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Sample records for psychology sociology physiology

  1. Sociological theory and Jungian psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    [[disenchantmentCarl JungpsychoanalysissociologyMax Weber ] In this article I seek to relate the psychology of Carl Jung to sociological theory, specifically Weber. I first present an outline of Jungian psychology. I then seek to relate this as psychology to Weber’s interpretivism. I point to basic methodological compatibilities within a Kantian frame, from which emerge central concerns with the factors limiting rationality. These generate the conceptual frameworks for parallel enquiries into the development and fate of rationality in cultural history. Religion is a major theme here: contrasts of eastern and western religion; the rise of prophetic religion and the disenchantment of modernity. Weber’s categories ‘ascetic’ and ‘mystic’ seem applicable to his own and Jung’s approaches and indeed temperaments, while a shared ironic view of rationality leads to similar visions of the disenchanted modern world. I conclude that Jung is sociologically coherent, but in an entirely different sense from Freud: rather than a constellation of family, socialization, ideology, social continuity, there is an analysis of cultural history against a background of adult normal psychology. I conclude that sociology should acknowledge Jung, but not in terms of over-arching theory. Rather Jungian insights might be used to orient new enquiries, and for reflexive analysis of sociology’s methodological debates.

  2. Sociology: a lost connection in social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Kesebir, Selin; Snyder, Benjamin H

    2009-11-01

    For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.

  3. Physiological Sociology. Endocrine Correlates of Status Behaviors,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Behavior. J. Spuhler (Ed.). Chicago: Aldine Press, pp. 135-170, 1967. Hare, R. D. Psychopathy ’ Theory and Research. New York: Wiley-Interscience, 1970...Hare, R. D. Psychophathy and physiological responses to adrenalin. J. Abnorm. Psychol. 79:138-147, 1972. Hare, R. D. and Quinn, M. J. Psychopathy and

  4. ACCOUNTING AND CREATIVITY: A SOCIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACH

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    Balaciu Diana Elisabeta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents aspects related to creativity in accounting. In our approach we started from theoretical aspects regarding the position of accounting in the field of scientific knowledge. The paper aims to justify these positions (as a language of communication, communication tool, social game, and from there to mirror the way of expressing creativity in accounting. In terms of research methodology, we have appealed to a qualitative research inspired by sociology and psychology. The sociological survey shows the vision of society related to creators, the way in which it admits or rejects them. The sociological approach allows us to understand the importance of collective consciousness in assessing and maintaining the creation. The psychological study regarding the creator describes a creature endowed with an excessive sensitivity, accompanied by a worker with permanent activity, but who is constantly gripped by an existential doubt. In conclusion, the consultant or the researcher will have to recognise the creator's right to be wrong and surround him with a climate of confidence. This paper shows that there is a path where the one who talks to numbers (and does not have the skill of words and those who possess the mastery of words actually meet. This paper is part of the PhD research entitled: Identifying and motivation of creative accounting practices the case of Romanian listed companies, carried out under the guidance of PhD Prof. Feleaga Liliana, research carried out within the framework of the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies.

  5. [Space physiology and psychology: long missions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorthes, G

    1989-06-01

    Until now spatial physiology and medicine concern mainly disturbances caused by life in microgravity during short stay (days, weeks). Neuro-sensorial, cardiovascular, osteo-muscular manifestations are well known; their prophylaxis is in great part established. It is shortly speak of them. Consequence of long stay (months or years) are not so well known; they are physiologic and psychologic. These long flights are now rare but they would probably be more numerous in next future. Authors present successively physics dangers: radiations, meteorites, composition of screw, number and selective tests, alimentation, fry time, habitation, biologic rhythms, psychism... We meet the same psychologic problems as great explorations have known.

  6. Understanding the Disproportionately Low Marriage Rate among African Americans: An Amalgam of Sociological and Psychological Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anthony L.; Kravitz, Aliza

    2011-01-01

    African Americans have the lowest marriage rate of any racial and ethnic group in America. Although the low marriage rate among African Americans has been largely examined through a sociological lens by documenting structural barriers, which has important policy implications, researchers have not sufficiently examined the psychological and…

  7. Language learning - physiological and psychological aspects

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    Dorina Tarnoveanu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several stages in the linguistic development of a child; he will not merely reproduce the sentences he hears, but a personal production is often noticed. Children do not acquire the grammar of their native language through theoretical teaching; exposure to the speaking community will lead to the acquisition of the grammatical structures of their language. Little is known about how little children acquire the rules of their native language; yet, we may distinguish between physiological and psychological aspects.

  8. [Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Ammar, Nadia; Bolmont, Mylène; Dosch, Alessandra; Favez, Nicolas; Van der Linden, Martial; Widmer, Eric

    2016-03-16

    In the last years, University Fund Maurice Chalumeau (FUMC) launched a dynamic of research designed to promote scientific excellence and the development of Sexology with particular interest regarding sexual desire. The FUMC has supported a research project entitled "Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction". This project, sampled on 600 people (300 men and 300 women) aged between 25 and 46 years, was structured around three studies: a broad sociological study and two more specific ones, focused on some psychological mechanisms and neurobiological factors involved in sexual desire. The results show how the secondary socialization, personal expectations, beliefs and values in sexuality, sexual motivations, body image, as well as the neurobiological foundations and visual patterns, are of vital importance in the dynamics of sexual desire.

  9. Teaching Physiological Psychology versus Teaching Biological Psychology: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Josephine F.

    1991-01-01

    Examines 539 undergraduate course catalogs to determine the percentage of institutions offering courses in physiological psychology, biological psychology, both, or neither. Finds 64.1 percent of the institutions studied offered physiological psychology, and 11.3 percent offer biological psychology. Finds catalog descriptions reveal confusion over…

  10. Teaching Physiological Psychology versus Teaching Biological Psychology: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Josephine F.

    1991-01-01

    Examines 539 undergraduate course catalogs to determine the percentage of institutions offering courses in physiological psychology, biological psychology, both, or neither. Finds 64.1 percent of the institutions studied offered physiological psychology, and 11.3 percent offer biological psychology. Finds catalog descriptions reveal confusion over…

  11. Attending to and neglecting people: bridging neuroscience, psychology and sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviour is context-dependent—based on predictions and influenced by the environment and other people. We live in a dynamic world where both the social stimuli and their context are constantly changing. Similar dynamic, natural stimuli should, in the future, be increasingly used to study social brain functions, with parallel development of appropriate signal-analysis methods. Understanding dynamic neural processes also requires accurate time-sensitive characterization of the behaviour. To go beyond the traditional stimulus–response approaches, brain activity should be recorded simultaneously from two interacting subjects to reveal why human social interaction is critically different from just reacting to each other. This theme issue on Attending to and neglecting people contains original work and review papers on person perception and social interaction. The articles cover research from neuroscience, psychology, robotics, animal interaction research and microsociology. Some of the papers are co-authored by scientists who presented their own, independent views in the recent Attention and Performance XXVI conference but were brave enough to join forces with a colleague having a different background and views. In the future, information needs to converge across disciplines to provide us a more holistic view of human behaviour, its interactive nature, as well as the temporal dynamics of our social world. PMID:27069043

  12. Attending to and neglecting people: bridging neuroscience, psychology and sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2016-05-05

    Human behaviour is context-dependent-based on predictions and influenced by the environment and other people. We live in a dynamic world where both the social stimuli and their context are constantly changing. Similar dynamic, natural stimuli should, in the future, be increasingly used to study social brain functions, with parallel development of appropriate signal-analysis methods. Understanding dynamic neural processes also requires accurate time-sensitive characterization of the behaviour. To go beyond the traditional stimulus-response approaches, brain activity should be recorded simultaneously from two interacting subjects to reveal why human social interaction is critically different from just reacting to each other. This theme issue on Attending to and neglecting people contains original work and review papers on person perception and social interaction. The articles cover research from neuroscience, psychology, robotics, animal interaction research and microsociology. Some of the papers are co-authored by scientists who presented their own, independent views in the recent Attention and Performance XXVI conference but were brave enough to join forces with a colleague having a different background and views. In the future, information needs to converge across disciplines to provide us a more holistic view of human behaviour, its interactive nature, as well as the temporal dynamics of our social world.

  13. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihashi, R.; Ohira, Masayoshi; Kimura, Teiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synthesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05<=0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15<=0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  14. Students' Personality Types, Intended Majors, and College Expectations: Further Evidence Concerning Psychological and Sociological Interpretations of Holland's Theory

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    Pike, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    Because it focuses on the interactions between students and their environments, Holland's theory of vocational choice provides a powerful framework for studying college experiences. The present study assessed the relative merits of psychological and sociological interpretations of Holland's theory by examining the relationships among students' …

  15. Students' Personality Types, Intended Majors, and College Expectations: Further Evidence Concerning Psychological and Sociological Interpretations of Holland's Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    Because it focuses on the interactions between students and their environments, Holland's theory of vocational choice provides a powerful framework for studying college experiences. The present study assessed the relative merits of psychological and sociological interpretations of Holland's theory by examining the relationships among students' …

  16. From physiological psychology to psychological physiology: Postnonclassical approach to ethnocultural phenomena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmolov, A.G.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern science, along with the “classic” and “non-classical” approach to solving fundamental and applied problems, there is an actively developing “postnonclassical” research paradigm. This renovation of general scientific methodology has been accompanied by the emergence of new experimental technologies and new scientific research directions based on them. “Social psychophysiology” is one such direction. It is formed within the frame of postnonclassical methodology at the intersection of neuroscience and psychology. This work is devoted to the analytical review of the methods, achievements and prospects of contemporary social neuroscience and social psychophysiology studying brain structures that are specifically related to the implementation of social forms of behavior and intercultural communication. Physiological studies of brain activity during social interaction processes, which are simulated using virtual reality environments, are analyzed, and the physiological approach to the study of the brain mechanisms associated with social perception, social cognition and social behavior is used. Along with the analysis of psychophysiological studies of the mechanisms of social perception and social cognition, we discuss the theories of “Brain Reading” and “Theory of Mind” and the underlying data concerning “Gnostic neurons recognition of persons and recognition of emotional facial expressions”, “mirror neurons”, “emotional resonance” and “cognitive resonance”. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of a fundamentally new trend in the study of the relationship between the brain and culture (i.e., “cultural neuroscience”. Related to this connection, the following topics are raised: physiological mechanisms protecting the “individual distance” in communication between members of a personified community, psychophysiological approaches to the study of cross-cultural differences, physiological

  17. THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE TRIAD ECONOMICS, SOCIOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY

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    Corneliu\tSorin\tBAICU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Underground economy, in view of researchers, economists and jurists, is a theoretical complex construct, a phenomenon with profound social and economic reverberations. This study argues multidisciplinary integrative the sociological, psychological and socio-psychological approach of underground economy. The premises of this study are given by methodological individualism and rational choice theory through building in neoclassical version of Homo economicus able to interact in a multidisciplinary and multifaceted manner with the area of social sciences. For the nonce, we submit to analysis an integrative model of Homo Oeconimicus with Homo Sociologicus, aggregated with elements of social psychology. Synergistic effects of this integrative approach consist of the ability to give an answer as relevant on symptoms and forms of deviant behavior and thus to explain the development of underground economy. The finality of this paper, starting from the stated premises, resides in the explanation and analysis of deviant behavior in the framework of the morphology and causality of underground economy. Deviant behavior in the context of our analysis reveals the coherence perspective on the following issues: anatomy and etiology of underground economy (informal and underground activities, illegal labor, tax fraud, etc.; attitude towards rules, society and the state (tax mentality, tax morality, moral conscience; tax compliance or non-compliance (willingness to pay tax liabilities. This paper is intended to constitute a pleading for an interdependent approach, multi-causal and interdisciplinary of underground economy

  18. MEDIA: CAUSES AND STRATEGIES TO OVERCOME ISLAMOPHOBIA (PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Istriyani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A stereotype appears and describes that Islam is the cause of a series of terror. Therefore, some states are worried and suspicious toward Muslims (Islamophobia up to the present. Islamophobia associated with negative prejudices against Muslims and Islam, and lead to construction of anti-Islam. Prejudice is based on a claim that Islam is an inferior religion and can threat the dominant values in society. The phenomenon of Islamophobia can be assessed by two perspectives: sociological and psychological. In the case of Islamophobia, media became the object of analysis because it has the dichotomy function. They become the cause for the outbreak of Islamophobia symptoms (latent functions. On the other hand, the media is an information agent which has role to provide education and social change effects (manifest functions. Thus, the media can be an instrument or strategy to overcome the turmoil of Islamophobia by involving a synergy of government, Islamic organizations, and institutions of higher education.

  19. Psychological motivation and physiological consequences of smoking in university students

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    Farkhutdinova, E.T.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychological and physiological characteristics were assessed in thirteen students aged 19-23 who are smokers for more than a year. Psychological status was studied with the use of the Spilberger-Khanin inventory of reactive and personality anxiety; physiological status was assessed through the analysis of cardio-rhythm. Fagerstrom tobacco dependence and Horn smoking motivation questionnaires were used as well. Study participants demonstrated high levels of personal anxiety, while changes in physiological and psychological characteristics after smoking were insignificant. Most common motivation to smoke was associated with desire to relax and cope with anxiety. Author concludes that smoking inhibits physiological functions but does not influence emotional status significantly. (Full text is in Russian

  20. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

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    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  1. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  2. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  3. Sexual assault and posttraumatic stress disorder: a review of the biological, psychological and sociological factors and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers-Wilson, Kaitlin A

    2006-07-01

    Sexual assault occurs with alarming frequency in Canada. The prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in assault survivors is drastically higher than the national prevalence of the disorder, which is a strong indication that the current therapies for sexual-assault-related PTSD are in need of improvement. Increasing knowledge and understanding of the pathologies associated with rape trauma in biological, psychological and sociological domains will help to develop more effective treatments for survivors. A dysregulation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis is observed in survivors of sexual assault and this may be a fundamental cause of the structural and functional abnormalities contributing to PTSD symptoms. Pharmacotherapies are available to treat PTSD; however, they are often inadequate or unwanted by the survivor. Psychological health is compromised following interpersonal trauma and many psychological therapies are available, but with varying efficacy. A person's cognitions have a dramatic effect on the onset, severity, and progress of PTSD following sexual assault. Sociological impacts of assault influence the development of PTSD through victim-blaming attitudes and the perpetuation of rape myths. Perceived positive regard and early social support is shown to be important to successful recovery. Education is vital in rape prevention and to foster a supportive environment for survivors. The biological, psychological and sociological impacts and treatments should not remain mutually exclusive. A better appreciation of the biopsychosocial repercussions of sexual assault will aid in developing a more holistic and individualized therapy to help alleviate the physical and emotional pain following the trauma of rape.

  4. Cyberbullying and Primary-School Aged Children: The Psychological Literature and the Challenge for Sociology

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    Lesley-Anne Ey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is an international issue for schools, young people and their families. Whilst many research domains have explored this phenomenon, and bullying more generally, the majority of reported studies appear in the psychological and educational literatures, where bullying, and more recently, cyberbullying has been examined primarily at the individual level: amongst adolescents and young people, with a focus on the definition, its prevalence, behaviours, and impact. There also is growing evidence that younger children are increasingly accessing technology and engaging with social media, yet there is limited research dedicated to this younger age group. The purpose of this paper is to report on a systematic literature review from the psychological and educational research domains related to this younger age group, to inform future research across the disciplines. Younger children require different methods of engagement. This review highlights the methodological challenges associated with this age group present in the psychological literature, and argues for a greater use of sociological, child-centred approaches to data collection. This review examined studies published in English, between 2009 and 2014, and conducted with children aged 5–12 years, about their experiences with cyberbullying. Searches were conducted on seven key databases using keywords associated with cyberbullying and age of children. A Google Scholar search also examined published and unpublished reports. A total of 966 articles and reports were retrieved. A random peer review process was employed to establish inter-rater reliability and veracity of the review. Findings revealed 38 studies reported specifically on children aged 5–12 years. The dominant focus of these articles was on prevalence of cyberbullying, established through survey methodology. Few studies noted impacts, understanding and behaviours or engaged children’s independent voice. This review

  5. How expectation works: psychologic and physiologic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Walter A

    2015-05-01

    Although expectation has been the most widely studied of the mechanisms that drive the placebo effect, we still don't know how it works. We don't know how the thought that one will respond to a substance in a certain way is converted to symptom relief, intoxication, or airway resistance; the pathway between expectation of a response and the response itself remains uncharted. Nonetheless, in the last decade, brain-imaging studies have begun to uncover this pathway. This paper reviews both long-standing psychologic concepts about the underpinnings of expectation and some of the contemporary brain imaging research, which shows that when expectation alleviates depression, produces pain relief or improves parkinsonian symptoms, these effects come with relevant changes in brain activity and chemistry. These findings oblige us to reevaluate some of the traditional common sense notions of how expectation brings about its effects and how placebos work.

  6. Sexual assault and posttraumatic stress disorder: A review of the biological, psychological and sociological factors and treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Chivers-Wilson, Kaitlin A.

    2006-01-01

    Sexual assault occurs with alarming frequency in Canada. The prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in assault survivors is drastically higher than the national prevalence of the disorder, which is a strong indication that the current therapies for sexual-assault-related PTSD are in need of improvement. Increasing knowledge and understanding of the pathologies associated with rape trauma in biological, psychological and sociological domains will help to develop more effective trea...

  7. Bingo!: An Engaging Activity for Learning Physiological Terms in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanags, Thea; George, Amanda M.; Grace, Diana M.; Brown, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain Bingo is a tutorial activity for helping undergraduate psychology students learn complex physiological terms. In two experiments, the authors tested pretest and posttest knowledge, and in Experiment 2, the authors tested retention after 5 weeks. In Experiment 1 (n = 41), the experimental group (Brain Bingo) recalled more terms than the…

  8. Understanding suicide among older adults: a review of psychological and sociological theories of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Hom, Melanie A; Rogers, Megan L; Hagan, Christopher R; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    Older adults die by suicide at a higher rate than any other age group in nearly every country globally. Suicide among older adults has been an intractable clinical and epidemiological problem for decades, due in part to an incomplete understanding of the causes of suicide, as well as imprecision in the prediction and prevention of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in later life. Theory-driven investigations hold promise in addressing these gaps by systematically identifying testable, and thus falsifiable, mechanisms that may better explain this phenomenon and also point to specific interventions. In this article, we comprehensively review key extant psychological and sociological theories of suicide and discuss each theory's applicability to the understanding and prevention of suicide among older adults. Despite a modest number of theories of suicide, few have undergone extensive empirical investigation and scrutiny, and even fewer have been applied specifically to older adults. To advance the science and contribute findings with a measurable clinical and public health impact, future research in this area, from conceptual to applied, must draw from and integrate theory.

  9. Daily Negative Work Events and Employees' Physiological and Psychological Reactions

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    Volmer, Judith; Fritsche, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Scholars have accumulated an abundant amount of knowledge on the association between work stressors and employees' health and well-being. However, notions of the complex interplay of physiological and psychological components of stress reactions are still in their infancy. Building on the Allostatic Load (AL) model, the present study considers short-term within-person effects of negative work events (NWEs) on indicators of both physiological (i.e., salivary cortisol) and psychological distress responses (i.e., negative affect and emotional exhaustion). Multilevel findings from an experience sampling study with 83 healthcare professionals suggest that reported NWEs predict employees' psychological but not endocrine stress responses. Results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of employees' daily response patterns to occupational stressors. PMID:27877145

  10. Needs of physiological and psychological research using artificial gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Toyobe, M.; Hamami, H.; Tayama, M.; Fujii, T.; Sato, T.; Nitta, K.; Kibe, S.

    In the next century, mankind will expand its activity to the moon and Mars. At that time, humans will be exposed to a low and micro-gravity environment in long term which causes physiological and psychological problems. The authors propose an artificial gravity space station for a research laboratory on human physiology and psychology at various gravity levels. The baseline specifications and the configuration of the space station are shown. Reviewing the history of manned space flight, the necessity of the research on an artificial gravity space station is discussed, including themes of research to be conducted on the station and the application of its results. Technical issues for realization of the space station such as environmental factors, system function and assembly scenario are also discussed.

  11. New Reaction Timer for Physiological and Psychological Studies

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    A. K. Gupta

    1983-07-01

    Full Text Available In physiological and psychological measurements, the response to some form of external stimulus is required. The instrumentation used for the measurement of Reaction Time is vital part of the main instrument system. Instrument design reported here is suitable for the measurement of Reaction. Time under environmental stress. The stimulus are visual (flash of light andauditory tone. This instrument is solidstate, portable and can be used with any electronic timer.

  12. Sociological Theory or Psychological Types: A Case Study of Attitudes to-wards Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, Laura; Elliot, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Sociological theories can be viewed as models of (sub)-populations. In this paper we explore the possibility of representing social theories as attitudinal types rather than as descriptions of society at large. To test this idea we investigate the relevance of four different theories of couple relationships to the attitudes of 18 to 30 year olds. Rather than testing these theories via aggregate social trends, we investigate the plausibility of treating the four social theories as attitudinal ...

  13. MEDIA: CAUSES AND STRATEGIES TO OVERCOME ISLAMOPHOBIA (PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY)

    OpenAIRE

    Ratna Istriyani

    2016-01-01

    A stereotype appears and describes that Islam is the cause of a series of terror. Therefore, some states are worried and suspicious toward Muslims (Islamophobia) up to the present. Islamophobia associated with negative prejudices against Muslims and Islam, and lead to construction of anti-Islam. Prejudice is based on a claim that Islam is an inferior religion and can threat the dominant values in society. The phenomenon of Islamophobia can be assessed by two perspectives: sociological and psy...

  14. Psychological and physiological correlates of childhood obesity in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Yi-Hua

    2015-11-27

    Evidence of associations between psychopathology and obesity in childhood remains inconsistent, and most studies have been conducted in Western countries. This study investigated psychological and physiological correlates of obesity in a community sample of children in Taiwan. In total, 302 children (157 overweight/obese and 145 healthy-weight children) were selected from first- and fourth-grade schoolchildren in eight elementary schools in 2009. These children participated in a comprehensive health examination, including a physical examination, blood sample analysis, and questionnaire administration. We found that regarding physiological characteristics, compared with the healthy-weight children, the overweight/obese children had significantly higher values for body fat estimated using the bioelectrical impedance method (p overweight/obesity was significantly associated with lower self-concept (odds ratio [OR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93-0.99) and less disruptive behavior (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.92-0.99). Less disruptive behavior and the lack of a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression in childhood obesity appear to be a unique pattern in Taiwan that warrants further investigation.

  15. 76 FR 2447 - Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment... authority granted by the Persian Gulf War Veterans Act of 1998, Public Law 105-277, title XVI, 112 Stat..., ``Gulf War and Health, Volume 6, Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment-Related...

  16. Sociological and psychological predictors of STD infection in homosexual men: a study of four countries.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, M W

    1984-01-01

    I investigated over 600 homosexual men in four countries (Sweden, Finland, Ireland, and Australia) regarding the number of times they had contracted a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and several psychological variables including masculinity and feminity, sex role conservatism, relationships with parents, number of sexual partners, attitudes towards homosexuality, and involvement in the homosexual subculture. Using multiple linear regression in each country, it was found that 19-42% of the ...

  17. Divorce in Russian Sociological and Social Psychological Research on Family Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kletsina I.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents social psychоlogical analysis of publications that focus on divorce situations in official marriages and explore its causes and consequences both for spouses and children. It is argued that the key factor in separation is a socio-psychological phenomenon called 'unconstructive marital relationships'. The partnership model described in the article, on the contrary, may serve as a normative basis contributing to the stabilization of marital relationships. While most publications conceptualize divorce as a collapse and split of family relationship, the article suggests interpreting divorces rather as a transformation stage in spousal and parentchild relationships.

  18. Local environmental grassroots activism: contributions from environmental psychology, sociology and politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Nikolay L; Perkins, Douglas D

    2015-03-23

    Local environmental grassroots activism is robust and globally ubiquitous despite the ebbs and flows of the general environmental movement. In this review we synthesize social movement, environmental politics, and environmental psychology literatures to answer the following questions: How does the environment emerge as a topic for community action and how a particular environmental discourse (preservation, conservation, public health, Deep Ecology, justice, localism and other responses to modernization and development) becomes dominant? How does a community coalesce around the environmental issue and its particular framing? What is the relationship between local and supralocal (regional, national, global) activism? We contrast "Not in My Back Yard" (NIMBY) activism and environmental liberation and discuss the significance of local knowledge and scale, nature as an issue for activism, place attachment and its disruption, and place-based power inequalities. Environmental psychology contributions to established scholarship on environmental activism are proposed: the components of place attachment are conceptualized in novel ways and a continuous dweller and activist place attachment is elaborated.

  19. Local Environmental Grassroots Activism: Contributions from Environmental Psychology, Sociology and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Nikolay L.; Perkins, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Local environmental grassroots activism is robust and globally ubiquitous despite the ebbs and flows of the general environmental movement. In this review we synthesize social movement, environmental politics, and environmental psychology literatures to answer the following questions: How does the environment emerge as a topic for community action and how a particular environmental discourse (preservation, conservation, public health, Deep Ecology, justice, localism and other responses to modernization and development) becomes dominant? How does a community coalesce around the environmental issue and its particular framing? What is the relationship between local and supralocal (regional, national, global) activism? We contrast “Not in My Back Yard” (NIMBY) activism and environmental liberation and discuss the significance of local knowledge and scale, nature as an issue for activism, place attachment and its disruption, and place-based power inequalities. Environmental psychology contributions to established scholarship on environmental activism are proposed: the components of place attachment are conceptualized in novel ways and a continuous dweller and activist place attachment is elaborated. PMID:25806672

  20. Who is to Blame on July 22, 2011? Psychological and Sociological Blame Frames in the Reporting of Anders Breivik in the Dutch Speaking Broadsheet Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertens Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On July 22, 2011 Anders Breivik murdered a large amount of people in Norway. In this study we investigate a sample of articles that were published about Breivik and his deeds in the Flemish and Dutch press. We will investigate these articles looking for the so-called “attribution of responsibility frame.” The murders from Breivik could be explained psychologically (“he is insane” as well as sociologically (far-right political parties are responsible because of having spread hate speech. We present a typology of subtypes of frames. We will furthermore investigate how many times these types of frames occur in different media outlets.

  1. The psychology and physiology of temperament: pragmatism in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordogna, F

    2001-01-01

    This paper traces William James's famous "temperament thesis" according to which the philosophical stance that individuals take depends on their "temperaments." It seeks to understand James's conception of temperament by locating James within a set of contemporary investigations that linked the sources of mental, and even higher, intellectual processes to the physiological and organic constitution of the individual. The paper argues that James understood temperament along the reflex-arc model and discusses the implications of that physiological account of temperament for James's overall conception of philosophy.

  2. The birth of experimental psychology in Germany between psychophysical methods and physiological theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinatra, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In 1879 Wundt's laboratory of psychology was opened in Leipzig, and it has been the landmark ever since for the beginning of modern experimental psychology. Its founder, Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt, was the first to successfully demarcate the areas of scientific psychology as being distinct from either physiology or philosophy, thus guaranteeing the survival of psychology, which was regarded as an autonomous discipline set upon a secure institutional framework. This paper attempts to clarify the basic facts and concepts related to the roots of scientific psychology in Germany, i.e., the context in which the "Founding Father" worked, as well as of those predecessors who proposed the topics and apparatus of his laboratory. Attention will be paid in particular to the psychophysical methods of Weber and Fechner, especially in regard to colour perception. In this context, an outline is presented of the history of reaction time experiments in astronomy, physiology, and psychology, and of the role played by the scientific instruments. It is shown how the methodology of physics and physiology contributed to the emancipation of scientific psychology and to the formation of its orientation.

  3. Human Performance: Psychological and Physiological Sex Differences (A Selected Bibliography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    133-151. I 10. Garal, J. E., & Scheinfeld, A. Sex differences in mental and behavioral traits. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1968, _77> 169-299...Androgens, and the XYY Syndrome, Heino F. L. Meyer-Bauhlburg. 433. Reproductive Hormones, Moods, and the Menstrual Cycle, Harold Persky. 455. 14...Hutts G. Males and females. Middlesex, England: Penguin Books, 1972. Contents: The Genetic Determination of Sex« 19o Hormones in Male and Female

  4. Personality and physiological reactions to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbey, Adam; Carroll, Douglas; Roseboom, Tessa J; Phillips, Anna C; de Rooij, Susanne R

    2013-10-01

    Stable personality traits have long been presumed to have biological substrates, although the evidence relating personality to biological stress reactivity is inconclusive. The present study examined, in a large middle aged cohort (N=352), the relationship between key personality traits and both cortisol and cardiovascular reactions to acute psychological stress. Salivary cortisol and cardiovascular activity were measured at rest and in response to a psychological stress protocol comprising 5min each of a Stroop task, mirror tracing, and a speech task. Participants subsequently completed the Big Five Inventory to assess neuroticism, agreeableness, openness to experience, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Those with higher neuroticism scores exhibited smaller cortisol and cardiovascular stress reactions, whereas participants who were less agreeable and less open had smaller cortisol and cardiac reactions to stress. These associations remained statistically significant following adjustment for a range of potential confounding variables. Thus, a negative personality disposition would appear to be linked to diminished stress reactivity. These findings further support a growing body of evidence which suggests that blunted stress reactivity may be maladaptive.

  5. General physiology, experimental psychology, and evolutionism. Unicellular organisms as objects of psychophysiological research, 1877-1918.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegel, Judy Johns; Schmidgen, Henning

    2002-12-01

    This essay aims to shed new light on the relations between physiology and psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the use of unicellular organisms as research objects during that period. Within the frameworks of evolutionism and monism advocated by Ernst Haeckel, protozoa were perceived as objects situated at the borders between organism and cell and individual and society. Scholars such as Max Verworn, Alfred Binet, and Herbert Spencer Jennings were provoked by these organisms to undertake experimental investigations situated between general physiology and psychology that differed from the physiological psychology advocated by Wilhelm Wundt. Some of these investigations sought to locate psychological properties in the molecular structure of protoplasm; others stressed the existence of organic and psychological individuality in protozoa. In the following decades, leading philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Henri Bergson, as well as psychological researchers like Sigmund Freud, integrated the results of these investigations into their reflections on such problems as the nature of the will, the structure of the ego, and the holistic nature of the reactions of organisms to their environment.

  6. Medical and psychological support and psycho-physiological examination of extreme activities specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of medical and psychological support is a continuous monitoring of functional and mental state of specialists and the system of mental health interventions aimed at maintaining the optimal level of occupational performance. The scientific basis of this direction is the idea of an integrated system of professional psychological and physiological adaptation in normal conditions, in condition of pre-pathology and pathology. Psychophysiological (professional and psychological examination of specialists is an integral part of medical and psychological support, and presents a set of measures aimed at in-depth study of individual psychological characteristics of personality and evaluation of the specialists' organism functional reserves in the process of their occupational duties implementation to determine the conformity of their professionally important qualities to the requirements of specific occupational activity.

  7. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...... - will be addressed in this book.   Sociology, as the self-proclaimed ‘the science of society', finds itself in an exceptional position within the scientific community in that it studies a universe it itself is part and parcel of. This means that sociology and sociologists are inextricably connected and linked...

  8. Identifying blood biomarkers and physiological processes that distinguish humans with superior performance under psychological stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Cooksey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attrition of students from aviation training is a serious financial and operational concern for the U.S. Navy. Each late stage navy aviator training failure costs the taxpayer over $1,000,000 and ultimately results in decreased operational readiness of the fleet. Currently, potential aviators are selected based on the Aviation Selection Test Battery (ASTB, which is a series of multiple-choice tests that evaluate basic and aviation-related knowledge and ability. However, the ASTB does not evaluate a person's response to stress. This is important because operating sophisticated aircraft demands exceptional performance and causes high psychological stress. Some people are more resistant to this type of stress, and consequently better able to cope with the demands of naval aviation, than others. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although many psychological studies have examined psychological stress resistance none have taken advantage of the human genome sequence. Here we use high-throughput -omic biology methods and a novel statistical data normalization method to identify plasma proteins associated with human performance under psychological stress. We identified proteins involved in four basic physiological processes: innate immunity, cardiac function, coagulation and plasma lipid physiology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteins identified here further elucidate the physiological response to psychological stress and suggest a hypothesis that stress-susceptible pilots may be more prone to shock. This work also provides potential biomarkers for screening humans for capability of superior performance under stress.

  9. Identifying Blood Biomarkers and Physiological Processes That Distinguish Humans with Superior Performance under Psychological Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, Amanda M.; Momen, Nausheen; Stocker, Russell; Burgess, Shane C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Attrition of students from aviation training is a serious financial and operational concern for the U.S. Navy. Each late stage navy aviator training failure costs the taxpayer over $1,000,000 and ultimately results in decreased operational readiness of the fleet. Currently, potential aviators are selected based on the Aviation Selection Test Battery (ASTB), which is a series of multiple-choice tests that evaluate basic and aviation-related knowledge and ability. However, the ASTB does not evaluate a person's response to stress. This is important because operating sophisticated aircraft demands exceptional performance and causes high psychological stress. Some people are more resistant to this type of stress, and consequently better able to cope with the demands of naval aviation, than others. Methodology/Principal Findings Although many psychological studies have examined psychological stress resistance none have taken advantage of the human genome sequence. Here we use high-throughput -omic biology methods and a novel statistical data normalization method to identify plasma proteins associated with human performance under psychological stress. We identified proteins involved in four basic physiological processes: innate immunity, cardiac function, coagulation and plasma lipid physiology. Conclusions/Significance The proteins identified here further elucidate the physiological response to psychological stress and suggest a hypothesis that stress-susceptible pilots may be more prone to shock. This work also provides potential biomarkers for screening humans for capability of superior performance under stress. PMID:20020041

  10. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...... irrelevance and introversion and the Charybdis of public relevancy and extroversion. But what does it mean to be a ‘public sociologist' in contemporary society and are there really any other ways of doing sociology? What are the requirements of sociologists in a social world increasingly informed and shaped...

  11. Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined with Thermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Won Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days, one condition per day: control, massage only, or massage with infrared heating. Physical (trunk extension [TE]; maximum power of erector spinae, physiological (heart-rate variability [HRV]; electroencephalogram [EEG], and psychological (state-trait anxiety inventory [STAI]; visual analogue scale [VAS] measurements were evaluated and recorded before and after each treatment condition. The results showed that massage therapy, especially when combined with infrared heating, significantly improved physical functioning, increased parasympathetic response, and decreased psychological stress and anxiety. In the current study, we observed that massage therapy contributes to various physical, physiological, and psychological changes, where the effect increases with thermotherapy.

  12. Physiological and Psychological Effects on High School Students of Viewing Real and Artificial Pansies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Igarashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation effects of gardening have attracted attention; however, very few studies have researched its physiological effects on humans. This study aimed to clarify the physiological and psychological effects on high school students of viewing real and artificial pansies. Forty high school students (male: 19, female: 21 at Chiba Prefectural Kashiwanoha Senior High School, Japan, participated in this experiment. The subjects were presented with a visual stimulation of fresh yellow pansies (Viola x wittrockiana “Nature Clear Lemon” in a planter for 3 min. Artificial yellow pansies in a planter were used as the control. Heart rate variability was used as a physiological measurement and the modified semantic differential method was used for subjective evaluation. Compared with artificial pansies, visual stimulation with real flowers resulted in a significant decrease in the ratio of low- to high-frequency heart rate variability component, which reflects sympathetic nerve activity. In contrast, high frequency, which reflects parasympathetic nerve activity, showed no significant difference. With regard to the psychological indices, viewing real flowers resulted in “comfortable”, “relaxed”, and “natural” feelings. The findings indicate that visual stimulation with real pansies induced physiological and psychological relaxation effects in high school students.

  13. Physiological and Psychological Effects on High School Students of Viewing Real and Artificial Pansies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Miho; Aga, Mariko; Ikei, Harumi; Namekawa, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The relaxation effects of gardening have attracted attention; however, very few studies have researched its physiological effects on humans. This study aimed to clarify the physiological and psychological effects on high school students of viewing real and artificial pansies. Forty high school students (male: 19, female: 21) at Chiba Prefectural Kashiwanoha Senior High School, Japan, participated in this experiment. The subjects were presented with a visual stimulation of fresh yellow pansies (Viola x wittrockiana “Nature Clear Lemon”) in a planter for 3 min. Artificial yellow pansies in a planter were used as the control. Heart rate variability was used as a physiological measurement and the modified semantic differential method was used for subjective evaluation. Compared with artificial pansies, visual stimulation with real flowers resulted in a significant decrease in the ratio of low- to high-frequency heart rate variability component, which reflects sympathetic nerve activity. In contrast, high frequency, which reflects parasympathetic nerve activity, showed no significant difference. With regard to the psychological indices, viewing real flowers resulted in “comfortable”, “relaxed”, and “natural” feelings. The findings indicate that visual stimulation with real pansies induced physiological and psychological relaxation effects in high school students. PMID:25723647

  14. The Psychological and Physiological Processes of Psychological Trauma%心理创伤的心身过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ame Hofmann; 盛晓春

    2011-01-01

    This paper first introduces the definition of psycho-trauma and post traumatic stress disorder(PTSD),the psychological and physiological mechanisms and the diagnostic criteria,and then discusses the theoretical and practical issues about traumatic memorie%本文介绍了精神创伤和创伤后应激障碍(PTSD)的定义、生理心理机制和诊断标准,讨论了与创伤记忆和创伤模式有关的理论和应用问题。

  15. Another sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carleheden, Mikael

    1998-01-01

    During the second half of the 20th century, sociology as a social technology in service of the welfare state has been the predominant form, especially in Scandinavia. The crisis of the welfare state has led this form of sociology into a crisis as well. Instead, I argue for a critical sociology...... contributing dianostics of the social pathologies of the modern state. Such an approach can find inspiration in classical sociology, but it is also important to realize that, today, we are living in another modernity. A liberation from social technology must thus include a liberation from objectivistic methods....

  16. Study on Effect of Plants in office on Human Physiological/Psychological Responses

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Some offices have indoor environmental quality (IEQ) related problems such as space, indoor air quality (IAQ), office workers' thermal comfort, productivity and mental stress. As is well known, some foliage plants have effects of humidity control and VOC removal from indoor air, improvement of productivity and reducing workers' mental stress as well. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of indoor plants on physiological/psychological responses, and to demonstrate the mental he...

  17. Effect of an On-Sight Lead on the Physiological and Psychological Responses to Rock Climbing

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Draper; Jones, Glenys A.; Simon Fryer; Chris Hodgson; Gavin Blackwell

    2008-01-01

    Rock climbing is a multi-discipline activity that encompasses forms such as bouldering, top roping and lead climbing on natural and artificial climbing surfaces. A major focus of research has been explanation of physiological functioning. More recent research indicates that anxiety levels are elevated for less experienced climbers and in response to lead climbing ascents. Research regarding the demands of rock climbing has placed a lesser focus on the interaction of psychological and physiolo...

  18. Physiological and Psychological Effects of a Forest Therapy Program on Middle-Aged Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Ochiai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The natural environment is increasingly recognized as an effective counter to urban stress, and “Forest Therapy” has recently attracted attention as a relaxation and stress management activity with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The present study assessed the physiological and psychological effects of a forest therapy program on middle-aged females. Seventeen Japanese females (62.2 ± 9.4 years; mean ± standard deviation participated in this experiment. Pulse rate, salivary cortisol level, and psychological indices were measured on the day before forest therapy and on the forest therapy day. Pulse rate and salivary cortisol were significantly lower than baseline following forest therapy, indicating that subjects were in a physiologically relaxed state. Subjects reported feeling significantly more “comfortable,” “relaxed,” and “natural” according to the semantic differential (SD method. The Profile of Mood State (POMS negative mood subscale score for “tension–anxiety” was significantly lower, while that for “vigor” was significantly higher following forest therapy. Our study revealed that forest therapy elicited a significant (1 decrease in pulse rate, (2 decrease in salivary cortisol levels, (3 increase in positive feelings, and (4 decrease in negative feelings. In conclusion, there are substantial physiological and psychological benefits of forest therapy on middle-aged females.

