stress and anxiety. This study examined whether hypnosis may alter the pattern and time evolution of maternal and fetal stress. Here we report a 23-yrs-old primigravida woman at 31-weeks' gestation who underwent daily sessions of hypnosis during one week. An A (baseline)-B (intervention) - A' (return to baseline) design was used. Each study phase lasted one week. The State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) was completed daily. Uterine contractions as well as maternal and fetal heart rate were recorded over 24-h periods in each of the study phase. Uterine contractions and maternal systolic blood pressure showed clear reductions during the hypnosis phase. In addition, a statistically significant declining trend in anxiety scores was observed during the hypnosis phase, and anxiety re-increased in the return-to-baseline phase (phypnosis phase. Our results suggest that a short-lived hypnosis intervention (combined with standard care) holds sufficient promise for antenatal stress relief to justify testing its efficacy in larger groups of pregnant women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychophysiological and stress responses to competition in team sport coaches: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J; Davison, G; Robinson, P

    2013-10-01

    Examinations of stress in coaches have mainly been qualitative and focused on chronic stressors. This exploratory study examined stress responses in coaches during competition, including psychological and physiological indices. Using reversal theory, we examined metamotivational state profiles during competition. Ten male team sport coaches (mean age 39.8 ± 13.12 years) reported levels of subjective stress, pleasant and unpleasant emotions, metamotivational state, and provided saliva samples, on a competition day: 15 min prior to the pre-match team talk; start of the match; end of the first half; start of the second half, and end of the match, then at equivalent times on a noncompetition day. Saliva samples were assayed for alpha-amylase activity. On competition day, alpha-amylase activity was significantly higher, as were subjective stress, arousal, and unpleasant emotions. Prior to and during active play, participants were mainly in the conformist, alloic (other-oriented), and mastery states, and at the end of the match, in the telic and sympathy states. Only 22 metamotivational state reversals were observed, mostly at the start and end of the match. The elevated levels of subjective stress, alpha-amylase activity, and unpleasant emotions suggest that educational programs may be useful for some coaches to manage psychological states during competition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Virtual reality exposure in anxiety disorders: impact on psychophysiological reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Julia; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most frequently encountered psychiatric disorders. Recommended treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and/or medication. In recent years, beneficial effects of virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy have been shown, making this technique a promising addition to CBT. However, the ability of VR to mimic threatening stimuli in a way comparable to in vivo cues has been discussed. In particular, it has been questioned whether VR is capable of provoking psychophysiological symptoms of anxiety. Since psychophysiological arousal is considered a prerequisite for effective exposure treatment, this systematic review aims to evaluate the evidence for the potential of VR exposure to evoke and modulate psychophysiological fear reactions. PubMed and PsycINFO/Academic Search Premier databases were searched. Thirty-eight studies investigating challenge or habituation effects were included. VR exposure does provoke psychophysiological arousal, especially in terms of electrodermal activity. Results on psychophysiological habituation in VR are inconclusive. Study design and methodological rigour vary widely. Despite several limitations, this review provides evidence that VR exposure elicits psychophysiological fear reactions in patients and healthy subjects, rendering VR a promising treatment for anxiety disorders, and a potent research tool for future investigations of psychophysiological processes and their significance during exposure treatment.

  11. Psychophysiological Studies II. Performance and Physiological Response in Coronary Prone and Noncoronary Prone Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-30

    Cyborg BL907 heart rate monitor. A pressure sensitive transducer was placed over the radial artery of the left arm to measure HR in beats per minute...measurement was obtained with a Cyborg Thermal P642. Temperature was recorded by a thermistor placed on the dorsal surface of the middle finger of...the left hand (second phalanx) and was displayed to .01 degrees Farenheit. Electromyogram activity was measured with a Cyborg P303. Measurements (to .1

  12. [Chronic insomnia: not always psychophysiological].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerings-Verberkmoes, Nicole E; Vlak, Monique H M; de Lau, Lonneke M L; Hamburger, Hans L

    2014-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive value of taking a detailed sleep history for making the diagnosis of psychophysiological insomnia. Retrospective case file study. We examined 767 patients referred to the Amsterdam Centre for Sleep and Wake Disorders, and who underwent polysomnography for the first time between 1 January and 31 December 2010. We compared the probable diagnosis made following history-taking with the final diagnosis made after polysomnography. In this we differentiated between organic and non-organic insomnia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the sleep history were calculated. In 24.8% of the 303 patients whose histories did not indicate organic insomnia, polysomnography showed there to be an organic cause. Primary causes were obstructive sleep apnoea (13.2%), upper airway resistance syndrome (5.4%), and periodic limb movement disorder (4.0%) or a combination of these. In the histories of 464 patients there were indications that the insomnia had an organic cause and in 325 of them this was confirmed by polysomnography. The sensitivity of detailed history taking to psychophysiological insomnia was 62.1%, the specificity 81.3%, the positive predictive value was 75.2% and the negative predictive value was 70.0%. In patients under the age of 40 with a score on the Epworth sleepiness scale insomnia, organic insomnia could not be demonstrated, with the exception of one parasomnia. History-taking only meant that the organic cause was missed in a substantial percentage of patients with insomnia, in particular in older patients with hypersomnolence and a high BMI.

  13. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity.

  14. Performance Optimization in Sport: A Psychophysiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selenia di Fronso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the last 20 years, there was a growing interest in the study of the theoretical and applied issues surrounding psychophysiological processes underlying performance. The psychophysiological monitoring, which enables the study of these processes, consists of the assessment of the activation and functioning level of the organism using a multidimensional approach. In sport, it can be used to attain a better understanding of the processes underlying athletic performance and to improve it. The most frequently used ecological techniques include electromyography (EMG, electrocardiography (ECG, electroencephalography (EEG, and the assessment of electrodermal activity and breathing rhythm. The purpose of this paper is to offer an overview of the use of these techniques in applied interventions in sport and physical exercise and to give athletes, coaches and sport psychology experts new insights for performance improvement.

  15. Psychophysiological responses to Salsa dance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guidetti

    Full Text Available Speculation exists whether dance provides physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits. Unfortunately, research to date has not addressed the affective and exertional responses to dance. These responses are of interest as positive affective and exertional responses experienced during physical activity may play an important role in predicting adherence. The present study aims to examine the psychophysiological responses of different Salsa dance styles. Ten pairs of dancers performed two different structured lessons of Salsa dance, including Typical Salsa and Rueda de Casino lessons, and a non-structured Salsa dance at a night club. Physiological responses (i.e., percent of heart rate reserve; %HRR were continuously assessed and perceived exertion and affective valence were rated every 15 min throughout the trials. %HRR responses differed between the Salsa dance styles (%HRR from 41.3 to 51.9%, and participants were dancing at intensities near their ventilatory threshold. Specifically, Typical Salsa lesson elicited lower %HRR responses than Rueda de Casino lesson (p 0.05. Surprisingly, exertional (from 8 to 11 and affective (from +3 to +5 responses were unaffected by Salsa dance styles (p > 0.05. These data support that different Salsa dance styles provide physiological stimuli adequate to promote health and fitness benefits, and perhaps more importantly, produce pleasurable experiences, which in turn might lead to an increase in adherence to Salsa dancing which likely provides exercise-like health benefits.

  16. Stress-related psycho-physiological disorders: randomized single blind placebo controlled naturalistic study of psychometric evaluation using a radio electric asymmetric treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a radio electric asymmetric treatment on psycho-physiological disorders (PPD). PPD are often stress related and are under the unconscious control of the patient and cannot be traced back to any serious physical disease. The brain stimulation treatment protocol used is called Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization (NPPO) with a Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyer (REAC) device. Methods Psychological stress and PPD were measured for a group of 888 subjects using the Psychological Stress Measure (PSM) test, a self-administered questionnaire. Data were collected immediately before and after the 4-weeks of REAC treatment cycle. Results This study showed a significant reduction in scores measuring subjective perceptions of stress for subjects treated with a cycle of NPPO REAC treatment. At the end-point the number of subjects reporting symptoms of stress-related PPD on the PSM test was significantly reduced, whereas in the placebo group the difference was not significant. Conclusion A cycle of NPPO treatment with REAC was shown to reduce subjective perceptions of stress measured by the PSM test and in particular on PPD. Trial Registration This trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with the number: ACTRN12607000463471. PMID:21771304

  17. Psychophysiological effects of yoga on stress in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Mahesh Narain; Kumari, Sony; Ganpat, Tikhe Sham

    2018-01-01

    College students are vulnerable to a critical period in developmental maturation, facing rigorous academic work, and learning how to function independently. Physical activities such as running and bicycling have been shown to improve mood and relieve stress. However, college students often have low levels of physical activity. Yoga is an ancient physical and mental activity that affects mood and stress. However, studies examining the psychophysiological effects of yoga are rare in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study is to establish preliminary evidence for the psychophysiological effects of yoga on stress in young-adult college students. The present study suggests that yoga has positive effects on a psychophysiological level that leads to decreased levels of stress in college student. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which different types of yogic practices address the needs of different college subpopulations (e.g., overweight, sedentary, and smokers).

  18. Psychophysiological effects of yoga on stress in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Narain Tripathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available College students are vulnerable to a critical period in developmental maturation, facing rigorous academic work, and learning how to function independently. Physical activities such as running and bicycling have been shown to improve mood and relieve stress. However, college students often have low levels of physical activity. Yoga is an ancient physical and mental activity that affects mood and stress. However, studies examining the psychophysiological effects of yoga are rare in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study is to establish preliminary evidence for the psychophysiological effects of yoga on stress in young-adult college students. The present study suggests that yoga has positive effects on a psychophysiological level that leads to decreased levels of stress in college student. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which different types of yogic practices address the needs of different college subpopulations (e.g., overweight, sedentary, and smokers.

  19. The Effects of Exercising in Different Natural Environments on Psycho-Physiological Outcomes in Post-Menopausal Women: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew P. White

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined potential psycho-physiological benefits from exercising in simulated natural environments among a sample of post-menopausal women using a laboratory based protocol. Participants cycled on a stationary exercise bike for 15 min while facing either a blank wall (Control or while watching one of three videos: Urban (Grey, Countryside (Green, Coast (Blue. Blood pressure, heart rate and affective responses were measured pre-post. Heart rate, affect, perceived exertion and time perception were also measured at 5, 10 and 15 min during exercise. Experience evaluation was measured at the end. Replicating most earlier findings, affective, but not physiological, outcomes were more positive for exercise in the simulated Green and, for the first time, Blue environment, compared to Control. Moreover, only the simulated Blue environment was associated with shorter perceived exercise duration than Control and participants were most willing to repeat exercise in the Blue setting. The current research extended earlier work by exploring the effects of “blue exercise” and by using a demographic with relatively low average levels of physical activity. That this sample of postmenopausal women were most willing to repeat a bout of exercise in a simulated Blue environment may be important for physical activity promotion in this cohort.

  20. The Effects of Exercising in Different Natural Environments on Psycho-Physiological Outcomes in Post-Menopausal Women: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mathew P.; Pahl, Sabine; Ashbullby, Katherine J.; Burton, Francesca; Depledge, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined potential psycho-physiological benefits from exercising in simulated natural environments among a sample of post-menopausal women using a laboratory based protocol. Participants cycled on a stationary exercise bike for 15 min while facing either a blank wall (Control) or while watching one of three videos: Urban (Grey), Countryside (Green), Coast (Blue). Blood pressure, heart rate and affective responses were measured pre-post. Heart rate, affect, perceived exertion and time perception were also measured at 5, 10 and 15 min during exercise. Experience evaluation was measured at the end. Replicating most earlier findings, affective, but not physiological, outcomes were more positive for exercise in the simulated Green and, for the first time, Blue environment, compared to Control. Moreover, only the simulated Blue environment was associated with shorter perceived exercise duration than Control and participants were most willing to repeat exercise in the Blue setting. The current research extended earlier work by exploring the effects of “blue exercise” and by using a demographic with relatively low average levels of physical activity. That this sample of postmenopausal women were most willing to repeat a bout of exercise in a simulated Blue environment may be important for physical activity promotion in this cohort. PMID:26404351

  1. Options Study - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  2. The Psychophysiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Nnamdi

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analysis of 58 resting baseline studies, 25 startle studies, 17 standardized trauma cue studies, and 22 idiographic trauma cue studies compared adults with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on psychophysiological variables: facial electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and blood pressure.…

  3. A novel psychophysiological treatment for vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, R K; Lynch, J J; Craig, F W

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transactional psychophysiological therapy (TPT) in a patient with recurrent vasovagal syncope (VVS) and to quantify the capacity of human dialogue to effect significant and consistent measurable therapeutic cardiovascular (CV) changes. A 31-year-old nurse with recurrent VVS and a reproducibly abnormal tilt-table test was refractory to pharmacological and conventional psychiatric treatments. She was treated with TPT. Her CV responses during psychotherapy were incorporated into the dialogue as an important source of communicative information, and she was taught psychophysiological techniques to correct exaggerated CV responses. These responses, during 16 weekly and 12 subsequent monthly sessions, were analysed using a one-way multiple analysis of variance. As TPT progressed, the magnitude and lability of CV responses as well as frequency of VVS were reduced. She has been relatively asymptomatic for 14 years posttherapy. In conclusion, (1) TPT may be an effective primary/adjunctive treatment for patients with VVS; (2) TPT may reduce syncopal episodes, perhaps by normalizing limbic input to the brainstem baroreflex system.

  4. Characterizing donation behavior from psychophysiological indices of narrative experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Anne Correa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research on narrative persuasion has yet to investigate whether this process influences behavior. The current study explored whether: 1 a narrative could persuade participants to donate to a charity, a prosocial, behavioral decision; 2 psychophysiological metrics can delineate the differences between donation/non-donation behaviors; and 3 donation behavior can be correlated with measures of psychophysiology, self-reported reactions to the narrative, and intrinsic characteristics. Participants (n = 49 completed personality/disposition questionnaires, viewed one of two versions of a narrative while EEG and ECG were recorded, completed a questionnaire regarding their reactions to the narrative, and were given an opportunity to donate to a charity related to the themes of the narrative. Results showed that 1 34.7% of participants donated; 2 psychophysiological metrics successfully delineated between donation behaviors and the effects of narrative version; and 3 psychophysiology and reactions to the narrative were better able to explain the variance (88% and 65%, respectively in the amount donated than all 3 metrics combined as well as any metric alone. These findings demonstrate the promise of narrative persuasion for influencing prosocial, behavioral decisions. Our results also illustrate the utility of the previously stated metrics for understanding and possibly even manipulating behaviors resulting from narrative persuasion.

  5. Psychological and psychophysiological functioning of young adults born preterm: The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pyhälä, Riikka

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in neonatal intensive care during the last few decades have led to a remarkable improvement in the survival rates of preterm infants born with very low birth weight (< 1500 g; VLBW). However, VLBW may have a cost for the physical, psychosocial and cognitive development of the survivors. Nevertheless, there has been little research into the long-term consequences of VLBW that last till or emerge in adulthood. In addition, there have been relatively few studies on whether the adult...

  6. The return trip is felt shorter only postdictively: A psychophysiological study of the return trip effect [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Ozawa

    Full Text Available The return trip often seems shorter than the outward trip even when the distance and actual time are identical. To date, studies on the return trip effect have failed to confirm its existence in a situation that is ecologically valid in terms of environment and duration. In addition, physiological influences as part of fundamental timing mechanisms in daily activities have not been investigated in the time perception literature. The present study compared round-trip and non-round-trip conditions in an ecological situation. Time estimation in real time and postdictive estimation were used to clarify the situations where the return trip effect occurs. Autonomic nervous system activity was evaluated from the electrocardiogram using the Lorenz plot to demonstrate the relationship between time perception and physiological indices. The results suggest that the return trip effect is caused only postdictively. Electrocardiographic analysis revealed that the two experimental conditions induced different responses in the autonomic nervous system, particularly in sympathetic nervous function, and that parasympathetic function correlated with postdictive timing. To account for the main findings, the discrepancy between the two time estimates is discussed in the light of timing strategies, i.e., prospective and retrospective timing, which reflect different emphasis on attention and memory processes. Also each timing method, i.e., the verbal estimation, production or comparative judgment, has different characteristics such as the quantification of duration in time units or knowledge of the target duration, which may be responsible for the discrepancy. The relationship between postdictive time estimation and the parasympathetic nervous system is also discussed.

  7. The pursuit of happiness measurement: a psychometric model based on psychophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietro, Cipresso; Silvia, Serino; Giuseppe, Riva

    2014-01-01

    Everyone is interested in the pursuit of happiness, but the real problem for the researchers is how to measure it. Our aim was to deeply investigate happiness measurement through biomedical signals, using psychophysiological methods to objectify the happiness experiences measurements. The classic valence-arousal model of affective states to study happiness has been extensively used in psychophysiology. However, really few studies considered a real combination of these two dimensions and no study further investigated multidimensional models. More, most studies focused mainly on self-report to measure happiness and a deeper psychophysiological investigation on the dimensions of such an experience is still missing. A multidimensional model of happiness is presented and both the dimensions and the measures extracted within each dimension are comprehensively explained. This multidimensional model aims at being a milestone for future systematic study on psychophysiology of happiness and affective states.

  8. STARFIRE-II studies. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy has initiated several studies during FY-1985 called Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS). The TPSS is being carried out by several laboratories, universities and industry with the general objective of developing innovative physics and technology concepts to improve the commercial attractiveness of tokamak power reactors. The effort of Argonne National Laboratory, entitled STARFIRE-II, is an effort to update and improve STARFIRE, which was the last comprehensive conceptual design study in the US of a commercial tokamak power plant. The STARFIRE-II effort has developed a number of goals in order to improve fusion commercial power plants based in part on several recent studies. The primary goals for STARFIRE-II are listed

  9. Impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers. Part II. Job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasl, S.V.; Chisholm, R.F.; Eskenazi, B.

    1981-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only) in comparison with workers interviewed at the Peach Bottom Plant. At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worrry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and symptoms was evident. Demoralization was greater primarily among TMI non-supervisory workers. The impact of the accident was not greater among TMI workers living closer to the plant. Presence of a preschool child at home enhanced the impact of the accident, but primarily among TMI supervisors. 39 references, 17 tables

  10. Thrills, Chills, Frissons, and Skin Orgasms: Toward an Integrative Model of Transcendent Psychophysiological Moments in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas D. Harrison

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Music has a unique power to elicit moments of intense emotional and psychophysiological response. These moments – termed chills, thrills, frissons, etc. – are subjects of introspection and philosophical debate, as well as scientific study in music perception and cognition. The present article integrates the existing multidisciplinary literature in an attempt to define a comprehensive, testable, and ecologically valid model of transcendent psychophysiological moments in music.

  11. The role of psychophysiology in clinical assessment: ERPs in the evaluation of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John J B

    2002-05-01

    Psychophysiological measures hold great potential for informing clinical assessments. The challenge, before such measures can be widely used, is to develop test procedures and analysis strategies that allow for statistically reliable and valid decisions to be made for any particular examinee, despite large individual differences in psychophysiological responding. Focusing on the evaluation of memory in clinical, criminal, and experimental contexts, this paper reviews the rationale for and development of ERP-based memory assessment procedures, with a focus on methods that allow for statistically supported decisions to be made in the case of a single examinee. The application of one such procedure to the study of amnesia in Dissociative Identity Disorder is highlighted. To facilitate the development of other psychophysiological assessment tools, psychophysiological researchers are encouraged to report the sensitivity and specificity of their measures where possible.

  12. Studies of the teratogenic potential of exposure of rats to 6000-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal psychophysiologic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Wistar rats (36) were exposed daily throughout pregnancy to a power density level of 35 mW/cm 2 of 6000-MHz microwave radiation (11), sham irradiated (10), or used as control animals (15). Litters were culled to a maximum of eight F 1 /sub a/ offspring/litter (total = 124) on Postnatal Day 1 and subjected to a series of reflex tests beginning Day 3. Mothers were rebred 10 days after weaning. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 263 F 1 /sub b/ offspring. Weekly weights were recorded for 298 F 1 /sub a/ offspring. At 60 days, behavioral testing was initiated on 121 offspring. At 90 days, offspring were bred within/across groups. Teratologic evaluations were completed on 659 F 2 term fetuses. Organ weight analyses were completed on 17 mothers and 181 F 1 /sub a/ adult offspring, and blood analyses on 21 mothers and 131 offspring. Sex differences within groups were observed in four behavioral tests and in blood data. Significant differences between groups were observed for: F 1 /sub b/ term fetal weight; F 1 /sub a/ eye opening, postnatal growth to the fifth week, water T-maze and open field test results; and several organ/body weight ratios. These results indicate that exposure to 6000-MHz radiation at this power density level may result in subtle long-term neurophysiologic alterations not detectable at term using conventional morphologic teratologic procedures

  13. Role of psychophysiological factors in industrial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuchalov, A V

    1980-03-01

    Improving methods of work accident prevention by investigating causes of work accidents are discussed. Analyzed are psychophysiological reasons for work accidents. Results of investigations carried out in the laboratory of psychology of labor of TsNIEhIugol' from 1977 to 1978 are discussed. The Institute investigated psychology and psychophysiology of the miners who were injured during work accidents. The tests were carried out in the Stakhanovugol' coal mines. Various features of the miners' personality were analyzed, among others: passivity or activity, mental stability or instability, independence or dependence on others, power of concentration, memory. The results of the investigation are discussed. (In Russian)

  14. Predisposition to out-of-body experience (OBE) is associated with aberrations in multisensory integration: Psychophysiological support from a "rubber hand illusion" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jason J; Watson, Derrick G; Dewe, Hayley

    2017-06-01

    It has been argued that disorders in body-ownership and aberrant experiences in self-consciousness are due to biases in multisensory integration. Here we examine whether such biases are also associated with spontaneous out-of-body experiences (OBEs) in a nonclinical population. One-hundred and 80 participants took part in a rubber hand illusion (RHI) experiment with synchronous and asynchronous visual and tactile stimulation. A realistic threat was delivered to the rubber hand after a fixed period of stimulation. Self-report exit questionnaires measured the subjective strength of the illusion and psychophysiological measures (skin conductance responses/finger temperature) provided an objective index of fear/anxiety toward the threat. Control participants reported a stronger RHI, and revealed larger threat-related skin conductance responses during synchronous compared with asynchronous brushing. For participants predisposed to OBEs, the magnitude of the skin conductance was not influenced by brushing synchrony-fear responses were just as strong in the asynchronous condition as they were in the synchronous condition. There were also no reliable effects of finger temperature for either group. Collectively, these findings are taken as support for the presence of particular biases in multisensory integration (perhaps via predictive coding mechanisms) in which imprecise top-down tuning occurs resulting in aberrant experiences in self-consciousness even in nonclinical hallucinators. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Acute psychophysiological stress impairs human associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, M R; Todd, R M

    2017-11-01

    Addiction is increasingly discussed asa disorder of associative learning processes, with both operant and classical conditioning contributing to the development of maladaptive habits. Stress has long been known to promote drug taking and relapse and has further been shown to shift behavior from goal-directed actions towards more habitual ones. However, it remains to be investigated how acute stress may influence simple associative learning processes that occur before a habit can be established. In the present study, healthy young adults were exposed to either acute stress or a control condition half an hour before performing simple classical and operant conditioning tasks. Psychophysiological measures confirmed successful stress induction. Results of the operant conditioning task revealed reduced instrumental responding under delayed acute stress that resembled behavioral responses to lower levels of reward. The classical conditioning experiment revealed successful conditioning in both experimental groups; however, explicit knowledge of conditioning as indicated by stimulus ratings differentiated the stress and control groups. These findings suggest that operant and classical conditioning are differentially influenced by the delayed effects of acute stress with important implications for the understanding of how new habitual behaviors are initially established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New worldwide horizons for the International Organization of Psychophysiology (IOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangina, C A

    2000-12-01

    This Presidential Address deals with the new challenges and horizons of the International Organization of Psychophysiology (IOP) as we are marching towards the 21st century. The importance of Clinical Psychophysiology to humanity is emphasized. The special contribution of the International Journal of Psychophysiology to the future of Psychophysiology as a world forum is underlined. The status of Psychophysiology as a leading neuroscientific discipline is described and the role and major contributions of the late Dr Herbert Jasper as Co-Founding Honorary Fellow of IOP is highlighted.

  17. EEG, HRV and Psychological Correlates while Playing Bejeweled II: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russoniello, Carmen V; O'Brien, Kevin; Parks, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    Stress related medical disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and anxiety are serious medical issues that can cause disability and death. Interventions to prevent their development and exacerbation are needed. Casual video games (CVGs) are fun, easy to play, spontaneous and tremendously popular. People report that they play these games because they decrease their stress and improve their mood. This study tested this theory by comparing people playing Bejeweled II a popular CVG with control subjects measured under similar conditions. Electroencephalographic (EEG) changes after playing Bejeweled II were consistent with increased mood and corroborated with similar findings on psychological reports. Moreover, heart rate variability (HRV) changes consistent with autonomic nervous system relaxation or decreased physical stress were also recorded. It is concluded, therefore, that playing a CVG like Bejeweled II can increase mood and decrease stress. These finding have broad implications and include the potential development of prescriptive interventions using Bejeweled II to prevent and treat stress related medical disorders. Finally, these findings demonstrate a method using EEG, HRV and psychological correlates to understand the psychophysiological or cybernetic interconnection between participant and video game.

  18. Subjective and psychophysiological indices of listening effort in a competing-talker task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackersie, Carol L.; Cones, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of noise and other competing backgrounds on speech recognition performance are well documented. There is less information, however, on listening effort and stress experienced by listeners during a speech recognition task that requires inhibition of competing sounds. Purpose The purpose was a) to determine if psychophysiological indices of listening effort were more sensitive than performance measures (percentage correct) obtained near ceiling level during a competing speech task b) to determine the relative sensitivity of four psychophysiological measures to changes in task demand and c) to determine the relationships between changes in psychophysiological measures and changes in subjective ratings of stress and workload. Research Design A repeated-measures experimental design was used to examine changes in performance, psychophysiological measures, and subjective ratings in response to increasing task demand. Study Sample Fifteen adults with normal hearing participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 27 (range: 24–54). Data Collection and Analysis Psychophysiological recordings of heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, and electromyographic activity (EMG) were obtained during listening tasks of varying demand. Materials from the Dichotic Digits Test were used to modulate task demand. The three levels of tasks demand were: single digits presented to one ear (low-demand reference condition), single digits presented simultaneously to both ears (medium demand), and a series of two digits presented simultaneously to both ears (high demand). Participants were asked to repeat all the digits they heard while psychophysiological activity was recorded simultaneously. Subjective ratings of task load were obtained after each condition using the NASA-TLX questionnaire. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were completed for each measure using task demand and session as factors. Results Mean performance was higher than 96

  19. Subjective and psychophysiological indexes of listening effort in a competing-talker task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackersie, Carol L; Cones, Heather

    2011-02-01

    The effects of noise and other competing backgrounds on speech recognition performance are well documented. There is less information, however, on listening effort and stress experienced by listeners during a speech-recognition task that requires inhibition of competing sounds. The purpose was (a) to determine if psychophysiological indexes of listening effort were more sensitive than performance measures (percentage correct) obtained near ceiling level during a competing speech task, (b) to determine the relative sensitivity of four psychophysiological measures to changes in task demand, and (c) to determine the relationships between changes in psychophysiological measures and changes in subjective ratings of stress and workload. A repeated-measures experimental design was used to examine changes in performance, psychophysiological measures, and subjective ratings in response to increasing task demand. Fifteen adults with normal hearing participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 27 (range: 24-54). Psychophysiological recordings of heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, and electromyographic (EMG) activity were obtained during listening tasks of varying demand. Materials from the Dichotic Digits Test were used to modulate task demand. The three levels of task demand were single digits presented to one ear (low-demand reference condition), single digits presented simultaneously to both ears (medium demand), and a series of two digits presented simultaneously to both ears (high demand). Participants were asked to repeat all the digits they heard, while psychophysiological activity was recorded simultaneously. Subjective ratings of task load were obtained after each condition using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index questionnaire. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were completed for each measure using task demand and session as factors. Mean performance was higher than 96% for all listening tasks. There

  20. Measuring the human psychophysiological conditions without contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.

    2017-08-01

    Heart Rate Variability, HRV, studies the variations of cardiac rhythm caused by the autonomic regulation. HRV analysis can be applied to the study of the effects of mental or physical stressors on the psychophysiological conditions. The present work is a pilot study performed on a 23-year-old healthy subject. The measurement of HRV was performed by means of two sensors, that is an electrocardiograph and a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which is a non-contact device able to detect the skin vibrations related to the cardiac activity. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of a physical task on HRV parameters (in both time and frequency domain), and consequently on the autonomic regulation, and the capability of Laser Doppler Vibrometry in correctly detecting the effects of stress on the Heart Variability. The results show a significant reduction of HRV parameters caused by the execution of the physical task (i.e. variations of 25-40% for parameters in time domain, also higher in frequency domain); this is consistent with the fact that stress causes a reduced capability of the organism in varying the Heart Rate (and, consequently, a limited HRV). LDV was able to correctly detect this phenomenon in the time domain, while the parameters in the frequency domain show significant deviations with respect to the gold standard technique (i.e. ECG). This may be due to the movement artefacts that have consistently modified the shape of the vibration signal measured by means of LDV, after having performed the physical task. In the future, in order to avoid this drawback, the LDV technique could be used to evaluate the effects of a mental task on HRV signals (i.e. the evaluation of mental stress).

  1. Study protocol on comparative effectiveness of mindfulness meditation and qigong on psychophysiological outcomes for patients with colorectal cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Wan, Adrian H Y; Chan, Jessie S M; Ng, S M; Chung, K F; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2017-08-08

    Colorectal cancer imposes threats to patients' well-being. Although most physical symptoms can be managed by medication, psychosocial stressors may complicate survival and hamper quality of life. Mindfulness and Qigong, two kinds of mind-body exercise rooted in Eastern health philosophy, has been found effective in symptoms management, improving mental health, and reducing stress. With these potential benefits, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is planned to investigate the comparative effectiveness of mindfulness and Baduanjin intervention on the bio-psychosocial wellbeing of people with colorectal cancer. A 3-arm RCT with waitlist control design will be used in this study. One hundred eighty-nine participants will be randomized into (i) Mindfulness, (ii) Baduanjin, or (iii) waitlist control groups. Participants in both the Baduanjin and mindfulness groups will receive 8-weeks of specific intervention. All three groups will undergo four assessment phases: (i) at baseline, (ii) at 4-week, (iii) at 8-week (post-intervention), and 6-month post-intervention (maintenance). All participants will be assessed in terms of cancer-related symptoms and symptom distress, mental health status, quality of life, stress level based on physiological marker. Based on prior research studies, participants in both the mindfulness and Baduanjn intervention group are expected to have better symptoms management, lower stress level, better mental health, and higher level of quality of life than the control group. This study contributes to better understanding on the common and unique effectiveness of mindfulness and Baduanjin qigong, as such patients and qualified healthcare professionals can select or provide practices which will produce maximum benefits, satisfaction, adherence, and sustainability. The trial has been registered in the Clinical Trials Centre of the University of Hong Kong ( HKCTR-2198 ) on 08 March 2017.

  2. Psychophysiological effects of audiovisual stimuli during cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Silva, Vinícius; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Chierotti, Priscila; Altimari, Leandro R

    2018-05-01

    Immersive environments induced by audiovisual stimuli are hypothesised to facilitate the control of movements and ameliorate fatigue-related symptoms during exercise. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of pleasant and unpleasant audiovisual stimuli on perceptual and psychophysiological responses during moderate-intensity exercises performed on an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer. Twenty young adults were administered three experimental conditions in a randomised and counterbalanced order: unpleasant stimulus (US; e.g. images depicting laboured breathing); pleasant stimulus (PS; e.g. images depicting pleasant emotions); and neutral stimulus (NS; e.g. neutral facial expressions). The exercise had 10 min of duration (2 min of warm-up + 6 min of exercise + 2 min of warm-down). During all conditions, the rate of perceived exertion and heart rate variability were monitored to further understanding of the moderating influence of audiovisual stimuli on perceptual and psychophysiological responses, respectively. The results of the present study indicate that PS ameliorated fatigue-related symptoms and reduced the physiological stress imposed by the exercise bout. Conversely, US increased the global activity of the autonomic nervous system and increased exertional responses to a greater degree when compared to PS. Accordingly, audiovisual stimuli appear to induce a psychophysiological response in which individuals visualise themselves within the story presented in the video. In such instances, individuals appear to copy the behaviour observed in the videos as if the situation was real. This mirroring mechanism has the potential to up-/down-regulate the cardiac work as if in fact the exercise intensities were different in each condition.

  3. Evaluation of a cognitive psychophysiological model for management of tic disorders: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kieron; Lavoie, Marc; Blanchet, Pierre; St-Pierre-Delorme, Marie-Ève

    2016-07-01

    Tic disorders, in particular chronic tic disorder and Tourette syndrome, affect about 1% of the population. The current treatment of choice is pharmacological or behavioural, addressing tics or the premonitory urges preceding tic onset. The current study reports an open trial evaluating the effectiveness of a cognitive psychophysiological treatment addressing Tourette-specific sensorimotor activation processes rather than the tic. Forty-nine people with Tourette syndrome and 36 people with chronic tics completed 10 weeks of individual cognitive psychophysiological therapy. Outcome measures included two tic severity scales and psychosocial measures. Post-treatment both groups had significantly improved on the tic scales with strong effect sizes across tic locations and complex and simple tics, maintained at 6-month follow-up with further change in perfectionism and self-esteem. The cognitive psychophysiological approach targeting underlying sensorimotor processes rather than tics in Tourette's and chronic tic disorder reduced symptoms with a large effect size. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  4. Psychophysiologic testing for post-traumatic stress disorder: forensic psychiatric application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, R K; Orr, S P

    1993-01-01

    The validity of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis is limited by both the illusory objectivity of the traumatic event and the subjectivity of the ensuing syndrome. These limitations are especially problematic in the forensic setting. Psychophysiologic measurements may strengthen PTSD's forensic value by offering a more objective assessment technique for cases that find their way into the courtroom. Based upon the results of published research studies conducted in a range of military and civilian, PTSD and non-PTSD subjects, psychophysiologic data can provide evidence helping to establish or refute the presence of the DSM-III-R PTSD arousal criteria, as well as aid psychiatric experts in estimating the probability of the disorder's presence in a given claimant. Psychophysiologic testing should be viewed as one component of a multimethod forensic psychiatric evaluation for PTSD. It is likely that it will soon be offered and, given current legal standards, admitted as evidence in civil and criminal litigation.

  5. Age–related psychophysiological vulnerability to phenylalanine in phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eLeuzzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phenylketonuria (PKU is caused by the inherited defect of the phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme, which converts phenylalanine (Phe into tyrosine (Tyr. Neonatal screening programs and early treatment have radically changed the natural history of PKU. Nevertheless, an increased risk of neurocognitive and psychiatric problems in adulthood remains a challenging aspect of the disease. In order to assess the vulnerability of complex skills to Phe, we explored: a the effect of a rapid increase in blood Phe levels on event-related potentials (ERP in PKU subjects during their second decade of life; b the association (if existing between psychophysiological and neurocognitive features.Methods. Seventeen early-treated PKU subjects, aged 10 to 20, underwent ERP (Mismatch Negativity, auditory P300, Contingent Negative Variation (CNV, and Intensity Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials recording before and 2 hours after an oral loading of Phe. Neurocognitive functioning, historical and concurrent biochemical values of blood Phe, Tyr, and Phe/Tyr ratio, were all included in the statistical analysis.Results. ERP components were normally detected in all the subjects. In subjects younger than 13 CNV amplitude, W2-CNV area, P3b latency, and Reaction Times in motor responses were negatively influenced by Phe loading. Independently from the psychophysiological vulnerability, some neurocognitive skills were more impaired in younger patients. No correlation was found between biochemical alterations and neurocognitive and psychophysiological findings. Conclusion. The vulnerability of the emerging neurocognitive functions to Phe suggests a strict metabolic control in adolescents affected by PKU and a neurodevelopmental approach in the study of neurocognitive outcome in PKU.

  6. Psychophysiological Assessment in Pilots Performing Challenging Simulated and Real Flight Maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Bernd; Rothe, Stefanie; Gens, André; Westphal, Soeren; Birkenfeld, Katja; Mulder, Edwin; Rittweger, Jörn; Ledderhos, Carla

    2017-09-01

    The objective assessment of psychophysiological arousal during challenging flight maneuvers is of great interest to aerospace medicine, but remains a challenging task. In the study presented here, a vector-methodological approach was used which integrates different psychophysiological variables, yielding an integral arousal index called the Psychophysiological Arousal Value (PAV). The arousal levels of 15 male pilots were assessed during predetermined, well-defined flight maneuvers performed under simulated and real flight conditions. The physiological data, as expected, revealed inter- and intra-individual differences for the various measurement conditions. As indicated by the PAV, air-to-air refueling (AAR) turned out to be the most challenging task. In general, arousal levels were comparable between simulator and real flight conditions. However, a distinct difference was observed when the pilots were divided by instructors into two groups based on their proficiency in AAR with AWACS (AAR-Novices vs. AAR-Professionals). AAR-Novices had on average more than 2000 flight hours on other aircrafts. They showed higher arousal reactions to AAR in real flight (contact: PAV score 8.4 ± 0.37) than under simulator conditions (7.1 ± 0.30), whereas AAR-Professionals did not (8.5 ± 0.46 vs. 8.8 ± 0.80). The psychophysiological arousal value assessment was tested in field measurements, yielding quantifiable arousal differences between proficiency groups of pilots during simulated and real flight conditions. The method used in this study allows an evaluation of the psychophysiological cost during a certain flying performance and thus is possibly a valuable tool for objectively evaluating the actual skill status of pilots.Johannes B, Rothe S, Gens A, Westphal S, Birkenfeld K, Mulder E, Rittweger J, Ledderhos C. Psychophysiological assessment in pilots performing challenging simulated and real flight maneuvers. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):834-840.

  7. Investigating the effect of the reality gap on the human psychophysiological state in the context of human-swarm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Podevijn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reality gap is the discrepancy between simulation and reality—the same behavioural algorithm results in different robot swarm behaviours in simulation and in reality (with real robots. In this paper, we study the effect of the reality gap on the psychophysiological reactions of humans interacting with a robot swarm. We compare the psychophysiological reactions of 28 participants interacting with a simulated robot swarm and with a real (non-simulated robot swarm. Our results show that a real robot swarm provokes stronger reactions in our participants than a simulated robot swarm. We also investigate how to mitigate the effect of the reality gap (i.e., how to diminish the difference in the psychophysiological reactions between reality and simulation by comparing psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed on a computer screen and psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality. Our results show that our participants tend to have stronger psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality (suggesting a potential way of diminishing the effect of the reality gap.

  8. Psychophysiological responses to competition and the big five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binboga, Erdal; Guven, Senol; Catıkkaş, Fatih; Bayazıt, Onur; Tok, Serdar

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between psychophysiological arousal, cognitive anxiety, and personality traits in young taekwondo athletes. A total of 20 male and 10 female taekwondo athletes (mean age = 18.6 years; ± 1.8) volunteered for the study. The Five Factor Personality Inventory and the state scale of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to measure personality and cognitive state anxiety. Electrodermal activity (EDA) was measured twice, one day and approximately one hour prior to the competition, to determine psychophysiological arousal. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlations, and stepwise regression were used to analyze the data. Several "Big Five" facets were related to the EDA delta scores that were measured both one day and one hour before the competition. Two stepwise regressions were conducted to examine whether personality traits could significantly predict both EDA delta scores. The final model, containing only neuroticism from the Big Five factors, can significantly explain the variations in the EDA delta scores measured one day before the competition. Agreeableness can significantly explain variations in the EDA delta scores measured one hour before the competition. No relationship was found between cognitive anxiety and the EDA delta scores measured one hour before the competition. In conclusion, personality traits, especially agreeableness and neuroticism, might be useful in understanding arousal responses to competition.

  9. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of biologically active tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Pd(II and Pt(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Pd(II and Pt(II were synthesized with the macrocyclic ligand, i.e., 2,3,9,10-tetraketo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacycoletradecane. The ligand was prepared by the [2 + 2] condensation of diethyloxalate and 1,3-diamino propane and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR and 1H NMR spectral studies. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic and electron paramagnetic resonance spectral studies. The molar conductance measurements of Mn(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes in DMF correspond to non electrolyte nature, whereas Pd(II and Pt(II complexes are 1:2 electrolyte. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Mn(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes, whereas square planar geometry assigned for Pd(II and Pt(II. In vitro the ligand and its metal complexes were evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium odum, Aspergillus niger and Rhizoctonia bataticola and some compounds found to be more active as commercially available fungicide like Chlorothalonil.

  10. My heart is racing! Psychophysiological dynamics of skilled racecar drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Edson; Di Fronso, Selenia; Mazzoni, Caterina; Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Bertollo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to test the multi-action plan model assumptions in which athletes' psychophysiological patterns differ among optimal and suboptimal performance experiences. Nine professional drivers competing in premier race categories (e.g. Formula 3, Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge) completed the study. Data collection involved monitoring the drivers' perceived hedonic tone, accuracy on core components of action, posture, skin temperature, respiration rate and heart rate responses during a 40-lap simulated race. Time marks, gathered at three standardised sectors, served as the performance variable. The A1GP racing simulator (Allinsport, Modena) established a realistic race platform. Specifically, the Barcelona track was chosen because of its inherently difficult nature characterised by intermittent deceleration points. Idiosyncratic analyses showed large individual differences in the drivers' psychophysiological profile, as well as distinct patterns in regards to optimal and suboptimal performance experiences. Limitations and future research avenues are discussed. Action- (e.g. attentional control) and emotion (e.g. biofeedback training)-centred applied sport psychology implications are advanced.

  11. Early Childhood Predictors of Post-Kindergarten Executive Function: Behavior, Parent Report, and Psychophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Kimberly; Hubble, Morgan; Bell, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined whether children's executive functions before kindergarten would predict variance in executive functions after kindergarten. We obtained behavioral (working memory task performance), parent-reported (temperament-based inhibitory control), and psychophysiological (working memory-related changes in heart rate…

  12. Metacognition in Self-Regulated Multimedia Learning: Integrating Behavioural, Psychophysiological and Introspective Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonietti, Alessandro; Colombo, Barbara; Di Nuzzo, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at investigating students' strategies--as revealed by behavioural, psychophysiological and introspective measures--which are applied during the free exploration of multimedia instructional presentations, which requires students to self-regulate their learning processes. Two multimedia presentations were constructed and presented to…

  13. Motion nature projection reduces patient's psycho-physiological anxiety during CT imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Emma; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Krijnen, Wim; van der Schans, Cees; Mobach, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that natural environments can positively influence people. This study investigated whether the use of motion nature projection in computed tomography (CT) imaging rooms is effective in mitigating psycho-physiological anxiety (vs. no intervention) using a

  14. Psychophysiological responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, S.J.M. de; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Sweep, F.C.; Donders, A.R.T.; Eijsbouts, A.; Koulil, S. van; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress management interventions may prove useful in preventing the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study assessed the effects of a stress management intervention on the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Seventy-four

  15. Validation of a psychophysiological waking erectile assessment (WEA) for the diagnosis of male erectile disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.; Everaerd, W.; van Lunsen, R. H.; Oerlemans, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a psychophysiological waking erectile assessment (WEA). WEA was designed to elicit penile responses using visual and vibrotactile stimuli and cognitive tasks (distraction and monitoring of erections). One hundred consecutive patients with erectile

  16. Psychophysiological methods for the diagnostics of human functional states: New approaches and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernorizov A.M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available L. S. Vygotsky in his famous methodological essay “The historical meaning of psychological crisis” (1928 emphasized the importance of studying any psychological process or state as a “whole” — that is, as characterized from the subjective and objective sides at the same time. This position is fully relevant for studying the human functional states (FSes. Today the objective psychophysiological diagnostics of human FSes in activities associated with a high risk of technological disasters (in nuclear-power plants, transportation, the chemical industry are extremely relevant and socially important. This article reviews some new psychophysiological methods of FS assessment that are being developed in Russia and abroad and discusses different aspects of developing integral psychophysiological FS assessment. The emphasis is on distant methods of FS diagnostics: the bioradiolocation method, laser Doppler vibrometry, eye tracking, audio and video recordings, infrared thermography. The possibilities and limitations of the most popular emotion atlases — the Facial Affect Scoring Technique (FAST and the Facial Action Coding System (FACS — in developing distant visual-range and infrared-range systems for automated classification of facial expressions are analyzed. A special section of the article concentrates on the problem of constructing an integral psychophysiological FS index. Mathematical algorithms that provide a partition of FS indicators into different FS types are based on various methods of machine learning. We propose the vector approach for construction of complex estimations of the human FSes.

  17. Two types of peak emotional responses to music: The psychophysiology of chills and tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    People sometimes experience a strong emotional response to artworks. Previous studies have demonstrated that the peak emotional experience of chills (goose bumps or shivers) when listening to music involves psychophysiological arousal and a rewarding effect. However, many aspects of peak emotion are still not understood. The current research takes a new perspective of peak emotional response of tears (weeping, lump in the throat). A psychophysiological experiment showed that self-reported chills increased electrodermal activity and subjective arousal whereas tears produced slow respiration during heartbeat acceleration, although both chills and tears induced pleasure and deep breathing. A song that induced chills was perceived as being both happy and sad whereas a song that induced tears was perceived as sad. A tear-eliciting song was perceived as calmer than a chill-eliciting song. These results show that tears involve pleasure from sadness and that they are psychophysiologically calming; thus, psychophysiological responses permit the distinction between chills and tears. Because tears may have a cathartic effect, the functional significance of chills and tears seems to be different. We believe that the distinction of two types of peak emotions is theoretically relevant and further study of tears would contribute to more understanding of human peak emotional response. PMID:28387335

  18. Two types of peak emotional responses to music: The psychophysiology of chills and tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuma; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2017-04-07

    People sometimes experience a strong emotional response to artworks. Previous studies have demonstrated that the peak emotional experience of chills (goose bumps or shivers) when listening to music involves psychophysiological arousal and a rewarding effect. However, many aspects of peak emotion are still not understood. The current research takes a new perspective of peak emotional response of tears (weeping, lump in the throat). A psychophysiological experiment showed that self-reported chills increased electrodermal activity and subjective arousal whereas tears produced slow respiration during heartbeat acceleration, although both chills and tears induced pleasure and deep breathing. A song that induced chills was perceived as being both happy and sad whereas a song that induced tears was perceived as sad. A tear-eliciting song was perceived as calmer than a chill-eliciting song. These results show that tears involve pleasure from sadness and that they are psychophysiologically calming; thus, psychophysiological responses permit the distinction between chills and tears. Because tears may have a cathartic effect, the functional significance of chills and tears seems to be different. We believe that the distinction of two types of peak emotions is theoretically relevant and further study of tears would contribute to more understanding of human peak emotional response.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and thermal studies of nickel (II), copper (II), zinc (II) and cadmium (II) complexes with some mixed ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Samiran; Kundu, Parimal; Singh, Rajkumar Bhubon

    1998-01-01

    Dichloro-(DCA) and trichloroacetate(TCA) -cyclic ligand morpholine (Morph)/thiomorpholine (Tmorph)/methylmorpholine (Mmorph)/dimethyl-piperazine (DMP) complexes of nickel (II), copper (II), zinc (II) and cadmium (II) with the compositions [Ni(tmorph) 2 (DCA) 2 ], [Ni(tmorph) 2 (TCA) 2 ].2H 2 O, [Cu(DMP) 2 (TCA) 2 ],[ML 2 X 2 ].nH 2 O where M=Zn II or Cd II , L=Morph, DMP or tmorph and X=DCA or TCA and n=O except in case of [Cd (Morph) 2 (TCA) 2 ] where n=1 have been synthesised. Some intermediate complexes have been isolated by temperature arrest technique (pyrolysis) and characterised. Configurational and conformational changes have been studied by elemental analyses, IR and electronic spectra, magnetic moment data (in the case of Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes) and thermal analysis. E a * , ΔH, and ΔS for the decomposition reaction of these complexes are evaluated and the stability of the complexes with respect to activation energy has also been compared. The linear correlation has been found between E a * and ΔS for the decomposition of the complexes. (author)

  20. Effects on Task Performance and Psychophysiological Measures of Performance During Normobaric Hypoxia Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Chad; Kennedy, Kellie; Napoli, Nicholas; Demas, Matthew; Barnes, Laura; Crook, Brenda; Williams, Ralph; Last, Mary Carolyn; Schutte, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Human-autonomous systems have the potential to mitigate pilot cognitive impairment and improve aviation safety. A research team at NASA Langley conducted an experiment to study the impact of mild normobaric hypoxia induction on aircraft pilot performance and psychophysiological state. A within-subjects design involved non-hypoxic and hypoxic exposures while performing three 10-minute tasks. Results indicated the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude did not induce significant performance decrement but did produce increase in perceived workload. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for hypoxia onset. This study represents on-going work at NASA intending to add to the current knowledge of psychophysiologically-based input to automation to increase aviation safety. Analyses involving coupling across physiological systems and wavelet transforms of cortical activity revealed patterns that can discern between the simulated altitude conditions. Specifically, multivariate entropy of ECG/Respiration components were found to be significant predictors (pTask performance was not appreciably impacted by the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for mild hypoxia onset.The potential for identifying shifts in underlying cortical and physiological systems could serve as a means to identify the onset of deteriorated cognitive state. Enabling such assessment in future flightdecks could permit increasingly autonomous systems-supported operations. Augmenting human operator through assessment of cognitive impairment has the potential to further improve operator performance and mitigate human error in safety critical contexts. This study represents ongoing work at NASA intending to add to the current knowledge of psychophysiologically-based input to automation to increase aviation safety.

  1. Aristotle Meets Zeno: Psychophysiological Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Stachtea, Xanthi; Papageorgiou, Panos; Alexandridis, Antonio T.; Tsaltas, Eleftheria; Angelopoulos, Elias

    2016-01-01

    This study, a tribute to Aristotle's 2400 years, used a juxtaposition of valid Aristotelian arguments to the paradoxes formulated by Zeno the Eleatic, in order to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of attentional and /or memory processing effects in the course of deductive reasoning. Participants undertook reasoning tasks based on visually presented arguments which were either (a) valid (Aristotelian) statements or (b) paradoxes. We compared brain activation patterns while partic...

  2. Synthesis and spectral studies of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II) complexes of 4-oxo-4H-1-benzopyran-3-carboxaldehyde hydrazone derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawar, N.; Khattab, M.A.; Bekheit, M.M.; El-Kaddah, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    A few complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) with 4-oxo-4H-1-benzopyran-3-(carboxaldehyde-4-chlorobenzylhydrazone) (BCBH) and 4-oxo-4H-1-benzopyran-3-(carboxaldehyde-4-methylbenzylhydrazone) (BMBH) have been synthesised and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivities, magnetic measurements and infrared (IR) and visible spectral studies. The IR spectra show that BCBH and BMBH behave as bidentate ligands either in the keto or enol form. (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Psycho-physiological response of soldiers in urban combat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente J. Clemente-Suárez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Current armed conflicts are asymmetrical and are developed m urban areas. These new requirements have not been studied for current literature. The aim of this study was to analyse changes in cortical arousal, blood lactate, muscle strength, autonomic modulation and rate of perceived exertion in a simulated urban combat. We analyzed 20 soldiers before and after an urban combat simulation. The results showed how urban combat produced high sympathetic nervous system activation, increasing the muscle strength, heart rate and blood lactate concentration of the soldiers. Despite this effort, rate of perceived exertion were not consistent with the physiological response that soldiers presented, the rate of perceived exertion was lower than the physiological response evaluated. Furthermore, the information processing and cortical arousal decreased after the urban combat simulation. These results have showed the psycho-physiological response of soldiers in combat, helping to better understanding and enabling an improvement of current training methods of soldiers.

  4. Aristotle Meets Zeno: Psychophysiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Stachtea, Xanthi; Papageorgiou, Panos; Alexandridis, Antonio T; Tsaltas, Eleftheria; Angelopoulos, Elias

    2016-01-01

    This study, a tribute to Aristotle's 2400 years, used a juxtaposition of valid Aristotelian arguments to the paradoxes formulated by Zeno the Eleatic, in order to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of attentional and /or memory processing effects in the course of deductive reasoning. Participants undertook reasoning tasks based on visually presented arguments which were either (a) valid (Aristotelian) statements or (b) paradoxes. We compared brain activation patterns while participants maintained the premises / conclusions of either the valid statements or the paradoxes in working memory (WM). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs), specifically the P300 component of ERPs, were recorded during the WM phase, during which participants were required to draw a logical conclusion regarding the correctness of the valid syllogisms or the paradoxes. During the processing of paradoxes, results demonstrated a more positive event-related potential deflection (P300) across frontal regions, whereas processing of valid statements was associated with noticeable P300 amplitudes across parieto-occipital regions. These findings suggest that paradoxes mobilize frontal attention mechanisms, while valid deduction promotes parieto-occipital activity associated with attention and/or subsequent memory processing.

