WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychology science education

  1. Psychology's Role in Mathematics and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Nora S.; Ambady, Nalini; Eccles, Jacquelynne; Gomez, Louis; Klahr, David; Linn, Marcia; Miller, Kevin; Mix, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Improving mathematics and science education in the United States has been a matter of national concern for over half a century. Psychology has a vital role to play in this enterprise. In this article, the authors review the kinds of contributions that psychology can make in four areas: (a) early understanding of mathematics, (b) understanding of…

  2. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Patil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Education Psychology is one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines which is concerned with the description, explanation and control of the educational processes arising from the interaction between the teacher and learner in the context of a specified or unspecified subject. The concept of educational psycology is changing as a result of the general impact of the disciplines such as sociology, anthropology,economics, political science and so on. The subject matter of educational psychology is also reflecting a diversity of structures and emphases in its connection.

  3. Social Network Methods for the Educational and Psychological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Social networks are especially applicable in educational and psychological studies involving social interactions. A social network is defined as a specific relationship among a group of individuals. Social networks arise in a variety of situations such as friendships among children, collaboration and advice seeking among teachers, and coauthorship…

  4. Virtue ethics, positive psychology, and a new model of science and engineering ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2015-04-01

    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students' moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of motivation for self-improvement by connecting the notion of morality and eudaimonic happiness. Thus this essay attempts to apply virtue ethics and positive psychology to science and engineering ethics education and to develop a new conceptual framework for more effective education. In addition to the conceptual-level work, this essay suggests two possible educational methods: moral modeling and involvement in actual moral activity in science and engineering ethics classes, based on the conceptual framework.

  5. Piaget's epistemic subject and science education: Epistemological vs. psychological issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Richard F.

    1993-06-01

    Many individuals claim that Piaget's theory of cognitive development is empirically false or substantially disconfirmed by empirical research. Although there is substance to such a claim, any such conclusion must address three increasingly problematic issues about the possibility of providing an empirical test of Piaget's genetic epistemology: (1) the empirical underdetermination of theory by empirical evidence, (2) the empirical difficulty of testing competence-type explanations, and (3) the difficulty of empirically testing epistemic norms. This is especially true of a central epistemic construct in Piaget's theory — the epistemic subject. To illustrate how similar problems of empirical testability arise in the physical sciences, I briefly examine the case of Galileo and the correlative difficulty of empirically testing Galileo's laws. I then point out some important epistemological similarities between Galileo and Piaget together with correlative changes needed in science studies methodology. I conclude that many psychologists and science educators have failed to appreciate the difficulty of falsifying Piaget's theory because they have tacitly adopted a philosophy of science at odds with the paradigm-case of Galileo.

  6. Science Supports Education: The Behavioral Research Base for Psychology's Top 20 Principles for Enhancing Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucariello, Joan M.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Anderman, Eric M.; Dwyer, Carol; Ormiston, Heather; Skiba, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Psychological science has much to contribute to preK-12 education because substantial psychological research exists on the processes of learning, teaching, motivation, classroom management, social interaction, communication, and assessment. This article details the psychological science that led to the identification, by the American Psychological…

  7. Science Supports Education: The Behavioral Research Base for Psychology's Top 20 Principles for Enhancing Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucariello, Joan M.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Anderman, Eric M.; Dwyer, Carol; Ormiston, Heather; Skiba, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Psychological science has much to contribute to preK-12 education because substantial psychological research exists on the processes of learning, teaching, motivation, classroom management, social interaction, communication, and assessment. This article details the psychological science that led to the identification, by the American Psychological…

  8. The Psychological Efficacy of Education as a Science through Personal, Professional, and Contextual Inquiry of the Affective Learning Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, James Edward

    2013-01-01

    This monograph provides a psychological rational for the novel field of "Educational Science" and how it conducts in-depth research investigations first presented in an article by the author in the i-manager's "Journal on Mathematics" through the trichotomous analysis of the affective domain. Educational Science uses the…

  9. Bringing Psychological Science to the Forefront of Educational Policy: Collaborative Efforts of the American Psychological Association's Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Stephen A.; Subotnik, Rena F.; Bassford, Maya; Smulson, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The following article details the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education (CPSE). First, a brief history of the background and creation of the coalition is described. The article then details the projects, completed and ongoing, of the CPSE. Those projects include a Teacher…

  10. Bibliometric Analysis of the Journal «Psychological Science and Education»

    OpenAIRE

    Shvedovskaya A.A.,; Meshkova N.V.,

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the journal bibliometric characteristics of the journal “Psychological Science and Education”. The citation data were drawn from references of each article of “Psychological Science and Education” during 1996 and 2015. Data retrieved from the Russian Citation Index (E.library.ru) and the Portal of Russian Psychological Publications (Psyjournals.ru) database were used to identify the main cited journals, publications and authors.

  11. Learning Opportunities for Pre-Service Science Teachers in a Core Course on Educational Psychology: Changing Epistemological View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Saiqa

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an action research study aimed at challenging and changing the epistemological views of pre-service science teachers (PSTs) during a core course on educational psychology in a teacher education programme. The researcher, as an instructor, used this course to provide learning opportunities for PSTs to change their existing…

  12. APA Educational Psychology Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs;…

  13. APA Educational Psychology Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs; and close…

  14. APA Educational Psychology Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs;…

  15. Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Rena F; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Worrell, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    the measure of giftedness; and in fully developed talents, eminence is the basis on which this label is granted. Psychosocial variables play an essential role in the manifestation of giftedness at every developmental stage. Both cognitive and psychosocial variables are malleable and need to be deliberately cultivated. Our goal here is to provide a definition that is useful across all domains of endeavor and acknowledges several perspectives about giftedness on which there is a fairly broad scientific consensus. Giftedness (a) reflects the values of society; (b) is typically manifested in actual outcomes, especially in adulthood; (c) is specific to domains of endeavor; (d) is the result of the coalescing of biological, pedagogical, psychological, and psychosocial factors; and (e) is relative not just to the ordinary (e.g., a child with exceptional art ability compared to peers) but to the extraordinary (e.g., an artist who revolutionizes a field of art). In this monograph, our goal is to review and summarize what we have learned about giftedness from the literature in psychological science and suggest some directions for the field of gifted education. We begin with a discussion of how giftedness is defined (see above). In the second section, we review the reasons why giftedness is often excluded from major conversations on educational policy, and then offer rebuttals to these arguments. In spite of concerns for the future of innovation in the United States, the education research and policy communities have been generally resistant to addressing academic giftedness in research, policy, and practice. The resistance is derived from the assumption that academically gifted children will be successful no matter what educational environment they are placed in, and because their families are believed to be more highly educated and hold above-average access to human capital wealth. These arguments run counter to psychological science indicating the need for all students to be

  16. Genetics and educational psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert; Walker, Sheila O

    2003-03-01

    Molecular genetics, one of the most energetic and exciting areas of science, is slowly but surely coming to educational psychology. We review recent molecular genetic research on learning disabilities as a sign of things to come in educational psychology. We also consider some misconceptions about genetics that have slowed the acceptance of genetics in educational psychology. Diverse samples of children with learning disabilities have been studied, primarily in the UK and the USA. Linkage analysis can detect genes that have large effects on learning disabilities. Association analysis can detect genes of much smaller effect size, which is important because common disorders such as learning disabilities are likely to be influenced by many genes as well as by many environmental factors. For reading disability, replicated linkages have been identified on chromosomes 6, 15 and 18. A gene responsible for a rare type of language impairment has recently been identified. For common language impairment, linkages on chromosomes 16 and 19 have recently been reported. More than 200 genetic disorders, most extremely rare, include mental retardation among their symptoms, and chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of mental retardation. Although finding specific genes associated with learning disabilities is unlikely to have much of a direct application for teachers in the classroom, such findings will have far-reaching implications for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of learning disabilities and for research in educational psychology. Educational psychology has been slower to accept evidence for the importance of genetics than other areas of psychology in part because of misconceptions about what it means to say that genetics is important for common complex disorders such as learning disabilities.

  17. An Ontologic Evaluation On Educational Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Erdoğan, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Thisarticle investigates emergence, development and existence of the science branchknown as Educational Psychology. The topic has been studied on the basis of ahistorical perspective from both national and international aspects. EducationalPsychology is a field born via interaction between psychology and education. Onemergence of the field, William James, Stanley Hall, John Dewey, Edward L.Thorndike played a significant role. Educational Psychology has been classifiedas a sub-branch of psycho...

  18. Psychology as a Moral Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    of morality • Confronts the “naturalistic fallacy” in contemporary psychology. • Explains why moral science need not be separated from social science. • Addresses challenges and critiques to the author’s work from both formalist and relativist theories of morality. With its bold call to reason, Psychology......, Psychology as a Moral Science argues that psychological phenomena are inherently moral, and that psychology, as prescriptive and interventive practice, reflects specific moral principles. The book cites normative moral standards, as far back as Aristotle, that give human thoughts, feelings, and actions...

  19. Translating Neuroscience, Psychology and Education: An Abstracted Conceptual Framework for the Learning Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Gregory M.; Horvath, Jared C.

    2016-01-01

    Educators strive to understand and apply knowledge gained through scientific endeavours. Yet, within the various sciences of learning, particularly within educational neuroscience, there have been instances of seemingly contradictory or incompatible research findings and theories. We argue that this situation arises through confusion between…

  20. Changing educational needs of psychologists: do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belar, Cynthia D

    2008-03-01

    Psychologists of the 21st century must be highly skilled and versatile to function effectively in academic health centers (AHCs). Thus, the current paper focuses on the training psychologists receive to prepare them for their diverse roles in AHCs. The paper is framed around the question: Do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science? posed to the author by the conference organizers of the 3rd National Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Conference and is based on the perspective of the author.

  1. Building Bridges between Psychological Science and Education: Cultural Stereotypes, STEM, and Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    There is a gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. This presents a worldwide problem of inequity. Sociocultural stereotypes associating STEM with males act as barriers that prevent girls from developing interests in STEM. This article aims to show that we can increase equity and enhance outcomes for a…

  2. Cognitive Psychology and scientific education

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Ignacio Pozo

    1996-01-01

    For many years, specific content knowledge has been the main criterion for curriculum design. Consequently, school curricula, specially in science, had almost the same kind of organization and the same contents. Today, however, it is recognized that other criteria must be taken into account in curriculum design such as, for example, the psychological source. The constructivist tradition in science education, for instance, emphasizes students’ cognitive capacities. In this paper a critical ana...

  3. Cognitive Science and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Robert

    1988-01-01

    States that renewed research on the processes of learning and teaching is necessary if all children are expected to meet high standards of educational performance. Discusses cognitive science, a federation of psychology, linguistics, and computer science which offers a reconceptualization of the nature of the learning process and new approaches to…

  4. Psychology as a Moral Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    meaning, and posits psychology as one of the critical methods of organizing normative values in society; at the same time it carefully notes the discipline’s history of being sidetracked by overemphasis on theoretical constructs and physical causes—what the author terms “the psychologizing of morality......What does morality have to do with psychology in a value-neutral, postmodern world? According to a provocative new book, everything. Taking exception with current ideas in the mainstream (including cultural, evolutionary, and neuropsychology) as straying from the discipline’s ethical foundations......, Psychology as a Moral Science argues that psychological phenomena are inherently moral, and that psychology, as prescriptive and interventive practice, reflects specific moral principles. The book cites normative moral standards, as far back as Aristotle, that give human thoughts, feelings, and actions...

  5. Psychology, philosophy and nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, M.; Byrne, A. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    At first glance, one might wonder what psychology has got to do with nuclear science. On closer inspection, it is clear that nuclear science and technology have historically attracted controversy, and still today public and political opposition cloud its future, perhaps even more so with recent tragic events in Japan. A key focus for psychology has been an attempt to explicate public opposition to nuclear power, and this has been largely carried out by examining attitudes and risk perception. But it is easy to demonstrate that this has not been enough. There are also other important psychological issues that warrant greater attention than has been given. In this paper, I will first give an overview of the 'discipline' of psychology, including some inherent philosophical problems, before outlining specific psychological issues of relevance to nuclear science. I will then discuss whether these issues have been adequately addressed to date, before finally suggesting ways in which psychology might better respond to the questions nuclear science and technology raise. (author)

  6. Cognitive Psychology and scientific education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Pozo

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available For many years, specific content knowledge has been the main criterion for curriculum design. Consequently, school curricula, specially in science, had almost the same kind of organization and the same contents. Today, however, it is recognized that other criteria must be taken into account in curriculum design such as, for example, the psychological source. The constructivist tradition in science education, for instance, emphasizes students’ cognitive capacities. In this paper a critical analysis is carried out regarding the contribution of the Piagetian, misconceptions, and implicit theories approaches to curriculum design.

  7. Psychology, education and history: the paths offered by social studies of science to analyze the mobilization of conceptual and practice devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Sebastian Soto Triana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a reflection about the way in which the analysis of the history of psychology in Colombia has been constituted. It contributes a conceptual development to the classical tradition of viewing history as a reference to moments and “heroic” characters, neglecting analytical possibilities around various narratives that enable a broad understanding of the movements of psychology as a space for social appropriation of knowledge, sociotechnical network building and practices of translation of interests. Through a brief exposition of the case of psychology and education at the Gimnasio Moderno School of Bogota in the early twentieth century, the way in which Social Studies of Science provide important tools in terms of their epistemology and methodology for monitoring concepts, practices, adaptations and staging of European developmental psychology in an educational institution where childhood is a “mandatory step” in narratives about modernization is presented.

  8. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  9. The Psychology of Physical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Gregory J.

    2006-12-01

    Who becomes a physical scientist is not completely a coincidence. People with spatial talent and who are thing-oriented are most likely to be attracted to physical science, including astronomy. Additional lessons from the psychology of science suggest that compared with non-scientists and social scientists, physical scientists are most likely to be introverted, independent, self-confident, and yet somewhat arrogant. Understanding the physical and inanimate world is part of what physical scientists do, and understanding those who understand the physical world is part of what psychologists of science do.

  10. Psychology in the education of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Silva Bandeira de Melo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the teaching of psychology in the education of nurses in the first decades of the twentieth century in Brazil. We present aspects related to nursing schools from Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte. Topics presented in the psychology courses in the education of nurses were connected to the psychological debates at that time. During this period, we can see the changing from a training based on working experiences to a new model based on the scientific knowledge. The Brazilian government sponsored this transformation, which was grounded in a broad context of the raising of the worth of sciences in the country. Psychological knowledge contributed for the establishment of a new theoretical and practical nursing training. Analyzing teaching of psychology in the education of nurses contributes to a better understanding of psychology as a discipline in Brazil.

  11. The Teaching of Courses in the Science and Pseudoscience of Psychology: Useful Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Lohr, Jeffrey M.; Morier, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of courses in science and pseudoscience to undergraduate education. Addresses why psychology educators should be concerned about pseudoscience, courses in the science and pseudoscience of psychology. Includes a model syllabus, useful primary and supplemental texts, videos, Web sites for psychology courses in science and…

  12. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  13. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  14. From Emotional and Psychological Well-Being to Character Education: Challenging Policy Discourses of Behavioural Science and "Vulnerability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecclestone, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to challenge a strong consensus that governments must intervene in a worsening crisis of emotional and psychological well-being. The article relates rising estimates of problems and corresponding calls for intervention in educational settings to the increasingly blurred boundaries between a cultural therapeutic ethos, academic…

  15. Perceptions of psychology as a science among university students: the influence of psychology courses and major of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M; Hinds, Ryan M; Glass, Laura A; Ryan, Joseph J

    2009-10-01

    The goal was to examine the relationship between the number of psychology courses students have taken and their perceptions of psychology as a science. Additionally, differences in perceptions of psychology among psychology, education, and natural science majors were examined. Results indicated that students who had taken four or more psychology courses had more favorable perceptions of psychology as a science compared to those who had taken no courses or one course and those who had taken two to three courses. No significant differences in overall perceptions of psychology emerged among students in the three majors.

  16. Development of learning science after learning psychology

    OpenAIRE

    森, 敏昭

    2015-01-01

    Learning psychology began as a branch of psychology in the last couple of decades of the nineteenth century, and its history is therefore as long as that of psychology itself. However, learning science is a relatively young discipline: its development may be traced to 1991, when the first international conference was held and Journal of the Learning Sciences was first published. In the short subsequent period, learning science has grown rapidly as an interdisciplinary approach to learning and...

  17. Positive Psychology and Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    A relatively new movement in psychology, positive psychology, has many implications for the field of outdoor education. Positive psychology has the goal of fostering excellence through the understanding and enhancement of factors that lead to growth. It embraces the view that growth occurs when positive factors are present, as opposed to the…

  18. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY: THE SCIENCE AND PRACTICE OF PSYCHOLOGY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alfonso Piña López

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology is not a science of psychology, because it lacks a specific subject matter as well as conceptual categories that theoretically represent it. Even more, it is not built on the foundations of a theory that would make it possible to translate scientific knowledge into technological knowledge, applicable to social problems in which the psychological dimension is relevant. We conclude that positive psychology is more than just a “good fashion” or “sympathetic magic”; it is, in essence, an unwarranted and fruitless attempt to give life to a new and very different psychology. In short, it is a conspicuous example of the illogic of logic.

  19. Topical Articles: Teaching Psychological Science through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David G.

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of psychological science occurs face-to-face in classrooms and also through writing via op-ed essays, magazine articles, trade books, Web sites, and textbooks. I discuss the teaching of psychological science through such outlets, offer some practical suggestions for writing, and reflect on what I have found motivating, helpful, and…

  20. Why Psychology Cannot be an Empirical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedslund, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The current empirical paradigm for psychological research is criticized because it ignores the irreversibility of psychological processes, the infinite number of influential factors, the pseudo-empirical nature of many hypotheses, and the methodological implications of social interactivity. An additional point is that the differences and correlations usually found are much too small to be useful in psychological practice and in daily life. Together, these criticisms imply that an objective, accumulative, empirical and theoretical science of psychology is an impossible project.

  1. Psychology in cognitive science: 1978-2038.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, Dedre

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers the past and future of Psychology within Cognitive Science. In the history section, I focus on three questions: (a) how has the position of Psychology evolved within Cognitive Science, relative to the other disciplines that make up Cognitive Science; (b) how have particular Cognitive Science areas within Psychology waxed or waned; and (c) what have we gained and lost. After discussing what's happened since the late 1970s, when the Society and the journal began, I speculate about where the field is going.

  2. Is psychological science a-cultural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Joseph P

    2011-07-01

    The history of psychological science, as it has intersected with ethnoracial, cultural, and other marginalized domains of group difference, is replete with disinterest, dismissal, or denigration of these diverse forms of psychological experience. This has led some to wonder whether psychological science is a-cultural, or even anti-cultural in orientation. Assessment of this provocative proposition first requires exploration of three composite questions: (1) What is culture?, (2) What is science?, and (3) What is psychological science? Based on brief consideration of these composite questions--which are remarkably complex in their own right--I argue that psychological science is not, has never been, and indeed cannot in principle be a-cultural. Instead, like all forms of knowing, psychological science emerges at particular historical moments to achieve particular goals that are motivated by particular interests. Throughout much of the history of psychological science, these goals and interests were tied to ideologically suspect agendas that contemporary psychologists are right to repudiate. The interesting question becomes whether psychology's knowledge practices can be disentangled from this earlier ideological contamination to furnish the discipline with viable methods. I propose that psychological science can in fact be so disentangled; nevertheless, the resulting methods are never adopted or deployed outside of culturally constituted interests, objectives, and motivations, thereby requiring ongoing critical engagement with the subtexts of disciplinary knowledge production. In fact, there seem to be important ways in which psychology's scientific aspirations hobble disciplinary inquiry into the human condition that has motivated multicultural psychologists to consider alternative paradigms of inquiry.