  19. Physiological, psychological, social, and cultural influences on the use of menthol cigarettes among Blacks and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe González

    2004-02-01

    Patterns of menthol cigarette consumption among Blacks and Hispanics are likely a product of the interactive effects of several factors: the physiological and pharmacological sensory effects of menthol, the "cool" psychological identity of being menthol smokers, the promotional marketing of menthol cigarettes, and the cultural effects of health-related beliefs and subjective culture norms. This article presents two conceptual frameworks--a moderation logic model and a mediation logic model--for organizing the disparate literature on factors affecting the consumption of menthol cigarettes among Blacks and Hispanics. Three factor domains are examined as direct effect predictors of menthol cigarette smoking: (a) physiological and pharmacological, (b) psychological, and (c) social and environmental. In addition, a fourth domain of cultural variables is presented as a class of moderator or mediator variables that can interact with these physiological, psychological, and social factors as determinants of menthol cigarette use. These cultural variables are examined as mediating or moderating factors that influence the use of menthol cigarettes by Black and Hispanic consumers. Recommendations are offered for future research to further understand the influence of cultural and other factors as determinants of menthol cigarette smoking among Blacks and Hispanics.

  20. Does empathy have a cost? Diverging psychological and physiological effects within families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manczak, Erika M; DeLongis, Anita; Chen, Edith

    2016-03-01

    Parental empathy is associated with a host of beneficial psychosocial outcomes for children. However, less is known about the effects of being empathic for parents. The current study tested the hypothesis that, although parental empathy may be beneficial to children both psychologically and physiologically, it may take a physiological toll on parents. The current study examined psychological and physiological correlates of parental empathy in 247 parent-adolescent dyads. During a baseline laboratory visit, parents and adolescents provide blood samples from which markers of systemic inflammation, including interleukin 1-ra, interleukin 6, and C-reactive protein, were assayed. Parents completed self-report questionnaires of empathy, well-being, and self-esteem, and also reported on their child's emotion regulation. Following the laboratory visit, adolescents completed 2 weeks of daily diary reporting on their emotion regulation abilities. In adolescents, parental empathy was significantly associated with both better emotion regulation and with less systemic inflammation. For parents, being empathic was associated with greater self-esteem and purpose in life, but also with higher systemic inflammation. These findings reinforce the importance of simultaneously considering both psychological and physical health-related effects of psychosocial traits and suggests that empathy may have diverging effects across providers and recipients of empathy. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    PAPER Sun Benwen and the Chinese Sociology in the First Half of the Twentieth Century Zhou Xiaohong 1 Abstract:As a representative of the comprehensive school of sociology, Sun Benwen occupied a mainstream position in the first half of the twentieth century, and contrib- uted remarkably to the early development of Chinese sociology during his nearly three-decade research. Being directly influenced by his learning experiences in Co- lumbia University and the University of Chicago, he started with cultural and psycho- logical factors in his endeavor to establish the comprehensive school of sociology, which endowed his theories with a significant touch of cultural determinism and psy- chological reductionism. In an age plagued by turmoil and wars, Sun Benwen played the dual role of constructor and reviewer of Chinese sociology. He took the initiative to advance social construction in tribulated China with sociological theories and devot- ed himself to estabhshing a Sinicized system of sociological theory. All these efforts not only reflected the intellectuals' naivety and helplessness in the face of crises, but also the sociologists' willfulness and unreconciledness in intervening in social real- ities. Meanwhile, Modern Chinese Sociology, his monograph written prior to the foun- dation of the PRC in 1949, virtually became the closing speech of all those Chinese sociologists who had outlived the Republic of China and who would have to accept a gloomy collective withdrawal.

  2. The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Herz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the special features of odor-evoked memory and the current state-of-the-art in odor-evoked memory research to show how these unique experiences may be able to influence and benefit psychological and physiological health. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that odors that evoke positive autobiographical memories have the potential to increase positive emotions, decrease negative mood states, disrupt cravings, and reduce physiological indices of stress, including systemic markers of inflammation. Olfactory perception factors and individual difference characteristics that would need to be considered in therapeutic applications of odor-evoked-memory are also discussed. This article illustrates how through the experimentally validated mechanisms of odor-associative learning and the privileged neuroanatomical relationship that exists between olfaction and the neural substrates of emotion, odors can be harnessed to induce emotional and physiological responses that can improve human health and wellbeing.

  3. The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the special features of odor-evoked memory and the current state-of-the-art in odor-evoked memory research to show how these unique experiences may be able to influence and benefit psychological and physiological health. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that odors that evoke positive autobiographical memories have the potential to increase positive emotions, decrease negative mood states, disrupt cravings, and reduce physiological indices of stress, including systemic markers of inflammation. Olfactory perception factors and individual difference characteristics that would need to be considered in therapeutic applications of odor-evoked-memory are also discussed. This article illustrates how through the experimentally validated mechanisms of odor-associative learning and the privileged neuroanatomical relationship that exists between olfaction and the neural substrates of emotion, odors can be harnessed to induce emotional and physiological responses that can improve human health and wellbeing. PMID:27447673

  4. Anatomic and Physiological Bases of Social Blushing: Speculations from Neurology and Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Cutlip II

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a common and occasionally troubling reaction, social blushing has received little systematic attention from either medical or behavioral researchers. This article reviews what is known of the physiological and psychological processes that mediate social blushing, and speculates regarding the role of central mechanisms in the phenomenon. Blushing is characterized by the unusual combination of cutaneous vasodilatation of the face, neck, and ears, accompanied by activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Psychologically, blushing appears to occur when people receive undesired social attention from others and may be analogous to the appeasement displays observed in non-human primates. Although poorly understood, the central mechanisms that mediate blushing obviously involve both involuntary autonomic effector systems and higher areas that involve self-reflective thought. Questions for future research are suggested.

  5. Relationship between Myers-Briggs psychological traits and use of course objectives in anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, P H; Leong, E J; Lucier, G E; Lorscheider, F L

    1996-06-01

    The results from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which identified preferred psychological traits for 131 nursing students, were compared to their usage levels of course objectives in an undergraduate course in anatomy and physiology. The three usage levels (user, occasional user, and nonuser) were also compared to exam scores in the course, overall grade point averages (GPA) in first-year nursing, and the various psychological traits measured by the MBTI. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated that users of objectives achieved significantly higher exam scores and maintained a higher GPA than occasional and nonusers. The MANOVA also indicated that users of course objectives preferred a sensing judging modality, whereas nonusers preferred an intuiting perceiving style to guide their studying and learning.

  6. [Perception of emotions in speech. A review of psychological and physiological research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislova, O O; Rusalova, M N

    2013-01-01

    The article is a review of the general concepts and approaches in research of recognition of emotions in speech: psychological concepts, principles and methods of study and physiological data in studies on animals and human. The concepts of emotional intelligence (ability to understand and recognize emotions of other people and to understand and regulate personal emotions), emotional hearing (ability to recognize emotions in speech) are discussed, general review of the paradigms is presented. The research of brain mechanisms of speech emotions differentiation is based on the study of local injuries and dysfunctions, along with the study on healthy subjects.

  7. Psychological and physiological predictors of health in romantic relationships: an attachment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Sarah C E; Campbell, Lorne

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews the burgeoning literature linking greater individual differences in attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance to poorer health. Extant research indicates that more anxiously and avoidantly attached individuals experience heightened psychological (e.g., distress) and physiological (e.g., HPA axis activation) responses to stressful situations, as well as have poorer mental (e.g., depression) and physical (e.g., immune system functioning) health. Research also suggests that perceived social support processes are sometimes beneficial for more anxiously and avoidantly attached persons' mental health, but are not helpful in alleviating physiological responses to stress. Future studies could fruitfully delve into the possible dyadic influences on health and interventions to improve the health experiences of more anxiously and avoidantly attached individuals. Lastly, future research could benefit from longitudinal explorations of health.

  8. Psychological and physiological human responses to simulated and real environments: A comparison between Photographs, 360° Panoramas, and Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Trujillo, Juan Luis; López-Tarruella Maldonado, Juan; Llinares Millán, Carmen

    2017-11-01

    Psychological research into human factors frequently uses simulations to study the relationship between human behaviour and the environment. Their validity depends on their similarity with the physical environments. This paper aims to validate three environmental-simulation display formats: photographs, 360° panoramas, and virtual reality. To do this we compared the psychological and physiological responses evoked by simulated environments set-ups to those from a physical environment setup; we also assessed the users' sense of presence. Analysis show that 360° panoramas offer the closest to reality results according to the participants' psychological responses, and virtual reality according to the physiological responses. Correlations between the feeling of presence and physiological and other psychological responses were also observed. These results may be of interest to researchers using environmental-simulation technologies currently available in order to replicate the experience of physical environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extreme rituals in a BDSM context: the physiological and psychological effects of the 'Dance of Souls'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Kathryn R; Lee, Ellen M; Ambler, James K; Hanson, Sarah A; Comber, Evelyn; Wietting, David; Wagner, Michael F; Burns, Valerie R; Cutler, Bert; Cutler, Nadine; Reid, Elwood; Sagarin, Brad J

    2017-04-01

    Participation in extreme rituals (e.g., fire-walking, body-piercing) has been documented throughout history. Motivations for such physically intense activities include religious devotion, sensation-seeking and social bonding. The present study aims to explore an extreme ritual within the context of bondage/discipline, dominance/submission and sadism/masochism (BDSM): the 'Dance of Souls', a 160-person ritual involving temporary piercings with weights or hooks attached and dancing to music provided by drummers. Through hormonal assays, behavioural observations and questionnaires administered before, during and after the Dance, we examine the physiological and psychological effects of the Dance, and the themes of spirituality, connectedness, transformation, release and community reported by dancers. From before to during the Dance, participants showed increases in physiological stress (measured by the hormone cortisol), self-reported sexual arousal, self-other overlap and decreases in psychological stress and negative affect. Results suggest that this group of BDSM practitioners engage in the Dance for a variety of reasons, including experiencing spirituality, deepening interpersonal connections, reducing stress and achieving altered states of consciousness.

  10. The effect of playing videogames on social, psychological and physiological variables in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncada Jiménez, José

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript will be to present scientific evidence regarding the effects of videogame playing on different aspects of the social life of children and adolescents, as well as the general potential psychological and physiological effects. A literature review from relevant databases has been performed, and experimental and meta-analytical studies have been scrutinized for positive and negative effects of videogames in children and adolescents. In general, it has been found that there is a billionaire videogame industry and yet, despite the worldwide popularity of videogames, research is still scarce and sometimes contradictory. Some research suggests a correlation between excess time video gaming on negative social and psychological aspects such as isolation and aggressive behavior; while other research suggests a positive association with motor learning, motor re-training and resilience. As far as physiological effects it has been reported that active videogames might promote higher energy expenditure than passive videogames; therefore, given an adequate parental instruction might provide videogames beneficial properties to combat the global epidemic of sedentary behavior and obesity. Videogames and everything related «to be» in front of a screen will be common to future generations, and therefore more systematic studies are required to determine the long-term exposure effects to these devices.

  11. Benefits of belonging: experimental manipulation of social inclusion to enhance psychological and physiological health parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begen, Fiona M; Turner-Cobb, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    Acute changes in social belonging are important triggers for alterations in health and well-being, yet research has emphasised the negative effects of 'exclusion' at the expense of evaluating the potentially positive effects of 'inclusion'. This study examined the impact of acute belonging on physiological and psychological outcomes. A healthy population (N = 138) were randomly allocated to 'included' or 'excluded' conditions. Condition-dependent differences in pre/during-task heart rate and pre/post-task self-reports of negative/positive mood, and social self-esteem, were assessed. Included participants showed decreased heart rate and negative mood, and increased social self-esteem. No inclusion-related change in positive mood was shown. An increase in heart rate was observed in excluded participants though no changes in negative/positive mood or social self-esteem were shown. Shifts in social self-esteem acted as a mechanism through which inclusion/exclusion impacted upon negative and positive mood alterations. Results remained significant in presence of covariates (sex, global self-esteem, rumination and social anxiety). Findings suggest that acting to enhance belonging through 'inclusion' resulted in adaptive physiological and psychological outcomes. Neutral and potentially protective responses were observed in the immediate aftermath of 'exclusion'. Self-esteem served as one route through which these effects were transmitted.

  12. Physiological Load and Psychological Stress During a 24-hour Work Shift Among Finnish Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Piia; Lindholm, Harri; Lusa, Sirpa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe physiological load and psychological stress of Finnish firefighters during a 24-hour work shift. R-R intervals were recorded during 24-hour work shifts. Short-time Fourier transform was used to analyze heart rate variability during shifts. HRmean, HRpeak, and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of the differences between adjacent R-to-R peak intervals of the 24-hour shift was 73 ± 7 bpm (38 ± 4% of HRmax), 156 ± 16 bpm (82 ± 8% of HRmax), and 42 ± 14 ms. Mean VO2 was 11 ± 2 (% of VO2max) and VO2peak 72 ± 11 (% of VO2max). Physiological load and psychological stress were temporarily high, even in young, fit firefighters. As the relative work load may increase and recovery processes slow down among aging employees, fatigue may occur unless work arrangements are well-designed.

  13. Physiological and psychological fatigue in extreme conditions: overtraining and elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Dianna; Gonsalves, Stephen; Deuster, Patricia A

    2010-05-01

    This article will review relevant mechanisms and markers associated with overtraining syndrome (OTS), and discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and current assessment tools for fatigue within the context of overtraining. The findings are drawn from original research and review articles referenced by PubMed and ScienceDirect databases. Sources were selected for their contributions to the current knowledge of biological, psychological, and molecular mechanisms. Data were reviewed for relevance to OTS and then evaluated against criteria that included significant OTS outcomes and findings. Information was systematically analyzed to identify patterns, dependencies, connections, and causal factors. Comparative analysis was confounded by inconsistent metrics, terminology, and variable methodology; potential biomarkers, treatment and prevention approaches, and future research directions are identified. Diagnosing OTS is difficult because underlying cause(s) are unknown; one must exclude other factors that degrade performance and mood status. Many studies are confounded by inadequate experimental designs, poor measures of performance, and different methods for characterizing OTS. OTS is complex because the demands of excessive training in combination with other biologic, psychological, and social stressors are difficult to quantify. However, changes in mood are always noted. Interrelations among dietary patterns; social, psychological and physiological profiles; and the neuroendocrine, immune, and central nervous systems are complex and not adequately elucidated. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Listening to music and physiological and psychological functioning: the mediating role of emotion regulation and stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, M V; Scholz, U; Ehlert, U; Nater, U M

    2012-01-01

    Music listening has been suggested to have short-term beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association and potential mediating mechanisms between various aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour and physiological and psychological functioning. An internet-based survey was conducted in university students, measuring habitual music-listening behaviour, emotion regulation, stress reactivity, as well as physiological and psychological functioning. A total of 1230 individuals (mean = 24.89 ± 5.34 years, 55.3% women) completed the questionnaire. Quantitative aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour, i.e. average duration of music listening and subjective relevance of music, were not associated with physiological and psychological functioning. In contrast, qualitative aspects, i.e. reasons for listening (especially 'reducing loneliness and aggression', and 'arousing or intensifying specific emotions') were significantly related to physiological and psychological functioning (all p = 0.001). These direct effects were mediated by distress-augmenting emotion regulation and individual stress reactivity. The habitual music-listening behaviour appears to be a multifaceted behaviour that is further influenced by dispositions that are usually not related to music listening. Consequently, habitual music-listening behaviour is not obviously linked to physiological and psychological functioning.

  15. Physiological strain in the Hungarian mining industry: The impact of physical and psychological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Varga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of these investigations completed on workplaces in the Hungarian mining industry were to characterize the physiological strain of workers by means of work pulse and to examine the effects of work-related psychological factors. Material and Methods: Continuous heart rate (HR recording was completed on 71 miners over a total of 794 shifts between 1987 and 1992 in mining plants of the Hungarian mining industry using a 6-channel recorder – Bioport (ZAK, Germany. The work processes were simultaneously documented by video recording along with drawing up the traditional ergonomic workday schedule. All workers passed health evaluation for fitness for work. The effects of different psychological factors (simulated danger, “instrument stress,” presence of managers, and effect of prior involvement in accidents as well as different mining technologies and work place illumination on the work pulse were evaluated. The statistical analysis was completed using SPSS software (version 13.0, SPSS Inc., USA. Results: The work-related physiological strain differed between work places with different mining technologies in groups of 12–18 workers. The work pulse was lowest in bauxite mining (ΔHR = 22±8.9 bpm and highest in drift drilling in dead rock with electric drilling machine (ΔHR = 30±6.9 bpm. During sham alarm situation the work pulse was significantly higher than during normal activities with the same physical task (ΔHR = 36.7±4.8 bpm vs. 25.8±1.6 bpm, p < 0.001. When work was performed under different psychological stress, the work pulse was consistently higher, while improving the work place illumination decreased the physiological strain appreciably (ΔHR (median, 25–75 percentiles = 23, 20–26 bmp vs. 28, 25–31.3 bpm, p < 0.001. Conclusions: Recording the heart rate during whole-shift work along with the work conditions gives reliable results and helps isolating factors that contribute to increased strain. The

  16. Syringe sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  17. Myers-Briggs psychological type and achievement in anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, P H; Leong, E J; Juschka, B B; Lucier, G E; Lorscheider, F L

    1995-06-01

    Results from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) for 259 nursing students were compared with their achievement on examinations in an undergraduate course in anatomy and physiology. Factor analysis demonstrated that no relationship existed between any of the eight individual personality traits purported to be measured by MBTI (i.e., E, Extrovert; I, Introvert; S, Sensing; N, Intuition; T, Thinking; F, Feeling; J, Judging; P, Perceiving) and examination scores in this course. The analysis also showed that the bipolar scales S vs. N and J vs. P collapsed into a single bipolar scale (S/J vs. N/P). This means that the MBTI is only capable of measuring three bipolar scales of personality traits instead of four scales as currently claimed. Contrary to other findings, results from an analysis of variance revealed no meaningful relationship between course achievement and psychological types.

  18. Correlations between psychological tests and physiological responses during fear conditioning and renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Karen G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety disorders are characterized by specific emotions, thoughts and physiological responses. Little is known, however, about the relationship between psychological/personality indices of anxiety responses to fear stimuli. Methods We studied this relationship in healthy subjects by comparing scores on psychological and personality questionnaires with results of an experimental fear conditioning paradigm using a visual conditioned stimulus (CS. We measured skin conductance response (SCR during habituation, conditioning, and extinction; subsequently testing for recall and renewal of fear 24 hours later. Results We found that multiple regression models explained 45% of the variance during conditioning to the CS+, and 24% of the variance during renewal of fear to the CS+. Factors that explained conditioning included lower levels of conscientiousness, increased baseline reactivity (SCL, and response to the shock (UCR. Low levels of extraversion correlated with greater renewal. No model could be found to explain extinction learning or extinction recall to the CS+. Conclusions The lack of correlation of fear extinction with personality and neuropsychological indices suggests that extinction may be less determined by trait variables and cognitive state, and may depend more on the subject’s current emotional state. The negative correlation between fear renewal and extraversion suggests that this personality characteristic may protect against post-treatment relapse of symptoms of anxiety disorders.

  19. Acupuncture Anxiolytic Effects on Physiological and Psychological Assessments for a Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Shayestehfar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a randomized controlled trial we examined the effect of acupuncture on anxiety of the adolescent football players prior to the competition using psychological and physiological markers. A total of 45 athletes were equally allocated to either acupuncture group, sham group, or wait-list control group. Thereafter, all participants were asked to complete an anxiety questionnaire before and after the intervention. Their heart rate and skin conductance were also examined before and after the intervention. The results of ANOVA on posttest scores showed that acupuncture had a significant effect on cognitive anxiety (p=0.001 and somatic anxiety (p0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that acupuncture significantly decreased the skin conductance in acupuncture group compared to sham group (p=0.006 and wait-list control group (p<0.001. In conclusion, the results suggested that acupuncture has the capacity to decrease cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety prior to competition in adolescent athletes, while this was accompanied by significant physiological changes. This trial is registered with IRCT138904074264N1 (IRCT is a Primary Registry in the WHO Registry Network.

  20. Treating chronic worry: Psychological and physiological effects of a training programme based on mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Luis Carlos; Guerra, Pedro; Perakakis, Pandelis; Vera, María Nieves; Reyes del Paso, Gustavo; Vila, Jaime

    2010-09-01

    The present study examines psychological and physiological indices of emotional regulation in non-clinical high worriers after a mindfulness-based training programme aimed at reducing worry. Thirty-six female university students with high Penn State Worry Questionnaire scores were split into two equal intervention groups: (a) mindfulness, and (b) progressive muscle relaxation plus self-instruction to postpone worrying to a specific time of the day. Assessment included clinical questionnaires, daily self-report of number/duration of worry episodes and indices of emotional meta-cognition. A set of somatic and autonomic measures was recorded (a) during resting, mindfulness/relaxation and worrying periods, and (b) during cued and non-cued affective modulation of defence reactions (cardiac defence and eye-blink startle). Both groups showed equal post-treatment improvement in the clinical and daily self-report measures. However, mindfulness participants reported better emotional meta-cognition (emotional comprehension) and showed improved indices of somatic and autonomic regulation (reduced breathing pattern and increased vagal reactivity during evocation of cardiac defense). These findings suggest that mindfulness reduces chronic worry by promoting emotional and physiological regulatory mechanisms contrary to those maintaining chronic worry. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Discursive Psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molder, te H.

    2015-01-01

    Discursive psychology was established in the United Kingdom by the end of the 1980s, mainly in response to the dominant cognitivist approach in social psychology. While it borrowed notions from poststructuralism and sociology of science, it is most akin to conversation analysis. Discursive psycholog

  2. Resilience Training Program Reduces Physiological and Psychological Stress in Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that police work is among the most stressful occupations in the world and officers typically suffer a variety of physiological, psychological, and behavioral effects and symptoms. Officers operating under severe or chronic stress are likely to be at greater risk of error, accidents, and overreactions that can compromise their performance, jeopardize public safety, and pose significant liability costs to the organization. Therefore, this study explored the nature and degree of physiological activation typically experienced of officers on the job and the impact of the Coherence Advantage resilience and performance enhancement training on a group of police officers from Santa Clara County, California. Areas assessed included vitality, emotional well-being, stress coping and interpersonal skills, work performance, workplace effectiveness and climate, family relationships, and physiological recalibration following acute stressors. Physiological measurements were obtained to determine the real-time cardiovascular impact of acutely stressful situations encountered in highly realistic simulated police calls used in police training and to identify officers at increased risk of future health challenges. The resilience-building training improved officers' capacity to recognize and self-regulate their responses to stressors in both work and personal contexts. Officers experienced reductions in stress, negative emotions, depression, and increased peacefulness and vitality as compared to a control group. Improvements in family relationships, more effective communication and cooperation within work teams, and enhanced work performance also were noted. Heart rate and blood pressure measurements taken during simulated police call scenarios showed that acutely stressful circumstances typically encountered on the job result in a tremendous degree of physiological activation, from which it takes a considerable amount of time to recover. Autonomic nervous system

  3. Resilience Training Program Reduces Physiological and Psychological Stress in Police Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Atkinson, Mike

    2012-11-01

    Research suggests that police work is among the most stressful occupations in the world and officers typically suffer a variety of physiological, psychological, and behavioral effects and symptoms. Officers operating under severe or chronic stress are likely to be at greater risk of error, accidents, and overreactions that can compromise their performance, jeopardize public safety, and pose significant liability costs to the organization. Therefore, this study explored the nature and degree of physiological activation typically experienced of officers on the job and the impact of the Coherence Advantage resilience and performance enhancement training on a group of police officers from Santa Clara County, California. Areas assessed included vitality, emotional well-being, stress coping and interpersonal skills, work performance, workplace effectiveness and climate, family relationships, and physiological recalibration following acute stressors. Physiological measurements were obtained to determine the real-time cardiovascular impact of acutely stressful situations encountered in highly realistic simulated police calls used in police training and to identify officers at increased risk of future health challenges. The resilience-building training improved officers' capacity to recognize and self-regulate their responses to stressors in both work and personal contexts. Officers experienced reductions in stress, negative emotions, depression, and increased peacefulness and vitality as compared to a control group. Improvements in family relationships, more effective communication and cooperation within work teams, and enhanced work performance also were noted. Heart rate and blood pressure measurements taken during simulated police call scenarios showed that acutely stressful circumstances typically encountered on the job result in a tremendous degree of physiological activation, from which it takes a considerable amount of time to recover. Autonomic nervous system

  4. Giving blood donors something to drink before donation can prevent fainting symptoms: is there a physiological or psychological reason?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavic, Nataša; Pagliariccio, Antonella; Bulajic, Milica; Dinić, Radovan; Marinozzi, Maria

    2014-08-01

    The vasovagal reaction has been widely studied but its anatomic and physiological nature remains uncertain. The mechanisms underlying vasovagal reaction related to blood donation are not completely understood either. Does its occurrence depend on the blood donors' physical characteristics and health variables or psychological factors? On the basis that a psychological approach considerably prevents donor reactions, the effect of fruit juice ingestion was studied in a group of 1849 first-time high-school students as a simple strategy to avoid systemic reactions at blood donation. The reasons for the psychological effect of this hydration protocol are stressed also in light of previous physiological studies on the hemodynamic effects of water or carbohydrate drinks.

  5. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-based interventions on physiological and psychological complications in adults with diabetes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordali, Farhan; Cumming, Jennifer; Thompson, Janice L

    2015-12-30

    This systematic review aimed to examine the effectiveness of Mindfulness-based interventions in reducing diabetes-related physiological and psychological symptoms in adults with types 1 and 2 diabetes. Five databases were systematically searched. A total of 11 studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Mindfulness-based intervention effectiveness for physiological outcomes (glycaemic control and blood pressure) was mixed. Mindfulness-based interventions appear to have psychological benefits reducing depression, anxiety and distress symptoms across several studies. Studies' short-term follow-up periods may not allow sufficient time to observe physiological changes or illustrate Mindfulness-based interventions' potential long-term efficacy. More long-term studies that include a consistent, standardised set of outcome measures are required.

  6. Development of relative body mass (BMI of students from Łódź, depending on the selected environmental, psychological and sociological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruszkowska-Przybylska Paulina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human height-to-weight ratio is an important parameter of the body homeostasis. Currently, the most popular measurement determining the relationship between body mass and height is the Quetelet II indicator, called Body Mass Index (BMI. The aim of this study is an evaluation of the differences in the height-to-weight ratios, depending on selected environmental, psychological and sociological factors in people studying at higher education institutions in Łódź. The research was conducted among students of higher education institutions in Łódź, by electronic means or with the use of an anonymous survey. It consisted of 28 closed single or multiple choice questions. Statistical analysis was made of complete results of the research involving 135 people, both males and females, aged between 19-26. It was revealed that the factors related to higher BMI values in students are the following: the presence of a tendency in the students to gain weight themselves, and a tendency to gain weight present in their mothers, an evaluation of their own body mass as excessive, regularly smoking cigarettes and rarely undergoing medical check-ups. Among the factors connected with lower BMI values are: regular coffee consumption, perception of their own body mass as being too low, and also obtaining systolic pressure values below 110 mm Hg. Additionally, a positive correlation between taking up physical activity and higher values of systolic blood pressure (p<0.05 was shown. Among the subjects, it was found that 92% of the underweight women declared that their body mass and figure were normal. In the case of women with optimal BMI values, 40% stated that their body mass was excessive. In the case of men the problem was reverse: 50% of the subjects who were either overweight or obese claimed that their body mass was within the norm. The factors that significantly influence body proportion differences among students include the subject’s and the subject

  7. Physiological and psychological individual differences influence resting brain function measured by ASL perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, M; Coen, S J; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q; Williams, S C R; Alsop, D C; Fukudo, S; O'Gorman, R L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of physiological and/or psychological inter-individual differences on the resting brain state have not been fully established. The present study investigated the effects of individual differences in basal autonomic tone and positive and negative personality dimensions on resting brain activity. Whole-brain resting cerebral perfusion images were acquired from 32 healthy subjects (16 males) using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Resting autonomic activity was assessed using a validated measure of baseline cardiac vagal tone (CVT) in each individual. Potential associations between the perfusion data and individual CVT (27 subjects) and personality score (28 subjects) were tested at the level of voxel clusters by fitting a multiple regression model at each intracerebral voxel. Greater baseline perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and cerebellum was associated with lower CVT. At a corrected significance threshold of p personality traits (amygdala, caudate, etc.) during active task processing. The resting brain state may therefore need to be taken into account when interpreting the neurobiology of individual differences in structural and functional brain activity.

  8. Explaining the Association between Early Adversity and Young Adults' Diabetes Outcomes: Physiological, Psychological, and Behavioral Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickrama, Kandauda A S; Bae, Dayoung; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

    2017-01-31

    Previous studies have documented that early adversity increases young adults' risk for diabetes resulting in morbidity and comorbidity with adverse health conditions. However, less is known about how inter-related physiological (e.g., body mass index [BMI]), psychological (e.g., depressive symptoms), and behavioral mechanisms (e.g., unhealthy eating and sedentary behavior) link early adversity to young adults' diabetes outcomes, although these mechanisms appear to stem from early stressful experiences. The current study tested the patterning of these longitudinal pathways leading to young adults' diabetes using a nationally representative sample of 13,286 adolescents (54% female) over a period of 13 years. The findings indicated that early adversity contributed to elevated BMI, depressive symptoms, and stress-related health behaviors. The impact of these linking mechanisms on hierarchical diabetes outcomes (i.e., prediabetes and diabetes) remained significant after taking their associations with each other into account, showing that these mechanisms operate concurrently. The findings emphasize the importance of early detection for risk factors of young adults' diabetes in order to minimize their detrimental health effects.

  9. Physiological and psychological effects of a high dose of alcohol in young men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago; Parra, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a high dose of alcohol on physiological and psychological parameters in young men and women with a previous history of alcohol consumption. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, state anxiety, attention, time estimation and manual dexterity were registered before (phase 1) and after (phase 2) intake of alcohol (38.4 g) or a non-alcoholic beverage. Trait anxiety was registered in phase 2 only. The results showed that acute consumption of a high dose of alcohol: i) improves attention in men (although the performance of alcohol consumers was not better than that of non-consumers); ii) blocks the systolic blood pressure habituation phenomenon (observed in controls) in women; and iii) blocks the improvement in manual dexterity (associated with experience in non-consumers) in both sexes. On the other hand, male consumers had a lower heart rate than non-consumers, independently of the phase, while female consumers had a higher state anxiety and performed worse in attention than controls, also independently of the phase. These results help to understand the extent of performance impairment of different tasks produced by risk alcohol consumption in young men and women.

  10. The politics of physiological psychology. Ivan Pavlov's suppressed defense of scientific freedom and its consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, I L

    1993-01-01

    This statement, first presented at a plenary session of the Pavlovian Society on 9 October 1992, in Los Angeles, California, attempts to assess the recently released speech delivered by Ivan Pavlov in 1923, but publicly brought to light only in 1991, on the subject of "Communist Dogmatism and the Autonomy of Science." This speech, noteworthy for the courage of the delivery under adverse circumstances no less than the contents of its remarks, compels a new estimate of the place of science in a totalitarian system boasting an ideology of physiological psychology. It also sheds new light on the Russian Nobel laureate and pioneer in the areas of behavior modification induced by the functions of the higher nervous system. These remarks take an in-depth view of American radical and Marxian appraisals--how they followed the Soviet lead in harnessing Pavlov to the Communist cause, and in attempting to discredit the work of Sigmund Freud. This lethal combination of Communist political needs and ideological proclivities served to rationalize the implementation of slave labor as work therapy during the Stalinist era. The linkage of Pavlov to Makarenko in education and Michurin in biology serves as a case study in the manufacture of tradition. The collapse of the Soviet system permits a recasting of the history of science and Pavlov's place in Russian life. Such new conditions also provide a lesson in the distortive role of ideology in the evolution of modern science.

  11. Effects of Endotoxin and Psychological Stress on Redox Physiology, Immunity and Feather Corticosterone in Greenfinches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Meitern

    Full Text Available Assessment of costs accompanying activation of immune system and related neuroendocrine pathways is essential for understanding the selective forces operating on these systems. Here we attempted to detect such costs in terms of disruption to redox balance and interference between different immune system components in captive wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris. Study birds were subjected to an endotoxin-induced inflammatory challenge and temporary exposure to a psychological stressor (an image of a predator in a 2*2 factorial experiment. Injection of bacterial endotoxin resulted in up-regulation of two markers of antioxidant protection - erythrocyte glutathione, and plasma oxygen radical absorbance (OXY. These findings suggest that inflammatory responses alter redox homeostasis. However, no effect on markers of oxidative damage to proteins or DNA in erythrocytes could be detected. We found no evidence that the endotoxin injection interfered with antibody production against Brucella abortus antigen or the intensity of chronic coccidiosis. The hypothesis of within-immune system trade-offs as a cost of immunity was thus not supported in our model system. We showed for the first time that administration of endotoxin can reduce the level of corticosterone deposited into feathers. This finding suggests a down-regulation of the corticosterone secretion cascade due to an endotoxin-induced immune response, a phenomenon that has not been reported previously. Exposure to the predator image did not affect any of the measured physiological parameters.

  12. Human physiology and psychology in space flight; Uchu hiko ni okeru ningen no seiri to shinri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, T. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-05

    Human beings' adaptation to space and the effects on them of a prolonged stay in space are discussed. Some effects may be detrimental to crewmen even when they are medically judged as 'normal' and 'adaptable.' Bone deliming, muscular atrophy, and hypodynamia may be physiologically 'normal' and 'adaptable' in the zero-gravity environment where no strength is required to hold a position or attitude, and they will not cause any serious problems if crewmen are to stay in the zero-gravity environment permanently. Astronauts work on conditions that they return to the earth, however, and they have to stand on their own legs when back on the ground. Such being the case, they in the space vehicle are forced to make efforts at having their bone density and muscular strength sustained. It is inevitable for a space station to be a closed, isolated system, and the crewmen have to live in multinational, multicultural, and multilingual circumstances in case the flight is an international project. They will be exposed to great social and psychological stresses, and their adaptability to such stresses presents an important task. (NEDO)

  13. Music in CrossFit®—Influence on Performance, Physiological, and Psychological Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Brupbacher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaining increasing popularity within the fitness sector, CrossFit® serves as an appealing and efficient high intensity training approach to develop strength and endurance on a functional level; and music is often utilized to produce ergogenic effects. The present randomized, controlled, crossover study aimed at investigating the effects of music vs. non-music on performance, physiological and psychological outcomes. Thirteen (age: 27.5, standard deviation (SD 6.2 years, healthy, moderately trained subjects performed four identical workouts over two weeks. The order of the four workouts (two with, and two without music, 20 min each was randomly assigned for each individual. Acute responses in work output, heart rate, blood lactate, rate of perceived exertion, perceived pain, and affective reaction were measured at the 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th min during the training sessions. Training with music resulted in a significantly lower work output (460.3 repetitions, SD 98.1 vs. 497.8 repetitions, SD 103.7; p = 0.03. All other parameters did not differ between both music conditions. This is partly in line with previous findings that instead of providing ergogenic effects, applying music during CrossFit® may serve as a more distractive stimulus. Future studies should separate the influence of music on a more individual basis with larger sample sizes.

  14. Sociology and Moral Education: New Directions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    Past work in the field is examined at four levels: the social structural, the institutional, that of action and the social psychological in both the psychological and sociological traditions. Moral choice is analyzed into three components with each component applied to moral education in an attempt to indicate worthwhile future directions for…

  15. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  16. Acute Effect of Virtual Reality Exercise Bike Games on College Students' Physiological and Psychological Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Nan; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2017-07-01

    Commercially available virtual reality (VR) exercise systems are extensively used in many health domains among clinical populations. However, evidence regarding the efficacy of this technology on healthy adults' health-related outcomes is unknown. This pilot study compared physiological and psychological responses following exercise on a VR-based exercise bike (VirZoom) and traditional stationary exercise bike. Twelve healthy college students (9 females; Mage = 25.01, SD = ± 4.74; MBMI = 22.84, SD = ± 3.68) completed two separate 20-minute exercise sessions on the VR-based exercise bike and traditional stationary exercise bike. Blood pressure (BP), ratings of perceived exertion, self-efficacy, and enjoyment were assessed as primary outcomes. Dependent t-tests indicated no significant differences in mean systolic or diastolic BP changes from pre to postexercise between the VR-based exercise and traditional stationary biking sessions (all p > 0.05). Notably, participants reported significantly higher ratings of perceived exertion (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.68) during the traditional exercise biking session compared with VR-based exercise biking session. However, participants had significantly higher self-efficacy (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = -0.83) and enjoyment (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = -0.89) during the VR-based exercise biking session compared with traditional stationary biking. The commercially available VR-based exercise bike (VirZoom) may be considered an effective, enjoyable, and motivating physical activity tool. Further interventions with larger and more diverse samples and examinations of more health-related outcomes are warranted to determine optimal application of VR-based exercise programming among various populations.

  17. Towards a sociology of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Stefan; Haas, Steven

    2008-07-01

    We argue for a sociology of health, illness, and disease. Under the influence of Talcott Parsons, the social study of health began as medical sociology and then morphed into sociology of health and illness, focusing largely on the social aspects of health-related topics. Social scientists have been reluctant to tackle disease in its physiological and biological manifestations. The result is an impoverishment of sociological analysis on at least three levels: social scientists have rarely made diseases central to their inquiries; they have been reluctant to include clinical endpoints in their analysis; and they have largely bracketed the normative purpose of health interventions. Consequently, social scientists tend to ignore what often matters most to patients and health care providers, and the social processes social scientists describe remain clinically unanchored. A sociology of disease explores the dialectic between social life and disease; aiming to examine whether and how social life matters for morbidity and mortality and vice versa. Drawing from specific advances in science and technology studies and social epidemiology, we point to ways that sociologists can participate as health researchers.

  18. Relationship of psychological and physiological variables in long-term self-monitored data during work ability rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärkkä, Juha; Merilahti, Juho; Mattila, Elina M; Malm, Esko; Antila, Kari; Tuomisto, Martti T; Saarinen, Ari Viljam; van Gils, Mark; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-03-01

    Individual wellness comprises both psychological and physiological wellbeing, which are interrelated. In long-term monitoring of wellness, both components should be included. Work-related stress and burnout are persistent problems in industrial countries. Early identification of work-related stress symptoms and early intervention could reduce individual suffering and improve the working productivity and creativity. The goal of this study was to explore the relationship between physiological and psychological variables measured at home by the users themselves or automatically. In all, 17 (3 males and 14 females, age 40-62) people participating in a work ability rehabilitation program (due to work overload) were monitored for three months. Physiological and behavioral variables (activity, bed occupancy, heart rate (HR) and respiration during night, HR during day, blood pressure, steps, weight, room illumination, and temperature) were measured with different unobtrusive wireless sensors. Daily self-assessment of stress, mood, and behaviors (exercise, sleep) were collected using a mobile phone diary. The daily self-assessment of stress and the Derogatis stress profile questionnaire were used as reference for stress status. Results show modest, but significant pooled overall correlations between self-assessed stress level, and physiological and behavioral variables (e.g., sleep length measured with wrist-worn activity monitor: rho = -0.22, p < 0.001, and variance of nightly bedroom illumination: rho = 0.13, p < 0.001). Strong, but sometimes conflicting correlations can be found at individual level, suggesting individual reactions to stress in daily life.