  5. Aristotle Meets Zeno: Psychophysiological Evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalabos Papageorgiou

    Full Text Available This study, a tribute to Aristotle's 2400 years, used a juxtaposition of valid Aristotelian arguments to the paradoxes formulated by Zeno the Eleatic, in order to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of attentional and /or memory processing effects in the course of deductive reasoning. Participants undertook reasoning tasks based on visually presented arguments which were either (a valid (Aristotelian statements or (b paradoxes. We compared brain activation patterns while participants maintained the premises / conclusions of either the valid statements or the paradoxes in working memory (WM. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs, specifically the P300 component of ERPs, were recorded during the WM phase, during which participants were required to draw a logical conclusion regarding the correctness of the valid syllogisms or the paradoxes. During the processing of paradoxes, results demonstrated a more positive event-related potential deflection (P300 across frontal regions, whereas processing of valid statements was associated with noticeable P300 amplitudes across parieto-occipital regions. These findings suggest that paradoxes mobilize frontal attention mechanisms, while valid deduction promotes parieto-occipital activity associated with attention and/or subsequent memory processing.

  6. Psychophysiology of Spaceflight and Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William

    2013-01-01

    In space, the absence of gravity alone causes unique physiological stress. Significant biomedical changes, across multiple organ systems, such as body fluid redistribution, diminished musculoskeletal strength, changes in cardiac function and sensorimotor control have been reported. The time course of development of these disorders and severity of symptoms experienced by individuals varies widely. Space motion sickness (SMS) is an example of maladaptation to microgravity, which occurs early in the mission and can have profound effects on physical health and crew performance. Disturbances in sleep quality, perception, emotional equilibrium and mood have also been reported, with impact to health and performance varying widely across individuals. And lastly, post-flight orthostatic intolerance, low blood pressure experienced after returning to Earth, is also of serious concern. Both the Russian and American space programs have a varied list of human errors and mistakes, which adversely impacted mission goals. Continued probability of human exposure to microgravity for extended time periods provides a rationale for the study of the effects of stress. The primary focus of this research group is directed toward examining individual differences in: (a) prediction of susceptibility to these disorders, (b) assessment of symptom severity, (c) evaluation of the effectiveness of countermeasures, and (d) developing and testing a physiological training method, Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) as a countermeasure with multiple applications. The present paper reports on the results of a series of human flight experiments with AFTE aboard the Space Shuttle and Mir Space Station, and during emergency flight scenarios on Earth.

  7. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Robazza

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A, and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys, ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77 took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46, higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55, lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33, and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35, visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35, and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26 tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p < .050. Across the two competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050 on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  8. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Izzicupo, Pascal; D'Amico, Maria Angela; Ghinassi, Barbara; Crippa, Maria Chiara; Di Cecco, Vincenzo; Ruiz, Montse C; Bortoli, Laura; Di Baldassarre, Angela

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A), and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys), ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77) took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46), higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55), lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33), and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35), visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35), and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26) tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050) on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  9. Psychological and Psychophysiological Effects of Recuperative Music Postexercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorghis, Costas I; Bruce, Andrew C; Pottratz, Suzanne T; Stevens, Rebecca C; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Hamer, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Few studies have examined the psychological and psychophysiological effects of recuperative music after exhaustive exercise. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of two music conditions compared with a no-music control on psychological and psychophysiological recovery processes after exercise. A randomized, fully counterbalanced, crossover design was used. Core affect, salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure were measured before exhaustive exercise, immediately after, and in 10-, 20-, and 30-min intervals during passive recovery (21 women and 21 men; 20.9 ± 1.7 yr) over three separate trials (slow, sedative music; fast, stimulative music; no-music control). The exercise task entailed incremental cycle ergometry performed at 75 rpm with an increase in intensity of 22.5 W·min at the end of each minute until exhaustion. Data were analyzed using mixed-model 3 (condition) × 4 (time) × 2 (gender) MANOVA/ANCOVA. The largest decline in affective arousal between active and passive recovery phases was evident in the slow, sedative condition (ηp = 0.50). Women had a more pronounced reduction in arousal than did men in the slow, sedative music condition. Heart rate measures showed that fast, stimulative music inhibited the return of heart rate toward resting levels (ηp = 0.06). Similarly, salivary cortisol levels tended to be lower in response to slow, sedative music (ηp = 0.11). There was a main effect of condition for affective valence indicating that the slow, sedative condition elicited more positive affective responses compared with the control and fast, stimulative conditions (ηp = 0.12). The present findings support the notion that slow, sedative music can expedite the recovery process immediately after strenuous exercise.

  10. Can a humanoid face be expressive? A psychophysiological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eLazzeri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-verbal signals expressed through body language play a crucial role in multi-modal human communication during social relations. Indeed, in all cultures facial expressions are the most universal and direct signs to express innate emotional cues. A human face conveys important information in social interactions and helps us to better understand our social partners and establish empathic links.Latest researches show that humanoid and social robots are becoming increasingly similar to humans, both aesthetically and expressively. However, their visual expressiveness is a crucial issue that must be improved to make these robots more realistic and intuitively perceivable by humans as not different from them.This study concerns the capability of a humanoid robot to exhibit emotion through facial expressions. More specifically, emotional signs performed by a humanoid robot have been compared with corresponding human facial expressions in terms of recognition rate and response time. The set of stimuli included standardized human expressions taken from an Ekman-based database and the same facial expressions performed by the robot. Furthermore, participants' psychophysiological responses have been explored to investigate whether there could be differences induced by interpreting robot or human emotional stimuli.Preliminary results show a trend to better recognize expressions performed by the robot than 2D photos or 3D models. Moreover no significant differences in the subjects' psychophysiological state have been found during the discrimination of facial expressions performed by the robot in comparison with the same task performed with 2D photos and 3D models.

  11. Vection in virtual environments: psychological and psychophysiological mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ya. Menshikova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The self-motion illusion (‘vection’ refers to a subjective phenomenon where a stationary observer experiences a compelling sense of illusory self-motion when she/he is exposed to large moving patterns of optic flow. As a part of vestibular dysfunction the self-motion illusion is accompanied by the complex of negative symptoms: vertigo, nausea, vomiting and headache. In recent years the phenomenon of vection has attracted the attention of researchers due to the development of virtual reality systems. In such systems stationary subjects are exposed to the large moving optic flow which leads to the appearance of vection. Despite the wide range of approaches and methods of its assessing there is no generally accepted view about the psychological and psychophysiological mechanisms of its appearance. This review considers various approaches to the study of the vection illusion, methods of its evaluation and various factors affecting its severity. Special attention is paid to the mechanisms of the brain activity underlying the vection perception, which was registered using the neuroimaging technique. This work contains also the analysis of the main factors influencing the vection perception such as technical features of virtual reality systems, individual characteristics of observers, cognitive rules of sensory information processing. A detailed description of psychological and psychophysiological methods allowing evaluating the vection strength is given. At the present understanding the process of the vection perception is an actual problem of theoretical and practical psychology. The experimental results may allow psychologists to solve the binding problem concerning the processes of sensory integration. As to practical application the results would help to develop new methods of counteracting the self-motion sickness for astronautics, pilots and sportsmen.

  12. Helmholtz and the psychophysiology of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debru, C

    2001-09-01

    After having measured the velocity of the nervous impulse in the 1850s, Helmholtz began doing research on the temporal dimensions of visual perception. Experiments dealing with the velocity of propagation in nerves (as well as with aspects of perception) were carried out occasionally for some fifteen years until their final publication in 1871. Although the temporal dimension of perception seems to have interested Helmholtz less than problems of geometry and space, his experiments on the time of perception were technically rather subtle and seminal, especially compared with experiments performed by his contemporaries, such as Sigmund Exner, William James, Rudolf Hermann Lotze, Ernst Mach, Wilhelm Volkmann, and Wilhelm Wundt. Helmholtz's conception of the temporal aspects of perception reflects the continuity that holds between psychophysiological research and the Kantian philosophical background.

  13. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  14. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  15. Are psychophysiological arousal and self-reported emotional stress during an oncological consultation related to memory of medical information? : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.N.C.; Tollenaar, M.S.; Bosch, J.A.; van Doornen, L.J.P.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    Patients forget 20-80% of information provided during medical consultations. The emotional stress often experienced by patients during consultations could be one of the mechanisms that lead to limited recall. The current experimental study therefore investigated the associations between (analog)

  16. Are psychophysiological arousal and self-reported emotional stress during an oncological consultation related to memory of medical information? An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Leonie N. C.; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Bosch, Jos A.; van Doornen, Lorenz J. P.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Patients forget 20-80% of information provided during medical consultations. The emotional stress often experienced by patients during consultations could be one of the mechanisms that lead to limited recall. The current experimental study therefore investigated the associations between (analog)

  17. Assessment of Psychophysiological Detection of Deception (PDD) Pretest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    The Defense Academy for Credibility Assessment (DACA) Research Division contracted with Battelle to conduct scientific research to determine the relationship between the content of the Psychophysiological Detection of Deception (PDD...

  18. Psychophysiological assessment of sexual function in women after radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: a pilot study on four patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breukink, Stephanie O; Wouda, Jan C; Van Der Werf-Eldering, Marieke J; Van De Wiel, Harry B M; Bouma, Esther M C; Pierie, Jean Pierre-En; Wiggers, Theo; Meijerink, Jeroen W J H J; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrord C M

    2009-04-01

    The potential contribution of psychological and anatomical changes to sexual dysfunction in female patients following short-term preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) and total mesorectal excision (TME) is not clear. Aim. In this study we assessed female sexual dysfunction in patients who underwent radiotherapy and TME for rectal cancer. Genital arousal was assessed using vaginal videoplethysmography. Sexual functioning was examined in four patients who had rectal cancer and underwent radiotherapy and TME. All investigations were done at least 15 months after treatment. The results were compared with an age-matched group of 18 healthy women. The patients and healthy controls showed comparable changes in vaginal vasocongestion during sexual arousal, though three out of four patients showed a lower mean spectral tension (MST) of the vaginal pulse compared with healthy controls. Subjective sexual arousal was equivalent between the two groups. In this study the changes of genital and subjective sexual arousal after erotic stimulus condition between patients and healthy controls were not different, though lower MST of the vaginal pulse was found in three out of four patients compared with healthy women. Additional work, however, must be performed to clarify the mechanisms of sexual dysfunction following treatment of rectal cancer.

  19. Comparative characteristics of psychophysiological features skilled basketball players-women with hearing and skilled basketball players healthy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the psychophysiological features of skilled basketball players with normal hearing and impaired hearing aid. The study involved two women's basketball team to 12 people each. The study used a complex computer psychodiagnosis. The complex includes 20 psychophysiological and 18 personal psychological tests. The indicators of the time simple and complex reaction and average tapping test healthy skilled basketball players and basketball players are hearing impaired. There was a significant higher rates of visual-motor speed and reaction-tapping test in basketball players with hearing compared to healthy athletes. This is explained by compensatory mechanisms that occur in connection with the violation of the audition.

  20. Comparative characteristics of psychophysiological features skilled basketball players-women with hearing and skilled basketball players healthy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.L. Kozina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the psychophysiological features of skilled basketball players with normal hearing and impaired hearing aid. The study involved two women's basketball team to 12 people each. The study used a complex computer psychodiagnosis. The complex includes 20 psychophysiological and 18 personal psychological tests. The indicators of the time simple and complex reaction and average tapping test healthy skilled basketball players and basketball players are hearing impaired. There was a significant higher rates of visual-motor speed and reaction-tapping test in basketball players with hearing compared to healthy athletes. This is explained by compensatory mechanisms that occur in connection with the violation of the audition.

  1. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: a prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Dan; Anderberg, Ulla Maria; Theorell, Töres; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2005-07-25

    The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23-64) from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention) lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA) decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference) remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  2. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: A prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theorell Töres

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. Methods A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23–64 from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. Results After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. Conclusion The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  3. Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety: A cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsi-Chung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC and pre-defined, theoretical factors from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Methods Three hundred fifty-four randomly selected Chinese male subjects aged ≥65 years and living in the community were enrolled. CVC was measured using a frequency-domain index of heart rate variability. Results Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the flat tripartite model of HADS provided a modest advantage in model fit when compared with other theoretical factor solutions. In the flat tripartite model, there was a significant negative association between anhedonic depression and CVC. In contrast, autonomic anxiety showed a significant positive correlation with CVC. In the hierarchical tripartite model, negative affectivity was not directly associated with CVC; instead, it had positive and negative indirect effects on CVC via autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression, respectively. As scores for negative affectivity increased, these specific indirect effects diminished. Conclusions Among competing models of co-occurring depression and anxiety, constructs from tripartite models demonstrate fair conformity with the data but unique and distinct correlations with CVC. Negative affectivity may determine the relationship of anhedonic depression and autonomic anxiety with CVC. Separating affective symptoms under the constructs of the tripartite models helps disentangle complex associations between co-occurring depression and anxiety with CVC.

  4. Understanding the Psycho-Physiological Implications of Interaction With a Virtual Reality-Based System in Adolescents With Autism: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Selvia; Lahiri, Uttama

    2015-07-01

    Individuals with Autism are characterized by deficits in socialization and communication. In recent years several assistive technologies, e.g., Virtual Reality (VR), have been investigated to address the socialization deficits in these individuals. Presently available VR-based systems address various aspects of social communication in an isolated manner and without monitoring one's affective state such as, anxiety. However, in conventional observation-based therapy, a therapist adjusts the intervention paradigm by monitoring one's anxiety level. But, often these individuals have an inherent inability to explicitly express their anxiety thereby inducing limitations on conventional techniques. Physiological signals being continuously available and not directly impacted by these communication difficulties can be alternatively used as markers of one's anxiety level. In our research we aim at designing a Virtual-reality bAsed Social-communication Task (VAST) system that can address the various aspects of social communication, e.g., social context, subtle social cues, emotional expression, etc., in a cumulative and structured way. In addition, we augment this with a capability to use one's physiological signals as markers of one's anxiety level. In our preliminary feasibility study we investigate the potential of VAST to cause variations in one's performance and anxiety level that can be mapped from one's physiological indices.

  5. Psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery from high-intensity interval training

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, L; Tiller, NB; Karageorghis, CI

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the multifarious effects of music applied during exercise but few have assessed the efficacy of music as an aid to recovery. Music might facilitate physiological recovery via the entrainment of respiratory rhythms with music tempo. High-intensity exercise training is not typically associated with positive affective responses, and thus ways of assuaging negative affect warrant further exploration. This study assessed the psychophysiological effects of music on ac...

  6. determinant of psychophysiological state of sportsmen of high qualification with different emotional characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Korobeynikova L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the work - to study the determinants of psycho-physiological state of sportsmen of high qualification with different emotional characteristics. In experiment took part 19 highly skilled athletes involved in the Greco-Roman wrestling. The survey was carried out using a hardware-software complex psychodiagnostic "Multipsihometr-05. Determined by the emotional background of athletes according to the method A. Rukavishnikova features of visual perception and perceptual speed.

  7. determinant of psychophysiological state of sportsmen of high qualification with different emotional characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikova L.G.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work - to study the determinants of psycho-physiological state of sportsmen of high qualification with different emotional characteristics. In experiment took part 19 highly skilled athletes involved in the Greco-Roman wrestling. The survey was carried out using a hardware-software complex psychodiagnostic "Multipsihometr-05. Determined by the emotional background of athletes according to the method A. Rukavishnikova features of visual perception and perceptual speed.

  8. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vandoni

    Full Text Available Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (p<0.05. Consequently, the affective responses to vigorous session were less pleasant than those during moderate session (p<0.05. These results suggest that the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior.

  9. Can biofeedback training of psychophysiological responses enhance athletes' sport performance? A practitioner's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusenjak, Nika; Grad, Anton; Tusak, Matej; Leskovsek, Matevz; Schwarzlin, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, biofeedback has become increasingly popular for its proven success in peak performance training - the psychophysiological preparation of athletes for high-stakes sport competitions, such as the Olympic games. The aim of this research was to test whether an 8-week period of exposure to biofeedback training could improve the psychophysiological control over competitive anxiety and enhance athletic performance in participating subjects. Participants of this study were highly competent athletes, each training in different sport disciplines. The experimental group consisted of 18 athletes (4 women, 14 men), whereas the Control group had 21 athletes (4 women, 17 men). All athletes were between 16 and 34 years old. The biofeedback device, Nexus 10, was used to detect and measure the psychophysiological responses of athletes. Athletes from both groups (control and experimental) were subjected to stress tests at the beginning of the study and once again at its conclusion. In between, the experimental group received training in biofeedback techniques. We then calculated the overall percentage of athletes in the experimental group compared with those in the control group who were able to control respiration, skin conductance, heart rate, blood flow amplitude, heart rate variability, and heart respiration coherence. One year following completion of the initial study, we questioned athletes from the experimental group, to determine whether they continued to use these skills and if they could detect any subsequent enhancement in their athletic performance. We demonstrated that a greater number of participants in the experimental group were able to successfully control their psychophysiological parameters, in comparison to their peers in the control group. Significant results (p biofeedback - psycho-regulation skills. Furthermore, these participants uniformly reported believing that these skills had enhanced their athletic performance and general well-being.

  10. Do East Asian and Euro-Canadian women differ in sexual psychophysiology research participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jane S T; Brotto, Lori A; Yule, Morag A

    2010-07-01

    Evidence from studies of ethnic differences in sexual conservativeness and Papanicolaou (Pap) testing behaviors suggests that there may be culture-linked differences in rates of participation in physically invasive sexuality studies, resulting in volunteer bias. The effects of ethnicity and acculturation on participation in female psychophysiological sexual arousal research were investigated in a sample of Euro-Canadian (n = 50) and East Asian (n = 58) women. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires and were given either course credits or $10 for their participation. Participants were then informed about the opportunity to participate in a second phase of the study, which involved psychophysiological sexual arousal testing and which was completely optional. Contrary to expectations, the results showed that the East Asian women were more likely to participate in Phase 2 than the Euro-Canadian women. Among the East Asian women, greater heritage acculturation and lower mainstream acculturation predicted a lower likelihood of Phase 2 participation. The findings suggest the need to be wary of overgeneralizing female psychophysiological sexual arousal research results and may have implications for improving Pap testing behaviors in East Asian women.

  11. Why is Facebook so successful? Psychophysiological measures describe a core flow state while using Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Maurizio; Cipresso, Pietro; Balgera, Anna; Villamira, Marco; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    People are more and more using social networking sites (SNSs) like Facebook and MySpace to engage with others. The use of SNSs can have both positive and negative effect on the individual; however, the increasing use of SNSs might reveal that people look for SNSs because they have a positive experience when they use them. Few studies have tried to identify which particular aspects of the social networking experience make SNSs so successful. In this study we focus on the affective experience evoked by SNSs. In particular, we explore whether the use of SNSs elicits a specific psychophysiological pattern. Specifically, we recorded skin conductance, blood volume pulse, electroencephalogram, electromyography, respiratory activity, and pupil dilation in 30 healthy subjects during a 3-minute exposure to (a) a slide show of natural panoramas (relaxation condition), (b) the subject's personal Facebook account, and (c) a Stroop and mathematical task (stress condition). Statistical analysis of the psychophysiological data and pupil dilation indicates that the Facebook experience was significantly different from stress and relaxation on many linear and spectral indices of somatic activity. Moreover, the biological signals revealed that Facebook use can evoke a psychophysiological state characterized by high positive valence and high arousal (Core Flow State). These findings support the hypothesis that the successful spread of SNSs might be associated with a specific positive affective state experienced by users when they use their SNSs account.

  12. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours - Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Hartl, Verena; Kallus, K Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees' well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms) of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level) to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees.

  13. The psychophysiological assessment method for pilot's professional reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L M; Yu, L S; Wang, K N; Jing, B S; Fang, C

    1997-05-01

    Previous research has shown that a pilot's professional reliability depends on two relative factors: the pilot's functional state and the demands of task workload. The Psychophysiological Reserve Capacity (PRC) is defined as a pilot's ability to accomplish additive tasks without reducing the performance of the primary task (flight task). We hypothesized that the PRC was a mirror of the pilot's functional state. The purpose of this study was to probe the psychophysiological method for evaluating a pilot's professional reliability on a simulator. The PRC Comprehensive Evaluating System (PRCCES) which was used in the experiment included four subsystems: a) quantitative evaluation system for pilot's performance on simulator; b) secondary task display and quantitative estimating system; c) multiphysiological data monitoring and statistical system; and d) comprehensive evaluation system for pilot PRC. Two studies were performed. In study one, 63 healthy and 13 hospitalized pilots participated. Each pilot performed a double 180 degrees circuit flight program with and without secondary task (three digit operation). The operator performance, score of secondary task and cost of physiological effort were measured and compared by PRCCES in the two conditions. Then, each pilot's flight skill in training was subjectively scored by instructor pilot ratings. In study two, 7 healthy pilots volunteered to take part in the experiment on the effects of sleep deprivation on pilot's PRC. Each participant had PRC tested pre- and post-8 h sleep deprivation. The results show that the PRC values of a healthy pilot was positively correlated with abilities of flexibility, operating and correcting deviation, attention distribution, and accuracy of instrument flight in the air (r = 0.27-0.40, p < 0.05), and negatively correlated with emotional anxiety in flight (r = -0.40, p < 0.05). The values of PRC in healthy pilots (0.61 +/- 0.17) were significantly higher than that of hospitalized pilots

  14. Non-verbal communication of compassion: measuring psychophysiologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Shaltout, Hossam A

    2011-12-20

    Calm, compassionate clinicians comfort others. To evaluate the direct psychophysiologic benefits of non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), it is important to minimize the effect of subjects' expectation. This preliminary study was designed to a) test the feasibility of two strategies for maintaining subject blinding to non-verbal communication of compassion (NVCC), and b) determine whether blinded subjects would experience psychophysiologic effects from NVCC. Subjects were healthy volunteers who were told the study was evaluating the effect of time and touch on the autonomic nervous system. The practitioner had more than 10 years' experience with loving-kindness meditation (LKM), a form of NVCC. Subjects completed 10-point visual analog scales (VAS) for stress, relaxation, and peacefulness before and after LKM. To assess physiologic effects, practitioners and subjects wore cardiorespiratory monitors to assess respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) throughout the 4 10-minute study periods: Baseline (both practitioner and subjects read neutral material); non-tactile-LKM (subjects read while the practitioner practiced LKM while pretending to read); tactile-LKM (subjects rested while the practitioner practiced LKM while lightly touching the subject on arms, shoulders, hands, feet, and legs); Post-Intervention Rest (subjects rested; the practitioner read). To assess blinding, subjects were asked after the interventions what the practitioner was doing during each period (reading, touch, or something else). Subjects' mean age was 43.6 years; all were women. Blinding was maintained and the practitioner was able to maintain meditation for both tactile and non-tactile LKM interventions as reflected in significantly reduced RR. Despite blinding, subjects' VAS scores improved from baseline to post-intervention for stress (5.5 vs. 2.2), relaxation (3.8 vs. 8.8) and peacefulness (3.8 vs. 9.0, P non-tactile LKM. It is possible to test the

  15. Stress in crisis managers: evidence from self-report and psychophysiological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Fischer, L; Perakakis, P; Guerra, P; Duschek, S

    2015-12-01

    Directing disaster operations represents a major professional challenge. Despite its importance to health and professional performance, research on stress in crisis management remains scarce. The present study aimed to investigate self-reported stress and psychophysiological stress responses in crisis managers. For this purpose, 30 crisis managers were compared with 30 managers from other disciplines, in terms of self-reported stress, health status and psychophysiological reactivity to crisis-related and non-specific visual and acoustic aversive stimuli and cognitive challenge. Crisis managers reported lower stress levels, a more positive strain-recuperation-balance, greater social resources, reduced physical symptoms, as well as more physical exercise and less alcohol consumption. They exhibited diminished electrodermal and heart rate responses to crisis-related and non-specific stressors. The results indicate reduced stress and physical complaints, diminished psychophysiological stress reactivity, and a healthier life-style in crisis managers. Improved stress resistance may limit vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and facilitate preparedness for major incidents.

  16. Integrated application of health improving methods of Pilates and Bodyflex for improving psychophysiological possibilities of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.L. Kozina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the effect of complex application procedures Bodyflex and Pilates using information and communication technology on the level of psycho-physiological capabilities of students. Material: the study involved 46 university students. Research methods - physiological (speed detection of simple and complex reactions in different modes of testing, the level of functional mobility and strength of the nervous system, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: the positive effect on the level of the developed technique psychophysiological capacities of students. The application of the developed technique in the experimental group showed a significant decrease in the latency time of a simple visual-motor reaction time latent complex visual-motor reaction time test run "level of functional mobility of nervous processes" in feedback mode. Found that the use of Bodyflex and Pilates promotes strength of nervous processes. Conclusions: the recommended use in the learning process of students of complex techniques of Pilates Bodyflex using information and communication technologies, increased levels of psychophysiological features, mobility and strength of the nervous processes.

  17. Orienting-defense responses and psychophysiological reactivity in isolated clinic versus sustained hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vera, María Paz; Sanz, Jesús; Labrador, Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether patients with white-coat or isolated clinic hypertension (ICH) show, in comparison to patients with sustained hypertension (SH), a defense response pattern to novel stimuli and an enhanced psychophysiological reactivity to stress. Forty-three patients with essential hypertension were divided into two groups after 16 days of self-monitoring blood pressure (BP): ICH (24 men; self-measured BP men; self-measured BP >or= 135/85 mmHg). Defense responses were measured as the cardiac changes to phasic non-aversive auditory stimuli. Psychophysiological reactivity (heart and breath rate, blood volume pulse, electromyography, and skin conductance) was measured during mental arithmetic and video game tasks. The standard deviation of self-measured BPs and the difference between mean BPs at work and at home were used as indicators of cardiovascular reactivity to daily stress. No significant differences were seen in defense responses or psychophysiological reactivity to laboratory or naturally occurring stressors. These results do not support the hypothesis that ICH can be explained in terms of a generalized hyperreactivity to novel or stressful stimuli.

  18. Optimism moderates psychophysiological responses to stress in older people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Perez, S; Hackett, R A; Salvador, A; Steptoe, A

    2017-04-01

    Optimism is thought to be beneficial for health, and these effects may be mediated through modifications in psychophysiological stress reactivity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with reduced cardiovascular responses to stress and heightened cortisol over the day. This study assessed the relationships between optimism, stress responsivity, and daily cortisol output in people with T2D. A total of 140 participants with T2D were exposed to laboratory stress. Heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and cortisol were measured throughout the session. Cortisol output over the day was also assessed. Optimism and self-reported health were measured using the revised Life Orientation Test and the Short Form Health Survey. Optimism was associated with heightened SBP and DBP stress reactivity (ps Optimism was not related to HR, cortisol stress responses, or the cortisol awakening response (ps > .180). Low optimism was related to poorer self-reported physical and mental health (ps Optimism could have a protective role in modulating stress-related autonomic and neuroendocrine dysregulation in people with T2D. © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Scientific review of psychophysiological detection of deceit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Areh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological detection of deceit has been in the centre of attention in the recent decade, which correlates with heightened security challenges of a modern world. The article provides scientific discussion about polygraph that is used in criminal investigation. Two most employed polygraph techniques are critically presented, examined and compared: the Comparison Question Test (CQT and the Concealed Information Test (CIT. Theoretical foundations, objectivity and standardization of testing procedures, ethical and practical issues are analysed. Proponents of the Comparison Question Test have not been successful in their efforts to resolve fundamental problems and limitations with which the technique is challenged. It remains unstandardized and unscientific, separated from science and mainly without attempts to escape from the dead-end. The most influential theoretical backgrounds of CQT technique are examined; however, none of them represents a satisfactory scientific foundation of the technique. Without being scientifically grounded in a verifiable theory, it remains controversial and caught into self-sufficiency, mostly supported by methodologically questionable research findings gained by proponents. To the contrary, the Concealed Information Test is associated with fast development, particularly in the field of neurology, and is considered to be less disputed and to be partly supported by a sound scientific ground. Applying the Concealed Question Test, somewhat naïve and disputable detection of lies typical of the Comparison Question Test is replaced by a search for information that lies concealed in the suspects’ memory. However, the Concealed Information Test also has been challenged by serious deficiencies, which bring forward a question about justification of the use of the polygraph.

  20. Psychophysiological correlates of aggression and violence: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J

    2008-08-12

    This paper reviews existing psychophysiological studies of aggression and violent behaviour including research employing autonomic, electrocortical and neuroimaging measures. Robust physiological correlates of persistent aggressive behaviour evident in this literature include low baseline heart rate, enhanced autonomic reactivity to stressful or aversive stimuli, enhanced EEG slow wave activity, reduced P300 brain potential response and indications from structural and functional neuroimaging studies of dysfunction in frontocortical and limbic brain regions that mediate emotional processing and regulation. The findings are interpreted within a conceptual framework that draws on two integrative models in the literature. The first is a recently developed hierarchical model of impulse control (externalizing) problems, in which various disinhibitory syndromes including aggressive and addictive behaviours of different kinds are seen as arising from common as well as distinctive aetiologic factors. This model represents an approach to organizing these various interrelated phenotypes and investigating their common and distinctive aetiologic substrates. The other is a neurobiological model that posits impairments in affective regulatory circuits in the brain as a key mechanism for impulsive aggressive behaviour. This model provides a perspective for integrating findings from studies employing different measures that have implicated varying brain structures and physiological systems in violent and aggressive behaviour.

  1. [Effects of Different Genres of Music on the Psycho-Physiological Responses of Undergraduates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chen; Lin, Mei-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Undergraduate students face tremendous stressors from learning, interpersonal relationships, and life. Stress may cause adaptation exhaustion and stress-related disorders. While the results of recent clinical studies indicate that music interventions may alleviate stress, there is a dearth of research exploring the discrete effects of various genres of music on psycho-physiological status. To explore the effects of listening to different genres of music on the psycho-physiological responses of undergraduates. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used. A total of 122 undergraduates were assigned to the following four music subgroups according to their musical preference: joyful, tense, sad, and peaceful. Students in each subgroup listened to the self-selected music for 15 minutes during the experiment. A physiological data acquisition systems, the State Anxiety Inventory, and the Visual Analogue Scale for anxiety and depression were used to measure the psycho-physiological responses of participants before, during, and after music listening. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed using SPSS 20.0. Results: Depression significantly decreased in the peaceful music group compared to the sad music group after the intervention. Further, significant differences in heart rate variability were identified during the intervention among the groups. The change in low frequency (LF) in the joyful music group was lower than the other three groups; the change in high frequency (HF) in the peaceful music group was lower than in the tension and joyful music groups; and the change in LF/HF in the peaceful music group was lower than in the sad and joyful music groups. Additionally, the subsamples with high state anxiety experienced more change in HF while listening to tense music than to peaceful music, reflecting an upward trend after listening for 10 minutes. The findings indicate that listening to different genres of music induces different psycho-physiological

  2. [Psychophysiological support for the professional activities of servicemen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogodin, Iu I; Novikov, V S; Bochenkov, A A

    1998-11-01

    Optimal solution of the personnel replenishment problem, the necessity of training and education process improvement in the training centers and schools, the outcome of social, psychological and medical measures greatly depend on the overall physical and mental health state of the servicemen and their professional training quality. On the basis of their long standing experience the authors discuss the traits of the psychophysiological maintenance of the military professional activities of servicemen, in particular--the methodology and theory of professional psychological selection, the importance of body functional indications for the estimation of the fighting capabilities of military units. They examine some prospects for the psychophysiological expertise in the promotion procedures of commanding officers and make a suggestion that psychophysiological maintenance in the Armed Forces would increase its combat capabilities and help to avoid some negative effects in military groups.

  3. Transformative Learning: Patterns of Psychophysiologic Response and Technology-Enabled Learning and Intervention Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Psychophysiologic Response and Technology -Enabled Learning and Intervention Systems PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Leigh W. Jerome, Ph.D...NUMBER Transformative Learning : Patterns of Psychophysiologic Response and Technology - Enabled Learning and Intervention Systems 5b. GRANT NUMBER...project entitled “Transformative Learning : Patterns of Psychophysiologic Response in Technology Enabled Learning and Intervention Systems.” The

  4. Biosorption of Cd(II) and Zn(II) by nostoc commune: isotherm and kinetics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsy, Fatthy M. [Faculty of Science, Botany Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Hassan, Sedky H.A. [Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Koutb, Mostafa [Faculty of Science, Botany Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Umm Al-Qura University, Faculty of Applied Science, Biology Department, Mecca (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-15

    In this study, Nostoc commune (cyanobacterium) was used as an inexpensive and efficient biosorbent for Cd(II) and Zn(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The effect of various physicochemical factors on Cd(II) and Zn(II) biosorption such as pH 2.0-7.0, initial metal concentration 0.0-300 mg/L and contact time 0-120 min were studied. Optimum pH for removal of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was 6.0, while the contact time was 30 min at room temperature. The nature of biosorbent and metal ion interaction was evaluated by infrared (IR) technique. IR analysis of bacterial biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of Cd(II) and Zn (II). The maximum biosorption capacities for Cd(II) and Zn(II) biosorption by N. commune calculated from Langmuir biosorption isotherm were 126.32 and 115.41 mg/g, respectively. The biosorption isotherm for two biosorbents fitted well with Freundlich isotherm than Langmuir model with correlation coefficient (r{sup 2} < 0.99). The biosorption kinetic data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, this study indicated that the N. commune is an efficient biosorbent for the removal of Cd(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Description of psychophysiological indexes of students of different sporting specializations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barybina L.N.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Information of the psychophysiological testing of students of technical institute of higher of different sporting specializations is considered. In research took part 159 students of specialization football, sambo, volleyball, basketball, aerobics, boxing, heavy athletics. The psychophysiological testing is given by possibility to choose the proper sporting specialization students for the best realization of the personality qualities. Positive attitude of students is marked toward employments on physical education. The increase of self-appraisal and improvement of health of students is also marked.

  6. Differential psychophysiological effects of operant and cognitive behavioural treatments in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, K; Turk, D C; Gracely, R H; Flor, H

    2016-10-01

    Determination of psychophysiological effects of operant behavioural (OBT) and cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for fibromyalgia patients. One hundred and fifteen female patients randomized to OBT (N = 43), CBT (N = 42), or whole-body infrared heat (IH) (N = 30) were compared before and after group treatment as well as at 6- and 12-month follow-ups using intent-to-treat analysis (12 drop-outs). Thirty matched pain-free controls (CON) served as reference group for the initial psychophysiological analysis. Surface electromyogram (EMG), blood pressure, heart rate (HR) and skin conductance levels (SCL) were continuously recorded during adaptation, baseline, social conflict, mental arithmetic and relaxation tasks. At baseline, fibromyalgia patients showed higher SCL and HR, lower diastolic blood pressure and EMG in comparison to controls. OBT and CBT compared to IH significantly reduced pain intensity [OBT: effect size (ES) = 1.21 CI: 0.71-1.71, CBT: ES = 1.23, CI: 0.72-1.74]. OBT increased diastolic blood pressure [ES = 1.13, CI: 0.63-1.63 and CBT reduced SCL (ES) = -0.66, CI: -1.14-0.18] 12 months after treatment. Both CBT and OBT significantly increased EMG levels (OBT: ES = 0.97, CI: 0.48-1.46, CBT: ES = 1.17, CI: 0.67-1.68). In contrast, the IH group did not show any significant changes in the psychophysiological parameters. Increased diastolic blood pressure and decreased pain after OBT suggest a reactivation of baroreflex-mechanisms in fibromyalgia and a normalization of the blood pressure and pain functional relationship. Reduced SCL following CBT may indicate reduced general arousal levels. Increased muscle tension after CBT and OBT suggest a normalization of physical parameters. The reduction in pain seems to be mediated by different psychophysiological processes, providing support for mechanism-based treatments might be indicated for CBT and OBT. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: Differential physiological stress responses followed different

  7. Synthesis, spectral, thermal and antimicrobial studies on cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and palladium(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawaf, Ayman K.; El-Essawy, Farag; Nassar, Amal A.; El-Samanody, El-Sayed A.

    2018-04-01

    The coordination characteristic of new N4-morpholinyl isatin-3-thiosemicarbazone (HL) towards Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pd(II) has been studies. The structures of the complexes were described by elemental analyses, molar conductivity, magnetic, thermal and spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR and ESR) studies. On the basis of analytical and spectral studies the ligand behaves as monobasic tridentate ONS donor forming two five membered rings towards cobalt, copper and palladium and afforded complexes of the kind [M(L)X], (Mdbnd Co, Cu or Pd; Xdbnd Cl, Br or OAc). Whereas the ligand bound to NiCl2 as neutral tridentate ONS donor and with ZnCl2 as neutral bidentate NS donor. The newly synthesized thiosemicarbazone ligand and some of its complexes were examined for antimicrobial activity against 2 gram negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli Pseudomonas and aeruginosa), 2 gram positive bacterial strains (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus)} and two Pathogenic fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans). All metal complexes possess higher antimicrobial activity comparing with the free thiosemicarbazone ligand. The high potent activities of the complexes may arise from the coordination and chelation, which tends to make metal complexes act as more controlling and potent antimicrobial agents, thus hindering the growing of the microorganisms. The antimicrobial results also show that copper bromide complex is better antimicrobial agent as compared to the Schiff base and its metal complexes.

  8. [Role of some psycho-physiological factors on driving safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergomi, M; Vivoli, G; Rovesti, S; Bussetti, P; Ferrari, A; Vivoli, R

    2010-01-01

    Within a research project on the role played by human factors on road accidents, the aim of the present study is to evaluate, in young adults, the relationships between driver behaviour and personality factors as well as to assess the neuroendocrine correlates of psychological and behavioural factors investigated. Another aim is to estimate in what measure the performance levels are affected by demographic, psychological and chronobiological variables. It has been found a positive relation between highway code violations, extroversion trait of personality and Sensation Seeking scores, so confirming that this component of personality can affect risky behaviour. Furthermore the subjects more oriented to morningness chronotype were found to be prone to adopt safe driving behaviour. Regarding the relations of the neuroendocrine parameters and driving behaviour a positive correlation was observed between dopamine levels and frequency of driving violations while a negative relationship was found between adrenaline levels and frequency of driving errors. In conclusion the identification of psycho-physiological variables related to driving risky behaviour might be a useful instrument to design traffic safety programs tailored to high risk subjects.

  9. Radioiodination of melagenine-II with I-125 (preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caso, R.; Ruiz, M.

    1996-01-01

    Radioiodination of Melagenine-II with I-125 farmacokinetic studies was made, using Chloramine-T method. Radiochemical purity and stability of the labelled product were determined by radiochromatography. The labelled Melagenine-II showed two radioactive fractions

  10. Adsorption study of cadmium (II) and lead (II) on radish peels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, J.; Shafique, U.; Salman, M.; Zaman, W.; Memoona, M.

    2009-01-01

    The removal efficiency of heavy metals like Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by adsorption on Raphanus sativus (Radish peels) has been studied. The effects of time, pH, concentration of adsorbent and agitation speed on adsorption have been evaluated. It is found that radish peels powder has high removal efficiency for both the metals. Batch adsorption study has shown that Cd(II) and Pb(II) has been removed up to 88% and 86% respectively. Adsorption equilibriums for both metals have been described by the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum amount of heavy metals (Q ) adsorbed at max equilibrium were 7.5 and 1.23 mg/g for Cd(II) and Pb(II) respectively as evaluated by Langmuir isotherm. It is concluded that waste materials like radish peels can be used for removal of heavy metals from aqueous streams. (author)

  11. Preparation of Schiff s base complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) and their spectroscopic, magnetic, thermal, and antifungal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, H.M.; Patel, M.N.

    2006-01-01

    The potassium salt of salicylidene-DL-alanine (KHL), bis(benzylidene)ethylenediamine (A 1 ), thiophene-o-carboxaldene-p-toluidine (A 2 ), and its metal complexes of the formula [(M II (L)(A)(H 2 O)] (M=Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II); A = A 1 or A 2 ) are prepared. They are characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, and infrared and electronic spectral studies. The electronic spectral and magnetic moment data suggest an octahedral geometry for the complexes. All of these complexes, metal nitrates, fungicides (bavistin and emcarb), and ligands are screened for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Aspergillus flavus using a plate poison technique. The complexes show higher activity than those of the free ligands, metal nitrate, and the control (DMSO) and moderate activity against bavistin and emcarb [ru

  12. Psycho-physiologic emergentism; four minds in a body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Rowland

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mind-body problem represents one of the most debated topics in the neurosciences. From a psychological standpoint, abstract/non-material data are an intrinsic part of the mind, intervening to a large extent in reasoning and decision making processes. Imaging studies also show a strong correlation between higher cognitive functions (such as working memory and specific cerebral brain regions (a fronto-parietal network of interacting left and right brain areas. In contrast, the physical/material brain would be unable to interact with abstract-immaterial data, such that the psychological processing of abstract data (processes such as thinking, reasoning, and judgment is attributed to the mind, with the mind representing a distinct entity interposed between the brain and abstract-immaterial data. Recent data suggest that the mind-body problem may simply be an artifact of human experience/ understanding, as the brain actually represents actually an intrinsic part of the mind. Even if the physical brain is not able to interact with abstract mental data, the brain still could process abstract data through a dynamic association between the abstract data and cerebral stimuli/ impulses. This form of processing without interaction defines the mind as a complex neurobiological structure, with the unconscious part of the mind processing abstract-immaterial data in a conscious/ mental format. In this overview, important concepts of psycho-physiologic emergentism, including internal mental reality, internal mental existence, internal mental interaction, and structural and informational dichotomies of the brain, are iterated. Such concepts/properties represent a neuro-informational support system capable of generating four distinct minds within the single brain. Future studies should further develop the dynamic and immaterial-material nature of the mind, as a possible premise for a scientific definition and understanding of mental events like affectivity

  13. Physicians' psychophysiological stress reaction in medical communication of bad news: A critical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Regina Katharina; Danuser, Brigitta; Gomez, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Stress is a common phenomenon in medical professions. Breaking bad news (BBN) is reported to be a particularly distressing activity for physicians. Traditionally, the stress experienced by physicians when BBN was assessed exclusively using self-reporting. Only recently, the field of difficult physician-patient communication has used physiological assessments to better understand physicians' stress reactions. This paper's goals are to (a) review current knowledge about the physicians' psychophysiological stress reactions in BBN situations, (b) discuss methodological aspects of these studies and (c) suggest directions for future research. The seven studies identified all used scenarios with simulated patients but were heterogeneous with regard to other methodological aspects, such as the psychophysiological parameters, time points and durations assessed, comparative settings, and operationalisation of the communication scenarios. Despite this heterogeneity, all the papers reported increases in psychological and/or physiological activation when breaking bad news in comparison to control conditions, such as history taking or breaking good news. Taken together, the studies reviewed support the hypothesis that BBN is a psychophysiologically arousing and stressful task for medical professionals. However, much remains to be done. We suggest several future directions to advance the field. These include (a) expanding and refining the conceptual framework, (b) extending assessments to include more diverse physiological parameters, (c) exploring the modulatory effects of physicians' personal characteristics (e.g. level of experience), (d) comparing simulated and real-life physician-patient encounters and (e) combining physiological assessment with a discourse analysis of physician-patient communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress and strain of short haul bus drivers: psychophysiology as a design oriented method for analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, M; Springer, J; Scherff, J

    1998-05-01

    Psychophysiological measures offer objective information for workplace design according to user requirements. They are, however, rarely applied in industrial practice due to weak points from the designer's point of view, such as the differentiation of various superimposed stressors, inter-individual differences, and the effort required for data acquisition and handling. In this study a set of psychophysiological methods was used to analyse bus driver workplaces as a basis for redesign, and afterwards to evaluate design improvements. During inner-city operation bus drivers are exposed to a particular workload situation, especially due to the high density of traffic and bus stops. Their job is characterized by highly frequent and often simultaneous task execution, performed with a compulsory body posture and under exposure to vibration and noise. To reduce the workload related to the equipment and tasks of bus driving, a research project was initiated to design a new driver workplace that meets the specific ergonomic requirements of the drivers. A detailed workload analysis, consisting of a task analysis, a strain analysis derived from ECG measures and an eye movement analysis was performed during public bus driving in different cities and with different drivers and bus types. Although the results have to be considered as somewhat limited owing to the methodological restraints and conditions of a field study, they provided valuable guidance for design. A new concept for the driver cabin was created based on this database. After installation, this design was evaluated by similar psychophysiological measures. Comparison of the pre- and post results indicates that the redesigned work station reduced workload levels.

  15. Face cognition in humans: Psychophysiological, developmental, and cross-cultural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernorizov A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigators are finding increasing evidence for cross-cultural specificity in face cognition along with individual characteristics. The functions on which face cognition is based not only are types of general cognitive functions (perception, memory but are elements of specific mental processes. Face perception, memorization, correct recognition of faces, and understanding the information that faces provide are essential skills for humans as a social species and can be considered as facets of social (cultural intelligence. Face cognition is a difficult, multifaceted set of processes. The systems and processes involved in perceiving and recognizing faces are captured by several models focusing on the pertinent functions or including the presumably underlying neuroanatomical substrates. Thus, the study of face-cognition mechanisms is a cross-disciplinary topic. In Russia, Germany, and China there are plans to organize an interdisciplinary crosscultural study of face cognition. The first step of this scientific interaction is conducting psychological and psychophysiological studies of face cognition in multinational Russia within the frame of a grant supported by the Russian Science Foundation and devoted to “cross-cultural tolerance”. For that reason and in the presence of the huge diversity of data concerning face cognition, we suggest for discussion, specifically within the psychological scientific community, three aspects of face cognition: (1 psychophysiological (quantitative data, (2 developmental (qualitative data from developmental psychology, and (3 cross-cultural (qualitative data from cross-cultural studies. These three aspects reflect the different levels of investigations and constitute a comprehensive, multilateral approach to the problem. Unfortunately, as a rule, neuropsychological and psychological investigations are carried out independently of each other. However, for the purposes of our overview here, we assume that the

  16. Psychophysiological correlates of relaxation induced by standard autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, N; Kubota, S; Nagata, S

    1999-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the psychophysiological changes induced in subjects by standard autogenic training (AT). Physiological measurements were taken under strict experimental conditions. Thirty-one healthy students were divided randomly into two groups: the AT group and the control group. In the first session, the physiological variables were measured for all students before and after all were asked to relax in their own way. The AT group were then taught AT for 3 months, after which time the measurements were repeated. In the second session, the AT group practised the standard AT exercise, while the control group repeated their own form of simple relaxation. Electrocardiogram, plethysmogram (PTG) and blood pressure (BP) were measured while the students carried out a breathing rate of 15 cycles/min. The R-R intervals and BP were analysed by an autoregressive model for spectral analysis, and the data were compared by repeated-measures ANOVA. The AT group had a significant increase in the mean R-R interval and a significant decrease in the baseline deflection of the PTG in the second session. There were no significant changes in sympathetic activity except for the change in the PTG, although low frequency amplitude of systolic BP decreased slightly. AT was found to induce significant changes that were independent of respiration in healthy students, although paced breathing might have operated as a mental stress. The increase in mean R-R interval and the decrease in baseline deflection of the PTG were the most robust correlates of AT.

  17. Neurological and psychophysiological sequelae following different treatments of craniopharyngioma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavazzuti, V.; Fischer, E.G.; Welch, K.; Belli, J.A.; Winston, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present neurological findings and data from psychophysiological tests administered during the follow-up period of 35 patients with craniopharyngioma. Group I patients who were treated by irradiation alone or by radiotherapy and conservative surgical procedures (including biopsy, cyst aspiration, and shunting), showed significantly less frontal lobe and visual perceptual dysfunction than Group II patients, in whom radical tumor resection was attempted by a subfrontal exposure. Frontal lobe dysfunction was demonstrated in sorting tests by perseverative responses, inflexibility of behavior, and lack of inhibitory control, while intelligence quotients remained relatively unaffected. Immediate memory defects and decreased manual dexterity were present, to different degrees, in both treatment groups. On the basis of these preliminary data and a maximum follow-up period of 10 years, the authors conclude that primary irradiation of a craniopharyngioma appears associated with a lower morbidity rate and may avoid the frontal lobe disorders seen in the patients with extensive tumor resection

  18. Psychophysiological responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine J M de Brouwer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stress management interventions may prove useful in preventing the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study assessed the effects of a stress management intervention on the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short-term stress management training, performed a standardized psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST 1 week after the stress management training and at a 9-week follow-up. Psychological and physical functioning, and the acute psychophysiological response to the stress test were assessed. RESULTS: Patients in the intervention group showed significantly lower psychological distress levels of anxiety after the training than did the controls. While there were no between-group differences in stress-induced tension levels, and autonomic (α-amylase or endocrine (cortisol responses to the stress test 1 week after the intervention, levels of stress-induced tension and cortisol were significantly lower in the intervention group at the 9-week follow-up. Overall, the response to the intervention was particularly evident in a subgroup of patients with a psychological risk profile. CONCLUSION: A relatively short stress management intervention can improve psychological functioning and influences the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with RA, particularly those psychologically at risk. These findings might help understand how stress can affect health and the role of individual differences in stress responsiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: TrialRegister.nl NTR1193.

  19. Capturing Cultural Glossaries: Case-study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matete Madiba

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT: This case-study attempts to present a brief glossary of Northern Sotho medical terms. It is a follow-up of a similar case-study (Madiba, Mphahlele and Kganyago 2003, which was an attempt to capture and present Northern Sotho cooking terms. Case-study I consists of the names for utensils, ingredients and the processes involved in the preparation of cultural dishes. With both these case-studies, the intention has been to use the opportunities availing themselves for the pres-ervation and valorisation of Northern Sotho, including the extension of its corpora to support national dictionary-making processes. The case-study methodology has been very useful for the purposes of this project and the context within which it was undertaken. It aims to provide a model for the collection and presentation of authentic Northern Sotho terminology which otherwise would hardly have been accessible.

    Keywords: CULTURAL GLOSSARY, INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS, CORPUS, OUTCOMES-BASED EDUCATION, ASSESSMENT CRITERIA, TRADITIONAL MEDICAL TERMS, COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH, STRUCTURAL APPROACH, METONYMY, HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES, TASK-BASED LEARNING

    *****

    OPSOMMING: Die totstandbrenging van kulturele woordversamelings: Ge-vallestudie II. Hierdie gevallestudie probeer om 'n beperkte woordelys van Noord-Sotho- mediese terme aan te bied. Dit is 'n voortsetting van 'n soortgelyke gevallestudie (Madiba, Mpha-hlele en Kganyago 2003 wat 'n poging was om Noord-Sothokookterme te versamel en aan te bied. Gevallestudie I bestaan uit die name van gereedskap, bestanddele, en die prosesse betrokke by die voorbereiding van kulturele geregte. Met altwee hierdie gevallestudies was die bedoeling om die geleenthede te gebruik wat hulleself aanbied vir die bewaring en bestendiging van Noord-Sotho, insluitende die uitbreiding van sy korpora om die nasionale woordeboeksamestellingsprosesse te ondersteun. Die gevallestudiemetodologie was baie nuttig vir die doeleindes van

  20. Exploration of changes in the brain response to sleep-related pictures after cognitive–behavioral therapy for psychophysiological insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seog Ju; Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Nambeom; Kim, Soohyun; Choi, Jae-Won; Park, Juhyun; Gwak, Ah Reum; Kang, Chang-Ki; Kang, Seung-Gul; Jeong, Do-Un

    2017-01-01

    Psychophysiological insomnia (PI) includes arousal to sleep-related stimuli (SS), which can be treated by cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). The present study was an exploratory, prospective intervention study that aimed to explore brain response to visual SS in PI before and after CBT-I. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal differences in response to SS and neutral stimuli (NS) were compared between 14 drug-free PI patients and 18 good sleepers (GS) using functional mag...

  1. Synthesis and studies on Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) complexes of Knoevenagel β-diketone ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, S.; Tharmaraj, P.; Sheela, C. D.; Anitha, C.

    2012-11-01

    Transition metal complexes of various acetylacetone based ligands of the type ML [where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II); L = 3-(aryl)-pentane-2,4-dione] have been synthesized. The structural features have been derived from their elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance, IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, Mass and ESR spectral studies. Conductivity measurements reveal that all the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. Spectroscopic and other analytical data of the complexes suggest octahedral geometry for other metal(II) complexes. The redox behavior of the copper(II) complexes have been studied by cyclic voltammetry. The free ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro biological activities against the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as well as the fungus Candida albicans by well diffusion method. The zone of inhibition value indicates that the most of the metal(II) complexes are found to possess increased activities compared to those of the free ligands. All synthesized compounds may serve as potential photoactive materials as indicated from their characteristic fluorescence properties. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the ligands (L1-L3) was found to be considerable effect than that of urea and KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate).