  3. Gestalt Psychology and Bilingual Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomstedt, Bob; And Others

    Several concepts detailed in Gestalt psychology/therapy appear to have a close relationship with many concepts being applied in bilingual education. The primary contribution of Gestalt psychology to learning theory in the U.S. is an emphasis on perception and reintegration of relationships within an organized whole. To the teacher this means that…

  4. Positive Psychology and Leisure Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John Dattilo

    2015-01-01

      The purpose of this paper is to present a balanced and systematic leisure education service model grounded in positive psychology principles that are applied across diverse audiences and in various...

  5. Psychology and the National Medal of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Robert P.; Benjamin, Ludy T., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When Congress created the National Medal of Science in 1959 to be awarded by the president of the United States, psychology was not among the eligible sciences. A concerted lobbying effort in the late 1970s changed that situation, adding social and behavioral sciences to the listing of eligible disciplines. This article describes how the award…

  6. Women's Involvement in Educational Psychology Journals from 1976 to 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joy; Hsieh, Peggy Pei-Hsuan; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2005-01-01

    Previously, Robinson, McKay, Katayama, and Fan (1998) examined women's involvement in six educational psychology journals ("American Educational Research Journal," "Contemporary Educational Psychology," "Educational Psychologist," "Educational Psychology Review," "Journal of Experimental Education," and "Journal of Educational Psychology") from…

  7. Science teaching in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  8. Science Teaching in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Reading the interesting article "Discerning selective traditions in science education" by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of "CSSE," allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must…

  9. COMPUTER SCIENCE DEVELOPMENTS RELEVANT TO PSYCHOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    on-line control of experiments by man-machine interaction. The developments in computer science which make these applications possible are discussed...in some detail. In addition, there are conceptual developments in computer science , particularly in the study of artificial intelligence, which may provide leads in the development of psychological theory. (Author)

  10. Educational Psychology in Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Charlene T.; Kroeker, Sharon D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Directly employed by the territorial government, Yukon's educational psychologists are moving away from "refer-test-place" services by actively clarifying a broader scope of practice within a non-categorical model of special education services. Yukon's educational psychologists provide a variety of services, such as consultation,…

  11. Educational Psychology in Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Charlene T.; Kroeker, Sharon D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Directly employed by the territorial government, Yukon's educational psychologists are moving away from "refer-test-place" services by actively clarifying a broader scope of practice within a non-categorical model of special education services. Yukon's educational psychologists provide a variety of services, such as consultation,…

  12. Good science, bad science: Questioning research practices in psychological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation we have questioned the current research practices in psychological science and thereby contributed to the current discussion about the credibility of psychological research. We specially focused on the problems with the reporting of statistical results and showed that reporting

  13. Reproducibility in Psychological Science: When Do Psychological Phenomena Exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo E. Iso-Ahola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific evidence has recently been used to assert that certain psychological phenomena do not exist. Such claims, however, cannot be made because (1 scientific method itself is seriously limited (i.e., it can never prove a negative; (2 non-existence of phenomena would require a complete absence of both logical (theoretical and empirical support; even if empirical support is weak, logical and theoretical support can be strong; (3 statistical data are only one piece of evidence and cannot be used to reduce psychological phenomena to statistical phenomena; and (4 psychological phenomena vary across time, situations and persons. The human mind is unreproducible from one situation to another. Psychological phenomena are not particles that can decisively be tested and discovered. Therefore, a declaration that a phenomenon is not real is not only theoretically and empirically unjustified but runs counter to the propositional and provisional nature of scientific knowledge. There are only “temporary winners” and no “final truths” in scientific knowledge. Psychology is a science of subtleties in human affect, cognition and behavior. Its phenomena fluctuate with conditions and may sometimes be difficult to detect and reproduce empirically. When strictly applied, reproducibility is an overstated and even questionable concept in psychological science. Furthermore, statistical measures (e.g., effect size are poor indicators of the theoretical importance and relevance of phenomena (cf. “deliberate practice” vs. “talent” in expert performance, not to mention whether phenomena are real or unreal. To better understand psychological phenomena, their theoretical and empirical properties should be examined via multiple parameters and criteria. Ten such parameters are suggested.

  14. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Montag; Éilish Duke; Alexander Markowetz

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting ...

  15. Emptiness in psychological science and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychology is now one of the most popular sciences for young students. But whether academic production or professional practice, it is still in crisis. When we look together at two different approaches we realize the enormous amount of syncretism. They are not only two different approaches to the same science. They are more than that, they are different areas of knowledge, with very different practical implications. Discussion of psychology with the other sciences researching the same "objects" is nonexistent. So when it comes to practice, many of young psychologists leave the profession. This article is an invitation to colleagues for a "look inside" this interesting science that can make a significant contribution to human sciences and the better life of human beings in the 21st century. This call is supported by a re-reading of the text by Lev S. Vygotsky The historical meaning of the crisis in psychology written in 1927. The article is structured in four subtopics: the problem of general science (in Psychology, the problem of terminology, the problem of difficulty in recognizing the crisis and the problem of emptiness. Being a call, of course, it is not a complete and finished analysis. It is rather a desire that, engaging some colleagues, we can continue the dialogue with Vygotsky on this topic started by him ninety years ago.

  16. Political diversity will improve social psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, José L; Crawford, Jarret T; Stern, Charlotta; Haidt, Jonathan; Jussim, Lee; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists have demonstrated the value of diversity--particularly diversity of viewpoints--for enhancing creativity, discovery, and problem solving. But one key type of viewpoint diversity is lacking in academic psychology in general and social psychology in particular: political diversity. This article reviews the available evidence and finds support for four claims: (1) Academic psychology once had considerable political diversity, but has lost nearly all of it in the last 50 years. (2) This lack of political diversity can undermine the validity of social psychological science via mechanisms such as the embedding of liberal values into research questions and methods, steering researchers away from important but politically unpalatable research topics, and producing conclusions that mischaracterize liberals and conservatives alike. (3) Increased political diversity would improve social psychological science by reducing the impact of bias mechanisms such as confirmation bias, and by empowering dissenting minorities to improve the quality of the majority's thinking. (4) The underrepresentation of non-liberals in social psychology is most likely due to a combination of self-selection, hostile climate, and discrimination. We close with recommendations for increasing political diversity in social psychology.

  17. Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Vygotsky is widely considered one of the most significant and influential psychologists of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, true appreciation of his theories has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the background to his thought. "Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology" aims to demonstrate how we can come to a new and…

  18. Transpersonal: The New Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas Bradford

    1974-01-01

    Transpersonal psychology deals with altered states of consciousness, man's impluse to higher states of being, psychic phenomena, biofeedback, and voluntary control of internal states. Argues that it will lead to new educational understandings and practices. Discusses some of those practices and understandings. (Author/JF)

  19. Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Vygotsky is widely considered one of the most significant and influential psychologists of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, true appreciation of his theories has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the background to his thought. "Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology" aims to demonstrate how we can come to a new and…

  20. Science, Education, and the Ideology of "How"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to relate discussions of ideology and science within the Radical Science movement of the 1960s-1980s with present conversations on the integration of biology, psychology, and education. The argument is that an ideological analysis yields useful direction with respect to how a learning science might develop and how we might…

  1. Science, Education, and the Ideology of "How"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to relate discussions of ideology and science within the Radical Science movement of the 1960s-1980s with present conversations on the integration of biology, psychology, and education. The argument is that an ideological analysis yields useful direction with respect to how a learning science might develop and how we might…

  2. Performative Social Science and Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Gergen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of "Performative Social Science," which is defined as the deployment of different forms of artistic performance in the execution of a scientific project. Such forms may include art, theater, poetry, music, dance, photography, fiction writing, and multi-media applications. Performative research practices are in their developmental stage, with most of the major work appearing in the last two decades. Frequently based on a social constructionist metatheory, supporters reject a realist, or mapping view of representation, and explore varieties of expressive forms for constructing worlds relevant to the social sciences. The performative orientation often relies on a dramaturgical approach that encompasses value-laden, emotionally charged topics and presentations. Social scientists invested in social justice issues and political perspectives have been especially drawn to this approach. Performative social science invites productive collaborations among various disciplinary fields and between the sciences and arts. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101119

  3. The Lack of Representation of Educational Psychology and School Psychology in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jennifer L.; Blazek, Melissa A.; Raley, Amber B.; Washington, Christi

    2005-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to look at the representation of educational and school psychology in introductory psychology textbooks. Research into the representation of other sub-fields of psychology has been conducted but no research has looked specifically at educational or school psychology. The second goal was to compare the…

  4. The Lack of Representation of Educational Psychology and School Psychology in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jennifer L.; Blazek, Melissa A.; Raley, Amber B.; Washington, Christi

    2005-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to look at the representation of educational and school psychology in introductory psychology textbooks. Research into the representation of other sub-fields of psychology has been conducted but no research has looked specifically at educational or school psychology. The second goal was to compare the…

  5. PBL in Educational Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulevicz, Thomas; Jensen, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses practical and theoretical aspects related to PBL. In the first section of the article, potentials related to professional training of forthcoming educational psychologists following PBL-principles are analyzed. It is argued that PBL constitutes a good platform for creating ...

  6. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  7. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  8. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

  9. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  10. Psychology and Schooling: The Impact of Susan Isaacs and Jean Piaget on 1960s Science Education Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jody S.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the tensions between two psychological frameworks in the negotiation of teaching practices, curriculum, and ideas about what constitutes childhood: (1) the theories of Jean Piaget focused on behavior at different developmental stages; or (2) the Susan Isaacs research that took a general view of children's intellectual capabilities. (CMK)

  11. Psychology and Schooling: The Impact of Susan Isaacs and Jean Piaget on 1960s Science Education Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jody S.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the tensions between two psychological frameworks in the negotiation of teaching practices, curriculum, and ideas about what constitutes childhood: (1) the theories of Jean Piaget focused on behavior at different developmental stages; or (2) the Susan Isaacs research that took a general view of children's intellectual capabilities. (CMK)

  12. PBL in Educational Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szulevicz, Thomas; Jensen, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses practical and theoretical aspects related to PBL. In the first section of the article, potentials related to professional training of forthcoming educational psychologists following PBL-principles are analyzed. It is argued that PBL constitutes a good platform for creating...... stimulating interplays between theory and practice. In the second section of the article we discuss some of the theoretical underpinnings in PBL. We discuss whether PBL is prone to a ‘form-content-dualism’, in which attention is centred on the form (the problem) and less on the content of learning. Afterwards......, it is discussed whether PBL potentially leads to an individualization of the learning process. Finally, we discuss whether the PBL-literature primarily tends toward portraying student learning as a matter of acquisition of knowledge, and therefore ignores the ontogical and identity-related processes in learning....

  13. Advancing psychology as a bio-behavioral science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John E

    2008-03-01

    Concerns for the integrity of psychology as an independent discipline have caused some psychologists to object to introducing any knowledge from the biological sciences into the training of psychologists. However, calls for the greater incorporation of the behavioral sciences in medical education, increased attention to research on the mechanisms of bio-behavioral interaction, and initiatives in translational medical research and clinical care, have prompted increased interest in interdisciplinary research, health care, and teaching. These changes, in turn, are resulting in a re-conceptualization of the structure of academic medicine with increasing emphasis upon multidisciplinary knowledge and interdisciplinary collaboration, and less emphasis upon disciplinary insularity and competitiveness. If clinical health psychology is to play a role in this evolving concept of academic health care, it must adequately prepare its trainees to function in interdisciplinary academic health care settings. This will require not only expertise in the role of behavioral factors relevant to medical disorders, but also some basic familiarity with the biological processes to which those behavioral factors relate. With the evolution of its fund of knowledge, clinical health psychology has the potential to utilize its science to discover, describe, interpret, teach and clinically apply knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between biological functions and behavioral, learning, cognitive, socio-cultural and environmental processes. By failing to seize this initiative, clinical health psychology risks becoming irrelevant to the evolving model of medical research, education and health care.

  14. Science Education Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents eight separate articles on science education. Topic areas addressed include: an inservice course in primary science; improving physics teaching; reducing chemistry curriculum; textbook readability measures; school-industry link for introductory engineering; local education authority initiatives in primary school science; and "Winnie…

  15. The Magic of Psychology in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Educational psychology is a curricular requirement for most teacher preparation programs in the world. Knowledge of educational psychology is assessed on examinations for teacher licensure in most jurisdictions, and understanding of psychology is assumed to be indispensible for effective teaching at all levels. Traditional university-based…

  16. The Magic of Psychology in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Educational psychology is a curricular requirement for most teacher preparation programs in the world. Knowledge of educational psychology is assessed on examinations for teacher licensure in most jurisdictions, and understanding of psychology is assumed to be indispensible for effective teaching at all levels. Traditional university-based…

  17. College Student Perceptions of Psychology as a Science as a Function of Psychology Course Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F., II; Pettijohn, Terry F.; Brenneman, Miranda M.; Glass, Jamie N.; Brito, Gabriela R.; Terranova, Andrew M.; Kim, JongHan; Meyersburg, C. A.; Piroch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    College students (N = 297) completed a perceptions of psychology as a science survey before and after completion of psychology courses. Psychology as a science scores increased significantly from the beginning to the end of the research methods courses, but scores in introductory psychology courses did not change and scores for students in…

  18. College Student Perceptions of Psychology as a Science as a Function of Psychology Course Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F., II; Pettijohn, Terry F.; Brenneman, Miranda M.; Glass, Jamie N.; Brito, Gabriela R.; Terranova, Andrew M.; Kim, JongHan; Meyersburg, C. A.; Piroch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    College students (N = 297) completed a perceptions of psychology as a science survey before and after completion of psychology courses. Psychology as a science scores increased significantly from the beginning to the end of the research methods courses, but scores in introductory psychology courses did not change and scores for students in…

  19. Standards for educational and psychological testing

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and employment. It includes changes in federal law and measurement trends affecting validity, testing individuals with disabilities or different linguistic backgrounds, and new types of tests, as well as new uses of existing tests.

  20. Science in General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    General education must develop in students an appreciation of the power of science, how it works, why it is an effective knowledge generation tool, and what it can deliver. Knowing what science has discovered is desirable but less important.

  1. Psychological jurisprudence as an interdisciplinary science and the area of psychological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozdnyakov V. M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article convincingly demonstrates that Russia is increasingly began to publish monographs lawyers on key legal and psychological phenomena, and in dissertations in the formulation of the provisions on the protection of delatsya criticism of "Westernization" of the state legislation and upheld psychologicaland position. At the same time, critically, it is noted that in the field of legal ideology and policies, and in making innovations in the law still, as in Soviet period, dominated by legal dogma, and psychological realities are taken into account in fragments. The reason for this state of Affairs is that still within the framework of University training and further education of local lawyers, in contrast to international practice, insufficient attention is paid to the development of psychological culture, but in the end no full-fledged dialogue between lawyers and psychologists. Taking into account possibilities of integrative methodology justified the subject of psychological law as an interdisciplinary science and the field of psychological practice focused on the identification of regularities and mechanisms of development of legal awareness and legal existence of various actors in the legal activity aimed at the development of psychologically informed interventions for the improvement of legal ideology and politics, systems of law-making, law enforcement and crime prevention, psycho-technical methods and techniques in activities of law enforcement officials. For constructive development of psychological jurisprudence identified the key areas of research and nodal practicerelevant problems.

  2. Conservation Psychology: A Gap in Current Australian Undergraduate Psychology Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa Pearson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human actions have contributed to numerous environmental challenges, including climate change and a significant loss of the world’s biodiversity. As the scientific study of human thought and behaviour, psychology has much to offer in better understanding these issues, as well as fostering greater sustainability in human actions. Yet, despite this recognition, and increasing calls from leaders in psychology education to produce graduates capable of applying their disciplinary knowledge to such real-world issues to solve worldwide behaviourally-based problems; this may not be adequately addressed in current psychology training. The present study assessed the content of all APAC (Australian Psychology Accreditation Council approved psychology programs within Australia to determine the proportion which offered a psychology-focused course (unit specifically in conservation or sustainability. Based on the data advertised through each university website, it appears that only one of 39 programs currently offers such a course, with one other university implementing a conservation psychology course in 2013. Thus 95% of current APAC-accredited programs in Australia do not have a strong focus on training psychology graduates to contribute to addressing these important issues. The need for greater integration of conservation psychology content into undergraduate psychology education in Australia and beyond is discussed.

  3. Games in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a categorisation of science game formats in relation to the educational possibilities or limitations they offer in science education. This includes discussion of new types of science game formats and gamification of science. Teaching with the use of games and simulations...... or representations of knowledge in digital and physical science environments, Use and design of new types of models or tools for scientific inquiry and innovation education....... in science education dates back to the 1970s and early 80s were the potentials of games and simulations was discussed extensively as the new teaching tool ( Ellington et al. , 1981). In the early 90s the first ITC -based games for exploration of science and technical subjects was developed (Egenfeldt...

  4. Leaving behind our preparadigmatic past: Professional psychology as a unified clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchert, Timothy P

    2016-09-01

    The behavioral and neurosciences have made remarkable progress recently in advancing the scientific understanding of human psychology. Though research in many areas is still in its early stages, knowledge of many psychological processes is now firmly grounded in experimental tests of falsifiable theories and supports a unified, paradigmatic understanding of human psychology that is thoroughly consistent with the rest of the natural sciences. This new body of knowledge poses critical questions for professional psychology, which still often relies on the traditional theoretical orientations and other preparadigmatic practices for guiding important aspects of clinical education and practice. This article argues that professional psychology needs to systematically transition to theoretical frameworks and a curriculum that are based on an integrated scientific understanding of human psychology. Doing so would be of historic importance for the field and would result in major changes to professional psychology education and practice. It would also allow the field to emerge as a true clinical science. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Remodeling Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David

    2013-01-01

    Radical reform in science and mathematics education is needed to prepare citizens for challenges of the emerging knowledge-based global economy. We consider definite proposals to establish: (1) "Standards of science and math literacy" for all students. (2) "Integration of the science curriculum" with structure of matter,…

  6. Literacy, science, and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVittie, Janet Elizabeth

    In examining the connections between literacy, science and science education, I laid out a number of questions. For example, what sorts of literate tools might facilitate writing to learn, and do children who are just becoming literate use these tools? I then examined the writing of children in science class in an attempt to determine if their writing can indeed facilitate their learning. The results of this research could help teachers make decisions about the use of writing in the learning of science. The kinds of literate tools I identified as being potentially helpful were transitionals---those words or grammatical devices which demonstrate how ideas are connected. Also, I suggested that data tables, sentences and paragraphs were also useful for students to learn. I found that grade 5/6 students used a wide range of literate tools, but that they were much more competent with those tools which were both oral and literate than those which could only be used for writing (punctuation, sentences, paragraphs, and data tables). When I attempted to determine if the children used their writing to learn, I found very little evidence that this was certainly so. However, there was some evidence that paragraphs had the potential to create a "dialogue" between student writing and thinking, so the students could make more explicit connections between science ideas. Lastly, I noticed certain gender difference in the classroom. Because of this, I contrasted the writing of the girls with the writing of the boys. I learned the girls were generally much more capable writers than the boys. More interesting, however, was that the girls generally attempted to explain their science concepts in different ways than did the boys. The girls were more likely to rely on their own reasoning, whereas the boys were more likely to persist in using culturally created science explanations. The research findings have important implications for analyzing students' learning and for finding ways to

  7. Science Education through Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    To develop the pedagogic efficiency of informal education in science teaching, promoting a close cooperation between institutions is suggested by Monteiro, Janerine, de Carvalho, and Martins (EJ1102247). In their article, they point out effective examples of how teachers and educators work together to develop programs and activities at informal…

  8. Psychological training of German science astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzey, Dietrich; Schiewe, Albrecht

    Although the significance of psychosocial issues of manned space flights has been discussed very often in recent literature, up to now, very few attempts have been made in North-America or Europe to provide astronaut candidates or spacecrew members with some kind of psychological training. As a first attempt in this field, a psychological training program for science astronauts is described, which has been developed by the German Aerospace Research Establishment and performed as part of the mission-independent biomedical training of the German astronauts' team. In contrast to other training concepts, this training program focused not only on skills needed to cope with psychosocial issues regarding long-term stays in space, but also on skills needed to cope with the different demands during the long pre-mission phase. Topics covered in the training were "Communication and Cooperation", "Stress-Management", "Coping with Operational Demands", "Effective Problem Solving in Groups", and "Problem-Oriented Team Supervision".