  19. A sigh of relief or a sigh to relieve: The psychological and physiological relief effect of deep breaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlemincx, Elke; Van Diest, Ilse; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2016-10-15

    Both animal and human research have revealed important associations between sighs and relief. Previously we argued to conceive of sighs as resetters which temporarily induce relief. The present study aimed to investigate the psychological and physiological relief effect of sighs by instructed deep breaths and spontaneous sighs compared to a control breathing maneuver. Participants completed three blocks of 40 trials during which uncertainty cues were followed by either safety cues followed by a positive picture, or danger cues followed by a negative picture. One block was presented without breathing instructions, two subsequent blocks with breathing instructions. During the presentation of the safety and danger cues, an instruction was given to either 'take a deep breath' or 'postpone the next inhalation for 2 s (breath hold). Continuously, participants rated relief and Frontalis electromyography was recorded. Trait anxiety sensitivity was assessed by the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. Self-reported relief and physiological tension were compared 5s before and after instructed deep breaths and breath holds, and before and after spontaneous deep breaths and breath holds in the respective blocks. Results show that self-reported relief following an instructed deep breath was higher than before. Physiological tension decreased following a spontaneous sigh in high anxiety sensitive persons and following a spontaneous breath hold in low anxiety sensitive persons. These results are the first to show that a deep breath relieves and, in anxiety sensitive persons, reduces physiological tension. These findings support the hypothesis that sighs are psychological and physiological resetters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of music tempo on performance, psychological, and physiological variables during 20 km cycling in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the effects of music on trained athletes during high intensity endurance tasks. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of different music tempi on performance, psychological, and physiological responses of well-trained cyclists to time trial cycling. 10 male road cyclists (M age = 35 yr., SD = 7), with a minimum of three years racing experience, performed four 20-km time trials on a Computrainer Pro 3D indoor cycle trainer over a period of four weeks. The time-trials were spaced one week apart. The music conditions for each trial were randomised between fast-tempo (140 bpm), medium-tempo (120 bpm), slow-tempo (100 bpm), and no music. Performance (completion time, power output, average speed and cadence), physiological (heart rate, oxygen consumption, breathing frequency and respiratory exchange ratio), psychophysical (RPE), and psychological (mood states) data were collected for each trial. Results indicated no significant changes in performance, physiological, or psychophysical variables. Total mood disturbance and tension increased significantly in the fast-tempo trial when compared with medium and no-music conditions.

  1. 2015 Hans O. Mauksch Address: How Departments Can Respond to the Changing Popularity of the Sociology Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While the popularity of the psychology major and the sociology major were comparable in 1970, sociology witnessed a decline while psychology witnessed expansion. This article considers strategies of expanding the popularity of the sociology major, considering data from a variety of sources. Primary recommendations are to configure programs to…

  2. 2015 Hans O. Mauksch Address: How Departments Can Respond to the Changing Popularity of the Sociology Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While the popularity of the psychology major and the sociology major were comparable in 1970, sociology witnessed a decline while psychology witnessed expansion. This article considers strategies of expanding the popularity of the sociology major, considering data from a variety of sources. Primary recommendations are to configure programs to…

  3. Physiological and Psychological Effects of Viewing a Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward') Orchard Landscape in Summer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Miho; Miwa, Masayuki; Ikei, Harumi; Song, Chorong; Takagaki, Michiko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-06-11

    The physiological and psychological relaxation effects of viewing a kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward') orchard landscape were investigated. Seventeen Japanese adult females (46.1 ± 8.2 years) viewed a kiwifruit orchard landscape or a building site (control) for 10 min. The heart rate variability and heart rate were determined. The modified semantic differential method and the short-form Profile of Mood States were used to assess the psychological effects. Compared with viewing the building site, viewing the kiwifruit orchard landscape resulted in a significant increase in the parasympathetic activity, a marginally significant decrease in the heart rate, a significant increase in "comfortable", "relaxed" and "natural" feelings and a significant improvement in mood states.

  4. Mind/body techniques for physiological and psychological stress reduction: stress management via Tai Chi training - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Tobias; Duckstein, Jorg; Welke, Justus; Braun, Vittoria

    2007-11-01

    Stress can affect health. There is a growing need for the evaluation and application of professional stress management options, i.e, stress reduction. Mind/body medicine serves this goal, e.g, by integrating self-care techniques into medicine and health care. Tai Chi (TC) can be classified as such a mind/body technique, potentially reducing stress and affecting physical as well as mental health parameters, which, however, has to be examined further. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal pilot study over 18 weeks for the evaluation of subjective and objective clinical effects of a Yang style TC intervention in young adults (beginners) by measuring physiological (blood pressure, heart rate, saliva cortisol) and psychological (SF-36, perceived stress, significant events) parameters, i.e, direct or indirect indicators of stress and stress reduction, in a non-randomised/-controlled, yet non-selected cohort (n=21) by pre-to-post comparison and in follow-up. SF-36 values were also compared with the age-adjusted norm population, serving as an external control. Additionally, we measured diurnal cortisol profiles in a cross-sectional sub-study (n=2+2, pre-to-post), providing an internal random control sub-sample. Only nine participants completed all measurements. Even so, we found significant (pstress reduction. A significant decrease in perceived mental stress (post) proved even highly significant (pstress perception declined to a much lesser degree. Significant improvements were also detected for the SF-36 dimensions general health perception, social functioning, vitality, and mental health/psychological well-being. Thus, the summarized mental health measures all clearly improved, pointing towards a predominantly psychological impact of TC. Subjective health increased, stress decreased (objectively and subjectively) during TC practice. Future studies should confirm this observation by rigorous methodology and by further combining physical and psychological measurements

  5. Racism, empire and sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Reviews of Gurminder K Bhambra, Connected Sociologies; Peo Hansen and Stefan Jonsson, Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism; Wulf D. Hund, Alana Lentin (eds) Racism and Sociology

  6. Introduktion til klassisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Søren

    Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas......Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas...

  7. Introduktion til klassisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Søren

    Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas......Papiret introducerer til en række klassiske sociologer: Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim og Habermas...

  8. Sociology as a Vocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the meaning of practicing sociology, claiming to "commit a social science" still makes sense. Accepts Max Weber's arguments that sociology clarifies human affairs and is oriented to certain virtues. Suggests, however, that sociology is a passion as well as a profession, something Weber recognized but did not elaborate. (NL)

  9. Sociology of justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebig, S.; Sauer, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of the empirical justice research done so far within sociology and aim to contribute to a clearer understanding of what constitutes a sociological approach. In order to do so, we first introduce the multilevel model of sociological explanation and derive four

  10. The case for a sociology of dying, death, and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil; Allan, June; Carverhill, Philip A; Cox, Gerry R; Davies, Betty; Doka, Kenneth; Granek, Leeat; Harris, Darcy; Ho, Andy; Klass, Dennis; Small, Neil; Wittkowski, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dying, death, and bereavement do not occur in a social vacuum. How individuals and groups experience these phenomena will be largely influenced by the social context in which they occur. To develop an adequate understanding of dying, death, and bereavement we therefore need to incorporate a sociological perspective into our analysis. This article examines why a sociological perspective is necessary and explores various ways in which sociology can be of practical value in both intellectual and professional contexts. A case study comparing psychological and sociological perspectives is offered by way of illustration.

  11. Impact of Positive Emotions Enhancement on Physiological Processes and Psychological Functioning in Military Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    McCraty R, Barrios -Choplin B, Rozman D, Watkins D. The impact of a new emotional self management program on stress, emotions, heart rate variability, DHEA...Psychological Reports 2007, 101: 943-944. [34] Spielberger C.D. Manual for the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory: STAI (form Y). Palo Alto , CA: Consulting

  12. Community-based behavioral weight-loss treatment: long-term maintenance of weight loss, physiological, and psychological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latner, Janet D; Ciao, Anna C; Wendicke, Annemarie U; Murakami, Jessica M; Durso, Laura E

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a significant public health problem, and sustainable long-term treatments are needed. This study examined a community-based model of weight-loss treatment. Ninety participants were recruited from eight community organizations (mean age: 49.65 years, mean body mass index: 35.80 kg/m(2); 64% female). Treatment groups were randomly assigned to two maintenance conditions: 1) self-help continuing care, or 2) assessment-only. Both received the same initial 20-session group behavioral treatment. Those randomized to continuing care were additionally instructed to meet as self-sustaining groups for 18 months post-treatment. Weight, physiological, behavioral, and psychological outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and at six-month and 18-month follow-up. Eighty-seven percent of participants completed treatment. Participant treatment satisfaction and therapist adherence to treatment protocol were high. No group differences or time by group interaction effects emerged. Participants achieved significant weight losses at post-treatment, with no significant weight regain at six-month or 18-month follow-up. Treatment produced sustained changes in waist circumference, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, insulin, eating patterns, physical activity, quality of life, and body image. A community-based treatment program may be an effective form of behavioral-weight-loss treatment for overweight/obese adults. Weight losses, along with physiological and psychological benefits, were sustained over time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Observation on Physiological and Psychological Effects of Eight-Section Brocade on Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang; Tufiutitakuya; Kosikawafusako; Kisitaiti; Havukiyutaka; Suzukiakio; Wang Weidong; Zhang Rongrui; Lin Yingna; Hong Lan; Zhao Yang; Ni Qing; Zhang Lin; Isiiyasutomo

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To observe the physiological and psychological changing of type 2 diabetic patients after practicing Eight-Section Brocade,to evaluate the clinical curative effect,and to provide a safe and effective self-regulating method for type 2 diabetic Patients.Methods:This study is a random controlled trial,the 54 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly assigned into the intervention and the control group.The intervention group was given a 2-month period of Eight-Section Brocade practice,then a comparison between groups was made.The intervention group continued to do Eight-Section Brocade practice for 2 months,so it was 4 months' intervention all together for this group.and then a comparison within the intervention group was made.Results:There was significant difierence 4 months later on HbAlc in the intervention group (P<0.05).There was significant difference between the intervention and control groups on obsessive-compulsive,depression,anxiety and hostility scores after 2 months' practice(P<0.05).There was significant difference between 2 and 4 months' practice on hostilities scores within the intervention group P<0.05).Conclusions:As an important part of the traditional Chinese medicine,Eight-section Brocade has physiological and psychological effects on type 2 Diabetic Patients.

  14. Physiological and Psychological Effects of Forest Therapy on Middle-Aged Males with High-Normal Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Ochiai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Time spent walking and relaxing in a forest environment (“forest bathing” or “forest therapy” has well demonstrated anti-stress effects in healthy adults, but benefits for ill or at-risk populations have not been reported. The present study assessed the physiological and psychological effects of forest therapy (relaxation and stress management activity in the forest on middle-aged males with high-normal blood pressure. Blood pressure and several physiological and psychological indices of stress were measured the day before and approximately 2 h following forest therapy. Both pre- and post-treatment measures were conducted at the same time of day to avoid circadian influences. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP, urinary adrenaline, and serum cortisol were all significantly lower than baseline following forest therapy (p < 0.05. Subjects reported feeling significantly more “relaxed” and “natural” according to the Semantic Differential (SD method. Profile of Mood State (POMS negative mood subscale scores for “tension-anxiety,” “confusion,” and “anger-hostility,” as well as the Total Mood Disturbance (TMD score were significantly lower following forest therapy. These results highlight that forest is a promising treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure into the optimal range and possibly prevent progression to clinical hypertension in middle-aged males with high-normal blood pressure.

  15. Psychological and physiological evaluation of emotional effects of a perfume in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriat, A; Barkat, S; Bensafi, M; Rouby, C; Fanchon, C

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, we familiarized menopausal women with a pleasant smell in the skin care products, they used for 1 week and assessed whether their mood and emotions improved using behavioural and physiological tools. Eventually, we studied the effects of inhaling the familiar fragrance on physiological response of the subjects. An anhedonia questionnaire was used to distinguish the effects of the test products according to low vs. high score of anhedonia. Familiarization with the fragrance induced a modification of some physiological parameters, reflecting a relaxing effect, and these unconscious effects paralleled the conscious positive effects on mood recorded during the familiarization phase; it appeared that the effects were more prominent in subjects with higher scores of anhedonia. These results suggest that the pleasant smell of a skin care product contributes to the quality of life in a population of menopausal women with low easiness to experience pleasure.

  16. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology. ... paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. ... which have a close bearing on psychology such as psychiatry, sociology, social work, ...

  17. Myers-Briggs Psychological Type and Achievement in Anatomy and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, P. H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Results from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) for 259 nursing students were compared with achievement on examinations in an anatomy and physiology course. Factor analysis demonstrated no relationship between examination scores and any of the individual personality traits purported to be measured by MBTI. Analysis of variance revealed no…

  18. Physiological and psychological reactions to work in men and women with identical job tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Roger; Hansen, Åse Marie; Ohlsson, Kerstina

    2009-01-01

    decrease in perceived energy levels during the workshift but there were no differences between men and women as regards cortisol, adrenaline, noradrenaline, heart-rate activation, perceived stress, pain and physical exertion. In conclusion, differential physiological activation during the workshift seem...

  19. MultiNeuron - Neural Networks Simulator for Medical, Physiological, and Psychological Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gorban, A. N.; Rossiyev, D. A.; M. G. Dorrer

    1995-01-01

    This work describes neural software applied in medicine and physiology to: - investigate and diagnose immune deficiencies; diagnose and study allergic and pseudoallergic reactions; forecast emergence or aggravation of stagnant cardiac insufficiency in patients with cardiac rhythm disorders; forecast development of cardiac arrhythmia after myocardial infarction; reveal relationships between the accumulated radiation dose and a set of immunological, hormonal, and bio-chemical parameters of ...

  20. Effects of work-related sleep restriction on acute physiological and psychological stress responses and their interactions: A review among emergency service personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkow, Alexander; Ferguson, Sally; Aisbett, Brad; Main, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Emergency work can expose personnel to sleep restriction. Inadequate amounts of sleep can negatively affect physiological and psychological stress responses. This review critiqued the emergency service literature (e.g., firefighting, police/law enforcement, defense forces, ambulance/paramedic personnel) that has investigated the effect of sleep restriction on hormonal, inflammatory and psychological responses. Furthermore, it investigated if a psycho-physiological approach can help contextualize the significance of such responses to assist emergency service agencies monitor the health of their personnel. The available literature suggests that sleep restriction across multiple work days can disrupt cytokine and cortisol levels, deteriorate mood and elicit simultaneous physiological and psychological responses. However, research concerning the interaction between such responses is limited and inconclusive. Therefore, it is unknown if a psycho-physiological relationship exists and as a result, it is currently not feasible for agencies to monitor sleep restriction related stress based on psycho- physiological interactions. Sleep restriction does however, appear to be a major stressor contributing to physiological and psychological responses and thus, warrants further investigation. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Effects of work-related sleep restriction on acute physiological and psychological stress responses and their interactions: A review among emergency service personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wolkow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Emergency work can expose personnel to sleep restriction. Inadequate amounts of sleep can negatively affect physiological and psychological stress responses. This review critiqued the emergency service literature (e.g., firefighting, police/law enforcement, defense forces, ambulance/paramedic personnel that has investigated the effect of sleep restriction on hormonal, inflammatory and psychological responses. Furthermore, it investigated if a psycho-physiological approach can help contextualize the significance of such responses to assist emergency service agencies monitor the health of their personnel. The available literature suggests that sleep restriction across multiple work days can disrupt cytokine and cortisol levels, deteriorate mood and elicit simultaneous physiological and psychological responses. However, research concerning the interaction between such responses is limited and inconclusive. Therefore, it is unknown if a psycho-physiological relationship exists and as a result, it is currently not feasible for agencies to monitor sleep restriction related stress based on psycho- physiological interactions. Sleep restriction does however, appear to be a major stressor contributing to physiological and psychological responses and thus, warrants further investigation.

  2. The Sociological Imagination -- A Basis for Teaching of Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1974-01-01

    The problem in teaching introductory sociology is to determine what can be extracted from the sociological tradition and the current crisis in sociology that will help students lead more meaningful lives. The answer lies in kindling the sociological imagination by the development of a sociology curriculum based upon the study of contemporary youth…

  3. Physiological Markers of Arousal Change with Psychological Treatment for Insomnia: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Miller

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate if Sleep Restriction Therapy for insomnia is associated with modifications to physiological arousal, indexed through overnight measures of plasma cortisol concentrations and core body temperature.In a pre-to-post open label study design, eleven patients with chronic and severe Psychophysiological Insomnia underwent 5 weeks of Sleep Restriction Therapy.Eight (73% patients out of 11 consented completed therapy and showed a decrease in insomnia severity pre-to-post treatment (mean (SD: 18.1 (2.8 versus 8.4 (4.8; p = .001. Six patients were analyzed with pre-to-post overnight measures of temperature and cortisol. Contrary to our hypothesis, significantly higher levels of plasma cortisol concentrations were found during the early morning at post-treatment compared to baseline (p < .01, while no change was observed in the pre-sleep phase or early part of the night. Core body temperature during sleep was however reduced significantly (overall mean [95% CI]: 36.54 (°C [36.3, 36.8] versus 36.45 [36.2, 36.7]; p < .05.Sleep Restriction Therapy therefore was associated with increased early morning cortisol concentrations and decreased core body temperature, supporting the premise of physiological changes in functioning after effective therapy. Future work should evaluate change in physiological variables associated with clinical treatment response.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ANZCTR 12612000049875.

  4. The role of psychological and physiological factors in decision making under risk and in a dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eFooken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different methods to elicit risk attitudes of individuals often provide differing results despite a common theory. Reasons for such inconsistencies may be the different influence of underlying factors in risk-taking decisions. In order to evaluate this conjecture, a better understanding of underlying factors across methods and decision contexts is desirable. In this paper we study the difference in result of two different risk elicitation methods by linking estimates of risk attitudes to gender, age and personality traits, which have been shown to be related. We also investigate the role of these factors during decision-making in a dilemma situation. For these two decision contexts we also investigate the decision-maker's physiological state during the decision, measured by heart rate variability (HRV, which we use as an indicator of emotional involvement. We found that the two elicitation methods provide different individual risk attitude measures which is partly reflected in a different gender effect between the methods. Personality traits explain only relatively little in terms of driving risk attitudes and the difference between methods. We also found that risk taking and the physiological state are related for one of the methods, suggesting that more emotionally involved individuals are more risk averse in the experiment. Finally, we found evidence that personality traits are connected to whether individuals made a decision in the dilemma situation, but risk attitudes and the physiological state were not indicative for the ability to decide in this decision context.

  5. Psychological profiles of gender and personality traces of Brazilian professional athletes of futsal, and their influence on physiological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento MGB

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Guimarães Boia do Nascimento,1,2 Sérgio Adriano Gomes,1 Márcio Rabelo Mota,1,2 Renata Aparecida,1 Gislane Ferreira de Melo21Physical Education Department, Universitary Center of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil; 2Physical Education Department, Catholic University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil Abstract: The present study aimed to identify the psychological profiles of professional futsal players in terms of the gender schema and to evaluate the physiological parameters (speed, acceleration, strength, and power and fatigue index of these athletes according to their gender profiles and relative to their positions on the court. The Masculine Inventory of the Self-concept Gender Schemas was used to classify the sample into typological groups, and the Running Anaerobic Sprint Test was used to measure the physiological parameters (speed, acceleration, strength, and power and the fatigue index. The study sample was composed of 64 male professional futsal players who competed in the National Indoor Soccer league in 2013; the subjects had an average weight of 76.00±6.7 kg. Among the athletes studied, 23 (35.9% were classified as heteroschematic female, 22 (34.4% as heteroschematic male, and 19 (29.7% as isoschematic. Regarding their positions on the court, eleven were goalkeepers (17.2%, 13 (20.3% were defenders, 28 (43.8% were midfielders, and 12 (18.8% were attackers. The players had similar weights even when belonging to different typological groups and having different positions in the court. However, it is worth noting that male heteroschematic players had a greater mean weight (77.11±5.93 kg and that the goalkeeper was, on average, the heaviest player (79.36±8.14 kg. The results of the physiological parameter analysis relative to typological group showed that, on average, high-level soccer players presented similar performance profiles in different rounds, as statistically significant differences were not found in any of the studied

  6. The role of flumazenil in the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence: physiological and psychological profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, S; O'Neil, G; Hulse, G

    2009-06-01

    Two-related studies are presented here, detailing our early experience with benzodiazepine-dependent patients treated with a four-day flumazenil infusion using a novel delivery technique. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine dependence who attended the Australian Medical Procedures Research Foundation (AMPRF, Perth, Australia) for treatment were recruited for these studies. Self-reported psychological and physical symptoms, as well as objective vital signs data were collected at intervals before, during and 2 weeks postinfusion. Study A is a case series with cardiovascular measures; study B is an open trial that tracks the psychological profiles of 13 subjects. Withdrawal symptoms were tracked, however, the nature and severity of these symptoms differed between patients. No major complications or discomfort prompting study dropout was observed. Significant benzodiazepine abstinence occurred with this flumazenil infusion method despite high levels of initial dependence, comorbid substance use and comorbid psychiatric illness. Low-dose flumazenil infusion appears to be a safe and effective treatment resulting in withdrawal symptoms of lesser severity than any other cessation method currently available. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  7. Mechanisms of change: Testing how preventative interventions impact psychological and physiological stress functioning in mothers in neglectful families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Sheree L; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    The present study applies a multilevel approach to an examination of the effect of two randomized preventive interventions with mothers in neglectful families who are also contending with elevated levels of impoverishment and ecological risk. Specifically, we examined how participation in either child-parent psychotherapy (CPP) or psychoeducational parenting intervention (PPI) was associated with reductions in maternal psychological parenting stress and in turn physiological stress system functioning when compared to mothers involved in standard community services as well as a demographic comparison group of nonmaltreating mothers. The resulting group sizes in the current investigation were 44 for CPP, 34 for PPI, 27 for community services, and 52 for nonmaltreating mothers. Mothers and their 13-month-old infants were randomly assigned to intervention group at baseline. Mothers completed assessments on stress within the parenting role at baseline and postintervention. Basal cortisol was sampled at postintervention and 1-year follow-up. Latent difference score analyses examined change in these constructs over time. Results suggested that mothers within the CPP intervention experienced significant declines in child-related parenting stress, while mothers in the PPI intervention reported declines in parent-related parenting stress. In turn, significant decreases in stress within the CPP mothers were further associated with adaptive basal cortisol functioning at 1-year postintervention. The results highlight the value of delineating how participation in preventive interventions aimed at ameliorating child maltreatment in neglectful families within the context of poverty may operate through improvements in psychological and physiological stress functioning. Findings are discussed with respect to the importance of multilevel assessments of intervention process and outcome.

  8. Impact of Viewing vs. Not Viewing a Real Forest on Physiological and Psychological Responses in the Same Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of viewing versus not viewing a real forest on human subjects’ physiological and psychological responses in the same setting. Fifteen healthy volunteers (11 males, four females, mean age 36 years participated. Each participant was asked to view a forest while seated in a comfortable chair for 15 min (Forest condition vs. sitting the same length of time with a curtain obscuring the forest view (Enclosed condition. Both conditions significantly decreased blood pressure (BP variables, i.e., systolic BP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure between pre and post experimental stimuli, but these reductions showed no difference between conditions. Interestingly, the Forest viewing reduced cerebral oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2 assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and improved the subjects’ Profile of Mood States (POMS scores, whereas the Enclosed condition increased the HbO2 and did not affect the POMS scores. There were no significant differences in saliva amylase or heart rate variability (HRV between the two conditions. Collectively, these results suggest that viewing a real forest may have a positive effect on cerebral activity and psychological responses. However, both viewing and not viewing the forest had similar effects on cardiovascular responses such as BP variables and HRV.

  9. Physiological and psychological responses to expressions of emotion and empathy in post-stress communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Makiko; Fujita, Mizuho; Yamada, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The effects of communicating during and after expressing emotions and receiving empathy after exposure to stress were investigated for 18 female students (9 pairs). After mental and physical tasks, a subject spoke to a listener about the stress task. In Experiment 1, responses to speaking about negative emotions aroused by the task (the "with emotion" condition) were compared to speaking about only objective facts about the task (the control). In Experiment 2, responses to empathetic reactions from the listener (the "with empathy" condition) were compared to no reaction (the control). Electroencephalograms were recorded, and heart rate variability (HRV) was calculated from electrocardiogram data. Subjective stress was estimated by a visual analog scale. Experiment 1 demonstrated that expressing emotions activated the left temporal region (T3) in the "with emotion" condition. In Experiment 2, physiological responses depended on cognition of different elements of empathy. During communication, feeling that the listener had the same emotion decreased the subject's T3 activity and sympathetic activity balance indicated by HRV. After communication, feeling that the listener understood her emotions decreased bilateral frontal and temporal activity. On the other hand, subjective stress did not differ between conditions in both experiments. These findings indicate that the comfort of having shared a message reduced physiological activity, especially in the "with empathy" condition. Conversely, even in the "with empathy" condition, not sharing a message can result in more discomfort or stress than the control. Sharing might be associated with cognition of the degree of success of communication, which reflected in the physiological responses. In communication, therefore, expressing emotions and receiving empathy did not in themselves reduce stress, and the level of cognition of having shared a message is a key factor in reducing stress.

  10. Sociología

    OpenAIRE

    Agulló Calatayud, Víctor; Martínez Haro, Aurelio

    2005-01-01

    Voz Sociología. Gran Enciclopedia de la Comunitat Valenciana. Se define el concepto de Sociología situando sus orígenes, proceso de institucionalización, análisis de la situación actual, herramientas y finalidad de esta Ciencia Social prestando una especial atención al caso valenciano (España). Sociology. Gran Enciclopedia de la Comunitat Valenciana. The concept of Sociology is defined by placing its origins, institutionalization process, analysis of the current situation, tools and purpos...

  11. Generating pedestrian trajectories consistent with the fundamental diagram based on physiological and psychological factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Narang

    Full Text Available Pedestrian crowds often have been modeled as many-particle system including microscopic multi-agent simulators. One of the key challenges is to unearth governing principles that can model pedestrian movement, and use them to reproduce paths and behaviors that are frequently observed in human crowds. To that effect, we present a novel crowd simulation algorithm that generates pedestrian trajectories that exhibit the speed-density relationships expressed by the Fundamental Diagram. Our approach is based on biomechanical principles and psychological factors. The overall formulation results in better utilization of free space by the pedestrians and can be easily combined with well-known multi-agent simulation techniques with little computational overhead. We are able to generate human-like dense crowd behaviors in large indoor and outdoor environments and validate the results with captured real-world crowd trajectories.

  12. Wearable monitoring systems for psychological and physiological state assessment in a naturalistic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, R; Faetti, T; Werner, S

    2011-01-01

    Wearable monitoring systems based on Smart Fibers and Interactive Textile (SFIT) platforms combine imperceptible sensing and computing functions with an interactive communication network. The integration into clothes of bio-potential sensors for health monitoring provides daily physiological parameters through a continuous, personalized, self-made detection of vital signs and the tracking of behavioral indicators of the subject. SFIT platforms can be used unobtrusively into the routinely daily activity to perform remote monitoring of persons in different circumstances and situations: during controlled exercises and diagnostic procedures as a biofeedback tool, during the usual daily life, during sleep or even to monitor behavioral indexes and mood disorders. Treatment of stress may include also training in cognitive-behavioral skills. Moreover, physiological signs and behavioral monitoring based on a multivariable approach leads to an enhanced sensitivity and specificity of these systems for the prediction of critical events. This paper presents two applications: a platform used in the frame of PSYCHE project, based on textile platforms and portable sensing devices for the long term and short term acquisition of data from patients affected by mood disorders and a platform addressing healthy subjects, based on biofeedback methodology, designed for the training of professional drivers named Mental Bio.

  13. “自我的道德地形学” 一个具有心理学和社会学意涵的本体诠释学理论%"The Moral Topography of the Self":An Ontological Hermeneutical Theory with Psychological and Sociological Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐冰

    2012-01-01

    The introduction and application of hermeneutics by contemporary Chinese scholars mainly focus on the fields of philosophy, theology, law, and literary theory, while the psychological and sociological implications of this approach are often neglected. "The moral topography of the self" by CharlesTaylor, a representative of the hermeneutical approach in contemporary social theories, will correct the bias. The "topography" leads to the main parts of Taylor's great book Sources of the Self, and occupies a basic position in his hermeneutical thoughts. Earlier than Sources of the Self, this theory was first published in a collection about the relationships between hermeneutics and psychological theories. Its sociological implications were demonstrated in Taylor's famous political theoretical paper The Politics of Recognition, which took it as its theoretical basis. In this writing, Taylorabsorbed and revised the classical psychological and sociological thoughts of Freud, Weber, and Durkheim, turning the "topography" into an ontological hermeneutical theory with the power of interpreting complicated historical experiences in a clear way. This theory has extraordinary significance to the "cultural self-awareness" of Chinese Sociology and Psychology, because it can strongly stimulate the interest of "cultural self-awareness" in empirical studies, that is, to highlight the cultural subjectivity and communicate peacefully between cultures. Both psychology and sociology embedded in culture have integrative perspectives which make these two sciences being recognized as the fundamental disciplines of humanity and social sciences. And between the two, sociology is more outstanding in its integrative power. Taylor's discussion of "the moral topography of the self" originates from psychological issues but concludes with strong sociological implications. This way of thinking and its framework are helpful to psychology and sociology, the latter, in

  14. The Analysis on "Kidult" Phenomenon among Contemporary Youth --- Studied in Psychological and Sociological Views%当代青年kidult现象探析——以心理学和社会学为视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠阳

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the "kiduh" phenomenon is a subculture among the youth. The phenomenon embodies young adults' regressing of childishness and their popular pursuit of nostalgia, by which the adults want to deal with the complex adult society. The phenomenon is caused by complicated reasons. Studied in psychological view, it can be explained as the awakening of sub-consciousness in childhood; while in sociological view, it can be understood as the relief of the pressure from adult society and the disadvantages of current education. We should make the phenomenon avoid disadvantages and develop with advantages by changing our education ideas and increasing education contents.%Kidult现象是当今社会流行的青年亚文化,它表现为成年青年人回归幼稚和追求怀旧,试图以此应对复杂的成人社会。这种现象的产生具有复杂的原因,从心理学的角度可以解读为童年潜意识的唤醒,从社会学的角度可以理解为缓解成人社会的压力和当今教育的缺失。为了使kidult文化现象趋利避害,必须在教育层面转变教育理念和增加教育内容。

  15. Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  16. Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  17. Physiological Reactivity to Psychological Stress in Human Pregnancy: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine reactivity to acute stress are important predictors of health outcomes in non-pregnant populations. Greater magnitude and duration of physiological responses have been associated with increased risk of hypertensive disorders and diabetes, greater susceptibility to infectious illnesses, suppression of cell-mediated immunity as well as risk for depression and anxiety disorders. Stress reactivity during pregnancy has unique implications for maternal health, birth outcomes, and fetal development. However, as compared to the larger literature, our understanding of the predictors and consequences of exaggerated stress reactivity in pregnancy is limited. This paper reviews the current state of this literature with an emphasis on gaps in knowledge and future directions. PMID:22800930

  18. Effect of water restrictions on the physiological parameters, psychological behavior and brain c-Fos expression in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Hua ZHU; Bai-Ren WANG; Qing-Rong TAN; Xiao-Li DUAN; Fang KUANG; Zhen XU; Gong JU

    2006-01-01

    Objective In order to characterize the feature of stress response induced by stressor with both physical and psychological natures, the effect of water restriction performed in different experimental modes on the physiological parameters, psychological behavioral manifestations and brain c-Fos expressions were observed and compared. Methods 58 male Wistar rats were used and randomly divided into three experimental groups (n= 18 for each) and a control group (n=4). In control group, the rats were allowed to access drinking water freely at all experimental period. In the experimental groups the water supply to the rats was restricted. In timed water supply (TW) group, the water was supplied twice a day,10 min for each in fixed hours every day. In empty bottle-served (EB) and water-restricted (WR) groups, the water was served only once a day for 10 min, either in the early morning or evening, and in the other time point scheduled for water supply only an empty bottle without water was provided in the EB group and nothing was given in the WR group. The quantities of drank water and eaten food, weight-gaining, and behavior score were observed every day. The serum level of corticosterone was assayed and the rats were sacrificed with fixative perfusion of 3 d, 7 d or 14 d respectively, following water restriction (n=6 for each time point in each group). The brain c-Fos expressions were examined with immunohistochemistry. Results The slowing down of weight-gaining, rise of serum corticosterone level, occurrence of psychological behavioral manifestations of unpeaceful restlessness such as exploring and attacking, enhance of c-Fos expression in the subfornical organ (SFO), median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), area postrema (AP), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON), medial (MeA) and central (CeA) amygdaloid nucleus and ventrolateral septum (LSV) were noticed in both EB and WR groups, except the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) in which the Fos

  19. Analysis of heart rate variability and possibility of its utilization in psychology and psycho-physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva A.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indices of heart rate variability are reliable and objective indicators of autonomic nervous systemtonus (of its sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions which in its turn reflect the changes in psycho-emotional state of a person, development of stress or any kind of tension. The purpose of this article was to describethe contemporary methods of objective study of a person’s functional state by the definition of autonomic regulation of heart rate and also the review of foreign studies which discuss the possibility of utilizing this method in psychology and psychophysiology. The review describes two approaches to the analysis of heart rate variability: temporal and frequency-response analyses. The indices used for temporal analysis include average duration of RR-intervalsand percentage of couples of RR-intervals, differing in more than 50ms(рNN50. The indices of frequency-response analysis included intensity of HF component, reflecting influences of parasympathetic outflow; intensity of LF component, reflecting sympathetic influences; intensity of VLF components; correlation of LF and HF waves, reflecting vegetal balance.

  20. The compression of perceived time in a hot environment depends on physiological and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Maria; Jakobson, Ainika; Havik, Merle; Burk, Andres; Timpmann, Saima; Allik, Jüri; Oöpik, Vahur; Kreegipuu, Kairi

    2014-01-01

    The human perception of time was observed under extremely hot conditions. Young healthy men performed a time production task repeatedly in 4 experimental trials in either a temperate (22 °C, relative humidity 35%) or a hot (42 °C, relative humidity 18%) environment and with or without a moderate-intensity treadmill exercise. Within 1 hour, the produced durations indicated a significant compression of short intervals (0.5 to 10 s) in the combination of exercising and high ambient temperature, while neither variable/condition alone was enough to yield the effect. Temporal judgement was analysed in relation to different indicators of arousal, such as critical flicker frequency (CFF), core temperature, heart rate, and subjective ratings of fatigue and exertion. The arousal-sensitive internal clock model (originally proposed by Treisman) is used to explain the temporal compression while exercising in heat. As a result, we suggest that the psychological response to heat stress, the more precisely perceived fatigue, is important in describing the relationship between core temperature and time perception. Temporal compression is related to higher core temperature, but only if a certain level of perceived fatigue is accounted for, implying the existence of a thermoemotional internal clock.

  1. Sociology through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness. One set of assignments uses self-portraiture to highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity. Another uses photography to guide sociological inquiry. Both sets of assignments draw on the Literacy Through Photography methodology,…

  2. Følelsernes sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Følelsernes sociologi præsenterer en række toneangivende teorier om følelsernes sociale funktion og rummer bidrag om den klassiske sociologi hos blandet andet Marx, Weber og Durkheim samt nyere teorier. Fænomener som fremmedgørelse og blaserthed er klassiske i sociologien, men også frygt, skam...

  3. Sociology through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness. One set of assignments uses self-portraiture to highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity. Another uses photography to guide sociological inquiry. Both sets of assignments draw on the Literacy Through Photography methodology,…

  4. The Sociology of Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rabbani Khorasghani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe sociology of emotions as one of the sub-disciplines of sociology received attention aroundthe late 70s and mid 80s in American sociology. During this period several important contributionstook place to make the roots of the sub-discipline robust. Drawing upon five theoretical discourses,this paper aimed at presenting a general picture of emotions in sociology. Among all, Shott’ssymbolic interactionist theory and Hochschild’s normative theory, which are labeled as socialconstructionist approaches, together with structural-relational theory of Kemper and Collins’sconflict theory, which are categorized as positivist approaches, are discussed. Having reviewedthese four theories, the paper goes on to consider synthetic approach introduced by Turner, which isknown as general sociological theory of emotions.

  5. Effects of foliage plants on human physiological and psychological responses at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumeno, Desto; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Escalation of task demands and time pressures tends to make a worker run into work stress, which leads to mental fatigue and depression. The mental fatigue can be reduced when attention capacity is restored. Nature can serve as a source of fascination which can restore the attention capacity. People bring plants indoors so they can experience nature in their workplace. The stress and fatigue are also affected by air temperatures. The increase or decrease of temperatures from the comfort zone may induce the stress and fatigue. The objective of this study is to investigate the intervention of using foliage plants placed inside a building at different air temperature levels. The effects of foliage plants on human stress and fatigue were measured by human physiological responses such as heart rate, amylase level, electroencephalography (EEG), and the secondary task-reaction time. Several different tasks, namely typing, math and logical sequences are included in the investigation of these studies. Fifteen subjects, with the age ranged from 22 to 38 years old have participated in the study using within subject design. From the study, it is revealed that the presence of foliage plants at several temperatures have different effects on meditation, secondary task reaction time and typing accuracy. This study also revealed that the presence of plants on several types of tasks has different effects of attention which are useful for increasing work performance.

  6. Physiological and psychological effects of deception on pacing strategy and performance: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollie S; Williams, Emily L; Bridge, Craig A; Marchant, Dave; Midgley, Adrian W; Micklewright, Dominic; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of an optimal pacing strategy during exercise is to enhance performance whilst ensuring physiological limits are not surpassed, which has been shown to result in a metabolic reserve at the end of the exercise. There has been debate surrounding the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain how pace is regulated, with more recent research investigating a central control of exercise regulation. Deception has recently emerged as a common, practical approach to manipulate key variables during exercise. There are a number of ways in which deception interventions have been designed, each intending to gain particular insights into pacing behaviour and performance. Deception methodologies can be conceptualised according to a number of dimensions such as deception timing (prior to or during exercise), presentation frequency (blind, discontinuous or continuous) and type of deception (performance, biofeedback or environmental feedback). However, research evidence on the effects of deception has been perplexing and the use of complex designs and varied methodologies makes it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions about how pacing strategy and performance are affected by deception. This review examines existing research in the area of deception and pacing strategies, and provides a critical appraisal of the different methodological approaches used to date. It is hoped that this analysis will inform the direction and methodology of future investigations in this area by addressing the mechanisms through which deception impacts upon performance and by elucidating the potential application of deception techniques in training and competitive settings.

  7. THE EFFECT OF PROGRESSIVE MUSCULAR RELAXATION AND PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING ON PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS DURING SURGICAL STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avnish

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out to study the effect of muscular relaxation technique and counseling on physiological parameters on subjects undergoing surgery. The study was conducted in 32 individuals between ages of 20 – 70 at Civil hospital, GMERS, Valsad and was compared with a control group (N=32 of the same age. The parameters recorded were arterial pulse, arterial blood pressure. The results show the significant differences in the recorded parameters in control ( n=34 and study group (n=33. Pulse rat e ( 75.54 to 80.17 , systolic ( 121.49 to 126.29 and diastolic blood pressure ( 80.4 to 84.23 values increased in preoperative period than on admission in the control group while study group showed decrease in the preoperative value compared to that on admi ssion Pulse rate ( 77.94 to 74.80, systolic ( 124.50 to 122.19 and diastolic blood pressure ( 82.88 to 81. The results obtained were analyzed for statistical significance. The results obtained were statistically significant

  8. Testing the physiological plausibility of conflicting psychological models of response inhibition: A forward inference fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criaud, Marion; Longcamp, Marieke; Anton, Jean-Luc; Nazarian, Bruno; Roth, Muriel; Sescousse, Guillaume; Strafella, Antonio P; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Boulinguez, Philippe

    2017-08-30

    The neural mechanisms underlying response inhibition and related disorders are unclear and controversial for several reasons. First, it is a major challenge to assess the psychological bases of behaviour, and ultimately brain-behaviour relationships, of a function which is precisely intended to suppress overt measurable behaviours. Second, response inhibition is difficult to disentangle from other parallel processes involved in more general aspects of cognitive control. Consequently, different psychological and anatomo-functional models coexist, which often appear in conflict with each other even though they are not necessarily mutually exclusive. The standard model of response inhibition in go/no-go tasks assumes that inhibitory processes are reactively and selectively triggered by the stimulus that participants must refrain from reacting to. Recent alternative models suggest that action restraint could instead rely on reactive but non-selective mechanisms (all automatic responses are automatically inhibited in uncertain contexts) or on proactive and non-selective mechanisms (a gating function by which reaction to any stimulus is prevented in anticipation of stimulation when the situation is unpredictable). Here, we assessed the physiological plausibility of these different models by testing their respective predictions regarding event-related BOLD modulations (forward inference using fMRI). We set up a single fMRI design which allowed for us to record simultaneously the different possible forms of inhibition while limiting confounds between response inhibition and parallel cognitive processes. We found BOLD dynamics consistent with non-selective models. These results provide new theoretical and methodological lines of inquiry for the study of basic functions involved in behavioural control and related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of G-trainer, cycle ergometry, and stretching on physiological and psychological recovery from endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy D; Cooke, Matthew B; LaBounty, Paul M; Byars, Allyn G; Greenwood, Mike

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 3 treatment modes (Anti-Gravity Treadmill [G-trainer], stationary cycling [CompuTrainer], and static stretching) on the physiological and psychological recovery after an acute bout of exhaustive exercise. In a crossover design, 12 aerobically trained men (21.3 ± 2.3 years, 72.1 ± 8.1 kg, 178.4 ± 6.3 cm, (Equation is included in full-text article.): 53.7 ± 6.3 ml·kg·min) completed a 29-km stationary cycling time trial. Immediately after the time trial, subjects completed 30 minutes of G-trainer or CompuTrainer (40% (Equation is included in full-text article.)) or static stretching exercises. A significant time effect was detected for plasma lactate (p = 0.010) and serum cortisol (p = 0.039) after exercise. No treatment or treatment by time interaction was identified for lactate or cortisol, respectively. No main effects for time, treatment, or treatment by time interaction were identified for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). No differences were observed among treatments in skeletal muscle peak power output, mean power output, time to peak power, and rate to fatigue at 24 hours postexercise bout. Finally, no significant changes in mood status were observed after exercise and between treatment groups. When compared with stationary cycling and static stretching, exercise recovery performed on the G-trainer was unable to reduce systemic markers of stress and inflammation, blood lactate, or improve anaerobic performance and psychological mood states after an exhaustive bout of endurance exercise. Further research is warranted that includes individualized recovery modalities to create balances between the stresses of training and competition.