  2. Using Psychophysiological Sensors to Assess Mental Workload During Web Browsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Molina, Angel; Retamal, Cristian; Lira, Hernan

    2018-02-03

    Knowledge of the mental workload induced by a Web page is essential for improving users' browsing experience. However, continuously assessing the mental workload during a browsing task is challenging. To address this issue, this paper leverages the correlation between stimuli and physiological responses, which are measured with high-frequency, non-invasive psychophysiological sensors during very short span windows. An experiment was conducted to identify levels of mental workload through the analysis of pupil dilation measured by an eye-tracking sensor. In addition, a method was developed to classify mental workload by appropriately combining different signals (electrodermal activity (EDA), electrocardiogram, photoplethysmo-graphy (PPG), electroencephalogram (EEG), temperature and pupil dilation) obtained with non-invasive psychophysiological sensors. The results show that the Web browsing task involves four levels of mental workload. Also, by combining all the sensors, the efficiency of the classification reaches 93.7%.

  3. The mind and sexuality: Introduction to a Psychophysiological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Rowland; Ion G. Motofei

    2015-01-01

    Cognition and sexuality are two distinct relational functions that are partially interconnected through our mind. Even though medical sciences have progressed substantially over the past decades, the current understanding of the mind psycho-physiology is yet at an early stage. As an example, the “mind-body problem” draws attention to the fact that fundamental aspects related to the understanding of the mind are still unresolved. Thus, it continues to be unclear how abstract ideas and thoughts...

  4. Psychophysiology of arterial baroreceptors and the etiology of hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Rau, Harald; Elbert, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are sensitive to blood pressure dependent blood vessel dilation. They play a key role in the short term regulation of blood pressure. Their impact on psychological and psychophysiological aspects is of increasing interest. The review focuses on experimental techniques for the controlled baroreceptor manipulation. Results from the application of these techniques show that baroreceptor activation influences the cardiovascular system as well as central nervous functioning:...

  5. Psycho-physiological characteristics of students-powerlifters of different training experience, who have affections of muscular skeletal apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Lobko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study of many years’ power lifting trainings influence on psycho-physiological and other characteristics of students, who have affections of muscular skeletal apparatus. Material: the research covered 73 students of 18-22 yrs. Age, who have different training experience. To exclude influence of previous training on experiment’s results, researches were conducted after 2-3 days of rest. The author studied personality’s features (by T. Elers. Psychological diagnostic was conducted by methodic of M.V. Makarenko. Results: different psycho-physiological characteristics, indicators of psychological state and personality’s features were found in students, depending on their power lifting training experience. Improvement of functional and nervous power indicators under influence of systemic power lifting trainings was detected. Conclusions: it was determined that improvement of students’ sportsmanship is accompanied by noticeable improvement of practically all tested indicators.

  6. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions using mushrooms: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimala, R., E-mail: vimararagu@yahoo.co.in [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Das, Nilanjana [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-08-30

    Sorption capacity of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus platypus), button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and milky mushroom (Calocybe indica) were evaluated on biosorption of heavy metals, viz. cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions. The optimum sorption conditions were studied for each metal separately. The desired pH of the aqueous solution was found to be 6.0 for the removal of cadmium (II) and 5.0 for removal of lead (II) for all the mushrooms. The percent removal of both the metals was found to increase with the increase in biosorbent dosage and contact time. The fitness of the biosorption data for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models was investigated. It was found that biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions onto the biomass of the three mushrooms were better suitable to Langmuir than Freundlich adsorption model. P. platypus showed the highest metal uptake potential for cadmium (q{sub max} 34.96 mg/g) whereas A. bisporus exhibited maximum potential for lead (q{sub max} 33.78 mg/g). Milky mushroom showed the lowest metal uptake capacity for both the metals. The present data confirms that mushrooms may be used as efficient biosorbent for the removal of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  7. PISC II: Parametric studies. Monitoring of PISC-II parametric studies in ultrasonic NDT for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toft, M.W.

    1989-09-01

    The CEGB NDT Applications Centre is partipating in the EEC-funded international Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC) on account of its relevance to the inspection of Sizewell B and future PWRs. This report describes an inspection monitoring exercise undertaken by NDTAC under partial funding from JRC Ispra, at the initiation of the PISC-III Ultrasonic Modelling Group. Experimental studies have been carried out under PISC-II to investigate ultrasonic defect response as a function of various parameters which characterise the inspection situation. Some of these parametric studies are potentially useful for the validation of theoretical models of ultrasonic inspection and are consequently relevant to the work of the PISC-III Modelling Group. The aim of the present exercise was to ensure that data obtained by the various contract organizations participating in the PISC-II Parametric Studies was of high quality, was a complete record of the inspection and would yield valid comparisons with the predictions of theoretical models. The exercise entailed visits by a nominated CEGB observer to 4 European NDT Laboratories at which the parametric studies were in progress; CISE (Milan); UKAEA (Harwell); UKAEA (Risley) and Vincotte (Brussels). This report presents the findings of those visits

  8. Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of Icariin and Icariside II in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To explore the pharmacokinetic properties of icariin (ICA and icariside II (ICA II following intragastric and intravenous administration in rats, a rapid and sensitive method by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS/MS was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of ICA and ICA II in rat plasma. The quantification was performed by using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions m/z 677.1/531.1 for ICA, 515.1/369.1 for ICA II and 463.1/301.1 for diosmetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (IS. The assay showed linearity over the concentration range of 1.03–1032 ng/mL, with correlation coefficients of 0.9983 and 0.9977. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were within 15%. The lower limit of quantification for both ICA and ICA II was 1.03 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery of ICA and ICA II was more than 86.2%. The LC-MS/MS method has been successfully used in the pharmacokinetic studies of ICA and ICA II in rats. The results indicated that 91.2% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after oral administration by rats, whereas only 0.4% of ICA was transformed into ICA II after intravenous administration. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of ICA and ICA II after oral administration revealed that the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were 3.8 and 13.0 times higher, respectively, than those of ICA. However, after intravenous administration, the Cmax and AUC0–t of ICA II were about only 12.1% and 4.2% of those of ICA. These results suggest that ICA and ICA II have distinct pharmacokinetic properties, and the insights obtained facilitate future pharmacological action studies.

  9. Some recriticality studies with SIMMER-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The SIMMER-II code was applied to the problem of evaluating the potential for recriticality in an LMFBR HCDA. The phenomenology examined was based on the post SAS3D behavior in a CRBR LOF accident. The SIMMER-II results were found to be sensitive to the development of fuel blockages. If blockages were formed close to the core, the core-disruption phase of the behavior resulted from the significant energy required following SAS3D termination to raise the average steel temperature to saturation conditions; also material deposition near heat sinks eliminated condensation surfaces and induced core pressurization and fuel collapse. Excessive ramp rates (greater than $100/s) were judged to be unlikely, but improved knowledge and calculational treatments of the applicable phenomenology would be desirable

  10. Equilibrium Sorption Studies of Hg (II) Ions from Aqueous Solution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of swamp arum (Lasimorpha senegalensis) seeds as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Hg (II) ions from aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The influence of initial metal concentration on the percent adsorption of Hg (II) ions onto powdered swamp arum seeds was studied in a batch system ...

  11. The influence of social stress on time perception and psychophysiological reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hedger, Kathryne; Necka, Elizabeth A; Barakzai, Anam K; Norman, Greg J

    2017-05-01

    Time perception is a fundamental component of everyday life. Although time can be measured using standard units, the relationship between an individual's experience of perceived time and a standard unit is highly sensitive to context. Stressful and threatening stimuli have been previously shown to produce time distortion effects, such that individuals perceive the stimuli as lasting for different amounts of time as compared to a standard unit. As a highly social species, humans are acutely sensitive to social stressors; however, time distortion effects have not been studied in the context of social stress. We collected psychophysiological (electrocardiogram and impedance cardiography) and time perception data before, during, and after a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test for 42 participants. Based on prior theories and evidence from the time perception literature, we hypothesized that experiencing a stressful event would result in time distortion. This hypothesis was supported by the data, with individuals on average reproducing short and long duration negative and positive stimuli as lasting longer after experiencing social stress, t(41) = -3.55, p = .001, and t(41) = -4.12, p social stress. These findings are in line with some other studies of time distortion, and provide evidence for the interoceptive salience model of time perception. Implications for mechanisms of time distortion are discussed. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Psychophysiological activation during preparation, performance, and recovery in high- and low-anxious music students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Regina Katharina; Danuser, Brigitta; Wild, Pascal; Hildebrandt, Horst; Gomez, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive view of (a) the time dynamics of the psychophysiological responding in performing music students (n = 66) before, during, and after a private and a public performance and (b) the moderating effect of music performance anxiety (MPA). Heart rate (HR), minute ventilation (VE), and all affective and somatic self-report variables increased in the public session compared to the private session. Furthermore, the activation of all variables was stronger during the performances than before or after. Differences between phases were larger in the public than in the private session for HR, VE, total breath duration, anxiety, and trembling. Furthermore, while higher MPA scores were associated with higher scores and with larger changes between sessions and phases for self-reports, this association was less coherent for physiological variables. Finally, self-reported intra-individual performance improvements or deteriorations were not associated with MPA. This study makes a novel contribution by showing how the presence of an audience influences low- and high-anxious musicians' psychophysiological responding before, during and after performing. Overall, the findings are more consistent with models of anxiety that emphasize the importance of cognitive rather than physiological factors in MPA.

  13. Home Versus Away Competition: Effect on Psychophysiological Variables in Elite Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Brian; Morgan, Kevin A; Baker, Julien S; Cardinale, Marco; Davies, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of game venue and starting status on precompetitive psychophysiological measures in elite rugby union. Saliva samples were taken from players (starting XV, n = 15, and nonstarters, n = 9) on a control day and 90 min before 4 games played consecutively at home and away venues against local rivals and league leaders. Precompetition psychological states were assessed using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2. The squad recorded 2 wins (home) and 2 losses (away) over the study period. Calculated effect sizes (ESs) showed higher pregame cortisol- (C) and testosterone- (T) difference values before all games than on a baseline control day (ES 0.7-1.5). Similar findings were observed for cognitive and somatic anxiety. Small between-venues C differences were observed in starting XV players (ES 0.2-0.25). Conversely, lower home T- (ES 0.95) and higher away C- (ES 0.6) difference values were observed in nonstarters. Lower T-difference values were apparent in nonstarters (vs starting XV) before home games, providing evidence of a between-groups effect (ES 0.92). Findings show an anticipatory rise in psychophysiological variables before competition. Knowledge of starting status appears a moderating factor in the magnitude of player endocrine response between home and away games.

  14. Psychophysiological states and special performance of boxers with different styles of fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Aksutin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The style of the fight is one of the important factors that affect the quality of the arts in boxing. Particularly important factor in the modern boxing are the mental processes that are involved in forecasting and analyzing the situation that arises in the ring and are associated with cognitive functions. Purpose - to examine the psychophysiological state and a special performance for skilled boxers with different styles of input match. Material : 22 highly qualification boxer aged 18-23 years were studies. The absolute and the relative strength of serial and single strikes were studied. Definition of special performance and power strokes performed on a special simulator. Recorded the absolute and relative strength of serial and single strikes. Results : The results show that the attacking style of the fight in boxing is accompanied by the presence of a high level of efficiency, reduction of fatigue, anxiety, and depending on the condition of vegetative functions. Showed a reduction in the growth of autonomy and heteronomy in the structure of psycho-physiological state of boxers with the attacking style of the fight, which indicates the presence of compromise and avoidance of external failures. Conclusions : Boxers with attacking style of fight characterized by high values of the left side impact forces and reduce the values of the right direct strike force, compared with boxers protective style of fight.

  15. De-individualized psychophysiological strain assessment during a flight simulation test—Validation of a space methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Bernd; Salnitski, Vyacheslav; Soll, Henning; Rauch, Melina; Hoermann, Hans-Juergen

    For the evaluation of an operator's skill reliability indicators of work quality as well as of psychophysiological states during the work have to be considered. The herein presented methodology and measurement equipment were developed and tested in numerous terrestrial and space experiments using a simulation of a spacecraft docking on a space station. However, in this study the method was applied to a comparable terrestrial task—the flight simulator test (FST) used in the DLR selection procedure for ab initio pilot applicants for passenger airlines. This provided a large amount of data for a statistical verification of the space methodology. For the evaluation of the strain level of applicants during the FST psychophysiological measurements were used to construct a "psychophysiological arousal vector" (PAV) which is sensitive to various individual reaction patterns of the autonomic nervous system to mental load. Its changes and increases will be interpreted as "strain". In the first evaluation study, 614 subjects were analyzed. The subjects first underwent a calibration procedure for the assessment of their autonomic outlet type (AOT) and on the following day they performed the FST, which included three tasks and was evaluated by instructors applying well-established and standardized rating scales. This new method will possibly promote a wide range of other future applications in aviation and space psychology.

  16. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours – Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Hartl, Verena; Kallus, K. Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees’ well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms) of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level) to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees. PMID:29379452

  17. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours – Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Wagner-Hartl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees’ well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees.

  18. Creation of virtual reality stimulus for a psychophysiological body balance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Alatalo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Tero Alatalo1, Martti Juhola1, Veikko Surakka1,2, Timo Tossavainen11Department of Computer Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; 2Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, FinlandAbstract: Virtual reality methods and equipment can be used to create stimulations for several psychophysiological measurements. Such stimulations can be flexibly modified and their versatility is wide; in principle even such could be prepared that are not possible in the real physical world like virtual flying in the space. For the generation of virtual reality stimulations we constructed a three-dimensional (3D graphics engine to measure body balance variations in response to emotional stimulation. The stimulation was implemented as a virtual reality scene, where the subject watched a street view with a human figure approaching the subject at a constant speed. The functioning of the system was tested by measuring body balance variations while the approaching figure’s facial expression was angry, neutral, or happy. The results showed that our young, healthy subjects were slightly, but still statistically significantly affected by the stimulation of the approaching figure. Thus, the whole system offers a tool for controlled experimental studies for analyzing body balance, for example, during stimulating approach-withdrawal behavior. There are several opportunities to further develop new visual psychophysiological stimulations and test forms.Keywords: virtual reality stimulations, signal analysis, body balance measurements, approachwithdrawal behavior, emotions

  19. Use of Biotechnological Devices in the Quantification of Psychophysiological Workload of Professional Chess Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Juan P; Villafaina, Santos; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; de la Vega, Ricardo; Gusi, Narcis; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier

    2018-01-19

    Psychophysiological requirements of chess players are poorly understood, and periodization of training is often made without any empirical basis. For this reason, the aim of the present study was to investigate the psychophysiological response and quantify the player internal load during, and after playing a chess game. The participant was an elite 33 year-old male chess player ranked among the 300 best chess players in the world. Thus, cortical arousal by critical flicker fusion threshold, electroencephalogram by the theta Fz/alpha Pz ratio and autonomic modulation by heart rate variability were analyzed. Data revealed that cortical arousal by critical flicker fusion threshold and theta Fz/alpha Pz ratio increased and heart rate variability decreased during chess game. All these changes indicated that internal load increased during the chess game. In addition, pre-activation was detected in pre-game measure, suggesting that the prefrontal cortex might be preparatory activated. For these reasons, electroencephalogram, critical flicker fusion threshold and heart rate variability analysis may be highly applicable tools to control and monitor workload in chess player.

  20. Clinical, psychophysiological and psychological aspects of risk factors of periodontal disease development in clinically healthy persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Nikulina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine risk factors of periodontal disease development, psychophysiological personal types and their interrelations in clinically healthy persons. 47 first-year cadets of St.-Petersburg Military School of radio electronics have been examined. This group of respondents has been chosen by presence of such social stressor as change of place of living (97,9% cadets have arrived in St.-Petersburg from other cities and republics of the Russian Federation and strict disciplinary conditions. The research has revealed a low level of oral hygiene, cases of mild gingivitis in most respondents. The general mental state of group under study is characterized by raised level of personal anxiety and low indices of reactive anxiety. The examined group has demonstrated anxiety, tension, indecision and lowered stress stability. Clinically healthy persons are more liable to develop inflammatory and inflammatory-destructive periodontal diseases. It was possible to determine psychophysiological features correlated with physiological parameters of risk degree of periodontal diseases. It may have a great significance in defining of periodontal disease etiology and pathogenesis

  1. Role of tempo entrainment in psychophysiological differentiation of happy and sad music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalfa, Stéphanie; Roy, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre; Dalla Bella, Simone; Peretz, Isabelle

    2008-04-01

    Respiration rate allows to differentiate between happy and sad excerpts which may be attributable to entrainment of respiration to the rhythm or the tempo rather than to emotions [Etzel, J.A., Johnsen, E.L., Dickerson, J., Tranel, D., Adolphs, R., 2006. Cardiovascular and respiratory responses during musical mood induction. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 61(1), 57-69]. In order to test for this hypothesis, this study intended to verify whether fast and slow rhythm, and/or tempo alone are sufficient to induce differential physiological effects. Psychophysiological responses (electrodermal responses, facial muscles activity, blood pressure, heart and respiration rate) were then measured in fifty young adults listening to fast/happy and slow/sad music, and to two control versions of these excerpts created by removing pitch variations (rhythmic version) and both pitch and temporal variations (beat-alone). The results indicate that happy and sad music are significantly differentiated (happy>sad) by diastolic blood pressure, electrodermal activity, and zygomatic activity, while the fast and slow rhythmic and tempo control versions did not elicit such differentiations. In contrast, respiration rate was faster with stimuli presented at fast tempi relative to slow stimuli in the beat-alone condition. It was thus demonstrated that the psychophysiological happy/sad distinction requires the tonal variations and cannot be explained solely by entrainment to tempo and rhythm. The tempo entrainment exists in the tempo alone condition but our results suggest this effect may disappear when embedded in music or with rhythm.

  2. Stop Saying That It Is Wrong! Psychophysiological, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Markers of Children's Sensitivity to Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gadea, Maria Luz; Scheres, Anouk; Tobon, Carlos Andres; Damm, Juliane; Baez, Sandra; Huepe, David; Marino, Julian; Marder, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Abrevaya, Sofia; Ibanez, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental evidence suggests that children's main decision-making strategy is to avoid options likely to induce punishment. However, the cognitive and affective factors contributing to children's avoidance to high punishment frequency remain unknown. The present study explored psychophysiological, cognitive, and metacognitive processes associated with sensitivity to punishment frequency. We evaluated 54 participants (between 8 and 15 years old) with a modified Iowa Gambling Task for children (IGT-C) which included options with varying long-term profit and punishment frequencies. Skin conductance responses (SCRs) were recorded during this task. Additionally, we assessed IGT-C metacognitive knowledge, fluid intelligence, and executive functions. Participants exhibited behavioral avoidance and high anticipatory SCRs to options with high frequency of punishment. Moreover, age, IGT-C metacognitive knowledge, and inhibitory control were associated with individual differences in sensitivity to punishment frequency. Our results suggest that children's preference for infrequently punished decisions is partially explained by psychophysiological signals as well as task complexity and development of cognitive control.

  3. Predicting fatigue and psychophysiological test performance from speech for safety critical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Richard Baykaner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic systems for estimating operator fatigue have application in safety-critical environments. A system which could estimate level of fatigue from speech would have application in domains where operators engage in regular verbal communication as part of their duties. Previous studies on the prediction of fatigue from speech have been limited because of their reliance on subjective ratings and because they lack comparison to other methods for assessing fatigue. In this paper we present an analysis of voice recordings and psychophysiological test scores collected from seven aerospace personnel during a training task in which they remained awake for 60 hours. We show that voice features and test scores are affected by both the total time spent awake and the time position within each subject’s circadian cycle. However, we show that time spent awake and time of day information are poor predictors of the test results; while voice features can give good predictions of the psychophysiological test scores and sleep latency. Mean absolute errors of prediction are possible within about 17.5% for sleep latency and 5-12% for test scores. We discuss the implications for the use of voice as a means to monitor the effects of fatigue on cognitive performance in practical applications.

  4. Alcatel-Lucent Network Routing Specialist II (NRS II) Self-Study Guide Preparing for the NRS II Certification Exams

    CERN Document Server

    Warnock, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    The definitive resource for the NRS II exams—three complete courses in a book Alcatel-Lucent is a world leader in designing and developing scalable systems for service providers. If you are a network designer or operator who uses Alcatel-Lucent's 7750 family of service routers, prepare for certification as an A-L network routing specialist with this complete self-study course. You'll get thorough preparation for the NRS II exams while you learn to build state-of-the-art, scalable IP/MPLS-based service networks. The book provides you with an in-depth understanding of the protocols and tec

  5. Process optimization and mechanistic studies of lead (II): Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lead (II) accumulation potential of various biosorbent had been widely studied in the last few years, but an outstanding Pb(II) accumulating biomass still seems crucial for bringing the process to a successful application stage. This investigation describes the use of non-living biomass of Aspergillus caespitosus for ...

  6. Adsorption and thermodynamic studies of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on organofunctionalized-kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Denis Lima; Airoldi, Claudio; Sousa, Kaline S. de

    2008-01-01

    Kaolinite-bearing clay samples from Perus, Sao Paulo state, Brazil, were used for chemical modification process with dimethyl sulfoxide and organofunctionalized with the silyating agent (RO) 3 Si(CH 2 ) 3 NH(CH 2 ) 2 NH 2 in the present study. The resulting material and natural kaolinite were subjected adsorpion process with Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and controlated temperature of 298 K. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm model has been applied to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the chemical modification process increases the basal spacing of the natural kaolinite from 0.711 to 0.955 nm. The energetic effects caused by Cu(II) and Zn(II) interactions were determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant

  7. Neurochemical and structural markers in the brain predicting best choice-of-treatment in patients with schizophrenia - The Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia II (PECANS II) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kasper; Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Sigvard, Anne Mette

    Background: Insufficient treatment response to dopaminergic antipsychotics constitutes a major challenge in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia and seems to be related to persistently high levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate. Excess glutamate is neurotoxic and may cause the progress......Background: Insufficient treatment response to dopaminergic antipsychotics constitutes a major challenge in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia and seems to be related to persistently high levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate. Excess glutamate is neurotoxic and may cause...... subgroup with good treatment response. Materials and methods: PECANS II is a prospective follow-up study of 60 initial antipsychotic naïve patients with schizophrenia and 60 matched healthy controls. Brain levels of glutamate are measured with proton magnetic resonance imaging (1H-MRS), dopaminergic...... rating scales. All examinations are performed before and after 6 weeks’ treatment with a partial dopamine agonist (aripiprazole), and further after 6 months and 2 years. Patients are also examined with neuropsychological and psychophysiological test batteries as part of co-operating projects. Results...

  8. Spectral, thermal, electrochemical and analytical studies on Cd(II) and Hg(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asmy, A. A.; El-Gammal, O. A.; Saleh, H. S.

    2008-11-01

    The coordination characteristic of the investigated thiosemicarbazones towards hazard pollutants, Cd(II) and Hg(II), becomes the first goal. Their complexes have been studied by microanalysis, thermal, electrochemical and spectral (electronic, IR and MS) studies. The substitutent (salicylaldehyde, acetophenone, benzophenone, o-hydroxy- p-methoxybenzophenone or diacetylmonoxime) plays an important role in the complex formation. The coordination sites were the S for thiosemicarbazide (HTS); NN for benzophenone thiosemicarbazone (HBTS); NS for acetophenone thiosemicarbazone (HATS) and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H 2STS); NNS or NSO for diacetylmonoxime thiosemicarbazone (H 2DMTS). The stability constants of Hg(II) complexes were higher than Cd(II). The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps in the complexes have been evaluated. The activation energy values of the first step ordered the complexes as: [Cd(H 2STS)Cl 2]H 2O > [Cd(H 2DAMTS)Cl 2] > [Cd(HBTS) 2Cl 2]2H 2O > [Cd(HATS) 2Cl 2]. The CV of [Cd(H 2STS)Cl 2]H 2O and [Hg(HBTS)Cl 2] were recorded. The use of H 2DMTS as a new reagent for the separation and determination of Cd(II) ions from water and some synthetic samples using flotation technique is aimed to be discussed.

  9. Studies on Manganese (II), Cobalt (II) and Cadmium (II) complexes with L-Cystine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M. Alamgir; Ahmed, A.H. Moinuddin; Iqbal, M. Monocheher

    1995-01-01

    A study has been carried out to prepare the manganese, cobalt and cadmium complexes of L-cystine using the metal salts and lithium cystinate. The crystalline 1:1 stoichiometric complexes with the empirical formulae of [Mn(SCH 2 CHNH 2 COO) 2 ], [Co(SCH 2 CHNH 2 COO) 2 ] and [Cd(SCH 2 CHNH 2 COO) 2 ] are obtained from the reaction of equimolar amount of the corresponding metal ions and ligand in aqueous solution. The complexes have been characterized by chemical analyses, infrared and ultraviolet spectra, magnetic measurements, optical and thermal decomposition methods. Studies show that L-cystine behaves as tetradentate ligand forming chelates with metal ions where the bonding sites of the ligand are the carboxylate O and the amino N atoms. 15 refs., 2 tables, 3 figs (author)

  10. Studies of heat transport to forced-flow He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Kashani, A.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of heat transport to forced-flow He II are reported. The work is pertinent to the transfer of He II in space. An analytical model has been developed that establishes a condition for two-phase flow to occur in the transfer line. This condition sets an allowable limit to the heat leak into the transfer line. Experimental measurements of pressure drop and flow meter performances indicate that turbulent He II can be analyzed in terms of classical pressure drop correlations

  11. Clinical Benefits of Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease in the Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Koike, Makoto; Sato, Kota; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nakano, Yumiko; Abe, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefits of memantine, depending on the baseline cognitive and affective conditions in real world dementia clinics, have not been completely examined. We performed the "Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II)" to retrospectively evaluate the clinical effects of memantine monotherapy (n = 38) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using seven batteries to assess dementia at the baseline, at 3, 6, and 12 months. Additionally, we divided 163 AD patients treated with memantine into two subgroups depending on the baseline cognitive score of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE): the MMSE OMS II showed that memantine monotherapy improved BPSD until 12 months. The higher baseline cognitive subgroup (MMSE ≥15) and the worse baseline BPSD subgroup were expected to show better effects with memantine.

  12. Studies of mn (ii) and ni (ii) complexes with schiff base derived from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, manganese(II) complex is insoluble in most organic solvents but soluble in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO). The molar conductance of the complexes measured are, indicating their non-electrolytic nature. The potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of the complex compounds revealed 1:1 metal to ligand ratio.

  13. Studies of Mn (II) and Ni (II) complexes with Schiff base derived from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, manganese(II) complex is insoluble in most organic solvents but soluble in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO). The molar conductance of the complexes measured are low, indicating their non-electrolytic nature. The potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of the complex compounds revealed 1:1 metal to ligand ...

  14. [Psychophysiology of sports addiction (exercises addiction)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshchekov, S G; Lushnikov, O N

    2011-01-01

    Addiction is a prevalent and growing concern in all aspects of our modern society. There are considerable concerns for the growing frequency of addictions to drugs, alcohol, gambling, eating, and even sex. Though exercise is generally accepted as a positive behaviour that has many benefits associated with enhanced physical and psychological wellbeing, there is an increasing awareness that exercise addiction is becoming a common phenomenon. Theories regarding how exercise can become addictive, and studies of withdrawal from exercise are reviewed. Several physiological mechanisms, including endogenous opioids, catecholamines, functional asymmetry of brain activity and thermoregulation have been implicated in exercise dependence.

  15. Confinement studies in the TJ-II stellarator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alejaldre, C.; Alonso, J.; Almoguera, L.; Ascasibar, E.; Baciero, A.; Balbin, R.; Blaumoser, M.; Botija, J.; Branas, B.; De La Cal, E.; Cappa, A.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Cepero, J. R.; Cremy, C.; Delgrado, J. M.; Doncel, J.; Dulya, C.; Estrada, T.; Fernandez, A.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, J. A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Krivenski, V.; Labrador, I.; Lapayese, F.; Likin, K.; Linier, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; de la Luna, E.; Martin, R.; Martinez, A.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Medrano, M.; Mendez, P.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; van Milligen, B.; Ochando, M.; Pacios, L.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M. A.; de la Pena, A.; Portas, A.; Qin, J.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Salas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tabares, F.; Tafalla, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Vega, J.; Zurro, B.; Akulina, D.; Fedyanin, O. I.; Grebenshchikov, S.; Kharchev, N.; Meshcheryakov, A.; Sarksian, K. A.; Barth, R.; van Dijk, G.; van der Meiden, H.

    1999-01-01

    ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heated plasmas have been studied in the low magnetic shear TJ-II stellarator (R = 1.5 m, a < 0.22 m, B = 1 T, f = 53.2 GHz, P-ECRH = 300 kW, power density = 1-25 W cm(-3)). Recent experiments have explored the flexibility of the TJ-II across a wide range of

  16. No psychophysiological interactions between caffeine and stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenfratz, M; Bättig, K

    1992-01-01

    In earlier studies, the predominantly beta-adrenergic effects of mental tasks and the alpha-adrenergic effects of caffeine on cardiovascular functions were observed to be simply additive without interaction. In the present study, annoying electrical shocks were superimposed on a mental task affording either active coping, which specifically raises beta-adrenergic activation, or passive coping, and the 40 female subjects were preselected so as to differ in subjective stress susceptibility. Caffeine as well as the type of coping and the considered personality dimension produced significant effects, but almost no interactions were obtained. The stress resistant subjects, who tended toward more extraversion, emotional stability and more masculinity, had lower anxiety scores, rated their performance higher and had a greater cardiac output than the stress non-resistant subjects, who represented a rather normal population according to the FPI personality dimensions. Caffeine increased EEG alpha and beta frequency and delta power and decreased beta power, raised blood pressure and enhanced stress reactions in respiration amplitude and pre-ejection period. Active stress coping induced greater stress reactions in heart rate (increase), left ventricular ejection time (decrease) and ear pulse arrival time (decrease) than passive coping.

  17. Psychophysiological correlates of affects in human olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensafi, M; Rouby, C; Farget, V; Bertrand, B; Vigouroux, M; Holley, A

    2002-11-01

    Pleasantness and arousal have been identified as the main dimensions of affective responses to environment. Pleasantness is defined as the degree of favorable feelings a subject can experience under given circumstances. Arousal is defined as the degree of excitement (general activation) the subject feels under these circumstances. In visual and auditory modalities, many studies using measures such as facial electromyographic (EMG) activity and skin conductance (SC) have found those parameters to vary as a function of either pleasantness or arousal: for example, facial corrugator EMG activity covaries with the pleasantness dimension, while SC increases together with arousal. The first objective of this research is to study the possible covariation between peripheral measures and pleasantness/arousal in olfaction. We also examined the effect of odor intensity on facial and autonomic variations. The second objective was to investigate whether odors could evoke verbally specific emotions (e.g. joy, anger, fear, surprise, disgust or sadness) and also induce specific patterns of peripheral responses. Participants were exposed to 12 different odors while their facial and autonomic parameters were recorded, and estimated their intensity, pleasantness, and arousal capacity. Then, they chose between seven words for emotions (fear, anger, sadness, surprise, neutral, joy or disgust) to describe their reaction to the odor. As in vision, olfactory pleasantness covaries (negatively) with facial activity of the corrugator muscle, and arousal (positively) with skin conductance. No relationships were observed between physiological changes and variations in perceived intensity. Results also showed that emotions of "disgust" and "joy" were more frequently evoked verbally than any other emotions, and that only facial EMG activity distinguishes them (e.g. "disgust" vs. "joy" and "neutral state"). The results are discussed in terms of possible existence of two brain systems (defensive

  18. Synthesis, spectral characterization thermal stability, antimicrobial studies and biodegradation of starch–thiourea based biodegradable polymeric ligand and its coordination complexes with [Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, and Zn(II] metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nishat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A biodegradable polymer was synthesized by the modification reaction of polymeric starch with thiourea which is further modified by transition metals, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II. All the polymeric compounds were characterized by (FT-IR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, 13C NMR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectra, magnetic moment measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and antibacterial activities. Polymer complexes of Mn(II, Co(II and Ni(II show octahedral geometry, while polymer complexes of Cu(II and Zn(II show square planar and tetrahedral geometry, respectively. The TGA revealed that all the polymer metal complexes are more thermally stable than their parental ligand. In addition, biodegradable studies of all the polymeric compounds were also carried out through ASTM-D-5338-93 standards of biodegradable polymers by CO2 evolution method which says that coordination decreases biodegradability. The antibacterial activity was screened with the agar well diffusion method against some selected microorganisms. Among all the complexes, the antibacterial activity of the Cu(II polymer–metal complex showed the highest zone of inhibition because of its higher stability constant.

  19. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  20. Children with disrupted attachment histories: Interventions and psychophysiological indices of effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterkenburg Paula S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diagnosis and treatment of children affected by disruptions of attachment (out of home placement, multiple changes of primary caregiver is an area of considerable controversy. The possible contribution of psychobiological theories is discussed in three parts. The first part relates the attachment theoretical perspective to major psychobiological theories on the developmental associations of parent-child relationships and emotional response. The second part reviews studies of autonomic reactivity and HPA-axis activity with foster children, showing that foster children show more reactivity within physiological systems facilitating fight or flight behaviours rather than social engagement, especially foster children with atypical attachment behaviour. The third part is focused on treatment of children suffering from the consequences of disrupted attachment, based on a psychotherapy study with psychophysiological outcome measures. Implications are discussed for theory, diagnosis, and intervention.

  1. Psychophysiological responses to imagined infidelity: the specific innate modular view of jealousy reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C R

    2000-06-01

    Three studies measured psychophysiological reactivity (heart rate, blood pressure, and electrodermal activity) while participants imagined a mate's infidelity. The specific innate modular theory of gender differences in jealousy hypothesizes that men are upset by sexual infidelity and women are upset by emotional infidelity, because of having faced different adaptive challenges (cuckoldry and loss of a mate's resources, respectively). This view was not supported. In men, sexual-infidelity imagery elicited greater reactivity than emotional-infidelity imagery. But, sexual imagery elicited greater reactivity even when infidelity was not involved, suggesting that the differential reactivity may not specifically index greater jealousy. In two studies with reasonable power, women did not respond more strongly to emotional infidelity. Moreover, women with committed sexual relationship experience showed reactivity patterns similar to those of men. Hypothetical infidelity self-reports were unrelated to reactivity.

  2. Psychophysiology of proactive and reactive relational aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Holterman, Leigh Ann; Breslend, Nicole L; Sullivan, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the joint effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity to social and non-social stressors on proactive (i.e., goal-directed, unemotional) and reactive (i.e., emotional, impulsive) functions of relational aggression. Two hundred and forty-seven (M age =18.77years) participants completed a series of stressor tasks while their sympathetic arousal (i.e., skin conductance) and parasympathetic arousal (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia) were assessed. Participants also provided self-reports of their aggressive behavior. In the standardized social stressor only, physiological reactivity was related to aggression, such that respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation predicted proactive relational aggression whereas heightened skin conductance reactivity predicted reactive relational aggression. Finally, in the context of low skin conductance reactivity, respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation was related to heightened proactive and reactive aggression, whereas respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal was protective. Results suggest that the benefits hypothesized to accompany respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal may only occur among individuals with low "fight or flight" stress responses. Findings extend research on the physiological indicators of aggression to relational aggression, and highlight the importance of assessing functions of aggression, as well as physiological reactivity to multiple stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Music and psychophysiological recovery from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radstaak, Mirjam; Geurts, Sabine A E; Brosschot, Jos F; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2014-09-01

    This experimental study examined whether listening to self-chosen music after stress exposure improves mood, decreases subjective arousal and rumination, and facilitates cardiovascular recovery. Participants (N = 123) were exposed to a mental arithmetic task with harassment to induce stress. Afterward, participants were randomly assigned to one of four "recovery" conditions where they (1) listened to self-chosen relaxing music, (2) listened to self-chosen happy music, (3) listened to an audio book, or (4) sat in silence. After this 5-minute "recovery manipulation period," participants sat in silence for another 5 minutes. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were continuously measured. The recovery conditions caused differences in positive affect (F(3,119) = 13.13, p music or happy music. The conditions showed no differences in subjective arousal (F(3,117) = 2.03, p = .11) and rumination (F(3,119) = 1.10, p = .35). Systolic blood pressure recovery, however, differed between the conditions (linear time trend: F(3,116) = 4.50, p = .005; quadratic time trend: F(3,115) = 5.24, p = .002). Listening to both relaxing and happy music delayed systolic blood pressure recovery when compared with both control conditions. Listening to self-selected music is an effective mood enhancer, but it delays blood pressure recovery.

  4. Conceptual design study on inertial confinement reactor ''SENRI-II''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Ouura, H.

    1983-01-01

    Design features of a laser fusion reactor concept SENRI-II are reviewed and discussed. A conceptual design study of the ICF reactor SENRI-II (an advanced design of SENRI-I) has been carried out over 2 years in the Research Committee of ICF Reactors, Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. While the ICF reactor SENRI-I utilized a magnetic field to guide and control an inner liquid lithium flow, SENRI-II is designed to use porous metal as the liquid lithium flow guide. In the design of SENRI-II, a metal porous lithium blanket serves as the protection of a wall against fusion products and as wall per se. Because of the separation of these two functions, a high power density can be attained

  5. Influence of Fragrances on Human Psychophysiological Activity: With Special Reference to Human Electroencephalographic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fragrances such as perfumes and room fresheners on the psychophysiological activities of humans has been known for a long time, and its significance is gradually increasing in the medicinal and cosmetic industries. A fragrance consists of volatile chemicals with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da that humans perceive through the olfactory system. In humans, about 300 active olfactory receptor genes are devoted to detecting thousands of different fragrance molecules through a large family of olfactory receptors of a diverse protein sequence. The sense of smell plays an important role in the physiological effects of mood, stress, and working capacity. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that various fragrances affected spontaneous brain activities and cognitive functions, which are measured by an electroencephalograph (EEG. The EEG is a good temporal measure of responses in the central nervous system and it provides information about the physiological state of the brain both in health and disease. The EEG power spectrum is classified into different frequency bands such as delta (0.5–4 Hz, theta (4–8 Hz, alpha (8–13 Hz, beta (13–30 Hz and gamma (30–50 Hz, and each band is correlated with different features of brain states. A quantitative EEG uses computer software to provide the topographic mapping of the brain activity in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital brain regions. It is well known that decreases of alpha and beta activities and increases of delta and theta activities are associated with brain pathology and general cognitive decline. In the last few decades, many scientific studies were conducted to investigate the effect of inhalation of aroma on human brain functions. The studies have suggested a significant role for olfactory stimulation in the alteration of cognition, mood, and social behavior. This review aims to evaluate the available literature regarding the influence of fragrances on the

  6. Influence of Fragrances on Human Psychophysiological Activity: With Special Reference to Human Electroencephalographic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowndhararajan, Kandhasamy; Kim, Songmun

    2016-01-01

    The influence of fragrances such as perfumes and room fresheners on the psychophysiological activities of humans has been known for a long time, and its significance is gradually increasing in the medicinal and cosmetic industries. A fragrance consists of volatile chemicals with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da that humans perceive through the olfactory system. In humans, about 300 active olfactory receptor genes are devoted to detecting thousands of different fragrance molecules through a large family of olfactory receptors of a diverse protein sequence. The sense of smell plays an important role in the physiological effects of mood, stress, and working capacity. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that various fragrances affected spontaneous brain activities and cognitive functions, which are measured by an electroencephalograph (EEG). The EEG is a good temporal measure of responses in the central nervous system and it provides information about the physiological state of the brain both in health and disease. The EEG power spectrum is classified into different frequency bands such as delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (30–50 Hz), and each band is correlated with different features of brain states. A quantitative EEG uses computer software to provide the topographic mapping of the brain activity in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital brain regions. It is well known that decreases of alpha and beta activities and increases of delta and theta activities are associated with brain pathology and general cognitive decline. In the last few decades, many scientific studies were conducted to investigate the effect of inhalation of aroma on human brain functions. The studies have suggested a significant role for olfactory stimulation in the alteration of cognition, mood, and social behavior. This review aims to evaluate the available literature regarding the influence of fragrances on the

  7. Contact psychophysiological and neural functions with technical and tactical readiness volleyball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.D. Glazyrin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Set the level of neural development, psycho-physiological functions in highly skilled volleyball players. Defined technical and tactical preparedness highly skilled volleyball players in the competitive period of the annual cycle of training. The study involved six masters of sport and 8 candidates for the master of sports. That the quality of play activities and the successful execution of technical elements depend on functional mobility, strength and reactivity of nerve processes, associative thinking, memory and attention. The results, which may have a prognostic value. It is shown that the neurodynamic functions are genetically determined. It is recommended to use them for the initial recruitment and selection stages for sports improvement. The necessity influence the types of thinking, memory and attention in the training process of volleyball players.

  8. Psychophysiologic responsivity in posttraumatic stress disorder: generalized hyperresponsiveness versus trauma specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casada, J H; Amdur, R; Larsen, R; Liberzon, I

    1998-11-15

    Clinically, subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are viewed as hyperresponsive to a variety of stimuli. Psychophysiologic studies, however, have demonstrated hyperresponsiveness only to stimuli that are closely related to the original trauma. This set of experiments uses a variety of stimuli that vary in trauma-relatedness, arousal level, sensory modality stimulated, and degree of cognitive processing demanded to assess the extent of generalization of physiologic responses. Heart rate (HR), frontal electromyogram (EMG), and skin conductance (EDG) responses were measured during presentation of each stimulus. PTSD subjects (n = 15) had an elevated baseline EDG and increased HR and EMG responses to the trauma-related stimulus (combat sounds) compared to normal control subjects (n = 11) and combat control subjects (n = 10). No significant differences were noted between PTSD and control groups in response to non-trauma-related arousing stimuli. These results suggest that the physiologic hyperresponsivity of PTSD subjects is limited to stimuli closely associated with the inciting trauma.

  9. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoni, Matteo; Codrons, Erwan; Marin, Luca; Correale, Luca; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim

    2016-01-01

    Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (psession were less pleasant than those during moderate session (ptraining sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior.

  10. The effect of musical experience on emotional self-reports and psychophysiological responses to dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacherie, Delphine; Roy, Mathieu; Hugueville, Laurent; Peretz, Isabelle; Samson, Séverine

    2011-03-01

    To study the influence of musical education on emotional reactions to dissonance, we examined self-reports and physiological responses to dissonant and consonant musical excerpts in listeners with low (LE: n=15) and high (HE: n=13) musical experience. The results show that dissonance induces more unpleasant feelings and stronger physiological responses in HE than in LE participants, suggesting that musical education reinforces aversion to dissonance. Skin conductance (SCR) and electromyographic (EMG) signals were analyzed according to a defense cascade model, which takes into account two successive time windows corresponding to orienting and defense responses. These analyses suggest that musical experience can influence the defense response to dissonance and demonstrate a powerful role of musical experience not only in autonomic but also in expressive responses to music. Copyright © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. [NEUROSEMANTIC AND PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF RHYTHM-SUGGESTIVE CORRECTION OF STRESS CONDITIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, I B; Ivanov, A V; Kvasovets, S V; Bubeev, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    Correlates of successful rhythm-suggestive compensation of stress in sportsmen with neurotic symptoms developed in consequence of painful experience of failure were studied. Effectiveness of the rhythm-suggestive and rational psychological methods was compared by measuring the evoked potentials response to emotionally significant extramental verbal stimuli and images, and using psychophysiological test MASTER to track dynamics of a number of body functional parameters. The rational compensation has been shown to reduce the psychic tension and to set right the voluntary control process. Rhythm-suggestive programs are good for compensation of post-stress emotions and affectations, and the involuntary control process. It was found that correction potentialities of the rhythm-suggestive programs together with the psychodiagnostic advantages of test MASTER are promising instruments for dynamic monitoring of the mental state with the aim to prevent workplace stresses and to provide rehabilitation treatment of aftermaths.

  12. Thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Štejfa, Vojtěch; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, Květoslav; Červinka, Ctirad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • (−)-Borneol, (−)-camphor, (±)-camphene, and (+)-fenchone were studied. • New thermodynamic data were measured and calculated. • Most of thermodynamic data are reported for the first time. - Abstract: A thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes, (−)-borneol, (−)-camphor, (±)-camphene, and (+)-fenchone is presented in this work. The vapor pressure measurements were performed using the static method over the environmentally important temperature range from (238 to 308) K. Heat capacities of condensed phases were measured by Tian–Calvet calorimetry in the temperature interval from (258 to 355) K. The phase behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) from subambient temperatures up to the fusion temperatures. The thermodynamic properties in the ideal-gas state were calculated by combining statistical thermodynamic and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculated ideal-gas heat capacities and experimental data for vapor pressures and condensed phase heat capacities were treated simultaneously to obtain a consistent thermodynamic description

  13. Elliptical cross section fuel rod study II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, H.; Marajofsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper it is continued the behavior analysis and comparison between cylindrical fuel rods of circular and elliptical cross sections. Taking into account the accepted models in the literature, the fission gas swelling and release were studied. An analytical comparison between both kinds of rod reveals a sensible gas release reduction in the elliptical case, a 50% swelling reduction due to intragranular bubble coalescence mechanism and an important swelling increase due to migration bubble mechanism. From the safety operation point of view, for the same linear power, an elliptical cross section rod is favored by lower central temperatures, lower gas release rates, greater gas store in ceramic matrix and lower stored energy rates. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. РSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ORPHANS AND CHILDREN WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. А. Киселева

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the psychological and psychophy-siological characteristics of children living in the Children’s Village-SOS and in the Children’s Home. Particular emotional and cognitive areas, self image, creativity, mental stress and neurotic tendencies in orphans and children without parental care are characterized in the article. Age and gender differences in the parameters studied are detected.Purpose. The purpose is to discoverage and gender aspects of the psychological and psychophysiological characteristics of children of orphans and children without parental care living in the Children’s Village-SOS and in the Children’s Home.Methodology. Empirical research of gender particular features of psychic state of alarmness of adopted children with the help of testing.Results. The significant gender differences in terms of phobias and fears were revealed; the significant gender differences on the scale of the emotional content of images were revealed; the study revealed the trends toward significant difference by gender in the manifestation of sleep disorders and autonomic dysfunction;the significant age-related differences in terms of increased anxiety, autonomic dysfunction, eating disorders were revealed.Practical implications. The results are of interest to the science workers of age psychology, gender psychology, social psychology, to the workers of the children’s institutions and to the organizations occupied with medical-social-psychological-pedagogycal maintenance of orphans and children without parental care.Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy now

  15. Assessment of Psychological and Psycho-physiological Problems Among Visually Impaired Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Mohanraj; Immanuel Selvaraj, Chinnadurai; Selvaraj, Balakrishnan; Srinivasan, Thiruvengadam

    2016-03-01

    Visual impairment tends to evoke more discomfiture than any other disability. Primarily, the biggest issue may be that blindness is visible. Furthermore, visual impairment develops serious medical, psychological, social and economic problems. The focus of the current study was to investigate the psychological and psycho physiological problems of visually impaired adolescent students. Purposive sampling was adopted to select 150 visually impaired students (71 males and 72 females) from five schools in Coimbatore city of the Tamil Nadu state, India. Anxiety, frustration, aggression and social and personal adjustment levels of the visually impaired students were measured in this study using Taylor's manifest anxiety scale, frustration test, aggression scale and the adolescent adjustment inventory, respectively. Anxiety (χ(2) = 185.66, P = 0 at P < 0.01), frustration (χ(2) = 167.23, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression (χ(2) = 57.66, P = 0 at P < 0.01) were significantly related to adjustment among visually impaired students. The adjustment score had a significant positive correlation with anxiety (r = 0.919, P = 0 at P < 0.01), frustration (r = 0.887, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression levels (r = 0.664, P = 0 at P < 0.01), anxiety was significantly correlated with frustration (r = 0. 961, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression levels (r = 0.727, P < 0.01) and frustration was significantly correlated with aggression level (r = 0. 637, P = 0 at P < 0.01) of visually impaired adolescents. There was a positive relationship between psycho-physiological disorders and anxiety frustration, aggression and adjustment among visually impaired students. Visually impaired students exhibited significant levels of psychological and psycho-physiological problems.

  16. Personal Identification and the Assessment of the Psychophysiological State While Writing a Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lozhnikov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the problem of user identification and psychophysiological state assessment while writing a signature using a graphics tablet. The solution of the problem includes the creation of templates containing handwriting signature features simultaneously with the hidden registration of physiological parameters of a person being tested. Heart rate variability description in the different time points is used as a physiological parameter. As a result, a signature template is automatically generated for psychophysiological states of an identified person. The problem of user identification and psychophysiological state assessment is solved depending on the registered value of a physiological parameter.

  17. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel

  18. Radioactivity studies. Progress report. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, N.

    1981-09-01

    The metabolism of 243 244 Cm in nine adult female baboons following intravenous injection was studied. Curium-243,244 was administered as a single injection of curium citrate in dosages of 0.053 to 0.220 μCi/kg. The behavior of 243 244 Cm at these low dosages was quantitated by external whole-body and partial-body counting, bioassay of blood, urine and feces samples, liver biopsies, and post-mortem tissues analysis. Curium-243,244 rapidly passed from the blood to other tissues. At 1 and 24 h after injection, the amounts circulating were 10% and 1%, respectively. At 24 h after injection 70% of the 243 244 Cm was located within soft tissues, probably associated with extracellular fluid; the liver alone contained 32% of the injected activity. During the first weeks the content of 243 244 Cm in soft tissues decreased sharply. As time progressed, significant deposition was noted in the liver and the skeleton. Approximately 20% of the injected activity was in the liver at 1 month with a 40 day half-time. The skeleton reached a maximum burden of 57% by 100 days; the half-time observed in bone was 4 to 16 y. During the first 24 h, 10% of the injected activity appeared in the urine decreasing to 0.1%/day at 30 days and 0.01%/day at 200 days. Fecal excretion increased reaching a maximum level at four weeks. The amount of 243 244 Cm excreted in the feces during the initial 4 to 5 months (approx. 20%) and the rate of elimination in the feces after the first month paralleled the retention in the liver indicating an hepatic-biliary-fecal pathway. A model illustrating the interaction of seven internal compartments with respect to the translocation kinetics of 243 244 Cm was derived based upon this data. Solutions of the model were derived for two specific time-related exposures

  19. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of metal complexes of Co (II), Ni (II), Cu (II), Zn (II) with sulphadimidine-benzylidene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahira, F.; Imran, M.; Iqbal, J.

    2009-01-01

    Some novel complexes of Co (II), Ni (II), Cu (II), and Zn (II) have been synthesized with a Schiff base ligand derived from sulphadimidine and benzaldehyde. The structural features of the complexes have been determined by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, conductance measurement, UV/ Vis. and infrared spectroscopy. IR studies revealed that the Schiff base ligand Sulphadimidine-benzylidene has monoanionic bidendate nature and coordinate with metal ions through nitrogen atom of azomethine (>C = N) and deprotonated -NH group. All the complexes were assigned octahedral geometry on the basis of magnetic moment and electronic spectroscopic data. Low value of conductance supports their non-electrolytic nature. The ligand, as well as its complexes were checked for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against two gram positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtillus. Staphylococcus aureus and one gram negative Salmonella typhae and five fungal strains, Nigrospora oryzae, Curvularia lunata, Drechslera rostrata, Aspergillus niger and Candida olbicans by disc diffusion method and agar plate technique, respectively. Both the antibacterial and antitungal activities of the synthesized metal complexes were found to be more as compared to parent drug and uncomplexed ligand. All the complexes contain coordinated water, which is lost at 141-160 degree C. (author)

  20. A retrospective study of Class II mixed-dentition treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heesoo; Baumrind, Sheldon; Korn, Edward L; Dugoni, Steven; Boero, Roger; Aubert, Maryse; Boyd, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To consider the effectiveness of early treatment using one mixed-dentition approach to the correction of moderate and severe Class II malocclusions. Three groups of Class II subjects were included in this retrospective study: an early treatment (EarlyTx) group that first presented at age 7 to 9.5 years (n = 54), a late treatment (LateTx) group whose first orthodontic visit occurred between ages 12 and 15 (n = 58), and an untreated Class II (UnTx) group to assess the pretreatment comparability of the two treated groups (n = 51). Thirteen conventional cephalometric measurements were reported for each group and Class II molar severity was measured on the study casts of the EarlyTx and LateTx groups. Successful Class II correction was observed in approximately three quarters of both the EarlyTx group and the LateTx group at the end of treatment. EarlyTx patients had fewer permanent teeth extracted than did the LateTx patients (5.6% vs 37.9%, P < .001) and spent less time in full-bonded appliance therapy in the permanent dentition than did LateTx patients (1.7 ± 0.8 vs 2.6 ± 0.7years, P < .001). When supervision time is included, the EarlyTx group had longer total treatment time and averaged more visits than did the LateTx group (53.1 ± 18. 8 vs 33.7 ± 8.3, P < .0001). Fifty-five percent of the LateTx extraction cases involved removal of the maxillary first premolars only and were finished in a Class II molar relationship. EarlyTx comprehensive mixed-dentition treatment was an effective modality for early correction of Class II malocclusions.