  9. Exploring sustainable behavior structure in higher education a socio-psychology confirmatory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Juárez-Nájera, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a social-psychology model delineating the factors that may influence in an altruistic manner sustainable behaviour (SB) of students, faculty and administrators in four higher education institutions (HEI) with very different economic and social characteristics. It presents the areas where these individuals work (education and community management), and in which of them education for sustainability is promoted, focusing on four alternative methods of learning: play, art, group therapy, and personnel management. The book is intended for bachelors and graduated students, as well as researchers in social psychology, environmental psychology, conservation psychology, environmental education, education for sustainable development, cross-cultural psychology, and social sciences.

  10. Producing a Radio Show about Psychological Science: The Story of "Psychological Frontiers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Emily; Sachau, Daniel; Albertson, Dawn N.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a campus-based radio show about psychological science. The authors' goals in creating the show were to inform the public about the science of psychology and to create a teaching and learning resource for faculty members and students. The show, "Psychological Frontiers," airs twice a week and consists of…

  11. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-02-10

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare.

  12. Psychology in the education of nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Silva Bandeira de Melo; Rodrigo Miranda; Sérgio Dias Cirino; Regina Helena de Freitas Campos

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the teaching of psychology in the education of nurses in the first decades of the twentieth century in Brazil. We present aspects related to nursing schools from Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte. Topics presented in the psychology courses in the education of nurses were connected to the psychological debates at that time. During this period, we can see the changing from a training based on working experiences to a new model based on the scientific knowledge. The Brazilian governme...

  13. Teaching Educational Psychology in an Online Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Michael P.; Johnson, Janet T.

    2005-01-01

    According to David Berliner (1992), Regents Professor and noted expert in teaching educational psychology, the goal of teaching educational psychology is to influence the practice of teaching. Whether it is teaching preservice teachers how to motivate their students or how to write appropriate behavioral objectives and lesson plans, educational…

  14. Towards a Psychology of Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Miika; Miloseva, Lence; Page, Tom; Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2008-01-01

    This study will introduce some of the fundamentals and rationale for the Psychology of Media Education based on Developmental Psychology. It is an important area of study of a modern teacher profession and teacher education and a new field of multi-, inter- and trans-disciplinary knowledge and research. We argue that without a doubt the different…

  15. Educational science meets simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Susan J

    2015-03-01

    With the increased use of simulation to teach the knowledge and skills demanded of clinical practice, toward the achievement of optimal patient care outcomes, it becomes increasingly important that clinician educators have fundamental knowledge about educational science and its applications to teaching and learning. As the foremost goal of teaching is to facilitate learning, it is essential that the simulation experience be oriented to the learning process. In order for this to occur, is it necessary for the clinician educator to understand the fundamentals of educational science and theories of education such that they can apply them to teaching and learning in an environment focused on medical simulation. Underscoring the rationale for the fundamentals of educational science to be applied to the simulation environment, and to work in tandem with simulation, is the importance that accurate and appropriate information is retained and applied toward establishing competence in essential practice-based skills and procedures.

  16. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Éilish; Markowetz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting “Big Data” sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline. PMID:27403204

  17. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christian; Duke, Éilish; Markowetz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting "Big Data" sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline.

  18. Toward Psychoinformatics: Computer Science Meets Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Montag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides insight into an emerging research discipline called Psychoinformatics. In the context of Psychoinformatics, we emphasize the cooperation between the disciplines of psychology and computer science in handling large data sets derived from heavily used devices, such as smartphones or online social network sites, in order to shed light on a large number of psychological traits, including personality and mood. New challenges await psychologists in light of the resulting “Big Data” sets, because classic psychological methods will only in part be able to analyze this data derived from ubiquitous mobile devices, as well as other everyday technologies. As a consequence, psychologists must enrich their scientific methods through the inclusion of methods from informatics. The paper provides a brief review of one area of this research field, dealing mainly with social networks and smartphones. Moreover, we highlight how data derived from Psychoinformatics can be combined in a meaningful way with data from human neuroscience. We close the paper with some observations of areas for future research and problems that require consideration within this new discipline.

  19. An Early Psychology of Science in Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. García

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The psychology of science is a field of research emerged in the late 80’s and its basic interest is the study of the conditions determining the rise and development of scientists and researchers. However, in spite of its apparent novelty, it is feasible to find background widely disseminated in the work of previous authors. One of them is R. Ross, who wrote an article in the Paraguayan journal Letras in 1915. Ross argued that geniuses’ production is one of the most valuable potentials to which a nation can aspire and has a relevance degree higher than any kind of wealth. His argument agrees with considerations related to the subjective processes leading creative inspiration, the generation of new ideas and the relations between genius and insanity, a view that fits the ideas of the Italian physician Cesare Lombroso. The article concludes that Ross’ ideas may be identified as a distant background for the psychology of science, although it has not reached a later continuity in the work of other Paraguayan authors. The methodology adopted is both descriptive and critical, with a contextual analysis of the primary sources that are relevant to the problem.

  20. Globalization and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, J. Lawrence; Carter, Lyn; Chiu, Mei-Hung; Duit, Reinders; Martin, Sonya; Siry, Christina; Krajcik, Joseph; Shin, Namsoo; Choi, Kyunghee; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-06-01

    Processes of globalization have played a major role in economic and cultural change worldwide. More recently, there is a growing literature on rethinking science education research and development from the perspective of globalization. This paper provides a critical overview of the state and future development of science education research from the perspective of globalization. Two facets are given major attention. First, the further development of science education as an international research domain is critically analyzed. It seems that there is a predominance of researchers stemming from countries in which English is the native language or at least a major working language. Second, the significance of rethinking the currently dominant variants of science instruction from the perspectives of economic and cultural globalization is given major attention. On the one hand, it is argued that processes concerning globalization of science education as a research domain need to take into account the richness of the different cultures of science education around the world. At the same time, it is essential to develop ways of science instruction that make students aware of the various advantages, challenges and problems of international economic and cultural globalization.

  1. Citizenship and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses purposes and policies of science education, including present growth trends and the resulting problems of human ecological scarcity, global nature of these problems, and the need for a global response to alter current trends. Emphasizes the role of science/technology in the amelioration of global problems. (Author/JN)

  2. Science education through informal education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    To develop the pedagogic efficiency of informal education in science teaching, promoting a close cooperation between institutions is suggested by Monteiro, Janerine, de Carvalho, and Martins. In their article, they point out effective examples of how teachers and educators work together to develop programs and activities at informal education places such as science museums. Their study explored and discussed the viability and relevancy of school visits to museums and possibilities to enhance the connection between students' visits in informal contexts and their learning in schools. Given that students learn science by crossing the boundaries of formal and informal learning contexts, it is critical to examine ways of integrated and collaborative approach to develop scientific literacy to help students think, act and communicate as members of problem solving communities. In this forum, we suggest the importance of students' lifeworld contexts in informal learning places as continuum of Monteiro, Janerine, de Carvalho, and Martins' discussion on enhancing the effectiveness of informal learning places in science education.

  3. Successful Massive Open Online Climate Course on Climate Science and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccitelli, D. A.; Cook, J.

    2015-12-01

    In 2015, the University of Queensland and edX launched a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), 'Making Sense of Climate Science Denial.' The MOOC debunked approximately 50 common climate myths using elements of both physical science and psychology. Students learned how to recognise the social and psychological drivers of climate science denial, how to better understand climate change, how to identify the techniques and fallacies that climate myths employ to distort climate science, and how to effectively debunk climate misinformation. Contributors to the website Skeptical Science delivered the lectures, which were reinforced via interviews with climate science and psychology experts. Over 15,000 students from 167 countries enrolled in the course, and student feedback was overwhelmingly positive. This MOOC provides a model for effective climate science education.

  4. School Psychology Research: Combining Ecological Theory and Prevention Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    The current article comments on the importance of theoretical implications within school psychological research, and proposes that ecological theory and prevention science could provide the conceptual framework for school psychology research and practice. Articles published in "School Psychology Review" should at least discuss potential…

  5. Towards a Cultural Psychology of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marco Carre Benzi, David

    The present thesis is an enquiry about two distinct but complementary issues: the personal dimension of scientific activity, and the influential role that economists have had during the last decades in Chile. Regarding the former, this work complements existing philosophical, social, and psycholo......The present thesis is an enquiry about two distinct but complementary issues: the personal dimension of scientific activity, and the influential role that economists have had during the last decades in Chile. Regarding the former, this work complements existing philosophical, social......, and psychological studies of science with a cultural psychology perspective. This perspective aims to be sensitive to the personal nature of the scientific activity but also to the cultural conditions in which scientific knowledge is constructed, without subsuming any of these dimensions into the other. At the same...... time, this work offers a novel perspective on the notorious role that economists have had in contemporary Chilean society, a topic that has been mostly addressed as exclusively social and institutional. By focusing on economists’ experiences and views, this thesis shows that, while inserted...

  6. The Psychology of Education: Achievements and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, W. Ray

    2009-01-01

    Psychology has been closely involved with educational research, policy and practice since its emergence as a scientific discipline in the late 19th century but it has occupied a less certain place in recent years. This paper describes aspects of the organisational framework of psychology as a discipline and draws upon Research Assessment Exercise…

  7. Consciousness, Psychology, and Education: A Speculative Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980

    This monograph explores implications of the psychology of consciousness for education. The psychology of consciousness encompasses the relationships among behavior, experience, and states of consciousness. It is interpreted to include different states of consciousness, paranormal phenomena, mystical experiences, dreams, psychic healing, and other…

  8. Positive Psychology and Quality Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss concepts of positive psychology related to quality physical education. Positive psychology and the scientific study of happiness refer to three paths or pursuits: the pleasant life (positive emotion), the engaged life (engagement), and the meaningful life (meaning). When individuals are aware of, pursue,…

  9. Kierkegaard and psychology as the science of the "multifarious life".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the actuality of some considerations around psychology made by the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). According to him psychology is about the "multifarious" life, which is a term that pinpoints the challenges psychology still have when it comes to including changes and genetic perspectives on its understanding of actual living. Yet Kierkegaard discusses psychology in relationship to metaphysics, which is an almost forgotten perspective. His understanding opens up for narrowing the definition of psychology down to the science of subjectivity, which at the same time elevates psychology to being the only science that focuses on the actual human life. Yet Kierkegaard's most important contribution to psychology is to maintain a radical distinction between subjectivity and objectivity, and in this respect the psychology of today is challenged.

  10. Humanizing science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, James F.

    2004-09-01

    This paper argues that the diverse curriculum reform agendas associated with science education are strongly and critically associated with the educational characteristics of the humanities. The article begins with a survey of interpretations of the distinctive contribution which the humanities make to educational purposes. From this survey four general characteristics of the humanities are identified: an appeal to an autonomous self with the right and capacity to make independent judgements and interpretations; indeterminacy in the subject matter of these judgements and interpretations; a focus on meaning, in the context of human responses, actions, and relationships, and especially on the ethical, aesthetic, and purposive; and finally, the possibility of commonality in standards of judgement and interpretation, under conditions of indeterminacy. Inquiry and science technology and society (STS) orientated curriculum development agendas within science education are explored in the light of this analysis. It is argued that the four characteristics identified are central to the educational purposes of these and other less prominent modes of curriculum development in science, though not unproblematically so. In the light of this discussion the prognosis and challenges for science curriculum development are explored.

  11. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  12. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  13. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  14. Psychology and Music Education since 1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Explores different movements in educational psychology that have affected music education since the 1950s: (1) behaviorism; (2) cognitivism; (3) humanism; and (4) a socio-biological model. Describes each of the four schools of thought in detail as they related to music education. (CMK)

  15. Psychology and Music Education since 1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Explores different movements in educational psychology that have affected music education since the 1950s: (1) behaviorism; (2) cognitivism; (3) humanism; and (4) a socio-biological model. Describes each of the four schools of thought in detail as they related to music education. (CMK)

  16. Psychology and Critical Methodologies for Educational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco-Aguilar, Claudia Lorena; Baltar-de Andrade, María Julia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This thought piece analyzes the role of psychology in the methodology of socio-critical research in education. Methodology: Articles published in 2010 and 2007 are analyzed, linking psychology to education; a theoretical analysis is also made of the main academic exponents of the concepts of emancipation, resistance and sensitization, seeking to establish research methodologies based on critical theory. Result: A proposal is put forward based on critical research methodologies i...

  17. Whatever happened to the human experience in undergraduate psychology? Comment on the special issue on undergraduate education in psychology (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Hook, Derek

    2017-01-01

    This comment addresses the omission of a series of critical reflections in recent discussions of undergraduate education in psychology. The lack of a stronger focus on human meaning and experience, on social context, on methodological diversity, and on social critique limits the critical horizons of undergraduate psychology education. Many perspectives are routinely excluded from undergraduate psychology curricula and associated guidelines, particularly psychoanalytic theories, human science approaches, and related critical standpoints. These perspectives can offer an educational focus vital for development of students capable of critical reflection and social action. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Science education standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the National Science Education Standards that are being developed at the National Research Council. The Standards are being developed for the following areas: content, teaching, assessment, program, and system. The national science standards will call for the kind of science that provides both an understanding of the basic concepts needed for success in our high technology society, and the acquisition of process skills, or the ability to proceed step by step to solve a practical problem. Science should become a core subject like reading, writing and math in grades K-12. At all levels, the material taught should be interesting, both to students and to teachers. The profession of science teaching must become an attractive one, which is possible to do well without superhuman effort. The scientific community must accept responsibility for achieving these goals.

  19. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Thomas J. Bouchard Jr.

  20. Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Daniel T; King, Gary; Pettigrew, Stephen; Wilson, Timothy D

    2016-03-04

    A paper from the Open Science Collaboration (Research Articles, 28 August 2015, aac4716) attempting to replicate 100 published studies suggests that the reproducibility of psychological science is surprisingly low. We show that this article contains three statistical errors and provides no support for such a conclusion. Indeed, the data are consistent with the opposite conclusion, namely, that the reproducibility of psychological science is quite high.

  1. Beyond Objectivity and Subjectivity: The Intersubjective Foundations of Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Michael F

    2016-12-01

    The question of whether psychology can properly be regarded as a science has long been debated (Smedslund in Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science, 50, 185-195, 2016). Science is typically understood as a method for producing reliable knowledge by testing falsifiable claims against objective evidence. Psychological phenomena, however, are traditionally taken to be "subjective" and hidden from view. To the extent that science relies upon objective observation, is a scientific psychology possible? In this paper, I argue that scientific psychology does not much fail to meet the requirements of objectivity as much as the concept of objectivity fails as a methodological principle for psychological science. The traditional notion of objectivity relies upon the distinction between a public, observable exterior and a private, subjective interior. There are good reasons, however, to reject this dichotomy. Scholarship suggests that psychological knowledge arises neither from the "inside out" (subjectively) nor from the outside-in (objectively), but instead intersubjective processes that occur between people. If this is so, then objectivist methodology may do more to obscure than illuminate our understanding of psychological functioning. From this view, we face a dilemma: Do we, in the name of science, cling to an objective epistemology that cuts us off from the richness of psychological activity? Or do we seek to develop a rigorous intersubjective psychology that exploits the processes through which we gain psychological knowledge in the first place? If such a psychology can produce systematic, reliable and useful knowledge, then the question of whether its practices are "scientific" in the traditional sense would become irrelevant.

  2. Rural Science Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intress, C. [New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rural Science Education Project is an outreach program of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science with the goal of helping rural elementary schools improve science teaching and learning by using local natural environmental resources. This program is based on the assumption that rural schools, so often described as disadvantaged in terms of curricular resources, actually provide a science teaching advantage because of their locale. The natural environment of mountains, forests, ponds, desert, or fields offers a context for the study of scientific concepts and skills that appeals to many youngsters. To tap these resources, teachers need access to knowledge about the rural school locality`s natural history. Through a process of active participation in school-based workshops and field site studies, teachers observe and learn about the native flora, fauna, geology, and paleontology of their community. In addition, they are exposed to instructional strategies, activities, and provided with materials which foster experimential learning. This school-museum partnership, now in its fifth year, has aided more than 800 rural teachers` on-going professional development. These educators have, in turn, enhanced science education throughout New Mexico for more than 25,000 students.

  3. Issues in Science Education: Changing Purposes of Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Stan

    This paper addresses the role of science education in today's society and the objectives of instruction in science. Observing that science cannot solve all of the problems of the world, and that science education has had little effect on the willingness of the general public to accept superstitions, the author argues that instructional approaches…

  4. Consumer Psychology: Not necessarily a manipulative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølander, Folke

    1990-01-01

    Although definitions and discussion of disciplinary borderlines are tedious and often not that useful, it has to be mentioned that in this paper, a distinction is made between consumer psychology and economic psychology, with the former regarded as a subfield of the latter. Traditionally, economic...... psychology has indeed to a large extent been identified with consumer behavior research (for an account of the historical development of economic psychology, see Wärneryd, 1988). But what most writers seem to agree about today is to regard not only consumer behavior proper, but also the way individuals...... of worker/producer as in the role of consumer. Thus, although such phenomena are undoubtedly relevant topics of economic psychology, it seems appropriate to restict the term consumer psychology, as a subfield of economic psychology, to studies of the determinants and impacts of (a) saving/spending patterns...

  5. Science, a Psychological versus a Logical Approach in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2015-01-01

    Under which approach do pupils attain more optimally, a logical versus a psychological procedure of instruction? Pupils do need to achieve well in a world of science. Science is all around us and pupils need to understand various principles and laws of science. Thus, teachers in the school curriculum must choose carefully objectives for pupil…

  6. Psychology of psychology? A theoretization of psychological science through historical and socio-anthropological analysis of Psychology as institution

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Žužek-Kres

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a "new" history of psychology, which is also termed as "psychology of psychology". In some academic communities this unconventional history of psychology represents today an accepted approach to epistemological questions about psychological concepts and it enables an insight into social contextualization of Psychology as an institution. The conclusion presents a referential and institutional context where this psychology of psychology is realized.

  7. 中职政治学科教学中渗透心理健康教育初探%On Penetration Psychological Health Education in Secondary Vocational School of Political Science Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尔古果果

    2015-01-01

    中职学校的学生大多数是经常被老师"特殊关照"的弱势群体,这一年龄阶段的学生正处于青春期,这就决定了他们的心理问题易发和频发.因此,加强中职学生心理健康教育显得尤为重要.然而,目前有些中职学校受师资、教学实施等条件的制约,心理健康教育仍然是教育教学中的薄弱环节.笔者结合自己所教的政治学科,初步探讨如何在政治学科教学中渗透心理健康教育.%Most of the students in grade school teacher is often"special care"of vulnerable groups, the age of the students are in adolescence, which determines their mental problems and prone to frequent. Therefore, strengthening vocational stu-dents' psychological health education is very important. However, some vocational schools is subject teachers, teaching im-plementation and other conditions, mental health education remains a weak link in education. The author combined with his political science teaching, and explore how to penetrate the mental health education in political science teaching.