  10. The effect of two kinds of T-shirts on physiological and psychological thermal responses during exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazaitis, Marius; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological responses during and after high-intensity exercise in a warm and humid environment in subjects wearing shirts of different fabrics. Eight healthy men exercised on two separate occasions, in random order, wearing two types of long-sleeve T-shirt: one made of polyester (PES) and the other of cotton fabric (CT). They performed three 20 min exercise bouts, with 5 min rest between each, and then rested in a chair for 60 min to recover. The ambient temperature was 25 °C and relative humidity was 60%. The exercise comprised of treadmill running at 8 km/h at 1° grade. Rectal temperature, skin temperatures at eight sites, heart rate, T-shirt mass and ratings of thermal, clothing wettedness, and shivering/sweating sensation were measured before the experiment, during the 5 min rest period after each exercise bout, and during recovery. Nude body mass was measured before the experiment and during recovery. The physiological stress index showed that the exercise produced a state of very high heat stress. Compared with exercise wearing the CT shirt, exercise wearing the PES fabric produced a greater sweating efficiency and less clothing regain (i.e., less sweat retention), but thermophysiological and subjective sensations during the intermittent high-intensity exercise were similar for both fabrics. However, skin temperature returned to the pre-exercise level faster, and the thermal and rating of shivering/sweating sensation were lower after exercise in the warm and humid environment in subjects wearing PES than when wearing the more traditional CT fabric.

  11. Making Research Sociological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Mishra

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a distinctive disciplinary vantage point is crucial to becoming a professional. Thesis writing at the Master's level allows the professional opportunity of thinking and writing independently. For students of Sociology in particular, it is fundamental to recognize that the social is everywhere. There is nothing that is not socially constituted. Further on, a Sociology student should develop the sociological vantage point in order to see how the social is constituted. This the student can do by engaging and ‘dialoguing' with well-known sociological theorists. The student will then be able to think about how and why societies are historically constituted, how and why societies are diverse, internally differentiated and hierarchized and how and why societies transform themselves. They will learn to unravel the relationship between different levels of a society. In addition, they will also learn the significance of the structure even as they visualize historical human agents change the structure. Keywords: Social; Sociological; Sociological Imagination; Thesis Writing; Social Relationship; Institutions DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v3i0.2779 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.3 2009 1-18

  12. Sociology Back to the Publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a reading of the `new sociology' that is mainly identified with the works of C. Wright Mills and Alvin Gouldner. Its main argument is that during the past 40 years the new sociology gave back a public face to sociology. This distinguishes it from the `old sociology' that had not been

  13. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  14. The Influence of Urban Natural and Built Environments on Physiological and Psychological Measures of Stress— A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Beil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Environments shape health and well-being, yet little research has investigated how different real-world environmental settings influence the well-known determinant of health known as stress. Using a cross-over experimental design; this pilot study investigated the effect of four urban environments on physiological and psychological stress measures. Participants (N = 15 were exposed on separate days to one of the four settings for 20 min. These settings were designated as Very Natural; Mostly Natural; Mostly Built and Very Built. Visitation order to the four settings was individually randomized. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase; as well as self-report measures of stress; were collected before and after exposure to each setting. Gender was included as a variable in analysis; and additional data about environmental self-identity, pre-existing stress, and perceived restorativeness of settings were collected as measures of covariance. Differences between environmental settings showed greater benefit from exposure to natural settings relative to built settings; as measured by pre-to-post changes in salivary amylase and self-reported stress; differences were more significant for females than for males. Inclusion of covariates in a regression analysis demonstrated significant predictive value of perceived restorativeness on these stress measures, suggesting some potential level of mediation. These data suggest that exposure to natural environments may warrant further investigation as a health promotion method for reducing stress.

  15. RELIABILITY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE VARIABLES IN CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME AND THE ROLE OF GRADED EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Wallman

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess variability in symptoms and physical capabilities in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS participants both before and after a graded exercise intervention. Sixty-one CFS subjects participated in a 12-week randomized controlled trial of either graded exercise (n =32 or relaxation/stretching therapy (n = 29. Specific physiological, psychological and cognitive variables were assessed once weekly over a four-week period both prior to and after the intervention period. All scores were assessed for reliability using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Apart from mental and physical fatigue, baseline ICC scores for all variables assessed were moderately to highly reliable, indicating minimal variability. Baseline scores for mental and physical fatigue were of questionable reliability, indicating a fluctuating nature to these symptoms (R1 = 0.64 and 0.60, respectively. Variability in scores for mental fatigue was reduced after graded exercise to an acceptable classification (R1 = 0.76. Results from this study support a variable nature to the symptoms of mental and physical fatigue only. Consequently, in order to more accurately report the nature of mental and physical fatigue in CFS, future studies should consider using repeated-measures analysis when assessing these symptoms. Graded exercise resulted in the reclassification of scores for mental fatigue from questionable to acceptable reliability

  16. Music therapy to promote psychological and physiological relaxation in palliative care patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Koenig, Julian; Wormit, Alexander F; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in different palliative care settings. Despite its long tradition and high acceptance by other health-care professionals, evidence on the effectiveness of music therapy interventions for terminally ill patients is rare. Recent reviews and health-care reports consistently point out the need of music therapists to provide an evidence-based rationale for their clinical treatments in this field. Therefore, the present study evaluates the psychological and physiological response of palliative care patients to a standardized music therapy relaxation intervention in a randomized controlled trial. A sample of 84 participants from a palliative care unit in Heidelberg is randomized to either two sessions of music therapy or two sessions of a verbal relaxation exercise, each lasting 30 minutes. The music therapy sessions consist of live played monochord music and a vocal improvisation, the control group uses a prerecorded excerpt from the mindfulness-based stress reduction program containing no musical elements. Outcome measures include self-report data on subjective relaxation, well-being, pain intensity, and quality of life, as well as continuous recording of heart rate variability and blood volume pulse as indicators of autonomous nervous system functioning. To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial in Europe and one of very few randomized controlled trials worldwide to systematically examine the effects of music therapy in palliative care. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137.

  17. The Influence of Urban Natural and Built Environments on Physiological and Psychological Measures of Stress—A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Kurt; Hanes, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Environments shape health and well-being, yet little research has investigated how different real-world environmental settings influence the well-known determinant of health known as stress. Using a cross-over experimental design; this pilot study investigated the effect of four urban environments on physiological and psychological stress measures. Participants (N = 15) were exposed on separate days to one of the four settings for 20 min. These settings were designated as Very Natural; Mostly Natural; Mostly Built and Very Built. Visitation order to the four settings was individually randomized. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase; as well as self-report measures of stress; were collected before and after exposure to each setting. Gender was included as a variable in analysis; and additional data about environmental self-identity, pre-existing stress, and perceived restorativeness of settings were collected as measures of covariance. Differences between environmental settings showed greater benefit from exposure to natural settings relative to built settings; as measured by pre-to-post changes in salivary amylase and self-reported stress; differences were more significant for females than for males. Inclusion of covariates in a regression analysis demonstrated significant predictive value of perceived restorativeness on these stress measures, suggesting some potential level of mediation. These data suggest that exposure to natural environments may warrant further investigation as a health promotion method for reducing stress. PMID:23531491

  18. Physiological and Biochemical Indexes Apply in Sports Psychology%生理生化指标在运动心理学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全明辉; 张秋海; 胡志刚

    2011-01-01

    Sports psychology plays a very important role in regulating emotions,ensure the athletes effective training.With the development of Sports psychology,and in order to more accurate judgment subjects psychology,physiological and biochemical indexes were introduced into the psychology research field.This thesis is an overview about physiological and biochemical indexes in the sports psychology application status and prospects,hoping to more and more researchers join to this filed.%运动心理学在调节运动员情绪,保证运动员坚持、有效训练中起着非常重要作用。随着运动心理学发展,同时为了更为客观的判断受试者心理状态,机体生理、生化等指标被引入到运动心理学研究领域中来。本文就生理生化指标在运动心理学中的应用现状、前景以及不足作一综述,希望能为广大学者的研究工作起到抛砖引玉的作用。

  19. Project Management in Russia: Sociologic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A O Gomaleev

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sociologic approach to project management allows to highlight the problems aroused by discrepancies between real management practices and ideal models; to determine basic socio-psychological barriers that impede project management in Russia; to classify real management practices on the basis of their correlation to project management; to single out basic types of projects implemented in Russian businesses; to work out practical recommendations on overcoming social barriers of developing the system of project management is Russia.

  20. [straus: The Two Medical Sociologies].

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Robert Straus' pioneer work, The nature and status of Medical Sociology, written in 1957, was reviewed. Straus, one of the founders of medical sociology, made major contributions to this field and created the first department of behavior sciences in a medical school. In the work reviewed, Straus establishes the differences between sociology in medicine and medical sociology. Comments are made on the current perspective of medical sociology and about the author.

  1. Sociology of Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    Sociology of Discourse takes the perspective that collective actors like social movements are capable of creating social change from below by creating new institutions through alternative discourses. Institutionalization becomes a process of moving away from existing institutions towards creating...

  2. The achievement of sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Giner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay begins saying that the contemporary conscience wouldn’t be the same without the presence of sociology – a human science and not only social – which is, in the group of the social sciences, the cognitive science that studies the human condition. Sociology is a multidimensional science, being its history that one of a discipline that cumulates objective knowledge. However, only the ethics of objectivity is not enough to cultivate the human sciences. They will encompass amplitude, as well as theoretical dignity, only if grounded on our moral competence. Finally it states that the continuity of the sociological mode in the modern culture and its current hegemony are justified only if sociology keeps faithful to the principles of rational intention on one hand, and to the humanism on the other, without losing, between them, the space of the social structure of liberty and the human dreams.

  3. SOCIOLOGICAL JURISPRUDENCE: ROSCOE POUND'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    identifiable in a lot of the older jurisprudential theory of insisting upon one ... information to be found in more than half a century's worth of academic work. .... 15 E. Nalbandian (2010) "Sociological Jurisprudence – General Introduction to.

  4. Sociología rural vs. Sociología pesquera. (Rural Sociology vs. Fishing Sociology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Marugán Pintos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available De forma recurrente, hasta hace no mucho tiempo, lo rural se ha conceptualizado como la dimensión espacial relativa a poblaciones pequeñas y homogéneas, dominadas por una cultura tradicional y un sentir comunitario. Partiendo de esta descripción, la sociología rural debería haberse ocupado de toda la población que habita este espacio y sin embargo, sólo se ha centrado en la agraria. Lo agrario ha absorbido a lo rural y la sociología rural ha olvidando a colectivos como el pesquero. Pero, ¿por qué la sociología rural no se ha ocupado de lo pesquero? La respuesta inicial fue valorar esta ausencia como una limitación de la sociología rural ya que algunas personas han compatibilizado la pesca y la agricultura y la mayoría de la población pesquera habita en espacios rurales, desarrolla un tipo de pesca artesanal y es partícipe de un modo de vida tradicional. Sin embargo, a medida que se profundiza en esta reflexión surge la idea de que el análisis de la pesca sería más pertinente desde una sociología propia e incluso de una sociología general que acabe con la excesiva especialización en esta disciplina. “Rural” has regularly been conceptualized in spatial terms relative to small towns and homogeneous populations, determined by their traditional culture and communitarian values. Following this definition, Rural Sociology should have concerned itself with all the populations living in these areas but, in fact, it only had been focused in agrarian populations. Why Rural Sociology didn’t pay any attention to fishermen and fisheries? The initial response may be to interpret as disciplinary limitation of Rural Sociology, but at the end this article concludes that sociological perspectives would be better oriented by a general sociological approach, which rejects excesive disciplinary specialization.

  5. Sociological concept of generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sociological concept of generation should be distinguished from biological and statistical, and they discussed all three of its meaning. In a sociological sense, it is characterized by a common historical experience that has its own internal and external, subjective and objective dimension. In sociology it was introduced by Dilthey, one of the main representatives of historicism, and which is characterized by discontinuous conception of history and emphasizing specificity of cultural epochs. In contemporary sociology, this concept was reaffirmed under the strong influence of Mannheim who argued that the generation is in the range of analytical categories of class and nation. The major historical generations in our society are pointed. Four generations are considered as the main age groups but also as social constructs children, youth, middle aged and old people. Their status in the traditional and contemporary, especially in our society is pointed. In the research of generation and its main forms have formed a special sociological disciplines, except for the middle-aged who are, as a generation, at least sociologically studied.

  6. Classroom Demonstrations of Social Psychological Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Royce Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes eight classroom activities which instruct college level sociology students about major concepts and principles of social psychology. Concepts include gestalt psychology, nonverbal communication, adaptation level, relative deprivation, selective exposure, labeling, sexism, and perceptual distortion. (Author/DB)

  7. Virtual reality in Latin American clinical psychology and the VREPAR project. Virtual Reality Environments for Psycho-Neuro-physiological Assessment and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mauro Rubens

    2002-10-01

    Starting with the excellent collective work done by the European Community (EC)-funded Virtual Reality Environments for Psycho-Neuro-physiological Assessment and Rehabilitation (VREPAR) projects, I try to indicate some possible pathways that would allow a better integration of this advanced technology into the reality of Latin American psychology. I myself use analyses that I did in my master's degree in the PUCSP-Catholic University in São Paulo, Brazil. I also include a brief description of the CD-ROM Clinical Psychology Uses of Virtual Reality (CPUVR) that accompanies my thesis. I point out the importance of collaboration between psychology and other disciplines, including computer science. I explain the method that I used to work with digital information, important for the formation of a critical mass of people thinking in Portuguese and Spanish to accelerate a technological jump.

  8. Individual from the Viewpoint of Psychology and Sociology in the Context of Leisure Time-Library Boş Zaman-Kütüphane Bağlamında Psikolojik ve Sosyolojik Açılardan Birey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Atmaca

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In today's world, people are getting much stumbled with the changing conditions in such phenomena like rapid growth of cities, contemporary technologies and the relative growth of industry due to the latter requiring more and more information as ever before in order to recover themselves from this transition. Individuals can not reserve time for reading and thinking which is a prerequisite of knowledge due to lack of time created predominantly by the working conditions and some time-wasting traditions and customs especially they employ during their spare times. As being deprived of these activities fall individual to some certain psychological and sociological problems to some extent, the spare time option which have become the most necessary time interval for the individual to cover up his/her specific needs thereby to show progress in his characteristic components should be facilitated with the usage of libraries. Here that the libraries are for, especially outstanding as institutions to assist the individual in removing up both of the two problems mentioned above. It is a widely common fact that people who get to libraries and enhance their intellectual identity during their spare times have essentially provided a unity in their personalities from the physchological angle clenching their spiritual health as well as gaining new types of behaviors from the sociological approach also establishing permanent adaptation with others inside the community and with the nature and the giddy speed of technology. Günümüz dünyasında insanlar, sanayi ve teknolojinin gelişmesi, kentlerin hızla büyümesi gibi kimi olguların ortaya çıkardığı değişim karşısında bocalamakta; bu bocalamayı atlatabilmek için de bilgiye gereksinim duymaktadır. Bireyler bilginin temeli olan okuma ve düşünme kavramına; iş yaşamlarının zorunlu olarak aldığı zaman; boş zamanlarının da gereksiz kimi amaç ve araçlarla geçmesi yüzünden zaman ay

  9. Renewing an Old Profession: Clinical Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, John

    1979-01-01

    Examines origins of clinical sociology as a behavioral science discipline in the humanist and normative tradition, stresses that clinical sociology is a form of sociological practice, and discusses training and employment in the field of clinical sociology. (Author/DB)

  10. Sociology and Social Work in Nigeria: Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    post-graduate levels. in discussing the characteristics of sociology and social work, ..... development, gender studies, political sociology and family studies. ... in the departments of sociology, there is considerable interaction between sociology.

  11. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Patil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Education Psychology is one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines which is concerned with the description, explanation and control of the educational processes arising from the interaction between the teacher and learner in the context of a specified or unspecified subject. The concept of educational psycology is changing as a result of the general impact of the disciplines such as sociology, anthropology,economics, political science and so on. The subject matter of educational psychology is also reflecting a diversity of structures and emphases in its connection.

  12. Data Visualization in Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Kieran; Moody, James

    2014-07-01

    Visualizing data is central to social scientific work. Despite a promising early beginning, sociology has lagged in the use of visual tools. We review the history and current state of visualization in sociology. Using examples throughout, we discuss recent developments in ways of seeing raw data and presenting the results of statistical modeling. We make a general distinction between those methods and tools designed to help explore datasets, and those designed to help present results to others. We argue that recent advances should be seen as part of a broader shift towards easier sharing of the code and data both between researchers and with wider publics, and encourage practitioners and publishers to work toward a higher and more consistent standard for the graphical display of sociological insights.

  13. Måltidets sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet introducerer den klassiske sociolog Georg Simmel og hans forståelse af samspillet mellem mad og måltider. Herefter sammenfattes en række udvalgte pointer, som er karakteristiske for den franske sociolog Claude Fischlers forståelse af begrebet commensality. Som led i diskussionen af de...... teoretiske positioner og den ’bekymringsdiskurs’, de siges at repræsentere, konfronteres disse med en mere empirisk baseret tilgang til måltidssociologien. Herunder udfordres begrebet commensality med henvisning til synspunkter hentet fra Ann Murcott. Som case inddrages Claude Fischlers forskning om...

  14. Merton and medical sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes E.D.

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research...

  15. Psychological and Sociological Determinants of Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six self-report measures were administered randomly to 280 senior secondary ... and locus of control, self-esteem, parent's education, parental discipline, culture, and governance) could jointly determine academic achievement of adolescents.

  16. What Is Critical about Sociology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is often presented as a generic technique. This article develops an alternative that links critique more closely to the sociological perspective. I suggest three answers to the above question: that the sociological perspective is critical for comprehending complex issues, that all sociology is implicitly critical by virtue of its…

  17. Urban Sociology in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Divides the history of urban sociology in France into three periods: (1) functionalism, which lasted from 1910 until the 1960s, (2) neo-Marxist socioeconomics lasting from 1968 until 1979, and (3) anthropological approach which is still dominant. Reviews theoretical perspectives and research characteristic of each period. (JDH)

  18. Development Sociology. Actor Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Using case studies and empirical material from Africa and Latin America, Development Sociology focuses on the theoretical and methodological foundations of an actor-oriented and social constructionist form of analysis. This style of analysis is opposed to the traditional structuralist/institutional

  19. How can we help? From "sociology in" to "sociology of" bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Sociology and bioethics have an uneasy relationship. Bioethicists find sociology helpful for describing and analyzing ethical issues, but they are less enthusiastic when bioethics becomes the subject of sociological scrutiny. After review of different sociological approaches to bioethical topics -- descriptive, evaluative, and analytical -- I explain how bioethics will benefit by using the tools of sociology to answer its questions ("sociology in bioethics") and by allowing sociology to use bioethics to answer sociological questions ("sociology of bioethics").

  20. The Social Psychologies of Emotion: A Bridge That Is Not Too Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Lovin, Lynn; Winkielman, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, emotion is a topic more central to psychology than to sociology. The "Annual Review of Psychology" has almost 400 articles that mention emotion since 1975, while the "Annual Review of Sociology" has roughly one-third as many in that period. Rather than bridging the two disciplinary canons, the early literature in sociology was…

  1. It is not all bad for the grey city - A crossover study on physiological and psychological restoration in a forest and an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigsdotter, Ulrika K; Corazon, Sus Sola; Sidenius, Ulrik; Kristiansen, Jesper; Grahn, Patrik

    2017-07-01

    Today, urbanization presents a challenge to urban planning with regard to creating healthy living environments. The aim of this research is to gain further knowledge of the restorativeness of a best case urban and natural environment: that is a historic down town urban environment and forest environment located in an arboretum. The study has a cross-over design where 51 (N) female university students are exposed to the two environments through both seated viewing and walking. A mixed method approach is used with both physiological measurements of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) and psychological measurements of mood change and perceived restorativeness. The HRV results show no significant differences between the two environments, and both environments are found to be more physiologically restorative than being at the office or on the minibus. The results of the psychological measures indicate that the forest walk has a positive effect on mood, while the walk in the urban environment has no effect. The forest environment is also rated more highly with regard to perceived restorativeness than the urban environment. The results support the current research that shows natural environments as more restorative than urban environments. The study also adds to the ongoing debate on healthy urban planning by indicating that architectural and historical qualities may be associated with the physiological well-being of citizens. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Noise sensitivity in relation to baseline arousal, physiological response and psychological features to noise exposure during task performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, K.; Hofman, W.F.; van Kamp, I.

    2010-01-01

    People who consider themselves sensitive to noise, experience more noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and reduced daytime performance. Besides psychological factors, an association with cardiovascular reactions during noise has been established in noise sensitives. Decreased efficiency of the parasy

  3. Tales of sociology and the nursing curriculum: revisiting the debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Law, Kate

    2007-08-01

    . Sociology and the nursing curriculum; editorial. Nurse Education in Practice 4, 81-82; Mowforth, G., Harrison, J., Morris, M., 2005. An investigation into adult nursing students' experience of the relevance and application of behavioural sciences (biology, psychology and sociology) across two different curricula. Nurse Education Today 25, 41-48]. Much attention has been given to the role, utility and value of sociology mostly within pre-registration but also post-registration nursing curricula. Through an initial analysis of a series of letters appearing in The Nursing Times over a 12 week period in 2004, and using an analytical framework of four tales (realist, critical, deconstructive and reflexive) we revisit this relationship. Unlike previous debates our argument is that this relationship is more usefully viewed as emblematic of the legitimation crisis inherent in all modern projects. We argue that in order to move beyond the 'utility' discussion, an interrogation of the knowledge claims of both nursing and sociology is required.

  4. The Three Faces of Social Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, James S.

    1977-01-01

    Social psychology's current crisis largely reflects the division of the field into three increasingly isolated domains: psychological social psychology, symbolic interactionism, and psychological sociology. Brief critical discussion of these facets indicates that the strengths of each complement the weaknesses in the others, highlighting a need…

  5. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  6. Regional Sociological Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vladimirovich Morev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of RAS in conducting sociological research on the territory of the Vologda Oblast and the Northwestern Federal District. It describes the historical aspects of formation of the system for public opinion monitoring and examines its theoretical and methodological foundations. The author of the article analyzes the structure of monitoring indicators and provides a brief interpretation of research findings that reflect social wellbeing and social perception trends. In addition, the paper analyzes people’s attitude toward the activities of federal and regional authorities, trends in social well-being, consumer sentiment and also the complex indicator – the index of public sentiment in the region – developed by ISEDT RAS researchers. The results of sociological studies carried out at ISEDT RAS correlate with the dynamics of the all-Russian public opinion polls conducted by the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM, Levada-Center, etc. They indicate that Russian society gradually adapts to new conditions of life after the collapse of the USSR. Besides, opinion polls show the most important features of the post-Soviet Russian history at its present stage; they are associated with the intensification of international political relations, the consequences of the “Crimean spring” and the new challenges Russia’s economy is facing now. The article concludes that as global community, of which Russian society is part, is evolving, sociological knowledge begins to play an increasingly important role in administration and national security; this is associated with the greater importance attached to intangible development factors. Therefore, a necessary prerequisite for administration effectiveness in all its stages is to implement the results of sociological research on social

  7. The idea of philosophical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernilo, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces the idea of philosophical sociology as an enquiry into the relationships between implicit notions of human nature and explicit conceptualizations of social life within sociology. Philosophical sociology is also an invitation to reflect on the role of the normative in social life by looking at it sociologically and philosophically at the same: normative self-reflection is a fundamental aspect of sociology's scientific tasks because key sociological questions are, in the last instance, also philosophical ones. For the normative to emerge, we need to move away from the reductionism of hedonistic, essentialist or cynical conceptions of human nature and be able to grasp the conceptions of the good life, justice, democracy or freedom whose normative contents depend on more or less articulated conceptions of our shared humanity. The idea of philosophical sociology is then sustained on three main pillars and I use them to structure this article: (1) a revalorization of the relationships between sociology and philosophy; (2) a universalistic principle of humanity that works as a major regulative idea of sociological research, and; (3) an argument on the social (immanent) and pre-social (transcendental) sources of the normative in social life. As invitations to embrace posthuman cyborgs, non-human actants and material cultures proliferate, philosophical sociology offers the reminder that we still have to understand more fully who are the human beings that populate the social world. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  8. Pædagogisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jørn

    Denne bog giver overblik over teorier og begreber inden for pædagogisk sociologi. Bogen gør dig i stand til at overskue forskelle og ligheder mellem forskellige teorier, der behandler samspil og relationer i pædagogisk praksis, det indhold, som pædagogikken arbejder med og de samfundsstrukturer......, som påvirker den pædagogiske praksis. Forfatteren behandler i alt fem positioner, der i dag kan siges at tegne den pædagogiske sociologi i Danmark: • Interaktionens mikrostrukturer med fokus på undervisningens miljø. • Social epistemologi med fokus på læreprocessens elementer. • Samfundets...

  9. Piketty's challenge for sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mike

    2014-12-01

    This paper argues that Piketty's book should not simply be seen as that of an economist, but that it contains significant resources for sociologists to draw upon. These are firstly, this approach to social science and his use of visualizations which chime closely with recent claims about the power of description. Secondly I consider his conceptualization of time and history - which in rebutting epochal arguments about the speed of contemporary change allows for a much better appreciation of the 'long durée'; and finally his conceptualization of social classes and privilege through his elaboration of a sociology of accumulation and inheritance. In all these ways, Piketty's work assists in developing an account of elites and wealth which should be highly productive for future sociology.

  10. Psychological Theories of Acculturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of cultural transition and intercultural contact has highlighted the importance of psychological theories of acculturation. Acculturation, understood as contact between diverse cultural streams, has become prevalent worldwide due to technological, economical, and educational...... advancements, together with greater mobility. Acculturation psychology aims to comprehend the dynamic psychological processes and outcomes emanating from intercultural contact. Acculturation psychology has been a growing field of research within cross-cultural psychology. Today, psychological theories...... of acculturation also include cognate disciplines such as cultural psychology, social psychology, sociology, and anthropology.The expansion of psychological theories of acculturation has led to advancements in the field of research as well as the bifurcation of epistemological and methodological approaches...

  11. But Is It Sociology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Casper

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores issues of trandisciplinarity through an autobiographical lens. Specifically, the essay attends to tensions between the discipline of sociology and interdisciplinary science, knowledge, and technology studies, with an emphasis on differing epistemic cultures in each. The author suggests the promise of border-crossings outweighs the challenges, and advocates for a reflexive practice that names our intellectual and political commitments. Eschewing traditional notions of objectivity, the author calls for transdisciplinary and public engagement.

  12. Sociology of Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    Sociology of Discourse takes the perspective that collective actors like social movements are capable of creating social change from below by creating new institutions through alternative discourses. Institutionalization becomes a process of moving away from existing institutions towards creating...... points and concepts. Through the example of the Platform for People Affected by Mortgages, the book concludes by analyzing how social change from below is possible....

  13. [Merton and medical sociology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2007-01-01

    The article is about the main contributions of the North-American sociologist Robert King Merton (1910-2003), particularly those related to the field of medical sociology. Merton was first to conduct research on medical education, and the working team he formed was fundamental for the introduction of social thought in the medicine field (Patrícia Kendall, Renée Fox, Samuel Bloom and others). Of particular importance are Merton's vocation for sociology and the unique trajectory of his research, which was marked by studies on subjects that were not common in the early XX century, particularly the relationships between science, technology, and society. We provide the most important theoretical ad conceptual contribution brought by the author, as well as the expressions he created and which were soon adopted by researchers, such as 'focused interview', 'Matthew effects, 'Pygmalion effect', 'nonplanned consequences of social actions', 'manifest function', and 'latent function'. The highlight in the field of medical sociology is his work on the socialization process of the student of medicine.

  14. 2004 American Sociological Association Presidential address: for public sociology*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burawoy, Michael

    2005-06-01

    Responding to the growing gap between the sociological ethos and the world we study, the challenge of public sociology is to engage multiple publics in multiple ways. These public sociologies should not be left out in the cold, but brought into the framework of our discipline. In this way we make public sociology a visible and legitimate enterprise, and, thereby, invigorate the discipline as a whole. Accordingly, if we map out the division of sociological labor, we discover antagonistic interdependence among four types of knowledge: professional, critical, policy, and public. In the best of all worlds the flourishing of each type of sociology is a condition for the flourishing of all, but they can just as easily assume pathological forms or become victims of exclusion and subordination. This field of power beckons us to explore the relations among the four types of sociology as they vary historically and nationally, and as they provide the template for divergent individual careers. Finally, comparing disciplines points to the umbilical chord that connects sociology to the world of publics, underlining sociology's particular investment in the defense of civil society, itself beleaguered by the encroachment of markets and states.

  15. Effects of confinement on physiological and psychological responses and expression of interleukin 6 and brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in primiparous and multiparous weaning sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aimed to investigate whether the long-lasting, recurrent restricting of sows leads to the physiological and psychological reaction of discomfort. Methods Sows (Large White that had experienced restricting for about 0.5 or 3 years and age-matched sows kept in a group housing system (loose sows were compared. Pupillary light reflex parameters were measured at the weaning stage. Immediately after slaughter, blood samples were taken to measure serum cortisol levels, and the brain was dissected, gene expression in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and hypothalamus was analyzed. Results The serum cortisol levels were higher in the confined sows than in the loose sows. The full maturity, but not the young adolescent, confined sows had longer latency time in the onset of pupil constriction than their loose counterparts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed an increased expression of interleukin 6 mRNA in the hippocampus and decreased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in hippocampus and hypothalamus and to a lesser extent in the frontal cortex of the full maturity confined sows, compared with the full maturity loose sows. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicated that recurrent restricting stress in full maturity sows leads to the physiological and psychological reaction of discomfort.

  16. Effects of confinement on physiological and psychological responses and expression of interleukin 6 and brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in primiparous and multiparous weaning sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyue; Li, Xiang; Li, Jianhong; Sun, Hanqing; Zhang, Xiaohui; Bao, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the long-lasting, recurrent restricting of sows leads to the physiological and psychological reaction of discomfort. Sows (Large White) that had experienced restricting for about 0.5 or 3 years and age-matched sows kept in a group housing system (loose sows) were compared. Pupillary light reflex parameters were measured at the weaning stage. Immediately after slaughter, blood samples were taken to measure serum cortisol levels, and the brain was dissected, gene expression in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and hypothalamus was analyzed. The serum cortisol levels were higher in the confined sows than in the loose sows. The full maturity, but not the young adolescent, confined sows had longer latency time in the onset of pupil constriction than their loose counterparts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed an increased expression of interleukin 6 mRNA in the hippocampus and decreased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in hippocampus and hypothalamus and to a lesser extent in the frontal cortex of the full maturity confined sows, compared with the full maturity loose sows. Taken together, these data indicated that recurrent restricting stress in full maturity sows leads to the physiological and psychological reaction of discomfort.

  17. RESULTS OF 2011 STATE DUMA ELECTIONS: SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Fedotova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Sociological forecasting of political processes arose as a powerful industry. Nevertheless, results of the polls conducted by the major agencies diverged significantly with the voting in 2011 State Duma elections. The article analyses major complications in forecasting results of elections using sociological data, including psychological factors, role of mass media and administrative resource. The author identifies strategies of the opposition, as well as proves predominant importance of Vladimir Putin for the electoral success of the ruling party on the basis of the polls.

  18. Economic sociology: today and tomorrow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard Swedberg

    2004-01-01

    This article ponders over the contemporary rebirth of economic sociology, attempting to distinguish its American and European traits, emphasizing the works and conceptual models of its respective pioneers...

  19. Toward Publicly Responsive Sociology Curricula: The Role of Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory sociology casts a wide net with regard to its audience and plays an important role in capturing the public eye as well as helping students to make more informed choices in their lives and communities. I ask six questions that help us as sociologists to think about how introductory sociology can better serve our discipline, our…

  20. Toward Publicly Responsive Sociology Curricula: The Role of Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory sociology casts a wide net with regard to its audience and plays an important role in capturing the public eye as well as helping students to make more informed choices in their lives and communities. I ask six questions that help us as sociologists to think about how introductory sociology can better serve our discipline, our…

  1. Sociology of Modern Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2009-08-01

    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the ``snowball effect'' or ``groupthink''. We might wonder whether cosmology, the study of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other branches of physics or just a dominant ideology.

  2. In Praise of Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Raewyn

    2017-08-01

    This reflection on the relevance of sociology starts with the different forms of social knowledge, and some autobiographical reflection on my engagement with the discipline. A research-based social science is made urgent by the prevalence of distortion and pseudoscience in the public realm. However, the research-based knowledge formation is embedded in a global economy of knowledge that centers on a privileged group of institutions and produces major imbalances on a world scale. Sociological data collection has important uses in policy and public discussion. But data need to be embedded in a larger project of understanding the world; this is what gives excitement to the work. Sociology has a potential future of marginality or triviality in the neoliberal economy and its university system. There are better trajectories into the future-but they have to be fought for. Cette réflexion sur l'utilité de la sociologie commence avec les différentes formes de savoir social, ainsi que quelques réflexions biographiques sur mon engagement avec la discipline. Le besoin d'une science sociale orientée vers la recherche est devenue nécessaire suite à la prédominance de la distorsion et de la pseudoscience dans la sphère publique. Par contre, ce savoir centré sur la recherche est lié à une économie globale de la connaissance qui est proche d'un groupe privilégié d'institutions et produit des déséquilibres majeurs au niveau mondial. La collecte de données sociologiques a une grande utilité en politique et dans les discussions publiques. Mais ces données doivent être liées à un projet plus large de compréhension du monde ; c'est ce qui rend ce travail excitant. La sociologie risque la marginalisation ou la trivialité dans une économie néo-libérale et son système universitaire. Il existe de meilleures trajectoires pour l'avenir - mais elles doivent être défendues. © 2017 Canadian Sociological Association/La Société canadienne de sociologie.

  3. 花样滑冰运动员的生理机能与心理训练特点%Physiological Characteristics and Psychological Training of Figure Skaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋赫奕

    2015-01-01

    Figure skating is an aperiodic technical event which is combined with skating technology and art of ice,which is both technical and artistical. Because of the particularity of the project,the diversity and complexity of actions,therefore,it requires comprehensive development of the athletes' physical quality. The physiological characteristics of figure skater refer to the physiological particularity after special figure skating training. Whether technical psychology or physiology should be paid enough attention. Study on the physiological characteristics of figure skaters,summarize the particularity of balance,the inspiration of comprehensive analyzing ability of the central nervous system,the stability of vestibular organ,the sensitivity of sensory organs and other physiological characteristics. Some problems should be paid attention in psychological training like the advanced scienticic and technical standard is the precondition of establishing technical psychological stability,training methods and teaching methods influence on the stability of the technical psychology,as well as idea training applied in technical training.%花样滑冰是滑冰技术和冰上艺术相组合的非周期的技巧性运动项目,它既有技术的一面,又有艺术的一面。由于项目的特殊性、动作的多样性和复杂性,因此要求运动员的身体素质要全面发展。花样滑冰运动员的生理特点是指经过花样滑冰专项训练生理上所表现出的特殊性。心理训练则是花样滑冰系统训练的组成部分,是不可或缺的训练内容之一,无论是技术心理还是比赛心理,都要给予足够的重视。对花样滑冰运动员的生理特点进行研究,总结出对平衡要求的特殊性、中枢神经系统的综合分析能力的灵感性、前庭器的稳定性、感官器官的敏感性等生理特点;提出先进的科学技术标准是建立技术心理稳定的前提、训练方法和教法对技术心

  4. Developments in Scandinavian and American medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the similarities and differences in Scandinavian and American medical sociology. First, the issue of medicalization has not been as important in Scandinavian as it has been in American medical sociology. Second, women's health has been less explored in Scandinavian than in American medical sociology. Third, research on social inequalities and health has been a major focus in Scandinavian medical sociology since the 1990s. Fourth, cultural sociology and the poststructuralist perspective have been part of mainstream theory building in European sociology and also European and Scandinavian medical sociology during the past decade, while American medical sociology has been characterized by social-role theory and a quantitative approach.

  5. A female sex offender with multiple paraphilias: a psychologic, physiologic (laboratory sexual arousal) and endocrine case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A J; Swaminath, S; Baxter, D; Poulin, C

    1990-05-01

    A 20 year old female pedophile exhibiting multiple paraphilias and who had been both a victim of incest and an active participant, undertook extensive clinical, psychometric, endocrine and laboratory sexual arousal studies. Her psychiatric, psychometric and physiologic arousal profiles showed similarities to those of a sizable proportion of male child molesters, especially incestors. It is suggested that laboratory arousal tests (using the vaginal photoplethysmograph) may have a role in the assessment of some female sex offenders.

  6. Sociology of Drug Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article which is a review of sociological ideas and studies of drug abusers in social situation, drug addiction steps (particularly alcohol, heroin and cocaine consumption are revised and some explanations are made. Also, the role of some sociological ideas in drug addiction is considered in which Anomie Theory reads: "because of such duality, the individuals who are not satisfied with their role are in hurt." According to this theory, drug users choose seclusion and neglecting usual social aims as well as competitive situations. Association of Differentiation Theory claims that drug use behavior is a learned behavior and the first learning occurs in a friendly small group (i.e. youngsters. Social Control theory believes that one can predict normal and abnormal behaviors through the rate of individuals' social commitments. Internal and external controls also determine commitment rate. Micro-cultural theory considers drug use as a compatibility with abnormal micro-culture rules. Symbolic Mutual Action Believes that the etiquettes which society attribute to individuals/behaviors determine their acquired social reactions rather than any inherited acquisition.

  7. A sociological dilemma: Race, segregation and US sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhambra, Gurminder K

    2014-07-01

    US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the 1960s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought - one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This is evident in the rarity with which scholars such as WEB Du Bois, E Franklin Frazier, Oliver Cromwell Cox, or other 'African American Pioneers of Sociology', as Saint-Arnaud calls them, are presented as core sociological voices within histories of the discipline. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts. With regard to the latter, the article focuses in particular on the debates around equality and emancipation and discusses the ways in which our understanding of these concepts could be extended by taking into account the work of African American sociologists and their different interpretations of core themes.