  1. Using Psychophysiological Measures to Examine the Temporal Profile of Verbal Humor Elicitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M Fiacconi

    Full Text Available Despite its pervasiveness in popular culture, there remains much to be learned about the psychological and physiological processes that underlie our experience of humor. In the present study, we examined the temporal profile of verbal humor elicitation using psychophysiological measures of heart rate (HR and facial electromyography (EMG. Consistent with recent prior research on cardiovascular changes to perceived humor, we found that HR acceleration was greater for jokes relative to non-jokes, and was positively related to the level of perceived humor elicited by these jokes. In addition, activity recorded from the zygomaticus major muscle that controls smiling was found to be greater for jokes relative to non-jokes. To link these physiological changes to the psychological processes that govern humor comprehension, we took the initial inflection point of the zygomatic EMG response as a marker for the onset of humor comprehension, and used this marker to probe the pattern of cardiovascular activity at this time-point. We estimated the onset of the humor response to occur during the initial HR deceleration phase, and found that jokes relative to non-jokes elicited a decreased HR response at this time-point. This result questions the previously forwarded notion that the psychological "moment of insight" that signals the start of the humor response is always associated with heightened cardiovascular activity. This discrepancy is discussed in relation to possible differences in the cognitive processes required to comprehend different forms of humor. At a broader level, our results also demonstrate the advantages of combining different psychophysiological measures to examine psychological phenomena, and illustrate how one such measure can constrain the interpretation of others.

  2. Using Psychophysiological Measures to Examine the Temporal Profile of Verbal Humor Elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Chris M; Owen, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    Despite its pervasiveness in popular culture, there remains much to be learned about the psychological and physiological processes that underlie our experience of humor. In the present study, we examined the temporal profile of verbal humor elicitation using psychophysiological measures of heart rate (HR) and facial electromyography (EMG). Consistent with recent prior research on cardiovascular changes to perceived humor, we found that HR acceleration was greater for jokes relative to non-jokes, and was positively related to the level of perceived humor elicited by these jokes. In addition, activity recorded from the zygomaticus major muscle that controls smiling was found to be greater for jokes relative to non-jokes. To link these physiological changes to the psychological processes that govern humor comprehension, we took the initial inflection point of the zygomatic EMG response as a marker for the onset of humor comprehension, and used this marker to probe the pattern of cardiovascular activity at this time-point. We estimated the onset of the humor response to occur during the initial HR deceleration phase, and found that jokes relative to non-jokes elicited a decreased HR response at this time-point. This result questions the previously forwarded notion that the psychological "moment of insight" that signals the start of the humor response is always associated with heightened cardiovascular activity. This discrepancy is discussed in relation to possible differences in the cognitive processes required to comprehend different forms of humor. At a broader level, our results also demonstrate the advantages of combining different psychophysiological measures to examine psychological phenomena, and illustrate how one such measure can constrain the interpretation of others.

  3. Measurement Devices and the Psychophysiology of Consumer Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzkopf, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    of the type of subjectivity that underlies consumer behaviour. I argue instead that a posthuman view of the relationship between brain, mind and behaviour underpinned neurophysiological research into consumers from its very beginning in the late nineteenth century. By tracing the biopolitical potentialities...... of neuromarketing back to the Fin-de-Siècle neurophysiological laboratory, I show that consumers' bodies and later on their brains became reconfigured as part of a dispositif made up of laboratory-based artefacts (measurement devices) and new ways of seeing the human brain and human behaviour. This dispositif......From the 1890s, psychophysiological measurement devices have played an important, but as yet under-theorized role in marketing and consumer research. Because of the recent advances made in neuromarketing, it is often assumed that these measurement devices ushered in a radically new understanding...

  4. Operationalizing Proneness to Externalizing Psychopathology as a Multivariate Psychophysiological Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lindsay D.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Bernat, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    The externalizing dimension is viewed as a broad dispositional factor underlying risk for numerous disinhibitory disorders. Prior work has documented deficits in event-related brain potential (ERP) responses in individuals prone to externalizing problems. Here, we constructed a direct physiological index of externalizing vulnerability from three ERP indicators and evaluated its validity in relation to criterion measures in two distinct domains: psychometric and physiological. The index was derived from three ERP measures that covaried in their relations with externalizing proneness the error-related negativity and two variants of the P3. Scores on this ERP composite predicted psychometric criterion variables and accounted for externalizing-related variance in P3 response from a separate task. These findings illustrate how a diagnostic construct can be operationalized as a composite (multivariate) psychophysiological variable (phenotype). PMID:20573054

  5. Kickboxing review: anthropometric, psychophysiological and activity profiles and injury epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Slimani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kickboxing is one of the modern combat sports. The psychophysiological demands of a kickboxing competition require athletes to achieve high thresholds of several aspects of physical fitness. The aim of the current review is to critically analyse and appraise the kickboxer’s anthropometric, physiological, physical and psychological attributes with the activity profile and injury epidemiology in order to provide practical recommendations for training as well as new areas of scientific research. The available information shows that both amateur and elite-level male kickboxers are characterized by a higher proportion of mesomorphy with a well-developed muscle mass and low body fat percentage. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of kickboxers, moderate to high cardio-respiratory levels are reported for these athletes. Regardless of kickboxers’ level, a high peak and mean anaerobic power output were reported. High-level kickboxing performance also requires well-developed muscle power in both the upper and lower limbs. Psychological factors contribute to success that requires high levels of self-confidence, motivation, dispositional hope and optimism, mental toughness/resiliency, and adaptive perfectionism. Psychological attributes also distinguished successful from less successful kickboxers. The activity-to-rest ratio was higher in elite (1:1 than both amateur and national-level (from 1:2 to 1:5 kickboxers, with no significant differences between rounds (round 1=1:4, and rounds 2 and 3=1:5 as well as between winners and losers in amateur and national-level simulated combats. These particular psychophysiological characteristics and performance aspects of kickboxers influence performance and could serve as guidance for training. Finally, kickboxing is characterized by chronic repetitive head trauma, which causes hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI. Future investigations into the physical, physiological and

  6. Kickboxing review: anthropometric, psychophysiological and activity profiles and injury epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabene, H; Miarka, B; Franchini, E; Chamari, K; Cheour, F

    2017-01-01

    Kickboxing is one of the modern combat sports. The psychophysiological demands of a kickboxing competition require athletes to achieve high thresholds of several aspects of physical fitness. The aim of the current review is to critically analyse and appraise the kickboxer’s anthropometric, physiological, physical and psychological attributes with the activity profile and injury epidemiology in order to provide practical recommendations for training as well as new areas of scientific research. The available information shows that both amateur and elite-level male kickboxers are characterized by a higher proportion of mesomorphy with a well-developed muscle mass and low body fat percentage. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of kickboxers, moderate to high cardio-respiratory levels are reported for these athletes. Regardless of kickboxers’ level, a high peak and mean anaerobic power output were reported. High-level kickboxing performance also requires well-developed muscle power in both the upper and lower limbs. Psychological factors contribute to success that requires high levels of self-confidence, motivation, dispositional hope and optimism, mental toughness/resiliency, and adaptive perfectionism. Psychological attributes also distinguished successful from less successful kickboxers. The activity-to-rest ratio was higher in elite (1:1) than both amateur and national-level (from 1:2 to 1:5) kickboxers, with no significant differences between rounds (round 1=1:4, and rounds 2 and 3=1:5) as well as between winners and losers in amateur and national-level simulated combats. These particular psychophysiological characteristics and performance aspects of kickboxers influence performance and could serve as guidance for training. Finally, kickboxing is characterized by chronic repetitive head trauma, which causes hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Future investigations into the physical, physiological and psychological

  7. The Portuguese long version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II (COPSOQ II) - a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Susel; Azevedo, Luís F; Fonseca, João A; Nienhaus, Albert; Nübling, Matthias; da Costa, José Torres

    2017-01-01

    Psychosocial risks are now widely recognised as one of the biggest challenges for occupational safety and health (OSH) and a major public health concern. The aim of this paper is to investigate the Portuguese long version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II (COPSOQ II), in order to analyse the psychometric properties of the instrument and to validate it. The Portuguese COPSOQ II was issued to a total of 745 Portuguese employees from both private and public organisations across several economic sectors at a baseline and then 2 weeks later. Methodological quality appraisal was based on COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) recommendations. An analysis of the psychometric properties of the long version of COPSOQ II (internal consistency, intraclass correlation coefficient, floor and ceiling effects, response rate, missing values, mean and standard deviation, exploratory factor analysis) was performed to determine the validity and reliability of the instrument. The COPSOQ II had a response rate of 60.6% (test) and a follow-up response rate of 59.5% (retest). In general, a Cronbach's alpha of the COPSOQ scales (test and retest) was above the conventional threshold of 0.70. The test-retest reliability estimated by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed a higher reliability for most of the scales, above the conventional 0.7, except for eight scales. The proportion of the missing values was less than 1.3%, except for two scales. The average scores and standard deviations showed similar results to the original Danish study, except for eight scales. All of the scales had low floor and ceiling effects, with one exception . Overall, the exploratory factor analysis presented good results in 27 scales assuming a reflective measurement model. The hypothesized factor structure under a reflective model was not supported in 14 scales and for some but not all of these scales the explanation may be a formative

  8. potentiometric studies of the complexes formed by copper (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    The overall stability constants of copper (II) and zinc (II) ions with some polar ... The average number of coordinated amino acids to the copper (II) and zinc (II) ions .... of chelated rings (Yamuchi and Odani, 1996). ... Synthesis and techniques in.

  9. Silk I and Silk II studied by fast scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebe, Peggy; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Kaplan, David L.; Wurm, Andreas; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schick, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Using fast scanning calorimetry (FSC), we investigated the glass transition and crystal melting of samples of B. mori silk fibroin containing Silk I and/or Silk II crystals. Due to the very short residence times at high temperatures during such measurements, thermal decomposition of silk protein can be significantly suppressed. FSC was performed at 2000 K/s using the Mettler Flash DSC1 on fibroin films with masses around 130–270 ng. Films were prepared with different crystalline fractions (ranging from 0.26 to 0.50) and with different crystal structures (Silk I, Silk II, or mixed) by varying the processing conditions. These included water annealing at different temperatures, exposure to 50% MeOH in water, or autoclaving. The resulting crystal structure was examined using wide angle X-ray scattering. Degree of crystallinity was evaluated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and from analysis of the heat capacity increment at the glass transition temperature. Silk fibroin films prepared by water annealing at 25 °C were the least crystalline and had Silk I structure. FTIR and FSC studies showed that films prepared by autoclaving or 50% MeOH exposure were the most crystalline and had Silk II structure. Intermediate crystalline fraction and mixed Silk I/Silk II structures were found in films prepared by water annealing at 37 °C. FSC results indicate that Silk II crystals exhibit endotherms of narrower width and have higher mean melting temperature Tm(II) = 351 ± 2.6 °C, compared to Silk I crystals which melt at Tm(I) = 292 ± 3.8 °C. Films containing mixed Silk I/Silk II structure showed two clearly separated endothermic peaks. Evidence suggests that the two types of crystals melt separately and do not thermally interconvert on the extremely short time scale (0.065 s between onset and end of melting) of the FSC experiment.

  10. A Statistical Study of Interplanetary Type II Bursts: STEREO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Magdalenic, J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kruparova, O.; Szabo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary cause of the most severe and disruptive space weather events such as solar energetic particle (SEP) events and geomagnetic storms at Earth. Interplanetary type II bursts are generated via the plasma emission mechanism by energetic electrons accelerated at CME-driven shock waves and hence identify CMEs that potentially cause space weather impact. As CMEs propagate outward from the Sun, radio emissions are generated at progressively at lower frequencies corresponding to a decreasing ambient solar wind plasma density. We have performed a statistical study of 153 interplanetary type II bursts observed by the two STEREO spacecraft between March 2008 and August 2014. These events have been correlated with manually-identified CMEs contained in the Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) catalogue. Our results confirm that faster CMEs are more likely to produce interplanetary type II radio bursts. We have compared observed frequency drifts with white-light observations to estimate angular deviations of type II burst propagation directions from radial. We have found that interplanetary type II bursts preferably arise from CME flanks. Finally, we discuss a visibility of radio emissions in relation to the CME propagation direction.

  11. Psychophysiological Manifestations Associated With Stress in Students of a Public University in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozos-Radillo, Elizabeth; Preciado-Serrano, Lourdes; Plascencia-Campos, Ana; Valdez-López, Rosa; Morales-Fernández, Armando

    2016-05-01

    Academic stress is defined as a physiological, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral activation reaction to stimuli. This stress can impact students' ability to cope with the school environment. To identify the psychophysiological manifestations associated with high-level academic stress in public university students in Mexico. A representative random sampling of 527 students was evaluated during 2012. The Academic Stress Symptom Inventory and the Rossi classification were used; data were analyzed with a binary logistic regression analysis to estimate association between psychophysiological manifestations and the high level of academic stress in public university students. Results indicated a meaningful association between high levels of academic stress situations and psychophysiological manifestations such as concentration and memory problems, mental blocks and chronic fatigue, drowsiness, and despair. Identifying academic stress situations and students' maladaptive responses may help promote timely attention to psychophysiological manifestations before they exacerbate and become harmful to college students' health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Confinement studies in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejaldre, C.; Alonso, J.; Almoguera, L.; Ascasibar, E.; Baciero, A.; Balbin, R.; Blaumoser, M.; Botija, J.; Branas, B.; Cal, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Carrasco, R.; Castejon, F.; Cepero, J.R.; Cremy, C.; Delgado, J.M.; Doncel, J.; Dulya, C.; Estrada, T.; Fernandez, A.; Fuentes, C.; Garcia, A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Jimenez, J.A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Krivenski, V.; Labrador, I.; Lapayese, F.; Likin, K.; Linier, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.; Luna, E. de la; Martin, R.; Martinez, A.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Medrano, M.; Mendez, P.; McCarthy, K.J.; Medina, F.; Milligen, B. van; Ochando, M.; Pacios, L.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Pena, A. de la; Portas, A.; Qin, J.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Salas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tabares, F.; Tafalla, D.; Tribaldos, V.; Vega, J.; Zurro, B.; Akulina, D.; Fedyanin, O.I.; Grebenshchikov, S.; Kharchev, N.; Meshcheryakov, A.; Sarksian, K.A.; Barth, R.; Dijk, G. van; Meiden, H. van der

    1999-01-01

    ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heated plasmas have been studied in the low magnetic shear TJ-II stellarator (R = 1.5 m, a ECRH = 300 kW, power density = 1-25 W cm -3 ). Recent experiments have explored the flexibility of the TJ-II across a wide range of plasma volumes with different rotational transforms and rational surface densities. In this paper, the main results of this campaign are presented and, in particular, the influence of iota and rational surfaces on plasma profiles is discussed. (author)

  13. Adsorption dynamics and equilibrium studies of Zn (II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Batch equilibration studies are conducted to determine the nature of adsorption of zinc (II) over chitosan. The factors affecting the adsorption process like particle size, contact time, dosage, pH, effects of chloride and nitrate are identified. The influence of temperature and co-ions on the adsorption process is verified.

  14. 94 STUDIES ON DOG POPULATION IN MAKURDI, NIGERIA (II): A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STUDIES ON DOG POPULATION IN MAKURDI, NIGERIA (II): A SURVEY OF ... only 5.2% mentioned tick infestation as potential health risk to dogs and humans. Bathing dogs with brush ... as pets and/or security alert; this has consequently ...

  15. Thermal Decompositon Studies Of Pre-Irradiated Nickel (II) Azides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of pre-irradiation on the thermal decomposition of three samples of nickel (II) azide was studied. It was found that the rates of thermal decomposition of Ni(OH)N3 increased substantially with increase in pre-irradiation dosage. The initial reaction rates change from time-dependant nucleation law for the unirradiated ...

  16. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  17. Adsorption dynamics and equilibrium studies of Zn (II) onto chitosan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Adsorption dynamics and equilibrium studies of Zn (II) onto chitosan. G KARTHIKEYAN*, K ANBALAGAN and N MUTHULAKSHMI ANDAL. Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural Institute – Deemed University, Gandhigram 624 302, India e-mail: drg_karthikeyan@rediffmail.com. MS received 3 June 2003; revised 12 ...

  18. Psychophysiological indicators of the human functional state in the process of socio-psychological testing ethnic and religious attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Isaichev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. To assess the structure of inter-ethnic attitudes and the risks of ethnoreligious tension, psychologists mostly use questionnaires, interviews, subjective scaling, content analysis, and special tests. One possible approach to increasing the validity and reliability of these explicit methods is the use of the registration of psychophysiological indicators while a recipient completes the questionnaire or test forms. Objective. The results of a pilot psychophysiological research are presented, which focus on the study of human psycho-emotional states during socio-psychological testing to identify attitudes in the field of interethnic and interfaith relations. Design. The essence of the applied experimental approach is to control the functional (psycho-emotional state of a respondent using the registration of complex psychophysiological (physiological and behavioral responses in the process of completing the socio-psychological questionnaire. Results. It was shown that the rhythmic brain activity (ratio of the power indexes of alpha and beta rhythms, the amplitude of the systolic wave (photoplethysmogram (ASW PhPG and the magnitude (length of the ‘circumflex line of the Galvanic Skin Response’ (GSR-L may be the complex of indicators that possess sufficiently high selective sensitivity to differentiate nonspecific reactions of the human nervous system to personally important (emotiogenic, stressful questions in the questionnaire. Conclusion. The proposed approach may help to identify stressful (emotiogenic issues (questions in socio-psychological tests and questionnaires that are of the greatest interest to the subject and, as a result, most adequately reflect individual and population attitudes in the field of social relations.

  19. Technical design aspects of Feasibility Study-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    Feasibility Study-II examined a high-performance Neutrino Factory providing 1 x 10 20 neutrinos per year aimed at a long-baseline detector. The Study was sponsored jointly by BNL and the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration ration (MC) and is based on a 1 MW proton driver operating at 24 GeV, i.e., an upgraded version of the AGS accelerator. Compared with the earlier FNAL-sponsored study (Feasibility Study-I), there is a sixfold improvement in performance. Here we describe details of the implementation of Study-II concepts and discuss their efficacy. Alternative approaches that will be pursued in follow-on R and D activities are also described briefly

  20. Study of physicochemical parameters for cadmium (II) and mercury (II) phytoremediation using the specie Eichhornia Crassipes (water hyacinth)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poma Llantoy, Victor R.; Valderrama Negron, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the studies were performed to measure the sorption capacity of metal ions Cd (II) and Hg (II) using the specie Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth). This study includes assays where the nutrient concentration, the pH and the metal ion concentration were optimized. These tests were carried out at room temperature and with aqueous solutions of Cd (II), Hg (II), in which the samples of Eichhornia crassipes were placed. To confirm the removal of these metals, the waste solutions after the treatment with the Water Hyacinth species were treated using the method APHA 3030-e. However, Eichhornia crassipes samples were treated using the EPA 200.3 method. The concentration of Cd (II) was determined by an ICP-OES spectrometer and Hg (II), by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed: Optimal dosage 1 mL of A and 0,5 mL of B, optimum pH 5, optimum concentration of Cd (II) and Hg (II) 5 mg/L for each ion. With these parameters, it was started the removal of 5 mg/L of the metal ions contained in 1 L of solution. Being the percentages of sorption 16,56% for Cd (II) and 15,6% for Hg (II) after a period of 7 days. (author)

  1. Studies on the interaction of benzotriazole (a corrosion inibitor) with the ruthenium (II) (III) ammincomplexes and pentacyanoferrate (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza R, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some studies on the interaction of benzotriazole with the aquapentacyanoferrate (II), aquapentaamminruthenium (II) and cis-and trans-(NH 3 ) 4 Ru(H 2 O) 2 2+ complexes are described. The reactions, substituted products and complexes production are demonstrated. The absorption bands for the ammine (benzotriazole) and ruthenium (II) complexes as well as the activation parameters and kinetics of reactions are discussed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  2. The prediction of success in kickboxing based on the analysis of morphofunctional, physiological, biomechanical and psychophysiological indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Podrigalo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To substantiate and develop a methodology for predicting success in kickboxing on the basis of analysis of morphofunctional, physiological, biomechanical and psychophysiological indicators. Material: it was examined athletes of kickboxing (n=185, age 18.58 +- 0.46 years. It was studied the features of physical development (n = 18. The main biomechanical parameters (n=45 were determined. Goniometric indices of limb joints (n=29 were studied. It was studied the features of psychophysiological reactions (n =76. The adaptive capabilities of the cardiovascular system were studied (n=17. The prognostication is carried out by means of a sequential Wald procedure. Prognostic coefficients and their informativity were calculated. Results: a prognostic table was developed containing the indicators of the functional state of kickboxing athletes. The table includes 31 criteria, the informativeness of which varied within 115,45 - 2,23. The content of the forecast consists in: an evaluation of the results; determination of the corresponding prognostic coefficient; summation of coefficients. The threshold was set at the level +- 13, which corresponds to a probability of 95% (p<0,05. Exceeding the positive threshold means a high level of success for the athlete. When the negative threshold is reached, the probability of success is low. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is based on a sequential analysis of Wald. The technique is a simple, informative and objective tool for monitoring and predicting the status of athletes.

  3. Psychophysiology in microgravity and the role of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. M.; Hackney, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    United States and Russian space agencies have taken steps to implement various countermeasure programs. One of the principle countermeasures used by both nations is exercise during space flight. The purpose is to present a brief overview of the major research findings examining the psychophysiological changes associated with microgravity exposure, and to address the potential role of exercise as a countermeasure in affecting these psychophysiological changes.

  4. Hemispheric asymmetry of the brain as a psycho-physiological basis of individual and typological features of the formation of a sense of humour.

    OpenAIRE

    Shportun, O. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the psycho-physiological peculiarities of hemispheric asymmetry of the brain as the basis of individual and typological features of the formation of a sense of humour. The analysis of the impact of the functional brain hemispheric asymmetry on emotional, intellectual and physiological features of development of sense of humour in ontogeny is conducted. Analysis of studies of inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the brain makes it possible to ascertain the impact of the functio...

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption by Lagenaria vulgaris shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić-Stojanović Dragana-Linda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of lead, cadmium and zinc ions from aqueous solution by Lagenaria vulgaris shell biosorbent (LVB in batch system was investigated. The effect of relevant parameters such as contact time, biosorbent dosage and initial metal ions concentration was evaluated. The Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption equilibrium (when 98% of initial metal ions were sorbed was attained within 15, 20 and 25 min, respectively. The pseudo first, pseudo-second order, Chrastil’s and intra-particle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second order kinetic model and intra-particle diffusion model. Removal efficiency of lead(II, cadmium(II and zinc(II ions rapidly increased with increasing biosorbent dose from 0.5 to 8.0 g dm-3. Optimal biosorbent dose was set to 4.0 g dm-3. An increase in the initial metal concentration increases the sorption capacity. The sorption data of investigated metal ions are fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Langmuir model best fitted the equilibrium data (r2 > 0.99. Maximal sorption capacities of LVB for Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II at 25.0±0.5°C were 0.130, 0.103 and 0.098 mM g-1, respectively. The desorption experiments showed that the LVB could be reused for six cycles with a minimum loss of the initial sorption capacity.

  6. A Comparative Study on the Sorption Characteristics of Pb(II and Hg(II onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muthulakshmi Andal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption equilibrium and kinetics of Pb(II and Hg(II on coconut shell carbon (CSC were investigated by batch equilibration method. The effects of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and initial concentration of Pb(II and Hg(II on the activated carbon of coconut shell wastes were studied. Maximum adsorption of Pb(II occurred at pH 4.5 and Hg(II at pH 6. The sorptive mechanism followed the pseudo second order kinetics. The equilibrium data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The equilibration data fitted well with both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. The Langmuir adsorption capacity for Pb(II was greater than Hg(II. The mean free energy of adsorption calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R isotherm model indicated that the adsorption of metal ions was found to be by chemical ion exchange. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Pb(II onto SDC was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. A comparison was evaluated for the two metals.

  7. A study on adsorption of Pb(II), Cr(Ш) and Cu(II) from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peanut husk has been used in this work for removing Pb(II), Cr(Ш) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies were carried out under different pH, initial concentration of metal ions, interfering metal ions, time and temperature. Adsorption was poor in strongly acidic solution but was improved in alkaline ...

  8. The Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study: baseline Axis I/II and II/II diagnostic co-occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, T H; Grilo, C M; Skodol, A E; Gunderson, J G; Shea, M T; Morey, L C; Zanarini, M C; Stout, R L

    2000-10-01

    To describe baseline diagnostic co-occurrence in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study. Six hundred and sixty-eight patients were reliably assessed with diagnostic interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II disorders to create five groups: Schizotypal (STPD), Borderline (BPD), Avoidant (AVPD), Obsessive-Compulsive (OCPD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) without personality disorder (PD). Mean number of Axis I lifetime diagnoses was 3.4; STPD and BPD groups had more diagnoses than AVPD, OCPD, and MDD groups. Significant Axis I co-occurrences emerged for Social Phobia/ AVPD, PTSD/BPD and Substance Use/BPD. Mean number of co-occurring PDs was 1.4; STPD had more than BPD group which had more than AVPD and OCPD groups. Significant PD co-occurrence emerged for: STPD/ Paranoid and Schizoid PDs, BPD with Antisocial and Dependent PDs, and lower frequency for OCPD/Antisocial PD. Diagnostic co-occurrences generally followed base rates, while significant departures resemble those of controlled literature.

  9. Study of the GERDA Phase II background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Gerda experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN in Italy, searches for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. Gerda Phase II is aiming to reach a sensitivity for the 0νββ half life of 1026 yr in ˜ 3 years of physics data taking with 100 kg·yr of exposure and a background index of ˜ 10-3 cts/(keV·kg·yr). After 6 months of acquisition a first data release with 10.8 kg·yr of exposure is performed, showing that the design background is achieved. In this work a study of the Phase II background spectrum, the main spectral structures and the background sources will be presented and discussed.

  10. New Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II, Pb(II complexes with 2-methylbenzimidazole and other ligands. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, crystal structure, magnetic susceptibility and biological activity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayma A. Shaker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II and Pb(II mixed ligand complexes of 2-methylbenzimidazole with other ligands have been reported. The structure of the ligands and their complexes was investigated using elemental analysis, IR, UV–Vis, (1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy, molar conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. In all the studies of complexes, the 2-methylbenzimidazole behaves as a neutral monodentate ligand which is coordinated with the metal ions through the N atom. While benzotriazole behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand which is coordinated with the Ni(II ion through the two N atoms. Moreover, the N-acetylglycine behaves as a bidentate ligand which is coordinated with the Mn(II, Ni(II and Pb(II ions through the N atom and the terminal carboxyl oxygen atom. The magnetic and spectral data indicate the tetrahedral geometry for Mn(II complex, irregular tetrahedral geometry for Pb(II complex and octahedral geometry for Ni(II complex. The X-ray single crystal diffraction method was used to confirm a centrosymmetric dinuclear Cd(II complex as each two metal ions are linked by a pair of thiocyanate N = S bridge. Two 2-methylbenzimidazole N-atom donors and one terminal thiocyanate N atom complete a highly distorted square pyramid geometry around the Cd atom. Besides, different cell types were used to determine the inhibitory effect of Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II and Pb(II complexes on cell growth using MTT assay. Cd(II complex showed cytotoxic effect on various types of cancer cell lines with different EC50 values.

  11. Behavioral, psycho-physiological and salivary cortisol modifications after short-term alprazolam treatment in patients with recent myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneti, Carlo; Giusti, Mariarosa; Boem, Adriano; Luisi, Michele

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the behavioral and physiological effects of the central nervous system depressant alprazolam on a group of cardiac patients. Immediately after hospital discharge, the Crown and Crisp Experiential Index (CCEI) was administered, the salivary cortisol was detected and a psycho-physiological profile was recorded in 52 subjects who had suffered from myocardial infarction. Half of the subjects represented the experimental group and the remaining 26 individuals acted as a control group not undergoing treatment. The benzodiazepine alprazolam (0.25 mg) was administered twice daily to the treated group only. With the exception of the administration of the drug, all recruited subjects underwent the same clinical evaluation. The CCEI data of the treated group showed significant decreases for the following scales: free floating anxiety (p anxiety (p < 0.01), somatic complaints (p < 0.05), and depression (p < 0.01). In the same group, with regard to the physiological parameters, the skin conductance response significantly decreased during the baseline phase (p < 0.01), and almost all parameters showed decreased values during mental stress test administration. Cortisol levels also decreased during the recovery phase of the psycho-physiological profile assessment. Alprazolam seems to be able to reduce sympathetic discharge and some stress-related behavioral and physiological responses. This could be of benefit for selected cardiac patients for whom increases in sympathetic tone may constitute a risk factor.

  12. Stop Saying That It Is Wrong! Psychophysiological, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Markers of Children’s Sensitivity to Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gadea, Maria Luz; Scheres, Anouk; Tobon, Carlos Andres; Damm, Juliane; Baez, Sandra; Huepe, David; Marino, Julian; Marder, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Abrevaya, Sofia; Ibanez, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental evidence suggests that children’s main decision-making strategy is to avoid options likely to induce punishment. However, the cognitive and affective factors contributing to children’s avoidance to high punishment frequency remain unknown. The present study explored psychophysiological, cognitive, and metacognitive processes associated with sensitivity to punishment frequency. We evaluated 54 participants (between 8 and 15 years old) with a modified Iowa Gambling Task for children (IGT-C) which included options with varying long-term profit and punishment frequencies. Skin conductance responses (SCRs) were recorded during this task. Additionally, we assessed IGT-C metacognitive knowledge, fluid intelligence, and executive functions. Participants exhibited behavioral avoidance and high anticipatory SCRs to options with high frequency of punishment. Moreover, age, IGT-C metacognitive knowledge, and inhibitory control were associated with individual differences in sensitivity to punishment frequency. Our results suggest that children’s preference for infrequently punished decisions is partially explained by psychophysiological signals as well as task complexity and development of cognitive control. PMID:26218584

  13. Influence of the signer's psychophysiological state on the results of his identification using handwritten pattern by natural and artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey E. Sulavko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, while various mechanisms to ensure information security are actively being improved, particular attention is paid to prevent unauthorized access to information resources.  The human factor and process of identification still remain the most problematic, as well as user authentication. A progress in the technology of information resources protection from internal security threats paves its way towards biometric systems of hidden identification of computer users and their psychophysiological state. A change in psychophysiological state results in the person's handwriting. The influence of the signer’s state of fatigue and excitation on the results of its identification both by a person and by pattern recognition methods on reproduced signatures are studied. Capabilities of human and artificial intelligence are compared in equal conditions. When the state of the signer changes, the probability of erroneous recognition by artificial intelligence increases by factor 3.3 to 3.7. A person identifies a handwritten image with fewer errors in case when the signer is agitated, and with higher error rate if the signer is tired.

  14. An Overview of the BIOMOVS II Study and its Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) was started under the auspices of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in 1985. Prior to the inception of the study, model testing had focussed on models of contaminant dispersion in the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater. In contrast, testing models of contaminant behaviour in soils, and in the terrestrial and aquatic food chains was receiving scant attention. BIOMOVS was therefore established as an international cooperative effort to redress this imbalance through the testing of models designed to quantify the transfer and uptake of radionuclides and other trace substances in the environment. When the first phase of BIOMOVS was completed in 1990, there still remained scope for further work. Clearly, in discussion of what should be done next, consideration had to be given to the output and conclusions of phase one of BIOMOVS, but also the objectives and programmes of other international projects and programmes, as well as the research and assessment interests of national bodies and organisations. Key interests were in particular areas of radioecology research, model validation and evaluation of uncertainties, and problems in performance assessment for solid waste repositories. Account was taken of the VAMP programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the interests of the Nuclear Energy Agency's Performance Assessment Advisory Group. Finally, it was decided that a second phase, BIOMOVS II, should be undertaken with funding from five organisations: The Atomic Energy Control Board, Canada; Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Spain; Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos SA, Spain; Swedish Radiation Protection Institute. By the completion of BIOMOVS II in October 1996 over 300 people from 31 countries and over 160 organisations had participated. This report provides an overview of the activities and achievements of BIOMOVS II

  15. Gender differences in emotional responses: a psychophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marta; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2012-02-28

    Gender differences in emotional responses have been investigated in two groups of students, 22 males and 21 females. Participants watched a set of sixty emotional standardized slides divided into pleasant, neutral and unpleasant, while Startle reflex, Evoked Potentials, Heart Rate, facial EMG and Skin Conductance were recorded. Startle reflex amplitude, an index modulated by amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex and sensitive to aversive emotional stimuli, was overall larger in women. In addition, startle emotion modulation was greater in women with respect to men. Slow Evoked Potentials (400-800 ms), a measure representing the cognitive component of the emotional response, revealed gender differences in the left prefrontal site, with women showing greater positivity to unpleasant compared with pleasant slides while men had greater positivity to pleasant vs. neutral slides. Women, compared with men, perceived all slides as less pleasant and reported greater arousal to unpleasant condition. Results are in line with known functional brain differences, at level of limbic and paralimbic structures, between men and women, and point to biologically grounded greater sensitivity and vulnerability of women to adverse/stressful events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Psychophysiological studies in the pre-school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullner, R; von Braun, G S; Ziegelmayer, G

    1976-10-14

    The behavior of 24 children, aged 3-6 years, was recorded on video-tape. Simultaneously the ECG was recorded telemetrically. These observations were made during two pre-school educational programs lasting 90 minutes each: "Didactic games" and "Elementary music and movement program". For each child a scale was developed to show the correlation of mean heart-rate and well defined motor-activity. It was evident that the mean heart-rate was higher during the music program than during the didactic program, corresponding to the higher motor-activity. But it was found that in the didactic program the variation of the heart-rate within short intervals was higher due to the more frequent occurrence of respiratory arrhythmias. It was also seen that during the music program the children showed no signs of exertion as they did towards the end of the didactic program. Respiratory arrhythmias were not seen in children who according to the Schellong-test were classified as stable in their cardiovascular system. The arrhythmias occurred mainly when the children showed signs of fatigue.

  17. Study of beam dynamics at cooler synchrotron TARN-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.; Katayama, T.; Watanabe, T.; Yoshizawa, M.; Tomizawa, M.; Chida, K.; Arakaki, Y.; Noda, K.; Kanazawa, M.

    1992-08-01

    Several kinds of beam diagnostic instruments, have been developed at cooler-synchrotron TARN-II. These are intended to study beam dynamics at low beam current of several microamperes and then have high sensitivity of good S/N ratio. In addition, the acceleration system, especially low level RF system, has been improved to attain the maximum beam energy. With the successful performance of these instrumentations, the study of beam dynamics are presently being carried out. For example, the synchrotron acceleration of the light ions was achieved up to 220 MeV/u without any beam loss. (author)

  18. Silk I and Silk II studied by fast scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Partlow, Benjamin P; Kaplan, David L; Wurm, Andreas; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schick, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Using fast scanning calorimetry (FSC), we investigated the glass transition and crystal melting of samples of B. mori silk fibroin containing Silk I and/or Silk II crystals. Due to the very short residence times at high temperatures during such measurements, thermal decomposition of silk protein can be significantly suppressed. FSC was performed at 2000K/s using the Mettler Flash DSC1 on fibroin films with masses around 130-270ng. Films were prepared with different crystalline fractions (ranging from 0.26 to 0.50) and with different crystal structures (Silk I, Silk II, or mixed) by varying the processing conditions. These included water annealing at different temperatures, exposure to 50%MeOH in water, or autoclaving. The resulting crystal structure was examined using wide angle X-ray scattering. Degree of crystallinity was evaluated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and from analysis of the heat capacity increment at the glass transition temperature. Silk fibroin films prepared by water annealing at 25°C were the least crystalline and had Silk I structure. FTIR and FSC studies showed that films prepared by autoclaving or 50%MeOH exposure were the most crystalline and had Silk II structure. Intermediate crystalline fraction and mixed Silk I/Silk II structures were found in films prepared by water annealing at 37°C. FSC results indicate that Silk II crystals exhibit endotherms of narrower width and have higher mean melting temperature T m (II)=351±2.6°C, compared to Silk I crystals which melt at T m (I)=292±3.8°C. Films containing mixed Silk I/Silk II structure showed two clearly separated endothermic peaks. Evidence suggests that the two types of crystals melt separately and do not thermally interconvert on the extremely short time scale (0.065s between onset and end of melting) of the FSC experiment. Silkworm silk is a naturally occurring biomaterial. The fibroin component of silk forms two types of crystals. Silk properties depend upon the

  19. Some psycho-physiological aspects of ecstasy in recent research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Ahlberg

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this article is to present some psycho-physiological perspectives of recent date concerned with the phenomenon of ecstasy. As almost none of this research has yet been assimilated by comparative religion, the focus here is on illustrating some of the background for renewed speculation on the relationship between psyche and soma. Traditional Western science has usually operated with a distinction between external and internal processes. Perhaps owing to this idea of the independence of our internal processes from our intentional consciousness, reports from other cultures such as those concerning the extraordinary achievements of holy men (e.g. their capacity to lie buried for days, or survive unclothed at very low temperatures have tended to be ignored as fantastic rumours (which, to some extent, is certainly true and myths. In a similar way the varieties of religious ecstatic states have often been countered with a shrug by psychiatrists. The recently renewed interest in consciousness within general psychology, together with what may be called marginal psychology and the drug revolt of youth culture have, however, provoked new speculation concerning human potential, speculation which in due time might also benefit comparative religion. From the perspective of comparative religion the primary concern is with cultural tradition and interpretation. Among our many new potential methods for better understanding ecstatic phenomena by means of experimental methods, biofeedback has been the most sensational one. It is above all the research in biofeedback that has forced many scientists to reconsider their view of the autonomic nervous system as a system completely independent of human will and control.

  20. PISC II: parametric studies. The purpose of the PISC II parametric studies programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.

    1989-09-01

    The results of the PISC I round robin test of the ASME type procedure showed a very large dispersion. The amplitude of response of all defects varied very much among the teams from the 27 laboratories considered for the evaluation of results. Scatter on detection and sizing in PISC I was such that discussions started on the reasons for such a phenomenon when exactly the same procedure was used by all teams. The observation of two teams' results (JRC Ispra and ENEL Piacenza, Italy) induced the NDE Ispra laboratories to insist on the possible importance of equipment characteristics. All PISC members insisted on specific studies of the influence of defect characteristics as well as the role of cladding. These three chapters were the leading PIS laboratory exercises called Parametric Studies

  1. Biofeedback on heart rate variability in cardiac rehabilitation: practical feasibility and psycho-physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climov, Daniela; Lysy, Camille; Berteau, Sylvain; Dutrannois, Jacques; Dereppe, Hubert; Brohet, Christian; Melin, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Biofeedback is a self-regulation therapy by which the patient learns how to optimize the functioning of his autonomic nervous system. It has been applied to patients with various cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the practical feasibility and the psychophysiological effects of biofeedback applied to heart rate variability (HRV biofeedback) in order to increase cardiac coherence in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation programme. In this randomised and controlled study, 31 CAD patients were randomly assigned to an experimental or to a control group. The experimental group participated in a programme of 10 sessions of cardiac coherence biofeedback training, in addition to the rehabilitation programme. The control group participated in the usual cardiac rehabilitation programme only. Physiological variables (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, SDNN) and psychosocial variables (anxiety, depression, type D personality) were measured at the start and at the end of the programme in both groups. Statistical comparisons assessed the inter and intra group differences. The small sample size precludes any firm conclusions concerning the effect of cardiac coherence biofeedback on physiological or psychological variables. However, we observed a significant increase of the percentage of cardiac coherence, in relation with an increased SDNN index. Our study demonstrated the practical feasibility of cardiac coherence biofeedback training in CAD patients. Further research is desirable to investigate the potential benefit of cardiac coherence biofeedback as an adjunct to stress management in cardiac rehabilitation.

  2. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bortolin, Claudio; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab. Vertical and horizontal cooling performance were checked and some crtitical aspects identified.

  3. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolin, Claudio; Dyngosz, Damian; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab....

  4. Study of Beam-Beam Effects at PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsky, I

    2004-01-01

    Using a self-consistent three-dimensional simulation running on parallel supercomputers, we have modeled the beam-beam interaction at the PEP-II asymmetric e + e - collider. To provide guidance for luminosity improvement, we scanned the tunes and currents in both rings and computed their impact on the luminosity and transverse beam sizes. We also studied the effects of colliding the beams with a small crossing angle. Where possible, the code was benchmarked against experimental measurements of luminosity and beam sizes, yielding an acceptable agreement

  5. Psychophysiological response in parachute jumps, the effect of experience and type of jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier; Robles-Pérez, José Juan; Fernández-Lucas, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to analyse the effect of experience and type of parachute jump on the psychophysiological responses of jumpers. We analysed blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood glucose, lactate and creatinkinase, leg strength, isometric hand strength, cortical arousal, specific fine motor skills, self-confidence and cognition, and somatic and state anxiety, before and after four different parachute jumps: a sport parachute jump, a manual tactical parachute jump, tandem pilots, and tandem passengers. Independently of the parachute jump, the psychophysiological responses of experienced paratroopers were not affected by the jumps, except for an increase in anaerobic metabolism. Novice parachute jumpers presented a higher psychophysiological stress response than the experienced jumpers, together with a large anticipatory anxiety response before the jump; however, this decreased after the jump, although the high physiological activation was maintained. This information could be used by civil and military paratroopers' instructors to improve their training programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Type II diabetes mellitus and the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in the cancer prevention study-II nutrition cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapstur, Susan M; Patel, Alpa V; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Gaudet, Mia M; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2012-11-01

    Despite consistent associations of type II diabetes mellitus with hormonally related cancers such as breast and endometrium, the relation between type II diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer risk is unclear. Associations of type II diabetes mellitus status, duration, and insulin use with epithelial ovarian cancer overall, and with serous and nonserous histologic subtypes were examined in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort, a prospective study of U.S. men and women predominantly aged 50 years and older. Between 1992 and 2007, 524 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified among 63,440 postmenopausal women. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using extended Cox regression to update diabetes status and bilateral oophorectomy status during follow-up. Type II diabetes mellitus status (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.75-1.46) and duration were not associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Although not statistically significantly different (P(difference) = 0.39), the RR was higher for type II diabetes mellitus with insulin use (RR = 1.28; 95% CI, 0.74-2.24) than for type II diabetes mellitus without insulin use (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.43). Diabetes seemed to be more strongly associated with nonserous (RR = 1.41; 95% CI, 0.70-2.85) than serous (RR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.41-1.23) histologic subtypes. Type II diabetes mellitus was not associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, although higher risks with nonserous subtypes and among insulin users cannot be ruled out. Larger studies are needed to clarify associations of type II diabetes mellitus with or without insulin use with risk of ovarian cancer overall and by histologic subtypes. ©2012 AACR.

  7. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its

  8. Analysis of heart rate variability and possibility of its utilization in psychology and psycho-physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva A.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indices of heart rate variability are reliable and objective indicators of autonomic nervous systemtonus (of its sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions which in its turn reflect the changes in psycho-emotional state of a person, development of stress or any kind of tension. The purpose of this article was to describethe contemporary methods of objective study of a person’s functional state by the definition of autonomic regulation of heart rate and also the review of foreign studies which discuss the possibility of utilizing this method in psychology and psychophysiology. The review describes two approaches to the analysis of heart rate variability: temporal and frequency-response analyses. The indices used for temporal analysis include average duration of RR-intervalsand percentage of couples of RR-intervals, differing in more than 50ms(рNN50. The indices of frequency-response analysis included intensity of HF component, reflecting influences of parasympathetic outflow; intensity of LF component, reflecting sympathetic influences; intensity of VLF components; correlation of LF and HF waves, reflecting vegetal balance.

  9. Psychosocial and psychophysiological effects of human-animal interactions: the possible role of oxytocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBeetz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade it has become more widely accepted that pet-ownership and animal-assistance in therapy and education may have a multitude of positive effects on humans. Here, we review the evidence from 67 original studies on human-animal interactions (HAI which met our inclusion criteria with regard to sample size, peer-review and standard scientific research design. Among the well-documented effects of HAI in humans of different ages, with and without special medical or mental health conditions are benefits for: social attention, social behavior, interpersonal interactions and mood; stress-related parameters such as cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure; self-reported fear and anxiety; and mental and physical health, especially cardiovascular diseases. Limited evidence exists for positive effects of HAI on: reduction of stress-related parameters such as epinephrine and norepinephrine; improvement of immune system functioning and pain management; increased trustworthiness of and trust towards other persons; reduced aggression; enhanced empathy and improved learning. We propose that the activation of the oxytocin system plays a key role in the majority of these reported psychological and psychophysiological effects of HAI. Oxytocin and HAI effects largely overlap, as documented by research in both, humans and animals, and first studies found that HAI affects the oxytocin system. As a common underlying mechanism, the activation of the oxytocin system does not only provide an explanation, but also allows an integrative view of the different effects of HAI.

  10. Psychophysiology of duration estimation in experienced mindfulness meditators and matched controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eOtten

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that bodily signals and interoception are strongly related to our sense of time. Mindfulness meditators train to be aware of their body states and therefore could be more accurate at interval timing. In this study, n = 22 experienced mindfulness meditators and n = 22 matched controls performed both, an acoustic and a visual duration reproduction task of 8 s, 14s and 20s intervals, while heart rate and skin conductance were continuously assessed. In addition, participants accomplished a heart-beat perception task and two selective attention tasks. Results revealed no differences between meditators and controls with respect to performance in duration reproduction or attentional capacities. Additionally no group difference in heart beat perception scores was found. Across all subjects, correlational analyses revealed several associations between performance in the duration reproduction tasks and psychophysiological changes, the latter being also related to heart beat perception scores. Furthermore, former findings of linearly increasing cardiac periods and decreasing skin conductance levels during the auditory duration estimation task (Meissner and Wittmann, 2011 could be replicated, and these changes could also be observed during a visual duration reproduction task. In contrast to our earlier findings, the heart-beat perception test was not related with timing performance. Overall, although experienced meditators did not differ from matched controls with respect to duration reproduction and interoceptive awareness, this study adds significantly to the emerging view that time perception is related to autonomic regulation and awareness of body states.

  11. Radiation hardness studies for DEPFETs in Belle II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The study of CP violation requires dedicated detectors and accelerators. At KEK, the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization located in Tsukuba, Japan, an upgrade of the present accelerator KEKB and its detector is in progress. For this new Belle II detector, a new vertex system will be installed, consisting of a silicon strip detector (SVD) and a pixel detector (PXD). The PXD exhibits eight million pixels, each of them made of Depleted p-channel Field Effect Transistors (DEPFETs). During the operation of Belle II various machine- as well as luminosity-related background processes affect the device performance of the DEPFET through radiation damage. As a Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) device, the DEPFET is affected by ionizing radiation damage as well as by damages to the silicon bulk itself. The major part of the radiation damage has its origin in the creation of electrons and positrons near the interaction point. Therefore, the hardness factor of electrons of relevant energy was investigated in this work. With this quantity the damage by electrons could be compared to the damage inflicted by neutrons. Neutron irradiations were performed with DEPFETs and related silicon material. The effects of leakage current increase and type inversion were studied. As the electron hardness investigation indicates, the bulk damage done to the DEPFET is small in comparison to the impact on the silicon dioxide layer of the device. Ionizing radiation results in a build-up of oxide charge, thus changing the device characteristics. Especially the threshold voltage of the DEPFET is shifted to more negative values. This shift has to be compensated during the operation of Belle II and is limited by device and system constraints, thus an overall small shift is desired. The changes in the device characteristics were investigated for the two gate electrodes of the DEPFET with respect to their biasing and production related issues. With an additional layer of silicon nitride and a

  12. Thermal, spectral, magnetic and biological studies of thiosemicarbazones complexes with metal ions: Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO2(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashaly, M.M.; Seleem, H.S.; El-Behairy, M.A.; Habib, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones ligands, isatin-3-thiosemicarbazone(HIT) and N-acetylisatin-3-thiosemicarbazone (HAIT), which have tridentate ONN coordinating sites were prepared. The complexes of both ligands with Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO 2 (VI) ions were isolated. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis and mass spectra, also by conductance, magnetic moment and TG-DSC measurements. All the transition metal complexes have octahedral configurations, except Cu-complexes which have planar geometry and the UO 2 (VI) complexes which have coordination number 8 and may acquire the distorted dodecahedral geometry. Thermal studies explored the possibility of obtaining new complexes. Inversion from octahedral to square-planar configuration occurred upon heating the parent Ni-HIAT complex to form the corresponding pyrolytic product. The antifungal activity against the tested organisms showed that some metal complexes enhanced the activity with respect to the parent ligands. (author)

  13. Psychophysiological types of clinically healthy individuals with different levels of teeth resistance to caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Khalturina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is a result of the psychophysiological tests with the help of cutting examination and psychogeometrical tests for 76 healthy individuals ages 20,18±1,25 years, having different caries resistance. It is known that group of people with poor caries resistance has a conflict type of personality. There is a positive tendency to growth of anxiety level and reducing caries resistance. The article concludes that the prophylaxis of caries and its complications must contain methods of psychophysiological correction

  14. Estimating time-varying RSA to examine psychophysiological linkage of marital dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Kathleen M; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M; Sandsten, Maria; Blandon, Alysia Y

    2015-08-01

    One of the primary tenets of polyvagal theory dictates that parasympathetic influence on heart rate, often estimated by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), shifts rapidly in response to changing environmental demands. The current standard analytic approach of aggregating RSA estimates across time to arrive at one value fails to capture this dynamic property within individuals. By utilizing recent methodological developments that enable precise RSA estimates at smaller time intervals, we demonstrate the utility of computing time-varying RSA for assessing psychophysiological linkage (or synchrony) in husband-wife dyads using time-locked data collected in a naturalistic setting. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  15. The psycho-physiological responses of partners in the process of divorce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita Kričaj Korelc

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish whether the partners who are in the process of separating and those, who evaluate their partnership as successful, differ from each other in emotional, behavioural and somatic responses, and whether there are differences between them in personal strenght, tackling and in different styles of defensive behaviour. According to that, the author followed a psycho-physiological integrational model of disease existence and biopsychosocial model of health and disease. The results showed that the separating partners of both gender experience subjectively stronger emotional states with negative hedonic note and manifest more mood and adaptable emotional disturbances in quality and quantity as a reaction to the stressful events. They also respond strongly with somatic disturbances without organic basis or defined physical causes. Partners in separation also engage more nonadaptive and risk taking behaviors. In addition their use of all disposable strategies of coping is more vigorous and frequent. Obtained results also show some specific cross gender features and differences in receiving and responding to the separation of a matrimony.

  16. Effect of Parachute Jump in the Psychophysiological Response of Soldiers in Urban Combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Molina, Joaquín; Robles-Pérez, José J; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente J

    2017-06-01

    The study of organic and psychological response during combat situations has been poorly reported despite its importance for soldiers training and specific instruction, so it was proposed as aim of the present investigation to analyze the effect of a tactical parachute simulated jump in psycho-physiological response of paratroopers' warfighters during an urban combat simulation. 19 male paratroopers (31.9 ± 6.2 year old; 173.6 ± 5.3 cm; 73.8 ± 8.3 Kg) of the Spanish Army were divided in two groups: parachute jump group (n:11) that conducted a simulated parachute jump and a urban combat maneuver and a non-parachute jump group (n:8) that only conducted an urban combat maneuver. We analyzed before and after the maneuver the rated perceived exertion, legs strength manifestation, blood lactate, cortical activation, heart rate variability, blood oxygen saturation and pressure, skin temperature, fine motor skills, and anxiety state. A tactical parachute simulated jump prior to an urban combat maneuver produce significantly (p jump situation in professional Army paratroopers. Independently of the parachute jump, an urban combat maneuver produces a significant increase in rated perceived exertion, blood lactate, heart rate, legs strength, sympathetic modulation and anxiety response as well as a significant decrease in blood oxygen saturation and parasympathetic modulation.

  17. Relationship of psychophysiological characteristics with different levels of motivation in judo athletes of high qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Korobeynikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim : to study the connection of psychophysiological characteristics with different levels of motivation in judo athletes of high qualification. Material: highly qualified athletes were examined, members of the National Judo Team (men. All athletes (n = 25 were divided into three groups, depending on the level of motivation to achieve success. Results: it is established that the high level of motivation for achieving success in judo is provided by activation of neurodynamic, cognitive functions and the level of light resistance. Athletes with a high level of motivation to achieve success is observed the predominance of the values of neurodynamic functions: endurance of the nervous system; speed of visual reactions. Athletes with an average level of motivation to achieve success identified higher values: productivity, speed, accuracy, effectiveness of verbal information. Athletes with a predominance of avoidance of failure motivation have a preference for other groups in the speed, efficiency and stability of the processes of thinking and processing information. Conclusions: judo athletes with a predominance of motivation to avoid a failure form coping strategy to prevent psycho-emotional stress. This helps to minimize the exhaustion of vegetative resources in conditions of extreme sports activity. Judo athletes with high level of motivation to achieve success, the presence of mental state of relative comfort is associated with the search for support among others and orientation toward internal beliefs.