  8. Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher J; Bahník, Štěpán; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bosco, Frank A; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D; Cordes, Andreas; Cremata, Edward J; Della Penna, Nicolas; Estel, Vivien; Fedor, Anna; Fitneva, Stanka A; Frank, Michael C; Grange, James A; Hartshorne, Joshua K; Hasselman, Fred; Henninger, Felix; van der Hulst, Marije; Jonas, Kai J; Lai, Calvin K; Levitan, Carmel A; Miller, Jeremy K; Moore, Katherine S; Meixner, Johannes M; Munafò, Marcus R; Neijenhuijs, Koen I; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M; Ricker, Ashley A; Schmidt, Kathleen; Spies, Jeffrey R; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B; van Aert, Robbie C M; van Assen, Marcel A L M; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2016-03-01

    Gilbert et al. conclude that evidence from the Open Science Collaboration's Reproducibility Project: Psychology indicates high reproducibility, given the study methodology. Their very optimistic assessment is limited by statistical misconceptions and by causal inferences from selectively interpreted, correlational data. Using the Reproducibility Project: Psychology data, both optimistic and pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility are possible, and neither are yet warranted.

  9. Consumer Psychology: Not necessarily a manipulative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølander, Folke

    1990-01-01

    Although definitions and discussion of disciplinary borderlines are tedious and often not that useful, it has to be mentioned that in this paper, a distinction is made between consumer psychology and economic psychology, with the former regarded as a subfield of the latter. Traditionally, economic...... psychology has indeed to a large extent been identified with consumer behavior research (for an account of the historical development of economic psychology, see Wärneryd, 1988). But what most writers seem to agree about today is to regard not only consumer behavior proper, but also the way individuals...... and households perceive and react to economic phenomena such as taxation and other economic ploicies, inflation, and economic growth or decline as central topics of economic psychology.These phenomena, however, seem rather to affect the individual in the role of citizin, i.e., at least as much in the role...

  10. Decolonizing Psychological Science: Introduction to the Special Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Adams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite unprecedented access to information and diffusion of knowledge across the globe, the bulk of work in mainstream psychological science still reflects and promotes the interests of a privileged minority of people in affluent centers of the modern global order. Compared to other social science disciplines, there are few critical voices who reflect on the Euro-American colonial character of psychological science, particularly its relationship to ongoing processes of domination that facilitate growth for a privileged minority but undermine sustainability for the global majority. Moved by mounting concerns about ongoing forms of multiple oppression (including racialized violence, economic injustice, unsustainable over-development, and ecological damage, we proposed a special thematic section and issued a call for papers devoted to the topic of "decolonizing psychological science". In this introduction to the special section, we first discuss two perspectives—liberation psychology and cultural psychology—that have informed our approach to the topic. We then discuss manifestations of coloniality in psychological science and describe three approaches to decolonization—indigenization, accompaniment, and denaturalization—that emerge from contributions to the special section. We conclude with an invitation to readers to submit their own original contributions to an ongoing effort to create an online collection of digitally linked articles on the topic of decolonizing psychological science.

  11. Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 2014 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educational Research Association (AERA), 2014

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and…

  12. Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 2014 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educational Research Association (AERA), 2014

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and…

  13. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  14. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  15. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  16. Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology: Science and Scientific Thinking as Safeguards against Human Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for…

  17. Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology: Science and Scientific Thinking as Safeguards against Human Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for…

  18. Augmented Reality in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swenson, Hakon

    2015-01-01

    and challenges related to AR enhancing student learning in science in lower secondary school were identified by expert science teachers, ICT designers and science education researchers from four countries in a Delphi survey. Findings were condensed in a framework to categorize educational AR designs....

  19. Computer Science Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Lin, Su

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of computer science departments at universities in China. Educational principles that characterize Chinese computer science education are discussed, selection of students for universities is described, and curricula for both undergraduate and graduate computer science studies are outlined. (LRW)

  20. Computer Science Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun-Lin, Su

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of computer science departments at universities in China. Educational principles that characterize Chinese computer science education are discussed, selection of students for universities is described, and curricula for both undergraduate and graduate computer science studies are outlined. (LRW)

  1. The Educational Psychology of Clinical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jessica H; Rutledge, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Clinical training is paramount to the educational experience of learners, and the purpose of this training can be categorized into the following 4 categories of learning taxonomies: socialization, clinical reasoning, medical management of patient care and attitudinal change. This article investigates the educational psychology that provides the foundation of the categories of learning that take place in the clinical environment. Understanding this is critically important to create an opportunity for learners to activate their knowledge repertoire at the precise time of appropriate application.

  2. Environmental Education: New Era for Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Ozgur

    This paper presents the history of environmental education with regard to major issues, theories, and goals; environmental education in science education curriculum; and inquiry-based approaches. An example for environmental education curriculum content and an example inquiry laboratory for environmental education are included. (KHR)

  3. Researching Race within Educational Psychology Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Schutz, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we question why race as a sociohistorical construct has not traditionally been investigated in educational psychology research. To do so, we provide a historical discussion of the significance of race as well as present current dilemmas in the exploration of race, including an examination of the incidence and prevalence of…

  4. Psychological Education for Visually Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Don C.; Gerler, Edwin R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of two psychological education programs (Developing Understanding of Self and Others--DUSO, and Human Development Program--HDP or Magic Circle) on the affective growth of 42 visually impaired children in grades kindergarten through 3. (Author/SBH)

  5. Validity Semantics in Educational and Psychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathcoat, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The semantics, or meaning, of validity is a fluid concept in educational and psychological testing. Contemporary controversies surrounding this concept appear to stem from the proper location of validity. Under one view, validity is a property of score-based inferences and entailed uses of test scores. This view is challenged by the…

  6. Researching Race within Educational Psychology Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Schutz, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we question why race as a sociohistorical construct has not traditionally been investigated in educational psychology research. To do so, we provide a historical discussion of the significance of race as well as present current dilemmas in the exploration of race, including an examination of the incidence and prevalence of…

  7. Education in space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, C. Russell

    2005-08-01

    The educational process for teaching space science has been examined as a topic at the 17th European Space Agency Symposium on European Rocket and Balloon, and Related Research. The approach used for an introductory course during the past 18 years at Penn State University is considered as an example. The opportunities for using space science topics to motivate the thinking and efforts of advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students are examined. The topics covered in the introductory course are briefly described in an outline indicating the breath of the material covered. Several additional topics and assignments are included to help prepare the students for their careers. These topics include discussions on workplace ethics, project management, tools for research, presentation skills, and opportunities to participate in student projects.

  8. ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SUPPORT IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lukyanenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the modern concept of the FGOS the most urgent problem is the role of psychological and pe dagogical support of children in inclusive education. Talking about inclusive education, it should be noted that it is not only the creation of technical conditions for unimpeded access of children with disabilities in educational institutions, but also the specifics of the educational  process,  which  should  be  built  taking into account the psycho-physical capabilities of a child with disabilities. Thus inclusive education is understood and becomes in fact a complex and mu ltifaceted process of joint education and training of persons  with  disabilities  and  normally  devel oping peers. That is, inclusive education and the system of psycho-pedagogical support allow children with di sabilities more effectively progress in social development, which is based on social adaptation. It becomes obvious that psychological support is a cting as one of the key components of the education system in general and the basic, fundamental, component of inclusive education. This position of psych ological support to successfully implement individual opportunities of personal  development  and  provi ding  a  fully  adaptive,  mutual  perception:  the  child microenvironment microenvironment-child. Psychological support a systematic approach is the key to efficient operation of the educational institution that seeks  to  implement a  program  of  inclusive  educ ation.

  9. Inter-level relations in computer science, biology, and psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, Fred; Bruggeman, Frank; Jonker, Catholijn; Looren de Jong, Huib; Tamminga, Allard; Treur, Jan; Westerhoff, Hans; Wijngaards, Wouter

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into inter-level relations in computer science, biology and psychology call for an *empirical* turn in the philosophy of mind. Rather than concentrate on *a priori* discussions of inter-level relations between “completed” sciences, a case is made for the actual study of the way inter-

  10. Metacognitive strategies in reading comprehension of majors in education and psychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaeva I.V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study looks at how well students majoring in educational sciences and psychology were able to use spontaneously metacognitive strategies for reading comprehension. Students majoring in education have demonstrated ineffective learning goals and strategies. The results of the study show that only 7 percent of education majors sought to establish logical connections between the text fragments in multiple-choice assessment by contrast with 48 percent of psychology majors. The study showed that the number of education and psychology majors with metacognitive strategy of systematization has increased in the situation of self-formulated answer.

  11. Antonio Gramsci, Education and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balampekou, Matina; Floriotis, Georgis

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how the ideas of a great political thinker and philosopher Antonio Gramsci, are relevant to education and science and to critical science education. One of the main points in Gramsci's analysis is the social value and impact of certain aspects of the superstructure. He understands that education is a means which can be used for…

  12. Nevada Underserved Science Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicole Rourke; Jason Marcks

    2004-07-06

    Nevada Underserved Science Education Program (NUSEP) is a project to examine the effect of implementing new and innovative Earth and space science education curriculum in Nevada schools. The project provided professional development opportunities and educational materials for teachers participating in the program.

  13. System Construction on Psychological Harmony Education of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-hua; Zhou, Rong

    2008-01-01

    The psychological harmony education, oriented to the unity of Truth, Good, Beauty, and in pursuit of a healthy, balanced and harmonious development of individual psychological quality to improve the mental quality, is an important part in mental education. In order to better fulfill the psychological harmony education of the college students, as…

  14. Globalisation and science education: Rethinking science education reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lyn

    2005-05-01

    Like Lemke (J Res Sci Teach 38:296-316, 2001), I believe that science education has not looked enough at the impact of the changing theoretical and global landscape by which it is produced and shaped. Lemke makes a sound argument for science education to look beyond its own discourses toward those like cultural studies and politics, and to which I would add globalisation theory and relevant educational studies. Hence, in this study I draw together a range of investigations to argue that globalisation is indeed implicated in the discourses of science education, even if it remains underacknowledged and undertheorized. Establishing this relationship is important because it provides different frames of reference from which to investigate many of science education's current concerns, including those new forces that now have a direct impact on science classrooms. For example, one important question to investigate is the degree to which current science education improvement discourses are the consequences of quality research into science teaching and learning, or represent national and local responses to global economic restructuring and the imperatives of the supranational institutions that are largely beyond the control of science education. Developing globalisation as a theoretical construct to help formulate new questions and methods to examine these questions can provide science education with opportunities to expand the conceptual and analytical frameworks of much of its present and future scholarship.

  15. REFLECTION IN RUSSIAN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, J.M.C.; Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    The present article explores the theoretical underpinnings upon which Russian psychologists base their analysis of reflection. The intention is to arrive at a clearer understanding of their research aims and research methods, and to explore the relevance of their research to educational practice.

  16. REFLECTION IN RUSSIAN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, J.M.C.; Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    The present article explores the theoretical underpinnings upon which Russian psychologists base their analysis of reflection. The intention is to arrive at a clearer understanding of their research aims and research methods, and to explore the relevance of their research to educational practice. Th

  17. Reflection in Russian Educational Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Jo M. C.; Tomic, Welko

    This paper discusses the cultural-historical school founded by Vygotsky, Luria, and Leontiev as the theoretical background of Russian educational psychologists who have been studying how children learn to reflect. Two approaches to reflection are examined within the cultural-historical tradition: first, reflection--like other higher psychological…

  18. 理工科院校艺术类学生心理问题及教育管理研究%Research on Psychological problems and Educational Management of Arts Students in Science and Engineer Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨栋

    2011-01-01

    The art students are college students in a group of highly distinctive, distinctive in education means that there will be a lot of the management of special problems, the paper science and engineering colleges of arts from the psychological problems of students are analyzed The causes of such students with their own characteristics, and create the institutions of science and engineering students in art education and management of new ideas.%艺术类学生是当代大学生中极具鲜明个性的一个群体,个性鲜明也就意味着在教育管理中会出现很多的特殊问题,本文从探讨理工科院校艺术专业学生的心理问题入手,分析其成因,结合此类学生自身特点,开创理工科院校艺术类学生教育管理的新思路。

  19. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. A POINT OF VIEW ON PSYCHOLOGY AS A SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AUGUSTO PÉREZ GÓMEZ

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with two questions: Is Psychology a profession? Is Psychology a science? The answerto the first one is that it should not be a profession; to the second, that we are still far from becoming ascience. On the basis of 19 statements, a series of queries and doubts on the scientific status of contemporaryPsychology are suggested. It is proposed that Psychology must necessarily consider neurosciencesand ethology as sources of knowledge; that philosophical reflection allowing conceptual definitionsmust be a priority; that the abusive glorification of experimental method has to come to an end becausethe tool cannot solve the conceptual difficulties; that the traditional emphasis on the factual dimension ofresearch and the minute attention to the theoretical and conceptual dimensions are detrimental to Psychology;and that it is urgent to create new research methods allowing access to the most refined forms ofhuman behavior, such as art.

  1. [Educational science, 'the hardest science of all'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tartwijk, J; Driessen, E W; van der Vleuten, C P M; Wubbels, T

    2012-06-01

    Educational research not only showed that student characteristics are of major importance for study success, but also that education does make a difference. Essentially, teaching is about stimulating students to invest time in learning and to use that time as effectively as possible. Assessment, goal-orientated work, and feedback have a major effect. The teacher is the key figure. With the aim to better understand teaching and learning, educational researchers usefindingsfrom other disciplines more and more often. A pitfall is to apply the findings of educational research without taking into consideration the context and the specific characteristics of students and teachers. Because of the large number offactors that influence the results ofeducation, educational science is referred as 'the hardest science of all'.

  2. Spatial abilities, Earth science conceptual understanding, and psychological gender of university non-science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Alice A. (Jill)

    Research has shown the presence of many Earth science misconceptions and conceptual difficulties that may impede concept understanding, and has also identified a number of categories of spatial ability. Although spatial ability has been linked to high performance in science, some researchers believe it has been overlooked in traditional education. Evidence exists that spatial ability can be improved. This correlational study investigated the relationship among Earth science conceptual understanding, three types of spatial ability, and psychological gender, a self-classification that reflects socially-accepted personality and gender traits. A test of Earth science concept understanding, the Earth Science Concepts (ESC) test, was developed and field tested from 2001 to 2003 in 15 sections of university classes. Criterion validity was .60, significant at the .01 level. Spearman/Brown reliability was .74 and Kuder/Richardson reliability was .63. The Purdue Visualization of Rotations (PVOR) (mental rotation), the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (spatial perception), the Differential Aptitude Test: Space Relations (DAT) (spatial visualization), and the Bem Inventory (BI) (psychological gender) were administered to 97 non-major university students enrolled in undergraduate science classes. Spearman correlations revealed moderately significant correlations at the .01 level between ESC scores and each of the three spatial ability test scores. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that PVOR scores were the best predictor of ESC scores, and showed that spatial ability scores accounted for 27% of the total variation in ESC scores. Spatial test scores were moderately or weakly correlated with each other. No significant correlations were found among BI scores and other test scores. Scantron difficulty analysis of ESC items produced difficulty ratings ranging from 33.04 to 96.43, indicating the percentage of students who answered incorrectly. Mean score on the ESC was 34

  3. Social Climate Science: A New Vista for Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adam R; Schuldt, Jonathon P; Romero-Canyas, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    The recent Paris Agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions, adopted by 195 nations at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, signaled unprecedented commitment by world leaders to address the human social aspects of climate change. Indeed, climate change increasingly is recognized by scientists and policymakers as a social issue requiring social solutions. However, whereas psychological research on intrapersonal and some group-level processes (e.g., political polarization of climate beliefs) has flourished, research into other social processes-such as an understanding of how nonpartisan social identities, cultural ideologies, and group hierarchies shape public engagement on climate change-has received substantially less attention. In this article, we take stock of current psychological approaches to the study of climate change to explore what is "social" about climate change from the perspective of psychology. Drawing from current interdisciplinary perspectives and emerging empirical findings within psychology, we identify four distinct features of climate change and three sets of psychological processes evoked by these features that are fundamentally social and shape both individual and group responses to climate change. Finally, we consider how a more nuanced understanding of the social underpinnings of climate change can stimulate new questions and advance theory within psychology.

  4. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Marcia K. Johnson

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  5. Coding the Biodigital Child: The Biopolitics and Pedagogic Strategies of Educational Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Educational data science is an emerging transdisciplinary field formed from an amalgamation of data science and elements of biological, psychological and neuroscientific knowledge about learning, or learning science. This article conceptualises educational data science as a biopolitical strategy focused on the evaluation and management of the…

  6. A science of meaning. Can behaviorism bring meaning to psychological science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrandpre, R J

    2000-07-01

    An argument is presented for making meaning a central dependent variable in psychological science. Principles of operant psychology are then interpreted as providing a basic foundation for a science of meaning. The emphasis here is on the generality of basic operant concepts, where learning is a process of meaning making that is governed largely by natural contingencies; reinforcement is an organic process in which environment-behavior relations are selected, defined here as a dialectical process of meaning making; and reinforcers are experiential consequences with acquired, ecologically derived meanings. The author concludes with a call for a more interdisciplinary science of psychology, focusing on the individual in society.

  7. Desettling Expectations in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, M.; Warren, B.; Rosebery, A. S.; Medin, D.

    2012-01-01

    Calls for the improvement of science education in the USA continue unabated, with particular concern for the quality of learning opportunities for students from historically nondominant communities. Despite many and varied efforts, the field continues to struggle to create robust, meaningful forms of science education. We argue that "settled…

  8. Blended Learning Improves Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Brent R; Stockwell, Melissa S; Cennamo, Michael; Jiang, Elise

    2015-08-27

    Blended learning is an emerging paradigm for science education but has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a randomized controlled trial of blended learning. We found that in-class problem solving improved exam performance, and video assignments increased attendance and satisfaction. This validates a new model for science communication and education.

  9. Science Education Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides perspectives and background information on selected aspects of science instruction. Addresses concerns related to physics teaching, academic assessment, problem-solving, integrated science, readability, college science for pre-nursing students, and a graded assessment scheme. (ML)

  10. Science Education After Dainton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Kevin

    1969-01-01

    The Dainton committee indicated that science must not be directed simply at the committed students. Curriculum changes, including those related to teaching science as a unity, could have a profound effect in making science more attractive and relevant. (JK)

  11. Educational Psychology and Resilience: New Concept, New Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, John; Carrigan, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on resilience in mainstream psychology, so far there has been very little discussion of resilience within educational psychology or how it might relate to practice. This article aims to bring resilience into the educational psychology literature and to show its potential to enhance service delivery. Resilience is…

  12. Educational Psychology and Resilience: New Concept, New Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, John; Carrigan, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on resilience in mainstream psychology, so far there has been very little discussion of resilience within educational psychology or how it might relate to practice. This article aims to bring resilience into the educational psychology literature and to show its potential to enhance service delivery. Resilience is…

  13. Places and Spaces: Environmental Psychology in Education. Fastback 112.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Mark

    The booklet discusses the concept of environmental psychology and suggests ways of applying environmental psychology principles to education. A new field of study, environmental psychology deals with influences of the physical environment on human attitudes and behavior. Of potential use to educators on all levels as they seek to use the physical…

  14. The Role of Educational Psychology in Teacher Education: Three Challenges for Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Helen; Anderman, Lynley H.; Bruening, Paige S.; Duffin, Lisa C.

    2011-01-01

    We argue that this is a crucial time for educational psychology as a field to refocus its attention on the evidence base for its contribution to teacher education. In revisiting the recommendations of the APA Division 15 committee charged with examining the role of educational psychology in teacher education (Anderson et al., 1995), we note…

  15. The Role of Educational Psychology in Teacher Education: Three Challenges for Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Helen; Anderman, Lynley H.; Bruening, Paige S.; Duffin, Lisa C.