  8. From Environmental Sociologies to Environmental Sociology? A Comparison of U.S. and European Environmental Sociology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    U.S. environmental sociology has gone through a very different development path compared with its European counterpart. U.S. environmental sociology was dominant in establishing the field and setting the terms for the development and identity of this subdiscipline. Whereas U.S. environmental sociolo

  9. Do Underachievers Need Sociology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aladin El-Mafaalani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a promising model for using sociological learning to support the education of young people who are socially disadvantaged or display behavioral problems. A great many of these students are trapped in patterns of negative behavior. The goal of the model is to enable these young people to think explicitly about the role they are playing and to encourage them to strike out in a new direction. To this end, Erving Goffman’s sociological insights are used to stage a theatrical performance about school. This approach is informed by the microsociological tradition of proceeding from the concrete to the abstract in order to facilitate inductive learning and self-reflection. Goffman’s theory of social action provides the social-theoretical background for the theatrical action, while also serving as a medium of contrast for the analysis of the individual, interaction, and institution in subsequent reflections about school. In this way, sociological theory not only serves as a theoretical foundation for the lesson, but is also explicitly its subject.Der Aufsatz zeigt eine erfolgversprechende Möglichkeit auf, soziologisches Lernen als Beitrag zur Förderung sozial benachteiligter und verhaltensauffälliger Jugendlicher in der Schule zu implementieren. Die meisten dieser Schüler sind in ihren Handlungsmustern gefangen. Ziel ist es, diesen Jugendlichen die Möglichkeit zu eröffnen, bewusst über ihre Rolle nachzudenken und einen anderen Weg einzuschlagen. Hierfür werden Erkenntnisse aus Erving Goffman‘s Soziologie für ein schulisches Schauspiel genutzt, um ganz im Sinne der mikrosoziologischen Tradition vom Konkreten auf das Abstrakte zu schließen und damit induktives Lernen sowie Selbstreflexion zu ermöglichen. Goffman‘s Theorie sozialen Handelns bildet für das szenische Spiel zunächst das sozialtheoretische Hintergrundrauschen, um schließlich in der Reflexion der sozialen Situation in der Schule als Kontrastmittel f

  10. Comparison of different cooling regimes within a shortened liquid cooling/warming garment on physiological and psychological comfort during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Gloria R.; Koscheyev, Victor S.; Coca, Aitor; List, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different cooling regime intensities to maintain physiological and subjective comfort during physical exertion levels comparable to that engaged in during extravehicular activities (EVA) in space. We studied eight subjects (six males, two females) donned in our newly developed physiologically based shortened liquid cooling/warming garment (SLCWG). Rigorous (condition 1) and mild (condition 2) water temperature cooling regimes were compared at physical exertion levels comparable to that performed during EVA to ascertain the effectiveness of a lesser intensity of cooling in maintaining thermal comfort, thus reducing energy consumption in the portable life support system. Exercise intensity was varied across stages of the session. Finger temperature, rectal temperature, and subjective perception of overall body and hand comfort were assessed. Finger temperature was significantly higher in the rigorous cooling condition and showed a consistent increase across exercise stages, likely due to the restriction of heat extraction because of the intensive cold. In the mild cooling condition, finger temperature exhibited an overall decline with cooling, indicating greater heat extraction from the body. Rectal temperature was not significantly different between conditions, and showed a steady increase over exercise stages in both rigorous and mild cooling conditions. Ratings of overall comfort were 30% higher (more positive) and more stable in mild cooling (p<0.001). The mild cooling regime was more effective than rigorous cooling in allowing the process of heat exchange to occur, thus maintaining thermal homeostasis and subjective comfort during physical exertion.

  11. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33 who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28 on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV, Natural Killer cell (NK cell activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS, depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  12. Annual Review of Sociology. Volume 9, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ralph H., Ed.; Short, James F., Jr., Ed.

    Twenty-six essays describing current research in sociology are included in this publication. The essays fall into 10 categories: differentiation and stratification; political sociology; social processes; institutions; individual and society; formal organizations; urban sociology; theory and methods; sociology of world regions; and historical…

  13. A Life with the Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a life with the sociology of education. He begins by describing the "old" and "new" sociologies of education. Then, he discusses the sociology of education policy and the relevance of Basil Bernstein, who remained the dominant presence within the sociology of education in the UK until his…

  14. Reflections on the Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinovskii, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the sociology of education, beginning with a discussion on the trajectory of the rise of the sociology of education in Russia. The author examines how the sociology of education in Russia looks compared to the rest of the world. The sociological study of education in Russia and the Soviet Union has…

  15. A Life with the Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a life with the sociology of education. He begins by describing the "old" and "new" sociologies of education. Then, he discusses the sociology of education policy and the relevance of Basil Bernstein, who remained the dominant presence within the sociology of education in the UK until his…

  16. A Life with the Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a life with the sociology of education. He begins by describing the "old" and "new" sociologies of education. Then, he discusses the sociology of education policy and the relevance of Basil Bernstein, who remained the dominant presence within the sociology of education in the UK until his death in 2000 and…

  17. FEW ASPECTS OF ESTABLISHMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF CYBERNETIC LUDOMANIA (COMPULSIVE GAMBLING AND ITS EFFECT ON PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. SYSOEV

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005, the term Cybernetic Ludomania (Compulsive Gambling has been used to define computer gaming addiction in global medical practice. It is defined as psychological addiction developed due to an obsessive fascination with computer games. The results of various studies insist on determining the diagnosis officially and creating a diagnostic base, subsequent treatments, psycho-correction programs, etc. Scientists at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences led by Professor Douglas A. Gentile examined 1200 persons and found that one out of every ten computer gamers was a cyber ludoman (addict [1]. Other studies have shown the spread of cybernetic ludomania reaches 8.5 % of 8-18 year old gamers in the USA [2], and 10 % of 11-14 year old gamers in Germany [3]. The percent of cybernetic ludomans of 8-14 year old gamers varies from 7.6 % to 9.9 % within the examined group of 3000 [4]. A team of psychologists from the University of Rochester led by D. Bavelier summed up the intermediate results and revealed that 1 of 5 people are cybernetic ludomans [5].

  18. A sociological dilemma: Race, segregation and US sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    US sociology has been historically segregated in that, at least until the 1960s, there were two distinct institutionally organized traditions of sociological thought – one black and one white. For the most part, however, dominant historiographies have been silent on that segregation and, at best, reproduce it when addressing the US sociological tradition. This is evident in the rarity with which scholars such as WEB Du Bois, E Franklin Frazier, Oliver Cromwell Cox, or other ‘African American Pioneers of Sociology’, as Saint-Arnaud calls them, are presented as core sociological voices within histories of the discipline. This article addresses the absence of African American sociologists from the US sociological canon and, further, discusses the implications of this absence for our understanding of core sociological concepts. With regard to the latter, the article focuses in particular on the debates around equality and emancipation and discusses the ways in which our understanding of these concepts could be extended by taking into account the work of African American sociologists and their different interpretations of core themes. PMID:25418995

  19. Regarding Bioethics: A Sociology of Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    C. Wright Mills said that when done well, sociology illuminates the intersection of biography and history. This essay examines how the author's vocational choices and career path were shaped by historical circumstance, leading him to a degree in sociology and to participation in the odd and interesting interdiscipline of bioethics. Drawing on a distinction between sociology in bioethics and sociology of bioethics, the essay considers the value of sociology to the bioethical project.

  20. The Sociology of Zygmunt Bauman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid; Poder, Poul

    Zygmunt Bauman is one of the most inspirational and controversial thinkers on the scene of contemporary sociology. For several decades he has provided compelling analyses and diagnoses of a vast variety of aspects of modern and liquid modern living. His work is increasingly popularized, appraised...... and adopted. However, there can be reasons to discuss and take a critical stance towards his work while also considering the theoretical significance of his contribution to sociology. To do this is the aim of this book. The Sociology of Zygmunt Bauman introduces and critically appraises some of the most...... significant as well as some of the lesser known and overlooked contributions of Zygmunt Bauman to contemporary sociology - ethics, freedom, utopia, genocide, metaphors, ambivalence, politics, strangers, globalization, power and consumerism. In separate chapters Bauman inspired scholars from the United Kingdom...

  1. Assessing the sociology of sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2015-01-01

    On the 50th anniversary of the ISSA and IRSS, a leading figure in the sociology of sport in Denmark, Gertrud Pfister, considers an important line of research on women and football (soccer). The analysis uses a diverse set of theoretical lenses to examine women’s participation and reception...... for the sociology of sport will be in stimulating understandings of women and football that can lead to policy change and more equitable allocation of resources to support and encourage participation....

  2. Effects of group psychological intervention on the physiological and psychological state of elderly patients with diabetes%团体心理干预对糖尿病患者心理和生理状况的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余慧慧; 雷震; 路翠艳; 江虹; 王淑康; 潘芳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of group psychological intervention on physiological and psychological state of elderly patients with diabetes.Methods A total of 71 elderly patients with diabetes living in one community were randomly divided into the intervention group and control group.The intervention group received 5 sessions of group psychological intervention,while the control group had no intervention.All patients were assessed with rating scales including the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI),Geratric Depression Scale (GDS),Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS)and Type D personality scale (DS).Fasting blood-glucose (FBG)and saliva cortisol (SC)before and after intervention were detected.All patients were retested with mental rating scales 6 months after intervention.Results After intervention,the scores of GDS,GAI,negative affectivity (NA)and SC level were significantly lower,while SSRS score was higher than that of the control group.Immediately after intervention,the scores of GAI,GDS and two dimensions of DS decreased and the SSRS score increased.Furthermore,the decreased negative emotions and increased social support of the intervention group persisted after 6 months.The level of blood glucose was positively related with DS score,and SC level was significantly positively correlated to GAI but negatively to SSRS score.Conclusion Group psychological intervention can improve the mental and physiological status of elderly diabetic patients,and the improved state can maintain at least six months.%目的:探讨团体心理干预对社区老年糖尿病患者心身状况的影响。方法采用老年焦虑量表(GAI),老年抑郁量表(GDS),D 型人格量表(DS)和社会支持量表(SSRS)对71例患者进行焦虑、抑郁、D 型人格和社会支持状况测评,同时检测血糖(FBG)和唾液皮质醇(SC)水平。患者随机分为干预组和对照组,干预组进行5次以心身放松为主要内容的团体心理干预,

  3. USSR Report, Sociological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Later the need to supplement this work with the psycho- logical and sexological advising of couples and measures on the preparation of young people for...marriage (infer- tility, aggravated heredity, sexual disorders); psychological and sexological edu- cation, first of all of young people, the

  4. 井下噪声对人心理生理影响分析%Impact of underground noise on human physiology and psychology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程根银; 陈绍杰; 魏志勇; 贺飞

    2011-01-01

    为了研究井下噪声对作业人员心理生理的影响,探究井下噪声的危害,通过对某矿井下作业人员问卷调查,用统计数据去分析噪声对作业人员的影响.分析结果表明:井下噪声对作业人员的影响是由年龄、工龄、作业区综合影响的结果,只从单一因素考虑噪声对井下人员的影响是不全面的;噪声对井下作业人员的影响,不仅与年龄、工龄有关,还因作业区间的不同而不同.井下噪声对心理的影响主要是使作业人员产生烦躁情绪,对生理的影响主要包括对听觉、消化系统、神经系统、内分泌系统等系统的影响.%In order to study the effects of underground noise on workers' physiology and psychology and investigate the harm of underground noise, according to questionnaire survey for work personnel in some underground coal mine, the influence of noise on workers is analyzed with the statistical data, and the analysis results indicate that the influence of underground noise on working personnel is a result of the combined effects of age, length of service, and work areas, and moreover the longer age of work is more serious effects; furthermore it is not perfect that take into account upon the influence on underground personnel according to only one signal factor. The influence "of noise on workers not only has something to do with age and length of service, but also depends on the working areas. The major influence of noise on workers' physiology refers to the work personnel suffering from irritable feeling, and the influence on workers' psychology mainly include auditory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system and other systems.

  5. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  6. Physiological and Psychological Responses during Exercise and Recovery in a Cold Environment Is Gender-Related Rather Than Fabric-Related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernych, Margarita; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Eimantas, Nerijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Brazaitis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated gender-specific effects of two types of undergarments on exercise-induced physiological and psychological stress and subsequent recovery in cold conditions for male and female participants. Ten healthy men and eleven healthy women (25.0 ± 1.5 versus 23.4 ± 1.2 years old, respectively) completed the experimental session twice with two different types of undergarments: polyester or merino wool leggings and long-sleeve tops; specifically, merino fabric had greater thermal resistance and water absorbency, and less water vapor as well as air permeability than polyester. Experimental sessions involved performing 1 h of exercise on a cycle ergometer at 8°C ambient temperature and 55% relative humidity, holding at 70-80 revolutions per minute and 60% of each participant's predetermined maximal power output (assessed by maximal oxygen uptake test), followed by 1 h recovery in the same environment. Every 5 min during exercise and every 10 min during recovery, rectal temperature, heart rate, subjective ratings for thermal, shivering/sweating and clothing wetness sensations, and clothing next-to-skin and outer side surface temperature and humidity on the chest, back and thigh were recorded. All participants experienced high physiological stress (assessed by physiological strain index) during exercise. No significant gender differences were found in core temperature or heart rate changes during exercise, but women cooled down faster during recovery. Next-to-skin humidity was similar between genders and different garment sets during exercise and recovery, but such temperatures at the chest during exercise and at the thigh during exercise and recovery were lower in women with both sets of garments. Subjective thermal sensations were similar in all cases. In the last 20 min of cycling, women started to feel wetter than men (P < 0.05) for both garment sets. Shivering was reported as stronger in women in the last 10 min of recovery. Most of the changes in the garment

  7. Physiological and Psychological Responses during Exercise and Recovery in a Cold Environment Is Gender-Related Rather Than Fabric-Related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Cernych

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated gender-specific effects of two types of undergarments on exercise-induced physiological and psychological stress and subsequent recovery in cold conditions for male and female participants. Ten healthy men and eleven healthy women (25.0 ± 1.5 versus 23.4 ± 1.2 years old, respectively completed the experimental session twice with two different types of undergarments: polyester or merino wool leggings and long-sleeve tops; specifically, merino fabric had greater thermal resistance and water absorbency, and less water vapor as well as air permeability than polyester. Experimental sessions involved performing 1 h of exercise on a cycle ergometer at 8°C ambient temperature and 55% relative humidity, holding at 70–80 revolutions per minute and 60% of each participant’s predetermined maximal power output (assessed by maximal oxygen uptake test, followed by 1 h recovery in the same environment. Every 5 min during exercise and every 10 min during recovery, rectal temperature, heart rate, subjective ratings for thermal, shivering/sweating and clothing wetness sensations, and clothing next-to-skin and outer side surface temperature and humidity on the chest, back and thigh were recorded. All participants experienced high physiological stress (assessed by physiological strain index during exercise. No significant gender differences were found in core temperature or heart rate changes during exercise, but women cooled down faster during recovery. Next-to-skin humidity was similar between genders and different garment sets during exercise and recovery, but such temperatures at the chest during exercise and at the thigh during exercise and recovery were lower in women with both sets of garments. Subjective thermal sensations were similar in all cases. In the last 20 min of cycling, women started to feel wetter than men (P < 0.05 for both garment sets. Shivering was reported as stronger in women in the last 10 min of recovery. Most of the

  8. Physiological and self assessed psychological stress induced by a high fidelity simulation course among third year anaesthesia and critical care residents: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraerts, Pr Thomas

    2017-06-22

    The use of high-fidelity simulators in Medicine can improve knowledge, behavior and practice but may be associated with significant stress. Our objective was to measure physiological and psychological self-assessed intensity of stress before and after a planned simulation training session among third year anesthesia and critical care residents. A convenience sample of 27 residents participating in a simulation training course was studied. Stress was evaluated by self-assessment using a numerical scale and by salivary amylase concentration before and after the session. Technical and non-technical (using the Aberdeen Anaesthetists' Non Technical Skills scale) performances were assessed through videotapes analysis. The median stress score was 5 [2-8] before and 7 [2-10] after the simulation session (ptechnical performance. Simulation-induced stress, as measured by self-assessment and biological parameter, is high before the session and increases significantly during the course. While this stress did not seem to impact performance negatively, it should be taken into account. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Latin american sociology's contribution to sociological imagination: analysis, criticism, and social commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vicente Tavares-dos-Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper tackles the role played by sociology in the analysis of the transformation processes in the Latin American societies, in following the construction process of both State and Nation, and in questioning the social issues in Latin America. Six periods of sociology in Latin America and in the Caribbean Islands are analyzed: (i sociology's intellectual inheritance; (ii the authoritative-teaching sociology; (iii the "scientific sociology" period and the configuration of the "critical sociology"; (iv the institutional crisis, consolidation of the "critical sociology", and the diversification of sociology; (v the sociology of authoritarianism, of democracy, and of exclusion; and (vi the institutional consolidation and the worldization of sociology in Latin America (from the year 2000 on. It can be said that the distinctive features of the sociological knowledge in the continent have been: internationalism, hybridism, critical approach to the processes and conflicts in the Latin American societies, and social commitment on the part of the sociologist.

  10. Preliminary report on social psychological factors in long duration space flights: Review and directions for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Group dynamics, sociological and psychological factors are examined. Crew composition and compatibility are studied. Group dynamics analysis includes: leadership; cohesiveness; conformity; and conflict.

  11. The Sociology of Social Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Allman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at social inclusion from a sociological perspective. It argues that sociology complements biological and other natural order explanations of social stratification. The article interrogates a variety of forms of social integration, including ostracism within 5th century b.c. Greece, 19th-century solidarism, and Goffman’s mid-20th-century work on stigma. It does so to demonstrate how in each of these contexts, social inclusion and exclusion can function as apparati that problematize people on the margins, and by extension, contribute to their governance and control. The article proposes that sociology provides a valuable orientation from which to consider social inclusion because it illuminates how social integration maintains and manages the ways in which people move about and through their socially stratified worlds.

  12. Medical sociology as a vocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosk, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    This article extends Weber's discussion of science as a vocation by applying it to medical sociology. Having used qualitative methods for nearly 40 years to interpret problems of meaning as they arise in the context of health care, I describe how ethnography, in particular, and qualitative inquiry, more generally, may be used as a tool for understanding fundamental questions close to the heart but far from the mind of medical sociology. Such questions overlap with major policy questions such as how do we achieve a higher standard for quality of care and assure the safety of patients. Using my own research, I show how this engagement takes the form of showing how simple narratives of policy change fail to address the complexities of the problems that they are designed to remedy. I also attempt to explain how I balance objectivity with a commitment to creating a more equitable framework for health care. © American Sociological Association 2014.

  13. The Sociology of Zygmunt Bauman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid; Poder, Poul

    Zygmunt Bauman is one of the most inspirational and controversial thinkers on the scene of contemporary sociology. For several decades he has provided compelling analyses and diagnoses of a vast variety of aspects of modern and liquid modern living. His work is increasingly popularized, appraised...... life and intellectual trajectory published here for the first time in English. In this postscript aptly entitled "Pro Domo Sua" ("About Myself"), he describes the pushes and pulls that throughout the years have shaped his thinking......., Germany, Australia and Scandinavia delineate and discuss how Bauman's treatment of these themes challenges conventional wisdom in sociology thereby revising and revitalizing sociological theory. As a special feature, the book concludes with Bauman's intriguing reflections and contemplations on his own...

  14. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  15. Sociology and the Sociology of Higher Education: A Missed Call or a Disconnection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Rosemary

    2004-01-01

    The article explores the relationship between sociology and sociology of education in the United Kingdom (UK), with specific reference to the development of a sociology of higher education. Though the article is mainly concerned with the UK, the broader issues raised, about the status and location of the sociology of education in relation to…

  16. The Corpus Status of Literature in Teaching Sociology: Novels as "Sociological Reconstruction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Using fiction in teaching sociology involves what Harvey Sacks calls "sociological reconstruction". Numerous comments on teaching sociology provide advice and suggestions on the use of literature and "what counts" as "sociological" literature, including specific titles. This paper goes further: while the use of literature is a routine feature of…

  17. Should We Talk about the Pain? Personalizing Sociology in the Medical Sociology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C. H.; Sumerau, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the potential of personalizing sociology curriculum, specifically in Medical Sociology courses, to increase student engagement and sociological awareness. Based on our experiences offering separate Medical Sociology courses at a large public research university and a small private teaching university, respectively, we…

  18. The Corpus Status of Literature in Teaching Sociology: Novels as "Sociological Reconstruction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Using fiction in teaching sociology involves what Harvey Sacks calls "sociological reconstruction". Numerous comments on teaching sociology provide advice and suggestions on the use of literature and "what counts" as "sociological" literature, including specific titles. This paper goes further: while the use of literature is a routine feature of…

  19. Should We Talk about the Pain? Personalizing Sociology in the Medical Sociology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C. H.; Sumerau, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the potential of personalizing sociology curriculum, specifically in Medical Sociology courses, to increase student engagement and sociological awareness. Based on our experiences offering separate Medical Sociology courses at a large public research university and a small private teaching university, respectively, we…

  20. 中国大陆社会心理学适应性重建初探--基于社会转型期知识社会学的视角%Social Psychology Reconstruction in Mainland China during Social Transition Period---From the Perspective of Sociology of Knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曙光

    2016-01-01

    以社会转型为背景,以知识社会学为视角,梳理当前中国大陆社会心理学的两种主要范式———“实验社会心理学”与“本土(化)社会心理学”,揭示其与本土“历史—社会现实”的疏离状况,进而对其本体论的缺陷进行反思与批判,探讨以消解疏离为目标、以“本土(化)社会心理学”为基底、以“社会转型”为基本背景框架与研究内容、以本体论的重构为切入点与着力点的大陆社会心理学重建之路。%From the perspective of sociology of knowledge, This article makes a review of the two main paradigms of social psychology in mainland China during the social transition period, that�s “Experimental Social Psychology” and “Indigenous/Indigenized Social Psychology”. It reveals these two paradigms�alienation from the indigenous “historical⁃social reality”, and reflects on the faults of the ontology of them. Some suggestions of a social psychology reconstruction in mainland China are made: this kind of alienation should be got rid of, the reconstruction should be supported by the “indigenous/indigenized social psychology” under the background of “social transition”, and an ontology reconstruction could work as the starting point.

  1. Can sociology help to improve nursing practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, David

    The first in a five-part series on sociology offers an overview of the debate about the relationship between sociology and nursing. Although sociological education is currently limited within nurse education, there is a long-held argument for its relevance. With a growing emphasis on preventative and public healthcare, sociology may yet prove its usefulness. Subsequent articles cover four of the key social factors affecting health.

  2. Physiological and Psychological Basis for Training Top Volleyball Players from Childhood%优秀排球运动员“从小培养”的生理学及心理学依据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨炯; 梁健

    2001-01-01

    The present study combines the principles of exercise physiology and psychology with the rules of volleyball and leads to the conclusion that top volleyball players should be trained from childhood, and expounds the physiological and psychological basis for training top volleyball players from childhood.%将运动生理学及运动心理学原理,与排球运动规律紧密结合。研究认为,优秀排球运动员应“从小培养”,并论述了优秀排球运动员“从小培养”的生理学及心理学依据。

  3. The Psychology of Psychic Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkanson, Lars; Ambos, Björn; Schuster, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and their theoretical underpinnings assume psychic distances to be symmetric. Building on insights from psychology and sociology, this paper demonstrates how national factors and cognitive processes interact in the formation of asymmetric distance perceptions. The results suggest that exposure to other countries...

  4. Guide to Sources: Sociology. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, Libby P.

    This guide and annotated bibliography is designed to introduce sociology students to the basic research tools in their field that are available in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. Brief explanations and examples are provided of the relevant Library of Congress subject headings and call numbers used in Fogler Library, as well as the…

  5. Audiological rehabilitation in sociological perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    as the 'truth'. By building on a sociological approach to hearing impairment that reaches beyond the medical definition, we see another picture emerging. Some patients embark on the process of getting a hearing aid and come to the hearing aid fitting as a response to social pressure from relatives or colleagues...

  6. Brazilian Sociology; Trends and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Neuma

    1995-01-01

    Delineates the historical and sociopolitical factors that influenced the educational development of sociology in Brazil. Discusses leading theorists, educational reformers, and the university's role in opposing the military regime. More recent crises have included shrinking academic budgets and declining enrollment. (MJP)

  7. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-01-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve…

  8. The Applied Connection for Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Alexander

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the 76 graduates of Kent State's applied sociology masters program, designed to prepare students for employment outside academe, found one graduate employed outside her field, four who continued their education and became practicing sociologists, and a majority who used their training as human service practitioners. (MSE)

  9. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  10. The Dialogic Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecha, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction theories emphasised the idea that schools reproduce relations of oppression. Later, postmodernism has increased the language of impossibility by analysing all educational actions in terms of power relations. Therefore, educational actions in line with any of those sociological approaches cannot act as tools that schools and…

  11. Race Relations in Sociological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, John

    This book seeks to develop sociological theory adequate to deal with the various uses to which racism has been put. How particular political orders apply "scientific" rationalizations, including race, to disguise their true origins in force, violence, and usurpation is demonstrated. Analysis of exploitative conditions starts with an objective…

  12. The Dialogic Sociology of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecha, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction theories emphasised the idea that schools reproduce relations of oppression. Later, postmodernism has increased the language of impossibility by analysing all educational actions in terms of power relations. Therefore, educational actions in line with any of those sociological approaches cannot act as tools that schools and…

  13. Connecting Life Span Development with the Sociology of the Life Course: A New Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The life course has become a topic of growing interest within the social sciences. Attempts to link this sub-discipline with life span developmental psychology have been called for but with little sign of success. In this paper, we seek to address three interlinked issues concerning the potential for a more productive interchange between life course sociology and life span psychology. The first is to try to account for the failure of these two sub-disciplines to achieve any deepening engagement with each other, despite the long-expressed desirability of that goal; the second is to draw attention to the scope for enriching the sociology of the life course through Erik Erikson's model of life span development; and the last is the potential for linking Eriksonian theory with current debates within mainstream sociology about the processes involved in 'individualisation' and 'self-reflexivity' as an alternative entry point to bring together these two fields of work.

  14. Sociology: a view from the diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard

    2010-12-01

    From the vantage point of criminology, one of sociology's main export subject areas, the present and future of sociology appear a good deal more promising than John Holmwood's essay on the discipline's misfortune would suggest. Sociology remains in high demand by students and faculty hiring remains strong, even in its more critical sub-fields, such as race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and social inequality. Holmwood is correct that sociology is vulnerable to external pressures to demonstrate its relevance to social practice, but those pressures come from left-wing social movements as well as from centres of power. He is also correct that external pressures contribute to internal disagreement, but sociology has been at war with itself since the 1960s, with little evident decline in its academic standing or intellectual vitality. Those of us on the discipline's diaspora, who depend on sociology for both support and light, must remain hopeful about sociology's continued good fortune.

  15. Extending Sociological Theorising on High Ability: The Significance of Values and Lived Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli Smith, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sociological work on high ability is framed by social constructionist theorising and/or takes a social justice approach, and hence particular analytical intellectual traditions are foregrounded. Whilst these approaches have contributed the main critique of essentialist psychological understandings of high ability, they can eclipse normative…

  16. Toward a Sociology of Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, John

    2017-02-01

    Despite covering around 70 percent of the earth's surface, the ocean has long been ignored by sociology or treated as merely an extension of land-based systems. Increasingly, however, oceans are assuming a higher profile, emerging both as a new resource frontier, a medium for geopolitical rivalry and conflict, and a unique and threatened ecological hot spot. In this article, I propose a new sociological specialty area, the "sociology of oceans" to be situated at the interface between environmental sociology and traditional maritime studies. After reviewing existing sociological research on maritime topics and the consideration of (or lack of consideration) the sea by classic sociological theorists, I briefly discuss several contemporary sociological approaches to the ocean that have attracted some notice. In the final section of the paper, I make the case for a distinct sociology of oceans and briefly sketch what this might look like. One possible trajectory for creating a shared vision or common paradigm, I argue, is to draw on Deleuze and Guattari's dialectical theory of the smooth and the striated. Même s'il couvre 70% de la surface de la Terre, l'océan a été longtemps ignoré en sociologie ou traité comme une extension des systèmes terrestres. De plus en plus, toutefois, l'océan retient l'attention, en étant vu comme une nouvelle frontière en termes de ressources, un médium pour les rivalités et les conflits géopolitiques, et un lieu écologique névralgique et unique. Dans cet article, je propose une nouvelle spécialisation sociologique, la 'sociologie des océans', se situant dans l'interface entre la sociologie environnementale et les études maritimes traditionnelles. Après une recension de la recherche sociologique existante sur les sujets maritimes et la prise en compte (ou l'absence de prise en compte) de l'océan par les théoriciens de la sociologie classique, je discute brièvement quelques approches sociologiques contemporaines de l

  17. Sociology, medicine and the construction of health-related sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nelson Filice de; Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2009-02-01

    Starting from a paper about closing the gap between sociology and medicine in Brazil and the United Kingdom that was published in 1971, a historical update was made with the aim of reflecting on the new shapes of health-related teaching and research within the social and human sciences, in these two countries. The methodology was qualitative and the study was developed using secondary data. The reflections were developed through the authors' immersion in Brazilian and British realities. It was concluded that the interface between sociology and health has expanded, although persistent old difficulties exist in relation to the structure and focus of the healthcare system, medical school power and medical student culture.

  18. Clinical observation of physiological and psychological reactions to electric stimulation of the amygdaloid nucleus and the nucleus accumbens in heroin addicts after detoxification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jun; GU Jian-wen; YANG Wen-tao; QIN Xue-ying; HU Yong-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Stereotactic surgery has been used to treat heroin abstinence in China since 2000 by ablating the amygdaloid nucleus (AMY) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc),which also provides opportunity to identify the relationship between these nuclei and addiction.Our study aimed to explore the physiological and psychological effects of electrically stimulating the AMY and the NAc in herein addicts after detoxification by observing changes of heart rate,arterial pressure and occurrence of euphoria similar to heroin induced euphoria.Methods A total of 70 heroin addicts after detoxification were recruited,and 61 of them were eligible to be given stereotactic surgery for heroin abstinence.The operation was carried out after determining the coordinates of all target nucleuses,and stimulation was performed at the AMY and the NAc solely or jointly.Heart rate,arterial pressure and occurrence of euphoria similar to heroin induced euphoria were recorded and analyzed.Results The average heat rate was (66±10) beats/min before electric stimulation,and significantly increased to (84±14) beats/min during stimulation,and changed to (73±12) beats/min 10 minutes after stimulation.There was a significant elevation of the average arterial pressure from 83 mmHg before stimulation to 98 mmHg during the stimulation,and it then decreased to 90 mmHg after stimulation.Forty-three of the 61 patients showed intense euphoria similar to heroin induced euphoria.The largest number (118/186) of euphoric responses occurred when the AMY and the NAc were stimulated at the same time.Odds ratio was 5.4 (95% CI: 2.4-11.9,P <0.0001) to quantify the association.Results from a Logistic regression model showed a positive correlation between unilateral stimulation of either the AMY or NAC and induction of euphoria (OR >1 ),especially when the left AMY or left NAc was stimulated (P <0.05).Conclusions Our data are consistent with existing results that the AMY and the NAc are related to addiction

  19. Dementia: sociological and philosophical constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H J

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents a challenge to the biomedical view of dementia as a disease. This view is critiqued from two perspectives: those of sociology and philosophy. Because these domains inform the creation of the medical discourse, their analysis provides an important refinement to the apprehension of the phenomenon of dementia. From the work of Foucault, and in particular his analysis of the historical origins of modern medicine, the sociological construction of dementia is considered. Following this, the philosophical question of Being is discussed, considering particularly the positions of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Lastly aspects of dementia nursing that are damaging to those relatives forced to take on the role of primary carer are isolated, in the context of Kitwood's view that it is possible to maintain personhood at the extremes of this condition. It is suggested that this critique of sociological and philosophical foundations of dementia might offer a way of approaching the dismantling of the self and revise current conceptions of dementia care for the better.

  20. The sociologically acceptable definition of religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Mirko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author has presented several important issues regarding the sociology of religion, but primarily the issue of the sociologically acceptable definition of religion both in theoretical and empirical research. Bearing in mind the sociology of religion in former Yugoslavia the author has first discussed the possibility of a general definition of the sociology of religion, but has stated the opposite view as well. Then he has dealt with the two basic approaches towards religion and two general definitions of sociology, namely substantial and functional ones. Finally the author has tried to define the religiousness in terms of sociological empirical research of human attachment to religion and church in post-socialism.

  1. Comparative education and the ?new? sociologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusz, Andrew R.; Parks-Trusz, Sandra L.

    1981-12-01

    The authors examine the impact of the `new' sociologies on comparative education by reviewing five comparative readers published during the past twenty years. While the `new' sociologies have had considerable impact within sociology and the sociology of education, minimal impact is found within comparative education. The authors further show that while critical new sociologies such as Marxism, neo-Marxism, and Critical theory have had some penetration into comparative education, use of the interpretative sociologies such as symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, and semiotics has generally been absent. The authors conclude by suggesting that a synthesis of the critical and interpretative modes would prove fruitful for further work in comparative education. The five texts are: Halsey, Floud and Anderson (eds.), Education, Economy and Society (1961); Eckstein and Noah (eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education (1969); Beck, Perspectives on World Education (1970); Karabel and Halsey (eds.), Power and Ideology in Education (1977); and Altbach and Kelly (eds.), Education and Colonialism (1978).

  2. Is There a Canon in Economic Sociology?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the findings of a bibliometric analysis of 52 syllabi on economic sociology provided by the members of the American Sociological Association section “Economic Sociology” and scholars from the UK, France, Germany, and Russia. In addition, the initial collection was expanded to course syllabi submitted from outside of sociology, including management departments, policy programs and anthropology. The analysis aims at measuring to what extent economic sociologists are con...

  3. Systems Fragility: The Sociology of Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS by Lori R. Hodges March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Robert Josefek Second Reader: Wayne Porter THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBER S SYSTEMS FRAGILITY: THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS 6. AUTHOR(S) Lori R. Hodges 7. PERFORMING OR GANIZATION NA:iVIE(S) AND...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK ii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited SYSTEMS FRAGILITY: THE SOCIOLOGY OF CHAOS Lori R. Hodges

  4. Is there a European medical sociology?

    OpenAIRE

    Henckes, Nicolas; Baszanger, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Is there a European sociology of health, illness and medicine – or, in short, a European medical sociology? While the answer to this question would certainly have been negative just a few years ago, this chapter argues that over the last thirty years a series of new analyses have emerged in the field which have laid the groundwork for a medical sociology at the European level. These examine how health issues are increasingly framed as consumer goods, public issues and ...

  5. Medical sociology: a personal fifty year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, R

    1999-06-01

    This paper reviews the author's experience in becoming a medical sociologist before the field had become formalized. The contributions to medical sociology of sociologist Selden D. Bacon and physician and medical educator William R. Willard are described. The relationship of medical sociology to medical behavioral science, as experienced at the University of Kentucky, is discussed. Finally, the thesis of the author's 1957 paper on the nature and status of medical sociology is re-examined.

  6. Sociological functionalism, exchange theory and life-cycle analysis: a call for more explicit theoretical bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, V L; Dowd, J J

    There has been a notable lack of articulation between mainstream sociological theory and the work of social gerontologists. This paper suggests four reasons for this, and reviews the basic assumptions and applications to gerontology of two well-established frameworks in sociological theory: structural-functionalism and exchange. With more rigorous and systematic integration of gerontological data with social and social psychological theory, more comprehensive explanations of life course phenomena would result. Moreover, the age variable would be considerably by other sociologists as less of a control and more of a relevant variable in its own right.

  7. A Sociology "of" or a Sociology "for" Education? The New Zealand Experience of the Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The sociology of education in New Zealand, as in other countries, is affected by the dilemma inherent to the discipline, namely: is it a sociology "of" education or a sociology "for" education? In this article I analyse three factors in which the dilemma is played out: "cultural oppositionism" in the indigenous…

  8. The Fourth Sociology and Music Education: Towards a Sociology of Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    By identifying three main sociologies that characterise broad movements in the field since its inception, this paper provides a background to considerations of music education from the perspective of sociology. A fourth sociology is then proposed that may be useful to interrogate the complexities of the field of 21st century music education. This…

  9. Sociology by Any Other Name: Teaching the Sociological Perspective in Campus Diversity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan A.; Banks, Kira Hudson

    2012-01-01

    This article suggests that the way in to sociology may not always be through the front door. The authors demonstrate how students in a three-day campus diversity program develop a sociological imagination despite not having a formal affiliation with the sociology department. In particular, students demonstrate a move from color blindness into…

  10. Toward a Sociology of Environmental Flows: A New Agenda for Twenty-First-Century Environmental Sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.P.J.; Spaargaren, G.

    2006-01-01

    The emerging sociology of networks and flows, as it can be found in the works of Castells and Urry among others, offers promising perspectives for environmental sociology in rethinking its principle object of study: nature and environment. The sociology of flow perspective takes us beyond the nation

  11. Sociology by Any Other Name: Teaching the Sociological Perspective in Campus Diversity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan A.; Banks, Kira Hudson

    2012-01-01

    This article suggests that the way in to sociology may not always be through the front door. The authors demonstrate how students in a three-day campus diversity program develop a sociological imagination despite not having a formal affiliation with the sociology department. In particular, students demonstrate a move from color blindness into…

  12. The Fourth Sociology and Music Education: Towards a Sociology of Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    By identifying three main sociologies that characterise broad movements in the field since its inception, this paper provides a background to considerations of music education from the perspective of sociology. A fourth sociology is then proposed that may be useful to interrogate the complexities of the field of 21st century music education. This…

  13. Secrets and the Sociological Imagination: Using PostSecret.com to Illustrate Sociological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Shiri

    2014-01-01

    Introductory sociology classes afford instructors an opportunity to expose students, often from a variety of backgrounds and majors, to the sociological imagination. In this article, I describe how the use of secrets from a popular website, PostSecret.com, can help teach students about the sociological imagination and incorporate biographical…

  14. A Sociology "of" or a Sociology "for" Education? The New Zealand Experience of the Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The sociology of education in New Zealand, as in other countries, is affected by the dilemma inherent to the discipline, namely: is it a sociology "of" education or a sociology "for" education? In this article I analyse three factors in which the dilemma is played out: "cultural oppositionism" in the indigenous…

  15. A Sociology "of" or a Sociology "for" Education? The New Zealand Experience of the Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The sociology of education in New Zealand, as in other countries, is affected by the dilemma inherent to the discipline, namely: is it a sociology "of" education or a sociology "for" education? In this article I analyse three factors in which the dilemma is played out: "cultural oppositionism" in the indigenous (kaupapa Maori) approach, critical…

  16. Sociological profiles of the candidate Turkish primary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ali Arslan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Teachers define the tomorrow’s of the society. In order to know and predict about future of the society, It has to be known the sociological profiles of the educators. In other words, it should be helpful to plan the education and to define the socio-political decisions on issue, if the social and psychological characteristics of the todays’ teachers were known before. Therefore, It was aimed to examine and analyse the sociological and social-psychological backgrounds of the candidate teachers. What a kind of social profile do they have? What are their opinion on particular actual social and political issues of the society. Do they present a homogeneus group character? Do they have enough skill and knowledge to educate tomorrow’s Turkish individuals? What are their major problems as the primary school teachers and teacher candidates? The answers of the theese kind of questions were examined within the research.A compherensive field reserarch realised to achieve the aim. A questionnaire form was developed and used for the interviews. There were structured, semi structured and open-ended questions in the questionnaire. A data sets was created from the data that were gathered from the field. The computer program of the SPSS (Statistical Packages for Social Sciences was used for analysing the data sets.

  17. Sociología ambiental

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez Gómez, José Andrés; Aledo Tur, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Este libro pretende ser un manual para los alumnos de las licenciaturas de sociología, ecología, ciencias ambientales o economía y profesionales de esas ramas que estén interesados en el estudio de las relaciones entre medio ambiente y sociedad desde una aproximación sociológica. El manual está divido en dos partes. La primera desarrolla las principales teorías sociológicas sobre el medio ambiente, así como el heterogéneo pensamiento ambiental. La segunda parte, ofrece capítulos diversos en l...

  18. Problems in Sociology of Sports

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    El presente artículo es una apuesta por reconstruir, articular y problematizar los aportes y los avances de investigación en torno a los estudios sociales del deporte y el tiempo libre, puestos en discusiones en el marco de la mesa de trabajo sobre problemáticas de la sociología del deporte, llevada a cabo durante el 9º Congreso Argentino y 4º Latinoamericano de Educación Física y Ciencias. La lectura holística e integral de las diferentes producciones académicas, y los diálogos que de ellas ...