  18. Preparing computers for affective communication: a psychophysiological concept and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Min Cheol; Lim, Joa Sang; Boucsein, Wolfram

    Despite rapid advances in technology, computers remain incapable of responding to human emotions. An exploratory study was conducted to find out what physiological parameters might be useful to differentiate among 4 emotional states, based on 2 dimensions: pleasantness versus unpleasantness and arousal versus relaxation. The 4 emotions were induced by exposing 26 undergraduate students to different combinations of olfactory and auditory stimuli, selected in a pretest from 12 stimuli by subjective ratings of arousal and valence. Changes in electroencephalographic (EEG), heart rate variability, and electrodermal measures were used to differentiate the 4 emotions. EEG activity separates pleasantness from unpleasantness only in the aroused but not in the relaxed domain, where electrodermal parameters are the differentiating ones. All three classes of parameters contribute to a separation between arousal and relaxation in the positive valence domain, whereas the latency of the electrodermal response is the only differentiating parameter in the negative domain. We discuss how such a psychophysiological approach may be incorporated into a systemic model of a computer responsive to affective communication from the user.

  19. Psychophysiological Associations between Chronic Tinnitus and Sleep: A Cross Validation of Tinnitus and Insomnia Questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schecklmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of insomnia in chronic tinnitus and the association of tinnitus distress and sleep disturbance. Methods. We retrospectively analysed data of 182 patients with chronic tinnitus who completed the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ and the Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS. Descriptive comparisons with the validation sample of the RIS including exclusively patients with primary/psychophysiological insomnia, correlation analyses of the RIS with TQ scales, and principal component analyses (PCA in the tinnitus sample were performed. TQ total score was corrected for the TQ sleep items. Results. Prevalence of insomnia was high in tinnitus patients (76% and tinnitus distress correlated with sleep disturbance (r=0.558. TQ sleep subscore correlated with the RIS sum score (r=0.690. PCA with all TQ and RIS items showed one sleep factor consisting of all RIS and the TQ sleep items. PCA with only TQ sleep and RIS items showed sleep- and tinnitus-specific factors. The sleep factors (only RIS items were sleep depth and fearful focusing. The TQ sleep items represented tinnitus-related sleep problems. Discussion. Chronic tinnitus and primary insomnia are highly related and might share similar psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms leading to impaired sleep quality.

  20. Brain mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational audiovisual stimuli on psychophysiological responses during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; Silva, Vinícius B; Karageorghis, Costas I; Bird, Jonathan M; Santos, Priscila C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2016-05-01

    Motivational audiovisual stimuli such as music and video have been widely used in the realm of exercise and sport as a means by which to increase situational motivation and enhance performance. The present study addressed the mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational stimuli on psychophysiological responses and exercise performance. Twenty-two participants completed fatiguing isometric handgrip-squeezing tasks under two experimental conditions (motivational audiovisual condition and neutral audiovisual condition) and a control condition. Electrical activity in the brain and working muscles was analyzed by use of electroencephalography and electromyography, respectively. Participants were asked to squeeze the dynamometer maximally for 30s. A single-item motivation scale was administered after each squeeze. Results indicated that task performance and situational motivational were superior under the influence of motivational stimuli when compared to the other two conditions (~20% and ~25%, respectively). The motivational stimulus downregulated the predominance of low-frequency waves (theta) in the right frontal regions of the cortex (F8), and upregulated high-frequency waves (beta) in the central areas (C3 and C4). It is suggested that motivational sensory cues serve to readjust electrical activity in the brain; a mechanism by which the detrimental effects of fatigue on the efferent control of working muscles is ameliorated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Accelerator studies at cooler rings TARN and TARN II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Takeshi.

    1992-07-01

    Two ion cooler rings, TARN and TARN II were constructed and operated from 1975 to 1992 at the Institute for Nuclear Study, Univ. of Tokyo, for mainly accelerator studies concerning the beam accumulation, acceleration and cooling. The main subjects performed in these facilities were; 1) beam stacking in transverse and longitudinal phase spaces, 2) stochastic momentum cooling, 3) electron cooling, 4) synchrotron acceleration and 5) slow beam extraction. In the present paper, typical experimental results on these subjects, arc described as well as the basic physical idea underlying these experimental results. The technical details are out of scope of the present paper. They can be found in the other papers refered in the concerned section in the text. (author)

  2. CiteSpace II: Idiom Studies Development Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Liu Ph.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Idioms, frequently used in daily language, are a typical metaphorical language and may be a cue to uncover the universal language processing mechanism. For the purpose of better mastery of the trends and front of idioms studies, CiteSpace II, an application designed to detect and visualize the development process within a scientific field, is adopted for comprehensive literature review. It is found that (1 idioms studies have thrived since 1990s with American scholars contributing the most, especially those from University of California; (2 suppositions on idiom comprehension mechanism have been inspired by different scholars including Lakoff, Swinney and Gibbs; (3 the exploration of the neurological bases for idiom comprehension has become the pursuit of researchers across different domains.

  3. Coordination studies of copper(II), cobalt(II) and iron(II) with isomeric pyridyl-tetrazole ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, A. D.; Fleming, A.; Gaire, J.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 2-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (L1) with 1,6-dibromohexane results in formation of the isomers 2-(6 ''-bromohexyl)-(1-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (12) and 2-(6 ''-bromohexyl)-(2-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (L3). Coordination reactions of 12 and 13 with CuCl2 center dot 2H(2)O, Co(SCN)(2) and ...... conformation in its equatorial plane. Complex 5 contains water molecules coordinated to Fe(II) in the axial sites, which form hydrogen bonds to the perchlorate counter anions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Psychophysiological prediction of choice: relevance to insight and drug addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J.; Hajcak, Greg; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Dunning, Jonathan P.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2012-01-01

    An important goal of addiction research and treatment is to predict behavioural responses to drug-related stimuli. This goal is especially important for patients with impaired insight, which can interfere with therapeutic interventions and potentially invalidate self-report questionnaires. This research tested (i) whether event-related potentials, specifically the late positive potential, predict choice to view cocaine images in cocaine addiction; and (ii) whether such behaviour prediction differs by insight (operationalized in this study as self-awareness of image choice). Fifty-nine cocaine abusers and 32 healthy controls provided data for the following laboratory components that were completed in a fixed-sequence (to establish prediction): (i) event-related potential recordings while passively viewing pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine images, during which early (400–1000 ms) and late (1000–2000 ms) window late positive potentials were collected; (ii) self-reported arousal ratings for each picture; and (iii) two previously validated tasks: one to assess choice for viewing these same images, and the other to group cocaine abusers by insight. Results showed that pleasant-related late positive potentials and arousal ratings predicted pleasant choice (the choice to view pleasant pictures) in all subjects, validating the method. In the cocaine abusers, the predictive ability of the late positive potentials and arousal ratings depended on insight. Cocaine-related late positive potentials better predicted cocaine image choice in cocaine abusers with impaired insight. Another emotion-relevant event-related potential component (the early posterior negativity) did not show these results, indicating specificity of the late positive potential. In contrast, arousal ratings better predicted respective cocaine image choice (and actual cocaine use severity) in cocaine abusers with intact insight. Taken together, the late positive potential could serve as a biomarker

  5. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of 2-(4-nitro phenylaminocarbonyl)benzoic acid and its complexes with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqeel Ashraf, M.; Jamil Maah, M.; Yusuf, I.

    2012-01-01

    Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts of 2-(4-nitro phenylaminocarbonyl)benzoic acid were characterized by physical, analytical and spectroscopic studies and checked for their in-vitro antimicrobial activity against three bacterial strains, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Gram +ve), Escherichia coli (Gram -ve), Pseudomonas aeuroginosa (Gram -ve) and three fungal strains, Nigrospora oryzae, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activities of the metal complexes - were found to be greater than those of 2-(4-nitro phenylaminocarbonyl)benzoic acid alone.

  6. Radial electrical field effects in TJ-II. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the radial electric field upon the neoclassical transport coefficients of TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been calculated as well on the microwave heating stage (ECRH) as on the neutral injection one (NBI). The influence of the solutions for the self-consistent ambipolar field on confinement times and temperatures has been studied by means of a zero-dimensional energy balance. The simultaneous presence of two roots, the electronic and the ionic one, is observed for the ECRH phase, while for NBI only the ionic root appears, although with a strong field intensity that could produce a favourable effect on confinement. The interest and need of the extension of these calculations to include radial profile effects by using spatial dependent transport codes in stressed

  7. Study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaj Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment with deposition of adhesive coats based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides. Efficiency of new prepared adhesive systems containing Co(II and Cu(II sulphides has been compared with the efficiency of double layer adhesive system commonly used in industry. The chemical composition of prepared adhesive systems was determined using the EDX analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used for study of topography and microstructure of prepared rubber to steel adhesive systems (Co(II, Cu(II sulphide, double layer adhesive system. For determination of adhesion strength between rubber blends and metal pieces with various adhesive systems deposited on these pieces, the test according to ASTM D429 standard relating to Rubber to metal adhesion, method A was used. For all test samples, the same type of rubber blend and the same curing conditions have been used.

  8. Using psychophysiological indices to estimate the effect of cosmophysical factors (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorseva, N. I.

    2013-12-01

    This review first summarizes estimates of the functional response of the central nervous system (CNS) to variations in cosmophysical factors using different psychophysiological indices (electrical activity of the brain, sensorimotor and motor reactions, and higher mental functions such as attention and memory). We analyze the applicability of information technologies to record different physiological parameters.

  9. URGENT AND LAG PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS NEUROFEEDBACK IN SPORTSMEN OF HIGH QUALIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kaigorodtseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a comparative analysis of the psychophysiological state of sportsmen of high qualification within one year after the course neurofeedback. These data demonstrated that high qualification sportsmen physiological effects of training persist throughout the year and depend on the ability to arbitrarily increase the power of the alpha rhythm of the brain.

  10. A Multi-Disciplinary Examination of Psycho-Physiological Performance Among Youth and Junior Ball Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Márton Pucsok

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The primary purpose of our review was to systematically review the evolution of psycho-physiological performance analysis. Our secondary aim was to investigate the role of specific, multi-disciplinary performance indicators to identify future talents in the sport of soccer, handball and basketball. Methods A review protocol was set up in order to avoid individual bias and ensure an efficient searching prodedure. This enabled a search strategy to define which literature was to be included or excluded from our research. Certain inclusion criteria were identified, before performing a search using three electronic databases (Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar and reference lists for English-language articles, published from the year 1980 till 2017. Results The comprehensive search yielded 82 documents to be relevant to our purpose of the study, according to our inclusion criteria criteria, 58 were fully-reviewed and referred to in our study. As we previously expected, the review of related literature resulted investigations involving mostly soccer and basketball players, studies conducted on handball players are significantly fewer. The majority of those studies examined physical performance characteristics via various field test. Conclusions We concluded that further analysis is necessary to identify relevant psycho-physiological performance indicators, in order to properly enhance sports performance in the younger athlete population and in general too. Vienna Test System protocols may offer a great potential to provide valuable information for athletes and their coaches to enhance athletic performance. Future research should focus on specifically identify Vienna Test System test protocols that may be linked to each particular sport.

  11. Equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic studies for the biosorption of aqueous lead(II), cadmium(II) and nickel(II) ions on Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seker, Ayseguel [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla 35430, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: aysegulseker@iyte.edu.tr; Shahwan, Talal [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla 35430, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: talalshahwan@iyte.edu.tr; Eroglu, Ahmet E. [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla 35430, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ahmeteroglu@iyte.edu.tr; Yilmaz, Sinan [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla 35430, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: sinanyilmaz@iyte.edu.tr; Demirel, Zeliha [Department of Biology, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: zelihademirel@gmail.com; Dalay, Meltem Conk [Department of Bioengineering, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: meltemconkdalay@gmail.com

    2008-06-15

    The biosorption of lead(II), cadmium(II) and nickel(II) ions from aqueous solution by Spirulina platensis was studied as a function of time, concentration, temperature, repetitive reactivity, and ionic competition. The kinetic results obeyed well the pseudo second-order model. Freundlich, Dubinin Radushkevich and Temkin isotherm models were applied in describing the equilibrium partition of the ions. Freundlich isotherm was applied to describe the design of a single-stage batch sorption system. According to the thermodynamic parameters such as {delta}G{sup o}, {delta}H{sup o}and {delta}S{sup o} calculated, the sorption process was endothermic and largely driven towards the products. Sorption activities in a three metal ion system were studied which indicated that there is a relative selectivity of the biosorbent towards Pb{sup 2+} ions. The measurements of the repetitive reusability of S. platensis indicated a large capacity towards the three metal ions.

  12. Comparative study of adsorption properties of Turkish fly ashes II. The case of chromium (VI) and cadmium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, Belgin

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study described in this paper was to compare the removal of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from an aqueous solution using two different Turkish fly ashes; Afsin-Elbistan and Seyitomer as adsorbents. The influence of four parameters (contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration in solution and ash quality) on the removal at 20±2 deg. C was studied. Fly ashes were found to have a higher adsorption capacity for the adsorption of Cd(II) as compared to Cr(VI) and both Cr(VI) and Cd(II) required an equilibrium time of 2 h. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was higher at pH 4.0 for Afsin-Elbistan fly ash (25.46%) and pH 3.0 for Seyitomer fly ash (30.91%) while Cd(II) was adsorbed to a greater extent (98.43% for Afsin-Elbistan fly ash and 65.24% for Seyitomer fly ash) at pH 7.0. The adsorption of Cd(II) increased with an increase in the concentrations of these metals in solution while Cr(VI) adsorption decreased by both fly ashes. The lime (crystalline CaO) content in fly ash seemed to be a significant factor in influencing Cr(VI) and Cd(II) ions removal. The linear forms of the Langmuir and Freundlich equations were utilised for experiments with metal concentrations of 55±2 mg/l for Cr(VI) and 6±0.2 mg/l for Cd(II) as functions of solution pH (3.0-8.0). The adsorption of Cr(VI) on both fly ashes was not described by both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms while Cd(II) adsorption on both fly ashes satisfied only the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption capacities of both fly ashes were nearly three times less than that of activated carbon for the removal of Cr(VI) while Afsin-Elbistan fly ash with high-calcium content was as effective as activated carbon for the removal of Cd(II). Therefore, there are possibilities for use the adsorption of Cd(II) ions onto fly ash with high-calcium content in practical applications in Turkey

  13. MRP (materiel requirements planning) II implementation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, D

    1994-05-01

    Manufacturing resource planning (MRP II) is a powerful and effective business planning template on which to build a continuous improvement culture. MRP II, when successfully implemented, encourages a disciplined yet nonthreatening environment centered on measurement and accountability. From the education that accompanies an MRP II implementation, the employees can better understand the vision and mission of the organization. This common goal keeps everyone's energy directed toward the same final objective. The Raymond Corporation is a major materiels handling equipment manufacturer headquartered in Greene, New York, with class "A" MRP II manufacturing facilities in Greene and Brantford, Ontario and an aftermark distribution facility in East Syracuse, New York. Prior to the implementation of MRP II in its Greene plant (from 1988 through 1990) good intentions and hard work were proving to be less than necessary to compete in the global market. Certified class "A" in February 1990. The Raymond Corporation has built a world-class organization from these foundations.

  14. Synthesis, spectral characterization thermal stability, antimicrobial studies and biodegradation of starch–thiourea based biodegradable polymeric ligand and its coordination complexes with [Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II)] metals

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid Nishat; Ashraf Malik

    2016-01-01

    A biodegradable polymer was synthesized by the modification reaction of polymeric starch with thiourea which is further modified by transition metals, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). All the polymeric compounds were characterized by (FT-IR) spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, 13C NMR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectra, magnetic moment measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and antibacterial activities. Polymer complexes of Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) show octahedral geometry, wh...

  15. Theoretical study of the magnetic behavior of hexanuclear Cu(II) and Ni(II) polysiloxanolato complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eliseo; Cano, Joan; Alvarez, Santiago; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante

    2003-06-04

    A theoretical density functional study of the exchange coupling in hexanuclear polysiloxanolato-bridged complexes of Cu(II) and Ni(II) is presented. By calculating the energies of three different spin configurations, we can obtain estimates of the first-, second-, and third-neighbor exchange coupling constants. The study has been carried out for the complete structures of the Cu pristine cluster and of the chloroenclathrated Ni complex as well as for the hypotethical pristine Ni compound and for magnetically dinuclear analogues M(2)Zn(4) (M = Cu, Ni).

  16. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation. [Comparison of aviation with other industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel.

  17. Organisational justice and markers of inflammation: the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovainio, Marko; Ferrie, Jane E; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Gimeno, David; De Vogli, Roberto; Shipley, Martin; Vahtera, Jussi; Brunner, Eric; Marmot, Michael G; Kivimäki, Mika

    2010-02-01

    Low organisational justice has been shown to be associated with increased risk of various health problems, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We tested whether organisational injustice contributes to chronic inflammation in a population of middle-aged men and women. This prospective cohort study uses data from 3205 men and 1204 women aged 35-55 years at entry into the Whitehall II study (phase 1, 1985-1988). Organisational justice perceptions were assessed at phase 1 and phase 2 (1989-1990) and circulating inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 at phase 3 (1991-1993) and phase 7 (2003-2004). In men, low organisational justice was associated with increased CRP levels at both follow-ups (phase 3 and 7) and increased IL-6 at the second follow-up (phase 7). The long term (phase 7) associations were largely independent of covariates, such as age, employment grade, body mass index and depressive symptoms. In women, no relationship was found between organisational justice and CRP or IL-6. This study suggests that organisational injustice is associated with increased long-term levels of inflammatory markers among men.

  18. Thermal Studies of Zn(II, Cd(II and Hg(II Complexes of Some N-Alkyl-N-Phenyl-Dithiocarbamates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition of Zn(II, Cd(II and Hg(II complexes of N-ethyl-N-phenyl and N-butyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamates have been studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The products of the decomposition, at two different temperatures, were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The results show that while the zinc and cadmium complexes undergo decomposition to form metal sulphides, and further undergo oxidation forming metal oxides as final products, the mercury complexes gave unstable volatiles as the final product.

  19. Reproducing a Prospective Clinical Study as a Computational Retrospective Study in MIMIC-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, Fabrício S P; Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we sought to reproduce, as a computational retrospective study in an EHR database (MIMIC-II), a recent large prospective clinical study: the 2013 publication, by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM), about disseminated intravascular coagulation, in the journal Critical Care (PMID: 23787004). We designed in SQL and Java a set of electronic phenotypes that reproduced the study's data sampling, and used R to perform the same statistical inference procedures. All produced source code is available online at https://github.com/fabkury/paamia2015. Our program identified 2,257 eligible patients in MIMIC-II, and the results remarkably agreed with the prospective study. A minority of the needed data elements was not found in MIMIC-II, and statistically significant inferences were possible in the majority of the cases.

  20. Justice at work and metabolic syndrome: the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, David; Tabák, Adám G; Ferrie, Jane E; Shipley, Martin J; De Vogli, Roberto; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G; Kivimäki, Mika

    2010-04-01

    Growing evidence shows that high levels of justice are beneficial for employee health, although biological mechanisms underlying this association are yet to be clarified. We aim to test whether high justice at work protects against metabolic syndrome. A prospective cohort study of 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II study) including 6123 male and female British civil servants aged 35-55 years without prevalent coronary heart disease at baseline (1985-1990). Perceived justice at work was determined by means of questionnaire on two occasions between 1985 and 1990. Follow-up for metabolic syndrome and its components occurring from 1990 to 2004 was based on clinical assessments on three occasions over more than 18 years. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, ethnicity and employment grade showed that men who experienced a high level of justice at work had a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome than employees with a low level of justice (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.89). There was little evidence of an association between organisational justice and metabolic syndrome or its components in women (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.67 to 1.17). Our prospective findings provide evidence of an association between high levels of justice at work and the development of metabolic syndrome in men.

  1. Unfairness and health: evidence from the Whitehall II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vogli, Roberto; Ferrie, Jane E; Chandola, Tarani; Kivimäki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G

    2007-06-01

    To examine the effects of unfairness on incident coronary events and health functioning. Prospective cohort study. Unfairness, sociodemographics, established coronary risk factors (high serum cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, exercise, smoking and alcohol consumption) and other psychosocial work characteristics (job strain, effort-reward imbalance and organisational justice) were measured at baseline. Associations between unfairness and incident coronary events and health functioning were determined over an average follow-up of 10.9 years. 5726 men and 2572 women from 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II Study). Incident fatal coronary heart disease, non-fatal myocardial infarction and angina (528 events) and health functioning. Low employment grade is strongly associated with unfairness. Participants reporting higher levels of unfairness are more likely to experience an incident coronary event (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.17), after adjustment for age, gender, employment grade, established coronary risk factors and other work-related psychosocial characteristics. Unfairness is also associated with poor physical (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.77) and mental (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.99) functioning at follow-up, controlling for all other factors and health functioning at baseline. Unfairness is an independent predictor of increased coronary events and impaired health functioning. Further research is needed to disentangle the effects of unfairness from other psychosocial constructs and to investigate the societal, relational and biological mechanisms that may underlie its associations with health and heart disease.

  2. Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, M; Kivimäki, M; Singh-Manoux, A; Gimeno, D; Shipley, M J; Vahtera, J; Akbaraly, T N; Marmot, M G; Ferrie, J E

    2010-05-01

    Privatisation and private sector practices have been increasingly applied to the public sector in many industrialised countries. Over the same period, long-term work disability has risen substantially. We examined whether a major organisational change--the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines--was associated with an increased risk of work disability. The study uses self-reported data from the prospective Whitehall II cohort study. Associations between transfer to an executive agency assessed at baseline (1991-1994) and work disability ascertained over a period of approximately 8 years at three follow-up surveys (1995-1996, 1997-1999 and 2001) were examined using Cox proportional hazard models. In age- and sex-adjusted models, risk of work disability was higher among the 1263 employees who were transferred to an executive agency (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.46 to 2.48) compared with the 3419 employees whose job was not transferred. These findings were robust to additional adjustment for physical and mental health and health behaviours at baseline. Increased work disability was observed among employees exposed to the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines. This may highlight an unintentional cost for employees, employers and society.

  3. Template synthesis of poly aza macrocyclic copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes: Spectral characterization and antimicrobial studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurumoorthy, P.; Ravichandran, J.; Kaliur Rahiman, A. [The New College, Chennai (India); Karthikeyan, N.; Palani, P. [Univ. of Madras, Chennai (India)

    2012-07-15

    The template synthesis of copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes derived from 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol with diethylenetriamine or 1,2-bis(3-amino propylamino)ethane produce the 12-membered N{sub 3}O and 17-membered N{sub 4}O macrocyclic complexes, respectively. The geometry of the complexes has been determined with the help of electronic and EPR spectroscopic values and found to be five coordinated square pyramidal and, six coordinated distorted tetragonal for 12-membered and 17-membered macrocyclic complexes, respectively. Electrochemical studies of the mononuclear N{sub 3}O and N{sub 4}O copper(II) complexes show one irreversible one electron reduction wave at E{sup pc} = .1.35 and .1.15 V respectively, and the corresponding nickel(II) complexes show irreversible one-electron reduction wave at E{sup pc} = .1.25 and .1.22 V, respectively. The nickel(II) complexes show irreversible one-electron oxidation wave at Epa = +0.84 and +0.82 V, respectively. All the complexes were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria and fungi.

  4. Adsorption study of copper (II) by chemically modified orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ningchuan; Guo Xueyi; Liang Sha

    2009-01-01

    An adsorbent, the chemically modified orange peel, was prepared from hydrolysis of the grafted copolymer, which was synthesized by interaction of methyl acrylate with cross-linking orange peel. The presence of poly (acrylic acid) on the biomass surface was verified by infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Total negative charge in the biomass surface and the zeta potentials were determined. The modified biomass was found to present high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate for Cu (II). From Langmuir isotherm, the adsorption capacity for Cu (II) was 289.0 mg g -1 , which is about 6.5 times higher than that of the unmodified biomass. The kinetics for Cu (II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorbent was used to remove Cu (II) from electroplating wastewater and was suitable for repeated use for more than four cycles.

  5. Infrared study of seven possible compact H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, F.; Lunel, M.; Bergeat, J.

    1976-01-01

    We report observations of seven possible compact H II regions in the infrared with the hydrogen spectrum in order to derive extinction and emission measures. The emission measure is compared with available radio data. For two sources, agreement is found between radio and infrared data. Infrared excess is found in four sources, its origin is discussed. Two sources cannot be interpreted as compact H II regions. (orig.) [de

  6. Computer augumented modelling studies of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes of L-glutamic acid in 1,2-propanediol–water mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHESWARA RAO VEGI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes of L-glutamic acid was studied at 303 K in 0–60 vol. % 1,2-propanediol–water mixtures, whereby the ionic strength was maintained at 0.16 mol dm-3. The active forms of the ligand are LH3+, LH2 and LH–. The predominant detected species were ML, ML2, MLH, ML2H and ML2H2. The trend of the variation in the stability constants with changing dielectric constant of the medium is explained based on the cation stabilizing nature of the co-solvents, specific solvent–water interactions, charge dispersion and specific interactions of the co-solvent with the solute. The effect of systematic errors in the concentrations of the substances on the stability constants is in the order alkali > > acid > ligand > metal. The bioavailability and transportation of metals are explained based on distribution diagrams and stability constants.

  7. Psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery from high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leighton; Tiller, Nicholas B; Karageorghis, Costas I

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies have examined the multifarious effects of music applied during exercise but few have assessed the efficacy of music as an aid to recovery. Music might facilitate physiological recovery via the entrainment of respiratory rhythms with music tempo. High-intensity exercise training is not typically associated with positive affective responses, and thus ways of assuaging negative affect warrant further exploration. This study assessed the psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery and prevalence of entrainment in between bouts of high-intensity exercise. Thirteen male runners (M age =20.2±1.9years; BMI=21.7±1.7; V̇O 2 max=61.6±6.1mL·kg·min -1 ) completed three exercise sessions comprising 5×5-min bouts of high-intensity intervals interspersed with 3-min periods of passive recovery. During recovery, participants were administered positively-valenced music of a slow-tempo (55-65bpm), fast-tempo (125-135bpm), or a no-music control. A range of measures including affective responses, RPE, cardiorespiratory indices (gas exchange and pulmonary ventilation), and music tempo-respiratory entrainment were recorded during exercise and recovery. Fast-tempo, positively-valenced music resulted in higher Feeling Scale scores throughout recovery periods (pmusic-moderated differences in cardiorespiratory responses. In conclusion, fast-tempo, positively-valenced music applied during recovery periods engenders a more pleasant experience. However, there is limited evidence that music expedites cardiorespiratory recovery in between bouts of high-intensity exercise. These findings have implications for athletic training strategies and individuals seeking to make high-intensity exercise sessions more pleasant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental study of impurity production in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The release mechanism for low-Z impurities in Tokapole II has been characterized through impurity doping and isotopic exchange experiments. The desorption mechanism responsible for the low-Z impurity concentrations during the rise phase of the plasma current depends on the mass of the plasma ions. Doping with small amounts of any gas studied (H 2 , D 2 , He, N 2 , O 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) increases the early-time radiation of O, C, and N. For exotic gas doping this increase is linear with the dopant concentration, and proportional to the mass of the dopant, as expected for a momentum transfer process. Isotopic exchange experiments confirm the mass-dependence of oxygen production. A time-dependent coronal model is compared with the vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic signals of the ionizing oxygen. The quantity sigma/tau (desorption cross section divided by particle confinement time) is determined to be 4 x 10 13 cm 2 /msec. The oxygen influx has a large peak early in the start-up

  9. Pulse radiolysis study of zinc(II)-insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, A J; Wilkinson, F; Armstrong, D A [Calgary Univ., Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1980-07-01

    Reactions of e/sup -/sub(aq) with zinc(II)-insulin at pH 6.6 and 9.0 yielded relatively low disulphide anion absorptions, suggesting e/sup -/sub(aq) reacts at other sites than S-S. A similar conclusion was reached for the reaction of COsub(./2) where an even lower yield of disulphide anion was found. However, here the disulphide anion yield increased with 'prepulsing'. Simultaneously the rate constant decreased, implying that a more reactive site was 'cleaned up'. While no reaction of Brsub(./2) with insulin was observed, both OH and Clsub(./2) reacted rapidly and predominantly at the tyrosine residues. The second order rate constants, calculated in terms of insulin monomer concentrations, are reported for e/sup -/sub(aq) COsub(./2) and Clsub(./2). The transient spectra qualitatively support evidence regarding the accessibility of S-S bonds and tyrosine residues in the various forms of insulin as predicted from earlier studies.

  10. Crew factors in flight operations II : psychophysiological responses to short-haul air transport operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This report is the second in a series on the physiological and psychological effects of flight operations on flight crews, and on the operational significance of these effects. This overview presents a comprehensive review and interpretation of the m...

  11. The Psychophysiological Diagnostics of the Functional State of the ATHLE TE. Preliminary Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat A. Dubynin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The original experimental scheme was developed to investigate athletes’ functionalstates (FS dynamics. The procedure allowed modeling various FS importantfor predicting the professional success of athletes: psychological and physiologicalstress, fatigue, and optimal FS (OFS. There were two main criteria fordifferentiation of the FS under study: efficiency rates and the psychological andphysiological costs of the achieved efficiency level. Analysis of the FS-dependentpsychophysiological changes showed significant interindividual differences on anumber of parameters. Thus, no single indicator could be used as effective diagnosticsfor the FS criteria. A minimum number of indicators need to be recordedincluded cardiovascular indicators (heart rate, ECG, respiration, muscle tension(EMG, and brain activity (EEG in the range of alpha and beta waves. The mainproblem can be artifacts induced by movement and muscle tension. The specialprocedure for artifact rejection and reduction of the artifacts was developed. Itallowed recording EEG, ECG, and EOG signals simultaneously. Another problemwas related to the development of the mathematical algorithm to analyze individualdata and differentiate patterns of the signals recorded from the athletes.An original approach to differentiate the FS – the k-means clustering algorithm –was offered based on seven psychophysiological indicators. Results of clusteringshowed that the k-means algorithm for seven-component vectors allows onewith confidence to differentiate state of quiet wakefulness, states of psychologicaland physiological stress. As the number of parameters used is attenuatedfrom seven to four (without the EEG parameters the accuracy of distinguishing FS is significantly reduced. To construct a complete and accurate differentiationof an athlete’s FS one should collect some statistical data on the dynamics ofeach FS in different time periods of the person’s life – in the process of training

  12. Psychophysiological Sensing and State Classification for Attention Management in Commercial Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrivel, Angela R.; Liles, Charles; Stephens, Chad L.; Ellis, Kyle K.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-related human performance limiting states (AHPLS) can cause pilots to lose airplane state awareness (ASA), and their detection is important to improving commercial aviation safety. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team found that the majority of recent international commercial aviation accidents attributable to loss of control inflight involved flight crew loss of airplane state awareness, and that distraction of various forms was involved in all of them. Research on AHPLS, including channelized attention, diverted attention, startle / surprise, and confirmation bias, has been recommended in a Safety Enhancement (SE) entitled "Training for Attention Management." To accomplish the detection of such cognitive and psychophysiological states, a broad suite of sensors has been implemented to simultaneously measure their physiological markers during high fidelity flight simulation human subject studies. Pilot participants were asked to perform benchmark tasks and experimental flight scenarios designed to induce AHPLS. Pattern classification was employed to distinguish the AHPLS induced by the benchmark tasks. Unimodal classification using pre-processed electroencephalography (EEG) signals as input features to extreme gradient boosting, random forest and deep neural network multiclass classifiers was implemented. Multi-modal classification using galvanic skin response (GSR) in addition to the same EEG signals and using the same types of classifiers produced increased accuracy with respect to the unimodal case (90 percent vs. 86 percent), although only via the deep neural network classifier. These initial results are a first step toward the goal of demonstrating simultaneous real time classification of multiple states using multiple sensing modalities in high-fidelity flight simulators. This detection is intended to support and inform training methods under development to mitigate the loss of ASA and thus reduce accidents and incidents.

  13. PISC II: Parametric studies. Summary of the PISC II Parametric studies on the Effect of defect Characteristics (EDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Murgatroyd, R.; Dombret, P.

    1989-09-01

    Studies on the effect of defect characteristics and selected inspection parameters on the detection and sizing of defects in ferritic steel blocks have been performed by: - United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA, Risley and Harwell), - CISE, (Italy, Milan), - VINCOTTE (Belgium, Brussels), - CEC, JRC (Ispra Site; complementary measurements), as part of a larger Commission of the European Communities (CEC) programme in support to the PISC (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components), jointly sponsored by OECD (Organization for Economic Coordination and Development) and CEC and operated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra Establishment. The purpose of the programme was to acquire reliable experimental data that could be used both to explain results of the PISC I and II Round Robin Tests (RRT) and to test and validate theoretical models of the ultrasonic testing techniques. For these studies, eighteen test blocks were manufactured by JRC Ispra, Operating Agent and Reference Laboratory of PISC. A range of defect types was inserted with great care covering aspects such as defect shape, defect size, defect surface roughness, defect position in depth, defect orientation. Several of these blocks (defects) were selected by the participating institutions. Each of these participants applied well specified usual ultrasonic techniques: echo techniques, tandem technique, focusing probe technique at 45 0 and time of flight diffraction (TOFD). Results of such measurements propose clear correlation between defect characteristics and amplitude of response of these defects

  14. Multilevel analysis of facial expressions of emotion and script: self-report (arousal and valence) and psychophysiological correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Balconi, Michela; Vanutelli, Maria Elide; Finocchiaro, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper explored emotion comprehension in children with regard to facial expression of emotion. The effect of valence and arousal evaluation, of context and of psychophysiological measures was monitored. Indeed subjective evaluation of valence (positive vs. negative) and arousal (high vs. low), and contextual (facial expression vs. facial expression and script) variables were supposed to modulate the psychophysiological responses. Methods Self-report measures (in terms of correct...

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and spectrophotometric studies of nickel(II)-iron(II) hybrid hemoglobins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, N.; Inubushi, T.; Morimoto, H.; Yonetani, T.

    1987-01-01

    Ni(II)-Fe(II) hybrid hemoglobins, α(Fe) 2 β(Ni) 2 and α(Ni) 2 β(Fe) 2 , have been characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance with Ni(II) protoporphyrin IX (Ni-PP) incorporated in apoprotein, which serves as a permanent deoxyheme. α(Fe) 2 β(Ni) 2 , α(Ni) 2 β(Fe) 2 , and NiHb commonly show exchangeable proton resonances at 11 and 14 ppm, due to hydrogen-bonded protons in a deoxy-like structure. Upon binding of carbon monoxide (CO) to α(Fe) 2 β(Ni) 2 , these resonances disappear at pH 6.5 to pH 8.5. On the other hand, the complementary hybrid α(Ni) 2 β(Fe-CO) 2 showed the 11 and 14 ppm resonances at low pH. Upon raising pH, the intensities of both resonances are reduced, although these changes are not synchronized. Electronic absorption spectra and hyperfine-shifted proton resonances indicate that the ligation of CO in the β(Fe) subunits induced changes in the coordination and spin states of Ni-PP in the α subunits. In a deoxy-like structure, the coordination of Ni-PP in the α subunits is predominantly in a low-spin (S = 0) four-coordination state, whereas in an oxy-like structure the contribution of a high-spin (S = 1) five-coordination state markedly increased. Ni-PP in the β subunits always takes a high-spin five-coordination state regardless of solution conditions and the state of ligation in the partner α(Fe) subunits. In the β(Ni) subunits, a significant downfield shift of the proximal histidyl N/sub δ/H resonance and a change in the absorption spectrum of Ni-PP were detected, upon changing the quaternary structure of the hybrid. The chemical shifts were analyzed in terms of the E11-Val methyls vs. the porphyrin rings in hybrid Hbs

  16. Extraction studies of Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) using N, N', N, N' -Bis((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl) (2-pyridylmethyl)) -ethylenediamine as a novel ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laus, R.; Anjos, A.D.; Naves, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the use of N,N',N,N'-bis((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl) (2- pyridylmethyl))-ethylenediamine (H2L) as ligand was evaluated in the liquid-liquid (water- chloroform) extraction of Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). Experiments were carried out to determine the pH for maximum extraction for each metal ion by ligand, maximum extraction capacity, extraction kinetics and extraction selectivity. The results revealed that the extraction of metal ions is dependent on the pH: maximum extraction maximum was obtained in the pH range of 4.5 - 6.0 for Cu(II) and 8.0 - 9.0 for Zn(II). Cd(II) and Mn(II) were best extracted at pH 9.0 and Ni(II) at 10.0. The ligand H2L was effective for the extraction of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) (extraction efficient, %E equal 100%), whereas %E of 76% and 23.5% were observed for Mn(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The ligand presented high selectivity for the extraction of Cu(II) at pH 4.0. (author)

  17. Interaction of Zn(II) with hematite nanoparticles and microparticles: Part 2. ATR-FTIR and EXAFS study of the aqueous Zn(II)/oxalate/hematite ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Juyoung; Trainor, Thomas P; Farges, François; Brown, Gordon E

    2009-05-19

    Sorption of Zn(II) to hematite nanoparticles (HN) (av diam=10.5 nm) and microparticles (HM) (av diam=550 nm) was studied in the presence of oxalate anions (Ox2-(aq)) in aqueous solutions as a function of total Zn(II)(aq) to total Ox2-(aq) concentration ratio (R=[Zn(II)(aq)]tot/[Ox2-(aq)]tot) at pH 5.5. Zn(II) uptake is similar in extent for both the Zn(II)/Ox/HN and Zn(II)/Ox/HM ternary systems and the Zn(II)/HN binary system at [Zn(II)(aq)](tot)system than for the Zn(II)/Ox/HM ternary and the Zn(II)/HN and Zn(II)/HM binary systems at [Zn(II)(aq)]tot>4 mM. In contrast, Zn(II) uptake for the Zn(II)/HM binary system is a factor of 2 greater than that for the Zn(II)/Ox/HM and Zn(II)/Ox/HN ternary systems and the Zn(II)/HN binary system at [Zn(II)(aq)]totternary system at both R values examined (0.16 and 0.68), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) results are consistent with the presence of inner-sphere oxalate complexes and outer-sphere ZnOx(aq) complexes, and/or type A ternary complexes. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic results suggest that type A ternary surface complexes (i.e., >O2-Zn-Ox) are present. In the Zn(II)/Ox/HN ternary system at R=0.15, ATR-FTIR results indicate the presence of inner-sphere oxalate and outer-sphere ZnOx(aq) complexes; the EXAFS results provide no evidence for inner-sphere Zn(II) complexes or type A ternary complexes. In contrast, ATR-FTIR results for the Zn/Ox/HN sample with R = 0.68 are consistent with a ZnOx(s)-like surface precipitate and possibly type B ternary surface complexes (i.e., >O2-Ox-Zn). EXAFS results are also consistent with the presence of ZnOx(s)-like precipitates. We ascribe the observed increase of Zn(II)(aq) uptake in the Zn(II)/Ox/HN ternary system at [Zn(II)(aq)]tot>or=4 mM relative to the Zn(II)/Ox/HM ternary system to formation of a ZnOx(s)-like precipitate at the hematite nanoparticle/water interface.

  18. Experiment to study K+ → π+ + ''nothing'' at LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    An experiment to measure K + → π + + ''nothing'' (where ''nothing'' denotes unobservable neutral particles) at LAMPF II is described. This experiment is capable of measuring one K + → π + nu anti nu event for branching ratio of 10 -12 . 12 refs

  19. Relative Leukocyte Telomere Length, Hematological Parameters and Anemia - Data from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Antje; Salewsky, Bastian; Buchmann, Nikolaus; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    The length of the chromosome ends, telomeres, is widely accepted as a biomarker of aging. However, the dynamic of the relationship between telomere length and hematopoietic parameters in the normal aging process, which is of particular interest with respect to age-related anemia, is not well understood. We have analyzed the relationship between relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL) and several hematological parameters in the older group of the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II) participants. This paper also compares rLTL between both BASE-II age groups (22-37 and 60-83 years). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of BASE-II participants and used to determine rLTL by a quantitative PCR protocol. Standard methods were used to determine blood parameters, and the WHO criteria were used to identify anemic participants. Telomere length data were available for 444 younger participants (28.4 ± 3.1 years old; 52% women) and 1,460 older participants (68.2 ± 3.7 years old; 49.4% women). rLTL was significantly shorter in BASE-II participants of the older group (p = 3.7 × 10-12) and in women (p = 4.2 × 10-31). rLTL of older men exhibited a statistically significant, positive partial correlation with mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; p = 0.012) and MCH concentration (p = 0.002). While these correlations were only observed in men, the rLTL of older women was negatively correlated with the number of thrombocytes (p = 0.015) in the same type of analysis. Among all older participants, 6% met the criteria to be categorized as 'anemic'; however, there was no association between anemia and rLTL. In the present study, we have detected isolated correlations between rLTL and hematological parameters; however, in all cases, rLTL explained only a small part of the variation of the analyzed parameters. In disagreement with some other studies showing similar data, we interpret the association between rLTL and some of the hematological parameters studied here to be

  20. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex “phase” behavior of glassy binary mixtures due to phase-separation (ice formation) and polyamorphism, and the relevance of sample preparation, concentration as well as cooling rates. The presence of the distorted ice (called “interphase” by us) also explains the debated “drift anomaly” upon melting. These results are compatible with the high-pressure study by Suzuki and Mishima indicating disappearance of polyamorphism at P ≈ 0.03–0.05 GPa at χ g ≈ 0.12–0.15 [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 094505]. PMID:27044677

  1. Assessment of Psychophysiological Response and Specific Fine Motor Skills in Combat Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Molina, Joaquín; Robles-Pérez, José J; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente J

    2018-03-02

    Soldiers´ training and experience can influence the outcome of the missions, as well as their own physical integrity. The objective of this research was to analyze the psycho-physiological response and specific motor skills in an urban combat simulation with two units of infantry with different training and experience. psychophysiological parameters -Heart Rate, blood oxygen saturation, glucose and blood lactate, cortical activation, anxiety and heart rate variability-, as well as fine motor skills were analyzed in 31 male soldiers of the Spanish Army, 19 belonging to the Light Infantry Brigade, and 12 to the Heavy Forces Infantry Brigade, before and after an urban combat simulation. A combat simulation provokes an alteration of the psycho-physiological basal state in soldiers and a great unbalance in the sympathetic-vagal interaction. The specific training of Light Infantry unit involves lower metabolic, cardiovascular, and anxiogenic response not only previous, but mainly after a combat maneuver, than Heavy Infantry unit's. No differences were found in relation with fine motor skills, improving in both cases after the maneuver. This fact should be taken into account for betterment units´ deployment preparation in current theaters of operations.

  2. Oxidation of Cu(II) aminopolycarboxylates by carbonate radical. A flash photolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.C.; Bardhan, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    Reactions of carbonate radical (CO 3 -. ) generated by photolysis or by radiolysis of a carbonate solution, with Cu(II) complexes of aminopolycarboxylic acids viz., Cu(II)ethylenediamine tetraacetate [Cu II EDTA] 2- and Cu(II)-iminodiacetate [Cu II IDA] were studied at pH 10.5 and ionic strength 0.2 mol x dm -3 . Time-resolved spectroscopy and kinetics for the transients were studied using flash photolysis and stable products arising from the ligand degradation of the complex were ascertained by steady-state radiolysis experiments. From the kinetic data it is observed that CO 3 -. radical reacts initially with Cu II -complex to form a transient intermediate having maximum absorption at 335 nm and 430 nm. From the subsequent reactions of this intermediate it was assigned to be Cu III .species. This Cu(III) species undergoes intermolecular electron transfer with the Cu II -complex to give a radical intermediate which again slowly reacts with Cu II -complex to give a long lived species containing Cu-C bond. This long lived species, however, slowly decomposed to give glyoxalic reaction between Cu III -complex and a suitable donor, the one electron reduction potential for [Cu III EDTA] 1- /[Cu II EDTA] 2- and [Cu III IDA] +1 /Cu II IDA was determined. (author)

  3. Kinetic and equilibrium study for the sorption of Pb(II) ions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic and equilibrium study for the sorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous phase by water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes ) ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... Abstract. This paper reports the kinetic and equilibrium studies of Eichhornia crassipes root biomass as a biosorbent for Pb(II) ions from aqueous system.

  4. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, spectroscopic and theoretical studies of new zinc(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes based on imine ligand containing 2-aminothiophenol moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaatian, Bita; Mousavi, S. Sedighe; Afshari, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

    New dimer complexes of zinc(II), copper(II) and nickel(II) were synthesized using the Schiff base ligand which was formed by the condensation of 2-aminothiophenol and 2-hydroxy-5-methyl benzaldehyde. This tridentate Schiff base ligand was coordinated to the metal ions through the NSO donor atoms. In order to prevent the oxidation of the thiole group during the formation of Schiff base and its complexes, all of the reactions were carried out under an inert atmosphere of argon. The X-ray structure of the Schiff base ligand showed that in the crystalline form the SH groups were oxidized to produce a disulfide Schiff base as a new double Schiff base ligand. The molar conductivity values of the complexes in dichloromethane implied the presence of non-electrolyte species. The fluorescence properties of the Schiff base ligand and its complexes were also studied in dichloromethane. The products were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV/Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis, and conductometry. The crystal structure of the double Schiff base was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory for the determination of the optimized structures of Schiff base complexes.

  6. Studying a disease with no home--lessons in trial recruitment from the PATCH II study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomas, Kim S

    2010-01-01

    Cellulitis is a very common condition that often recurs. The PATCH II study was designed to explore the possibility of preventing future episodes of cellulitis, with resultant cost savings for the NHS. This was the first trial to be undertaken by the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network. As such, it was the first to test a recruitment model that involved many busy clinicians each contributing just a few patients.

  7. Spectroscopic and DFT studies of flurbiprofen as dimer and its Cu(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdinc, Seda; Pir, Hacer

    2009-07-01

    The vibrational study in the solid state of flurbiprofen and its Cu(II) and Hg(II) complexes was performed by IR and Raman spectroscopy. The changes observed between the IR and Raman spectra of the ligand and of the complexes allowed us to establish the coordination mode of the metal in both complexes. The comparative vibrational analysis of the free ligand and its complexes gave evidence that flurbiprofen binds metal (II) through the carboxylate oxygen. The fully optimized equilibrium structure of flurbiprofen and its metal complexes was obtained by density functional B3LYP method by using LanL2DZ and 6-31 G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities of flurbiprofen were calculated by density functional B3LYP methods by using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The scaled theoretical wavenumbers showed very good agreement with the experimental values. The electronic properties of the free molecule and its complexes were also performed at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Detailed interpretations of the infrared and Raman spectra of flurbiprofen are reported. The UV-vis spectra of flurbiprofen and its metal complexes were also investigated in organic solvents.

  8. Synthesis, molecular structure, biological properties and molecular docking studies on Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes containing bipyridine-azide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Jayamani, Arumugam; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi

    2015-01-07

    Metal complexes of the type Mn(bpy)2(N3)2 (1), Co(bpy)2(N3)2·3H2O (2) and Zn2(bpy)2(N3)4 (3) (Where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectral (FT-IR, UV-vis) studies. The structure of complexes (1-3) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration of ligand-coordinated metal(II) ion was well described as distorted octahedral coordination geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and distorted square pyramidal geometry for Zn(II) complexes. DNA binding interaction of these complexes (1-3) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence circular dichroism spectral and molecular docking studies. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of complexes 1, 2 and 3 with CT-DNA obtained from UV-vis absorption studies were 8.37 × 10(4), 2.23 × 10(5) and 5.52 × 10(4) M(-1) respectively. The results indicated that the three complexes are able to bind to DNA with different binding affinity, in the order 2 > 1 > 3. Complexes (1-3) exhibit a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins having relatively high binding constant values. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes 1-3 promote the cleavage ability of the pBR322 plasmid DNA in the presence of the reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) but with different cleavage mechanisms: the complex 3 cleaves DNA via hydrolytic pathway (T4 DNA ligase assay), while the DNA cleavage by complexes 1 and 2 follows oxidative pathway. The chemical nuclease activity follows the order: 2 > 1 > 3. The effects of various activators were also investigated and the nuclease activity efficacy followed the order MPA > GSH > H2O2 > Asc. The cytotoxicity studies of complexes 1-3 were tested in vitro on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and they found to be active. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Spectroscopic study of cadmium (II) complexes with heterocyclic dithiocarbamate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Fontan, S.; Rodriguez-Seoane, P.; Casas, J.S.; Sordo, J.; Jones, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Cadmium(II) dithiocarbamates [Cd(dtc) 2 ] (dtc=4-carboxamidopiperidine-1-carbodithioate, morpholine-1-carbodithioate or 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-carbodithioate) and [Cd(dtc) 2 ].H 2 O (dtc=4-hydroxypiperidine-1-carbodithioate} have been prepared and characterized by thermal analysis and IR and NMR ( 13 C, 113 Cd) spectrometry. Two of these ligands have previously been shown capable of removing cadmium from its aged in vivo storage sites. The use of solid state 13 C NMR measurements to establish the coordination mode of the dithiocarbomate ligands is also examined and the difficulties which arise are discussed. (orig.)

  10. DNA-Binding Studies of Some Potential Antitumor 2,2'-bipyridine Pt(II)/Pd(II) Complexes of piperidinedithiocarbamate. Their Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Eslami-Moghadam, Mahboube; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali-Akbar

    2011-12-01

    In this study two platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of the type [M(bpy)(pip-dtc)]NO3 (where M=Pt(II) or Pd(II), bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, pip-dtc=piperidinedithiocarbamate) were synthesized by reaction between diaquo-2,2'-bipyridine Pt(II)/Pd(II) nitrate and sodium salt of dithiocarbamate. These cationic water soluble complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies. The cyclic dithiocarbamate was found to coordinate as bidentate fasion with Pt(II) or Pd(II) center. Their biological activities were tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562, at micromolar concentration. The obtained cytotoxic concentration (IC50) values were much lower than cisplatin. The interaction of these complexes with highly polymerized calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was extensively studied by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism and other measurements. The experimental results, thermodynamic and binding parameters, suggested that these complexes cooperatively bind to DNA presumably via intercalation. Moreover, the tendency of the Pt(II) complex to interact with DNA was more than that of Pd(II) complex.

  11. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic study of ion pairing of strontium(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both ν(CN) and ν(CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  12. Preparation of phenacylchloride, morpholinophenacyl and N-Piperidinophenacyl oximes and study of their complexation with Copper (II) and Cobalt (II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Kamal Eldin Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to prepare phenacyl chloride oxime and phenacyl of N-Piperidine and morpholine derivatives, and mainly to study their complexes with Cu(II) and Co(II) ions with objective ascertaining that one of these ligands can be used in quantitative extraction of these metal ions from the aqueous solution. Copper (II) salts form 1:1 complexes with the phenyacyl oximes of N-piperidine and morpholine and 1:2 complex with phenacyl chloride oxime. However, cobalt(II) salts form 1:2 complexes with phenacyl oxime of N-piperidine and morpholine but does not complex with phenacyl chloride oxime. The stoichiometry of these complexes were determined by UV/VIS spectrophotometry using the mole ratio, continuous variation and slope ratio methods.The stability constants of the five complexes were calculated from aberrances using Job's method. They showed that the copper (II) and cobalt (II) complexes with N-piperidinophenacy oxime are more stable than those with morpholinophenacyl oxime. Copper (II) complexes with any of these two ligands are more stable than those of cobalt (II). IR spectra of the complexes of copper (II) and cobalt (II) with phenacyl oxime of N-piperidine and morpholine show diminished peaks of hydrogen bonds between N and O atoms of the ligand. Specific extractabilities using amylalcohol of copper (II) complexes with the three ligands increase from PH4 to reach its maximum at PH8. The high value for N-piperidinophenacyl oxime ligand (96%-97%) indicates that, this ligand can be used as analytical reagent for the quantitative spectrophotometric determination of copper (II) salts in aqueous media. Cobalt (II) complexes were formed and extracted from solution only at PH6 (specific PH). The extractabilities ranging from 81.6-87.2% warrants the use of these ligands in quantitative spectrophotometric determination of cobalt (II).(Author)

  13. Dynamic adsorption studies for the removal of Cd (II) and Ni (II) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption was found to be more effective at higher concentrations of metals and with smaller adsorbent particle size. ... Recommendation was made such that, mahogany leaves should be studied for the remediation of other heavy metals, such as lead, chromium, mercury, zinc and uranium among others. Keywords: ...