    2011-01-01

    We argue that this is a crucial time for educational psychology as a field to refocus its attention on the evidence base for its contribution to teacher education. In revisiting the recommendations of the APA Division 15 committee charged with examining the role of educational psychology in teacher education (Anderson et al., 1995), we note…

  16. Positive Psychology and Positive Education: Old Wine in New Bottles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2012-01-01

    The recently fashionable theories of positive psychology have educational ramifications at virtually every level of engagement, culminating in the model of positive education. In this critical review, I scrutinize positive education as a potential theory in educational psychology. Special attention is given to conceptual controversies and…

  17. Positive Psychology and Positive Education: Old Wine in New Bottles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2012-01-01

    The recently fashionable theories of positive psychology have educational ramifications at virtually every level of engagement, culminating in the model of positive education. In this critical review, I scrutinize positive education as a potential theory in educational psychology. Special attention is given to conceptual controversies and…

  18. Science and religion: implications for science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael J.

    2010-03-01

    A religious perspective on life shapes how and what those with such a perspective learn in science; for some students a religious perspective can hinder learning in science. For such reasons Staver's article is to be welcomed as it proposes a new way of resolving the widely perceived discord between science and religion. Staver notes that Western thinking has traditionally postulated the existence and comprehensibility of a world that is external to and independent of human consciousness. This has led to a conception of truth, truth as correspondence, in which our knowledge corresponds to the facts in this external world. Staver rejects such a conception, preferring the conception of truth as coherence in which the links are between and among independent knowledge claims themselves rather than between a knowledge claim and reality. Staver then proposes constructivism as a vehicle potentially capable of resolving the tension between religion and science. My contention is that the resolution between science and religion that Staver proposes comes at too great a cost—both to science and to religion. Instead I defend a different version of constructivism where humans are seen as capable of generating models of reality that do provide richer and more meaningful understandings of reality, over time and with respect both to science and to religion. I argue that scientific knowledge is a subset of religious knowledge and explore the implications of this for science education in general and when teaching about evolution in particular.

  19. Multicultural Science Education and Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes multicultural science education and explains the purposes of multicultural science curricula. It also serves as an introductory article for the other multicultural science education activities in this special issue of "Science Activities".

  20. Information processing psychology: A promising paradigm for research in science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James H.; Atkin, Julia A.

    Three research paradigms, those of Ausubel, Gagné and Piaget, have received a great deal of attention in the literature of science education. In this article a fourth paradigm is presented - an information processing psychology paradigm. The article is composed of two sections. The first section describes a model of memory developed by information processing psychologists. The second section describes how such a model could be used to guide science education research on learning and problem solving.Received: 19 October 1981

  1. Self research in educational psychology: a cautionary tale of positive psychology in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack

    2006-07-01

    Recent calls for a positive psychology that would deemphasize human pathology and dysfunction in favor of building an understanding of positive features of human life and human flourishing make two assumptions that the author questions in this article. First, he challenges the assumption that disciplinary psychology has been fixated on pathology and dysfunction by considering work in educational psychology that, both historically and currently, espouses the characteristics of positive psychology as articulated by its major advocates. Second, through a brief, critical consideration of research on the self in educational psychology, he contests the assumption that psychology has sufficient resources to develop into the positive psychology envisioned by its promoters. He argues that psychology's emphasis on the individual, whose core self resides in a deep, internal psyche, radically strips psychology of the historical and sociocultural resources that enable self-development, constrain self-understanding, and constitute the self.

  2. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  3. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  4. Cultural psychology as a bridge between anthropology and cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A

    2012-07-01

    The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target's point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (d) provide a road map for understanding and reducing social inequities. As illustrated in this essay, a cultural psychological approach provides a bridge between anthropology and the cognitive sciences, and in so doing it offers an alternative set of explanations and interventions for group differences. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  5. Conducting Science-Based Psychology Research in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinella, Lisa M., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    What are the common pitfalls experienced by school researchers and how can they be avoided? Edited by Lisa M. Dinella of Monmouth University, "Conducting Science-Based Psychology Research in Schools" includes the collective knowledge of both established and emerging names in the field, providing an unparalleled resource for those interested in…

  6. [Sex education in practice and science in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielert, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Sex education in Germany has a history full of conflict and ideological change between emancipatory, reforming, and repressive tendencies. As a science, sex education has only recently gained independence from its mother disciplines theology, medicine, psychology, and sociology and at the same time has taken a critically constructive position towards sexual science. Its topics range from dissemination of knowledge about biological processes and contraception to relationship concerns, sexual orientation, gender issues, sexual transgression, moral, and ethical questions. Sexual socialization happens nearly everywhere. Sexual education takes place mainly in families, elementary education, and school, but increasingly also in all other areas of education, social work, and health service. Its clientèle are no longer exclusively children and adolescents but increasingly adults of every age group. Subjects such as AIDS, sexual abuse, and teenage pregnancy have contributed to governmental funding of projects and training in sex education. Thus, sex education still reaches from mere protection from dangers to fostering or maintaining psychological health.

  7. Multiculturalism, universalism, and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William B.; Brickhouse, Nancy W.

    Multiculturalists have recently raised a number of important challenges to the school curriculum, including whose knowledge are we teaching? and who benefits and loses by existing approaches to the curriculum? In this article we examine a number of issues in this debate that are of primary importance to science educators. These issues include: (1) problems with the universalist account of the nature of science that has been the most powerful defense against multiculturalism; (2) an examination of some historical cases that illuminate the consequences of maintaining a universalist perspective on science; and (3) an argument for a multicultural perspective on scientific knowledge. These issues are examined in the context of a national science education reform in which there is considerable consensus that the science curriculum should include teaching about the nature of science. We argue that the nature of science taught in school should reflect a multicultural perspective on scientific knowledge.

  8. Business involvement in science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Science and math education in grades K through 12 directly affects America`s ability to meet tomorrow`s challenges. If America is to stay competitive in the world, we will need highly qualified scientists and engineers in industry and government and at universities. Jobs of the future will require greater technical and mathematical literacy than jobs of the past. Our goal is both to improve the quality of science education and to encourage more students to pursue science careers. General Atomics, a privately held research and development company, has joined the growing list of businesses that are committed to helping educators prepare students to meet these challenges.

  9. Excess success for psychology articles in the journal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory; Tanzman, Jay; Matthews, William J

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a systematic analysis of the relationship between empirical data and theoretical conclusions for a set of experimental psychology articles published in the journal Science between 2005-2012. When the success rate of a set of empirical studies is much higher than would be expected relative to the experiments' reported effects and sample sizes, it suggests that null findings have been suppressed, that the experiments or analyses were inappropriate, or that the theory does not properly follow from the data. The analyses herein indicate such excess success for 83% (15 out of 18) of the articles in Science that report four or more studies and contain sufficient information for the analysis. This result suggests a systematic pattern of excess success among psychology articles in the journal Science.

  10. Preparing informal science educators perspectives from science communication and education

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a diverse look at various aspects of preparing informal science educators. Much has been published about the importance of preparing formal classroom educators, but little has been written about the importance, need, and best practices for training professionals who teach in aquariums, camps, parks, museums, etc. The reader will find that as a collective the chapters of the book are well-related and paint a clear picture that there are varying ways to approach informal educator preparation, but all are important. The volume is divided into five topics: Defining Informal Science Education, Professional Development, Designing Programs, Zone of Reflexivity: The Space Between Formal and Informal Educators, and Public Communication. The authors have written chapters for practitioners, researchers and those who are interested in assessment and evaluation, formal and informal educator preparation, gender equity, place-based education, professional development, program design, reflective practice, ...

  11. Productivity in Educational Psychology Journals from 2003 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara J.; Fong, Carlton J.; Torres, Laura G.; Yoo, Julia H.; Decker, Mark Lowry; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Productivity of individuals and institutions in educational psychology journals has been previously examined in three separate studies (Hsieh et al. [Hsieh, P., Acee, T., Chung, W., Hsieh, Y., Kim, H., Thomas, G. D., et al. (2004). An alternate look at educational psychologist's productivity from 1991 to 2002. "Contemporary Educational Psychology,…

  12. Productivity in Educational Psychology Journals from 2003 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara J.; Fong, Carlton J.; Torres, Laura G.; Yoo, Julia H.; Decker, Mark Lowry; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Productivity of individuals and institutions in educational psychology journals has been previously examined in three separate studies (Hsieh et al. [Hsieh, P., Acee, T., Chung, W., Hsieh, Y., Kim, H., Thomas, G. D., et al. (2004). An alternate look at educational psychologist's productivity from 1991 to 2002. "Contemporary Educational Psychology,…

  13. Problems with German Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Falk

    The main problems of science (especially physics) teaching in Germany are students'' lack of interest and motivation in the subject, their poor understanding of scientific concepts, ideas, methods,and results, and their lack of comprehension of the social, political, and epistemological role of science. These circumstances result in a growing `scientific illiteracy'' of the population and adecline in democratic quality concerning decision making processes about scientific and technological projects. One means of improving this situation lies in the use of history and philosophy of science in science teaching. School science curricula and textbooks neglect almost completely the importance of history and philosophy of science. In this paper, the main empirical results concerning motivation and knowledge are given. Some examples from science curricula and textbooks are presented, and some of the few reform projects in Germany are listed. As a consequence a compensatory program is proposed in order to create the prerequisites for raising science education in Germany to an international standard.

  14. Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-02-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive errors that can contribute to belief in pseudoscientific practices within school psychology and allied professions, (c) provide a list of 10 key warning signs of pseudoscience, illustrated by contemporary examples from school psychology and allied disciplines, and (d) offer 10 user-friendly prescriptions designed to encourage scientific thinking among school psychology practitioners and researchers. We argue that scientific thinking, although fallible, is ultimately school psychologists' best safeguard against a host of errors in thinking.

  15. Science education in a multiscience perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masakata

    The effects of the multiculturalism movement have emerged, especially in the West, in the form of multicultural science education. Multiculturalism can be a powerful and significant tool to reflect on science education and to improve classroom practices. However, this article argues that a multiscience perspective on science education affords richer implications for reflection and practice. A multiscience perspective recognizes the existence of various types of science at play in all science classrooms, especially personal science, indigenous science, and Western modem science.

  16. Understanding Immigrants, Schooling, and School Psychology: Contemporary Science and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L.; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into the United States is a particularly salient topic of current contemporary educational, social, and political discussions. The school-related needs of immigrant children and youth can be well served by rigorous research and effective school psychology preservice training and preparation. This overview highlights key definitions,…

  17. Individual and Institutional Productivity in Educational Psychology Journals from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Hannah; Meyer, Lisa; Smith, M. Cecil; Barber, Amanda; Henderson, Heather; Riel, David; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the productivity of both individuals and institutions, indexed through an examination of five educational psychology journals ("Cognition and Instruction," "Contemporary Educational Psychology," "Educational Psychologist," "Educational Psychology Review," and "Journal of…

  18. Individual and Institutional Productivity in Educational Psychology Journals from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Hannah; Meyer, Lisa; Smith, M. Cecil; Barber, Amanda; Henderson, Heather; Riel, David; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the productivity of both individuals and institutions, indexed through an examination of five educational psychology journals ("Cognition and Instruction," "Contemporary Educational Psychology," "Educational Psychologist," "Educational Psychology Review," and "Journal of…

  19. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudourides, Moses A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and…

  20. Educational Psychology in Portugal: Results of the 2013 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Vitor Alexandre; Marchante, Marta; Raimundo, Raquel; Jimerson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This study provides valuable information regarding the characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and challenges reported by 803 Portuguese educational psychologists. The study includes responses to the International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) from educational psychologists across various regions of…

  1. Educational Psychology in Portugal: Results of the 2013 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Vitor Alexandre; Marchante, Marta; Raimundo, Raquel; Jimerson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This study provides valuable information regarding the characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and challenges reported by 803 Portuguese educational psychologists. The study includes responses to the International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) from educational psychologists across various regions of…

  2. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field…

  3. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field…

  4. Study for Teaching Behavioral Sciences in Schools of Medicine, Volume III: Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sociological Association, Washington, DC. Medical Sociology Council.

    Volume III of a study of teaching behavioral sciences in medical school presents perspectives on medical behavioral science from the viewpoints of the several behavioral disciplines (anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, behavioral biology and medical education). In addition, there is a discussion of translating…

  5. Internationalizing undergraduate psychology education: Trends, techniques, and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takooshian, Harold; Gielen, Uwe P; Plous, Scott; Rich, Grant J; Velayo, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    How can we best internationalize undergraduate psychology education in the United States and elsewhere? This question is more timely than ever, for at least 2 reasons: Within the United States, educators and students seek greater contact with psychology programs abroad, and outside the United States, psychology is growing apace, with educators and students in other nations often looking to U.S. curricula and practices as models. In this article, we outline international developments in undergraduate psychology education both in the United States and abroad, and analyze the dramatic rise of online courses and Internet-based technologies from an instructional and international point of view. Building on the recommendations of the 2005 APA Working Group on Internationalizing the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum, we then advance 14 recommendations on internationalizing undergraduate psychology education--for students, faculty, and institutions.

  6. Persuasion and attitude change in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    Many strategies used to induce the occurrence of desirable science-related beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors involve the use of persuasive messages. Science educators need to become acquainted with persuasion in the context of social influence and learning theory to be able to evaluate its usefulness in the science education milieu. Persuasion is the conscious attempt to bring about a jointly developed mental state common to both source and receiver through the use of symbolic cues, and it can be distinguished from other forms of social influence. Propaganda is a type of persuasion directed toward a mass audience. Coercion relies on reinforcement control, whereas persuasion is prompted by information. Brainwashing involves coercive techniques used to obtain cooperation and compliance. Persuasion and instruction are much alike; both require conscious cognitive activity by the recipient and involve communication which includes giving arguments and evidence for the purpose of getting someone to do something or to believe something.Persuasion research is anchored in learning theory. Early efforts were based on information processing. Studies following an information process approach focused on the effect of the variables harbored within the question Who says what in which channel to whom with what effect? on belief and attitude change. Cognitive processing and social exchange approaches to persuasion represent extensions to information process. Cognitive processing is concerned specifically with how people personally process the arguments presented in a persuasive message. Social exchange emphasizes the interchange that takes place between the message source and recipient. These approaches seem to be fruitful areas for future persuasion research in science education.Science educators' unfamiliarity with persuasion research stems from the fact that it is largely reported in the social psychology literature and has not been integrated into a framework familiar to

  7. Science Education and Worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Moyra

    2008-01-01

    Is there a place for Indigenous Knowledge in the science curriculum for a Zulu community in rural Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa? This article argues "yes," based on a participative research and development project that discovered relevant science learning in a Zulu community. Among community concerns for relevant factual and performative…

  8. Splitting and Projection: Drawing on Psychodynamics in Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Dario W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects the author's journey into an area of psychology which is not dominant in Educational Psychology discourse, namely psychodynamic psychology. Two psychodynamic mechanisms, namely splitting and projection are explained, and then the author describes and critiques how these mechanisms have proved useful in his practice. Two case…

  9. Coaching Psychology: An Approach to Practice for Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coaching psychology is a distinct sub-discipline of academic and applied psychology that focuses on the enhancement of performance, development and well-being in the broader population. Applied in educational contexts, the practice of coaching psychology has the potential to have a positive impact by supporting children and adults to achieve…

  10. Situated Learning: What Ever Happened to Educational Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore the diminishing contributions of psychology in teacher preparation programs. Using situated learning as a basis for discussion, I have argued that a student may take a course in educational psychology and then subsequently discover that subsequent preparation may ignore those psychological "caveats" regarding the…

  11. Coaching Psychology: An Approach to Practice for Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coaching psychology is a distinct sub-discipline of academic and applied psychology that focuses on the enhancement of performance, development and well-being in the broader population. Applied in educational contexts, the practice of coaching psychology has the potential to have a positive impact by supporting children and adults to achieve…

  12. Splitting and Projection: Drawing on Psychodynamics in Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Dario W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects the author's journey into an area of psychology which is not dominant in Educational Psychology discourse, namely psychodynamic psychology. Two psychodynamic mechanisms, namely splitting and projection are explained, and then the author describes and critiques how these mechanisms have proved useful in his practice. Two case…

  13. Science in early childhood education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Based on an action research project with 12 preschools in a municipality north of Copenhagen the article investigates and takes a first step in order to create a preschool science Didaktik. The theoretical background comprises a pedagogical/didactical approach based on German critical constructive...... Bildung Didaktik, and a learning approach based on a Vygotskian cultural-historical activity theory. A science-oriented dynamic contextual didactical model was developed as a tool for educational thinking and planning. The article presents five educational principles for a preschool science Didaktik...

  14. The Interplay between Subjectivity, Statistical Practice, and Psychological Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N Rouder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bayesian inference has been advocated as an alternative to conventional analysis in psychological science. Bayesians stress that subjectivity is needed for principled inference, and subjectivity by-and-large has not been seen as desirable. This paper provides the broader rationale and context for subjectivity, and in it we show that subjectivity is the key to principled measures of evidence for theory from data. By making our subjective elements focal, we provide an avenue for common sense and expertise to enter the analysis. We cover the role of models in linking theory to data, the notion that models are abstractions which are neither true nor false, the need for relative model comparison, the role of predictions in stating relative evidence for models, and the role of subjectivity in specifying models that yield predictions. In the end, we conclude that transparent subjectivity leads to a more honest and fruitful analyses in psychological science.

  15. Laudan's normative naturalism: a useful philosophy of science for psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, E J; Proctor, R W

    2000-01-01

    Logical positivism, widely regarded as the received epistemology of psychology in the first half of the 20th century, was supplanted in the 1960s by various postpositivistic, relativistic philosophies of science, most notably that of Kuhn. Recently, Laudan, a major figure in the philosophy of science, developed a novel approach called normative naturalism that provides an alternative to positivism and relativism. His central thesis is that the two are not always on opposite ends of a continuum but rather have many assumptions in common. This article brings Laudan's important views to the attention of psychologists and describes some of the unique implications of these views for the conduct of research and theory in psychology. These implications, which follow from a number of closely reasoned pragmatic arguments, include more realistic and appropriate evaluation of theory and methodology than has been suggested by logical positivism or relativism.

  16. Human-computer interaction: psychology as a science of design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J M

    1997-01-01

    Human-computer interaction (HCI) study is the region of intersection between psychology and the social sciences, on the one hand, and computer science and technology, on the other. HCI researchers analyze and design specific user interface technologies (e.g. pointing devices). They study and improve the processes of technology development (e.g. task analysis, design rationale). They develop and evaluate new applications of technology (e.g. word processors, digital libraries). Throughout the past two decades, HCI has progressively integrated its scientific concerns with the engineering goal of improving the usability of computer systems and applications, which has resulted in a body of technical knowledge and methodology. HCI continues to provide a challenging test domain for applying and developing psychological and social theory in the context of technology development and use.

  17. Jung's mediatory science as a psychology beyond objectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsch, W E

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, the author argues that Jung's non-objectivist--yet scientific--epistemology and his empirical/hermeneatic methods of inquiry situate him within a psychological tradition that, in many respects, began with William James and, today, is finding expression in the work of many non-Jungian cognitive scientists. In an effort to encourage dialogue between Jungians and scholars within related intellectual traditions, the author presents evidence from the corpus of Jung's work that demonstrates that, like William James, Jung intentionally rejected the absolutist claims of objectivism and the opposite position on 'anything goes' relativism, emotivism, or subjectivism. Instead, Jung forged a path that led to the meta-psychological position similar to internal realism (Putnam 1981) or experientialism (Lakoff 1987) and to a theoretical psychology that gave a central place both to unconscious cognitive structure and to imagination. This he labelled a 'mediatory science'. The psychological theories developed within this mediatory science framework represent an early articulation of key constructs that are currently used by a number of cognitive scientists seeking to understand how we make sense of experience.