  19. Audiological rehabilitation in sociological perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    as the 'truth'. By building on a sociological approach to hearing impairment that reaches beyond the medical definition, we see another picture emerging. Some patients embark on the process of getting a hearing aid and come to the hearing aid fitting as a response to social pressure from relatives or colleagues...... discourse, manifesting itself in the audiologist's spoken language, body language, and technologies in the room. Interaction rituals help explain why and how the patient complies with the way he or she is positioned by this discourse during that encounter....

  20. The Sociology and Entrenchment. A Cystic Fibrosis Test for Everyone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Lene; Stemerding, Dirk

    1994-01-01

    Socialmedicine, genetic screening, cystic fibrosis, ethics, political regulation, sociology of technology......Socialmedicine, genetic screening, cystic fibrosis, ethics, political regulation, sociology of technology...

  1. Unification and mechanistic detail as drivers of model construction: models of networks in economics and sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuorikoski, Jaakko; Marchionni, Caterina

    2014-12-01

    We examine the diversity of strategies of modelling networks in (micro) economics and (analytical) sociology. Field-specific conceptions of what explaining (with) networks amounts to or systematic preference for certain kinds of explanatory factors are not sufficient to account for differences in modelling methodologies. We argue that network models in both sociology and economics are abstract models of network mechanisms and that differences in their modelling strategies derive to a large extent from field-specific conceptions of the way in which a good model should be a general one. Whereas the economics models aim at unification, the sociological models aim at a set of mechanism schemas that are extrapolatable to the extent that the underlying psychological mechanisms are general. These conceptions of generality induce specific biases in mechanistic explanation and are related to different views of when knowledge from different fields should be seen as relevant.

  2. [Where are we in general sociology ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, history and social sciences have experienced a kind of merging, and a vast number of specialized domains have emerged. Yet the durkheim - ian register of "general sociology" seems somehow neglected. Firstly, this article analyzes the reasons for this neglect, and secondly, it indicates how, through a long-term reflexivity, one can formulate a new agenda for general sociology.

  3. Incorporating Sociology into Community Service Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochschild, Thomas R., Jr.; Farley, Matthew; Chee, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Sociologists and instructors who teach about community service share an affinity for understanding and addressing social problems. While many studies have demonstrated the benefits of incorporating community service into sociology courses, we examine the benefits of incorporating sociological content into community service classes. The authors…

  4. Sociology in U.S. High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesare, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of continuing the push toward understanding the status of sociology in high schools, this research note reports some results from the first national study of high school sociology to be carried out in more than 25 years. It is also only the second national study to ever be conducted. Specifically, the author examines the prevalence…

  5. Fænomenologisk sociologi og konstruktivisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Inger Glavind

    hvilke implikationer har pespektivet for forståelse af mennesket og dets omverden? Hvordan skal vi forstå den fænomenologiske sociologis videnskabsteoretiske tilgang? Som hovedleverandører til dette videnskabsteoretiske fundament er - foruden den østrisk-amerikanske sociolog Alfred Schutz også de...

  6. Fænomenologisk sociologi og konstruktivisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Inger Glavind

    hvilke implikationer har pespektivet for forståelse af mennesket og dets omverden? Hvordan skal vi forstå den fænomenologiske sociologis videnskabsteoretiske tilgang? Som hovedleverandører til dette videnskabsteoretiske fundament er - foruden den østrisk-amerikanske sociolog Alfred Schutz også de...

  7. The Sociology of Education. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The translation of a Russian college level textbook dealing with educational sociology is presented in this and the September issue. Chapters three to six are included in this issue. Discusses the sociological problems of Russian secondary education, vocational education, and pedagogical cadres and the research methodology of educational…

  8. The Sociology of Education. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The translation of a Russian college level textbook dealing with educational sociology is presented in this and the October issue. The textbook's introduction and first two chapters are included in this issue. The subject matter of educational sociology and the societal functions of education in a socialist society are discussed. (RM)

  9. A Capstone Course in Applied Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Richard Cheever

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the value of a capstone course in applied sociology as the culmination of the undergraduate sociology curriculum. Points out advantages of joint faculty-student projects for the course and presents the relative merits of two different formats: solo versus team projects. (Author/GEA)

  10. French Economics of Convention and Economic Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    The French Economics of convention tradition has developed to be an influential research tradition situated in the area between economics and sociology. The aim of the paper is to explore some of the themes that may be common to economics of conventions and economic sociology by looking more...

  11. Medical Sociology: What's in a Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Derek G.; Twaddle, Andrew C.

    1977-01-01

    Traces the development of medical sociology, which deals with sociological perspectives in relation to health care, from trends in Europe and the United States beginning in the early 20th century through the present. Available from: Unipub, Box 433, Murray Hill Station, New York, New York 10016. (AV)

  12. French Economics of Convention and Economic Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    The French Economics of convention tradition has developed to be an influential research tradition situated in the area between economics and sociology. The aim of the paper is to explore some of the themes that may be common to economics of conventions and economic sociology by looking more...... closely into three recent texts from the economics of convention tradition discussing, in slightly different ways, differences and similarities between economics of convention and economic sociology. It is argued that André Orléan’s point that a common aim could be to ‘denaturalise’ the institutional...... foundation of markets and of money may be an occasion for economic sociology to focus even more on elaborating on the institutional void created by traditional economic theory. A second point is that economic sociology could benefit from the perspective of a plurality of forms of coordination involved...

  13. Economics of Convention and New Economic Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the article is to explore potential common themes in economic sociology and economics of conventions. The article explores two issues raised by economics of conventions that may be of particular importance to economic sociology. First, the explicit exploration of the consequences...... of a plurality of forms of justification, as elaborated in économie de la grandeur. This perspective was recently taken up in economic sociology by David Stark's introduction of the notion ‘sociology of worth'. The second issue, recently suggested by André Orléan, is the need to denaturalize economic theory...... and economic action to demonstrate the social constructed nature of economic action. It is argued that these two issues demonstrate that a fruitful dialogue is indeed possible between economic sociology and economics of convention and should be encouraged....

  14. Sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niels

    2016-01-01

    I kapitlet diskuteres ud fra et sociologisk perspektiv brug af et screeningsinstrumentet til opsporing af depression efter indlæggelse for hjertesygdom. HADS – Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Det er en udbredt praksis at screene udskrevne hjertepatienter for depression. Som screeningsinstru...

  15. On Explaining Language Shift: Sociology or Social Psychology of Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the potentials and limits of sociolinguistic research on language shift. Starting from a position that the ultimate goal of the research must be to create a general theory of language shift of predictive power, the author examines the explanatory potential of current mainstream research methodology now regarded as canonical…

  16. Giving and Volunteering in the Netherlands : Sociological and Psychological Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René Henricus Franciscus Petrus

    2004-01-01

    Dissertation of the University of Utrecht Volunteer work, membership of voluntary associations, philanthropy and donation of blood and organs are studied by scholars from a wide range of disciplines. Sociologists and economists assume that good intentions are universal, but that some people have a s

  17. Revisiting College Predisposition: Integrating Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Johanna C.; Perez, Rosemary J.; Posselt, Julie R.

    2010-01-01

    Student choice models from the higher education literature elucidate the psychosocial factors that are correlated with college enrollment. They do not, however, clarify how these factors interact to cultivate the inclination to pursue postsecondary education. This critical review integrates a Bourdieuian framework with research on academic domain…

  18. Giving and volunteering in the Netherlands : Sociological and psychological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2004-01-01

    Volunteer work, membership of voluntary associations, philanthropy and donation of blood and organs are studied by scholars from a wide range of disciplines. Sociologists and economists assume that good intentions are universal, but that some people have a stock of human and social capital that allo

  19. On Explaining Language Shift: Sociology or Social Psychology of Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the potentials and limits of sociolinguistic research on language shift. Starting from a position that the ultimate goal of the research must be to create a general theory of language shift of predictive power, the author examines the explanatory potential of current mainstream research methodology now regarded as canonical…

  20. Physiological and Psychological Predictors of Short-Term Disability in Workers with a History of Low Back Pain: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Cantin, Vincent; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an elusive pathophysiology, common characteristics are often observed in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP). These include psychological symptoms, altered pain perception, altered pain modulation and altered muscle activation. These factors have been explored as possible determinants of disability, either separately or in cross-sectional studies, but were never assessed in a single longitudinal study. Therefore, the objective was to determine the relative contribution of psychological and neurophysiological factors to future disability in individuals with past LBP. The study included two experimental sessions (baseline and six months later) to assess cutaneous heat pain and pain tolerance thresholds, pain inhibition, as well as trunk muscle activation. Both sessions included the completion of validated questionnaires to determine clinical pain, disability, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain vigilance. One hundred workers with a history of LBP and 19 healthy individuals took part in the first experimental session. The second experimental session was exclusively conducted on workers with a history of LBP (77/100). Correlation analyses between initial measures and disability at six months were conducted, and measures significantly associated with disability were used in multiple regression analyses. A first regression analysis showed that psychological symptoms contributed unique variance to future disability (R2 = 0.093, p = .009). To control for the fluctuating nature of LBP, a hierarchical regression was conducted while controlling for clinical pain at six months (R2 = 0.213, p < .001) where pain inhibition contributed unique variance in the second step of the regression (R2 change = 0.094, p = .005). These results indicate that pain inhibition processes may constitute potential targets for treatment to alleviate future disability in individuals with past or present LBP. Then again, the link between psychological symptoms and

  1. Sociological establishment of 'normative facts'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Slobodan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Every science is searching for 'it's facts', it's concept and categorical decree, and by this defines specific subject of it's science researching. Here, the researching is steered on identification of ontological contents of 'normative fact' in the aim of comprehension of it's categorical entity and conceptual disposition.'The normative fact' refers to importance, significance and sense which norm has, in other words, which is attributed to the norm by man and society, and which in the air of importance influence on it's behavior. Exclusive term of sociological science is 'normative fact' as behavior of an individual, groups, institutions and society with regard to establishment, application and changes of social norms.

  2. Metaphor of society (a sociological essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadii Vasil’evich Osipov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay by Academician G.V. Osipov, who is the patriarch of Russian sociology, is dedicated to one of the most cognitive topics of modern sociology – identification of sociological metaphor as such and its application in research projects. This topic is avant-garde for the world sociological thought, and in Russia such kind of research is making its first steps. However, its future importance is difficult to overestimate. Sociological metaphor, if a methodology for its application is developed, can provide scientists with qualitatively new synthetic research tools. It can also bring together scientific structures and artifacts on the space of interdisciplinary and inter-subject borderland and give them qualitatively new intellectual and sensuous (system and mental technological capabilities for learning the surrounding world. The advantage of the following essay can be found in the fact that it is based on the objective analysis of the real embodiment of social metaphor in the work of art – a pictorial triptych “The Mystery of the 21st Century”. This is the first such experience in domestic sociological and artistic-painting practice. The authors of the final product are a scientist of great scientific and life experience and a young artist, who received in-depth sociological training and defended his Ph.D. in Sociology dissertation. But the main result of their collaboration is a product that combines scientific (sociological knowledge and insight and intuitive-creative artistic perception in a qualitatively new perception of the world and world outlook

  3. A View from Above: The Evolving Sociological Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, James; Light, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    How has sociology evolved over the last 40 years? In this paper, we examine networks built on thousands of sociology-relevant papers to map sociology's position in the wider social sciences and identify changes in the most prominent research fronts in the discipline. We find first that sociology seems to have traded centrality in the field of…

  4. First Contact: Teaching and Learning in Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Introduction to Sociology course is usually the first contact that students have with the discipline of sociology. This course can determine whether students take other sociology courses or learn to use sociology in their lives as adults and citizens. "First Contact" identifies important issues facing instructors in introducing students to the…

  5. Sociology of Music and Ethnomusicology: Two Disciplines in Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marcello Sorce

    1986-01-01

    Examines the history and structure of two interdisciplinary fields (sociology of music and ethnomusicology) and describes their relationship to each other. Looks at the sociology of music within the context of musical scholarship, describes four approaches to musical sociology, and contrasts sociology of music with ethnomusicology. (AYC)

  6. Comte Unplugged: Using a "Technology Fast" to Teach Sociological Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    Sociology majors learn that sociological theory is foundational to our field; it frames the way we look at the world and provides guiding questions for our social inquiry. But sociology instructors know that teaching theory is a challenge. A number of activities have been created to engage students in sociological theory courses. This note…

  7. First Contact: Teaching and Learning in Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Introduction to Sociology course is usually the first contact that students have with the discipline of sociology. This course can determine whether students take other sociology courses or learn to use sociology in their lives as adults and citizens. "First Contact" identifies important issues facing instructors in introducing students to the…

  8. Avoiding Aging? Social Psychology's Treatment of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E.; Redmond, Rebecca; von Rohr, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Population aging, in conjunction with social and cultural transformations of the life course, has profound implications for social systems--from large-scale structures to micro-level processes. However, much of sociology remains fairly quiet on issues of age and aging, including the subfield of social psychology that could illuminate the impact of…

  9. Culture and Social Psychology: Converging Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaggio, Paul; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    Views of culture in psychology and sociology have converged markedly in the past two decades. Both have rejected what Adams and Markus (2004) refer to as the "entity" conception of culture--the view that culture is coherent, stable, and located in the heads of collectivities' members--in favor of more supple and dynamic constructs. Culture, in…

  10. Vocation in Theology and Psychology: Conflicting Approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Recent contributions in the fields of psychology, sociology, and theology reveal opposing attitudes about the subject of calling or vocation with regard to one's work. Whereas psychologists have rediscovered the concept, theologians increasingly show reluctance to accept a vocational view of work. In offering an alternative perspective, this…

  11. Where Is the Sociology of Religion Heading? Some Comments to 'Three European Sociologies of Religion'

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Comments on Zdenek R. Nespor's article, 'Three European Sociologies of Religion: Beyond the Usual Agenda of the Discipline,' which reviews three new European overviews of the discipline that go beyond its traditional agenda. There is agreement with Nespor that there has been a merging of European & Anglo-American sociologies of religion; however, differences between European & American applications of the sociological study of religion are said to be an artificially created problem. Attention...

  12. From sociology in medicine to the sociology of collective health: contributions toward a necessary reflexivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Castro

    2016-01-01

    En este texto se aborda la distinción entre la sociología en la medicina (colaboradora de las instituciones de salud) y la sociología de la medicina (independiente de las instituciones de salud). Se argumenta que, si es consecuente, la sociología en la medicina deviene sociología de la medicina. Como ejemplo, se discute el caso de los determinantes sociales de la salud que, inicialmente, asumen como no problemática la realidad ontológica de la salud-enfermedad y luego problematizan el concept...

  13. Teaching Sociology within the Speech and Language Therapy Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Earle, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists suggests that sociology should be included within the speech and language therapy curriculum. However, in spite of this, sociology is seldom given priority. Although the role of sociology with the curricula of other professions has been discussed, the role of sociology within speech and language therapy has not. Given the contemporary climate of competence-based training, the position of subjects such as sociology is b...

  14. A Socio-Psychological Exploration of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwasomba, Chijioke

    2009-01-01

    Using a socio-psychological approach, the essay explores Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment. The exploration highlights Dostoyevsky's heavy reliance on the use of psychological realism, showing in the process the intricate interplay between psychology, sociology and literature. In the novel, the reader comes across the merging of the…

  15. Economic Sociology and Economics of Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    This paper is part of a larger exploration of the French Economics of Convention tradition. The aim of the paper is to explore potential themes of common interest to economic sociology and Economics of Conventions. The paper is in two parts. First, I summarise the main theoretical features of EC...... the institutional framework of social action. Second, I explore two issues raised by economics of conventions that may be particularly important to consider for economic sociology. The first issue is the explicit exploration of the consequences of a plurality of forms of justification suggested by Luc Boltanski...... and Laurent Thévenot in ‘économie de la grandeur’. This perspective has already been taken up in economic sociology in David Stark’s notion of a ‘Sociology of Worth’. The second issue, recently suggested by André Orléan, is the need to denaturalise economic theory and economic action to demonstrate the social...

  16. Soaps and the Sociology of the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Williams, John

    1986-01-01

    Using the television series "Dallas" as an example, this article describes how to use soap operas to illustrate common topics and increase students' interest in a sociology of the family course. (JDH)

  17. Feminism and the sociology of everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Ivana A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influences of feminist thought on sociological theory and research, refracted through the conceptualization of the sphere of everyday life. It is argued that there are important theoretical affinities between feminism and the sociology of everyday life, as it has developed since mid-20th century. Main feminist contributions to sociological study of everyday life are identified at two levels: substantive (the study of formerly neglected social phenomena, particularly the private sphere, and epistemological (the questioning of positivistic ideals of objective and neutral social science. The position of the feminist theorist Dorothy Smith is selected for a more detailed critical discussion. In the concluding part of the paper some controversial points in the feminist concept of the sociology of everyday life are indicated.

  18. Teaching Sociology and Womens’ Critical Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Zaki

    2013-08-01

    C. Wright Mills, leaning on approach, each student through the process of critical thinking in the sociology of education increases,Identification and analysis of practical realization of the society will be realized by most students.

  19. Teaching Sociological Research Methods to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Stanford W.; O'Toole, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Reports the development of a three-course eight-week summer program for medical students. One course covers research methods and the other two involve research practicums in public health and medical sociology. (JDH)

  20. The Reflexive Principle of Sociological Theorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaidullayeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to describe the reflexive principle in theory-making, which integrates the basic modern methodological paradigms and lays the foundation for the development of sociology. On the basis of the theoretical ideas of P. Bourdieu, A. Giddens and P. Ricoeur the author defines the concept of social reflexion and reveals its peculiarities in sociology as compared to reflexion in philosophy. According to the author, the fulfillment of reflexive functions in sociology is connected with the task of analyzing the complex structure of the polysemantic object, considering the specific quality of the subjects and their various trends of development. The presence of the poles — objectivity-subjectivity, rationality-irrationality, consciousness-unconsciousness etc, requires a reproduction of the dichotomies engendering them in social life and development of cognitive methods for their study in sociology.

  1. The age of school shootings: a sociological interpretation on masculinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades there has been a growing interest in the study of the horrendous massacres perpetrated by students at school premises. These massacres, known as school shootings, haven been predominantly analyzed by employing psychological approaches. Despite the fact that empirical research clearly reveals that school shooters tend not to present life-long histories of mental illness, these approaches usually put a strong emphasis on the perpetrator’s individual pathologies, ignoring the influence that social values such as masculinity exert on perpetrators’ actions. Consequently, perpetrators are viewed as lone wolf shooters and school shootings as isolated cases. Based on data derived from scholarly works published mainly in peer-review journals and the sociological theory of P. Berger and T. Luckmann, the aim of this essay is to offer a sociological interpretation on school shootings by explaining why school shooters commit violent actions against teachers and classmates as a form of retrieving their masculinity. In this regard, the essay finds that male rather than female students commit school shootings. At the same time, the majority of perpetrators have had parents who were gun collectors. It is no coincide that shooters mostly use family guns to commit the massacres. Additionally, shooters see school as a social entity that has diminished their masculinity, and the way to reaffirm their masculinity is to attack randomly students and teachers in full view of the rest of school members during school hours.

  2. Post-Phenomenological Sociology of the Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Krpič

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the works of two classic philosophic writers, Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, by focusing on the significance of both writers for the post-phenomenological nature of the sociology of the body. With their reflections on the “living body” and its position in the world, Husserl and Merleau-Ponty both pave the way to phenomenological thought and consolidate its place in the post-phenomenological sociology of the body.

  3. Socialkonstruktivismer i klassisk og moderne sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasborg, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    En videnskabsteoretisk diskussion af socialkonstruktivismens genealogi, samt af en række fremtrædende socialkonstruktivistiske positioner i klassisk og moderne sociologi (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Berger & Luckmann, Goffman og Bourdieu)......En videnskabsteoretisk diskussion af socialkonstruktivismens genealogi, samt af en række fremtrædende socialkonstruktivistiske positioner i klassisk og moderne sociologi (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Berger & Luckmann, Goffman og Bourdieu)...

  4. Socialkonstruktivismer i klassisk og moderne sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasborg, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    En videnskabsteoretisk diskussion af socialkonstruktivismens genealogi, samt af en række fremtrædende socialkonstruktivistiske positioner i klassisk og moderne sociologi (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Berger & Luckmann, Goffman og Bourdieu)......En videnskabsteoretisk diskussion af socialkonstruktivismens genealogi, samt af en række fremtrædende socialkonstruktivistiske positioner i klassisk og moderne sociologi (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Berger & Luckmann, Goffman og Bourdieu)...

  5. Review on Urban Sociology(2nd Edition)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Yuting; Li; Caige

    2016-01-01

    Urban Sociology(2nd Edition)Author:Gu Chaolin,Liu Jiayan,et al.Year:2013Publisher:Tsinghua University Press ISBN:9787302337591(446 pages,in Chinese)Urban Sociology is a textbook edited by Gu Chaolin,a wellk now n schola r of u rba n st udies i n Ch i na,a nd published by Tsinghua University Press in 2013.The first edition of this book,

  6. The Impact of Feminism on Sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Walby

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the impact of feminism on British sociology over the last 60 years. It focuses on changes in the intellectual content of the discipline, including epistemology, methodology, theory, concepts and the fields of economy, polity, violence and civil society. It situates these changes in the context of changes in gendered organisation of sociology, the rise of women's/gender studies, the ecology of social sciences and societal changes, especially the transformation of the gen...

  7. On the nature and sociology of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Mark; Dunn, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Much has been written in the last decade about how we should understand the value of the sociology of bioethics. Increasingly the value of the sociology of bioethics is interpreted by its advocates directly in terms of its relationship to bioethics. It is claimed that the sociology of bioethics (and related disciplinary approaches) should be seen as an important component of work in bioethics. In this paper we wish to examine whether, and how, the sociology of bioethics can be defended as a valid and justified research activity, in the context of debates about the nature of bioethics. We begin by presenting and arguing for an account of bioethics that does justice to the content of the field, the range of questions that belong within this field, and the justificatory standards (and methodological orientations) that can provide convincing answers to these questions. We then consider the role of sociology in bioethics and show how and under what conditions it can contribute to answering questions within bioethics. In the final section, we return to the sociology of bioethics to show that it can make only a limited contribution to the field.

  8. Social factors, mental illness, and psychiatric care: recent advances from a sociological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, J R

    1984-08-01

    The author reviews advances in the sociological perspective on mental health over the past four years. He examines research on such topics as community acceptance of the mentally ill, arrest rates among former psychiatric inpatients, and the effect of social factors on the type of mental health treatment received. Other research areas surveyed include the influence of social factors on service utilization and on life stress and psychological distress, sex differences in psychological problems, and the relationship between organization of service delivery systems and patient outcome.

  9. The influence of psychological nursing in preoperative interview on physiological and psychological stress response of patients with local anaesthesia in the department of ophthalmology%术前访视心理护理对眼科局麻患者心理、生理应激的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯华丽

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the application effect of psychological nursing in preoperative interview in department of ophthalmology patients with local anesthesia.Methods Eighty patients with local anesthesia in department of ophthalmology were divided into the observation group and the control group with 40 cases in each group,the control group was given routine nursing,the observation group was strengthen psychological nursing care in preoperative interview,two groups were compared with psychological,physiological stress response.Results Anxiety,depression score,heart rate,blood pressure,norepinephrine (NE),epinephrine (E) concentrations 30 min before the operation in the observation group were significantly lower than those in control group (P < 0.05).Conclusions Psychological nursing in preoperative interview can relieve psychological,physiological stress response of local anesthesia operation patients in department of ophthalmology.It is conducive to the rehabilitation of postoperative patients.%目的 探讨术前访视心理护理在眼科局部麻醉患者中的应用.方法 将80例眼科局部麻醉手术患者分为观察组和对照组各40例,对照组采用常规护理,观察组在对照组的基础上于术前访视中加强心理护理,比较两组患者心理、生理应激反应.结果 观察组术前30 min的焦虑、抑郁评分及心率、血压、NE、E浓度均显著低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 术前访视心理护理能够减轻眼科局麻手术患者心理、生理应激反应,有利于患者术后康复.

  10. Towards a Sociological Understanding of Robots as Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oost, Ellen; Reed, Darren

    While Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) have, in the past, primarily mediated or facilitated emotional bonding between humans, contemporary robot technologies are increasingly making the bond between human and robots the core issue. Thinking of robots as companions is not only a development that opens up huge potential for new applications, it also raises social and ethical issues. In this paper we will argue that current conceptions of human-robot companionship are primarily rooted in cognitive psychological traditions and provide important, yet limited understanding of the companion relationship. Elaborating on a sociological perspective on the appropriation of new technology, we will argue for a richer understanding of companionship that takes the situatedness (in location, network and time) of the use-context into account.

  11. Sociology facing new scientistic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Parra Saiani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2011 Marradi drew the attention to the semantic expansion that have suffered some of the terms used in the social sciences because of an inferiority complex regarding the physical sciences. The cascade of conceptual components from “hard” sciences to the “soft” ones is certainly impressive. Obviously, the problem is not the blending of the human sciences, but the substitution of thought itself with slogans, without reflecting on its epistemological and ontological assumptions. In my note I want to extend the analysis of the consequences of inferiority complex in three directions: i extending the referents (imported terms, including another key part of social science term: the term indicator; ii analyzing the significance of the quantification in the development of sociological discipline in competition with economic discipline for public recognition; iii marking the importance of a successful image of science among the world of those who take political and economic decisions, which limits the possibilities of social research

  12. The sociology of superstring theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Brian Douglas

    This dissertation carefully tracks the historical origins of superstring theory in high energy particle physics, its subsequent decline under the guise of the "dual model" in the mid-1970s, and its reemergence in the mid-1980s in what came to be known as the "first superstring revolution." I then explore the scientific controversy that emerged after the first superstring revolution due to superstring theory's lack of contact with experiment, and the set of institutional pressures felt by string theorists that they refer to as the "sociology" of superstring theory. I employ and develop the concept of "scientific legitimacy" to organize the historical analysis of superstring theory and the subsequent scientific controversy. My study emphasizes the interpretive flexibility of theory selection, the role of scientific judgment in the acceptance of scientific knowledge, and the ways in which boundary work operates in scientific controversies. A careful analysis of the empirical case of superstring theory indicates some of the limitations associated with the ways in which the closure of scientific controversies has traditionally been conceptualized by social researchers. To help overcome these difficulties, I propose a four-fold typology that I refer to as the "epistemic space of rejected science."

  13. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  14. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  15. A Sociology for the 21st Century? An Enquiry into Public Sociology Reading Zygmunt Bauman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Aidnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Burawoy’s public sociology presents a vision of engaged and political sociology that stands for critical debate and social justice. The article will consider public sociology in light of Zygmunt Bauman’s social thought, one of the most acclaimed sociologists whose writings transcend academic readership. It will identify the similarities and diff erences concerning their understanding of contemporary society and sociology’s tasks, as well as its shortcomings, which will sediment public sociology’s cause. The article will discuss Burawoy’s conception of public sociology through Bauman’s views on the tasks of sociology, which will be seen as illuminating for both political and ethical reasons. The aim of the paper is to interpret public sociology from the point of view of Bauman’s writings on liquid modernity, and thereby increase its awareness of the ways in which contemporary societies call for sociological engagement. It will be argued that ethics and dialogue are equally important to politics for public sociology

  16. Sociology of the College Classroom: Applying Sociological Theory at the Classroom Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Maxine P.; Buck, Alison R.; Hunt, Andrea N.

    2009-01-01

    "Teaching Sociology's" emphasis on the scholarship of teaching and learning has moved the field well beyond simple description of teaching methods. There is no doubt that the journal is more scholarly than in the past. Still, we do not take advantage of our rich theoretical disciplinary work. There is much to learn sociologically about the…

  17. Sociology of the Prison Classroom: Marginalized Identities and Sociological Imaginations behind Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrotta, Kylie L.; Thompson, Gretchen H.

    2011-01-01

    The authors use sociology of the college classroom to analyze their experiences as feminists teaching sociology courses in the "unconventional setting" of prison. Reflective writing was used to chronicle experiences in the classes. They apply the concepts of doing gender, interaction order, and emotion work to the prison classroom. Based on their…

  18. [From sociology in medicine to the sociology of collective health: contributions toward a necessary reflexivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    This text looks at the difference between sociology in medicine (collaborator of health institutions) and the sociology of medicine (independent of health institutions). If consistent, sociology in medicine should become a sociology of medicine. As an example, it is shown how the study of the social determinants of health and illness begins by assuming non-problematically the ontological reality of health and illness, but ends up problematizing the very concept of health-disease, demonstrating that the study of health determinants also requires the study of the determinants of the social construction of disease. The urgent necessity of objectifying collective health itself is argued. By applying sociological tools we can examine the so-called objective factors in the determination of health and disease, the socially constructed nature of these categories of knowledge, and the struggles and power relations that determine whether or not such categories are viable.

  19. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Contact ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > ANATOMY > Nasal Physiology Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy ...

  20. The use of quantitative medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, David

    2003-01-01

    The present article reviews, in relation to quantitative work on the social structure, papers published in Sociology of Health and Illness during its first 25 years. Each issue published during the years 1979-2002 has been examined; and quantitative papers, relating to various aspects of the social structure, have been identified. Such papers are found to have formed a minor but substantively significant theme within the Journal. These contributions situate the journal between sociology and social epidemiology. Articles in the Journal, for example, have been part of sociological debates about the measurement of social class, and of social epidemiological debates about the relationship between income distribution and population health. The contribution of Sociology of Health and Illness to a number of such debates is reviewed. The article concludes that the present situation, in particular the intellectual crisis in social epidemiology and social science investment in large data sets, gives the Journal the chance to build on this distinguished tradition by encouraging, through its publication policy, the further development of quantitative medical sociology.

  1. Sociology of diagnosis: a preliminary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2009-03-01

    Diagnoses are the classification tools of medicine, and are pivotal in the ways medicine exerts its role in society. Their sociological study is commonly subsumed under the rubrics of medicalisation, history of medicine and theory of disease. Diagnosis is, however, a powerful social tool, with unique features and impacts which deserve their own specific analysis. The process of diagnosis provides the framework within which medicine operates, punctuates the values which medicine espouses, and underlines the authoritative role of both medicine and the doctor. Diagnosis takes place at a salient juncture between illness and disease, patient and doctor, complaint and explanation. Despite calls for its establishment, almost two decades ago (Brown 1990), there is not yet a clear sociology of diagnosis. This paper argues that there should be, and, as a first step, draws together a number of threads of medical sociology that potentially contribute to this proposed sociology of diagnosis, including the place of diagnosis in the institution of medicine, the social framing of disease definitions, the means by which diagnosis confers authority to medicine, and how that authority is challenged. Through this preliminary review, I encourage sociology to consider the specific role of diagnosis in view of establishing a specific sub-disciplinary field.

  2. [Pierre Bourdieu: sociology as a "symbolic revolution"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaud, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The article combines two objectives: understand the genesis and development of the sociology of Bourdieu in connection with his social and intellectual positioning. The sociology of Bourdieu is a theory of Action which reconciles the double requirement of objectification and taking account of the practical logic bound by social agents. From the character both objective and subjective of social space, he analyzes how different institutions (firstly School) are doing that mental structures match the objective structures of society. By making acceptable reality and registering it in the body, these instances contribute to reproduce social divisions and participate in the work of domination. Gradually, Bourdieu develops a general theory about Power, which leads to a sociology of State. But he refuses any sociological fatalism. Because he perceived homologies between the sociologist and the artist facing the social order, each in their own way, he devoted two researches to Flaubert and Manet, seized in the same enterprise of aesthetic subversion he described as a 'symbolic revolution'. In many aspects, the sociology of Bourdieu opens ways of looking for an objectification of caregivers and their practices.

  3. Developing public sociology through health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Eva; Williams, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    The renewed interest in 'public sociology' has sparked debate and discussion about forms of sociological work and their relationship to the State and civil society. Medical sociologists are accustomed to engaging with a range of publics and audiences inside and outside universities and are in a position to make an informed contribution to this debate. This paper describes how some of the debates about sociological work are played out through a 'health impact assessment' of a proposed housing renewal in a former coal mining community. We explore the dynamics of the health impact assessment process and relate it to wider debates, current in the social sciences, on the 'new knowledge spaces' within which contentious public issues are now being discussed, and the nature of different forms of expertise. The role of the 'public sociologist' in mediating the relationships between the accounts and interpretations of lay participants and the published 'evidence' is described as a process of mutual learning between publics, professionals and social scientists. It is argued that the continued existence and development of any meaningful 'professional sociology' requires an openness to a 'public sociology' which recognises and responds to new spaces of knowledge production.

  4. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status.

  5. Sabri Ulgener, Economic Sociology and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga KABAŞ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the approach of economic sociology, economics should include a social perspective. Because economy is a part of society, therefore it cannot be analyzed by isolating from the rest of the society. The best works of Old Economic Sociology is done by Max Weber. According to Max Weber, capitalism is born from Protestant Ethic and its values. For Weber culture is like conductor working at railways switching the ways of the train. In this study, the birth and development of economic sociology, which is a relatively young social science, will be told. Besides a dignified Turkish economist, SabriÜlgener’s views will be explained in this study. SabriÜlgener had written a lot of books and articles for explaining the economic mind of Muslim-Turk people.  

  6. Structurational aspect of Georg Simmel's sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović Srđan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper attempt will be made in explaining some basic notions of Simmel's sociology, especially those regarding his very complex comprehension of money and causality in history. In analysis of his work, I will argue that Simmel stands very close to the contemporary structurational point of view, and that there are three levels of freedom and structural givens (overlapping each other in society. These are: meta-theoretical level, level of integration into the World, and the historical level. Besides that, less explicit aims of this paper are to show that in Simmlel's thought there are no disciplinary borders between sociology and philosophy, as well as to depict some of the potential benefits that sociology might get from this line of reasoning.

  7. The sociological knowledge and problematic behaviors’ prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Serjanaj

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the importance of sociology knowledge in students attending teaching Master Program, specialists in education, experienced teachers, as well as high school graduates who study sociology in high school. The issues discussed involve not only the role of teacher on recording and straightening such problematic behaviors but even the ways of changing the situation on the future. Phenomena such as: culture, subculture, ethnicity, religion, race and gender diversity, prejudices and discrimination which derive by these kinds of diversities; inequality of social strata, the understanding of social role, cultural norms practicing and their respecting are present in our schools environment. These are reasons why teachers and students must have information about above-mentioned phenomena. Ministry of Education and Sport must add Sociology as a subject of core curricula of high school and teachers programs’ studies.

  8. Medical sociology and technology: critical engagements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Monica J; Morrison, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    In this selective review of the literature on medical sociology's engagement with technology, we outline the concurrent developments of the American Sociological Association section on medicine and advances in medical treatment. We then describe theoretical and epistemological issues with scholars' treatment of technology in medicine. Using symbolic interactionist concepts, as well as work from the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies, we review and synthesize critical connections in and across sociology's intellectual relationship with medical technology. Next, we discuss key findings in these literatures, noting a shift from a focus on the effects of technology on practice to a reconfiguration of human bodies. We also look toward the future, focusing on connections between technoscientific identities and embodied health movements. Finally, we call for greater engagement by medical sociologists in studying medical technology and the process of policy-making--two areas central to debates in health economics and public policy.

  9. 海上演习对某部官兵部分心理和生理指标的影响%Influence of the sea exercises on the soldiers' psychological and physiological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文; 钟海忠; 鞠金涛; 徐纪平; 朱伟; 李兆申

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate influence of the sea exercises on the soldiers' psychological and physiological indexes. Methods One hundred and twenty-six officers and soldiers were detected by the psychological stress self-evaluation test ( PSET) before and after the sea exercises. Contents of serum immunosuppressive acidic protein (IAP), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 ( sTNFR-1) , cortisol( Cor) and aldosterone(Ald) in 126 officers and soldiers were analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). All datas were processed by correlation analysis with PSET. Results The contents of serum IAP, sTNFR-1, cortisol and aldosterone in officers and soldiers after the sea exercises were all higher than before(P <0.05) .especially in whose PSET data≥70. Conclusions As a strong psychosocial stress, the sea exercises may have some influences on immume system and level of endocrine krinin. It is necessary that the suitable psychological and physiological training be selected to strengthen competence of immune and psychological stress in officers and soldiers.%目的 探讨海上演习对某部官兵部分心理和生理指标的影响.方法 采用放射免疫方法(RIA)检测126名参演官兵演习前后血清免疫抑制酸性蛋白(IAP)、可溶性肿瘤坏死因子受体1(sTNFR-1)、血清皮质醇和醛同酮水平,应用军人心理应激自评问卷(PSET)进行心理状态的调查,将血清学检测结果与军人心理应激自评结果进行相关性分析.结果 参加演习后血清IAP和sTNFR-1升高,与演习前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);而演习后PSET分值≥70官兵IAP和sTNFR-1升高更明显(P<0.05).演习后血清皮质醇和醛同酮均升高,与演习前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),演习后PSET分值≥70官兵血清皮质醇和醛固酮升高更明显,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 登陆演习作为一种强烈的应激行为,对机体免疫系统会产生一定的抑制,也可引起人体内分泌激素水平改变,

  10. The influence of wheelchair taichi of psychology and physiological status on high paraplegia people%残疾人轮椅太极拳运动对其身心健康影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王和平; 叶茜龙; 呙华峰

    2011-01-01

    为了探讨轮椅太极拳运动对高位截瘫残疾人的心理及生理状态的影响,于2009年6月~2011年5月进行调查、查阅相关文献、发放问卷、应用常规方法测量血压、心率等身体指标数据.对象是轮椅太极拳练习者54人,非练习轮椅太极拳普通残疾者30人.均为武汉市江岸区百步亭花园标志广场进行练习的残疾人(自愿者).研究发现,练习轮椅太极拳者各项指标明显好于非练习者.说明轮椅太极拳对高位截瘫残疾人身心产生了积极的影响.%Discuss the influence of wheelchair taichi of psychology and physiological status on High paraplegia people. In survey June, 2009 to March, 2011, the research was given to objects questionnaires, measured their blood pressure, heart rate and other physical measurements, and researched relevant information. The objects of study are 84 people with high paraplegia and ordinary disabled. The volunteers were from people who doing exercises in Baibuting Squre Jiangan District in Wuhan. 54 volunteers were doing wheelchair taichi and 30 volunteers were not. The people who practiced wheelchair tai chi have better psychological improvement. Based on the measurement, the heart rate is increased few in people who practice wheelchair taichi. Some even have no increase. Most of people's blood pressure went down or kept stable after practicing wheelchair taichi. The blood pressure of few of the participants went up.

  11. Does infant cognition research undermine sociological theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the results of infant research challenge the assumptions of the classical sciences of social behaviour. According to A.J. Bergesen, the findings of infant research invalidate Durkheim's theory of mental categories, thus requiring a re-theorizing of sociology. This article...... argues that Bergesen's reading of Emile Durkheim is incorrect, and his review of the infant research in fact invalidates his argument. Reviewing the assumptions of sociology in the light of the findings of infant research, it is argued that the real challenge is to formulate a research strategy...

  12. Chronic illness in adolescents: a sociological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, T J

    1983-01-01

    This article relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. This is an area of controversy: the views of Freidson, Lorber and Robinson are presented as being representative of the dispute. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perception and rules explicit. The concept of the chronically ill adolescent as deviant is descriptive and devoid of value judgment. Only through such rigorous assessment is it possible to gain a realistic understanding of the societal role in the life of the chronically ill adolescent.