  14. STUDIES OF Ni(II) & Cu(II) COMPLEXES WITH AMPICILLIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    akg

    ABSTRACT. The Kolo Creek E2.0 reservoir oils from the Nigerian Niger Delta region have been studied for molecular marker by characterisation using full scan GC-MS and GC-MS-MS transition from 412 → 369. An existing molecular marker compound normally found in coals and lignites has been observed in some these ...

  15. Commentary: moving toward cost-effectiveness in using psychophysiological measures in clinical assessment: validity, decision making, and adding value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstrom, Eric A; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Psychophysiological measures offer a variety of potential advantages, including more direct assessment of certain processes, as well as provision of information that may contrast with other sources. The role of psychophysiological measures in clinical practice will be best defined when researchers (a) switch to research designs and statistical models that better approximate how clinicians administer assessments and make clinical decisions in practice, (b) systematically compare the validity of psychophysiological measures to incumbent methods for assessing similar criteria, (c) test whether psychophysiological measures show either greater validity or clinically meaningful incremental validity, and (d) factor in fiscal costs as well as the utilities that the client attaches to different assessment outcomes. The statistical methods are now readily available, along with the interpretive models for integrating assessment results into client-centered decision making. These, combined with technology reducing the cost of psychophysiological measurement and improving ease of interpretation, poise the field for a rapid transformation of assessment practice, but only if we let go of old habits of research.

  16. Contact angle study on the activation mechanisms of sphalerite with Cu(II) and Pb(II); Estudio de los mecanismos de activacion de la esfalerita con Cu(II) y Pb(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila Pulido, G. I.; Uribe Salas, A.

    2011-07-01

    This article presents results of an experimental study on the sphalerite activation with Cu(II) and Pb(II), whose main objective was to investigate the activation mechanisms and to evaluate the magnitude of the hydrophobization achieved with both chemical species. The hydrophobicity acquired by the mineral due to the interaction with the activator and collector (sodium isopropyl xanthate) is characterized making use of the contact angle technique. The results show that Cu(II) replaces the Zn of the external layers of the mineral, promoting the sulfide (S{sup 2}-) oxidation to produce a mixture of CuS, Cu{sub 2}S and S{sup o}, of hydrophobic nature. The subsequent interaction with xanthate increases the hydrophobicity of the mineral surface. In turn, Pb(II) activation of sphalerite is due to the formation of a PbS layer that reacts with xanthate to produce hydrophobic species (e.g., PbX{sub 2}). It is also observed that the hydrophobicity of sphalerite activated with Pb(II) is favored under air atmospheres, as compared to that obtained under nitrogen atmospheres. It is concluded that the hydrophobicity achieved by lead activation may be of the same order of magnitude to that deliverately induced by copper activation. (Author) 11 refs.

  17. Studying a disease with no home - lessons in trial recruitment from the PATCH II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kim S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulitis is a very common condition that often recurs. The PATCH II study was designed to explore the possibility of preventing future episodes of cellulitis, with resultant cost savings for the NHS. This was the first trial to be undertaken by the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network. As such, it was the first to test a recruitment model that involved many busy clinicians each contributing just a few patients. Methods A double-blind randomised controlled trial comparing prophylactic antibiotics (penicillin V with placebo tablets, for the prevention of repeat episodes of cellulitis of the leg. Primary outcome was time to subsequent recurrence of cellulitis. Results The PATCH II study was closed to recruitment having enrolled 123 participants from a target of 400. Whilst the recruitment period was extended by 12 months, it was not possible to continue beyond this point without additional funds. Many factors contributed to poor recruitment: (i changes in hospital policy and the introduction of community-based intravenous teams resulted in fewer cellulitis patients being admitted to hospital; ii those who were admitted were seen by many different specialties, making it difficult for a network of dermatology clinicians to identify suitable participants; and iii funding for research staff was limited to a trial manager and a trial administrator at the co-ordinating centre. With no dedicated research nurses at the recruiting centres, it was extremely difficult to maintain momentum and interest in the study. Attempts to boost recruitment by providing some financial support for principal investigators to employ local research staff was of limited success. Discussion The model of a network of busy NHS clinicians all recruiting a few patients into large clinical studies requires further testing. It did not work very well for PATCH II, but this was probably because patients were not routinely seen by dermatologists, and recruitment

  18. Tinnitus sensitization: Sensory and psychophysiological aspects of a new pathway of acquired centralization of chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Hans P; Pfister, Markus; Birbaumer, Niels

    2006-12-01

    Acquired centralized tinnitus (ACT) is the most frequent form of chronic tinnitus. The proposed ACT sensitization (ACTS) assumes a peripheral initiation of tinnitus whereby sensitizing signals from the auditory system establish new neuronal connections in the brain. Consequently, permanent neurophysiological malfunction within the information-processing modules results. Successful treatment has to target these malfunctioning information processing. We present in this study the neurophysiological and psychophysiological aspects of a recently suggested neurophysiological model, which may explain the symptoms caused by central cognitive tinnitus sensitization. Although conditioned reflexes, as a causal agent of chronic tinnitus, respond to extinction procedures, sensitization may initiate a vicious circle of overexcitation of the auditory system, resisting extinction and habituation. We used the literature database as indicated under "References" covering English and German works. For the ACTS model we extracted neurophysiological hypotheses of the auditory stimulus processing and the neuronal connections of the central auditory system with other brain regions to explain the malfunctions of auditory information processing. The model does not assume information-processing changes specific for tinnitus but treats the processing of tinnitus signals comparable with the processing of other external stimuli. The model uses the extensive knowledge available on sensitization of perception and memory processes and highlights the similarities of tinnitus with central neuropathic pain. Quality, validity, and comparability of the extracted data were evaluated by peer reviewing. Statistical techniques were not used. According to the tinnitus sensitization model, a tinnitus signal originates (as a type I-IV tinnitus) in the cochlea. In the brain, concerned with perception and cognition, the 1) conditioned associations, as postulated by the tinnitus model of Jastreboff, and the 2

  19. Studies on nickel (II and palladium (II complexes with some tetraazamacrocycles containing tellurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathee Nitu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of 10-membered and 12-membered tellurium containing tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of divalent nickel and palladium by template condensation of diaryltellurium dichlorides, (aryl = p-hydroxyphenyl, 3-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl, p-methoxyphenyl with 1,2-diaminoethane and 1,3-diaminopropane in the presence of metal dichloride is reported. The resulting complexes have been subjected to elemental analyses, magnetic measurements, electronic absorption, infra-red, and proton magnetic resonance spectral studies. The formation of proposed macrocyclic skeletons and their donor sites have been identified on the basis of spectral studies. Distorted octahedral structure for the nickel complexes in the solid state and squareplanar structure for the palladium complexes have been suggested.

  20. Alfven wave heating studies in Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortbawi, D.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Zhu, S.Y.; Casavant, T.; Sprott, J.C.; Prager, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    In earlier experiments at low power on the Tokapole II tokamak using the internal divertor rings as a launching structure the authors have observed a resonance with properties consistent with those expected for a shear Alfven wave. With these encouraging results, a second phase of experiments has begun where, eventually, 4 discrete antennas, located ≅180 0 apart in both the toroidal and poloidal directions and phased to establish proper mode numbers are driven from a 1 MW source. A prototype antenna has been installed and tested. It is a 2 turn Faraday shielded loop extending 54 0 along a toroidal arc. This orientation was chosen for the antenna currents based on the earlier experiments and the simple MHD result that the component of the wage magnetic field perpendicular to the equilibrium field is most strongly divergent. To test this the antenna can be rotated +.45 0 . It can also be inserted radially up to 6 cm

  1. Elliptical cross section fuel rod study II; Estudio de barras combustibles de seccion eliptica II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taboada, H; Marajofsky, A [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Combustibles Nucleares

    1997-12-31

    In this paper it is continued the behavior analysis and comparison between cylindrical fuel rods of circular and elliptical cross sections. Taking into account the accepted models in the literature, the fission gas swelling and release were studied. An analytical comparison between both kinds of rod reveals a sensible gas release reduction in the elliptical case, a 50% swelling reduction due to intragranular bubble coalescence mechanism and an important swelling increase due to migration bubble mechanism. From the safety operation point of view, for the same linear power, an elliptical cross section rod is favored by lower central temperatures, lower gas release rates, greater gas store in ceramic matrix and lower stored energy rates. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Feasibility Study on a Neutral Beam Diagnostic Injector for TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.

    2003-01-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam system is proposed for the TJ-II stellarator. The main goal of installing such a system in TJ-II is to increase the signal to noise ratio and provide spatial resolution in diagnostic systems based on Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies in this magnetically confined plasma device. After outlining the unique characteristics of the TJ-II and reviewing available diagnostic injector systems, the compact system selected for TJ-II is presented together with estimates of the resulting increased signal levels Finally other important aspects are discussed, in particular its location and orientation, as well as possible solutions to avoid perturbing the TJ-II magnetic configurations in the heliac device. (Author) 31 refs

  3. Feasibility Study on a Neutral Beam Diagnostic Injector for TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.

    2003-07-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam system is proposed for the TJ-II stellarator. The main goal of installing such a system in TJ-II is to increase the signal to noise ratio and provide spatial resolution in diagnostic systems based on Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies in this magnetically confined plasma device. After outlining the unique characteristics of the TJ-II and reviewing available diagnostic injector systems, the compact system selected for TJ-II is presented together with estimates of the resulting increased signal levels Finally other important aspects are discussed, in particular its location and orientation, as well as possible solutions to avoid perturbing the TJ-II magnetic configurations in the heliac device. (Author) 31 refs.

  4. Structural and antimicrobial studies of coordination compounds of VO(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II with some Schiff bases involving 2-amino-4-chlorophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. MISHRA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of tailor-made ligands with life essential metal ions may be an emerging area to answer the problem of multi-drug resistance (MDR. The coordination complexes of VO(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II with the Schiff bases derived from 2-hydroxyacetophenone/2-chlorobenzaldehyde with 2-ami¬no-4-chlorophenol were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic spectra, FT-IR, ESR, FAB mass, thermal and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The FAB mass and thermal data show degradation of the complexes. The ligand A (2-hydroxyacetophenone-2amino-4-chlorophenol behaved as tridentate and ligand B (2-chlorobenzylidene-2-amino-4-chlorophenol as bidentate, coordinating through O and N donors. The complexes [VO(A(H2O]×xH2O, [M(A(H2On]×xH2O for Co and Ni, [Cu(A(H2O] and [VO(B2]×xH2O, [M(B2(H2On] for Co and Cu and [Ni(B2] exhibited coordination numbers 4, 5 or 6. X-ray powder diffraction data (a = 11.00417 Å, b = 11.706081 Å and c = 54.46780 Å showed that [Cu(CACP2(H2O2], complex 8, crystallized in the orthorhombic system. The in vitro biological screening effects of the investigated compounds were tested against the bacteria Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus fecalis and the fungi Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma polysporum and Candida albicans by the serial dilution method. A comparative study of the MIC values of the Schiff base and their [M(B2(H2O2] complexes (Co(II, complex 6 and Cu(II, complex 8, indicated that the metal complexes exhibited a higher or lower antimicrobial activity than 2-chlorobenzylidene-2-amino-4-chlorophenol as the free ligand (B.

  5. Effects of music on psychophysiological responses and opioid dosage in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Ji; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Hsieh, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The present authors examined the effects of listening to music on psychophysiological parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate) during preoperative and postoperative days and determined whether listening to music could lower pain intensity and opioid dosage during postoperative days in patients who underwent total knee replacements. This was a two group repeated measures design for 30 subjects aged 53-85 years who were scheduled for total knee replacement. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a music group or a control group. Psychophysiological parameters were obtained from patients' monitors. A visual analog scale was used to assess postoperative pain. Opioid dosage was recorded and converted to standardized units. Mann-Whitney U-test and generalized estimating equation analysis were used to compare groups. Respiratory rates while in the surgical waiting area were lower for the music group than for the control group (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between these groups for blood pressure, heart rate, pain intensity, or opioid dosage. However, a within-group comparison showed that systolic blood pressure in the music group was significantly and consistently decreased during postoperative recovery (Wald = 9.21, P = 0.007). These results suggest that listening to music stabilized systolic blood pressure in patients during postoperative recovery. However, the effects of music on psychophysiological parameters, pain intensity, and opioid dosage in a surgical setting require further research. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Studies of the labelling of human serum albumin with 99mTc using Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl2 as reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kolaly, M.T.; El-Asrag, H.A.; El-Wetery, A.S.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the effect of Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl 2 on the labelling efficiency and tissue distribution of 99m Tc-human serum albumin. The effect of reductant content, reaction time (incubation time), albumin content, pH, and ascorbic acid on the efficiency of labelling and the tissue distribution of the labelled albumin has been investigated. The percentage of labelling was determined by paper and thin layer radiochromatography. Ascorbic acid shows no effect on either labelling efficiency or tissue distribution of 99m Tc-HSA prepared by Sn(II) tartrate or Sn(II)Cl 2 . (author)

  7. Plasma-wall Interaction Studies in the Start-up Phase of TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cal, E.; Tabares, F.L.; Tafalla, D.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present some first plasma-wall interaction studies made during the first experimental campaign of TJ-II. The different sections contain independent contributions presented orally in the fusion division of the Euratom-Ciemat association during 1998: I. Density limit during the start-up phase of TJ-II : are we limited by radiation?. II. Temporal evolution of oxygen in the plasma during an experimental day. III. The contribution of helium to the plasma electron density IV. First studies of the S.O.L. diffusion coefficient and its dependence with the boundary plasma parameters. (Author) 3 refs

  8. Increased psychophysiological parameters of attention in non-psychotic individuals with auditory verbal hallucinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lutterveld, Remko; Oranje, Bob; Abramovic, Lucija

    2010-01-01

    with an auditory oddball paradigm in 18 non-psychotic individuals with AVH and 18 controls. RESULTS: P300 amplitude was increased in the AVH group as compared to controls, reflecting superior effortful attention. A trend in the same direction was found for processing negativity. No significant differences were...... found for mismatch negativity. CONCLUSION: Contrary to our expectations, non-psychotic individuals with AVH show increased rather than decreased psychophysiological measures of effortful attention compared to healthy controls, refuting a pivotal role of decreased effortful attention...

  9. Psychophysiological Assessment Of Fear Experience In Response To Sound During Computer Video Gameplay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, Tom Alexander; Grimshaw, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The potential value of a looping biometric feedback system as a key component of adaptive computer video games is significant. Psychophysiological measures are essential to the development of an automated emotion recognition program, capable of interpreting physiological data into models of affect...... and systematically altering the game environment in response. This article presents empirical data the analysis of which advocates electrodermal activity and electromyography as suitable physiological measures to work effectively within a computer video game-based biometric feedback loop, within which sound...

  10. Column dynamic studies and breakthrough curve analysis for Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions adsorption onto palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Shukor Abdul; Manaf, Latifah Abd; Man, Hasfalina Che; Kumar, Nadavala Siva

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA) derived from an agricultural waste material in removing Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution via column studies. The performance of the study is described through the breakthrough curves concept under relevant operating conditions such as column bed depths (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) and influent metal concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mg/L). The Cd(II) and Cu(II) uptake mechanism is particularly bed depth- and concentration-dependant, favoring higher bed depth and lower influent metal concentration. The highest bed capacity of 34.91 mg Cd(II)/g and 21.93 mg Cu(II)/g of POFA was achieved at 20 mg/L of influent metal concentrations, column bed depth of 2 cm, and flow rate of 5 mL/min. The whole breakthrough curve simulation for both metal ions were best described using the Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models, but it is apparent that the initial region of the breakthrough for Cd(II) was better described using the BDST model. The results illustrate that POFA could be utilized effectively for the removal of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column system.

  11. Tears Falling on Goosebumps: Co-occurrence of Emotional Lacrimation and Emotional Piloerection Indicates a Psychophysiological Climax in Emotional Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Jacobsen, Thomas; Heinrich, Jan; Schneiderbauer, Manuel; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    This psychophysiological study is the first to examine the relationship between emotional tears and emotional piloerection (i.e., goosebumps). Although both phenomena have been related to peak states of being moved, details about their temporal occurrence and the associated levels of physiological arousal have remained unknown. In our study, we used emotionally powerful film scenes that were self-selected by participants. Our findings show that even within peak moments of emotional arousal, a gradation of intensity is possible. The overlap of tears and goosebumps signifies a maximal climax within peak moments. On the side of the stimulus, we found that displays of prosocial behavior play a crucial role in the elicitation of tears and goosebumps. Finally, based on the results of a formal film analysis of the tears-eliciting clips provided by our participants, as compared to randomly extracted, equally long control clips from the same films, we show how the technical and artistic making of the clips was optimized for the display of social interaction and emotional expressions. PMID:28223946

  12. Multilevel analysis of facial expressions of emotion and script: self-report (arousal and valence) and psychophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Vanutelli, Maria Elide; Finocchiaro, Roberta

    2014-09-26

    The paper explored emotion comprehension in children with regard to facial expression of emotion. The effect of valence and arousal evaluation, of context and of psychophysiological measures was monitored. Indeed subjective evaluation of valence (positive vs. negative) and arousal (high vs. low), and contextual (facial expression vs. facial expression and script) variables were supposed to modulate the psychophysiological responses. Self-report measures (in terms of correct recognition, arousal and valence attribution) and psychophysiological correlates (facial electromyography, EMG, skin conductance response, SCR, and heart rate, HR) were observed when children (N = 26; mean age = 8.75 y; range 6-11 y) looked at six facial expressions of emotions (happiness, anger, fear, sadness, surprise, and disgust) and six emotional scripts (contextualized facial expressions). The competencies about the recognition, the evaluation on valence and arousal was tested in concomitance with psychophysiological variations. Specifically, we tested for the congruence of these multiple measures. Log-linear analysis and repeated measure ANOVAs showed different representations across the subjects, as a function of emotion. Specifically, children' recognition and attribution were well developed for some emotions (such as anger, fear, surprise and happiness), whereas some other emotions (mainly disgust and sadness) were less clearly represented. SCR, HR and EMG measures were modulated by the evaluation based on valence and arousal, with increased psychophysiological values mainly in response to anger, fear and happiness. As shown by multiple regression analysis, a significant consonance was found between self-report measures and psychophysiological behavior, mainly for emotions rated as more arousing and negative in valence. The multilevel measures were discussed at light of dimensional attribution model.

  13. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This Article Abstract Introduction ... Table 1. Pregnancy Complications and Diabetes Risk Factors, Nurses’ Health Study II, 1989–2005 Characteristic All Births ...

  14. Type II diabetes and personality; a study to explore other psychosomatic aspects of diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeilinasab, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Mokarrar, Mohsen Heidari; Rahmati, Leila; Mahjouri, Mohammad Yoosef; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background As one of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes and its control are affected by the patients? psychological and spiritual attributes. The present study investigates the relationship between glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes and personality traits, defense mechanisms and spirituality. Method The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 Iranian patients with type II diabetes, 64% were men. Participants completed the NEO Personality Inventory, the Defen...

  15. Extraction magnetically insulated diode studies on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, J.M.; Boller, J.R.; Ottinger, P.F.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Greenly, J.

    1993-01-01

    An extraction Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID) with anode and cathode magnetic field coils has been tested on the NRL Gamble II accelerator. The purpose of the experiments is to develop an annular, intense ion beam source for testing ion beam transport physics related to light ion inertial confinement fusion. Initial experiments have been performed with surface flashover ion sources. The experimental challenge has been to obtain a tuning of the 4 magnetic field coils that results in a minimum turn-on time of the ion source and acceptable coupling to the accelerator. Results from several different geometries of magnetic field will be presented. The principal diode diagnostics are the total diode current, net ion current, and corrected diode voltage. Calculations of the magnetic field strength and geometry are performed with the ATHETA code. An active anode ion source is also under development. The initial portion of the accelerator pulse is diverted with a plasma opening switch (POS) and passed through a thin foil that will become the ion source. The foil is swiftly heated by the current pulse and gas is desorbed or diffused from the foil into the anode-cathode gap. The gas is then broken down by the current pulse, forming a dense plasma source on the anode surface. Two different foils are being used. A thin aluminum foil will work with desorbed gases, and provide a beam that is predominately protons. A hydrogen loaded titanium foil, with a paladium overcoating, will use diffused hydrogen, and produce a high purity proton beam. The net result of the POS and active anode plasma source should be much faster ion turn-on time, and better coupling of the ion source to the accelerator. Preliminary results with the active anode sources will be presented

  16. Spectrochemical study the effect of high energetic ionization radiation on Ru(III, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar A. Aly

    2017-04-01

    Thermal studies of these chelates before and after γ-irradiation stable that the complexes of Ru(III and Pd (II after γ-irradiation are more thermal show than Hg(II complexes before and after γ-irradiation.

  17. Psychophysiology of Delayed Extinction and Reconsolidation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    fearfulness in anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. Studying the efficacy of potential interventions in clinical populations is challenging...involved in the pathogenesis of PTSD (Pitman, 1989). Pharmacological agents, including beta- adrenergic antagonists, could limit the memory...providing a potential means to reduce fearfulness in anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study used videos of

  18. The "choking game": a new craze among Brazilian children and young people. Psychophysiological, behavioral and epidemiological characteristics of 'asphyxial games'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilheri, Juliana; Andronikof, Anne; Yazigi, Latife

    2017-03-01

    The 'choking game' is a risk-taking behavior that has spread quickly among children and young people, causing dependence, accidents and even death, including in Brazil. These activities are performed in order to experience fleeting euphoric sensations, attracting numerous participants through the thousands of videos posted on YouTube. The problem of 'asphyxial games' can be observed in the Brazilian digital media, although there is a lack of scientific studies. Through a systematic review of the literature and complementary material, this paper aims to address the 'asphyxial games', warning about the psychophysiological and behavioral effects of these practices, while also presenting international epidemiological data. Sharing this information in academic circles is extremely important given the need to acquire more knowledge on the topic, train professionals and propose preventive measures that raise awareness among children and young people of the potential danger of voluntary fainting. It is equally important to raise awareness among parents and teachers so they can identify the warning signs that children may be engaging in these practices. And finally, it is also necessary to request government support to control exposure to videos that encourage the behavior.

  19. Psychophysiological and self-reported reactivity associated with social anxiety and public speaking fear symptoms: Effects of fear versus distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Georgia; Karekla, Maria; Georgiou, Dora; Constantinou, Elena; Paraskeva-Siamata, Michaela

    2017-09-01

    This study examines psychophysiological and subjective reactivity to anxiety-provoking situations in relation to social anxiety and public speaking fear. We hypothesized that social anxiety symptoms would be associated with similar reactivity across types of imaginary anxiety scenes and not specifically to social anxiety-related scenes. This would be attributed to co-existing depression symptoms. Public speaking fear was expected to be associated with more circumscribed reactivity to survival-threat scenes, due to its association with fearfulness. Community participants imagined standardized anxiety situations, including social anxiety and animal fear scenes, while their physiological reactivity and self-reported emotions were assessed. Findings supported that social anxiety was associated with undifferentiated physiological reactivity across anxiety-provoking situations, except with regards to skin conductance level, which was higher during social anxiety imagery. Public speaking fear was associated with increased reactivity to animal phobia and panic scenes. Covariance analyses indicated that the lack of response specificity associated with social anxiety could be attributed to depression levels, while the specificity associated with public speaking fear could be explained by fearfulness. Findings highlight the need to assess not only primary anxiety symptoms but also depression and fearfulness, which likely predict discrepant reactions of individuals to anxiogenic situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria eMallorquí-Bagué

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased ‘interoceptive’ sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal. Joint hypermobility, an expression of a common variation in the connective tissue protein collagen, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor to anxiety and related disorders. This study explored the link between anxiety, interoceptive sensitivity and hypermobility in a sub-clinical population using neuroimaging and psychophysiological evaluation. Methods: Thirty-six healthy volunteers undertook interoceptive sensitivity tests, a clinical examination for hypermobility and completed validated questionnaire measures of state, anxiety and body awareness tendency. Nineteen participants also performed an emotional processing paradigm during functional neuroimaging. Results: We confirmed a significant relationship between state anxiety score and joint hypermobility. Interoceptive sensitivity mediated the relationship between state anxiety and hypermobility. Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

  1. The Diabeates Project: Perceptual, Affective and Psychophysiological Effects of Music and Music-Video in a Clinical Exercise Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jasmin C; Karageorghis, Costas I; Black, Jessica D

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music and music-video on perceptual (attentional focus, rated perceived exertion), affective (affective valence and enjoyment) and psychophysiological (blood glucose, heart rate) variables in outpatients attending a diabetes exercise clinic. Participants were 24 females (age = 66.0 ± 8.5 years) enrolled in a supervised exercise program for people with diabetes. They engaged in mixed-modality exercise sessions that included a standardized combination of flexibility, aerobic and resistance activities under conditions of music, music-video and control. Analyses revealed a main effect of condition on attentional focus and affect during aerobic exercise only. The music-video condition elicited the highest level of attentional dissociation, while affective valence was more positive in the 2 experimental conditions when compared to control. Rated perceived exertion and heart rate did not differ across conditions. Measures of exercise enjoyment indicated a main effect of condition wherein scores were higher with the music-video condition when compared to control. There was an acute glucose-lowering effect of exercise in all conditions. Results lend support to the notion that auditory and visual stimuli can enhance affective responses to exercise in a clinical setting. This may have meaningful implications for adherence, given the link between affective judgements and future behaviour in an exercise context. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Guidelines for uncertainty analysis developed for the participants in the BIOMOVS II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeverstam, U.; Davis, P.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Henrich, E.; Koch, J.

    1993-07-01

    This report has been produced to provide guidelines for uncertainty analysis for use by participants in the BIOMOVS II study. It is hoped that others with an interest in modelling contamination in the biosphere will also find it useful. The report has been prepared by members of the Uncertainty and Validation Working Group and has been reviewed by other BIOMOVS II participants. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the views of the BIOMOVS II sponsors or other BIOMOVS Il participating organisations

  3. Guidelines for uncertainty analysis developed for the participants in the BIOMOVS II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeverstam, U; Davis, P; Garcia-Olivares, A; Henrich, E; Koch, J

    1993-07-01

    This report has been produced to provide guidelines for uncertainty analysis for use by participants in the BIOMOVS II study. It is hoped that others with an interest in modelling contamination in the biosphere will also find it useful. The report has been prepared by members of the Uncertainty and Validation Working Group and has been reviewed by other BIOMOVS II participants. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the views of the BIOMOVS II sponsors or other BIOMOVS Il participating organisations.

  4. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  5. ynthesis, theoretical study on Zinc (II and Ni(II complexes of 5-methoxyisatin 3-[N-(4-chlorophenyl thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kandemirli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Zinc(II and nickel(II-complexes of 5-methoxyisatin 3-[N-(4-chlorophenyl thiosemicarbazone] (H2MICP were synthesized and characterized by infrared, ultraviolet and 1H-NMR spectroscopies as well as elemental analysis. Model of H2MICP and its zinc(II and nickel(II-complexes were optimized with B3LYP method using 6-31G(d,p, 6-311G(d,p, 6-311++G(d,p, 6-311++G(2d,2p basis sets. The calculated 1H-NMR, UV and IR spectra data were compared with experimental results. In addition to the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO analysis of H2MICP and its Zinc(II and Nickel(II complexes, Fukui functions of H2MICP were also reported.

  6. Iron(II) porphyrins induced conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting Ting; Liu, Yong Dong; Zhong, Ru Gang

    2015-09-01

    Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by heme proteins was reported as a protective mechanism to hypoxic injury in mammalian physiology. In this study, the pathways of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrin (P) complexes, which were generally recognized as models for heme proteins, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). In view of two type isomers of combination of nitrite and Fe(II)(P), N-nitro- and O-nitrito-Fe(II)-porphyrin complexes, and two binding sites of proton to the different O atoms of nitrite moiety, four main pathways for the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrins were proposed. The results indicate that the pathway of N-bound Fe(II)(P)(NO2) isomer into Fe(III)(P)(NO) and water is similar to that of O-bound isomer into nitric oxide and Fe(III)(P)(OH) in both thermodynamical and dynamical aspects. Based on the initial computational studies of five-coordinate nitrite complexes, the conversion of nitrite into NO mediated by Fe(II)(P)(L) complexes with 14 kinds of proximal ligands was also investigated. Generally, the same conclusion that the pathways of N-bound isomers are similar to those of O-bound isomer was obtained for iron(II) porphyrin with ligands. Different effects of ligands on the reduction reactions were also found. It is notable that the negative proximal ligands can improve reactive abilities of N-nitro-iron(II) porphyrins in the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide compared to neutral ligands. The findings will be helpful to expand our understanding of the mechanism of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by iron(II) porphyrins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NMR study of the possible interaction in solution of angiotensin II with a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, H.L.; Fesik, S.W.; Austin, R.E.; Martin, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    The potential binding of angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) (AII) to a peptide encoded by its complementary RNA (Lys-Gly-Val-Asp-Val-Try-Ala-Val) (IIA) has been studied by monitoring the 1 H NMR spectrum of IIA in aqueous phosphate or Tris·HCl buffer ( 2 H 2 O) as it is titrated with AII. For molar ratios of AII/IIA ranging from 0.2 to 1.8, the NMR spectra are unchanged as compared to the spectra of the isolated peptides. Based on these findings, the K d for the putative biomolecular complex of the two peptides under these conditions is calculated to be >10 -4 M. This result does not support the suggestion of Elton et al. that AII and IIA engage in high-affinity binding (K d ∼ 5 x 10 -8 M) with each other

  8. Music induces universal emotion-related psychophysiological responses: comparing Canadian listeners to Congolese Pygmies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egermann, Hauke; Fernando, Nathalie; Chuen, Lorraine; McAdams, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mebenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29–99 s in duration in random order (eight from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts). For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface), peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation). Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre) were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music. PMID:25620935

  9. Music Induces Universal Emotion-Related Psychophysiological Responses: Comparing Canadian Listeners To Congolese Pygmies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke eEgermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective and psychophysiological emotional responses to music from two different cultures were compared within these two cultures. Two identical experiments were conducted: the first in the Congolese rainforest with an isolated population of Mbenzélé Pygmies without any exposure to Western music and culture, the second with a group of Western music listeners, with no experience with Congolese music. Forty Pygmies and 40 Canadians listened in pairs to 19 music excerpts of 29 to 99 seconds in duration in random order (8 from the Pygmy population and 11 Western instrumental excerpts. For both groups, emotion components were continuously measured: subjective feeling (using a two- dimensional valence and arousal rating interface, peripheral physiological activation, and facial expression. While Pygmy music was rated as positive and arousing by Pygmies, ratings of Western music by Westerners covered the range from arousing to calming and from positive to negative. Comparing psychophysiological responses to emotional qualities of Pygmy music across participant groups showed no similarities. However, Western stimuli, rated as high and low arousing by Canadians, created similar responses in both participant groups (with high arousal associated with increases in subjective and physiological activation. Several low-level acoustical features of the music presented (tempo, pitch, and timbre were shown to affect subjective and physiological arousal similarly in both cultures. Results suggest that while the subjective dimension of emotional valence might be mediated by cultural learning, changes in arousal might involve a more basic, universal response to low-level acoustical characteristics of music.

  10. Immunochemical studies of Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A A; Kihara, T K; Marsh, D G

    1987-12-15

    It was reported earlier that human immune responses to three perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III, are associated with histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3. Rye-allergic people are often concordantly sensitive to all three of these allergens. Since earlier studies suggested that these antigens are non-cross-reactive, their immunologic relatedness by double antibody radioimmunoassay (DARIA) was studied in order to understand further the immunochemical basis for the concordant recognition of the three allergens. Direct binding DARIA studies were performed with human sera from 189 allergic subjects. Inhibition DARIA studies were carried out with 17 human sera from grass-allergic patients who were on grass immunotherapy, one goat anti-serum, and six rabbit antisera. None of the sera detected any significant degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p I and II, or between Lol p I and III. However, the degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III exhibited by individual human and animal antisera varied between undetectable and 100%. In general, the degree of cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III was higher among human sera than among animal sera. Taken together with earlier findings that antibody responses to Lol p I, II and III are associated with HLA-HDR3, and that most Lol p II and III responders are also Lol p I responders, but not vice versa, our present results suggest the following: the HLA-DR3-encoded Ia molecule recognizes a similar immunodominant Ia recognition site (agretope) shared between Lol p I and Lol p II and/or III; in addition, Lol p I appears to contain unique Ia recognition site(s) not present in Lol p II and III. However, further epitope analyses are required to investigate these possibilities.

  11. A Review of Psycho-Physiological Responses to Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Vera; Schneider, Stefan; Guardiera, Simon; Struder, Heiko K.

    2008-06-01

    This review combines and correlates data of several studies conducted in the recent years where we were able to show an increase in stress hormone concentrations, EEG activity and a decrease in mood during parabolic flights. The aim of these studies was to consider whether previous results showing a decrease in mental and perceptual motor performance during weightlessness were solely due to the changes in gravity itself or were also, at least partly, explainable by an increase of stress and/or arousal during parabolic flights. A correlation between stress hormones and mood but not between EEG activity and mood nor between stress hormones and EEG activity could be found. We propose two different stressors: First an activation of the adrenomedullary system, secondly a general increase of cortical arousal. Whereas the first one is perceived by subjects, this is not the case for the second one.

  12. Recovery from Gz-induced Loss of Consciousness: Psychophysiologic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    hypnagogic hallucinations). REM activity been considered to occur during REM sleep, non-REM during narcoleptic episodes is usually present at the on...is difficult to ascertain whether the sidered adequate for our purposes. Fig. 3 depicts an "dreams" reported were either " hypnagogic " (as the...necessary. Currently, it is difficult to obtain EEG data in the ac- HYPNAGOGIC HYPNOPOMPIC celeration environment. However, current studies are PERIOD

  13. Psychophysiology of Delayed Extinction and Reconsideration in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    modify or block it. The aim of this project is to create an experimental assay in the form of an optimal Pavlovian differential fear conditioning ...The aim of this project is to create an experimental assay in the form of an optimal Pavlovian differential fear conditioning paradigm. Animal...open label study examining the relative efficacies of pharmacological and non- drug interventions within a fear conditioning paradigm. At the time of

  14. Army Personnel Management System Study (PMS2). Volume II. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-06

    demonstrated desirability, some functions would be facilitated, costs need further study, and mobilization capabilities should be emphasized. PMS2 is basis for current reorganization planning within ODCSPER.

  15. Shirodhara : A psycho-physiological profile in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana D Dhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shirodhara is a classical and a well-established ayurvedic procedure of slowly and steadily dripping medicated oil or other liquids on the forehead. This procedure induces a relaxed state of awareness that results in a dynamic psycho-somatic balance. Objectives: The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychological and physiological effects of Shirodhara in healthy volunteers by monitoring the rating of mood and levels of stress, electrocardiogram (ECG, electroencephalogram (EEG, and selected biochemical markers of stress. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the human pharmacology laboratory. The study design was open labeled, comparing the baseline variables with values after Shirodhara. The subjects (n = 16 chosen were healthy human volunteers who gave an informed consent. Shirodhara was preceded by Abhyanga - whole body massage. The Shirodhara method was standardized for rate of dripping with peristaltic pump and temperature was controlled with a thermostat. Mood and stress levels were assessed by validated rating scales. The pre- and post-Shirodhara ECG and EEG records were evaluated. Results: Student′s paired "t" test was applied to the means + SE of the variables to calculate statistical significance at P <0.05. There was a significant improvement in mood scores and the level of stress (P <0.001. These changes were accompanied by significant decrease in rate of breathing and reduction in diastolic blood pressure along with reduction in heart rate. The relaxed alert state, after Shirodhara, was co-related with an increase in alfa rhythm in EEG. Conclusion : A standardized Shirodhara leads to a state of alert calmness similar to the relaxation response observed in meditation. The clinical benefits observed with Shirodhara in anxiety neurosis, hypertension, and stress aggravation due to chronic degenerative diseases could be mediated through these adaptive physiological effects.

  16. Psychophysiological Tracking of a Female Physique Competitor through Competition Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrig, Brandon J; Pettitt, Robert W; Pettitt, Cherie D; Kanzenbach, Todd L

    2017-01-01

    Natural physique competitions are based on subjective judgments of how a competitor appears on show day. Prior to competition, there is a prolonged dieting phase referred to as contest preparation. The primary goal is to reduce body fat levels while maintaining skeletal muscle mass. The study tracked the physiological and psychological changes for a 24 year old female preparing for a physique competition. The study was conducted to describe the physiological and psychological changes of a female physique competitor who engages in long-term contest preparation. Diet, body composition, blood work, energy expenditure, mood, and performance were evaluated through contest preparation. The participant lost 10.1kg throughout contest preparation in a strong weekly linear pattern (R 2 =0.97). Body fat was reduced from 30.45% to 15.85% while fat free mass was maintained. Mood for the participant remained stable until month five, when an observed variation occurred, with performance maintaining. Contest preparation was successful in reducing the body fat in the participant while having a minimum effect on both performance and fat free mass. For athletes looking to lose large amounts of body fat with minimal performance decrements a prolonged diet period with moderate exercise and food restriction can be an effective solution.

  17. Facial feature tracking: a psychophysiological measure to assess exercise intensity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Kathleen H; Clark, Bradley; Périard, Julien D; Goecke, Roland; Thompson, Kevin G

    2018-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether facial feature tracking reliably measures changes in facial movement across varying exercise intensities. Fifteen cyclists completed three, incremental intensity, cycling trials to exhaustion while their faces were recorded with video cameras. Facial feature tracking was found to be a moderately reliable measure of facial movement during incremental intensity cycling (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.65-0.68). Facial movement (whole face (WF), upper face (UF), lower face (LF) and head movement (HM)) increased with exercise intensity, from lactate threshold one (LT1) until attainment of maximal aerobic power (MAP) (WF 3464 ± 3364mm, P exercise intensities (UF minus LF at: LT1, 1048 ± 383mm; LT2, 1208 ± 611mm; MAP, 1401 ± 712mm; P exercise intensity.

  18. The psychophysiology of real-time financial risk processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Andrew W; Repin, Dmitry V

    2002-04-01

    A longstanding controversy in economics and finance is whether financial markets are governed by rational forces or by emotional responses. We study the importance of emotion in the decision-making process of professional securities traders by measuring their physiological characteristics (e.g., skin conductance, blood volume pulse, etc.) during live trading sessions while simultaneously capturing real-time prices from which market events can be detected. In a sample of 10 traders, we find statistically significant differences in mean electrodermal responses during transient market events relative to no-event control periods, and statistically significant mean changes in cardiovascular variables during periods of heightened market volatility relative to normal-volatility control periods. We also observe significant differences in these physiological responses across the 10 traders that may be systematically related to the traders' levels of experience.

  19. Synthesis, spectral, thermal studies and electrical conductivity of Co (II) and Ni (II) complexes 3-[4-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaber, Mohamed, E-mail: abuelazm@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, 31527 Tanta (Egypt); Al-Daly, Samy; Fayed, Tarek [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, 31527 Tanta (Egypt); El-Sayed, Yousif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt)

    2015-01-15

    Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of 3-[4-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl)prop-2-en-1-one have been prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic spectra as well as thermal studies. The magnetic and spectral studies suggested the octahedral geometry for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes. The kinetic parameters of the thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats–Redfern method. The electrical conductivity of the titled ligand and its Co(II) complexes was studied. The effects of different alcoholic solvents, pH and temperature on the complexation formation were considered. Also, the effect of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions on the emission spectrum of the free DMAPP was assigned. The stoichiometry of the metal complexes, the conditional formation constant, free energy, Beer{sup '}s law, molar extinction coefficient as well as specific absorptivity were evaluated. The ability of using the titled ligand as metalochromic indicator in complexometric titration was studied.

  20. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of Pb(II and Cd(II adsorption on African wild mango (Irvingia gabonensis shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Adekola

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption behavior of NaOH-activated African wild mango (Irvingia gabonensis shell with respect to Pb2+ and Cd2+ has been studied in order to consider its application to purify metal finishing waste water. The optimum conditions of adsorption were determined by investigating the initial metal ions concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature. The extent of adsorption of metal ions was investigated by batch method using metal concentrations in solution ranging from 5-200 mg/L. The adsorption efficiencies were found to be pH dependent, with maximum metals uptake recorded at pH of 5. The equilibrium adsorption capacity for lead and cadmium ions were obtained from Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and DRK isotherms and the experimental data were found to fit best the Langmuir isotherm with values of 21.28 and 40.00 mg/g for Cd(II and Pb(II ions, respectively. The Pseudo-second order kinetics model had the best fitting for lead and cadmium adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic investigation showed that the adsorption processes of both metals are exothermic. An optimum concentration of 0.05 M HCl was found to be adequate for the regeneration of the spent adsorbent with recovery values of 78% and 71% for Pb2+ and Cd2+ respectively from the spent adsorbent. The results revealed that lead and cadmium are considerably adsorbed on the adsorbent and could be an economic method for the removal of these metals from aqueous solutions.

  1. A study on the safety regulation of byproduct material (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Sun; Song, Yang Su [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    The scope of this study consists of : in relating to the domestic license of byproduct material, a survey of technical criteria and status of regulation in U.S.A., a determination of range of application and contents of byproduct material, a tentative suggestion of related technical criteria and regulatory system. A study was performed about the above topics to establish the safe regulation of byproduct material institutionally, and this can be contributed in establishing the proper domestic technical criteria related.

  2. Rapid adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) by rice straw/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposite: optimization, equilibrium isotherms, and adsorption kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles.

  3. Comparative Study on Adsorption of Mn(II from Aqueous Solutions on Various Activated Carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Mn(II on indigenously prepared activated carbons (IPAC from Bombax malabaricum, Pithecelobium dulse, Ipomea batatas and Peltaforum ferraginium have been studied. The effects of various experimental parameters have been investigated using batch adsorption technique. The extent of Mn(II removal increased with decrease in initial concentration of the Mn(II, particle size of the adsorbent and increased with increase in contact time, amount of adsorbent used and the initial pH of the solution. Adsorption data were modeled using Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms and first order kinetic equations. The kinetics of adsorption was found to be first order with regard to intra-particle diffusion rate. The results indicate that such carbons could be employed as low cost adsorbents in waste water treatment for the removal of Mn(II.

  4. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  5. Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study

  6. Statistical ensembles and molecular dynamics studies of anisotropic solids. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.R.; Rahman, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have recently discussed how the Parrinello--Rahman theory can be brought into accord with the theory of the elastic and thermodynamic behavior of anisotropic media. This involves the isoenthalpic--isotension ensemble of statistical mechanics. Nose has developed a canonical ensemble form of molecular dynamics. We combine Nose's ideas with the Parrinello--Rahman theory to obtain a canonical form of molecular dynamics appropriate to the study of anisotropic media subjected to arbitrary external stress. We employ this isothermal--isotension ensemble in a study of a fcc→ close-packed structural phase transformation in a Lennard-Jones solid subjected to uniaxial compression. Our interpretation of the Nose theory does not involve a scaling of the time variable. This latter fact leads to simplifications when studying the time dependence of quantities

  7. Morphologic study of the maxillary molars. Part II: Internal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécora, J D; Woelfel, J B; Sousa Neto, M D; Issa, E P

    1992-01-01

    The internal anatomy of three hundred and seventy (370) decalcified and cleared human maxillary molars was studied. Seventy-five percent of the first molars, 58% of the second molars and 68% of the third molars studied presented three (3) root canals and 25% of the first molars, 42% of the second molars and 32% of the third molars presented four (4) root canals. The authors observed that the incidence of two root canals in the mesiobuccal root was higher in second maxillary molars than in first maxillary molars.

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity and aspects of cognitive coping negatively predict outcome in cognitive behavioral treatment of psychophysiological insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, M. van de; Pevernagie, D.; Mierlo, P. van; Overeem, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral treatment is the gold standard treatment for insomnia, although a substantial group does not respond. We examined possible predictors for treatment outcome in psychophysiological insomniacs, with a focus on the presence of clearly defined psychiatric comorbidity. This was a

  9. Synthesis, spectral, antitumor, antioxidant and antimicrobial studies on Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of 4-[(1H-Benzoimidazol-2-ylimino)-methyl]-benzene-1,3-diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-wakiel, Nadia; El-keiy, Mai; Gaber, Mohamed

    2015-08-05

    A new Schiff base of 2-aminobenzimidazole with 2,4-dihydroybezaldehyde (H₃L), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, thermal analysis (TGA), inductive coupled plasma (ICP), magnetic moment measurements, IR, EI-mass, UV-Vis. and ESR spectral studies. On the basis of spectral studies and analytical data, it is evident that the Schiff base acts as dibasic tridentate ligand coordinating via deprotonated OH, NH and azomethine nitrogen atom. The results showed that Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes have tetrahedral structure while Cu(II) complexes has octahedral geometry. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated. The studied complexes were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against some bacterial strains. The anticancer activity of the ligand and its metal complexes is evaluated against human liver Carcinoma (HEPG2) cell. These compounds exhibited a moderate and weak activity against the tested HEPG2 cell lines with IC₅₀ of 9.08, 18.2 and 19.7 μg/ml for ligand, Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro antioxidant activity of the newly synthesized compounds has also been evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  11. Case study of degeneracy in quantum statistics. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, W.A.; Raney, D.; Sy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In an earlier paper, classical and weak degeneracy, with the activity parameter r between 0 and 1, are investigated. In this paper, intermediate and strong degeneracy, with r>1, are studied. Coefficients for the Joyce--Dixon-type series are calculated for bosons as well as fermions in one, two, and three dimensions, for either nonrelativistic or ultrarelativistic particles. The theory is applied to the electrons and Cooper pairs in mercury at four temperatures

  12. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora (II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Tao, Liang

    2010-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. seven compounds were isolated and identified as aucubin (1), catalpol (2), acteoside (3), martynoside (4), ursolicacid (5), daucosterol (6), beta-sitosterol-3-0-beta-D-(6'-0-palmitate) glucopyranosisde (7). All these compounds are obtained from Buddleja albiflora for the first time.

  13. A Study on the Anodic Dissolution of Aluminum(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, C. W.; Park, C. S.; Park, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    In many cases oxide films formed on metals in atmosphere or aqueous solution are chemically inactive, especially it is the case with aluminum. In this study, anodic dissolution of aluminum was done using various electrolyte and cathode, mechanism of which was examined. As a consequence, oxide film on aluminum surface was dissolved together with the dissolution reaction of metal by the anodic current. It was shown that the dissolution reaction due to the contact between electrolyte and metal happened in the same time

  14. Study on the ventilation resistance of timbered airways (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, S; Takiguchi, I

    1977-01-01

    From the results of a model study described in a previous paper (I), (Vol.23, No.4), a timber factor Kr is determined as a specific parameter for type of timber and as a function of spacing ratio d/e where d and e are the spacing and the height of sets respectively. A general formula for the determination of the friction coefficient of timbered airways is also proposed.

  15. Study on dilatation of multi-criteria evaluation method (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabaru, Yasuhiko; Tomizawa, Masao; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2003-01-01

    In the study on FBR-cycle practical application strategy conducted by JNC, as part of development of evaluation system aiming at comparative evaluation of promising concept for FBR-cycle system, they grade the value of the concepts under the criteria evaluation such as economical efficiency and environmental load. In order that this system functions effectively in selecting promising concepts, we believe that it is important to extend the range of criteria evaluation and improve objectivity and persuasiveness of it. This is why since the last fiscal year we have been studying on evaluation methodology of and investigation examples on external economical efficiency (effects on the environment and human health, safety, energy security, nuclear non-proliferation, etc.) relevant to introduction of FBR, which had not been included in the conventional evaluation of economical efficiency. In this work, we have especially focused on the external economical efficiency relevant to energy security which is peculiar to FBR-cycle and studied on its evaluation methodology and investigation examples. Firstly, we summarized up on the concept and current situation of energy security and the position of nuclear energy in energy security. Then we identified the necessity of clarifying the importance of energy security with the middle-term point of view allowing for deficiency of fossil or uranium resources, and also the importance of the role of FBR as an improvement action for it. Secondly, we studied on the current energy economic model and examined the possibility of applying energy security for quantitative evaluation. As a result, we have concluded that the general equilibrium GTAP (Global Trade Analysis Project) in which fossil resource market around the world is modeled should be effective for quantitative evaluation of long term energy security. Finally, assuming that we will conduct the quantitative evaluation of long term energy security using GTAP model in the future, we

  16. Improvability of assembly systems II: Improvability indicators and case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-Y. Chiang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the performance analysis technique developed in Part I, this paper presents improvability indicators for assembly lines with unreliable machines. In particular, it shows that assembly lines are unimprovable with respect to workforce re-distribution if each buffer is, on the average, close to being half full. These lines are unimprovable with respect to buffer capacity re-distribution if each machine is starved and blocked with almost equal frequency. In addition, the paper provides indicators for identification of bottleneck machines and bottleneck buffers. Finally, the paper reports on an application of these improvability indicators in a case study at an automotive components plant.

  17. Study of the interaction between mercury (II) and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunmei, Dai; Cunwei, Ji; Huixiang, Lan; Yuze, Song; Wei, Yang; Dan, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Mercury is a significant environmental pollutant that originates from industry. Mercury will bind with albumin and destroy biological functions in humans if it enters the blood. In this paper, the interaction between mercury (II) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated in vitro by fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) under simulated physiological conditions. This study proves that the probable quenching mechanism of BSA by mercury (II) was mainly static quenching due to the formation of a mercury (II)-BSA complex. The quenching constant K(a) and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) at four different temperatures were calculated by a modified Stern-Volmer equation and the van't Hoff equation, respectively. The results revealed that the interaction between mercury (II) and BSA was mainly enthalpy-driven and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces played a major role in the reaction. The obtained data for binding sites of n approximately equal to 1 indicated that there was a single class of binding site for the BSA with mercury (II). The value of the distance r (3.55 nm), determined by Föster's non-radioactive energy transfer theory, suggested that the energy transfer from BSA to mercury (II) occurred with a high probability. The conformational investigation from synchronous fluorescence, CD spectroscopy and three-dimensional fluorescence showed that the presence of mercury (II) resulted in micro-environmental and conformational changes of the BSA molecules, which may be responsible for the toxicity of mercury (II) in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharyngeal airway dimensions in skeletal class II: A cephalometric growth study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu-Akcam, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal dimensions of individuals with skeletal class II, division 1 and division 2 patterns during the pre-peak, peak, and post-peak growth periods for comparison with a skeletal class I control group. Totally 124 lateral cephalograms (47 for skeletal class I; 45 for skeletal class II, division 1; and 32 for skeletal class II, division 2) in pre-peak, peak, and post-peak growth periods were selected from the department archives. Thirteen landmarks, 4 angular and 4 linear measurements, and 4 proportional calculations were obtained. The ANOVA and Duncan test were applied to compare the differences among the study groups during the growth periods. Statistically significant differences were found between the skeletal class II, division 2 group and other groups for the gonion-gnathion/sella-nasion angle. The sella-nasion-B-point angle was different among the groups, while the A-point-nasion-B-point angle was significantly different for all 3 groups. The nasopharyngeal airway space showed a statistically significant difference among the groups throughout the growth periods. The interaction among the growth periods and study groups was statistically significant regarding the upper oropharyngeal airway space measurement. The lower oropharyngeal airway space measurement showed a statistically significant difference among the groups, with the smallest dimension observed in the skeletal class II, division 2 group. The naso-oropharyngeal airway dimensions showed a statistically significant difference among the class II, division 1; class II, division 2; and class I groups during different growth periods

  19. Pharyngeal airway dimensions in skeletal class II: A cephalometric growth study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uslu-Akcam, Ozge [Clinic of Orthodontics, Ministry of Health, Tepebasi Oral and Dental Health Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2017-03-15

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal dimensions of individuals with skeletal class II, division 1 and division 2 patterns during the pre-peak, peak, and post-peak growth periods for comparison with a skeletal class I control group. Totally 124 lateral cephalograms (47 for skeletal class I; 45 for skeletal class II, division 1; and 32 for skeletal class II, division 2) in pre-peak, peak, and post-peak growth periods were selected from the department archives. Thirteen landmarks, 4 angular and 4 linear measurements, and 4 proportional calculations were obtained. The ANOVA and Duncan test were applied to compare the differences among the study groups during the growth periods. Statistically significant differences were found between the skeletal class II, division 2 group and other groups for the gonion-gnathion/sella-nasion angle. The sella-nasion-B-point angle was different among the groups, while the A-point-nasion-B-point angle was significantly different for all 3 groups. The nasopharyngeal airway space showed a statistically significant difference among the groups throughout the growth periods. The interaction among the growth periods and study groups was statistically significant regarding the upper oropharyngeal airway space measurement. The lower oropharyngeal airway space measurement showed a statistically significant difference among the groups, with the smallest dimension observed in the skeletal class II, division 2 group. The naso-oropharyngeal airway dimensions showed a statistically significant difference among the class II, division 1; class II, division 2; and class I groups during different growth periods.