  18. Knowledge, Belief, and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago Alfredo S.; El-Hani, Charbel N.; da Silva-Filho, Waldomiro José

    2016-10-01

    This article intends to show that the defense of "understanding" as one of the major goals of science education can be grounded on an anti-reductionist perspective on testimony as a source of knowledge. To do so, we critically revisit the discussion between Harvey Siegel and Alvin Goldman about the goals of science education, especially where it involves arguments based on the epistemology of testimony. Subsequently, we come back to a discussion between Charbel N. El-Hani and Eduardo Mortimer, on the one hand, and Michael Hoffmann, on the other, striving to strengthen the claim that rather than students' belief change, understanding should have epistemic priority as a goal of science education. Based on these two lines of discussion, we conclude that the reliance on testimony as a source of knowledge is necessary to the development of a more large and comprehensive scientific understanding by science students.

  19. Science Identity in Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Jennifer A.

    The national drive to increase the number of students pursuing Science Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) careers has brought science identity into focus for educators, with the need to determine what encourages students to pursue and persist in STEM careers. Science identity, the degree to which students think someone like them could be a scientist is a potential indicator of students pursuing and persisting in STEM related fields. Science identity, as defined by Carlone and Johnson (2007) consists of three constructs: competence, performance, and recognition. Students need to feel like they are good at science, can perform it well, and that others recognize them for these achievements in order to develop a science identity. These constructs can be bolstered by student visitation to informal education centers. Informal education centers, such as outdoor science schools, museums, and various learning centers can have a positive impact on how students view themselves as scientists by exposing them to novel and unique learning opportunities unavailable in their school. Specifically, the University of Idaho's McCall Outdoor Science School (MOSS) focuses on providing K-12 students with the opportunity to learn about science with a place-based, hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum that hopes to foster science identity development. To understand the constructs that lead to science identity formation and the impact the MOSS program has on science identity development, several questions were explored examining how students define the constructs and if the MOSS program impacted how they rate themselves within each construct. A mixed-method research approach was used consisting of focus group interviews with students and pre, post, one-month posttests for visiting students to look at change in science identity over time. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that the instrument created is a good fit for examining science identity and the associated

  20. Guidelines for Building Science Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Cheryn E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rashkin, Samuel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huelman, Pat [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) residential research and demonstration program, Building America, has triumphed through 20 years of innovation. Partnering with researchers, builders, remodelers, and manufacturers to develop innovative processes like advanced framing and ventilation standards, Building America has proven an energy efficient design can be more cost effective, healthy, and durable than a standard house. As Building America partners continue to achieve their stretch goals, they have found that the barrier to true market transformation for high performance homes is the limited knowledge-base of the professionals working in the building industry. With dozens of professionals taking part in the design and execution of building and selling homes, each person should have basic building science knowledge relevant to their role, and an understanding of how various home components interface with each other. Instead, our industry typically experiences a fragmented approach to home building and design. After obtaining important input from stakeholders at the Building Science Education Kick-Off Meeting, DOE created a building science education strategy addressing education issues preventing the widespread adoption of high performance homes. This strategy targets the next generation and provides valuable guidance for the current workforce. The initiative includes: • Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Engages universities and provides students who will be the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers and entrepreneurs with the necessary skills and experience they need to begin careers in clean energy and generate creative solutions to real world problems. • Building Science to Sales Translator: Simplifies building science into compelling sales language and tools to sell high performance homes to their customers. • Building Science Education Guidance: Brings together industry and academia to solve problems related to

  1. Guidelines for Building Science Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Cheryn E.; Rashkin, Samuel; Huelman, Pat

    2015-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) residential research and demonstration program, Building America, has triumphed through 20 years of innovation. Partnering with researchers, builders, remodelers, and manufacturers to develop innovative processes like advanced framing and ventilation standards, Building America has proven an energy efficient design can be more cost effective, healthy, and durable than a standard house. As Building America partners continue to achieve their stretch goals, they have found that the barrier to true market transformation for high performance homes is the limited knowledge-base of the professionals working in the building industry. With dozens of professionals taking part in the design and execution of building and selling homes, each person should have basic building science knowledge relevant to their role, and an understanding of how various home components interface with each other. Instead, our industry typically experiences a fragmented approach to home building and design. After obtaining important input from stakeholders at the Building Science Education Kick-Off Meeting, DOE created a building science education strategy addressing education issues preventing the widespread adoption of high performance homes. This strategy targets the next generation and provides valuable guidance for the current workforce. The initiative includes: • Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Engages universities and provides students who will be the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers and entrepreneurs with the necessary skills and experience they need to begin careers in clean energy and generate creative solutions to real world problems. • Building Science to Sales Translator: Simplifies building science into compelling sales language and tools to sell high performance homes to their customers. • Building Science Education Guidance: Brings together industry and academia to solve problems related to

  2. Psychological and educational interventions for subfertile men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuijlen, Jolijn; Verhaak, Christianne; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Wilkinson, Jack; Farquhar, Cindy

    2016-03-31

    Approximately one-fifth of all subfertile couples seeking fertility treatment show clinically relevant levels of anxiety, depression, or distress. Psychological and educational interventions are frequently offered to subfertile couples, but their effectiveness, both in improving mental health and pregnancy rates, is unclear. To assess the effectiveness of psychological and educational interventions for subfertile couples on psychological and fertility treatment outcomes. We searched (from inception to 2 April 2015) the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 2, 2015), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, EBSCO CINAHL, DARE, Web of Science, OpenGrey, LILACS, PubMed, and ongoing trials registers. We handsearched reference lists and contacted experts in the field. We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster randomised trials, and cross-over trials (first phase) evaluating the effectiveness of psychological and educational interventions on psychological and fertility treatment outcomes in subfertile couples. Two review authors independently assessed trial risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Our primary outcomes were psychological measures (anxiety and depression) and fertility rates (live birth or ongoing pregnancy). We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using GRADE criteria.As we did not consider the included studies to be sufficiently similar to permit meaningful pooling, we summarised the results of the individual studies by presenting the median and interquartile range (IQR) of effects as well as the minimum and maximum values. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables and odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous outcomes. We included 39 studies involving 4925 participants undergoing assisted reproductive technology. Studies were

  3. Trends in Computational Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Rubin

    2002-08-01

    Education in computational science and engineering (CSE) has evolved through a number of stages, from recognition in the 1980s to its present early growth. Now a number of courses and degree programs are being designed and implemented at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and students are beginning to receive degrees. This talk will discuss various aspects of this development, including the impact on faculty and students, the nature of the job market, the intellectual content of CSE education, and the types of programs and degrees now being offered. Analytic comparisons will be made between the content of Physics degrees versus those of other disciplines, and reasons for changes should be apparent. This talk is based on the papers "Elements of Computational Science Education" by Osman Yasar and Rubin Landau, and "Computational Science Education" by Charles Swanson.

  4. Pilot research on a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulikova, Tatyana I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world, the environment of any educational institution represents a spectrum of ethnic groups and subcultures: a multicultural educational environment. Pupils who are aware of their national identity often demonstrate intolerance toward students of other nationalities, which threatens pupils’ psychological safety. In this article, we present the results of pilot research examining the level of a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment and identifying the criteria that influence a pupil’s psychological safety. The research sample comprised 127 pupils aged 13–14 years from different schools living in various places that differed by the type of settlement, industrial development and level of science and culture. We isolated the following criteria for a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment: satisfaction with the educational environment, protection from psychological abuse and self-confidence. According to pupils, the essential characteristics of safety in the educational environment, regardless of school category and type, are being able to ask for help, protection of personal dignity, interactions with other students, and self-respect. Empirical data reveal the current status of the psychological safety of the entire sample group (n = 127 and compare indices of psychological safety in the educational institutions under study. Analysis of the results of our research indicates that protecting a pupil’s personality in the multicultural educational environment has the greatest influence on his/her psychological safety. In addition, a comfortable psychological atmosphere, mutual aid and support of pupils and low levels of classmates’ and coevals’ aggression positively influence the protection experience.

  5. Scientific Literacy and Thailand Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuenyong, Chokchai; Narjaikaew, Pattawan

    2009-01-01

    Education and political leaders worldwide are increasingly placing emphasis on developing scientific literacy. This also is the case in Thailand with science education influenced by educational reform in 1999, in which the goals of science education are shaped by the notion of scientific literacy. Thai science education emphasizes the scientific…

  6. The Application of Jung's Analytical Psychology to Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the application of Jungian analytical psychology to education. The author outlines Jung's concepts which relate to the foundations of education, personality development, cognitive processes, motivation, and curriculum theory. (AM)

  7. [Psychologic, pedagogical and hygienic analysis of educational difficulties in students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostankina, E N; Artemenkov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Educational difficulties in students are studied. Classification of the difficulties is suggested. Causes of the difficulties (outer and inner factors) are shown. Psychologic portrait of a student facing educational difficulties is presented.

  8. Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo, Jr.; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research,…

  9. Science education as an exercise in foreign affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobern, William W.

    1995-07-01

    In Kuhnian terms, science education has been a process of inducting students into the reigning paradigms of science. In 1985, Duschl noted that science education had not kept pace with developments in the history and philosophy of science. The claim of certainty for scientific knowledge which science educators grounded in positivist philosophy was rendered untenable years ago and it turns out that social and cultural factors surrounding discovery may be at least as important as the justification of knowledge. Capitalizing on these new developments, Duschl, Hamilton, and Grandy (1990) wrote a compelling argument for the need to have a joint research effort in science education involving the philosophy and history of science along with cognitive psychology. However, the issue of discovery compels the research community go one step further. If the science education community has been guilty of neglecting historical and philosophical issues in science, let it not now be guilty of ignoring sociological issues in science. A collaborative view ought also to include the sociological study of cultural milieu in which scientific ideas arise. In other words, an external sociological perspective on science. The logic of discovery from a sociological point of view implies that conceptual change can also be viewed from a sociological perspective.

  10. Reflections on Educational Psychology in an Emerging Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on the changes in Educational Psychology in South Africa in a ten year period (2005-2015) after the first democratic elections. It shows how Educational Psychology as a scientific discipline, and as a helping profession, has responded to the changing landscape and how the post-democracy years inspired a complete departure from…

  11. Four Psychologies Applied to Education: Freudian, Behavioral, Humanistic, Transpersonal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas B., Ed.

    This document presents 62 selected articles of psychology and education which demonstrate how educational theory and practice have changed and broadened to meet the need for new modes of teaching and learning. The writings, which show how psychologies can be complementary ways of understanding human behavior, are accompanied by both theoretical…

  12. Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

  13. Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

  14. [The politics of the self: psychological science and bourgeois subjectivity in 19th century Spain.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novella, Enric J

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of the process of institutionalization of psychological knowledge in Spain following the educative reforms implemented during the second third of the 19th century, which prescribed its inclusion in the curricular program of the new secondary education. After a detailed examination of the theoretical orientation, the ideological assumptions and the socio-political connections of the contents transmitted to the students throughout the century, its militant spiritualism is interpreted as a highly significant attempt on the part of the liberal elites to articulate a pedagogy of subjectivity intended to counteract the trends toward reduction, naturalization and fragmentation of psychic life inherent to the development of modern science.

  15. A Case for Psychology as a Human Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Morehouse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The disciples of Psychology and Sociology and the social sciences more generally, are and have been for some time, in a state of flux, especially with regard to research methods. The tension, in the view if many, is between the approaches to research in terms of positivist verses naturalist [1,2]. This tension has to a considerable degree remains unsolved and has been exacerbated by the postmodernist’s discourse as exemplified in the works of Foucault [3] and Lyotard [4] (see Rosenberg, 2003 for an overview of this discourse. This short commentary cannot address all of these issues. Instead, it will [5] provide an introduction to the history of 19th century and early 20th century social sciences focusing on key differences and similarities in research methods and their philosophic underpinning [6]. This will be followed by a short statement regarding the nature of mid 20th century evolution of the social sciences, touching on both the philosophical and practical aspects of research [7]. This essay will end with an overview of some psychology research conducted within the parameters of the Human sciences.

  16. Education science and biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This contribution states deficits and makes proposals in order to overcome them. First there is the question as to why the Biological Anthropology--despite all its diversifications--hardly ever deals with educational aspects of its subject. Second it is the question as to why Educational Science neglects or even ignores data of Biological Anthropology which are recognizably important for its subject. It is postulated that the stated deficits are caused by several adverse influences such as, the individual identity of each of the involved single sciences; aspects of the recent history of the German Anthropology; a lack of conceptual understanding of each other; methodological differences and, last but not least, the structure of the universities. The necessity to remedy this situation was deduced from two groups of facts. First, more recent data of the Biological Anthropology (e.g. brain functions and learning, sex specificity and education) are of substantial relevance for the Educational Science. Second, the epistemological requirements of complex subjects like education need interdisciplinary approaches. Finally, a few suggestions of concrete topics are given which are related to both, Educational Science and Biological Anthropology.

  17. Development and perspectives of educational psychology in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Žagar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the development of educational psychology as a scientific discipline is presented, and the history of its development in Slovenia is described in detail. The key scientific research and professional areas of educational psychologists are outlined. The fact is that the educational psychology in the broader Euro-American psychological context has a relatively longer tradition than in Slovenia. However, the analysis of various sources shows that the Slovene educational psychologists with their contributions have established a strong position in the modern international flows, both in the areas of educational psychological issues as well as in the methodology of the research. Nowadays Slovene educational psychologists with their research results, teaching and professional work offer an important contribution to the understanding, quality and the development of educational practice.

  18. Trends of Science Education Research: An Automatic Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Chun-Yen; Tseng, Yuen-Hsien

    2010-08-01

    This study used scientometric methods to conduct an automatic content analysis on the development trends of science education research from the published articles in the four journals of International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Research in Science Education, and Science Education from 1990 to 2007. The multi-stage clustering technique was employed to investigate with what topics, to what development trends, and from whose contribution that the journal publications constructed as a science education research field. This study found that the research topic of Conceptual Change & Concept Mapping was the most studied topic, although the number of publications has slightly declined in the 2000's. The studies in the themes of Professional Development, Nature of Science and Socio-Scientific Issues, and Conceptual Chang and Analogy were found to be gaining attention over the years. This study also found that, embedded in the most cited references, the supporting disciplines and theories of science education research are constructivist learning, cognitive psychology, pedagogy, and philosophy of science.

  19. Using the Psychology of Language to Effectively Communicate Actionable Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The words used to articulate science can have as significant a psychological impact on public perception as the data itself. It is therefore essential to utilize language that not only accurately relates the scientific information, but also effectively conveys a message that is congruent with the presenter's motivation for expressing the data. This is especially relevant for environmental subjects that are surrounded by emotionally charged, political discourses. For example are terms like catastrophe and disaster; while these words may accurately illustrate impartial scientific data, they will likely trigger psychological responses in audiences such as fear or denial that have a detrimental impact on the human decision making process. I propose a set of 5 key principles to assist in communicating data to the general public that both support the transfer of ideas and the presenter's intended psychological impact. 1) Articulate the underlying intentions that motivate the communication of data in a transparent manner 2) Use language congruent with the presenter's stated intentions 3) Maintain a neutral, non-judgmental attitude towards the complex human psychological and emotional dynamics present in a target audience 4) Demonstrate acceptance and compassion when analyzing past and present human actions that adversely affect the environment 5) Develop a perspective of non-attachment when proposing future actions and/or consequences of current human behaviors. The application of these 5 principles provides a framework to move from our current understanding of problems and solutions to effective physical action that allows us to gracefully adapt with our ever changing planet.

  20. Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of these "Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology" is to provide a common framework for use in the development, evaluation, and review of education and training in consulting psychology/organizational consulting psychology (CP/OCP). The…

  1. Inquiry-based science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Hagelskjær, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) er en internationalt afprøvet naturfagsdidaktisk metode der har til formål at øge elevernes interesse for og udbytte af naturfag. I artiklen redegøres der for metoden, der kan betegnes som en elevstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret naturfagsundervisnings......Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) er en internationalt afprøvet naturfagsdidaktisk metode der har til formål at øge elevernes interesse for og udbytte af naturfag. I artiklen redegøres der for metoden, der kan betegnes som en elevstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret...

  2. On the importance of tail ratios for psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Mohr, Elisabeth; Hagmann, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Even small group-mean differences (whether combined with variance differences or not) or variance differences alone (absent mean differences) can generate marked and sometimes surprising imbalances in the representation of the respective groups compared in the distributional tail regions. Such imbalances in group representation, quantified as tail ratios, have general importance in the context of any threshold, susceptibility, diathesis-stress, selection, or similar models (including the study of sex differences), as widely conceptualized and applied in the psychological, social, medical, and biological sciences. However, commonly used effect-size measures, such as Cohen's d, largely exploit data information around the center of distributions, rather than from the tails, thereby missing potentially important patterns found in the tail regions. This account reviews the background and history of tail ratios, emphasizes their importance for psychological research, proposes a consensus approach for defining and interpreting them, introduces a tail-ratio calculator, and outlines future research agenda.

  3. Evolutionary psychology: toward a unifying theory and a hybrid science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporael, L R

    2001-01-01

    Although evolutionary psychology is typically associated with "selfish gene theory," numerous other approaches to the study of mind and behavior provide a wealth of concepts for theorizing about psychology, culture, and development. These include general evolutionary approaches and theories focused on sociality, dual inheritance, multilevel selection, and developmental systems. Most evolutionary accounts use the same methods as Darwin-the "fit among facts"-to use natural selection as an explanation for behavior. Scientific standards for constraining and evaluating such accounts, research into the mutual influence of science and society on the understanding of evolution, and computational technologies for modeling species-typical processes are important considerations. Coevolutionary theories and developmental systems theories may eventually give rise to unification in a broad and general sense. Such a unification would be interdisciplinary and problem centered rather than discipline centered.

  4. [Science museums and psychology: interactivity, experimentation, and context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinvaux, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The article reflects on the notion of the museum experience from the perspective of a visitor to a science and technology museum. Unlike studies that postulate a generic, abstract 'model visitor', the goal was to discuss the perspectives of the visitor as a psychological being, and to this end the research relied on the notion of interactivity. Using two classic psychology studies analyzing the behavior of children and adolescents, the current study first focused on the notion of experimentation, characterized as an interaction between subject and object. It then explored interactions between subjects and contexts, approaching from the notion of mediated action. My conclusion is that a museum experience should, on the one hand, take into account the visitor's ability to act, ask, and experiment and, on the other, the specific museum contexts that invite and propose but may also limit these very chances to act, question, and experiment.

  5. Cognitive science and mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Schoenfeld, Alan H

    2013-01-01

    This volume is a result of mathematicians, cognitive scientists, mathematics educators, and classroom teachers combining their efforts to help address issues of importance to classroom instruction in mathematics. In so doing, the contributors provide a general introduction to fundamental ideas in cognitive science, plus an overview of cognitive theory and its direct implications for mathematics education. A practical, no-nonsense attempt to bring recent research within reach for practicing teachers, this book also raises many issues for cognitive researchers to consider.

  6. The application of positive psychology in the practice of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluskota, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to present the possibility of the application in the field of education this highly interesting and promising trend in the psychology which is the positive psychology. For this reason the origins as well as an outline of the interest scope of this relatively recent, dating back only over 10 years, trend are shown. A crucial question has become in this context the examination of the relationship between the positive psychology and the education, particularly regarding the potential linked to the prospect of the so called strong points". The founding fathers as well as the supporters of the positive psychology try to propagate it in the therapy and in the fields of organization and education. In the following text some selected concepts of the positive psychology and the corresponding examples of their practical use in the form of the so called positive prevention and intervention programs in the domain of education are described.