  13. Une ou plusieurs sociologies ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Heinich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Après une ébauche de diagnostic des causes et des effets de la « bulle » sociologique qui s’est créée en France dans la dernière génération, cet article reprend une tentative de cartographie des quatre grandes tendances de la sociologie telle qu’elle avait été proposée il y a quelques années dans la Revue du Mauss. Il s’agit de mettre en évidence, par-delà l’apparente homogénéité de la discipline intitulée « sociologie », deux grandes lignes de clivage : d’une part, l’opposition entre une « sociologie du social » et une « sociologie de l’expérience » ; d’autre part, une sociologie à visée normative et une sociologie analytico-descriptive. Une fois croisées, ces lignes dessinent quatre zones (ou familles sociologiques, entre quatre « points cardinaux » (ou positions idéal-typiques dont elles s’approchent plus ou moins. L’article se termine par un court plaidoyer en faveur d’une sociologie de l’expérience analytico-descriptive, en tant qu’elle est la plus spécifique de ce qu’autorisent les méthodes et les outils de cette discipline.¿Una o varias sociologías? Esbozo « cartográfico »Después de realizar un bosquejo del diagnóstico de las causas y de los efectos de la « burbuja » sociológica que se formó en Francia en el transcurso de la generación anterior, este artículo retoma una tentativa de « cartografía » de las cuatro principales tendencias de la sociología tal como había sido representada hace varios años en la Revue du Mauss. Se trata de poner en evidencia, más allá de la homogeneidad aparente de la materia llamada « sociología », dos grandes líneas de fractura: por una parte la oposición entre una « sociología de lo social » y una « sociología de la experiencia ». Por otra parte una sociología con objetivos normativos y una sociología analítico-descriptiva. Una vez cruzadas esas líneas aparecen cuatro zonas (o familias

  14. Analysis on driving fatigue before and after lunch based on indices of physiology and psychology%基于驾驶人生理心理参数的午餐后驾驶疲劳分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李平凡; 王殿海; 刘东波; 王峻极

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze the variation of the driver fatigue characteristics,6 drivers were selected to carry out driving simulation experiments,and the indices of physiology and psychology,such as body temperature,heart rate variability,depth perception,speed perception,were recorded at the same time.And the results of self-evaluation about fatigue were gotten by questionnaire,and the driving fatigue characteristics changes of drivers before and after lunch were analyzed.The analysis results of physiological indices show that heart rate variability(HRV) index of drivers tends to increase after lunch about 1~1.5 hours,then decreased to normal levels;body temperature will decrease to a low level after lunch and then return to normal;PERCLOS index value increase occur on all drivers,of which 67% PERCLOS value increases dramatically obvious.Changes in indices of psychological characteristics show that,after lunch,the driver's cognitive abilities decrease,mainly reflected in decrease of ability in depth perception,reaction time and speed perception,these will affect the drivers' getting road environmental information,thereby increasing insecurity of driving behavior.4 tabs,4 figs,11 refs.%为找出午餐前后驾驶人疲劳特征变化规律,选取6名驾驶人开展了驾驶模拟试验。对驾驶人午餐前后的体温、心率变异性、深度知觉、速度知觉等生理、心理特征参数进行了测定,并通过问卷方式获取了驾驶人对自身疲劳状况的主观感受,分析了午餐前后驾驶疲劳特征的变化。生理参数分析结果表明:驾驶人心率变异性指标在午餐后1~1.5 h内呈升高趋势,随后下降至正常水平;体温指标在午餐后出现一个低谷,随后恢复正常;PERCLOS指标值午餐后均有所增大,其中67%受试者PERCLOS值增幅明显。心理特征参数变化表明:午餐后受试者认知能力出

  15. THE FEATURES OF THE HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGY IN LITHUANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Vaicekauskaite

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose – is to reveal the stages of the development of history of Lithuanian sociology and its specific features. Methodology. The article is based on the survey of sources analysing the history of sociology, paying special attention to manifestations of sociology in Lithuania during various periods of time. Findings. Sociology is one of the youngest academic disciplines established as a distinct field of study in Europe only in the 19th century. Three main fields of investigation can be distinguished in the history of Lithuanian sociology: the pre-war period, the soviet period and the post-soviet period. Each period is characterised by its peculiar opportunities for sociologists’ professional expression, challenges and achievements; as well as different topics and directions for sociological research. After the review of sources dealing with the history of sociology, it must be noted that there are three main stages of the development of sociology: (1 the period of 1960-1970, characterised by work study; (2 since the 1970s the main attention has been paid to social planning; (3 the period starting from 1989 is distinguished for the beginning of public opinion poll. Research limitations/implications. This brief review of the history of sociology in Lithuania is rather fragmentary; a thorough analysis needs more time and more comprehensive studies. Practical implications. The importance of the study shows in the fact that the research of the history of Lithuanian sociology can be helpful in analysing the issues of sociological professionalism and identity. The status of sociology as science and profession in society cannot be examined without taking into account the historical context of the country. Originality/Value. This article is an attempt to summarise and systematise different approaches to the circumstances of sociology formation and their impact on the development of the discipline and profession. Keywords: sociology, history of

  16. Blurring Public and Private Sociology: Challenging an Artificial Division

    OpenAIRE

    Kate Butler

    2009-01-01

    This article encourages sociologists to take a hybrid approach to the incorporation of public sociology into the discipline. The idea of public sociology rests upon a double conversation between sociologists as public actors, and the involvement of the 'extra-academic' world into the dialogue. However, the separation of public sociology from professional sociology is artificial. The division of labour between those working solely in academia, and those reaching out to the public at large is i...

  17. Effect of Psychological Care for Psychological State and Physiological Functions Patients of the Operating Room%心理护理在手术室患者心理状态及生理功能中的应用效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范风群

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of psychological care for psychological state and physiological functions patients of the operating room. Method:84 cases of surgery patients were randomly divided into the observation group(n=42) and the control group(n=42),the observation group was implemented comprehensive psychological care and the control group was implemented routine operating room nursing intervention,the psychological status(anxiety and depression),systolic blood pressure,diastolic blood pressure,and heart rate of two groups were compared.Result:After surgery,the symptom scores of anxiety,depression of the observation group decreased,they were significantly lower than the control group(P<0.05).After surgery,the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate of the observation group were significantly lower than the control group,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion:The effect of psychological care for psychological state and physiological functions in patients of the operating room is favorable.%目的:研究心理护理在手术室患者心理状态及生理功能中的应用效果。方法:将84例手术室患者按照随机数字表法分为观察组42例和对照组42例,对照组患者采用常规的手术护理方案进行治疗,观察组患者采用心理护理方案进行治疗。观察两组患者手术前后焦虑、抑郁等各项心理状况评分及收缩压、舒张压等生理功能指标的变化。结果:术后两组患者的心理状况评分与术前相比,明显下降,而手术后观察组患者的焦虑、抑郁等心理状况评分均明显低于对照组(P<0.05);术后两组患者的生理功能各指标与手术前相比,均显著降低,而术后观察组患者的收缩压、舒张压以及心率均明显低于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:心理护理在手术室患者心理状态及生理功能中的应用效果良好。

  18. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sz Makó, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla

    2011-01-01

    The present paper, based on the results of international studies, is focused on the reconsideration of the psychological aspects of induced abortion. By presenting a narrow cross-section of the Hungarian demographic data, we would like to emphasise the necessity and the significance of a deeper understanding of the subject. Factors behind the decision-making, short- and long term outcomes of the intervention influencing primarily the mental health of women and partner-relationship aspects are discussed in details. While acknowledging the complexity of the subject deriving from the legal, ethical, moral, religious, medical, social and sociological concerns, our aim is to call attention to the psychological aspects of induced abortion and the importance of psychological care of women undergoing surgical operation.

  19. Study on the physiological mechanism of yoga to improve the psychological health of female college students%瑜伽促进女大学生心理健康生理机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝珏娟; 郑琦; 朱玉华; 金其贯

    2014-01-01

    目的:为了探讨瑜伽锻炼对女大学生心理健康的影响激起生理机制。方法:对36名女大学生进行为期12周的瑜伽锻炼,在锻炼前后采用《中国大学生心理应急量表》测定锻炼前后女大学生的心理应激状态,并测定血液中皮质醇、β-内啡肽的含量。结果:与锻炼前比较,瑜伽锻炼后女大学生在生活、社交、发展、正性、负性、生活事件、生活琐事等分量表的得分和总分均显著降低,而血液中皮质醇含量显著降低(P<0.01),β-内啡肽含量显著升高(P<0.05)。结论:(1)长期的瑜伽锻炼是可以显著降低女大学生的心理应激状态,对促进女大学生心理健康具有积极的作用。(2)长期的瑜伽锻炼可以通过促进机体β-内啡肽的分泌,减少皮质醇的分泌来降低机体的心理应激水平,提高女大学生心理健康水平。%Objectives:To investigate the effects of yoga exercise training on psychological health of female college students and it’ s physiological mechanism. METHODS:for 12 weeks of yoga exercise on 36 female college students,“the Chinese College Student Psychological Stress Scale(CCSPSS)”was used to measure psychological stress of female college students before and after exercise training,and the serum cortisol and beta endorphin contents were measured. RESULTS:Compared with that before exercise,the subscales score in the life,social,development,positive events,negative events,life events,trivia of life and total score in the female college students were significantly decreased after yoga exercise training,and serum cortisol content decreased significantly(P<0.01),β-endorphin content increased significantly(P<0.05).CONCLUSION:(1)long-term of yoga exercise training can significantly reduce the psychological stress of female college students,and plays a positive role in promoting mental health of female college students.(2)long-term of yoga exercise training can

  20. The Dutch sociology of education: Its origins, significance and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, A.

    1996-01-01

    As in many other countries the Dutch sociology of education has blossomed into a fully-fledged specialised branch of sociology since the beginning of the 1970s. A tradition of policy-oriented research has also consolidated the position of the sociology of education at the universities. The strength

  1. Toward a Buddhist Sociology: Theories, Methods, and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Janine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores potential links between Buddhism and sociology, highlighting the many commonalities between sociology and Buddhism, with an emphasis on ways that Buddhist thought and practice may contribute to the field of sociology. What could Buddhism offer to our understanding of social institutions, social problems, and to the dynamics…

  2. Simulating Secularization: A Pedagogical Strategy for the Sociology of Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Instructing students in sociological theory is a foundational part of the discipline, but it can also be a challenge. Readers of "Teaching Sociology" can find a number of activities designed to improve students' understanding of sociological theory in their general theory courses, but there are fewer activities designed to improve…

  3. American Sociology in a Transnational World: Against Parochialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, John

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that, in spite of its cosmopolitan origins, U.S. sociology is regarded widely as parochial in its outlook and concerns. Discusses factors contributing to the intellectual isolationism of U.S. sociological research and pedagogy. Provides suggestions for internationalizing the sociology curriculum. (CFR)

  4. The Dutch sociology of education: Its origins, significance and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, A.

    1996-01-01

    As in many other countries the Dutch sociology of education has blossomed into a fully-fledged specialised branch of sociology since the beginning of the 1970s. A tradition of policy-oriented research has also consolidated the position of the sociology of education at the universities. The strength

  5. Durkheim's Sociology of Education: Interpretations of Social Change Through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc A.

    1976-01-01

    Three questions are examined: (1) Why have contemporary American educators generally ignored Durkheim's sociology of education? (2) What were Durkheim's contributions to the sociology of education as his analysis related to social change through education? and (3) What is the relationship between Durkheim's sociology of education, social change,…

  6. Toward a Buddhist Sociology: Theories, Methods, and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Janine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores potential links between Buddhism and sociology, highlighting the many commonalities between sociology and Buddhism, with an emphasis on ways that Buddhist thought and practice may contribute to the field of sociology. What could Buddhism offer to our understanding of social institutions, social problems, and to the dynamics…

  7. Simulating Secularization: A Pedagogical Strategy for the Sociology of Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Instructing students in sociological theory is a foundational part of the discipline, but it can also be a challenge. Readers of "Teaching Sociology" can find a number of activities designed to improve students' understanding of sociological theory in their general theory courses, but there are fewer activities designed to improve…

  8. "The Sociology of Childhood" by William A. Corsaro. Book Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvortrup, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Corsaro's work on the shift toward sociological approaches to research on children. Notes that the book fills a need for textbook on the sociology of childhood; documents the need for concern about children's well-being; presents a new analytical framework for the sociological study of children and of childhood; and challenges traditional…

  9. Teaching Mills in Tokyo: Developing a Sociological Imagination through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Here I emphasize the applicability of the sociological imagination to an international audience by sharing my journey of teaching sociology in Japan. I found my own sociological imagination helpful in critically evaluating the literature on Japanese higher education and the construction of the Japanese student as a form of Orientalism. As I…

  10. Durkheim's Sociology of Education: Interpretations of Social Change Through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc A.

    1976-01-01

    Three questions are examined: (1) Why have contemporary American educators generally ignored Durkheim's sociology of education? (2) What were Durkheim's contributions to the sociology of education as his analysis related to social change through education? and (3) What is the relationship between Durkheim's sociology of education, social change,…

  11. The Graduate Internship Program in Applied Medical Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Sue Keir; Barr, Judith K.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the history, goals, achievements, and future of a graduate internship program sponsored by the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. Students are placed in internships in a variety of clinical and research areas concerned with the development of health policy and careers in applied medical sociology. (NL)

  12. Pharmaceutical Sociology: Issues in Research, Education and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarstad, Bonnie L.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses need for social scientific research, clinical social scientists in pharmacy, and specialists in pharmaceutical sociology and the other social sciences. To illustrate, patient noncompliance with drug regimens and the use of sociology to analyze the problem are examined. Includes a sample program in pharmaceutical sociology, course…

  13. A Sociological Study or the Effect of Western Values and Mass Media on Body Image (The Case of 15-and-above Years Old Women in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad Abbaszadeh

    2014-04-01

    Body image is a complicated phenomenon including physiological, psychological and sociological indexes. Recently, new studies are conducted about body image. From a psychological perspective, it is defined, as "an image of the body one has in mind and the way that the body is seen". In fact, Body image is a mentality means that everyone is concerned with his /her appearance. Much of this mindset, positive or negative, roots in values of the society in which it is promoted. In every society, there are certain patterns and characteristics associated with cultural ideals of beauty and the ways that female body should look and appear. One specific example of this, which is accepted in most societies, is being slim. However, appearance and its ideals have a broad meaning and cannot be considered only from a physiological perspective. Instead, it can be studied from a sociological perspective, as it is the society which dictates the appropriate appearance for people. To the extent that a person tries to have an acceptable appearance, he or she is accepted by the community. The society and culture in which a person is born and grows, teaches them how to define and interpret many of the changes that occur in the body. It is through our perceptions of our body that we come to understand how to establish relations with others, and may also affect the responses that we receive from others. Considering the fact that mass media and Western values are among the most important influential sources by which body image is defined, this study examines the relationship between Western values and mass media with body image Materials and Methods The statistical population of this study includes all 15-and-above years old women in Tabriz. Sample size was chosen through Cochran Formula, according to which 316 women were selected by means of cluster sampling method. This study is done through survey method and we used questionnaire for collecting the data. Also, we analyzed the data by

  14. The denial of death thesis: sociological critique and implications for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Camilla; Rodin, Gary

    2004-03-01

    It has become commonplace to say that contemporary western society is 'death-denying'. This characterization, which sociologists have termed the 'denial of death thesis', first arose in the social science, psychological and clinical medical literature in the period between 1955 and 1985. During the same time period, the hospice and palliative care movements were developing and in part directed themselves against the perceived cultural denial of death in western society. While the denial of death has been taken for granted by the lay public as well as by clinicians, in the sociological literature it has been increasingly questioned. In this paper we use sociological critiques of the denial of death thesis to raise critical questions about the theory and practice of contemporary palliative care. In particular, we argue that the emphasis of palliative care should not be on extinguishing the denial of death but on the relief of suffering.

  15. From Medicalisation to Pharmaceuticalisation - A Sociological Overview. New Scenarios for the Sociology of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordogna Mara Tognetti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the sociological literature on pharmaceuticalisation and see how sociology helps us understand and explain the phenomenon. We then discuss how sociology, especially in Anglo-Saxon countries, defines the process of pharmaceuticalisation and how this last is evolving. The paper points out that, while medicalisation remains a key concept for health sociology, it is increasingly being queried and/or extended to allow for a techno-scientific era of biomedicalisation (Clarke et al. 2003 and to acknowledge the importance of the pharmaceutical industry in this process (Williams, Martin and Gabe 2011a, 2011b. Particular attention will be paid to the process of pharmaceuticalisation as brought about not just by doctors and their prescriptions, but by the central role of pharmaceutical promoters and the marketing of drugs.

  16. Travel-Study as Learning in Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Brenda; Prinz, Andrew K.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the objectives, characteristics, and outcomes associated with a joint "sociology-urban studies, travel-study, minicourse program." Describes how students in a four-day, two-credit-hour course travel to cities such as Washington, DC and Toronto to be exposed to different cultures, organizational structures, and social arrangements.…

  17. Urban Sociology Bibliography, Exchange Bibliography 1336.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James L.; And Others

    This bibliography on urban sociology cites studies which discuss the structures and processes of urban society from an historical and comparative perspective. Although it includes studies that discuss population growth, decline, size, and density, the prime concern of this bibliography is not with urban demography. After a brief look at some…

  18. Urban Sociology. Curriculum Bulletin. Grade 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmington Public Schools, DE.

    The focus of the urban sociology teaching guide for grade 12 is on the effect of urbanization upon four of the major social institutions: familial, governmental, economic, and educational. An overall educational objective is to prepare students for developing rational solutions to problems confronting urban society. Objectives are stated in…

  19. Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, Patti; Anderson, Cynthia; Bird, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes two teaching strategies from our workshop, "Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work," that can help students understand the mechanisms and consequences of workplace gender inequality at the macro- and micro-levels. Cynthia Anderson's class project uses wage and sex composition data that allows students to learn actively how…

  20. On the New Approach in Sociological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russian Education and Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A roundtable was held in April 2010, by correspondence and with participants in attendance; it was organized by the editorial board of "Sotsiologicheskie issledovaniia" jointly with the faculty of sociology of the Russian State University of the Humanities [RGGU]. The focus of the proceedings was a discussion (taking account of…

  1. How to Find Out in: Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Clara K.

    This library handbook was designed to aid the student of sociology. It lists reference materials basic to general research and gives their location in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. Materials are listed in six categories: (1) guides to the literature; (2) general, including dictionaries and encyclopedias; (3) biographical…

  2. Why Economists Should Pay Heed to Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hechter, Michael Norman

    2015-01-01

    Gintis and Helbing suggest that certain elements from classical sociological theory can be usefully incorporated into a general equilibrium model, thereby providing a superior explanation of social behavior. Although the paper seemingly is addressed to sociologists, I argue that their message...

  3. "World Religions" in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    A section on "world religions" (WRs) is now routinely included in the religion chapters of introductory sociology textbooks. Looking carefully at these WR sections, however, two things seem puzzling. The first is that the criteria for defining a WR varies considerably from textbook to textbook; the second is that these WRs sections…

  4. The Continuation of the Dialectic in Sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2010-01-01

    A rapidly changing ‘society’ that requires ‘new units of analysis’, ‘new roles for sociology’, and new democratic commitment to ‘the publics’ has implications for the identity and calling of sociology. In this so-called ‘identity crisis’, some sociologists have introduced the so-called ‘after

  5. Sociology, environment and health: a materialist approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, N J; Alldred, P

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews the sociology of environment and health and makes the case for a postanthropocentric approach based on new materialist theory. This perspective fully incorporates humans and their health into 'the environment', and in place of human-centred concerns considers the forces that constrain or enhance environmental capacities. This is not an empirical study. The paper uses a hypothetical vignette concerning child health and air pollution to explore the new materialist model advocated in the paper. This paper used sociological analysis. A new materialist and postanthropocentric sociology of environment and health are possible. This radically reconfigures both sociological theory and its application to research and associated policies on health and the environment. Theoretically, human health is rethought as one among a number of capacities emerging from humans interactions with the social and natural world. Practically, the focus of intervention and policy shifts towards fostering social and natural interactions that enhance environmental (and in the process, human) potentiality. This approach to research and policy development has relevance for public health practice and policy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regression Analysis and the Sociological Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Regression analysis is an important aspect of most introductory statistics courses in sociology but is often presented in contexts divorced from the central concerns that bring students into the discipline. Consequently, we present five lesson ideas that emerge from a regression analysis of income inequality and mortality in the USA and Canada.

  7. Sociological perspectives on self-help groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, L; Rasmussen, J M

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The paper discusses two themes: first, professional involvement in self-help groups and secondly, sociological evidence on self-help groups in postmodern society. BACKGROUND: Self-help groups are a growing phenomenon across national borders and social/political systems. They affect the indiv...

  8. "World Religions" in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    A section on "world religions" (WRs) is now routinely included in the religion chapters of introductory sociology textbooks. Looking carefully at these WR sections, however, two things seem puzzling. The first is that the criteria for defining a WR varies considerably from textbook to textbook; the second is that these WRs sections…

  9. New Biological Sciences, Sociology and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Since the Human Genome Project mapped the gene sequence, new biological sciences have been generating a raft of new knowledges about the mechanisms and functions of the molecular body. One area of work that has particular potential to speak to sociology of education, is the emerging field of epigenetics. Epigenetics moves away from the mapped…

  10. Postdiploma Professional Education (A Sociological Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhorukova, N.; Filatov, S.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a sociological study of postdiploma professional education. The authors state, that under the conditions of the mounting dynamics of social and economic processes, the only way that an individual can retain and increase the level of his professional and social competence and, consequently, his ability to compete in the domestic and…

  11. Micropolitics and the Sociology of School Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willower, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Schools are examined using a common sociological perspective. Relationships among key groups in school organizations are discussed from a micropolitical frame of reference. School micropolitics are considered in terms of teacher autonomy, order, time, and school administrators and the organization. Implications for future micropolitical research…

  12. On the New Approach in Sociological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russian Education and Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A roundtable was held in April 2010, by correspondence and with participants in attendance; it was organized by the editorial board of "Sotsiologicheskie issledovaniia" jointly with the faculty of sociology of the Russian State University of the Humanities [RGGU]. The focus of the proceedings was a discussion (taking account of experience in…

  13. New Biological Sciences, Sociology and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Since the Human Genome Project mapped the gene sequence, new biological sciences have been generating a raft of new knowledges about the mechanisms and functions of the molecular body. One area of work that has particular potential to speak to sociology of education, is the emerging field of epigenetics. Epigenetics moves away from the mapped…

  14. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  15. How Sociology Texts Address Gun Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonso, William R.

    2004-01-01

    William R. Tonso has chosen an issue that he knows something about to examine how sociology textbooks address controversy. Appealing for gun control is fashionable, but it is at odds with a fondness that ordinary Americans have for their firearms--one that is supported by a growing body of research on deterrence to crime. There are two sides to…

  16. Regression Analysis and the Sociological Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Regression analysis is an important aspect of most introductory statistics courses in sociology but is often presented in contexts divorced from the central concerns that bring students into the discipline. Consequently, we present five lesson ideas that emerge from a regression analysis of income inequality and mortality in the USA and Canada.

  17. Teaching Medical Sociology in Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gerard J.; Sobal, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    Provides 11 teaching guidelines for presentation of sociological material to medical students and addresses the problems of dense scheduling and competition for time in a medical school curriculum. Considers career implications for sociologists in this setting as well as resources available. (NL)

  18. Applied Medical Sociology: Learning from Within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, C. Allen; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Current training efforts used to prepare students of medical sociology to function in a changing professional environment are described. Crucial to this effort is the internship--that real-world experience where the students can learn the accommodative strategies needed to maximize interdisciplinary ties without loss of their identities as…

  19. Some Sociological Ideas for Conceptual Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smardon, Regina

    2008-01-01

    This review takes a critical position with regards to Treagust and Duit's article, "Conceptual Change: A discussion of theoretical methodological and practical challenges for science education." It is proposed that conceptual change research in science education might benefit from borrowing concepts currently being developed in the sociology of…

  20. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  1. The Continuation of the Dialectic in Sociology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus

    2010-01-01

    A rapidly changing ‘society’ that requires ‘new units of analysis’, ‘new roles for sociology’, and new democratic commitment to ‘the publics’ has implications for the identity and calling of sociology. In this so-called ‘identity crisis’, some sociologists have introduced the so-called ‘after dialec

  2. Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, Patti; Anderson, Cynthia; Bird, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes two teaching strategies from our workshop, "Teaching the Sociology of Gender and Work," that can help students understand the mechanisms and consequences of workplace gender inequality at the macro- and micro-levels. Cynthia Anderson's class project uses wage and sex composition data that allows students to learn actively how…

  3. Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings for Teaching Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses using open Alcoholics Anonymous meetings for teaching sociology courses. Suggests that the meetings provide excellent case studies and can exemplify a variety of topics. Stresses that three conditions must be present: (1) easy access to meetings and high student interest; (2) meeting experience is integrated into course; and (3) student…

  4. Research Progress in the Effect of Scenic Recreational Forest on People's Physiological and Psychological Health%风景游憩林对人们身心健康影响研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温静; 刘昕昕; 黄祥丰; 高园园; 贠小琴; 魏松坡

    2012-01-01

    随着人们生活水平的提高,城市居民迫切希望进入森林开展户外游憩活动以便放松身心、强身健体.分析了空气负离子、植物挥发物等森林保健资源对人体生理和心理健康的影响,并对风景游憩林保健功能研究现状及农村旅游发展态势进行了探讨.%With the improvement of peoples living standards, city residents are eager to have outdoor recreational activities in scenic recreational forest in order to loosen mind and exercise body. In the paper, the effect of forest healthcare resources, such as the air negative ions and plant volatiles on human physiological and psychological health was analyzed. In addition, the research status and development of healthcare function of scenic recreational forest was discussed.

  5. Origins and canons: medicine and the history of sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Fran

    2010-01-01

    Differing accounts are conventionally given of the origins of medical sociology and its parent discipline sociology. These distinct "histories" are justified on the basis that the sociological founders were uninterested in medicine, mortality and disease. This article challenges these "constructions" of the past, proposing the theorization of health not as a "late development of sociology" but an integral part of its formation. Drawing on a selection of key sociological texts, it is argued that evidence of the founders' sustained interest in the infirmities of the individual, of mortality, and in medicine, have been expunged from the historical record through processes of "canonization" and "medicalization."

  6. Effects of Exercise on Psychological State and Physiological Function in the Elderly%运动锻炼对老年人心理状态及生理功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伟; 李光华; 杨俏玲; 郭忠琴

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨运动锻炼对老年人心理状态及生理功能的影响.方法 筛选128名老年人,分为对照组和运动组.采用SCL-90调查表评价其心理状态,测定其握力、心率、血压及免疫球蛋白含量,分析其生理功能变化.结果 运动组人际关系、抑郁、偏执因子及总平均分得分均低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05或0.01);运动组老年人心率(91.35±14.15)、收缩压(126.78±12.58)均低于对照组(96.22±13.31;132.22±16.51),P<0.05,运动组握力(31.06±10.21)高于对照组(27.42±9.11),P<0.05;运动锻炼可明显增加老年人血清IgG(13.16±2.60/11.06±2.86)与IgM(1.28±0.22/1.19 ±0.21)的水平(P<0.05,P<0.01).结论 运动锻炼可防止老年人心理障碍的发生、增强肌握力、改善心血管及机体免疫功能,有助于老年人的身心健康.%Objective To explore the effect of exercise on elder people physiological state and physiological function. Methods 128 subjects were divided into the control group and the exercise group. Psychological state was evaluated Using SCL - 90 questionnaire in elder people. The grip strength, heart rate, blood pressure and immune globulin content were determined to analyze elder people physiological function changes. Results Significant difference was found between the exercise group and control group in interpersonal relationships, depression, paranoia , and total average scores ( P < 0. 05 or 0.01) ;The heart rate of the exercise group (91.35 ± 14. 15) , systolic blood pressure (126.78 ± 12.58) were significantly lower than those of the control group (96. 22 ± 13. 31; 132. 22 ± 16. 51 ) , P < 0. 05. Grip strength in the exercise group (31. 06 ± 10) were significantly higher than that of the control group (27. 42 ± 9. 11) ,P <0. 05. Serum IgG (13. 16 ± 2.60/11.06 ±2. 86) and IgM (1.28 ±0.22/1.19 ± 0.21) levels in exercise group significantly increased (P <0.05, P <0.01). Conclusion Exercise could

  7. Towards a global environmental sociology? Legacies, trends and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidskog, Rolf; Mol, Arthur Pj; Oosterveer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    A current debate on environmental sociology involves how the subdiscipline should conceptualise and investigate the environment and whether it should be prescriptive and deliver policy recommendations. Taking this debate as a point of departure this article discusses the current and future role of sociology in a globalised world. It discusses how environmental sociology in the US and Europe differ in their understandings of sociology's contribution to the study of the environment. Particular stress is placed on how these two regions differ with respect to their use of the tradition of sociological thought, views on what constitutes the environment and ways of institutionalising environmental sociology as a sociological field. In conclusion, the question is raised of whether current versions of environmental sociology are appropriate for analysing a globalised world environment; or whether environmental sociology's strong roots in European and US cultures make it less relevant when facing an increasingly globalised world. Finally, the article proposes some new rules for a global environmental sociology and describes some of their possible implications for the sociological study of climate change.

  8. Cognitive psychological theories of suicidal behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Saška Roškar

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal behaviour is a consequence of simultaneous influences of many factors. Basically it can be regarded as a consequence of an interplay of two risk factors, namely genetic and environmental, which express themselves in the form of sociological, biological and psychological factors. It is difficult to find a theory of suicidal behaviour which would cover or consider all factors, and although present theories are overlapping, they emphasize different risk factors. More recent studies are ...

  9. On Social Psychology and Human Nature: An Interview with Roy Baumeister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Natalie Kerr

    2008-01-01

    Roy F. Baumeister currently holds the Eppes Eminent Professorship in the Department of Psychology at Florida State University. He received his PhD in social psychology from Princeton in 1978 working under Edward E. Jones. After a postdoctoral fellowship in sociology at Berkeley, he spent 23 years on the faculty at Case Western Reserve University,…

  10. PCI治疗前护理干预对患者身心状态影响的研究%Study the physiological and psychological influence for the patients who have used the nursing intervention before percutaneous coronary intervention therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祥芝

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the physiologieal and psychological influence for the patients who have used the nursing intervention before percutaneous coronary intervention therapy(PCI).Methods 95 cases in the cardiovascular department were divided into two groups randomly:the intervention group,47 cases and the control group,48 cases before PGI.The control group have been adopted the conventional nursing,the intervention group adopted the foundation of conventional nursing,carrying on preoperative visiting and seeing on the first day afternoon and before PCI,and then the nurses pick up their patients into the operating room and evaluate the condition of anxiety and heart rate,blood pressure before PCI 30 minutes.Results There are significant difference between two groups in the condition of anxious,heart rate,and blood pressure(P<0.01).Concluslon The nursing intervention before percutaneous coronary intervention therapy(PCI)can effectively alleviate the PCI patients's physiological and psychological reaction effectively and being advantageous the PCI process.%目的 探讨PCI前护理干预对患者心理和生理方面的影响.方法 将95例在心内科准备行PCI治疗的患者随机分为干预组47例,对照组48例.对照组患者采用常规护理,干预组患者在常规护理的基础上,在进行PCI前1 d下午护士进行访视,手术前由访视护士接病人进入介入室,术前1 d和术前30 min评估病人观察指标.结果 干预组患者焦虑水平、心率、血压与对照组比较差异均有显著性(P<0.01).结论 PCI前护理干预可以有效缓解患者心理和生理应激反应,有利于PCI的顺利进行.

  11. Physiological mechanisms of prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G

    2017-08-12

    Psychophysiological perspectives can provide unique insights into the nature and motivations of children's prosociality and inform our understanding of individual differences. Here, I review current research on prosociality involving some of the most common physiological measures in developmental psychology, including cortisol, various sympathetic nervous system measures, and high-frequency heart rate variability. The literature has been quite mixed, in part because the link between physiology and prosociality is context-dependent and person-dependent. However, recent advances are refining our understanding of the basic physiological mechanisms of prosociality. Resting physiology that contributes to a balance of regulation and vigilance prepares children to effectively cope with future social challenges, like noticing and attending to the needs of others. Experiencing some arousal is an important aspect of empathy-related responding, but physiological patterns of both heightened and hypoarousal can undermine prosociality. Physiological flexibility in response to others' needs may support emotional and behavioral flexibility important for prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. USSR Report, Political and Sociological Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    novel — from publicistic interpretations of current events to deep and penetrating intellectual and psychological reflexion, from the empiricism of...young people, for the selection and placement of personnel and for their practical and psychological reorganization in accordance with contemporary...workers. It is neces- sary to conduct constant work on the psychological reorientation of people, especially managers, and conduct a decisive struggle

  13. Medical and Psychological Determinants on the Development in Aged Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Scherzer, R.

    The relationships between somatic and sociological-psychological variables are complex. Each mental change which occurs in aging is more or less closely accompanied by somatic changes. The reverse is also true. The objective state of health and the subjective feeling of well-being are linked. Both can exert an influence over behavior and…

  14. Willingness to Share Knowledge Compared with Selected Social Psychology Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Krok

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is one of the key determinants in the growth and competitiveness of modern enterprises. Hence, it is essential to analyse the factors that induce employees to exchange knowledge. The problem of sharing an intangible asset — in this case, the knowledge of individuals — can be viewed from many perspectives: psychological, economic, organisational, sociological and technological. The aim of this article is to explore selected social psychology theories and to analyse the incentives for...

  15. Sociological theory and the knowledge society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation and its knowledge society are bringing about a major change in the entire social system and this, in turn, is creating several discontinuities in the social order in many parts of the world. In some countries, the traditional economy has been thrown out of equilibrium, in some others the political system has been destabilised and in all countries the existing social order based mostly on conformity has been dislocated or de-railed. This paper examines the prospect of sociological theory in the wake of Information Technology (IT and Knowledge Revolution (KR that are overtaking societies the world over and that are changing many of the traditional values and norms of behaviour of individuals and organisations in society. It tries to habilitate sociology and its theoretical underpinnings in the matrix of the Knowledge Society built on Information Technology.

  16. Sociological theory and the knowledge society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation and its knowledge society are bringing about a major change in the entire social system and this, in turn, is creating several discontinuities in the social order in many parts of the world.  In some countries, the traditional economy has been thrown out of equilibrium, in some others the political system has been destabilised and in all countries the existing social order based mostly on conformity has been dislocated or de-railed. This paper examines the prospect of sociological theory in the wake of Information Technology (IT and Knowledge Revolution (KR that are overtaking societies the world over and that are changing many of the traditional values and norms of behaviour of individuals and organisations in society. It tries to habilitate sociology and its theoretical underpinnings in the matrix of the Knowledge Society built on Information Technology.

  17. Social kapital og økonomisk sociologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2003-01-01

    Social kapital og økonomisk sociologi (in Danish) What is social capital? We try to answer this question by using an interdisciplinary approach that combines economics and sociology in three steps. First, we introduce the general economic starting point from New Institutional Economics (NIE......) focusing on asymmetrical information and transaction costs. Next, we incorporate the capital theory of Pierre Bourdieu, demonstrating how cultural values may generally compensate for the presence of asymmetrical information. Finally, we introduce the concept of social capital as a more specific version...... of Bourdieu's capital approach. Overall, we suggest that social capital can be operationalized as a matter of trust. This would solve the fundamental problem in NIE, namely by compensating for asymmetrical information and thereby reducing the size of transaction costs following social and economic interaction...

  18. The sociological nature of science communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d’Andrea Luciano

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a reflection on science communication and on the communicative processes characteristic to the production of new-found knowledge. It aims to outline the role that sociology can play within this frame for greater understanding. The article first defines the main evolutionary trends in scientific research in recent decades, with particular reference to the emergence of new social actors. Following on from this, it will look at some of the epistemological conditions that may strengthen the sociologist’s role in the cognition of scientific production. Using this as a premise, we will look at a typology for science communication and its components, as well as some of its governing principles. The conclusion of the article indicates the added value that can be gained from the use of such a model, with the particular aim of identifying indicators that allow the evaluation of scientific research in sociological terms as well as those already in existence.

  19. Norbert Elias. A sociology of written culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Borges Leão

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with Norbert Elias’ historical sociology. In the first place, it asserts the civilizing process theory is pretty much based on objects from the written culture produced by European Courts in the 17th and 18th centuries: the articles of the Encyclopédie, the memoirs of writers and manuals of civility. In this approach I consider that separating the construction of sociological models from the corpus of specific documents from the Ancien Regime results in a dichotomic appropriation of the knowledge process, which is far away from Elias’ perspective. Finally, this paper analyzes Norbert Elias’ contributions to contemporary historiographic thinking, as well as the concepts of mentality, private life and the notion of childhood in Philippe Ariès.

  20. Economics and sociology: Between cooperation and intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Božo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In social sciences two opposing tendencies act simultaneously: the growth of specialization and the need for synthesis. Similar tendencies are noticeable when economics and sociology are in question. The need for these two sciences to cooperate was noticed a long time ago. However, an increasingly intensive exchange has been achieved only recently, particularly in the explanation of individual and group behavior. The works of Mancur Olson are a good example how the results of economics can be inspiring for the research in other sciences, particularly sociology and political science. Applying the results he got by analyzing the logic of collective action, Olson managed to attain significant insight concerning the functioning of economics and society as a whole.

  1. Effect of aviation physiological and psychological training on naval aviators%海军航空兵飞行员航空生理心理训练的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余红英; 熊万喜; 李刚; 李萌; 王蕾; 宋光

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore methods and effects of aviation physiological and psychological training on naval aviators . Methods One hundred and sixty-five aviators, who stayed in a certain sanatorium from March 2013 to May 2014, were used as our research subjects of aviation physiological and psychological training .Training methods included vestibular disorientation training , com-plex angular acceleration adaptation training and muscular coordination anti -G training.Then, training methods and results were ana-lyzed and evaluated accordingly .Results In the 165 aviators who received special orientation training , every aviator experienced simu-lated disorientation at least 3 times during spatial orientation training , with an induction rate of 100%.The qualified rate of 42 high-per-formance fighter pilots increased from 92.86%to 100%.Anti-G capacity of the aviators improved significantly after muscular coordina-tion anti-G training, with the qualified rate increasing from 88.5%to 100%.Conclusion Through actual training , the aviators had a better understanding of the purpose and significance of aviation training both theoretically and practically .Their consciousness and the enthusiasm for aviation training were greatly aroused .Furthermore, actual training enabled them to have better mastery of aviation train-ing methods and enhance self-health promotion, most importantly, it improved their spatial orientation and anti-G capacity.%目的:旨在探讨海军航空兵飞行员航训的方法与效果。方法将2013年3月至2014年5月在某疗养院疗养的165名海军航空兵飞行员作为航训对象,训练方法包括前庭性错觉体验训练、复合角加速度适应性训练、肌力协调抗荷能力训练,并分析和评价训练方法与效果。结果165名飞行员通过空间定向能力训练,每人都体验到至少3次模拟错觉,错觉诱发率为100%;42名高性能战斗机飞行员训练合格率从92.86%提高到100%;肌

  2. Elements for a of Rural Research Methodology. Sociological Monographs and the Rural Sociological Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERONICA DUMITRAŞCU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to provide an "X-ray image" of rural life through the inventory of certain research methods and techniques used in the study of Romanian rural communities. Sociological monographs, including the sociological rural atlas,were the epitome of Gustian sociology. The investigation of rural life focusing on certain key aspects - economic, political, and religious - simultaneously, can provide a more comprehensive perspective on the Romanian village than would be possible by considering each of these elements on its own. Hence, the monograph brings unity to past and present realities. The dynamic character of sociology, on which the Sociological School of Bucharest focused, can be applied nowadays as well. The sociologist is called forth now more than ever in order to interfere with social life. In this case, the methodological tool, that is the monograph, is very useful. Through the Social Atlas, the problems of rural communities can be anticipated and diagnosed and, as such, certain serious problems which take place in a social dimension can be averted. Hence, the Social Atlas project is very useful for research on rural life, as the maps capture the progress of social change.

  3. From sociology in medicine to the sociology of collective health: contributions toward a necessary reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Castro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available En este texto se aborda la distinción entre la sociología en la medicina (colaboradora de las instituciones de salud y la sociología de la medicina (independiente de las instituciones de salud. Se argumenta que, si es consecuente, la sociología en la medicina deviene sociología de la medicina. Como ejemplo, se discute el caso de los determinantes sociales de la salud que, inicialmente, asumen como no problemática la realidad ontológica de la salud-enfermedad y luego problematizan el concepto de salud-enfermedad y muestran que estudiar los determinantes exige estudiar también los determinantes de los procesos de construcción social de la enfermedad. Se muestra la ineludible necesidad de objetivar la propia salud colectiva, es decir, de aplicar las herramientas de la sociología de manera que podamos poner bajo examen los llamados factores objetivos de la determinación de la salud-enfermedad, el carácter socialmente construido de las categorías de conocimiento, y las luchas y relaciones de poder que determinan la viabilidad o no de tales categorías.