  20. Chromosomic studies on some Pteridophyta from Portugal. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queirós, Magarida

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of ten taxa of Pteridophyta from Portugal are reported. Earlier counts on six of these taxa have been carried out on material from other portuguese places. Selaginella denticulata (L. Spring, Polypodium cambricum L. subsp. Cambricum, Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. var. adiantum-nigrum and Cystopteris fragilis (L. Bernh. subsp. fragilisare now first studied under the caryological point of view.

    Se ha estudiado el número cromosómico de algunos taxones de Pteridaphyta portugueses de los cuales se dan a conocer per primera vez los siguientes: Selaginella denticulata (L. Spring, Polypodium cambricum L. subsp. Cambricum, Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. var. adiantum-nigrum y Cystopteris fragilis (L. Bernh. subsp. fragilis. Los restantes coinciden con los datos dados anteriormente.

  1. Hemispheric asymmetry of the brain as a psycho-physiological basis of individual and typological features of the formation of a sense of humour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shportun O.N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the psycho-physiological peculiarities of hemispheric asymmetry of the brain as the basis of individual and typological features of the formation of a sense of humour. The analysis of the impact of the functional brain hemispheric asymmetry on emotional, intellectual and physiological features of development of sense of humour in ontogeny is conducted. Analysis of studies of inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the brain makes it possible to ascertain the impact of the functioning of each hemisphere on the formation of the perception of humour. Studies show that in the process of developing of sense of humour, two functional hemispheres of the brain are involved. As the emotion of humour – is an intellectual emotion, and in the development of intelligence a lot of mental processes are involved, in the formation of humour two hemispheres of the brain are functioned. The right hemisphere is responsible for the emotional nature of humour (intonation, sound level of language, speed of response to a joke ..., the left hemisphere – for processing verbal information (content of the joke, category, purpose, content analysis .... After analysing the research of hemispheric functional asymmetry of the human brain, its psycho-physiological and neurochemical characteristics, it can be assumed that people with more developed left hemisphere in perceiving humour are more prone to displays of gelotophilia and “right hemisphere” people – show signs of gelotophobia and katagelasticism. Examining gender differences of hemisphere asymmetry of the brain, it can be argued that diagnosing sense of humour is important to take into account gender-specific functioning of hemispheres, because men have more clearly functioning the left hemisphere, and women – the right one. This fact of sexual peculiarities of functioning of inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the brain allows diagnosing objectively sense of humour, as well as different variations

  2. A study on complex formation of cadmium (II) ions, 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Haruo

    1984-01-01

    Formation constants of cadmium (11) complexes with dicarboxylic acids such as oxalic, malonic, methylmalonic, succinic, and glutaric acids were determined in aqueous solutions containing 3 mol.dm -3 LiClO 4 as a constan ionic medium at 25 0 C by potentiometric titrations. It was reported in the previous works that cadmium (11)- aspartic acid complexes contained two chelate rings. However, a problem remained whether the second chelate ring could be formed by six membered-ring containing -O-Cd-N- bond or by seven membered-ring containing -O-Cd-O- bond. The results of the present work suggested that it would be formed by a six membered ring. Cadmium (11) ions were coordinated with a carboxylic group of the dicarboxylic acids studied, and formed no chelate ring within the complexes. The white precipitate appeared in the solution containing cadmium (11) ion and oxalic acid, in the pH range below 3.0, therefore, the chelate formation was not ascertained in this case. The formation constants, log βsub(pr)= log([Cdsub(p)Lsub(r)sup((2p-2r)+)]/([Cd 2+ ]sup(p)[L 2- ]sup(r))), of the complexes were: log β 11 = 1.98, log β 12 = 3.05 for cadmium (11)-malonic acid; log β 11 = 2.28, log β 12 = 3.06 for cadmium (11)-methylmalonic acid; log β 11 = 1.78, log β 12 = 3.08 for cadmium (11)-succinic acid; log β 11 = 1.85, log β 12 = 3.28 for cadmium (11)-glutaric acid complexes. (author)

  3. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  4. Studies of Inner Detector Layouts with 5 Pixel layers for the Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Garcia-Sciveres, M

    2013-01-01

    This note describes a study of Inner Detector layouts for the phase-II upgrade. Starting from the LOI layout the impact of adding a 5th pixel layer, and shortening the pixel and/or SCT barrel layers is studied.

  5. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  6. Synthesis, EPR, Electronic and Magnetic Studies on Cobalt (II) Complexes of Semicarbazone and Thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, S.; Gupta, L.K.; Sharma, K.K.

    2005-01-01

    Cobalt (II) complexes having the general composition Co(L2) X2 [where Lisopropyl methyl ketone semicarbazone (LLA), isopropyl methyl ketone thiosemicarbazone (LLB), 4-aminoacetophenone semicarbazone (LLC) and4-aminoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (LLD) and X=Cl] have been synthesized. All the Co(II) complexes reported here have been characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have magnetic moments corresponding to three unpaired electrons. The possible geometries of the complexes were assigned on the basis of electronic infrared and EPR spectral studies. (author) = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

  7. Radiation Hardness Study of CsI(Tl) Crystals for Belle II Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Matvienko, D V; Sedov, E V; Shwartz, B A

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II calorimeter (at least, its barrel part) consists of CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals which have been used at the Belle experiment. We perform the radiation hardness study of some typical Belle crystals and conclude their light output reductions are acceptable for Belle II experiment where the absorption dose can reach 10 krad during the detector operation. CsI(Tl) crystals have high stablity and low maintenance cost and are considered as possible option for the calorimeter of the future Super-Charm-Tau factory (SCT) in Novosibirsk. Our study demonstrates sufficiently high radiation hardness of CsI(Tl) crystals for SCT conditions.

  8. The effect of carbohydrate mouth rinse on performance, biochemical and psychophysiological variables during a cycling time trial: a crossover randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Amanda M J; Farias-Junior, Luiz F; Mota, Thaynan A A; Elsangedy, Hassan M; Marcadenti, Aline; Lemos, Telma M A M; Okano, Alexandre H; Fayh, Ana P T

    2018-01-01

    The hypothesis of the central effect of carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) on performance improvement in a fed state has not been established, and its psychophysiological responses have not yet been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CMR in athletes fed state on performance, biochemical and psychophysiological responses compared to ad libitum water intake. Eleven trained male cyclists completed a randomized, crossover trial, which consisted of a 30 km cycle ergometer at self-selected intensity and in a fed state. Subjects were under random influence of the following interventions: CMR with a 6% unflavored maltodextrin solution; mouth rinsing with a placebo solution (PMR); drinking "ad libitum" (DAL). The time for completion of the test (min), heart rate (bpm) and power (watts), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affective response, blood glucose (mg/dL) and lactate (mmol/DL), were evaluated before, during and immediately after the test, while insulin (uIL/mL), cortisol (μg/dL) and creatine kinase (U/L) levels were measured before, immediately after the test and 30 min after the test. Time for completion of the 30 km trial did not differ significantly among CMR, PMR and DAL interventions (means = 54.5 ± 2.9, 54.7 ± 2.9 and 54.5 ± 2.5 min, respectively; p  = 0.82). RPE and affective response were higher in DAL intervention ( p  creatine kinase responses showed no significant difference among interventions. In a fed state, CMR has not caused metabolic changes, and it has not improved physical performance compared to ad libitum water intake, but demonstrated a possible central effect. ReBec registration number: RBR-4vpwkg. Available in http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/?q=RBR-4vpwkg.

  9. Demonstration of intuitive thinking in conditions of competitive activity depending on athletes' psychophysiological state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One investigated application of intuitive thinking, depending on the physiological status of skilled fighters in their competitive activity. In research members of the team of Ukraine in Greco-Roman wrestling participated. 29 effective throws were analysed reverse a capture from position orchestra. One analyzed the effectiveness of intuitive thinking in athletes of different weight categories and the distribution coefficients of correlation of psychophysiological functions of athletes directly in competition during championships of Ukraine, World and Europe. One found that expression of intuitive thinking is associated with weight category of skilled fighters. It is shown that the effectiveness of intuitive thinking in terms of competitive activity is related to physiological state, and, above all qualified wrestlers' neurodynamic functions.

  10. Psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD: Preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, Jacob; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    add valuable information on how to differentiate premature stages of early onset psychosis from ADHD. Aim: To characterize psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD and compare the profiles of impariments between the two groups. Materials and methods: A cohort of young...... and low intensity prepulse trials, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), Selective Attention (SA) and P50. Results: Preliminary analyses of 18 patients with psychosis and 12 patients with ADHD showed significantly less PPI in the higher intensity prepulse trials in the psychosis group than in the ADHD group....... No significant group difference was found in the lower intensity prepulse trials. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate lower levels of PPI in adolescents with early onset psychosis than in young patients with ADHD. If these results hold in the final analyses then this knowledge may contribute to better...

  11. Using Psycho-Physiological Interaction Analysis with fMRI-Data in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Marco; Linzmajer, Marc; Riedl, René

    2017-01-01

    The integration of neuroscientific methods in Information Systems (IS) research to better understand how the brain interacts with IS-relevant context has gained in importance. Many papers that highlight the potential of neuroIS and that discuss methodological issues associated with using functional...... brain imaging already exist. However, neuroIS researchers have to keep in mind that the emergence of complex mental processes such as trust in IS contexts is based on activity in a network of brain regions rather than on activity in one area alone. Accordingly, we introduce psycho......-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis, a technique that one can use to analyze fMRI data. Specifically, we review how one can conduct PPI analysis, provide a concrete research example, and show how this analysis can inform IS trust research. Thus, we introduce neuroIS researchers working in the domain of functional...

  12. Are individual differences in appetitive and defensive motivation related? A psychophysiological examination in two samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapas, Casey; Katz, Andrea C; Nelson, Brady D; Campbell, Miranda L; Bishop, Jeffrey R; Robison-Andrew, E Jenna; Altman, Sarah E; Gorka, Stephanie M; Shankman, Stewart A

    2014-01-01

    Appetitive and defensive motivation account for a good deal of variance in personality and mental health, but whether individual differences in these systems are correlated or orthogonal has not been conclusively established. Previous investigations have generally relied on self-report and have yielded conflicting results. We therefore assessed the relation between psychophysiological indices of appetitive and defensive motivation during elicitation of these motivational states: specifically, frontal electroencephalogram asymmetry during reward anticipation and startle response during anticipation of predictable or unpredictable threat of shock. Results in a sample of psychopathology-free community members (n=63), an independent sample of undergraduates with a range of internalising symptoms (n=64), and the combination of these samples (n=127) revealed that differences in responding to the two tasks were not significantly correlated. Average coefficients approached zero in all three samples (community: .04, undergraduate: -.01, combined: .06). Implications of these findings for research on normal and abnormal personality are discussed.

  13. Influence of physical culture and sport on the psychophysiological state of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalenko N.V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of the psychophysiology state of students under influence of employments a physical culture and sport are considered. 50 students took part in research. From them 25 are students of sporting separation. For research of perception tests were utillized on reproducing of muscular efforts and temporal intervals. For research of memory are methods «visual memory» and «auditory memory». For research of attention is a method «proof-reading test with the rings of Landolt». For research thoughts are a method «arithmetic account». The favourable affecting of employments is exposed perception, attention and thought of students. It is set that students-sportsmen have a high level of development of attention, above average level of development of perception and memory, middle level of development of thought.

  14. Influence of music on performance and psychophysiological responses during moderate-intensity exercise preceded by fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Silva, Joao P; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D

    2015-02-01

    We examined the effects of listening to music on time to exhaustion and psychophysiological responses during moderate-intensity exercise performed in fatigued and non-fatigued conditions. Fourteen healthy men performed moderate-intensity exercise (60% Wmax) until exhaustion under four different conditions: with and without pre-fatigue (induced by 100 drop jumps) and listening and not listening to music. Time to exhaustion was lower in the fatigued than the non-fatigued condition regardless listening to music. Similarly, RPE was higher in the fatigued than the non-fatigued condition, but music had no effect. On the other hand, listening to music decreased the associative thoughts regardless of fatigue status. Heart rate was not influenced by any treatment. These results suggest that listening to music changes attentional focus but is not able to reverse fatigue-derived alteration of performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychophysiological traits of men with several genotypes in polymorphic locus Val158Met COMT and different levels of aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel N. Ermakov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The catechol-O-methyl transferase gene influences the reuptake of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline from the synaptic space. The structural peculiarities of this gene are linked with the duration of stay of neurotransmitters in the synaptic gap and the emergence and duration of emotional reactions, which may considerably affect a person’s level of aggressiveness; these peculiarities may manifest as psychophysiological characteristics. Objective and design. This study investigated the amplitude, spatio-temporal traits and sources of evoked brain activity in men with several genotypes in the polymorphic locus Val158Met in the COMT (Catechol-O-methyl transferase gene, levels of aggressiveness using the Buss-Darkee inventory, proneness to various types of deviant and addictive behaviors in accordance with the methods of A.N. Oryol and the preferred strategies of behavior during conflict in accordance with the methods of Kenneth Thomas. Statistical processing of psychodiagnostic data included dispersive (ANOVA and discriminative analyses. Results. This study found significant differences in the parameters of evoked brain activity components in responses to emotionally charged stimuli (“aggression”, “positive”, “tolerance”, “extremism, terrorism” compared with neutral images. Student’s t-test (Holms- corrected for multiple comparisons was used to analyze the EEG-VEP data. Conclusion. This study confirmed the hypothesis of differences in spatio-temporal and amplitude parameters of evoked brain potentials in young men exhibiting differing levels of aggressiveness. The sources of evoked brain activity determined using sLORETA (Standardized Low-resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography were different between carriers of different genotypes.

  16. Investigating Behavioral and Psychophysiological Reactions to Conflict-Related and Individualized Stimuli as Potential Correlates of Repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Kessler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repression is considered as a central defense mechanism in psychodynamic theory. It refers to the process by which “unbearable” mental contents (e.g., those related to internal conflicts are kept out of consciousness. The process of repression is probably closely related to concepts of emotion regulation derived from a different theoretical background. This relationship is particularly relevant because it relates repression to current research in the affective neurosciences as well as to experimental studies on emotion regulation. Due to its complex and highly individual nature, repression has been notoriously difficult to investigate. We investigated repression with an individualized experiment in healthy subjects in order to establish methods to study repression in clinical populations. To this end we operationalized repression using individualized experimental conditions, and then studied potential behavioral [memory and reaction time (RT] and psychophysiological correlates [skin conductance response (SCR].Method: Twenty-nine healthy female subjects were asked to freely associate to individualized cue sentences. Sentences were generated from individual psychodynamic interviews based on operationlized psychodynamic diagnosis (OPD, and were comprised of three different types: positive, negative non-conflictual, and negative conflict-related sentences. Subjects were asked to name the first three associations coming into their mind. Afterward, the remaining time was used for free association. SCR during each association trial and RT of the first given association were recorded. The memory for the first three associations was subsequently tested in an unexpected recall.Results: Associations to conflict-related cue sentences were associated with longer RTs and increased SCRs. Moreover, the unexpected recall task showed memory for these associations to be reduced.Conclusion: We interpret these findings as possible correlates of

  17. Investigating Behavioral and Psychophysiological Reactions to Conflict-Related and Individualized Stimuli as Potential Correlates of Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Henrik; Schmidt, Anna Christine; Hildenbrand, Oliver; Scharf, Daniela; Kehyayan, Aram; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Repression is considered as a central defense mechanism in psychodynamic theory. It refers to the process by which "unbearable" mental contents (e.g., those related to internal conflicts) are kept out of consciousness. The process of repression is probably closely related to concepts of emotion regulation derived from a different theoretical background. This relationship is particularly relevant because it relates repression to current research in the affective neurosciences as well as to experimental studies on emotion regulation. Due to its complex and highly individual nature, repression has been notoriously difficult to investigate. We investigated repression with an individualized experiment in healthy subjects in order to establish methods to study repression in clinical populations. To this end we operationalized repression using individualized experimental conditions, and then studied potential behavioral [memory and reaction time (RT)] and psychophysiological correlates [skin conductance response (SCR)]. Method: Twenty-nine healthy female subjects were asked to freely associate to individualized cue sentences. Sentences were generated from individual psychodynamic interviews based on operationlized psychodynamic diagnosis (OPD), and were comprised of three different types: positive, negative non-conflictual, and negative conflict-related sentences. Subjects were asked to name the first three associations coming into their mind. Afterward, the remaining time was used for free association. SCR during each association trial and RT of the first given association were recorded. The memory for the first three associations was subsequently tested in an unexpected recall. Results: Associations to conflict-related cue sentences were associated with longer RTs and increased SCRs. Moreover, the unexpected recall task showed memory for these associations to be reduced. Conclusion: We interpret these findings as possible correlates of repression, in line

  18. Magnetic Study of the Novel Polynuclear Compound [Cu(II)(6-Mercaptopurinolate 2-)] n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Chávez, Rodolfo; Costas, María. Eugenia; Escudero, Roberto

    1997-08-01

    Chemical reactions between Cu(II) and 6-mercaptopurine, both in aqueous and in methanolic media, yield the novel amorphous polynuclear compound [Cu(II)(6-mercaptopurinolate)2-]n, which is also obtained from diverse Cu(II)-heterocyclic ligand competitive reactions. The kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities associated with the formation of this compound are inferred as remarkable. The spectroscopic data let us suggest the involvement of the exocyclic S(6) donor site and the N atoms in the imidazolic moiety of the deprotonated heterocyclic ligand in the coordination to Cu(II) atoms, forming a distorted bidimensional metallic network. The magnetic studies show the existence of very weak antiferromagnetic coupling in the solid sample. This system represents the first example of a 1 : 1 metal : 6-mercaptopurinolate2-system with ad-type open shell metallic center. The magnetic study carried out also represents the first example of magnetic characterization for this type of polynuclear Cu(II) systems with the dianionic 6-mercaptopurine ligand.

  19. Synthesis, Spectral and Antimicrobial Studies of Some Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II Complexes Containing 2-Thiophenecarboxaldehyde Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some new Schiff base metal complexes of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II derived from 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline (HL1 and 4-fluoroaniline (HL2 with 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, FAB-mass, molar conductance, electronic spectra, ESR and magnetic susceptibility. The complexes exhibit coordination number 4 or 6. The complexes are colored and stable in air. Analytical data revealed that all the complexes exhibited 1:2 (metal: ligand ratio. FAB-mass data show degradation pattern of the complexes. The Schiff base and metal complexes show a good activity against the bacteria; B. subtilis, E. coli and S. aureus and fungi A. niger, A. flavus and C. albicans. The antimicrobial results also indicate that the metal complexes are better antimicrobial agents as compared to the Schiff bases.

  20. Ionophoretic method in the study of mixed ligand ternary chelates of UO2(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) involving nitrilotriacetate and cytosine as ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.P.; Mishra, S.K.; Yadava, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    A novel electrophoretic technique is described for the assessment of the equilibria in mixed-ligand complex system in solution. It is based on the movement of spot of the metal ion under an electric field with the complexants added in the background electrolyte at fixed pH. The concentration of primary ligand nitrilotriacetate was constant while that of secondary ligand (cytosine) was varied. The plot of log (cytosine) against mobility was used to obtain information on the formation of the mixed complexes and to calculate its stability constants. Experimentally obtained logK values are as 5.62, 4.55 and 4.42 for mixed complexes of UO 2 (II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) respectively at μ=0.1 and temp.=35 +- 01.degC. (author). 10 refs

  1. U-target irradiation at FRM II aiming the production of Mo-99 - A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberg, H.; Mueller, C.; Neuhaus, I.; Roehrmoser, A.

    2010-01-01

    Following the shortage in radioisotope availability the Technische Unversitaet Muenchen and the Belgian Institut National des Radioelements conducted a common study on the suitability of the FRM II reactor for the generation of Mo-99 as a fission product. A suitable irradiation channel was determined and neutronic calculations resulted in sufficiently high neutron flux densities to make FRM II a promising candidate for Mo-99 production. In addition the feasibility study provides thermohydraulic calculations as input for the design and integration of the additional cooling circuit into the existing heat removal systems of FRM II. The required in-house processes for a regular uranium target irradiation programme have been defined and necessary upgrades identified. Finally the required investment cost was estimated and a possible time schedule was given. (author)

  2. Psychophysiological methods and criteria for the selection of individual metered loads in athletes of taekwondo section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Ohromiy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: scientific rationale approaches Express-diagnostics for athletes of taekwondo section by psychophysiological parameters. Material: Total surveyed 84 people, including 68 boys and 16 girls. Were defined backup capabilities, exercise tolerance and selection of adequate individual dose of loads in preparation for the international competition, participants - taekwondo athletes. Was attended by representatives of Ukraine, Russia and Lithuania. Age groups of participants: 6 - 16 years. Athletes have different levels and different schools of training. Results: evaluation of exercise tolerance and definition of an adequate level of motor mode in taekwondo athletes in terms of the difference of lability (DL before and after training, revealed: high and very high nervous system (NS lability. These figures correspond to high and very high tolerance to physical loads. The respondents who had difference of liability (DL <0, were well-trained athletes and their high points of strength of nervous system testified about good backup capabilities (withstand great and continuous loads. In 78 % of the tested load was chosen adequately. Less than 20% of the respondents noted the average backup capabilities. They need individual correction dose loads to increase adaptive capacity. Insignificant 10%, the share of respondents had low exercise tolerance at the average values NS strength, which indicates a good backup capabilities. The direct dependence: respondents with high levels on state of health, activity and mood - low levels of anxiety, frustration, aggression and rigidity. Conclusions The proposed optimized approach Express-diagnostics according to psychophysiological parameters allow you to determine the level of physical endurance, speed adaptation athletes in the sections taekwondo and adequate response to the loads.

  3. Psychophysiological adaptation of the patient with the remote effect of the III degree acute radiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2013-12-01

    putation of both shins at level in top / 3, late beam buttock, right hip ulcers, a beam cataract of the III degree of both eyes, stabilized. The assessment of the efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation in dynamics with 2009 indicates emergence of prevalence of hypochondriac tendencies over a demonstration with accession of high uneasiness and autistic lines at preservation of the leading role of an hypochondriac somatization of alarm with considerable decrease in an emotionality, an integration, a freedom of behavior. The changes revealed in dynamics correspond to the specific increase weight of violations of mental adaptation, characteristic for the period of adaptation exhaustion. The high intelligence, good figurative and logical thinking, well-mannered forms of behavior, high control over the emotional sphere, restraint of emotions, independence, self-sufficiency, organization, behavior taking into account environment requirements provided the patient M. firmness before a heavy illness, promoted good adaptation to an environment with confidence in myself, high social adaptability, opportunity successfully to carry out duties, hold the work account (worked 39 years after accident. Comparative assessment of operator ability of the patient M. showed good average time of common and difficult sensorimotor reactions with 2 mistakes, high time of reaction for moving object, however decrease in accuracy of reaction from 10-13% to 2% testifies to manifestation in dynamics of insufficiency of real functional reserves of nervous system. Conclusions. Efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation depends not only on a dose of radiation and weight of the transferred disease, but, mostly, on premorbid properties of the identity of the victim and his social and labor installation.

  4. Optimization study for Pb(II) and COD sequestration by consortium of sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anamika; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Gupta, Asha

    2017-09-01

    In this study, initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pb(II) ions was analysed to check optimum concentration of Pb(II) ions at which the growth of sulphate-reducing consortium (SRC) was found to be maximum. 80 ppm of Pb(II) ions was investigated as minimum inhibitory concentration for SRC. Influence of electron donors such as lactose, sucrose, glucose and sodium lactate was examined to investigate best carbon source for growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Sodium lactate was found to be the prime carbon source for SRC. Later optimization of various parameters was executed using Box-Behnken design model of response surface methodology to explore the effectiveness of three independent operating variables, namely, pH (5.0-9.0), temperature (32-42 °C) and time (5.0-9.0 days), on dependent variables, i.e. protein content, precipitation of Pb(II) ions, and removal of COD by SRC biomass. Maximum removal of COD and Pb(II) was observed to be 91 and 98 %, respectively, at pH 7.0 and temperature 37 °C and incubation time 7 days. According to response surface analysis and analysis of variance, the experimental data were perfectly fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of pH, temperature and time on Pb(II) and COD removal was highly significant. A high regression coefficient between the variables and response ( r 2 = 0.9974) corroborate eminent evaluation of experimental data by second-order polynomial regression model. SEM and Fourier transform infrared analysis was performed to investigate morphology of PbS precipitates, sorption mechanism and involved functional groups in metal-free and metal-loaded biomass of SRC for Pb(II) binding.

  5. Copper(II) ions interactions in the systems with triamines and ATP. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R; Gasowska, A; Zalewska, A; Lomozik, L

    2017-12-01

    The mode of interaction and thermodynamic stability of complexes formed in binary and ternary Cu(II)/ATP/triamines systems were studied using potentiometric and spectroscopic (NMR, EPR, UV-Vis) methods. It was found that in binary metal-free systems ATP/H x PA species are formed (PA: Spd=spermidine or 3,3-tri=1,7-diamino-4-azaheptane) where the phosphate groups from nucleotides are preferred negative centers and protonated amine groups of amines are positive centers of reaction. In the ternary systems Cu/ATP/H x (PA) as well as Cu/(ATP)(PA) species are formed. The type of the formed Cu(II) complexes depends on pH of the solution. For a low pH value the complexation appears between Cu(II) and ATP molecules via oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. For a very high pH value, where ATP is hydrolyzed, the Cu(II) ions are bound to the nitrogen atoms of polyamine molecules. We did not detect any direct coordination of the N7 nitrogen atom of adenosine to Cu(II) ions. It means that the CuN7 interaction is an indirect type and can be due to noncovalent interplay including water molecule. EPR studies were performed at glassy state (77K) after a fast freezing both for binary and ternary systems. The glassy state EPR spectra do not reflect species identified in titration studies indicating significant effect of rapid temperature decrease on equilibrium of Cu(II) complexes. We propose the molecular structure of all the studied complexes at the glassy state deduced from EPR and optical spectroscopy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Baseline psychophysiological and cortisol reactivity as a predictor of PTSD treatment outcome in virtual reality exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Jovanovic, Tanja; Gerardi, Maryrose; Breazeale, Kathryn G; Price, Matthew; Davis, Michael; Duncan, Erica; Ressler, Kerry J; Bradley, Bekh; Rizzo, Albert; Tuerk, Peter W; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2016-07-01

    Baseline cue-dependent physiological reactivity may serve as an objective measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Additionally, prior animal model and psychological studies would suggest that subjects with greatest symptoms at baseline may have the greatest violation of expectancy to danger when undergoing exposure based psychotherapy; thus treatment approaches which enhanced the learning under these conditions would be optimal for those with maximal baseline cue-dependent reactivity. However methods to study this hypothesis objectively are lacking. Virtual reality (VR) methodologies have been successfully employed as an enhanced form of imaginal prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of PTSD. Our goal was to examine the predictive nature of initial psychophysiological (e.g., startle, skin conductance, heart rate) and stress hormone responses (e.g., cortisol) during presentation of VR-based combat-related stimuli on PTSD treatment outcome. Combat veterans with PTSD underwent 6 weeks of VR exposure therapy combined with either d-cycloserine (DCS), alprazolam (ALP), or placebo (PBO). In the DCS group, startle response to VR scenes prior to initiation of treatment accounted for 76% of the variance in CAPS change scores, p < 0.001, in that higher responses predicted greater changes in symptom severity over time. Additionally, baseline cortisol reactivity was inversely associated with treatment response in the ALP group, p = 0.04. We propose that baseline cue-activated physiological measures will be sensitive to predicting patients' level of response to exposure therapy, in particular in the presence of enhancement (e.g., DCS). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Experimental studies of hydrogen on boron nitride: II. NMR studies of orientational ordering of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the results of NMR studies of thin films of hydrogen adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. Orientational ordering is observed below 1 K but the ordering is not complete, and a clear two-component ordering is observed. Molecules are either (i) almost completely ordered with local order parameters σ=left-angle 1-3/2Jz 2 right-angle clustered close to a maximum value of σ congruent 0.94 (comparable to the values for long range ordering in bulk samples at high ortho concentrations), and (ii) a large fraction of the molecules that remain nearly disordered with σ≤0.25. The degree of orientational ordering depends on the number of hydrogen layers and on the ortho-hydrogen concentration, and these studies indicate that ordering occurs principally in the first four layers closest to the substrate, with weaker orientational ordering in the outer layers near the free surface even at temperatures as low as 210 mK

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Antimicrobial Studies of a New Mannich Base N-[Morpholino(phenylmethyl]acetamide and Its Cobalt(II, Nickel(II and Copper(II Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Muruganandam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Mannich base N-[morpholino(phenylmethyl]acetamide (MBA, was synthesized and characterized by spectral studies. Chelates of MBA with cobalt(II, nickel(II and copper(II ions were prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR and UV spectral studies. MBA was found to act as a bidentate ligand, bonding through the carbonyl oxygen of acetamide group and CNC nitrogen of morpholine moiety in all the complexes. Based on the magnetic moment values and UV-Visible spectral data, tetracoordinate geometry for nitrato complexes and hexacoordinate geometry for sulphato complexes were assigned. The antimicrobial studies show that the Co(II nitrato complex is more active than the other complexes.

  9. Reliability and Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish Non-Criminal Sample - A Multimethod Approach including Psychophysiological Correlates of Empathy for Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Sörman

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R's reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227 in Sweden, using a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain. PPI-R construct validity was investigated in subgroups of participants by exploring its degree of overlap with (i the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV, (ii self-rated empathy and behavioral and physiological responses in an experiment on empathy for pain, and (iii additional self-report measures of alexithymia and trait anxiety. The PPI-R total score was significantly associated with PCL:SV total and factor scores. The PPI-R Coldheartedness scale demonstrated significant negative associations with all empathy subscales and with rated unpleasantness and skin conductance responses in the empathy experiment. The PPI-R higher order Self-Centered Impulsivity and Fearless Dominance dimensions were associated with trait anxiety in opposite directions (positively and negatively, respectively. Overall, the results demonstrated solid reliability (test-retest and internal consistency and promising but somewhat mixed construct validity for the Swedish translation of the PPI-R.

  10. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  11. Heavy metal / polyacid interaction : an electrochemical study of the binding of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) to polycarboxylic and humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleven, R.F.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with model polycarboxylic acids have been described, in order to establish the relevance of these effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The model systems consisted of Cd(II),

  12. New Cu (II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of chalcone derivatives: Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, electrochemical properties and DFT computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabti, Salima; Djedouani, Amel; Aggoun, Djouhra; Warad, Ismail; Rahmouni, Samra; Romdhane, Samir; Fouzi, Hosni

    2018-03-01

    The reaction of nickel(II), copper(II) and cobalt(II) with 4-hydroxy-3-[(2E)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)prop-2-enoyl]-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one (HL) leads to a series of new complexes: Ni(L)2(NH3), Cu(L)2(DMF)2 and Co(L)2(H2O). The crystal structure of the Cu(L)2(DMF)2 complex have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The Cu(II) lying on an inversion centre is coordinated to six oxygen atoms forming an octahedral elongated. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the metal complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode (GC) in CH3CN solutions, showing the quasi-reversible redox process ascribed to the reduction of the MII/MI couples. The X-ray single crystal structure data of the complex was matched excellently with the optimized monomer structure of the desired compound; Hirschfeld surface analysis supported the packed crystal lattice 3D network intermolecular forces. HOMO/LUMO energy level and the global reactivity descriptors quantum parameters are also calculated. The electrophilic and nucleophilic potions in the complex surface are theoretically evaluated by molecular electrostatic potential and Mulliken atomic charges analysis.

  13. Experimental study of poloidal flow effect on magnetic island dynamics in LHD and TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narushima, Y.; Sakakibara, S.; Castejon, F.

    2010-11-01

    The dynamics of a magnetic island are studied by focusing on the poloidal flows in the helical devices LHD and TJ-II. The temporal increment of the ExB poloidal flow prior to the magnetic island transition from growth to healing is observed. The direction of the poloidal flow is in the electron-diamagnetic direction in LHD and in the ion-diamagnetic direction in TJ-II. From the magnetic diagnostics, it is observed that a current structure flowing in the plasma moves ∼π rad poloidally in the electron-diamagnetic direction during the transition in LHD experiments. These experimental observations from LHD and TJ-II show that the temporal increment of the poloidal flow is followed by the transition (growth to healing) of the magnetic island regardless of the flow direction and clarify the fact that significant poloidal flow affects the magnetic island dynamics. (author)

  14. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Kerton, C. R., E-mail: sjkang@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: kerton@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential products of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.

  15. BEAM OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR AN X-RAY FEL OSCILLATOR AT THE LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Weilun; Huang, S.; Liu, K.X.; Huang, Z; Ding, Y.; Maxwell, T.J.; Kim, K.-J.

    2016-06-01

    The 4 GeV LCLS-II superconducting linac with high repetition beam rate enables the possibility to drive an X-Ray FEL oscillator at harmonic frequencies *. Compared to the regular LCLS-II machine setup, the oscillator mode requires a much longer bunch length with a relatively lower current. Also a flat longitudinal phase space distribution is critical to maintain the FEL gain since the X-ray cavity has extremely narrow bandwidth. In this paper, we study the longitudinal phase space optimization including shaping the initial beam from the injector and optimizing the bunch compressor and dechirper parameters. We obtain a bunch with a flat energy chirp over 400 fs in the core part with current above 100 A. The optimization was based on LiTrack and Elegant simulations using LCLS-II beam parameters.

  16. MHC class II B diversity in blue tits : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Schut, Elske; Merino, Santiago; Martinez, Javier; Komdeur, Jan; Westerdahl, Helena

    In this study, we partly characterize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). A total of 22 individuals from three different European locations: Spain, The Netherlands, and Sweden were screened for MHC allelic diversity. The MHC genes were

  17. Longitudinal Stability Study for the FACET-II e+ Damping Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-11-29

    This is an initial study of the longitudinal, single-bunch stability in the proposed FACET-II e+ damping ring. It is preliminary because, at present, only a few specific features of the vacuum chamber are known.

  18. [Developing indices for caloric restriction related to World War II--a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shi; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2011-04-01

    The vast numbers of studies regarding caloric restriction (CR) and breast cancer risk are based on war-related extreme situations. Studying the impact of CR in Jews during World War II (WW II) is challenging due to its variance and duration. To develop novel research tools in order to assess CR exposure in Jews that occurred more than 60 years ago during WW II. A pilot study based on Israeli women born in Europe in 1926-45, who lived there during WWII. Primary incident breast cancer patients and population-based controls were interviewed using a detailed questionnaire referring to demographic, obstetric factors and WW II experiences. Exposure to WWII-related CR was assessed by several proxy variables based on this information. The individual hunger score was higher in the exposed cases [mean score 141.06 vs. 130.07 in the controls). The same trend was observed for self perceived hunger score (mean score 2.75 in cases vs. 2.40 in controls) and hunger symptoms score (4.89 vs. 3.56, respectively). The novel research tools are appropriate for comparative assessment of CR exposure in case control studies.

  19. BIOASSAY STUDIES OF METAL(II) COMPLEXES OF 2,2'-(ETHANE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    diyldiimino)diacetic acid (EDDA) were prepared and characterized. Coordination complexes of the EDDA ... corresponding amines with alkyl halide to bear diammines of the same class with different substituents. ... Bioassay studies of metal(II) complexes of 2,2'-(ethane-1,2-diyldiimino)diacetic acid. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop.

  20. Intracellular PHB conversion in a type II methanotroph studied by 13 C NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecherskaya, M.; Dijkema, C.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly-g-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation under aerobic conditions via incorporation of [13C-2]acetate as a cosubstrate and its intracellular degradation under anaerobic conditions in a Type II methanotroph was studied by 13C NMR. During PHB synthesis in the presence of labelled acetate, low levels of

  1. Study of the emission oxidative reactions of ruthenium (II) complex by cationic compounds in anionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilha, J.B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative quenching of the emission of the tetraanionic complex tris (4,4' dicarboxylate - 2,2' - bipyridine ruthenium (II) in aqueous solution, by both organic and inorganic compounds in presence of anionic detergents, above and below the critical micelle concentration is studied. The organic cations, the inorganic ion and detergents used are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  2. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  3. Structural studies on a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural studies on a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs from bitter gourd: Molecular basis of non-toxicity, conformational selection and glycan structure. MS accepted http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. THYAGESHWAR CHANDRAN, ALOK SHARMA and M VIJAYAN. J. Biosci. 40(5), October 2015, 929–941, © Indian Academy of ...

  4. Music processing in preterm and full-term newborns: A psychophysiological interaction (PPI) approach in neonatal fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordier, Lara; Loukas, Serafeim; Grouiller, Frédéric; Vollenweider, Andreas; Vasung, Lana; Meskaldij, Djalel-Eddine; Lejeune, Fleur; Pittet, Marie Pascale; Borradori-Tolsa, Cristina; Lazeyras, François; Grandjean, Didier; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Hüppi, Petra S

    2018-04-06

    Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) provide special equipment designed to give life support for the increasing number of prematurely born infants and assure their survival. More recently NICU's strive to include developmentally oriented care and modulate sensory input for preterm infants. Music, among other sensory stimuli, has been introduced into NICUs, but without knowledge on the basic music processing in the brain of preterm infants. In this study, we explored the cortico-subcortical music processing of different types of conditions (Original music, Tempo modification, Key transposition) in newborns shortly after birth to assess the effective connectivity of the primary auditory cortex with the entire newborn brain. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure during NICU stay modulates brain processing of music in preterm infants at term equivalent age. We approached these two questions using Psychophysiological Interaction (PPI) analyses. A group of preterm infants listened to music (Original music) starting from 33 weeks postconceptional age until term equivalent age and were compared to two additional groups without music intervention; preterm infants and full-term newborns. Auditory cortex functional connectivity with cerebral regions known to be implicated in tempo and familiarity processing were identified only for preterm infants with music training in the NICU. Increased connectivity between auditory cortices and thalamus and dorsal striatum may not only reflect their sensitivity to the known music and the processing of its tempo as familiar, but these results are also compatible with the hypothesis that the previously listened music induces a more arousing and pleasant state. Our results suggest that music exposure in NICU's environment can induce brain functional connectivity changes that are associated with music processing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychophysiological correlates of sexually and non-sexually motivated attention to film clips in a workload task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Gonçalves, Oscar F

    2011-01-01

    Some authors have speculated that the cognitive component (P3) of the Event-Related Potential (ERP) can function as a psychophysiological measure of sexual interest. The aim of this study was to determine if the P3 ERP component in a workload task can be used as a specific and objective measure of sexual motivation by comparing the neurophysiologic response to stimuli of motivational relevance with different levels of valence and arousal. A total of 30 healthy volunteers watched different films clips with erotic, horror, social-positive and social-negative content, while answering an auditory oddball paradigm. Erotic film clips resulted in larger interference when compared to both the social-positive and auditory alone conditions. Horror film clips resulted in the highest levels of interference with smaller P3 amplitudes than erotic and also than social-positive, social-negative and auditory alone condition. No gender differences were found. Both horror and erotic film clips significantly decreased heart rate (HR) when compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. The erotic film clips significantly increased the skin conductance level (SCL) compared to the social-negative films. The horror film clips significantly increased the SCL compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. Both the highly arousing erotic and non-erotic (horror) movies produced the largest decrease in the P3 amplitude, a decrease in the HR and an increase in the SCL. These data support the notion that this workload task is very sensitive to the attentional resources allocated to the film clip, although they do not act as a specific index of sexual interest. Therefore, the use of this methodology seems to be of questionable utility as a specific measure of sexual interest or as an objective measure of the severity of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder. © 2011 Carvalho et al.

  6. Psychophysiological correlates of sexually and non-sexually motivated attention to film clips in a workload task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Carvalho

    Full Text Available Some authors have speculated that the cognitive component (P3 of the Event-Related Potential (ERP can function as a psychophysiological measure of sexual interest. The aim of this study was to determine if the P3 ERP component in a workload task can be used as a specific and objective measure of sexual motivation by comparing the neurophysiologic response to stimuli of motivational relevance with different levels of valence and arousal. A total of 30 healthy volunteers watched different films clips with erotic, horror, social-positive and social-negative content, while answering an auditory oddball paradigm. Erotic film clips resulted in larger interference when compared to both the social-positive and auditory alone conditions. Horror film clips resulted in the highest levels of interference with smaller P3 amplitudes than erotic and also than social-positive, social-negative and auditory alone condition. No gender differences were found. Both horror and erotic film clips significantly decreased heart rate (HR when compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. The erotic film clips significantly increased the skin conductance level (SCL compared to the social-negative films. The horror film clips significantly increased the SCL compared to both social-positive and social-negative films. Both the highly arousing erotic and non-erotic (horror movies produced the largest decrease in the P3 amplitude, a decrease in the HR and an increase in the SCL. These data support the notion that this workload task is very sensitive to the attentional resources allocated to the film clip, although they do not act as a specific index of sexual interest. Therefore, the use of this methodology seems to be of questionable utility as a specific measure of sexual interest or as an objective measure of the severity of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

  7. Flash photolysis ESR study of photosystem II signal II/sub vf/, the physiological donor to P-680/sup +/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warden, J T [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY; Blankenship, R E; Sauer, K

    1976-01-01

    In flash-illuminated, oxygen-evolving spinach chloroplasts and green algae, a free radical transient has been observed with spectral parameters similar to those of Signal II (g approx. = 2.0045, ..delta..H/sub pp/ approx. = 19 G). However, in contrast with ESR Signal II, the transient radical does not readily saturate even at microwave power levels of 200 mW. This species is formed most efficiently with ''red'' illumination (lambda < 680 nm) and occurs stoichiometrically in a 1:1 ratio with P-700/sup +/. The Photosystem II transient is formed in less than 100 ..mu..s and decays via first-order kinetics with a halftime of 400-900 ..mu..s. Additionally, the t/sub /sup 1///sub 2// for radical decay is temperature independent between 20 and 4/sup 0/C; however, below 4/sup 0/C the transient signal exhibits Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy of approx. 10 kcal . mol/sup -1/. Inhibition of electron transport through Photosystem II by o-phenanthroline, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or reduced 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone suppresses the formation of the light-induced transient. At low concentrations (0.2 mM), 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone partially inhibits the free radical formation, however, the decay kinetics are unaltered. High concentrations of 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (1-5 mM) restore both the transient signal and electron flow through Photosystem II. These findings suggest that this ''quinoidal'' type ESR transient functions as the physiological donor to the oxidized reaction center chlorophyll, P-680/sup +/.

  8. Increased mortality associated with HTLV-II infection in blood donors: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith James W

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-I is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, and both HTLV-I and -II are associated with HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Several published reports suggest that HTLV-I may lead to decreased survival, but HTLV-II has not previously been associated with mortality. Results We examined deaths among 138 HTLV-I, 358 HTLV-II, and 759 uninfected controls enrolled in a prospective cohort study of U.S. blood donors followed biannually since 1992. Proportional hazards models yielded hazard ratios (HRs for the association between mortality and HTLV infection, controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, age, income, educational level, blood center, smoking, injection drug use history, alcohol intake, hepatitis C status and autologous donation. After a median follow-up of 8.6 years, there were 45 confirmed subject deaths. HTLV-I infection did not convey a statistically significant excess risk of mortality (unadjusted HR 1.9, 95%CI 0.8–4.4; adjusted HR 1.9, 95%CI 0.8–4.6. HTLV-II was associated with death in both the unadjusted model (HR 2.8, 95%CI 1.5–5.5 and in the adjusted model (HR 2.3, 95%CI 1.1–4.9. No single cause of death appeared responsible for the HTLV-II effect. Conclusions After adjusting for known and potential confounders, HTLV-II infection is associated with increased mortality among healthy blood donors. If replicated in other cohorts, this finding has implications for both HTLV pathogenesis and counseling of infected persons.

  9. Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes with ibuprofen hydrazide: Characterization, theoretical calculations, antibacterial and antitumor assays and studies of interaction with CT-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Carlos M.; Bergamini, Fernando R. G.; Lustri, Wilton R.; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia T. G.; de Oliveira, Ellen C. S.; Ribeiro, Marcos A.; Formiga, André L. B.; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2018-02-01

    Palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes with a hydrazide derivative of ibuprofen (named HIB) were synthesized and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Elemental and thermogravimetric analyses, as well as ESI-QTOF-MS studies for both complexes, confirmed a 1:2:2 metal/HIB/Cl- molar ratio. The crystal structure of the palladium(II) complex was solved by single crystal X-ray diffractometric analysis, which permitted identifying the coordination formula [PdCl2(HIB)2]. Crystallographic studies also indicate coordination of HIB to the metal by the NH2 group. Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies reinforced the coordination observed in the crystal structure and suggested that the platinum(II) complex presents similar coordination modes and structure when compared with the Pd(II) complex. The complexes had their structures optimized with the aid of DFT methods. In vitro antiproliferative assays showed that the [PdCl2(HIB)2] complex is active over ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-03, while biophysical studies indicated its capacity to interact with CT-DNA. The complexes were inactive over Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial strains.

  10. Type II Modic Changes May not Always Represent Fat Degeneration: A Study Using MR Fat Suppression Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiyun; Liu, Yuanhao; Wei, Wei; Hu, Shengping; Wang, Yue

    2016-08-15

    A radiological study of type II Modic changes (MCs). The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of type II MCs on fat suppression (FS) magnetic resonance (MR) images and its association with radiological disc degeneration. Type II MCs are common endplate signal changes on MR images. On the basis of limited histological samples, type II MCs are thought to be stable fat degeneration. FS technique on MR, which can quantify fat content, may be an alternative to explore the pathology of MCs. To date, however, the characteristics of type II MCs on FS sequence have not been studied. Lumbar MR images conducted in a single hospital during a defined period were reviewed to include those with type II MCs and FS images. On FS images, signal status of type II MCs was visually classified as suppressed or not-suppressed. Signal intensity of vertebral regions with and without MCs was measured quantitatively on T2-weighted (T2W) and FS images to calculate fat content index and validate the visual classification. Using image analysis program Osirix, MCs size and adjacent disc degeneration were measured quantitatively. Paired t-tests and logistic regressions were used to determine the associations studied. Sixty-four lumbar MRIs were included and 150 endplates with type II MCs were studied. Although signal of 37 (24.7%) type II MCs was suppressed on FS images, that of 113 (75.3%) was not suppressed. The discs adjacent to type II MCs had lower signal intensity (0.13 ± 0.003 vs. 0.14 ± 0.004, P Type II MCs that were not suppressed on FS image were associated with greater age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.11, P type II MCs was not suppressed on FS MR images, suggesting that there are ongoing complicated pathologies. Type II MCs may not merely represent fat replacement. 3.

  11. A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görgülü Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II ion from water or other solution.

  12. Synthesis, crystallographic and spectral studies of homochiral cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of a new terpyridylaminoacid ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Gao, Chang-Qing; Gao, Zhi-Yang; Wu, Ben-Lai; Niu, Yun-Yin

    2018-04-01

    Based on a chiral terpyridylaminoacid ligand, a series of homochiral Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes, namely, [Co(H2L)(HL)]·Cl·(PF6)2·2H2O (1), [Ni(H2L)(HL)]·Cl·(PF6)2 (2), [Co2(L)2(CH3OH)(H2O)]·(PF6)2·CH3OH (3), [Ni2(L)2(CH3OH)2]·(PF6)2·2CH3OH (4), [Co2(L)2(N3)2]·3H2O (5), and [Ni2(L)2(SCN)2]·4H2O (6) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, TGA, spectroscopic methods (IR, CD and electronic absorption spectra) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction structural analysis (HL = (S)-2-((4-([2,2':6‧,2″-terpyridin]-4‧-yl)benzyl)amino)-4-methylpentanoic acid). In the acidic reaction conditions, one protonated (H2L)+ and one zwitterionic HL only used their terpyridyl groups to chelate one metal ion Co(II) or Ni(II), forming chiral mononuclear cationic complexes 1 or 2. But in the basic and hydro(solvo)thermal reaction conditions, deprotonated ligands (L)‒ acting as bridges used their terpyridyl and amino acid groups to link with two Co(II) or Ni(II) ions, fabricating chiral dinuclear metallocyclic complexes 3-6. Those chiral mononuclear and dinuclear complexes whose chirality originates in the homochiral ligand HL further self-assemble into higher-dimensional homochiral supramolecular frameworks through intermolecular hydrogen-bonding and π···π interactions. Notably, the coordination mode, hydrogen-bonding site, and existence form of HL ligand can be controlled by the protonation of its amino group, and the architectural diversity of those supramolecular frameworks is adjusted by pH and counter anions. Very interestingly, the 3D porous supramolecular frameworks built up from the huge chiral mononuclear cationic complexes 1 and 2 have novel helical layers only formed through every right-handed helical chain intertwining with two adjacent same helical chains, and the 2D supramolecular helicate 5 consists of two types of left-handed helical chains.

  13. Dynamics of psychophysiological state of the boxers influenced by the standard of specialized demands of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Martsiv

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Examined the psychophysiological state of boxers with 9 types of reactions to the anticipation stage of the specialized basic training. In the experiment involved 18 male boxers aged 18-20 years. We investigated the dynamics of the reactions of anticipation in boxers under the influence of standard specialized loads. In the main part of the session boxers improved individual series 4-5 shock the boxing bag with the installation of the most strongly and quickly strike (loading dose - 9 rounds of 3 minutes each with an interval of 1 minute rest. Upon completion of the boxers performed strength training with weightlifting neck and stuffed ball. The regularities of the occurrence of each type of response in this group of athletes, provides a way of their use as criteria for assessing the psycho-physiological state of boxers.

  14. Reshaping clinical science: Introduction to the Special Issue on Psychophysiology and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J; Hajcak, Greg

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative seeks to establish new dimensional conceptions of mental health problems, through the investigation of clinically relevant "process" constructs that have neurobiological as well as psychological referents. This special issue provides a detailed overview of the RDoC framework by NIMH officials Michael Kozak and Bruce Cuthbert, and spotlights RDoC-oriented investigative efforts by leading psychophysiological research groups as examples of how clinical science might be reshaped through application of RDoC principles. Accompanying commentaries highlight key aspects of the work by each group, and discuss reported methods/findings in relation to promises and challenges of the RDoC initiative more broadly. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  15. KINETIC AND EQUILIBRIUM STUDY FOR THE SORPTION OF Pb(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    passive process for adsorption of the metal ions by metabolically inactive biomass. ..... split in the concentration gradient between solute concentration in the .... binding capacity of Cd(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Sn(II) ions increased with ...

  16. Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

  17. Dietary Patterns, Insulin Resistance, and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the Whitehall II Study

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Sarah A.; Mishra, Gita D.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The aim of this study was to identify a dietary pattern associated with insulin resistance and investigate whether this pattern was prospectively associated with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Analysis was based on 7,339 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. We used the reduced rank regression method to determine dietary patterns using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance as ...

  18. Microwave synthesis, spectral, thermal and antimicrobial studies of some Ni(II) and Cu(II) Schiff base complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, A. P.; Sharma, Neha; Jain, Rajendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Se sintetizaron bases de Schiff bidentadas y tridentadas (NO), (ONO) a través de la reacción de condensación entre la metil-isobutilcetona y el 2-amino-4clorofonol y 2-hidroxiacetofenona con la hidracina del ácido isonicotínico. Los complejos metálicos 1:1 o 1:2 han sido preparados mediante la interacción de estas bases de Schiff y los iones Ni(II) y Cu(II). La síntesis fue realizada empleando el método convencional y el de microondas, y los productos fueron caracterizados por análisis elemen...

  19. Heart Rate Variability and Cardiac Vagal Tone in Psychophysiological Research – Recommendations for Experiment Planning, Data Analysis, and Data Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, Sylvain; Mosley, Emma; Thayer, Julian F.

    2017-01-01

    Psychophysiological research integrating heart rate variability (HRV) has increased during the last two decades, particularly given the fact that HRV is able to index cardiac vagal tone. Cardiac vagal tone, which represents the contribution of the parasympathetic nervous system to cardiac regulation, is acknowledged to be linked with many phenomena relevant for psychophysiological research, including self-regulation at the cognitive, emotional, social, and health levels. The ease of HRV collection and measurement coupled with the fact it is relatively affordable, non-invasive and pain free makes it widely accessible to many researchers. This ease of access should not obscure the difficulty of interpretation of HRV findings that can be easily misconstrued, however, this can be controlled to some extent through correct methodological processes. Standards of measurement were developed two decades ago by a Task Force within HRV research, and recent reviews updated several aspects of the Task Force paper. However, many methodological aspects related to HRV in psychophysiological research have to be considered if one aims to be able to draw sound conclusions, which makes it difficult to interpret findings and to compare results across laboratories. Those methodological issues have mainly been discussed in separate outlets, making difficult to get a grasp on them, and thus this paper aims to address this issue. It will help to provide psychophysiological researchers with recommendations and practical advice concerning experimental designs, data analysis, and data reporting. This will ensure that researchers starting a project with HRV and cardiac vagal tone are well informed regarding methodological considerations in order for their findings to contribute to knowledge advancement in their field. PMID:28265249

  20. The milestones in patient safety -The Harvard Medical Practice Study I , Study II and Study III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe La Torre

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Over the past decade there has been a steady increase in the number of malpractice claims brought against healthcare providers [1,2] and in the monetary damages awarded to plaintiffs [1,3]. This increase has precipitated numerous state programs designed to moderate the number of claims and encourage providers to develop quality of care initiatives [4,5].