  7. Educational Psychology Working to Improve Psychological Well-Being: An Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Joe; Singh-Dhesi, Davinder

    2010-01-01

    This article presents one English local authority's educational psychology service's approach to supporting children and young people's psychological well-being. Evidence for the effectiveness of the therapeutic approaches adopted by one intervention (the Child Behaviour Intervention Initiative [CBII]) is presented. The statistical analysis…

  8. Dual Processes in the Psychology of Mathematics Education and Cognitive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Ellen; Van Dooren, Wim; Schaeken, Walter; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    Research in the psychology of mathematics education has been confronted with the fact that people blatantly fail to solve tasks they are supposed to be able to solve correctly given their available domain-specific knowledge and skills. Also researchers in cognitive psychology have encountered such phenomena. In this paper, theories that have been…

  9. Dual Processes in the Psychology of Mathematics Education and Cognitive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Ellen; Van Dooren, Wim; Schaeken, Walter; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    Research in the psychology of mathematics education has been confronted with the fact that people blatantly fail to solve tasks they are supposed to be able to solve correctly given their available domain-specific knowledge and skills. Also researchers in cognitive psychology have encountered such phenomena. In this paper, theories that have been…

  10. NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Callery, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Riebeek Kohl, H.; Taylor, J.; Martin, A. M.; Ferrell, T.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative (NESEC) is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies with partners at three NASA Earth science Centers: Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Langley Research Center. This cross-organization team enables the project to draw from the diverse skills, strengths, and expertise of each partner to develop fresh and innovative approaches for building pathways between NASA's Earth-related STEM assets to large, diverse audiences in order to enhance STEM teaching, learning and opportunities for learners throughout their lifetimes. These STEM assets include subject matter experts (scientists, engineers, and education specialists), science and engineering content, and authentic participatory and experiential opportunities. Specific project activities include authentic STEM experiences through NASA Earth science themed field campaigns and citizen science as part of international GLOBE program (for elementary and secondary school audiences) and GLOBE Observer (non-school audiences of all ages); direct connections to learners through innovative collaborations with partners like Odyssey of the Mind, an international creative problem-solving and design competition; and organizing thematic core content and strategically working with external partners and collaborators to adapt and disseminate core content to support the needs of education audiences (e.g., libraries and maker spaces, student research projects, etc.). A scaffolded evaluation is being conducted that 1) assesses processes and implementation, 2) answers formative evaluation questions in order to continuously improve the project; 3) monitors progress and 4) measures outcomes.

  11. Does science education need the history of science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooday, Graeme; Lynch, John M; Wilson, Kenneth G; Barsky, Constance K

    2008-06-01

    This essay argues that science education can gain from close engagement with the history of science both in the training of prospective vocational scientists and in educating the broader public about the nature of science. First it shows how historicizing science in the classroom can improve the pedagogical experience of science students and might even help them turn into more effective professional practitioners of science. Then it examines how historians of science can support the scientific education of the general public at a time when debates over "intelligent design" are raising major questions over the kind of science that ought to be available to children in their school curricula. It concludes by considering further work that might be undertaken to show how history of science could be of more general educational interest and utility, well beyond the closed academic domains in which historians of science typically operate.

  12. Social psychology of education as a branch of scientific knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.Е. Sachkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the emergence of a new scientific field – social psychology of education. Most of the key phenomena that contemporary social psychology examines, cannot influence training and education success of an individual. Therefore, in addition to traditional general psychological, psycho-pedagogic, developmental, psychophysical and other approaches solving the problems of the education system; the possibility is considered of increasing the efficiency of the educational process by means of a rapidly growing social psychology. The prospects of this approach is evidenced by the results of numerous Russian and international research, including those performed in Moscow State University of Psychology and Education. The article discusses ways to develop the concept of the social psychology of education, approaches to the definition of its subject, goals and objectives, as well as new methods of the discipline. The possibilities of further use of the potential of social psychology are analyzed to address the efficiency of the educational process and the full personal development of students.

  13. Blogs: Applications in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Erica; Klein, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Blogs are reshaping our political, social, and cultural environment. Education is affected by blogs because of their potential for learning and teaching, and also their risks. This article elaborates a set of rules for evaluating and implementing blogs in teaching college science. (Contains 5 figures.)

  14. The Utopia of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    In this forum I expand on the ideas I initially presented in "Extending the purposes of science education: addressing violence within socio-economic disadvantaged communities" by responding to the comments provided by Matthew Weinstein, Francis Broadway and Sheri Leafgren. Focusing on their notion of utopias and superheroes, I ask us to reconsider…

  15. Effect of adaptability of field army recruits to psychological education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-xue ZHAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of psychological education adaptability on the mental quality and mental health of recruits of field army units. Methods A total number of 1244 recruits who joined the army in 2012 were tested with Mental Quality Questionnaire of Armyman (MQQA, Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90, Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, Selfrating Depression Scale (SDS, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and self-compiled questionnaire for adaptability psychological education. 568 recruits received adaptability psychological education for 10 times (sessions in the experimental group, and 676 in the control group did not receive the education. Results After intervention, each dimension score of experimental and control groups on MQQA significantly increased (P0.05. Psychological education showed a significant effect on improving mental quality (P0.05. After education, the anxiety, depression, state-trait anxiety scores of the two groups reduced significantly (P<0.001; compared with the control group, the anxious emotion was effectively relieved by psychological education in experimental group (P<0.001. The recruits in the experimental group showed significant difference in 30 subjective evaluation items between before- and after-education periods (P<0.001. Conclusions The adaptability psychological education has a significant effect on promoting the mental quality, mental health, emotional state and positive cognition of the recruits in field army units. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.15

  16. Artificial intelligence and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined and related to intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) and science education. Modeling the student, the teacher, and the natural environment are discussed as important parts of ICAI and the concept of microworlds as a powerful tool for science education is presented. Optimistic predictions about ICAI are tempered with the complex, persistent problems of: 1) teaching and learning as a soft or fuzzy knowledge base, 2) natural language processing, and 3) machine learning. The importance of accurate diagnosis of a student's learning state, including misconceptions and naive theories about nature, is stressed and related to the importance of accurate diagnosis by a physician. Based on the cognitive science/AI paradigm, a revised model of the well-known Karplus/Renner learning cycle is proposed.

  17. Creationism, Evolution, and Science Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Eugenie C. (National Center for Science Education)

    2005-06-22

    Many topics in the curriculum of American schools are controversial, but perhaps the one with the longest tenure is evolution. Three arguments are made against evolution: that it is allegedly weak science ('evolution is a theory in crisis'); that it is incompatible with religion; and that it is only 'fair' to 'balance' evolution with creationism. Regardless of the appropriateness of their application to science education, all three of the arguments are made to try to restrict the teaching of evolution. Variants of the fairness argument such as balancing evolution with 'scientific alternatives to evolution' or balancing evolution with 'arguments against evolution' have in fact become the current predominant antievolutionist strategy. Current events in the creationism/evolution controversy will be reviewed, and suggestions made for how to promote sound science education in the schools.

  18. Reforming Science Education: Part I. The Search for a Philosophy of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    The call for reforms in science education has been ongoing for a century, with new movements and approaches continuously reshaping the identity and values of the discipline. The HPS movement has an equally long history and taken part in the debates defining its purpose and revising curriculum. Its limited success, however, is due not only to competition with alternative visions and paradigms (e.g. STS, multi-culturalism, constructivism, traditionalism) which deadlock implementation, and which have led to conflicting meanings of scientific literacy, but the inability to rise above the debate. At issue is a fundamental problem plaguing science education at the school level, one it shares with education in general. It is my contention that it requires a guiding “metatheory” of education that can appropriately distance itself from the dual dependencies of metatheories in psychology and the demands of socialization—especially as articulated in most common conceptions of scientific literacy tied to citizenship. I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science. This will be elaborated in Part II of a supplemental paper to the present one. As a prerequisite to presenting Egan’s metatheory I first raise the issue of the need for a conceptual shift back to philosophy of education within the discipline, and thereto, on developing and demarcating true educational theories (essentially neglected since Hirst). In the same vein it is suggested a new research field should be opened with the express purpose of developing a discipline-specific “philosophy of science education” (largely neglected since Dewey) which could in addition serve to reinforce science education

  19. New Master’s Programme in Educational Psychology: Training Future Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Egorova M.A.,

    2016-01-01

    The article presents main results of the project implemented within the framework of the State Contract of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation No. 05.043.12.0018 of 23 may 2014 aimed at developing a set of academic materials for the master’s programme in School Psychology. The article explains the methodological principles underlying the design of academic courses in higher education (master’s degree level) fulfilling the requirements of activity- and competency-ba...

  20. V. M. BEKHTEREV IN RUSSIAN CHILD SCIENCE, 1900S-1920S: "OBJECTIVE PSYCHOLOGY"/"REFLEXOLOGY" AS A SCIENTIFIC MOVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byford, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In the early 20(th) century the child population became a major focus of scientific, professional and public interest. This led to the crystallization of a dynamic field of child science, encompassing developmental and educational psychology, child psychiatry and special education, school hygiene and mental testing, juvenile criminology and the anthropology of childhood. This article discusses the role played in child science by the eminent Russian neurologist and psychiatrist Vladimir Mikhailovich Bekhterev. The latter's name is associated with a distinctive program for transforming the human sciences in general and psychology in particular that he in the 1900s labelled "objective psychology" and from the 1910s renamed "reflexology." The article examines the equivocal place that Bekhterev's "objective psychology" and "reflexology" occupied in Russian/Soviet child science in the first three decades of the 20(th) century. While Bekhterev's prominence in this field is beyond doubt, analysis shows that "objective psychology" and "reflexology" had much less success in mobilizing support within it than certain other movements in this arena (for example, "experimental pedagogy" in the pre-revolutionary era); it also found it difficult to compete with the variety of rival programs that arose within Soviet "pedology" during the 1920s. However, this article also demonstrates that the study of child development played a pivotal role in Bekhterev's program for the transformation of the human sciences: it was especially important to his efforts to ground in empirical phenomena and in concrete research practices a new ontology of the psychological, which, the article argues, underpinned "objective psychology"/"reflexology" as a transformative scientific movement.

  1. Making Philosophy of Science Education Practical for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F. J. J. M.; van Berkel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Philosophy of science education can play a vital role in the preparation and professional development of science teachers. In order to fulfill this role a philosophy of science education should be made practical for teachers. First, multiple and inherently incomplete philosophies on the teacher and teaching on what, how and why should be…

  2. Making Philosophy of Science Education Practical for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F. J. J. M.; van Berkel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Philosophy of science education can play a vital role in the preparation and professional development of science teachers. In order to fulfill this role a philosophy of science education should be made practical for teachers. First, multiple and inherently incomplete philosophies on the teacher and teaching on what, how and why should be…

  3. Rethinking Science Education: Meeting the Challenge of "Science for All"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Robin

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's Presidential Address delivered to the Association for Science Education Annual Conference, University of Liverpool, January 2012. "Science for all" has been an aspiration of the Association for Science Education and the organisations from which it evolved for almost a century. It has, however, proved an elusive…

  4. The Rationality Debate: Application of Cognitive Psychology to Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leron, Uri; Hazzan, Orit

    2006-01-01

    Research in mathematics education usually attempts to look into students' learning and other mental processes. It could therefore be expected to build on knowledge acquired within the academic discipline of cognitive psychology. Our aim in this paper is to show how some recent developments in cognitive psychology can help interpret empirical…

  5. The Rationality Debate: Application of Cognitive Psychology to Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leron, Uri; Hazzan, Orit

    2006-01-01

    Research in mathematics education usually attempts to look into students' learning and other mental processes. It could therefore be expected to build on knowledge acquired within the academic discipline of cognitive psychology. Our aim in this paper is to show how some recent developments in cognitive psychology can help interpret empirical…

  6. Integrating Positive Psychology Techniques into Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Martha H.; Boykin, Rebecca B.

    2010-01-01

    Positive psychology offers rehabilitation counselor educators a framework to help students evaluate their own competencies and understand the value of a strengths-based approach to rehabilitation counseling. This article reviews several positive psychology techniques and discusses recommended uses as well as their effectiveness. Positive…

  7. Internationalization of Psychology Education in Indonesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarlito W. Sarwono

    2014-01-01

    Psychology in Indonesia was born from a medical faculty in 1953, a few years after the independence of Indonesia. It was founded primarily to get the right man in the right place that is very urgent at that time after the Dutch colonial government left many vital public and private positions empty. From the time it was born, the Indonesian psychology has moved vice-versa from indigenous psychology to universalism, from East to West, and from qualitative to quantitative methodology. The internationalization process of Indonesian psychology is discussed from the author's personal view.

  8. Psychological emergency attendance as a psychological service in educational psychology: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson do Nascimento Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The School Psychology Emergency Practices differs from others School Psychology practices, is more than type of psychology service and should have more institutional visibility. This paper reflects on these references from both the practice of the author and the currently literature in school psychology. To this purpose, we use as reference the concept of Extended Clinic and its relation with Psychology Emergency Service area. We discuss the opportunity of the school psychologist has, among other things, to be able to listen and to welcome spontaneously anyone in the school community seeking for support in case of emergency. In so doing, the author reflects on the condition of psychological emergency service as service and as a type of treatment at school, and school psychology as an area of expertise inserted in this complex environment different of views and perspectives.

  9. Psychology as an Evolving, Interdisciplinary Science: Integrating Science in Sensation and Perception from Fourier to Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Tela M.; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G.

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines the theoretical rationale and process for an integrated-science approach to teaching sensation and perception (S&P) to undergraduate psychology students that may also serve as an integrated-science curriculum. The course aimed to introduce the interdisciplinary evolution of this psychological field irrespective of any…

  10. Innovation in Science Education - World-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Albert V.

    The purpose of this book is to promote improvements in science education, world-wide, but particularly in developing countries. It is addressed to those in positions to make effective contributions to the improvement of science education. The world-wide role of science education, the goals of innovative activities, past experience in efforts to…

  11. Leadership, Responsibility, and Reform in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1993-01-01

    Regards leadership as central to the success of the reform movement in science education. Defines leadership and introduces a model of leadership modified from the one developed by Edwin Locke and his associates. Provides an overview of the essential qualities of leadership occurring in science education. Discusses reforming science education and…

  12. Innovation in Science Education - World-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Albert V.

    The purpose of this book is to promote improvements in science education, world-wide, but particularly in developing countries. It is addressed to those in positions to make effective contributions to the improvement of science education. The world-wide role of science education, the goals of innovative activities, past experience in efforts to…

  13. Gender Variance and Educational Psychology: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The area of gender variance appears to be more visible in both the media and everyday life. Within educational psychology literature gender variance remains underrepresented. The positioning of educational psychologists working across the three levels of child and family, school or establishment and education authority/council, means that they are…

  14. Educational Psychology and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first comprehensive, research-based textbook on Internet-infused education, "Educational Psychology and the Internet" offers students an accessible guide to important issues in the field. Michael Glassman begins with an overview of the history that traces the evolution of the Internet and its significance for education. He outlines…

  15. Gender Variance and Educational Psychology: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The area of gender variance appears to be more visible in both the media and everyday life. Within educational psychology literature gender variance remains underrepresented. The positioning of educational psychologists working across the three levels of child and family, school or establishment and education authority/council, means that they are…

  16. Educational Psychology and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first comprehensive, research-based textbook on Internet-infused education, "Educational Psychology and the Internet" offers students an accessible guide to important issues in the field. Michael Glassman begins with an overview of the history that traces the evolution of the Internet and its significance for education. He outlines…

  17. Psychological and educational interventions for subfertile men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuijlen, J.; Verhaak, C.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Wilkinson, J.; Farquhar, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately one-fifth of all subfertile couples seeking fertility treatment show clinically relevant levels of anxiety, depression, or distress. Psychological and educational interventions are frequently offered to subfertile couples, but their effectiveness, both in improving mental

  18. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, EMOTIONAL EDUCATION AND THE HAPPY CLASSROOMS PROGRAM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rafael Bisquerra Alzina; Silvia Hernández Paniello

    2017-01-01

    .... This has been a clear aim for emotional education (Bisquerra, 2000, 2009), from the outset. With the emergence of positive psychology, there was a renewed effort in this direction, as a means of providing a better foundation. GROP...

  19. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  20. Simpson's paradox in psychological science: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Rogier A; Frankenhuis, Willem E; Waldorp, Lourens J; Borsboom, Denny

    2013-01-01

    The direction of an association at the population-level may be reversed within the subgroups comprising that population-a striking observation called Simpson's paradox. When facing this pattern, psychologists often view it as anomalous. Here, we argue that Simpson's paradox is more common than conventionally thought, and typically results in incorrect interpretations-potentially with harmful consequences. We support this claim by reviewing results from cognitive neuroscience, behavior genetics, clinical psychology, personality psychology, educational psychology, intelligence research, and simulation studies. We show that Simpson's paradox is most likely to occur when inferences are drawn across different levels of explanation (e.g., from populations to subgroups, or subgroups to individuals). We propose a set of statistical markers indicative of the paradox, and offer psychometric solutions for dealing with the paradox when encountered-including a toolbox in R for detecting Simpson's paradox. We show that explicit modeling of situations in which the paradox might occur not only prevents incorrect interpretations of data, but also results in a deeper understanding of what data tell us about the world.

  1. Earth Science Education in Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullatif, Osman M.; Farwa, Abdalla G.

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes Earth Science Education in Sudan, with particular emphasis on the University of Khartoum. The first geological department in Sudan was founded in 1958 in the University of Khartoum. In the 1980s, six more geological departments have been added in the newer universities. The types of courses offered include Diploma, B.Sc. (General), B.Sc. (Honours), M.Sc. and Ph.D. The Geology programmes are strongly supported by field work training and mapping. Final-year students follow specialised training in one of the following topics: hydrogeology, geophysics, economic geology, sedimentology and engineering geology. A graduation report, written in the final year, represents 30-40% of the total marks. The final assessment and grading are decided with the help of internal and external examiners. Entry into the Geology programmes is based on merit and performance. The number of students who graduate with Honours and become geologists is between 20% to 40% of the initial intake at the beginning of the second year. Employment opportunities are limited and are found mainly in the Government's geological offices, the universities and research centres, and private companies. The Department of Geology at the University of Khartoum has long-standing internal and external links with outside partners. This has been manifested in the training of staff members, the donation of teaching materials and laboratory facilities. The chief problems currently facing Earth Science Education in Sudan are underfunding, poor equipment, laboratory facilities and logistics. Other problems include a shortage of staff, absence of research, lack of supervision and emigration of staff members. Urgent measures are needed to assess and evaluate the status of Earth Science Education in terms of objectives, needs and difficulties encountered. Earth Science Education is expected to contribute significantly to the exploitation of mineral resources and socio-economic development in the Sudan.

  2. A Study of the Work of Daniel Starch: A Chapter in the History of the Application of Psychology and Statistics to Education and Other Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanningmeier, Erwin V.

    This document examines the work of Daniel Starch, emphasizing his work in educational psychology and advertising. After earning his doctorate in psychology (1906), Starch attempted to apply the findings of the new science to education and to advertising. This application met with much success. In advertising, he devised new sampling techniques and…

  3. Scale of Academic Emotion in Science Education: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Contemporary research into science education has generally been conducted from the perspective of 'conceptual change' in learning. This study sought to extend previous work by recognizing that human rationality can be influenced by the emotions generated by the learning environment and specific actions related to learning. Methods used in educational psychology were adopted to investigate the emotional experience of science students as affected by gender, teaching methods, feedback, and learning tasks. A multidisciplinary research approach combining brain activation measurement with multivariate psychological data theory was employed in the development of a questionnaire intended to reveal the academic emotions of university students in three situations: attending science class, learning scientific subjects, and problem solving. The reliability and validity of the scale was evaluated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results revealed differences between the genders in positive-activating and positive-deactivating academic emotions in all three situations; however, these differences manifested primarily during preparation for Science tests. In addition, the emotions experienced by male students were more intense than those of female students. Finally, the negative-deactivating emotions associated with participation in Science tests were more intense than those experienced by simply studying science. This study provides a valuable tool with which to evaluate the emotional response of students to a range of educational situations.