  4. Some sociological ideas for conceptual change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smardon, Regina

    2008-07-01

    This review takes a critical position with regards to Treagust and Duit's article, Conceptual Change: A discussion of theoretical methodological and practical challenges for science education. It is proposed that conceptual change research in science education might benefit from borrowing concepts currently being developed in the sociology of emotions. It is further suggested that the study of social interaction within evolving emotional cultures is the most promising avenue for developing and extending theories about conceptual change.

  5. China Report, Political, Sociological and Military Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Springfield, Virginia 22161. In order- ing, it is recommended that the JPRS number, title, date and author, if applicable, of publication be cited...Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS 83369 29 April 1983 CHINA REPORT POLITICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL AND MILITARY AFFAIRS No, 414 CONTENTS...paintings that can be advantageously reprinted in newspapers. The paper’s supplement " Satire and Humor" has been well received. It should continue to

  6. Integrated sociology by P. A. Sorokin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Nazarko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sociology of P.A. Sorokin is the unique phenomenon in science of XX of century. For works of Sorokin the use of integralism is characteristic for exposition of the positions, theoretical ideas. An ultimate goal of integral social science is a reconstruction of personality, society, culture. In this article we will consider essence of this conception, and also her application to the phenomenon of culture in creation of P.A. Sorokin.

  7. KRITIK TERHADAP ALIRAN SOCIOLOGICAL JURISPRUDENCE EUGEN EHRLICH

    OpenAIRE

    W.M. Herry Susilowati

    2000-01-01

    Eugen Ehrlich, seorang ahli hukum dan sosiologi dengan teorinya Sociological Jurisprudence, ingin membuktikan bahwa titik berat perkembangan hukum terletak pada masyarakat itu sendiri dengan konsep dasarnya “living law” yang mencerminkan nilai-nilai yang hidup dalam masyarakat (volkgeist). Dan apa yang dimaksud dengan volkgeist itu, Eugen Ehrlich tidak dapat memberikan jawaban secara memuaskan. Mochtar Kusumaatmadja mencoba mencari jalan keluar dengan teorinya yang dikenal dengan Teori Hukum ...

  8. knowledge and information on psychological, physiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-11-03

    Nov 3, 2011 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. KNOWLEDGE AND ... and unplanned pregnancies and infection with. STIs including ... mellitus, hyper/ hypothyroidism, poly-cystic ovary. (PCO), ..... rate of teenage conception among young women. (17).

  9. Psychological and Physiological Responses to Depressed Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-18

    system and electrodermal activity . In M. G. H. Coles, E. Donchin, & S. W. Porges (Eds.), Psychophysiology: Systems, processes, and applications. New...scale. Interaction of target affect and target gender on participants’ passive/ active ratings on how target would like to be seen scale. Interaction...symptoms, and because of the discovery of feedback regulation systems connected to sleep , appetitive, and libido centers and related to the monoamine

  10. Gender and physics: a sociological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendick, Heather

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I take a sociological approach to understanding the under-representation of gender and physics. I argue that gender is something we do not something that we are. Thus, every aspect of our behaviour, including our engagement (or not) with physics becomes part of our performance of gender. I then use a brief historical analysis and an example from popular culture to show how physics is culturally aligned with masculinity. The impact is that the subject feels more ‘natural’ for men than for women. I end with some of the implications of this for those who want to make physics more accessible to girls and women. (EDITORS NOTE: This paper was given at the Improving Gender Balance (IGB) conference in Cambridge, UK, in March 2015, organised by the Institute of Physics. This conference was for schools and their supporters who were part of the IGB strand of the Stimulating Physics Network, funded by the Department for Education. It aimed to summarise some of the sociological perspectives on girls and physics for the benefit of the teachers attending the conference. We feel that it may be a useful summary for those teachers of physics who are unfamiliar with sociological approaches to gender and the classroom.)

  11. A Sociological Analysis of Ethical Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Emmerich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines a theoretical and conceptual account for the analysis of contemporary ethical or “bioethical” expertise. The substantive focus is on the academic discipline of bioethics—understood as a “practical” or “applied” ethics—and its relationship to medicine and medical ethics. I draw intellectual inspiration from the sociology of science and make use of research into the idea of “expertise” per se. In so doing, I am attempting to move the debate beyond the limitations placed upon it by philosophical or meta-ethical analysis and develop a perspective than can be used to address the sociological reality of (bioethical expertise. To do so, I offer the terms ethos and eidos to provide a basic conceptual framework for the sociological analysis of “morality” and “ethics.” I then turn to an exegesis of Collins and Evans’s account of ubiquitous, contributory, and interactional expertise and situate these topics in relation to academic bioethics and medical practice. My account suggests a particular understanding of the kinds of relationships that “bioethics” should seek to foster with the social fields it endeavors to not only comment on but also influence.

  12. [Human nature--understanding psychology in Nietzsche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckhöfer, K

    1980-01-01

    It was tried to show some decisive and essential points of the psychological analyses contained in the complex work of the philosopher Nietzsche. The extent of his knowledge of man and his changeability constitutes here the field of an understanding, "unmasking" psychology with a sociological-historical touch. The thorough, slow ("lento") study of the original sources on the part of the master of a "connaisseurship of the word" seems to be indispensable for any reader trying to occupy himself with Nietzsche in a work of his own and the questions arising therefrom.

  13. A Sociological Interpretation of Emotion%情绪的社会学解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹弘飚

    2013-01-01

      在社会学视域中,情绪不仅是一种个体心理现象,更是一种复杂的社会文化建构。社会学对情绪的解读超越了情绪智力的限制,更加质朴地重构了情绪与理性之间的关系;借助反身性、主体间性等概念,社会学阐明了情绪与自我的关系以及情绪理解的发生机制;此外,社会学对情绪劳动、情绪法则的分析还揭示了权力关系对情绪施加的社会控制。%In the horizon of sociology , emotion is not only an individual psychological phenomenon , but more like a complex socio-cultural construction as well . The sociological interpretation of emotion goes beyond the limitation of emotional intelligence , and more appropriately reconstructs the relationship between emotion and rationality . Using the concepts of reflexivity and intersubjectivity ,it illuminates the affiliation between emotion and self and the mechanism of emotional understanding . Furthermore , the sociological analysis of emotional labor and emotional rules opens out the social control of power relationship on emotion .

  14. Remembering a sociology of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A sociology of human rights sounds almost like a contradiction in terms. Sociology is about social groups, about particular experiences, about how people, embedded in space and time, make sense of their lives and give meaning to their world. It deals with power and interest and the social bases of our experiences. On the other hand, human rights are about human beings in general, without temporal or spatial references, not about groups and their boundaries. Human rights are about humanity, located in the world and connected to an inviolable nature. Global media representations, among others, create new cosmopolitan memories, providing new epistemological vantage points and emerging moral-political interdependencies. As such, memories of the Holocaust contribute to the creation of a common European cultural memory based on the abstract notion of human rights. Sociologically, a theory of human rights has to show how universal and particular memories co-exist, are reconciled etc. and what it means for the recognition of the “other”, and the broadening of circles of solidarity.Una sociología de los derechos humans suena casi como un oxímoron. La sociología se fija en los grupos sociales, en las experiencias particulares, y en cómo las personas, marcadas por el espacio y el tiempo, dan sentido a sus vidas y atribuyen un significado al mundo. Trata del poder, el interés y la base social de nuestras experiencias. Contrariamente, los derechos humanos se refieren a humanos en general, sin referencias temporales ni espaciales, y no a grupos y sus límites. Los derechos humanos tratan de la humanidad, ubicado en el mundo y conectado con su naturaleza inviolable. Representaciones mediáticas globales, entre otras, crean memorias cosmopólitas nuevas, disponiendo nuevos puntos de vista epistemológicos y interdependencias morales-políticas emergentes. Así, las memorias del Holocausto contribuyen a la creación de una memoria cultural europea com

  15. Self-presentation of sociology in scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mamedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some methodological foundations of social cognition, socio-cultural and theoretical foundations of social science; defines a clear position in the sociology of science, criticizes the positivist’s approach to the analysis of the methods of sociology; epistemologically analyze such theoretical constructs, which formed the basis of modern sociological knowledge. The article posits the importance of theoretical knowledge in sociology and its philosophical and methodological foundations. Author explains the integrity of the science of sociology, it differs from simple empiricism. Here we describe the theory of Comte and Spencer, the theory of the scientific revolution Koyre, Kuhn’s theory of sciense paradigm and influence of these theories on the development of sociology (and their limitations. The author examines the methodological principles of postpositivism in the social sciences and social cognition in general and describes fenomenology and essential theories.

  16. The sociology of medical screening: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Natalie; Eborall, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Medical screening raises fundamental issues for sociological inquiry, but at present a well-developed sociology of medical screening is lacking. This special issue on the sociology of screening brings together an exciting collection of new work that tackles medical screening from a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. In this opening paper, we begin by explaining what we mean by screening, and why we believe screening merits sociological attention. Secondly, we reflect on the sociology of screening to date and provide an introduction for those new to this area. We then provide an overview of the papers in this collection, highlighting links and contrasts between papers. We conclude by reflecting on sociology's potential contribution to wider debates about screening, and propose future research directions.

  17. PSYCHO-SOCIOLOGICAL PERSONALITY TRAITS OF SEXUAL OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SlobodankaTodoroska-Gjurchevska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Criminality is an extremely heterogeneous social phenomenon that includes various kinds of deviant behavior. It also includes sexual criminality (crimes against sexual freedom and moral, which has highly negative impact on society and endangers the most intimate parts of a person’s life. The aim of this survey is to outline a structure of psychological features of sexual offenders, to determine the degree of their development and the way in which they are connected, as well as to describe certain social and sociological phenomena that are typical of sexual offenders. The results that have been achieved during this survey will successfully be implemented into the practical work of penal institutions in the Republic of Macedonia in order to ensure successful resocialisation and reintegration of sexual offenders in the society. Our experience and knowledge are compatible with world-wide trends saying that sexual offenders are mentally healthy people and that they cannot be included in any diagnostic category. The main results of this survey can be summed up into several points: in general, sexual offenders are male, aged between 26 and 33, with minimal education and without profession or employment. Usually, they do not behave in pathological manner and they are mentally healthy people. It is believed that resocialisation as well as a complex treatment will be necessary for people convicted of sexual offenses: not only will it represent prevention from committing new crimes, it will also be a breeding ground for their active participation in life out of the penal institutions

  18. A BRANCH OF SOCIOLOGY FORBIDDEN DURING THE COMMUNIST DICTATORSHIP: THE SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Professor DAN BANCIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The sociology of deviance emerged as a distinct field of social knowledge, trying to identify and explain the forms of deviance in society, such as alcoholism and mental illness, suicide, sexual pathologies, crime, corruption, etc. In Romania, before 1989, this subject was considered taboo, very few research teams being dedicated to investigating deviant manifestations. This article is a review and evaluation of the work of a research group of the Institute of Sociology of the Romanian Academy, before and after 1989, that initiated researches regarding deviance, publishing a series of books, studies and articles in this area

  19. Annotated Bibliography on the Teaching of Psychology: 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David E.; Schroder, Simone I.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography covering awards, computers and technology, critical thinking, developmental psychology and aging, ethics, graduate education and training issues, high school psychology, history, introductory psychology, learning and cognition, perception/physiological/comparative psychology, research methods and research-related…

  20. Annotated Bibliography on the Teaching of Psychology: 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David E.; Schroder, Simone I.

    1998-01-01

    Includes materials on: (1) abnormal and clinical psychology, and personality; (2) career issues; (3) cognition and learning; (4) educational technology; (5) faculty evaluation; (6) graduate education; (7) high school instruction; (8) history of psychology; (9) introductory psychology; (10) perception, and physiological and comparative psychology;…

  1. Darwinian Theory, Functionalism, and the First American Psychological Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    American functionalist psychology constituted an effort to model scientific psychology on the successes of English evolutionary theory. In part it was a response to the stagnation of Wundt's psychological research program, which had been grounded in German experimental physiology. In part it was an attempt to make psychology more appealing within…

  2. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY DURING THE LAST FORTYFIVE YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Orlov A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Sociology is one of the most important social sciences. Mathematical and primarily statistical methods are effective intellectual tools of sociologists. Let us analyze the work of the author of this article on the development of statistical methods to meet the challenges of sociology. Then we give the review of development of statistical methods in Russian sociology for 45 years (1970-2015). The basic scientific events of these years, first of all, were formation of applied statistics and its...

  3. The state of the art in medical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklin, Harris

    2011-08-01

    This is a review of the state of the art in Medical Sociology. Three approaches are used. One is looking at the work of the pioneers. Another approach involves examining textbooks, books of reading, and handbooks. The third approach is reporting on the 50th anniversary of the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. Special attention is given to the way medical sociologists examine issues in psychiatric diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  5. Psychology of anomie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narciso Benbenaste

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anomie is a phenomenon which not only affects daily life but also the quality of institutions and therefore, as studied by economic neo-institutionalism, the possibilities of economic development. So far the treatment of this phenomenon comes predominantly from the sociological theory. In the fi rst part of this paper we recognize some of Emile Durkheim´s contributions, adding Nino´s perspicacious comments as regards “anomia boba” (“dull anomie”.Then we describe, what makes the main purpose of this article, what we believe to be the basic psychological confi guration of a population in which anomie is not perceived as a negative value. That basic confi guration, which takes as a reference observations and data from our own research, consists of the following four characteristics-defi ned psychologically as regressive features: a The individual development represented as opposite to social interest; b tendency to represent the hierarchy as authoritarianism, where there is no difference between authority and authoritarianism; c the primarization of secondary links; d male chauvinism.

  6. Psychological Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ...

  7. Classical sociology and cosmopolitanism: a critical defence of the social.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bryan S

    2006-03-01

    It is frequently argued that classical sociology, if not sociology as a whole, cannot provide any significant insight into globalization, primarily because its assumptions about the nation-state, national cultures and national societies are no longer relevant to a global world. Sociology cannot consequently contribute to a normative debate about cosmopolitanism, which invites us to consider loyalties and identities that reach beyond the nation-state. My argument considers four principal topics. First, I defend the classical legacy by arguing that classical sociology involved the study of 'the social' not national societies. This argument is illustration by reference to Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons. Secondly, Durkheim specifically developed the notion of a cosmopolitan sociology to challenge the nationalist assumptions of his day. Thirdly, I attempt to develop a critical version of Max Weber's verstehende soziologie to consider the conditions for critical recognition theory in sociology as a necessary precondition of cosmopolitanism. Finally, I consider the limitations of some contemporary versions of global sociology in the example of 'flexible citizenship' to provide an empirical case study of the limitations of globalization processes and 'sociology beyond society'. While many institutions have become global, some cannot make this transition. Hence, we should consider the limitations on as well as the opportunities for cosmopolitan sociology.

  8. SOCIOLOGICAL SCIENCE AND EDUCATION IN SARATOV: HISTORY AND CONTEMPORANEITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. POKATOV

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the peculiarities of sociology and sociologicaleducation institutionalization in Saratov. Regional and university sociology institutionalization stages are being defined and their characteristic peculiarities are being considered. Special attention is being paid to the first period connected with the origin of the sociological science at Saratov University, with the working out of the plans of sociology teaching at the faculties and departments that existed at those times, with the organization of the first sociology chairs at the political and law department of the social sciences faculty. Some basic trends in scientific investigation of the first sociology chairs at the University are being considered on the basis of the existing archives materials and some other sources. And some stages in the lives of, the sociological scientists are being considered, too. And important attention is being paid to the formation of the sociological faculty at Saratov State University. Some basic trends in scientific investigation are being characterized as well as contribution of prominent scientists who worked at different times in the field of sociology at the University and the region.

  9. A critical look at the theories of sociology of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sever

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to discuss major theories of sociology of education in an attempt to reveal why we need to extend analysis beyond their current forms. It provides both a brief historical account for each theory and fundamental critiques directed towards them. Sociology of education has taken a historical turn by breaking away from the dominant understandings of functionalist theories of 1950s. The matters of history, social class, race and gender and their intimate links to the education began to occupy a prestigious position in sociological analysis of education. However, the new sociology of education also could not escape from creating its own field specific orthodoxies

  10. Task Differences, Stylistic Characteristics and Physiological Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    responses in Type A and B subjects. Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 1979, 9, 209-228. Dembroski, T. M., MacDougall, J. M. and Shields, J. L...C. and Denson, A. L. Information load stress, risk taking and physiological responsivity in a visual-motor task. Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 1983

  11. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  12. Smith's Sentiments (1759) and Wright's Passions (1601): the beginnings of sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbalet, Jack

    2005-06-01

    Treatments of sources of Adam Smith's sociological theory of the self and associated ideas in The Theory of Moral Sentiments typically refer to classical antecedents or the work of his teacher Francis Hutcheson or his contemporary David Hume. During the seventeenth century, however, many books on the passions were published in London that arguably constitute an important but neglected source of Smith's treatment of moral sentiments. These works are largely forgotten today but at the time were widely read. They are not philosophical, partly devotional and predominantly psychological. Although Smith does not refer to these works his argument resembles theirs in many places. The importance of the seventeenth-century books on the passions, apart from their role in the history of psychology, is their bearing on contemporary economic practices. In this paper the connections between Smith and one of these books, Thomas Wright's The Passions of the Minde in Generall, are indicated.

  13. Assessing the sociology of sport : On critical sport sociology and sport management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoppers, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    On the 50th anniversary of the ISSA and IRSS, Annelies Knoppers, one of the leading scholars in understanding the culture of sport in organizational settings, considers how the critical lens of sociology can enhance and mesh with research on sport management. Knoppers argues that there have been los

  14. Assessing the sociology of sport : On critical sport sociology and sport management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoppers, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    On the 50th anniversary of the ISSA and IRSS, Annelies Knoppers, one of the leading scholars in understanding the culture of sport in organizational settings, considers how the critical lens of sociology can enhance and mesh with research on sport management. Knoppers argues that there have been

  15. Assessing the sociology of sport : On critical sport sociology and sport management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoppers, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    On the 50th anniversary of the ISSA and IRSS, Annelies Knoppers, one of the leading scholars in understanding the culture of sport in organizational settings, considers how the critical lens of sociology can enhance and mesh with research on sport management. Knoppers argues that there have been los

  16. 舒适护理对老年血液透析患者生理及心理指标的影响%Effect of comfort care on physiological and psychological indexes for elderly patients with hemodialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳; 紫妮

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨舒适护理对老年血液透析患者生理以及心理的影响。方法选取我院自2012年3月~2013年5月的150例进行长期血液透析的老年患者,随机分为对照组和实验组两组,每组75例,对照组采用常规护理,而实验组采用舒适护理。采用SF-36表评价患者的生活质量和健康指数,同时采用医院焦虑自评量表(SAS)比较两组患者护理前后心理状态。结果观察组患者护理后的生活质量和健康指数明显优于对照组(P<0.05)、焦虑程度明显低于对照组(P<0.05)。结论采用舒适护理可以提高血液透析患者的医疗质量和生活质量,消除患者的不良情绪,有益于患者的身心健康。%Objective To explore the effect of comfort care on physiological and psychological indexes for elderly patients with hemodialysis. Methods 150 elderly patients with hemodialysis in our hospital from March 2012 to May 2013 were selected, who were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, and each group had 75 patients. The patients in the control group received the routine care, while the patients in the experimental group adopted the comfort care. The quality of life and health indexes of patients were assessed by using the SF-36 scale, and the mental state of patients in the two groups were compared by using the hospital self-rating anxiety scale(SAS) before and after the care. Results The quality of life and health indexes of patients in the experimental group after the care were significantly better than those in the control group(P<0.05), and the anxiety degree was significantly lower(P < 0.05). Conclusion Comfort care can improve the quality of care and life in patients with hemodialysis, eliminate the patient's negative emotions, conduce to the patient's physical and mental health.

  17. Sociogenomic Personality Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W.; Jackson, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology. PMID:19012657

  18. Sociogenomic personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W; Jackson, Joshua J

    2008-12-01

    In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology.

  19. The Sociology of Tourism in Jost Krippendorf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano E. Korstanje

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present essay review focuses on the work of Jost Krippendorf, his problems to understand an all-encompassing model which would be self-explanatory. Although his project was ambitious, he undermined some basic points at time of formulating a theory of tourist motivation. To unearth the Krippendorf´s contributions, is a valid way of honoring his geniality. To date the world of tourism owes too much from the sociology of Jost Krippendorf. Analyzing the pastime as he proposes is the best way to understand many older forms of tourism existed before us. Our ethnocentrism leads us to think ours is the only way of making things.

  20. Sociological Inequality and the Second Law

    CERN Document Server

    Kafri, Oded

    2008-01-01

    There are two fair ways to distribute particles in boxes. The first one is the Casino way, namely an equal chance to any box. The second one is the thermodynamic way, namely an equal chance to any different configuration of particles and boxes. The second way, calculated here, yields an uneven distribution of the particles in the boxes. It is shown that this distribution fits well to sociological phenomena, such as to the distribution of votes in polls and the distribution of wealth. This distribution yields the Benford law, the distribution of digits in numerical data, as a private case.

  1. Economic Sociology and Economics of Convention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    as 1) the reformulation of the theory of action focusing on the uncertainty of social action; 2) pointing to the importance of collective frames of reference for individual rationality; and 3) the elaboration of a theory of institutions, focusing on the importance of conventions as forming...... the institutional framework of social action. Second, I explore two issues raised by economics of conventions that may be particularly important to consider for economic sociology. The first issue is the explicit exploration of the consequences of a plurality of forms of justification suggested by Luc Boltanski...

  2. Introduction: why a Sociology of Pandemics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Robert; Hoffman, Lily M; Staniland, Karen

    2013-02-01

    Infectious disease has re-emerged as a public health threat in an increasingly globalised era, adding trans-national actors to traditional national and local government actors. This special issue showcases new sociological work in response to this challenge. The contributors have investigated the social construction of new and re-emerging diseases; the development of surveillance systems, public health governance; the impact of scientific/technical modalities on uncertainty and risk, the interplay of infectious disease, public health and national security concerns, and public and media responses. The case studies range broadly across North America, Europe and Asia and define new agendas for medical sociologists and public health policymakers.

  3. The troubled relationship between psychiatry and sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, David; Rogers, Anne

    2005-09-01

    The alienated relationship between psychiatry and sociology is explored. The two disciplines largely took divergent paths after 1970. On the one side, psychiatry manifested a pre-occupation with methodological questions and sought greater medical respectability, with a biomedical approach returning to the fore. Social psychiatry and its underpinning biopsychosocial model became increasingly marginalised and weakened. On the other side, many sociologists turned away from psychiatry and the epidemiological study of mental health problems and increasingly restricted their interest to social theory and qualitative research. An interdisciplinary void ensued, to the detriment of the investigation of social aspects of mental health.

  4. Arte, sociedad y sociología

    OpenAIRE

    José Othón Quiroz Trejo

    2009-01-01

    Este es un análisis histórico-sociológico de la relación arte-sociedad-sociología. Se inicia en la Revolución Francesa y culmina en la actualidad. El recorrido permite conocer: la función social del arte para los fundadores de la disciplina; el surgimiento de las vanguardias artísticas; el auge y decadencia del arte socialista; el surgimiento de la sociedad de masas, la industria cultural y la cultura de masas; la degradación del arte moderno y el nacimiento del arte contemporáneo. Fenómenos ...

  5. Psychological and psychophysiological factors in prevention and treatment of cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes, B; Mills, W; O'Malley, J

    1993-01-01

    Cold injured patients in Alaska come from many sources. Although sport and work continues to provide large numbers of cold injured, most severe repeat injuries tend to reflect other biopsychosocial consequences. Certain behaviors can increase the probability of injury, however all persons living in cold climates are potential candidates. One can decrease risk by education, knowledge and intelligent behavior. Proper respect for adequate protection and hydration seem to be critical factors. Understanding the psychological, physiological and psychophysiological aspects of the cold environment performer helps refine the prevention and treatment strategies for cold injury. Skill training with bio-behavioral methods, such as thermal biofeedback, and the value of medical psychotherapy appear to offer continued promise by facilitating physiologic recovery from injury, as well as assisting in long term rehabilitation. Both approaches increase the likelihood of a favorable healing response by soliciting active patient participation. Medical Psychotherapy for traumatic injuries can also help identify and manage cognitive emotional issues for families and patients faced with the permanent consequences of severe thermal injuries. Thermal biofeedback therapy has the potential benefit of encouraging greater self-reliance and responsibility for self-regulating overall health by integrating self-management skills regarding physiology, diet and lifestyle. Inpatient and outpatient biofeedback training offers specific influence over vascular responses for healing, as well as providing an effective tool for pain management. Interest in cold region habitation has continued to expand our study of human tolerance to harsh, extreme environments. Biological, psychological, sociological, and anthropological views on adaptation, habituation, acclimatization, and injury in cold environments acknowledges the role of development, learning and educated responses to cold environments. The study of

  6. Gaming-Simulations in the Teaching of Urban Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Richard D.; And Others

    It is time that sociology made use of the increasingly popular teaching device of linking computer simulation and gaming. It is needed because in teaching courses in urban sociology, human ecology, and urban planning, we have found that: a) most class exercises present the community as a statis phenomenon; b) there is no quick and easy way to…

  7. Challenges of Urban Education: Sociological Perspectives for the Next Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Karen A., Ed.; Torres, Carlos Alberto, Ed.; Mitchell, Theodore R., Ed.

    The papers in this collection discuss the challenges facing urban education and the sociology of urban education. The more comprehensive perspective presented in this document can contribute to the improvement of city schools and the empowerment of urban students. Following an introduction, "Challenges of the New Sociology of Urban Education"…

  8. The Empty Shops Project: Developing Rural Students' Sociological Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Evan; Burns, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    An informal research project with high local relevance was developed for a first-year sociology course at an Australian rural university campus. The project developed students' sociological insight by challenging them to investigate "truths" about their own region, rather than immediately pushing them to comprehend new and different…

  9. Old Wine in New Bottles: The Undergraduate Major in Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, W. I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    How one sociology department in an urban university has responded to the enrollment crisis by returning to a somewhat more traditional and structured curriculum is described. Areas of concentration were developed, and a paralegal program was grafted onto the undergraduate sociology program. (Author/RM)

  10. New Frontiers: "Milieu" and the Sociology of American Jewish Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Bethamie

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century changing circumstances have prompted American Jewish educators to develop new educational strategies to address these needs, and these developments are an important aspect of the sociology of American Jewish education. Using the method of historical sociology, I examine the educational configuration at…

  11. The "Biographical Turn" in University Sociology Teaching: A Bernsteinian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Monica; Abbas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what happens to disciplinary knowledge when it is taught in contemporary UK universities of different status. Here, Basil Bernstein's theories are applied to what sociology lecturers say about teaching, demonstrating that in conditions in which students are less likely to engage with sociological theory, lecturers,…

  12. Disciplinarity in Question: Comparing Knowledge and Knower Codes in Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to understanding why curriculum design in a discipline with a horizontal knowledge structure is difficult, time-consuming and contested. A previous paper on the same case study in one sociology department reported that students who had completed the general sociology major found it lacking in coherence. To illustrate the…

  13. The Educational Imagination and the Sociology of Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the sociology of education is its proliferation under a broad gamut of research themes and topics. Understanding the relationship of education to social reproduction and social change are pivotal to the sociology of education, and have fruitfully informed research in fields such as gender and education, vocational education…

  14. Adolescent Crime in the Mirror of Sociological Expert Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of empirical sociological surveys in providing legal support for Russia's social development has a substantive foundation. Sociology and the juridical sciences share a common viewpoint when it comes to the study of social relations, namely the analysis of normative behavior. Social norms and the norms of law differ a great deal,…

  15. Sociological Research on the Byelorussian S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidyuk, Georgy P.

    1978-01-01

    Characterizes trends in the development of applied sociology in the Byelorussian S.S.R., which reflects general developments in the USSR as a whole. Applied sociology studies the specific laws of development and functioning of social structures, processes, systems, organizations, and their component parts. It researches specific social groups,…

  16. Using the Sociological Imagination to Teach about Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell Trautner, Mary; Borland, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The sociological imagination is a useful tool for teaching about plagiarism and academic integrity, and, in turn, academic integrity is a good case to help students learn about the sociological imagination. ?We present an exercise in which the class discusses reasons for and consequences of dishonest academic behavior and then examines a series of…

  17. The Educational Imagination and the Sociology of Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the sociology of education is its proliferation under a broad gamut of research themes and topics. Understanding the relationship of education to social reproduction and social change are pivotal to the sociology of education, and have fruitfully informed research in fields such as gender and education, vocational education…

  18. Disciplinarity in Question: Comparing Knowledge and Knower Codes in Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to understanding why curriculum design in a discipline with a horizontal knowledge structure is difficult, time-consuming and contested. A previous paper on the same case study in one sociology department reported that students who had completed the general sociology major found it lacking in coherence. To illustrate the…

  19. The "Biographical Turn" in University Sociology Teaching: A Bernsteinian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Monica; Abbas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what happens to disciplinary knowledge when it is taught in contemporary UK universities of different status. Here, Basil Bernstein's theories are applied to what sociology lecturers say about teaching, demonstrating that in conditions in which students are less likely to engage with sociological theory, lecturers,…

  20. Truth and Truthfulness in the Sociology of Educational Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael; Muller, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to reflect on and explore questions of truth and objectivity in the sociology of educational knowledge. It begins by reviewing the problems raised by the social constructivist approaches to knowledge associated with the "new sociology of education" of the I970s. It suggests that they have significant parallels…

  1. The Development of Visual Sociology: A view from the inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Harper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a reflection by one of the founding members of the IVSA (International Visual Sociology Association about the events, ideas, social trends and revolutions within sociology that contributed to development of visual sociology. In 2016 the IVSA entered its 34th year and the author has been a participant in the organization for its full duration. The paper details the importance of documentary photography in the early era of visual sociology. During this era key papers by Howard Becker contributed to the intellectual movement’s original intellectual definition and created a pedagogical model that has served as a model for teaching visual sociology to this day. Moving from visual sociology as a method based on black and white photography, the discipline embraced and developed collaborative methods including photo elicitation and photovoice. A parallel track of visual sociology focused on the analysis of the visual dimension of society, drawing on semiotics and cultural studies. More recently visual sociology has begun to explore the rapidly changing meaning and social function of photographic imagery, as cameras and images have become ubiquitous in the cell phone era.

  2. Science Fiction and Introductory Sociology: The "Handmaid" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laz, Cheryl

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the uses of science fiction to teach sociology and develop critical and creative thinking. Maintains that in the last 20 years science fiction has become concerned increasingly with social themes. Concludes with a detailed description of the use of "The Handmaid's Tale" in an introductory sociology course. (MJP)

  3. Using the Sociological Imagination to Teach about Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell Trautner, Mary; Borland, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The sociological imagination is a useful tool for teaching about plagiarism and academic integrity, and, in turn, academic integrity is a good case to help students learn about the sociological imagination. ?We present an exercise in which the class discusses reasons for and consequences of dishonest academic behavior and then examines a series of…

  4. Parsons, professions and the sociology of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaszewski, A; Manthorpe, J

    The fourth paper in the sociology series examines the work of the American Talcott Parsons. His work has particular relevance to the sociology of health and illness. The concept of the sick role as a means of understanding the effects of ill health, which he proposed, is critically examined here.

  5. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL, SOCIAL, AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this article, eating behavior is discussed from the point of view of various areas of psychology. First, tasting food and the perception of food palatability are discussed from the viewpoints of sensory and perceptual psychology and of physiological psychology. Second, the phenomenology of some social-psychological effects on eating behavior are introduced – for example, communication at the table, sociocultural variations in food liking/disliking, and emotional changes after eating. Third...

  6. La sociología del cuerpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIEGO CANALES

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la década de 1960 comienza una reflexión en torno a la dimensionalidad del cuerpo, motivada por la crisis de la legitimidad de las modalidades físicas de la relación del hombre con los otros y con el mundo, lo que genera los movimientos sociales de rebelión contra los antiguos valores. El cuerpo pasa a convertirse en el medio mediante el cual el ser humano se comunica con el exterior, a través de las actividades perceptivas y la expresión de los sentimientos y de las convenciones de los ritos de interacción. Se abría un campo de estudio muy interesante para la sociología y también para la historia: la sociología del cuerpo tomaba forma como una dimensión sistemática de estudio...

  7. KRITIK TERHADAP ALIRAN SOCIOLOGICAL JURISPRUDENCE EUGEN EHRLICH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Herry Susilowati

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eugen Ehrlich, seorang ahli hukum dan sosiologi dengan teorinya Sociological Jurisprudence, ingin membuktikan bahwa titik berat perkembangan hukum terletak pada masyarakat itu sendiri dengan konsep dasarnya “living law” yang mencerminkan nilai-nilai yang hidup dalam masyarakat (volkgeist. Dan apa yang dimaksud dengan volkgeist itu, Eugen Ehrlich tidak dapat memberikan jawaban secara memuaskan. Mochtar Kusumaatmadja mencoba mencari jalan keluar dengan teorinya yang dikenal dengan Teori Hukum Pembangunan, yaitu bahwa “nilai-nilai yang hidup di masyarakat” berkaitan dengan “perasaan keadilan masyarakat” atau “kesadaran hukum masyarakat”. Di samping itu, teori Eugen Ehrlich (Teori Sociological Jurisprudence terdapat 3 (tiga kelemahan pokok yaitu: pertama, ajaran tersebut tidak dapat memberikan kriteria yang jelas yang membedakan norma hukum dari norma sosial yang lain; kedua, Ehrlich meragukan pisisi adat kebiasaan sebagai “sumber” hukum dan adat kebiasaan sebagai suatu bentuk hukum; ketiga, Ehrlich menolak mengikuti logika perbedaan antara norma-norma hukum negara yang khas dan norma-norma hukum dimana negara hanya memberi sanksi pada fakta sosial.

  8. Towards a Sociology of the Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim McGuigan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of the mobile phone is an immensely significant social and cultural phenomenon. However, market hype and utopian dreams greatly exaggerate its importance. The fundamental issue for sociology is the process of change. Bound up with contemporary issues of change, the mobile phone is a prime object for sociological attention both at the macro and micro levels of analysis. This article considers the strengths and weaknesses of four methods for studying the sociality of the mobile phone (social demography; political economy; conversation, discourse and text analysis; and ethnography, the different kinds of knowledge they produce, and the interests they represent. Recent ethnographic research on the mobile phone, particularly motivated by issues around the uncertain transition from 2G to the 3G technology, has examined the actual experience of routine use. Interpretative research is now supplementing purely instrumental research, thereby giving a much more nuanced understanding of mobile communications. Critical research on the mobile phone, of which there is little, is beginning to ask skeptical questions that should be pursued further.

  9. Exploring the "Learning Careers" of Irish Undergraduate Sociology Students through the Establishment of an Undergraduate Sociology Student Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Patricia; Power, Martin J.; Barnes, Cliona; Haynes, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a faculty-reviewed student undergraduate journal titled "Socheolas: The Limerick Student Journal of Sociology" was officially launched. The journal, now in its fourth volume, is produced, edited, and managed by a small team from within the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick in Ireland. The objective of this student…

  10. Renewing Sociology of Education? Knowledge Spaces, Situated Enactments, and Sociological Practice in a World on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Sociology of education is caught in a dilemma. The study of education and society that unfolded through the twentieth century produced educational vocabularies that spoke into education policy and practice about inequality and social justice. Now that sociologically informed educational discourse is marginalised by individualistic…

  11. Sociology, Education and Equality in the Sociology of Education: A Review of Halsey, Heath & Ridge's Origins and Destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Norman

    1980-01-01

    Traces major trends in educational sociology since the late 1980s and reviews major findings from sociological literature of various periods. Emphasis is placed on interpretation of "Origins and Destinations: Family, Class and Education in Modern Britain," by A. M. Halsey, A. F. Heath, and J. M. Ridge. (Author/DB)

  12. Renewing Sociology of Education? Knowledge Spaces, Situated Enactments, and Sociological Practice in a World on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Sociology of education is caught in a dilemma. The study of education and society that unfolded through the twentieth century produced educational vocabularies that spoke into education policy and practice about inequality and social justice. Now that sociologically informed educational discourse is marginalised by individualistic…

  13. Exploring the "Learning Careers" of Irish Undergraduate Sociology Students through the Establishment of an Undergraduate Sociology Student Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Patricia; Power, Martin J.; Barnes, Cliona; Haynes, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a faculty-reviewed student undergraduate journal titled "Socheolas: The Limerick Student Journal of Sociology" was officially launched. The journal, now in its fourth volume, is produced, edited, and managed by a small team from within the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick in Ireland. The objective of this…

  14. Toward an Understanding of "Genetic Sociology" and Its Relationships to Medical Sociology and Medical Genetics in the Educational Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Odiet, Jeff A.; Miller, Steven I.; Fredericks, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we have demonstrated that a new subdiscipline in the field of Medical Sociology is urgently needed to integrate, interpret, and synthesize the interrelationships and implications of genetic discoveries, treatments, and prognoses upon societal behavior. That subdiscipline in our view is "Genetic Sociology."We applied the…

  15. Influence and canonical supremacy: an analysis of how George Herbert Mead demoted Charles Horton Cooley in the sociological canon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    This analysis assesses the factors underlying Charles Horton Cooley's place in the sociological canon as they relate to George Herbert Mead's puzzling diatribe-echoed in secondary accounts-against Cooley's social psychology and view of the self published scarcely a year after his death. The illocutionary act of publishing his critique stands as an effort to project the image of Mead's intellectual self and enhance his standing among sociologists within and outside the orbit of the University of Chicago. It expressed Mead's ambivalence toward his precursor Cooley, whose influence he never fully acknowledged. In addition, it typifies the contending fractal distinctions of the scientifically discursive versus literary styles of Mead and Cooley, who both founded the interpretive sociological tradition. The contrasting styles and attitudes toward writing of the two figures are discussed, and their implications for the problems of scale that have stymied the symbolic interactionist tradition are explored.

  16. Psychological Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Flohrer, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Instilling psychological empowerment in employees is one of the most important tasks of modern leadership. Building on quantitative research and the development of a new psychometric scale related to project management this thesis shows: First, individuals' characteristics and their work team environment influence perceptions of access to information and resources – two important antecedents of psychological empowerment. Second, while a project briefing strengthens the link of the psychologic...

  17. [Political psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2013-04-21

    In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects.

  18. [Psychological trauma and crisis intervention in children after earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-Hua

    2013-06-01

    As a momentous disaster, earthquake would bring severe psychological trauma to children, with an adverse effect not only on the physiological functions, but also on their behaviors, emotions, and cognition, and the short-term and long-term consequences are much greater in children than in adults. The children of different ages have different psychological reactions, so psychological intervention varies with children's age. Psychological intervention is still important long afterwards to prevent permanent psychological trauma in children.

  19. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  20. The sociology of popular music, interdisciplinarity and aesthetic autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lee

    2011-03-01

    This paper considers the impact of interdisciplinarity upon sociological research, focusing on one particular case: the academic study of popular music. 'Popular music studies' is an area of research characterized by interdisciplinarity and, in keeping with broader intellectual trends, this approach is assumed to offer significant advantages. As such, popular music studies is broadly typical of contemporary intellectual and governmental attitudes regarding the best way to research specific topics. Such interdisciplinarity, however, has potential costs and this paper highlights one of the most significant: an over-emphasis upon shared substantive interests and subsequent undervaluation of shared epistemological understandings. The end result is a form of 'ghettoization' within sociology itself, with residents of any particular ghetto displaying little awareness of developments in neighbouring ghettos. Reporting from one such ghetto, this paper considers some of the ways in which the sociology of popular music has been limited by its positioning within an interdisciplinary environment and suggests two strategies for developing a more fully-realized sociology of popular music. First, based on the assumption that a sociological understanding of popular music shares much in common with a sociological understanding of everything else, this paper calls for increased intradisciplinary research between sociologists of varying specialisms. The second strategy, however, involves a reconceptualization of the disciplinary limits of sociology, as it argues that a sociology of popular music needs to accept musical specificity as part of its remit. Such acceptance has thus far been limited not only by an interdisciplinary context but also by the long-standing sociological scepticism toward the analysis of aesthetic objects. As such, this paper offers an intervention into wider debates concerning the remit of sociological enquiry, and whether it is ever appropriate for sociological