    It is important to develop more reliable estimates of the incidence of adverse events and negligence in hospitalized patients.An adverse event is defined as an injury caused by medical management (rather than the underlying disease that prolongs the hospitalization and results in disability at the time of discharge, or both. Negligence is defined as care that has fallen below the standard expected of physicians in their community.

    The Harvard Medical Practice Study (HMPS was first published in 1991 and was based on 1984 case records of more than 30,000 randomly selected records from 51 randomly selected acute care, nonpsychiatric hospitals.The study attempts to measure the extent of medical malpractice in hospitals in the state of New York, and compare the resulting patterns with the negligence claims actually filed [6-8]. The HMPS reviews randomly selected records with disability injuries caused by medical treatment.To establish that an adverse event or negligence has occurred, it uses as a criterion an average confidence score of four or more (on a six point scale. Data identified are age, sex, and primary discharge diagnosis. The significance of the differences in rates of adverse events and negligence according to sex and age were tested.

  1. Intelligent system for pilot and astronaut Psychophysiological status monitoring and recuperating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Andrzej; -Bogumila Pecyna, S. Maria

    The proposal for development of synthetic indicators of the individuals psychophysiological status as well as measurements methodology which are responsible for decision making process, is discussed. The interdisciplinary of principles methods and tools (instruments) which was created out of a specific inter-section of multiply domains of science and technology belonging to the common domain of scientific information systems with specific utility objectives and measures of quality assessment of solutions is presented. As it is well-known, the development directions of the space technology in contemporary terms are increasingly associated with the system approach to solving the problems that are defined in a holistic way, with the emphasis on the aspects to their usefulness. This results in the necessity to create solutions, which are in fact decisions of a negotiating nature, taken in the systems of incomplete information with blurs as well as social and psychological contexts on the grounds of the importance of the human factor (human-centric approach). For the sake of one thing - explicitness in operating with contents, we find support in ontology, and the human factor in the system complexes is treated by us in accordance with the principles of the “human being ecology”. Hence, a key role is played here by so-called “three-factor utility function” proposed by the author [Janicki, 1991], both as an objective function and as a measure of the quality assessment of solutions, where the first factor is interpreted as the will of striving for the objective, the second one - as the fear of the consequences, and the third one - as the internal consistency of the decision-maker (intelligent agent coherence). It reflects in fact a trans-disciplinary union of the problem-solving approaches proposed earlier [Minsky, Antonovsky and Kulikowski, 1987-1993]. The solutions to these problems themselves come down to the calculations of a heuristic nature, which are often

  2. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  3. Study on the adsorption of Cu(II) by folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cuicui [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Heyi, E-mail: geheyi@sina.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhao, Yueying [Shandong Xiaguang Industrial Co., Ltd., Jining 272000 (China); Liu, Shanshan; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Wenbo [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2017-02-01

    The folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide (FA-mGO) as a new adsorbent has been synthesized in this work for the elimination of Cu(II) from waste water. The as-prepared FA-mGO was tested by SEM, TEM, particle size analyzer, FTIR, XRD, Roman spectrum, TGA and magnetic properties analyzer. Some factors, such as adsorbent dose, pH, contact time, initial concentration of adsorbate and temperature were explored. The results showed that the FA-mGO had the better adsorption performance than mGO. After 40 min, the adsorption equilibrium could be reached. Furthermore, the adsorption property obeyed the pseudo-second order kinetic model and the Temkin isotherms well. The maximum adsorption capacity was 283.29 mg/g for Cu(II) from Pseudo-second-order model at pH=5 and 318 K. The chelation action between FA and Cu(II) along with electrostatic incorporation between GO and Cu(II) determined the favourable adsorption property. Besides, thermodynamic studies results ∆G{sup 0}<0, ∆H{sup 0}>0, ∆S{sup 0}>0 suggested that the adsorption mechanism was an endothermic and spontaneous process essentially. Finally, desorption and reusability studies imply FA-mGO has an excellent reproducibility and is benefit to environmental protection and resource conservation. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of preparing FA-mGO. - Highlights: • The FA-mGO was synthesized for the removal of Cu(II). • The chelation action and electrostatic incorporation determined the favourable adsorption property. • The adsorption property obeyed the pseudo-second-order and Temkin models well. • The adsorption mechanism was an endothermic and spontaneous process. • The FA-mGO has an excellent reproducibility.

  4. I. Structural studies of termite defense secretions. II. Structural studies of natural products of marine nudibranchs. [Kempene, tridachione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solheim, B.A.

    1977-12-01

    Three families of termites have the ability to produce a sticky secretion that envelopes and immobilizes the enemy. In the family Termitidae the secretion contains the diterpenoid hydrocarbons, kempene I and kempene II. The molecular structure of kempene II from the termite, Nasutitermes kempae, is described in detail. Another species of termite, Cubitermes umbratus, contained the diterpenoid hydrocarbon biflora-4,10-19,15-triene in the secretion and this compound is described. Studies were also conducted on the mucous secretion of the pedal gland of the marine nudibranch, Tidachiella diomedea. Tridachione, a substituted ..gamma..-pyrone, was isolated in the pure state and its molecular structure is described in detail. (HLW)

  5. A performance study of WebDav access to storages within the Belle II collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, S.; Russo, G.

    2017-10-01

    WebDav and HTTP are becoming popular protocols for data access in the High Energy Physics community. The most used Grid and Cloud storage solutions provide such kind of interfaces, in this scenario tuning and performance evaluation became crucial aspects to promote the adoption of these protocols within the Belle II community. In this work, we present the results of a large-scale test activity, made with the goal to evaluate performances and reliability of the WebDav protocol, and study a possible adoption for the user analysis. More specifically, we considered a pilot infrastructure composed by a set of storage elements configured with the WebDav interface, hosted at the Belle II sites. The performance tests include a comparison with xrootd and gridftp. As reference tests we used a set of analysis jobs running under the Belle II software framework, accessing the input data with the ROOT I/O library, in order to simulate as much as possible a realistic user activity. The final analysis shows the possibility to achieve promising performances with WebDav on different storage systems, and gives an interesting feedback, for Belle II community and for other high energy physics experiments.

  6. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  7. A Parameter Study for Modeling Mg ii h and k Emission during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210, Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-06-20

    Solar flares show highly unusual spectra in which the thermodynamic conditions of the solar atmosphere are encoded. Current models are unable to fully reproduce the spectroscopic flare observations, especially the single-peaked spectral profiles of the Mg ii h and k lines. We aim to understand the formation of the chromospheric and optically thick Mg ii h and k lines in flares through radiative transfer calculations. We take a flare atmosphere obtained from a simulation with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN as input for a radiative transfer modeling with the RH code. By iteratively changing this model atmosphere and varying thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, electron density, and velocity, we study their effects on the emergent intensity spectra. We reproduce the typical single-peaked Mg ii h and k flare spectral shape and approximate the intensity ratios to the subordinate Mg ii lines by increasing either densities, temperatures, or velocities at the line core formation height range. Additionally, by combining unresolved upflows and downflows up to ∼250 km s{sup −1} within one resolution element, we reproduce the widely broadened line wings. While we cannot unambiguously determine which mechanism dominates in flares, future modeling efforts should investigate unresolved components, additional heat dissipation, larger velocities, and higher densities and combine the analysis of multiple spectral lines.

  8. Synthesis, spectral and theoretical studies of Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole-3-imine-2‧-hydroxynaphyhaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Ghamry, Hoda; Atlam, Faten; Fathalla, Shaimaa

    2015-02-01

    Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole-3-imine-2‧-hydroxynaphthaline have been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, EI-mass, UV-vis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements and thermogravimetric analysis. The molar conductance values indicated that the complexes are non-electrolytes. The magnetic moment values of the complexes displayed diamagnetic behavior for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometrical structure for Ni(II) complex. From the bioinorganic applications point of view, the interaction of the ligand and its metal complexes with CT-DNA was investigated using absorption and viscosity titration techniques. The Schiff-base ligand and its metal complexes have also been screened for their antimicrobial and antitumor activities. Also, theoretical investigation of molecular and electronic structures of the studied ligand and its metal complexes has been carried out. Molecular orbital calculations were performed using DFT (density functional theory) at B3LYP level with standard 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets to access reliable results to the experimental values. The calculations were performed to obtain the optimized molecular geometry, charge density distribution, extent of distortion from regular geometry, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), Mulliken atomic charges, reactivity index (ΔE), dipole moment (D), global hardness (η), softness (σ), electrophilicity index (ω), chemical potential and Mulliken electronegativity (χ).

  9. Synthesis, Spectroscopy, Theoretical, and Electrochemical Studies of Zn(II, Cd(II, and Hg(II Azide and Thiocyanate Complexes of a New Symmetric Schiff-Base Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Montazerozohori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of zinc(II/cadmium(II/mercury(II thiocyanate and azide complexes of a new bidentate Schiff-base ligand (L with general formula of MLX2 (M = Zn(II, Cd(II, and Hg(II in ethanol solution at room temperature is reported. The ligand and metal complexes were characterized by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy and physical characterization, CHN analysis, and molar conductivity. 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra have been studied in DMSO-d6. The reasonable shifts of FT-IR and NMR spectral signals of the complexes with respect to the free ligand confirm well coordination of Schiff-base ligand and anions in an inner sphere coordination space. The conductivity measurements as well as spectral data indicated that the complexes are nonelectrolyte. Theoretical optimization on the structure of ligand and its complexes was performed at the Becke’s three-parameter hybrid functional (B3 with the nonlocal correlation of Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP level of theory with double-zeta valence (LANL2DZ basis set using GAUSSIAN 03 suite of program, and then some theoretical structural parameters such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles were obtained. Finally, electrochemical behavior of ligand and its complexes was investigated. Cyclic voltammograms of metal complexes showed considerable changes with respect to free ligand.

  10. Some Aspects of Psychophysiological Support of Crew Member's Performance Reliability in Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, A. P.; Myasnikov, V. I.; Stepanova, S. I.; Isaev, G. F.; Bronnikov, S. V.

    The history of cosmonautics demonstrates many instances in which only crewmembers' intervention allowed critical situations to be resolved, or catastrophes to be prevented. However, during "crew-spacecraft" system operation human is exposed by influence of numerous flight factors, and beforehand it is very difficult to predict their effects on his functional state and work capacity. So, the incidents are known when unfavorable alterations of crewmember's psychophysiological state (PPS) provoked errors in task performance. The objective of the present investigation was to substantiate the methodological approach directed to increase reliability of a crewmember performance (human error prevention) by means of management of his/her PPS. The specific aims of the investigation were: 1) to evaluate the statistical significance of the interrelation between crew errors (CE) and crewmember's PPS, and 2) to develop the way of PPS management. At present, there is no conventional method to assess combined effect of flight conditions (microgravity, confinement, psychosocial factors, etc.) on crewmembers' PPS. For this purpose experts of the Medical Support Group (psychoneurologists and psychologists) at the Moscow Mission Control Center analyze information received during radio and TV contacts with crew. Peculiarities of behavior, motor activity, sleep, speech, mood, emotional reactions, well-being and sensory sphere, trend of dominant interests and volitional acts, signs of deprivation phenomena are considered as separate indicators of crewmember's PPS. The set of qualitative symptoms reflecting PPS alterations and corresponding to them ratings (in arbitrary units) was empirically stated for each indicator. It is important to emphasize that symptoms characterizing more powerful PPS alterations have higher ratings. Quantitative value of PPS integral parameter is calculating by adding up the ratings of all separate indicators over a day, a week, or other temporal interval (in

  11. Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of benzimidazole derivative: Structures, catecholase like activities and interaction studies with hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Babli; Adhikari, Sangita; Matalobos, Jesús Sanmartín; Das, Debasis

    2018-01-01

    Present study describes the synthesis and single crystal X-ray structures of two metal complexes of benzimidazole derivative (PBI), viz. the Cu(II) complex, [Cu(PBI)2(NCS)]ClO4 (1) and a Co(II) complex, [Co(PBI)2(NCS)1.75Cl0.25] (2). The Cu(II) complex (1) shows catecholase like activity having Kcat = 1.84 × 104 h-1. Moreover, interactions of the complexes with hydrogen peroxide have been investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. The interaction constant of 1 and 2 for H2O2 are 6.67 × 102 M-1 and 1.049 × 103 M-1 while their detection limits for H2O2 are 3.37 × 10-7 M and 2.46 × 10-7 M respectively.

  12. Polarographic study of mixed-ligand complexes of cadmium(II) with L-amino acid and vitamin B5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Alok K.; Khan, Farid

    1998-01-01

    A survey of literature shows that ternary complexes of Cd II with L-amino acids and vitamin B 5 have not been studied so far. The present communication reports the formation of mixed-ligand complexes of Cd II with L-amino acids as primary ligands and vitamin B 5 as secondary ligand, studied by polarographic technique. (author)

  13. Pulmonary function testing in HTLV-I and HTLV-II infected humans: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garratty George

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-I infection has been linked to lung pathology and HTLV-II has been associated with an increased incidence of pneumonia and acute bronchitis. However it is unknown whether HTLV-I or -II infection alters pulmonary function. Methods We performed pulmonary function testing on HTLV-I, HTLV-II and HTLV seronegative subjects from the HTLV outcomes study (HOST, including vital capacity (VC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, and diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO corrected for hemoglobin and lung volume. Multivariable analysis adjusted for differences in age, gender, race/ethnicity, height and smoking history. Results Mean (standard deviation pulmonary function values among the 257 subjects were as follows: FVC = 3.74 (0.89 L, FEV1 = 2.93 (0.67 L, DLCOcorr = 23.82 (5.89 ml/min/mmHg, alveolar ventilation (VA = 5.25 (1.20 L and DLCOcorr/VA = 4.54 (0.87 ml/min/mmHg/L. There were no differences in FVC, FEV1 and DLCOcorr/VA by HTLV status. For DLCOcorr, HTLV-I and HTLV-II subjects had slightly lower values than seronegatives, but neither difference was statistically significant after adjustment for confounding. Conclusions There was no difference in measured pulmonary function and diffusing capacity in generally healthy HTLV-I and HTLV-II subjects compared to seronegatives. These results suggest that previously described HTLV-associated abnormalities in bronchoalveolar cells and fluid may not affect pulmonary function.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Shah, Naseer Ali; Sohail, Manzar; Pandarinathan, Vedapriya

    2015-08-01

    A new binuclear O-bridged Cu(II) complex with 4-chlorophenyl acetate and 2,2‧-bipyridine has been synthesized and characterized using FT-IR, powder and single crystal XRD and electrochemical solution studies. The results revealed that the two penta-coordinated Cu(II) centers are linked by two carboxylate ligands in end-on bonding fashion. The coordination geometry is slightly distorted square pyramidal (SP) with bridging oxygen atoms occupying the apical position and other ligands lying in the equatorial plane. The striking difference in Cu-O bond distance of the bridging oxygen atom in the complex may be responsible for the SP geometry of Cu(II) ion. The complex gave rise to metal centered irreversible electro-activity where one electron Cu(II)/Cu(III) oxidation process and a single step two electron Cu(II)/Cu(0) reduction process was observed. The redox processes were found predominantly adsorption controlled. The values of diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous rate constant for oxidation process were 6.98 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 4.60 × 10-5 cm s-1 while the corresponding values for reduction were 5.30 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 and 5.41 × 10-6 cm s-1, respectively. The formal potential and charge transfer coefficient were also calculated. The DNA-binding ability was explored through cyclic voltammetry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Diminution in the value of Do for oxidation indicated the binding of the complex with DNA corresponding to Kb = 8.58 × 104 M-1. UV-Visible spectroscopy yielded ε = 49 L mol-1 cm-1 and Kb = 2.96 × 104 M-1. The data of both techniques support each other. The self-induced redox activation of the complex, as indicated by cyclic voltammetry heralds its potential applications in redox catalysis and anticancer activity.

  15. Swamp plots for dynamic aperture studies of PEP-II lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.T.; Irwin, J.; Cai, Y.; Chen, T.; Ritson, D.

    1995-01-01

    With a newly developed algorithm using resonance basis Lie generators and their evaluation with action-angle Poisson bracket maps (nPB tracking) the authors have been able to perform fast tracking for dynamic aperture studies of PEP-II lattices as well as incorporate lattice nonlinearities in beam-beam studies. They have been able to better understand the relationship between dynamic apertures and the tune shift and resonance coefficients in the generators of the one-turn maps. To obtain swamp plots (dynamic aperture vs. working point) of the PEP-II lattices, they first compute a one-turn resonance basis map for a nominal working point and then perform nPB tracking by switching the working point while holding fixed all other terms in the map. Results have been spot-checked by comparing with element-by-element tracking

  16. Study of an instability of the PEP-II positron beam (Ohmi effect and Multipactoring)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifets, S A [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The processes defining the density distribution of the photoelectrons are quite complicated. In this study, a simplified model of the instability was used to get a quick estimate of the growth rate of the instability and the relative importance of the parameters, as has been done in Ohmi`s paper. The production rate and dynamics of the photoelectrons are studied for the PEP-II parameters. The growth rate of the transverse instability driven by the primary photoelectrons is of the order of 0.7 msec for the PEP-II parameters. The multipactoring at resonance currents cannot produce large electron density due to the final energy spread caused by the finite bunch length and the intrinsic energy spread of the secondary electrons. Production of the secondary electrons may lead to large average densities. The ion can be produced in electron collisions with the residual gas with density of the order of the electron density. (G.K.)

  17. Evaluation of new gastro-intestinal prokinetic (ENGIP-II) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwaikar, Pradeep P; Kulkarni, Sujay S; Bargaje, Rahul S

    2005-12-01

    Non-ulcer dyspepsia is a common clinical disorder characterised by reduced gastric motility. Safety concerns have restricted use of currently available prokinetic drugs. Itopride is a new safer prokinetic drug with dopamine D2 antagonism and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory actions. The ENGIP-II study was conducted to investigate the efficacy, and safety of itopride in patients of non-ulcer dyspepsia. There were significant reductions in upper abdominal pain, heartburn frequency, gastro-oesophageal regurgitation, nausea, bloating, early satiety after meals at day 3 only; whereas significant improvements were noted in belching, anorexia at day 6 and in vomiting at day 9. Thus, ENGIP-II study shows that itopride was well tolerated patients and appears to be the drug of choice in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

  18. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes

  19. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  20. Studying the Interstellar Medium of H II/BCD Galaxies Using IFU Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Lagos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the results from our studies, and previous published work, on the spatially resolved physical properties of a sample of H ii/BCD galaxies, as obtained mainly from integral-field unit spectroscopy with Gemini/GMOS and VLT/VIMOS. We confirm that, within observational uncertainties, our sample galaxies show nearly spatially constant chemical abundances similar to other low-mass starburst galaxies. They also show He ii  λ4686 emission with the properties being suggestive of a mix of excitation sources and with Wolf-Rayet stars being excluded as the primary ones. Finally, in this contribution, we include a list of all H ii/BCD galaxies studied thus far with integral-field unit spectroscopy.

  1. [Study on the terpenoids of chemical constituents of Buddleja purdomii (II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Cai, Li; Li, Hai-Yan; Li, Chong

    2007-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja purdomii W. W. Smith. The constituents were isolated and purified by various chromatographic methods and structurally identified by spectral analysis. 7 compounds were obtained as luteolin (I), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucoside (II), trans-caffeic acid (III), cis-caffeic acid (IV), beta-stiosterol (V), stigmasterol (VI), nonacosane (VII). All these compounds are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  2. Phase II study of 4'-(9-acridinylamino) methanesulfon-m- anisidide (AMSA) in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, S S; Hall, S W; Powell, K C; Burgess, M A; Benjamin, R S; Gutterman, J U; Bodey, G P

    1980-01-01

    A phase II study of AMSA in previously treated patients with metastatic malignant melanoma was conducted. The dose schedule of AMSA was 40 mg/m2/day for 3 days repeated at 3-week intervals. Among the 30 evaluable patients, one achieved a complete response, one a partial response, and four had minor responses. Side effects included mild nausea and vomiting and moderate degree of myelosuppression. AMSA has poor activity against previously treated metastatic melanoma.

  3. Study of heavy quark production with the Mark II at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.; Amidei, D.; Baden, A.

    1983-10-01

    The methods adopted by the Mark II collaboration to study heavy quark production at PEP are described. Two complementary techniques are used: D* tagging using the decay chain D* + . D 0 π + , D 0 → K - π + , and inclusive lepton tagging using the characteristic p/sub T/ distributions to distinguish contributions from b and c quarks. These techniques are used to derive information about heavy quark fragmentation and about the weak coupling of heavy quarks

  4. Kinetic studies of electrochemical generation of Ag(II) ion and catalytic oxidation of selected organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Smith, W.H.; Martinez, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a method to treat mixed hazardous wastes containing selected organic compounds and heavy metals, including actinide elements. One approach is to destroy the organic via electrochemical oxidation to carbon dioxide, then recover the metal contaminants through normally accepted procedures such as ion exchange, precipitation, etc. The authors have chosen to study the electrochemical oxidation of a simple alcohol, iso-propanol. Much of the recent work reported involved the use of an electron transfer mediator, usually the silver(I)/(II) redox couple. This involved direct electrochemical generation of the mediator at the anode of a divided cell followed by homogeneous reaction of the mediator with the organic compound. In this study the authors have sought to compare the mediated reaction with direct electrochemical oxidation of the organic. In addition to silver(I)/(II) they also looked at the cobalt(II)/(III) redox coupled. In the higher oxidation state both of these metal ions readily hydrolyze in aqueous solution to ultimately form insoluble oxide. The study concluded that in a 6M nitric acid solution at room temperature iso-propanol can be oxidized to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. Acetic acid is a stable intermediate and resists further oxidation. The presence of Co(III) enhances the rate or efficiency of the reaction

  5. Poly (furfural-acetone) as New Adsorbent for Removal of Cu(II) from Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium Study

    OpenAIRE

    Najim, Tariq S.

    2010-01-01

    The batch removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solution using poly (furfural-acetone), (PFA) as adsorbent was investigated in this study. The influences of initial Cu(II) ion concentration (10 to 120 ppm), pH (4-8) and contact time have been reported. Adsorption of Cu(II) is highly pH-dependent and the result indicate that the optimum pH for the removal was found to be 6. At this pH a small amount of PFA, 2 g/L, could remove as much as 97% of Cu(II) from a solution of initial concentration 10 ppm....

  6. [Analysis of interdependence of temperament, neuroendocrine control and psychophysiological status during dry immersion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichiporuk, I A

    2008-01-01

    Interdependence of temperament, hormonal and psychophysiological status was investigated in 8 young volunteers for 7-d dry immersion (DI). Blood levels of insulin, sex, steroid, thyroid hormones and psychomotor parameters were determined on DI days 3 and 7, and on day 7 of recovery. Before DI, the volunteers filled in the Kettelle personality questionnaire. During DI, anxious subjects spent less time to compare visual patterns demonstrating high and stable speed of reactions but made a bit more errors. Extraverts showed high speed of reactions and stability of psychomotor parameters and did not increase the number of errors. Easy-tempered and introvert subjects preserved inherently high insulin concentrations in DI. Support deprivation was attended by drop of the levels of triiodothyronine and cortisol and rise of prolactin and thyroxin. Results of multiple correlation analysis led to the conclusion that DI accentuates the role of original extra-introversion and dampens origin anxiety. Successfulness can be attained by adequate alteration of the levels of steroid and thyroid hormones with effectively balanced vagoinsulin-sympathoadrenal neuroendocrine control and monoaminergic CNV activity.

  7. "Great Ideas" in Russian Psychology: Personality Impact on Psychophysiological Functions and Causal Approach to Self- determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Mironenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian psychology has brought into the world science at least two great ideas: the conditioned reflex (Pavlov and the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky. These concepts were formulated before “iron curtain” fell. Since then Russian science dropped out from the view of western colleagues for decades. Now it is challenged to re-join international mainstream. Are we in a position to contribute?A key concept for Russian psychology is personality impact on psycho-physiological functions and causal approach to self-determination. The concept of selfdetermination appeared in Western theories in 1980-es and since then it has been developed in the context of teleological humanitarian approach. In Russian science the concept of self-determination dates back to 1934, when it was defined by Rubinstein as “sub’ekt”. Self-determination of ontogenesis of psycho physiological functions resulting from confluence of ontogenesis and social development was explicated by Russian scientists whose theoretical reasoning and empirical results are compared to Western counterparts.

  8. Physiological and psychophysiological responses to an exer-game training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Pinsker, Russell; Naik, Rutika; Noah, J Adam

    2016-03-01

    Exer-games and virtual reality offer alternative opportunities to provide neuro-rehabilitation and exercise that are fun. Our goal was to determine how effective they are in achieving motor learning goals and fitness benefits as players gain experience. We employed a repeated measures design to determine changes in physical exertion and engagement with training. Fourteen healthy adults trained on the XBOX Kinect video game Dance Central using a skill-based protocol to examine changes in energy expenditure (EE), heart rate (HR), METs, limb movement, game proficiency, and player engagement in initial, post-training, and transfer-testing of a full-body dance exer-game. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, pengagement remained unchanged. It is important to understand whether player physiological and psychophysiological responses change with continued game-play. Although Dance Central involves whole-body movement, physical exertion remained at moderate levels after training. As exer-game and virtual reality systems move from their initial novelty, research about how players react to continued involvement with a game can guide game developers to maintain a freshness through game progression that preserves the participant's attentional focus, minimizes attrition and maintains a prescribed level of energy exertion. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic Changes in Amygdala Psychophysiological Connectivity Reveal Distinct Neural Networks for Facial Expressions of Basic Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diano, Matteo; Tamietto, Marco; Celeghin, Alessia; Weiskrantz, Lawrence; Tatu, Mona-Karina; Bagnis, Arianna; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-03-27

    The quest to characterize the neural signature distinctive of different basic emotions has recently come under renewed scrutiny. Here we investigated whether facial expressions of different basic emotions modulate the functional connectivity of the amygdala with the rest of the brain. To this end, we presented seventeen healthy participants (8 females) with facial expressions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and emotional neutrality and analyzed amygdala's psychophysiological interaction (PPI). In fact, PPI can reveal how inter-regional amygdala communications change dynamically depending on perception of various emotional expressions to recruit different brain networks, compared to the functional interactions it entertains during perception of neutral expressions. We found that for each emotion the amygdala recruited a distinctive and spatially distributed set of structures to interact with. These changes in amygdala connectional patters characterize the dynamic signature prototypical of individual emotion processing, and seemingly represent a neural mechanism that serves to implement the distinctive influence that each emotion exerts on perceptual, cognitive, and motor responses. Besides these differences, all emotions enhanced amygdala functional integration with premotor cortices compared to neutral faces. The present findings thus concur to reconceptualise the structure-function relation between brain-emotion from the traditional one-to-one mapping toward a network-based and dynamic perspective.

  10. Removal of copper(II) ions from aqueous solutions by Azolla rongpong: batch and continuous study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedumaran, B; Velan, M

    2008-01-01

    Batch and packed bed continuous biosorption studies were conducted to investigate the kinetics and isotherms of Cu(II) ions on the biomass of blue green alga Azolla rongpong. It is observed that the biosorption capacity of algae depends on initial pH and dosage. The biosorption capacity increases with increasing concentration and follows Freundlich isotherm model well with k and n values 0.06223 and 0.949 respectively. The optimum pH of 3.5 with an algae dosage of 1 g/L was observed. The results indicate that with the advantage of high metal biosorption capacity and recovery of Cu(II) ions, A. rongpong can be used as an efficient and economic biosorbent for the removal and recovery of toxic heavy metals from aqueous wastes even at higher concentration.

  11. Studies related to emergency decay heat removal in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies related to emergency decay heat removal by natural circulation in the EBR-II heat transport circuits are described. Three general categories of natural circulation plant transients are discussed and the resultant reactor flow and temperature response to these events are presented. these categories include the following: (1) loss of forced flow from decay power and low initial flow rates; (2) reactor scram with a delayed loss of forced flow; and (3) loss of forced flow with a plant protective system activated scram. In all cases, the transition from forced to natural convective flow was smooth and the peak in-core temperature rises were small to moderate. Comparisons between experimental measurements in EBR-II and analytical predictions of the NATDEMO code are included

  12. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, Luis; Berrios, Cristhian; Yanez, Mauricio; Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  13. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Luis [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Berrios, Cristhian [Laboratorio de Electrocatalisis, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Yanez, Mauricio [Laboratorio de Recursos Renovables, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla-160 C, Concepcion (Chile); Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I., E-mail: gloria.cardenas@usach.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-11-26

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  14. Hospital costs for treatment of acute heart failure: economic analysis of the REVIVE II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lissovoy, Greg; Fraeman, Kathy; Teerlink, John R; Mullahy, John; Salon, Jeff; Sterz, Raimund; Durtschi, Amy; Padley, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the leading cause of hospital admission among older Americans. The Randomized EValuation of Intravenous Levosimendan Efficacy (REVIVE II) trial compared patients randomly assigned to a single infusion of levosimendan (levo) or placebo (SOC), each in addition to local standard treatments for AHF. We report an economic analysis of REVIVE II from the hospital perspective. REVIVE II enrolled patients (N = 600) hospitalized for treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who remained dyspneic at rest despite treatment with intravenous diuretics. Case report forms documented index hospital treatment (drug administration, procedures, days of treatment by care unit), as well as subsequent hospital and emergency department admissions during follow-up ending 90 days from date of randomization. These data were used to impute cost of admission based on an econometric cost function derived from >100,000 ADHF hospital billing records selected per REVIVE II inclusion criteria. Index admission mean length of stay (LOS) was shorter for the levo group compared with standard of care (SOC) (7.03 vs 8.96 days, P = 0.008) although intensive care unit (ICU)/cardiac care unit (CCU) days were similar (levo 2.88, SOC 3.22, P = 0.63). Excluding cost for levo, predicted mean (median) cost for the index admission was levo US $13,590 (9,458), SOC $19,021 (10,692) with a difference of $5,431 (1,234) favoring levo (P = 0.04). During follow-up through end of study day 90, no significant differences were observed in numbers of hospital admissions (P = 0.67), inpatient days (P = 0.81) or emergency department visits (P = 0.41). Cost-effectiveness was performed with a REVIVE-II sub-set conforming to current labeling, which excluded patients with low baseline blood pressure. Assuming an average price for levo in countries where currently approved, there was better than 50% likelihood that levo was both cost-saving and improved survival. Likelihood that levo would

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of 2-(4-nitrophenylamino-carbonyl)benzoic acid and its complexes with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, M; Nazir, S.; Latif, S.; Mahmood, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-(4-Nitrophenyl aminocarbonyl)benzoic acid were synthesized and characterized on the basis of physical, analytical and spectroscopic data. The ligands, as well as its metal complexes were checked for their in-vitro antimicrobial activity against three bacterial strains, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, and three fungal strains, Nigrospora oryzae, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. Disc diffusion method and Tube diffusion test were used for antibacterial and antifungal activities, respectively. The synthesized complexes only show significant antifungal activity but inactive for antibacterial, however, in general, the metal complexes were found to be more active against antimicrobial activities as compared to their un complexed ligand. (author)

  16. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of

  17. Study of thermal spin crossover in [Fe(II)(isoxazole)(6)](BF4)(2) with Mossbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; van Koningsbruggen, P. J.; Hibbs, W.; Miller, Joel S.; Guetlich, P.

    2007-01-01

    Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy of the mononuclear [Fe( II)( isoxazole)(6)]( BF4)(2) compound has been studied to reveal the thermal spin crossover of Fe( II) between low- spin ( S = 0) and high- spin ( S = 2) states. A temperature-dependent spin transition curve has been constructed with the least-

  18. Radiochemical and thermal studies of the copper(II)-exchanged form of synthetic zeolite linde sieve A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    Synthetic zeolite Linde Sieve A displays a double ion-sieve action. Only small cations can penetrate the single 6-rings into the beta cages. The radiochemical and thermal studies of copper(II)-exchanges form of 4A shows evidence of hydrated copper(II) ions in the zeolite structure. (author)

  19. Serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II reference interval in healthy Chinese adults: Sub-analysis from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cunling; Hu, Jian; Yang, Jia; Chen, Zhaoyun; Li, Huijun; Wei, Lianhua; Zhang, Wei; Xing, Hao; Sang, Guoyao; Wang, Xiaoqin; Han, Ruilin; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhihui; Li, Zhiyan; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Li, Shunjun; Dai, Shuyang; Wang, Nianyue; Yang, Yongfeng; Ma, Li; Soh, Andrew; Beshiri, Agim; Shen, Feng; Yang, Tian; Fan, Zhuping; Zheng, Yijie; Chen, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has been widely used as a biomarker for liver cancer diagnosis in Japan for decades. However, the reference intervals for serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II have not been established in the Chinese population. Thus, this study aimed to measure serum PIVKA-II levels in healthy Chinese subjects. This is a sub-analysis from the prospective, cross-sectional and multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03047603). A total of 892 healthy participants (777 Han and 115 Uygur) with complete health checkup results were recruited from 7 regional centers in China. Serum PIVKA-II level was measured by ARCHITECT immunoassay. All 95% reference ranges were estimated by nonparametric method. The distribution of PIVKA-II values showed significant difference with ethnicity and sex, but not age. The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 13.62-40.38 mAU/ml in Han Chinese subjects and 15.16-53.74 mAU/ml in Uygur subjects. PIVKA-II level was significantly higher in males than in females (P < 0.001). The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 15.39-42.01 mAU/ml in Han males while 11.96-39.13 mAU/ml in Han females. The reference interval of serum PIVKA-II on the Architect platform was established in healthy Chinese adults. This will be valuable for future clinical and laboratory studies performed using the Architect analyzer. Different ethnic backgrounds and analytical methods underline the need for redefining the reference interval of analytes such as PIVKA-II, in central laboratories in different countries. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hospital discharge bags and breastfeeding at 6 months: data from the infant feeding practices study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadacharan, Radha; Grossman, Xena; Matlak, Stephanie; Merewood, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Distribution of industry-sponsored formula sample packs to new mothers undermines breastfeeding. Using data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (IFPS II), we aimed to determine whether receipt of 4 different types of bags was associated with exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life. We extracted data from IFPS II questionnaires. Type of discharge bag received was categorized as "formula bag," "coupon bag," "breastfeeding supplies bag," or "no bag". We examined exclusive breastfeeding status at 10 weeks (post hoc) and at 6 months using univariate descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables. Overall, 1868 (81.4%) of women received formula bags, 96 (4.2%) received coupon bags, 46 (2.0%) received breastfeeding supplies bags, and 284 (12.4%) received no bag. By 10 weeks, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bags or no bag were significantly more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding than formula bag recipients. In the adjusted model, compared to formula bag/coupon bag recipients, recipients of breastfeeding supplies bag/no bag were significantly more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.36). The vast majority of new mothers received formula sample packs at discharge, and this was associated with reduced exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months. Bags containing breastfeeding supplies or no bag at all were positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding at 10 weeks and 6 months.

  1. Experimental study of Pb (II) solution sorption behavior onto Coffee Husk Bioactivated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fona, Z.; Habibah, U.

    2018-04-01

    Coffee husk which is abundantly produced in the coffee plantations is potential to be a challenging adsorbent. The fate of Pb (II) solution in the sorption mechanism onto the adsorbent has been investigated. This paper aimed to study the efficiency of Pb (II) aqueous solution removal using activated carbon from coffee husk (CAC). The sorption characteristics were using two isotherm models, Langmuir and Freundlich, were also reported. The coffee husk from local plantations in Middle Aceh was carbonized and sieved to 120/140 mesh. The charcoal was activated using hydrochloric acid before contacted with the different initial concentrations of Pb (II) solution. The remaining concentrations of the metal in the specified contact times were determined using Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer at 283.3 wavelength. The result showed that the equilibrium concentrations were obtained in about 30 minutes which depended on the initial concentration. The sorption mechanism followed Freundlich isotherm model where the adsorption constant and capacity were accordingly 1.353 and 1.195 mgg‑1. The iodine sorption was up to 1,053 mgg‑1. Based on the ash and moisture content, as well as iodine sorption, the activated carbon met the national standard.

  2. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  3. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018

  4. Adding a PECS II block for proximal arm arteriovenous access - a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, K H; Low, E Y; Tan, Y R; Ong, A S C; Tang, T Y; Kam, J W; Kiew, A S C

    2018-05-01

    Brachial plexus block is often utilised for proximal arm arteriovenous access creation. However, the medial upper arm and axilla are often inadequately anaesthetised, requiring repeated, intraoperative local anaesthetic supplementation, or conversion into general anaesthesia. We hypothesised that the addition of a PECS II block would improve anaesthesia and analgesia for proximal arm arteriovenous access surgery. In this prospective, double-blinded, randomised proof-of-concept study, 36 consenting adults with end-stage renal disease aged between 21 and 90 years received either a combined supraclavicular and PECS II block (Group PECS, n = 18), or combined supraclavicular and sham block (Group SCB, n = 18) for proximal arm arteriovenous access surgery. Primary outcome was whether patients required intraoperative local anaesthetic supplementation by the surgeon. In Group PECS, 33.3% (6/18) needed local anaesthetic supplementation vs. 100% (18/18) in Group SCB. Group SCB had three times (RR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.8; P PECS required lower volume of supplemental local anaesthetic compared to Group SCB (0.0 ml, IQR 0.0-6.3 ml vs. 15.0 ml, IQR 7.4-17.8 ml; P PECS II block to a supraclavicular block improves regional anaesthesia for patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing proximal arm arteriovenous access surgery. © 2018 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Spectroscopic, thermal, catalytic and biological studies of Cu(II) azo dye complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Shoair, A. F.; Hussein, M. A.; El-Boz, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    New complexes of copper(II) with azo compounds of 5-amino-2-(aryl diazenyl)phenol (HLn) are prepared and investigated by elemental analyses, molar conductance, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Visible, mass, ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal analyses. The complexes have a square planar structure and general formula [Cu(Ln)(OAc)]H2O. Study the catalytic activities of Cu(II) complexes toward oxidation of benzyl alcohol derivatives to carbonyl compounds were tested using H2O2 as the oxidant. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) of the ligands (HLn) and Cu(II) complexes (1-4) with CT-DNA are determined. The formed compounds have been tested for biological activity of antioxidants, antibacterial against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and yeast Candida albicans. Antibiotic (Ampicillin) and antifungal against (Colitrimazole) and cytotoxic compounds HL1, HL2, HL3 and complex (1) showed moderate to good activity against S. aureus, E. coli and Candida albicans, and also to be moderate on antioxidants and toxic substances. Molecular docking is used to predict the binding between the ligands with the receptor of breast cancer (2a91).

  6. Structure of the Hydrated Platinum(II) Ion And the Cis-Diammine-Platinum(II) Complex in Acidic Aqueous Solution: An EXAFS Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilehvand, F.; Laffin, L.J.

    2009-05-18

    Careful analysis of Pt L{sub 3}-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra shows that the hydrated platinum(II) ion in acidic (HClO{sub 4}) aqueous solution binds four water molecules with the Pt-O bond distance 2.01(2) {angstrom} and one (or two) in the axial position at 2.39(2) {angstrom}. The weak axial water coordination is in accordance with the unexpectedly small activation volume previously reported for water exchange in an interchange mechanism with associative character. The hydrated cis-diammineplatinum(II) complex has a similar coordination environment with two ammine and two aqua ligands strongly bound with Pt-O/N bond distances of 2.01(2) {angstrom} and, in addition, one (or two) axial water molecule at 2.37(2) {angstrom}. This result provides a new basis for theoretical computational studies aiming to connect the function of the anticancer drug cis-platin to its ligand exchange reactions, where usually four-coordinated square planar platinum(II) species are considered as the reactant and product. {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the Pt(II) complexes.

  7. Kinetic studies of adsorption of Cu (II) from aqueous solution by coriander seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, L.; Lebkiri, A.; Rifi, E. H.; Ouass, A.; Essaadaoui, Y.; Lebkiri, I.; Hamad, H.

    2018-05-01

    The adsorption of copper ions Cu2+ by Coriandrum Sativum seeds (CSS) from aqueous solution was studied in order to highlight the importance of coriander seeds as a potential tool in the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals. The kinetic studies of adsorption of Cu (II) were discussed using the spectroscopic technique "Inducting Coupled Plasma" (ICP). The effects of initial copper ion concentration and contact time were determined. All results show that coriander seeds have, over their culinary and medicinal benefits, a significant adsorbent power of copper ions.

  8. Fundamental studies, reference values and relationship to menstrual cycle on Prolactin RIA BEAD II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Midori; Sakai, Rinko; Satoh, Shigekiyo; Maruyama, Kiyoji; Kanai, Masamitsu

    1989-01-01

    We have tried fundamental studies, reference values and relationship to menstrual cycle on Prolactin RIA BEAD II kit which has a method of IRMA using monocronal antibody. On clinical studies, we investigated change of serum prolactin level during the menstrual cycle and relationship to other hormones (LH, FSH, estradiol, progesterone). It was the result that prolactin level of follicular phase was lower than that of preavulatory phase and luteal phase. We conclude that change of prolactin level during the menstrual cycle is related with change of estradiol level. (author)

  9. Fundamental studies, reference values and relationship to menstrual cycle on Prolactin RIA BEAD II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Midori; Sakai, Rinko; Satoh, Shigekiyo; Maruyama, Kiyoji; Kanai, Masamitsu (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    We have tried fundamental studies, reference values and relationship to menstrual cycle on Prolactin RIA BEAD II kit which has a method of IRMA using monocronal antibody. On clinical studies, we investigated change of serum prolactin level during the menstrual cycle and relationship to other hormones (LH, FSH, estradiol, progesterone). It was the result that prolactin level of follicular phase was lower than that of preavulatory phase and luteal phase. We conclude that change of prolactin level during the menstrual cycle is related with change of estradiol level. (author).

  10. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Adams, F.; De Jong, M.

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q's of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods

  11. Archaeometric studies of ceramics from the Sao Paulo II archaeological site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerio Baria; Munita, C.S.; Cano, N.F.; Tatumi, S.H.; Silva-Carrera, B.N.; Shigueo Watanabe; Neves, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at studying the elementary chemical composition of 70 ceramic fragments from the Sao Paulo II archaeological site by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration data was studied next using multivariate statistical methods, such as cluster analysis, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis. The results showed three different chemical groups of samples regarding the similarity/dissimilarity between the samples. Ceramics from each group have been selected and dated using thermoluminescence. The firing temperature of the ceramics was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance. (author)

  12. Fe(II) and Co (II) complexes of (4-(4-bromophenyl)-[2,2'-bipyridine]-6-carboxylic acid) synthesis, characterization and electrochromic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, A.; Maqsood, Z.T.; Wasim, A.A.; Basha, F.Z.

    2017-01-01

    In this study novel complexes of substituted bipyridine (4-(4-bromophenyl)-[2,2'-bipyridine]-6-carboxylic acid) with Fe/sup +2/ and Co/sup +2/ were synthesized and characterized by different physical, analytical and spectral techniques which includes /sup 1/ H-NMR, MALDI-MS, FTIR, UV-VIS Spectrophotometry, CHN analysis and conductometry. Mole ratio method revealed that both complexes satisfied ML2 stoichiometry. Other characterization studies showed that substituted bipyridine acted as a tridentate ligand, with two pyridine N and one carboxylic O atom as binding sites per ligand molecule. The complexes were found octahedral, neutral and possessed fairly high molar absorptivities in visible region. Electrochromic studies revealed that Fe (II) complex had relatively good electrochromic properties with a reversible color change from blue to pale yellow. Co (II) complex, however, did not show significant electrochromic properties in the visible region. (author)

  13. A Generalized Form of Context-Dependent Psychophysiological Interactions (gPPI): A Comparison to Standard Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Donald G.; Ries, Michele L.; Xu, Guofan; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) allows one to study task-related regional responses and task-dependent connectivity analysis using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) methods. The latter affords the additional opportunity to understand how brain regions interact in a task-dependent manner. The current implementation of PPI in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) is configured primarily to assess connectivity differences between two task conditions, when in practice fMRI tasks frequently employ more than two conditions. Here we evaluate how a generalized form of context-dependent PPI (gPPI; http://www.nitrc.org/projects/gppi), which is configured to automatically accommodate more than two task conditions in the same PPI model by spanning the entire experimental space, compares to the standard implementation in SPM8. These comparisons are made using both simulations and an empirical dataset. In the simulated dataset, we compare the interaction beta estimates to their expected values and model fit using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). We found that interaction beta estimates in gPPI were robust to different simulated data models, were not different from the expected beta value, and had better model fits than when using standard PPI (sPPI) methods. In the empirical dataset, we compare the model fit of the gPPI approach to sPPI. We found that the gPPI approach improved model fit compared to sPPI. There were several regions that became non-significant with gPPI. These regions all showed significantly better model fits with gPPI. Also, there were several regions where task-dependent connectivity was only detected using gPPI methods, also with improved model fit. Regions that were detected with all methods had more similar model fits. These results suggest that gPPI may have greater sensitivity and specificity than standard implementation in SPM. This notion is tempered slightly as there is no gold standard; however, data simulations with a known outcome support our

  14. In vitro study of 137Cs sorption by hexacyanoferrates(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, P.; Dresow, B.; Heinrich, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    We synthesized a variety of colloidal and non-colloidal mixed hexacyanoferrate(II) complexes of Fe, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Mn and studied the cesium sorption in vito under physiological conditions (artificial gastric juice, pH 1.2 and artificial duodenal juice, pH 6.8). All of the hexacyanoferrates under study (except cesium iron(III) hexacyanoferrate CsFeHCF) sorb tracer amounts of 137 Cs quantitatively. Differences in the sorption capacity become obvious by offering substantial amounts of cesium. Potassium copper hexacyanoferrate(II) (KCuHCF) and potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate(II) (KZnHCF) are most efficient in cesium sorption at pH 1.2 and at pH 6.8. The sorption capacities of KCuHCF and KZnHCF (2.3-3.0 mmol Cs/g HCF) are twice as high as for colloidal Prussian blue (KFeHCF; 1.0-1.3 mmol Cs/g HCF) and insoluble Prussian blue (FeHCF; 1.0-1.6 mmol Cs/g HCF). The most promising compounds, KCuHCF and KZnHCF, should be further investigated in in vivo studies for 137/134 cesium decorporation. Evidence indicate that the sorption mechanism for most of the compounds under study is a cesium/potassium ion-exchange reaction. In the case of insoluble Prussian blue (FeHCF), a cesium/proton exchange was observed. On laboratory scale, 137/134 Cs-contaminated whey dry powder, produced from South German cow milk in summer 1986 was almost completely decontaminated by dialysing a whey suspension against buffer solution containing FeHCF. The 137/134 Cs + -ions, completely bound by FeHCF, can be isolated from the buffer solution by simple filtration. The buffer solution and the FeHCF can be re-used several times. (orig.)

  15. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and study of the magnetic properties of a coordination polymer containing cobalt(II) and copper(II); Sintese, caracterizacao e estudo das propriedades magneticas de um polimero de coordenacao contendo cobalto(II) e cobre(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Tamyris T. da; Stumpf, Humberto O.; Pereira, Cynthia L.M., E-mail: cynthialopes@ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pires, Heber S.; Oliveira, Luiz F.C. de [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Pedroso, Emerson F. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Wallace C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis and characterization of two new compounds with ligand opy (N-(2-pyridyl)oxamate): the copper(II) precursor [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 2}[Cu(opy){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O and Co{sup II} Cu{sup II} coordination polymer {l_brace}[Co Cu(opy){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}x4nH{sub 2}O. This latter compound was obtained by reaction of [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 2}[Cu(opy){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O and CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O in water. The heterobimetallic Co{sup II} Cu{sup II} chain was characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and magnetic measurements. Magnetic characterization revealed typical behavior of one-dimensional (1D) ferrimagnetic chain as shown in the curves of temperature (T) dependence of magnetic susceptibility ({chi}{sub M}), in the form of {chi}{sub M}T versus T, and dependence of magnetization (M) with applied field (H). (author)

  17. Physicochemical, Spectral, and Biological Studies of Mn(II, Cu(II, Cd(II, Zr(OH2(IV, and UO2(VI Compounds with Ligand Containing Thiazolidin-4-one Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Schiff base (I upon reacting with mercaptoacetic acid in dry benzene undergoes cyclization and forms N-(2-carbamoylthienyl-C-(3′-carboxy-2′-hydroxyphenylthiazolidin-4-one, LH3 (II. A MeOH solution of II reacts with Mn(II, Cu(II, Cd(II, Zr(OH2(IV, and UO2(VI ions and forms the coordination compounds, [Mn(LH(MeOH2], [Cu(LH]2, [Cd(LH], [Zr(OH2(OAc2(LH3], and [UO2(NO3(LH2(MeOH]. The compounds have been characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductance, molecular weight, spectral (IR, reflectance, and EPR studies and magnetic susceptibility measurements. LH3 behaves as a neutral tridentate ONS donor ligand in [Zr(OH2(OAc2(LH3], monobasic tridentate ONS donor ligand in [UO2(NO3(LH2(MeOH], dibasic tridentate OOS donor ligand in [Cu(LH]2 and dibasic tetradentate OONO donor ligand in [Mn(LH(MeOH2] and [Cd(LH]. [Cu(LH]2 is dimer, while all other compounds are monomers in diphenyl. A square-planar structure for [Cu(LH]2, a tetrahedral structure for [Cd(LH], an octahedral structure for [Mn(LH(MeOH2], a pentagonal-bipyramidal structure for [Zr(OH2(OAc2(LH3], and an eight-coordinate structure for [UO2(NO3(LH2(MeOH] are proposed. The ligand (II and its compounds show antibacterial activities towards E. coli. (Gram negative and S. aureus (Gram positive.

  18. Synthesis, spectral and theoretical studies of Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole-3-imine-2'-hydroxynaphthaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Ghamry, Hoda; Atlam, Faten; Fathalla, Shaimaa

    2015-02-25

    Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole-3-imine-2'-hydroxynaphthaline have been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H NMR, EI-mass, UV-vis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements and thermogravimetric analysis. The molar conductance values indicated that the complexes are non-electrolytes. The magnetic moment values of the complexes displayed diamagnetic behavior for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometrical structure for Ni(II) complex. From the bioinorganic applications point of view, the interaction of the ligand and its metal complexes with CT-DNA was investigated using absorption and viscosity titration techniques. The Schiff-base ligand and its metal complexes have also been screened for their antimicrobial and antitumor activities. Also, theoretical investigation of molecular and electronic structures of the studied ligand and its metal complexes has been carried out. Molecular orbital calculations were performed using DFT (density functional theory) at B3LYP level with standard 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets to access reliable results to the experimental values. The calculations were performed to obtain the optimized molecular geometry, charge density distribution, extent of distortion from regular geometry, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), Mulliken atomic charges, reactivity index (ΔE), dipole moment (D), global hardness (η), softness (σ), electrophilicity index (ω), chemical potential and Mulliken electronegativity (χ). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of the Adsorbent-Adsorbate Interactions from Cd(II) and Pb(II) Adsorption on Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Doo Won; Kim, Bohye; Yang, Kap Seung [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yongkyun; Park, Eun Nam [Microfilter Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution using granular activated carbon (GAC), activated carbon fiber (ACF), modified ACF (NaACF), and a mixture of GAC and NaACF (GAC/NaACF) have been studied. The surface properties, such as morphology, surface functional groups, and composition of various adsorbents were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and pore size distribution were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods. In this study, NaACF showed a high adsorption capacity and rate for heavy metal ions due to the improvement of its ion-exchange capabilities by additional oxygen functional groups. Moreover, the GAC and NaACF mixture was used as an adsorbent to determine the adsorbent-adsorbate interaction in the presence of two competitive adsorbents.

  20. Study of the Adsorbent-Adsorbate Interactions from Cd(II) and Pb(II) Adsorption on Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Doo Won; Kim, Bohye; Yang, Kap Seung; Lim, Yongkyun; Park, Eun Nam

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution using granular activated carbon (GAC), activated carbon fiber (ACF), modified ACF (NaACF), and a mixture of GAC and NaACF (GAC/NaACF) have been studied. The surface properties, such as morphology, surface functional groups, and composition of various adsorbents were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and pore size distribution were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods. In this study, NaACF showed a high adsorption capacity and rate for heavy metal ions due to the improvement of its ion-exchange capabilities by additional oxygen functional groups. Moreover, the GAC and NaACF mixture was used as an adsorbent to determine the adsorbent-adsorbate interaction in the presence of two competitive adsorbents