  4. A model of psychological evaluation of educational environment and its empirical indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Laktionova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the study is to identify ways of complex psychological assessment of educational en-vironment quality, the nature of conditions that affect positive personal development of its members. The solution to this problem is to develop science-based content and technology sup-port for psychological evaluation of the educational environment. The purpose of the study was theoretical rationale and empirical testing of a model of psychological examination of education-al environment. The study is based on the assumption that in order to assess the quality of the educational environment in the aspect of its personality developing potential, we need to create a model of psychological examination as a special developmental system, reflected in terms of the personal characteristics of its subjects. The empirical material is based on a study sample of 717 students and 438 teachers from 28 educational institutions that participated in the program of urban pilot sites of the Department of Education of Moscow. In total, 1,155 people took part it the study.

  5. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2016 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2015 Education and Training Awards Committee were Sharon L. Berry, PhD (Chair); Arthur C. Graesser, PhD; and Thomas R. Kratochwill, PhD; Erica Wise, PhD (Chair-Elect); Ron Rozensky, PhD; and Jane Halonen, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Effecting change in elementary school science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parravano, C.

    1994-12-31

    The mission of the Merck Institute for Science Education is to improve the quality of science education during the formative years of kindergarten through eighth grade. To accomplish this mission, the Institute has three primary goals: Transform the teaching of science to communicate the excitement and relevance of science; Reform the education of teachers to instill in tomorrow`s teachers an understanding and appreciation of science; and Create a consensus on the importance of elementary science education among leaders in education, business, and science. Merck has made a minimum ten year commitment of funding and resources to the Institute. The Institute will work very closely with faculty, administration, and community leaders in target school districts to enhance science education in the elementary grades of their schools. Once the Institute`s goals have been achieved in these initial partner districts, the Institute will replicate its programs in other districts.

  7. Science and Religion: Implications for Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A religious perspective on life shapes how and what those with such a perspective learn in science; for some students a religious perspective can hinder learning in science. For such reasons Staver's article is to be welcomed as it proposes a new way of resolving the widely perceived discord between science and religion. Staver notes that Western…

  8. An Interdisciplinary Team Project: Psychology and Computer Science Students Create Online Cognitive Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Kathleen A.; Malita, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    We present our case study of an interdisciplinary team project for students taking either a psychology or computer science (CS) course. The project required psychology and CS students to combine their knowledge and skills to create an online cognitive task. Each interdisciplinary project team included two psychology students who conducted library…

  9. Connecting Psychological Science with Climate Change: A Persuasion and Social Influence Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Geoffrey D.; Behlen, Margaret M.

    2017-01-01

    Students often have little understanding of the role psychological science plays in informing us about the impact of human behavior when addressing climate change. We designed an assignment for a social psychology course based on Frantz and Mayer's use of the decision tree model of helping behavior to identify the psychological barriers that…

  10. Integrating Science in Applied Psychology Programs: A Student-Operated Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonius, Daniel; Brown, Adam D.; Todman, McWelling; Safran, Jeremy D.

    2007-01-01

    As a requirement of APA accreditation, many PhD programs in applied psychology subscribe to some variant of the scientist-practitioner model. However, critics have argued that integrating science into an applied psychology curriculum may be too challenging a task. This article describes the development of The New School Psychology Bulletin, a…

  11. An Interdisciplinary Team Project: Psychology and Computer Science Students Create Online Cognitive Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Kathleen A.; Malita, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    We present our case study of an interdisciplinary team project for students taking either a psychology or computer science (CS) course. The project required psychology and CS students to combine their knowledge and skills to create an online cognitive task. Each interdisciplinary project team included two psychology students who conducted library…

  12. Investigating Creativity in Graphic Design Education from Psychological Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Amur Alhajri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of creativity in graphic design education has been a central aspect of graphic design education. The psychological component of creativity and its role in graphic design education has not been given much importance. The present research would attempt to study ‘creativity in graphic design education from psychological perspectives’. A thorough review of literature would be conducted on graphic design education, creativity and its psychological aspects. Creativity is commonly defined as a ‘problem solving’ feature in design education. Students of graphic design have to involve themselves in the identification of cultural and social elements. Instruction in the field of graphic design must be aimed at enhancing the creative abilities of the student. The notion that creativity is a cultural production is strengthened by the problem solving methods employed in all cultures. Most cultures regard creativity as a process which leads to the creation of something new. Based on this idea, a cross-cultural research was conducted to explore the concept of creativity from Arabic and Western perspective. From a psychological viewpoint, the student’s cognition, thinking patterns and habits also have a role in knowledge acquisition. The field of graphic design is not equipped with a decent framework which necessitates certain modes of instruction; appropriate to the discipline. The results of the study revealed that the psychological aspect of creativity needs to be adequately understood in order to enhance creativity in graphic design education.

  13. Educational Psychology as an Evolving Discipline: Trends and Synthesis in Asia Pacific Education Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-il; Koh, Hye-jung; Jo, Su-yeon; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Kim, Myeung-chan

    2014-01-01

    Educational psychology has seen rapid growth as an academic discipline in recent years. The current study reviewed research articles published in "Asia Pacific Education Review" ("APER"), a journal that has been gaining greater international recognition, to reveal recent trends in educational psychology research in Asia…

  14. Educational Psychology as an Evolving Discipline: Trends and Synthesis in Asia Pacific Education Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-il; Koh, Hye-jung; Jo, Su-yeon; Nam, JeeEun Karin; Kim, Myeung-chan

    2014-01-01

    Educational psychology has seen rapid growth as an academic discipline in recent years. The current study reviewed research articles published in "Asia Pacific Education Review" ("APER"), a journal that has been gaining greater international recognition, to reveal recent trends in educational psychology research in Asia…

  15. Information security: where computer science, economics and psychology meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross; Moore, Tyler

    2009-07-13

    Until ca. 2000, information security was seen as a technological discipline, based on computer science but with mathematics helping in the design of ciphers and protocols. That perspective started to change as researchers and practitioners realized the importance of economics. As distributed systems are increasingly composed of machines that belong to principals with divergent interests, incentives are becoming as important to dependability as technical design. A thriving new field of information security economics provides valuable insights not just into 'security' topics such as privacy, bugs, spam and phishing, but into more general areas of system dependability and policy. This research programme has recently started to interact with psychology. One thread is in response to phishing, the most rapidly growing form of online crime, in which fraudsters trick people into giving their credentials to bogus websites; a second is through the increasing importance of security usability; and a third comes through the psychology-and-economics tradition. The promise of this multidisciplinary research programme is a novel framework for analysing information security problems-one that is both principled and effective.

  16. Philosophy of Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Walter

    2012-08-01

    This is a vast and vague topic. In order to do justice to it one has to write a book or maybe more than one. For it can be understood in quite different ways and on different levels For example you may think mainly of the historical aspect, that is how philosophy of science developed in the last hundred or so years and how its influence on education changed; you may think of quite different schools of philosophy, from Marxist or positivist to such exotic but at some places influential philosophic positions like that of Rudolph Steiner; of course, you may limit the subject to special fields like epistemology, theory of scientific methodology, or, what has become fashionable recently, sociology of knowledge which may have a considerable bearing on physics teaching (Collins and Shapin 1983; Jung 1985). Again we may think of the topic treated by a philosopher, a scientist, an educationalist, a teacher, which would mean quite a difference. I am trying here to speak as an educationalist, with the physics teacher in mind: this is my vocational perspective as someone who educates physics teachers. Of course, our main concern is the contribution of science, especially physics, to general education, which integrates many of the special topics mentioned. Philosophy of science comes in because it is not at all clear what science and physics is, and what of it should be taught, and how such chosen parts should be taught. I also take this opportunity to give an idea of the longstanding tradition of this discussion in Germany, connected with names like Wagenshein, Litt, Heisenberg and many others.

  17. Analysing Theoretical Frameworks of Moral Education through Lakatos's Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2014-01-01

    The structure of studies of moral education is basically interdisciplinary; it includes moral philosophy, psychology, and educational research. This article systematically analyses the structure of studies of moral educational from the vantage points of philosophy of science. Among the various theoretical frameworks in the field of philosophy of…

  18. Analysing Theoretical Frameworks of Moral Education through Lakatos's Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2014-01-01

    The structure of studies of moral education is basically interdisciplinary; it includes moral philosophy, psychology, and educational research. This article systematically analyses the structure of studies of moral educational from the vantage points of philosophy of science. Among the various theoretical frameworks in the field of philosophy of…

  19. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the science of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Philip G. Zimbardo. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  20. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field has not been explored. Romanticism was not only an obvious historical period, but a particular state of mind with its own extraordinary emotional sensitivity towards nature. It is especially the latter which we hope to revisit and reclaim for science education. After discussing several key historical contributions, we describe nine characteristics of `Romantic Science' in order to focus on six ideas/possibilities that we believe hold much value for transforming current science education: (1) the emotional sensitivity toward nature, (2) the centrality of sense experience, (3) the importance of "holistic experience", (4) the importance of the notions of mystery and wonder, (5) the power of science to transform people's outlook on the natural world, and (6) the importance of the relationship between science and philosophy. It is argued that in view of a pragmatist/utilitarian conception of school science prevalent today the aforementioned ideas (especially the notion of wonder and the poetic/non-analytical mode of knowledge), can provide food for thought for both science teachers and researchers seeking to work out an aesthetic conception, one that complements current approaches such as inquiry science and conceptual change.

  1. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  2. Enriching science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2016-03-01

    This editorial provides a brief synthesis of the past, present, and future of School Psychology Quarterly, highlighting important contributions as an international resource to enrich, invigorate, enhance, and advance science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe. Information herein highlights (a) the value of high quality and timely reviews, (b) publishing manuscripts that address a breadth of important topics relevant to school psychology, and (c) the structure and contributions of the special topic sections featured in School Psychology Quarterly.

  3. Preparing Future Secondary Computer Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajwa, Iyad

    2007-01-01

    Although nearly every college offers a major in computer science, many computer science teachers at the secondary level have received little formal training. This paper presents details of a project that could make a significant contribution to national efforts to improve computer science education by combining teacher education and professional…

  4. Preparing Future Secondary Computer Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajwa, Iyad

    2007-01-01

    Although nearly every college offers a major in computer science, many computer science teachers at the secondary level have received little formal training. This paper presents details of a project that could make a significant contribution to national efforts to improve computer science education by combining teacher education and professional…

  5. Historical Approaches in German Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the second half of the 20th century, historical approaches became relevant in science education. This development can at least in part be explained with the growing awareness of the importance to address Nature of Science aspects in science education. In comparison to the international publications, some particularities can be…

  6. Persuasion and Attitude Change in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Persuasion is presented as it may be applied by science educators in research and practice. The orientation taken is that science educators need to be acquainted with persuasion in the context of social influence and learning theory to be able to evaluate its usefulness as a mechanism for developing and changing science-related attitudes. (KR)

  7. Promoting Science in Secondary School Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovitti, Anthony; Duncan, Jacinta C; Jabbar, Abdul

    2017-03-05

    Engaging secondary school students with science education is crucial for a society that demands a high level of scientific literacy in order to deal with the economic and social challenges of the 21st century. Here we present how parasitology could be used to engage and promote science in secondary school students under the auspice of a 'Specialist Centre' model for science education.

  8. Earth Science Education in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kevin L.

    1999-05-01

    Zimbabwe is a mineral-rich country with a long history of Earth Science Education. The establishment of a University Geology Department in 1960 allowed the country to produce its own earth science graduates. These graduates are readily absorbed by the mining industry and few are without work. Demand for places at the University is high and entry standards reflect this. Students enter the University after GCE A levels in three science subjects and most go on to graduate. Degree programmes include B.Sc. General in Geology (plus another science), B.Sc. Honours in Geology and M.Sc. in Exploration Geology and in Geophysics. The undergraduate curriculum is broad-based and increasingly vocationally orientated. A well-equipped building caters for relatively large student numbers and also houses analytical facilities used for research and teaching. Computers are used in teaching from the first year onwards. Staff are on average poorly qualified compared to other universities, but there is an impressive research element. The Department has good links with many overseas universities and external funding agencies play a strong supporting role. That said, financial constraints remain the greatest barrier to future development, although increasing links with the mining industry may cushion this.

  9. Reconceptualising inquiry in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Stuart; Price, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Decades of discussion and debate about how science is most effectively taught and learned have resulted in a number of similar but competing inquiry models. These aim to develop students learning of science through approaches which reflect the authenticity of science as practiced by professional scientists while being practical and manageable within the school context. This paper offers a collection of our current reflections and suggestions concerning inquiry and its place in science education. We suggest that many of the current models of inquiry are too limited in their vision concerning themselves, almost exclusively, with producing a scaffold which reduces the complex process of inquiry into an algorithmic approach based around a sequence of relatively simple steps. We argue that this restricts students' experience of authentic inquiry to make classroom management and assessment procedures easier. We then speculate that a more integrated approach is required through an alternative inquiry model that depends on three dimensions (conceptual, procedural and personal) and we propose that it will be more likely to promote effective learning and a willingness to engage in inquiry across all facets of a students' school career and beyond.

  10. Community and Communication among Instructors of Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Kelvin

    2010-01-01

    Even though introductory educational psychology is a widespread feature of preservice teacher education, instructors of this course generally learn to teach the course in isolation from each other--a circumstance that limits the effectiveness of this course. The traditional strategies of professional development are conducting research about the…

  11. Evolutionary Psychology: A Natural Selection for Music Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rodger

    2006-01-01

    In this viewpoint it is suggested that recent research and authorship in the evolutionary psychology (EP) of music can provide musicians and educators with an enriched understanding of the adaptive role of music in human life. Within a climate of continual educational reform in which music is often marginalised from other mainstream curricular…

  12. Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology and Education, 8th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Robert M.; Thorndike-Christ, Tracy M.

    2010-01-01

    In this classic introduction to educational and psychological measurement, Thorndike and Thorndike-Christ provide all of the pertinent information future professionals need to know in order to develop the skills to use test information wisely. Incorporating standard measurement concepts as they apply to both educational and psychological…

  13. Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology and Education, 8th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Robert M.; Thorndike-Christ, Tracy M.

    2010-01-01

    In this classic introduction to educational and psychological measurement, Thorndike and Thorndike-Christ provide all of the pertinent information future professionals need to know in order to develop the skills to use test information wisely. Incorporating standard measurement concepts as they apply to both educational and psychological…

  14. APRENDIZAJES EN PSICOLOGÍA EDUCACIONAL. UNA EXPERIENCIA DE FORMACIÓN DOCENTE EN CIENCIAS BIOLÓGICAS / LEARNING PROCESSES IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. A TEACHER TRAINING EXPERIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Duarte

    2016-06-01

    . / This article approaches the learning processes in the biological sciences through the analysis of ethnographic observations in natural sciences classes in secondary schools from Córdoba. The analysis is based on the ethnographic records made by students of the subject Educational Psychology, part of the Teacher Training program in Biological Sciences from the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba between 2008 and 2015. These ethnographic records are kept in the context of a teacher training experience that seeks that future biology teachers can approach situated learning processes in order to facilitate the processes of conceptualization, analysis and the understanding of the dynamics, the dimensions and the problems related to teaching and learning practices in secondary schools. At the beginning of the article we describe the classroom and institutional conditions in which the interactions between the students and the biological sciences contents take place in the secondary schools that have promoted this teaching experience. Then, we delve into these specific interactions in two sections. The first one focuses on the interactions between the knowledgeable subject and the natural sciences contents on the basis of the identified variations according to the type of tasks that students must solve in the classroom, the focus on previous ideas, the kinds of participation promoted, authorized or rejected by the teacher in charge, the dialogic exchanges that occur around the contents, the uses of questions and answers in class, the space where these learning activities are developed and the materials with which students interact. The second section focuses on the forms, uses and potential effects of the evaluation practices in these observed classes. Finally, we focus on some questions and reflections derived from the analysis presented.

  15. Simpson’s Paradox in Psychological Science: A Practical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier eKievit

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The direction of an association at the population-level may be reversed within the subgroups comprising that population—a striking observation called Simpson’s paradox. When facing this pattern, psychologists often view it as anomalous. Here, we argue that Simpson’s paradox is more common than conventionally thought, and typically results in incorrect interpretations – potentially with harmful consequences. We support this claim by drawing on empirical results from cognitive neuroscience, behavior genetics, psychopathology, personality psychology, educational psychology, intelligence research, and simulation studies. We show that Simpson’s Paradox is most likely to occur when inferences are drawn across different levels of explanation (e.g., from populations to subgroups, or subgroups to individuals. We propose a set of statistical markers indicative of the paradox, and offer psychometric solutions for dealing with the paradox when encountered—including a toolbox in R for detecting Simpson’s Paradox. We show that explicit modeling of situations in which the paradox might occur not only prevents incorrect interpretations of data, but also results in a deeper understanding of what data tell us about the world.

  16. The Mystery in Science: A Neglected Tool for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacosta, Pangratios

    2008-01-01

    Of the many valuable tools available to science education, the mystery in science is the one that is most ignored, underused, or misunderstood. whenever it is used, it is only as mere entertainment or as an attention grabber. In this article, the author discusses how the mystery in science can improve student attitudes, generate a life-long…

  17. Improving epistemological beliefs and moral judgment through an STS-based science ethics education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin; Jeong, Changwoo

    2014-03-01

    This study develops a Science-Technology-Society (STS)-based science ethics education program for high school students majoring in or planning to major in science and engineering. Our education program includes the fields of philosophy, history, sociology and ethics of science and technology, and other STS-related theories. We expected our STS-based science ethics education program to promote students' epistemological beliefs and moral judgment development. These psychological constructs are needed to properly solve complicated moral and social dilemmas in the fields of science and engineering. We applied this program to a group of Korean high school science students gifted in science and engineering. To measure the effects of this program, we used an essay-based qualitative measurement. The results indicate that there was significant development in both epistemological beliefs and moral judgment. In closing, we briefly discuss the need to develop epistemological beliefs and moral judgment using an STS-based science ethics education program.

  18. Discovering Science Education in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Science, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Science is amazing for many reasons. One of them is its immeasurable size as a subject, and the breadth of its application. From nanotech to astrophysics, from our backyards to the global arena, science links everything and everyone on Earth. Our understanding of science--and science education--needs to be just as diverse and all-encompassing.…

  19. Library and Information Science Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Won

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the historical background and current trends of library- and information science-education in Japan. Analyzes the various types of curriculum and the teaching staff of these institutions, while identifying factors influencing library and information-science education. Mentions present issues of the education system and discusses future…

  20. Reconceptualizing the Nature of Science for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Zoubeida R.; Erduran, Sibel

    2016-03-01

    Two fundamental questions about science are relevant for science educators: (a) What is the nature of science? and (b) what aspects of nature of science should be taught and learned? They are fundamental because they pertain to how science gets to be framed as a school subject and determines what aspects of it are worthy of inclusion in school science. This conceptual article re-examines extant notions of nature of science and proposes an expanded version of the Family Resemblance Approach (FRA), originally developed by Irzik and Nola (International handbook of research in history, philosophy and science teaching. Springer, Dordrecht, pp 999-1021, 2014) in which they view science as a cognitive-epistemic and as an institutional-social system. The conceptual basis of the expanded FRA is described and justified in this article based on a detailed account published elsewhere (Erduran and Dagher in Reconceptualizing the nature of science for science education: scientific knowledge, practices and other family categories. Springer, Dordrecht, 2014a). The expanded FRA provides a useful framework for organizing science curriculum and instruction and gives rise to generative visual tools that support the implementation of a richer understanding of and about science. The practical implications for this approach have been incorporated into analysis of curriculum policy documents, curriculum implementation resources, textbook analysis and teacher education settings.

  1. 76 FR 11765 - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Notice Inviting Applications... support education research and special education research. The Director takes this action under the...

  2. Making Philosophy of Science Education Practical for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F. J. J. M.; van Berkel, B.

    2015-04-01

    Philosophy of science education can play a vital role in the preparation and professional development of science teachers. In order to fulfill this role a philosophy of science education should be made practical for teachers. First, multiple and inherently incomplete philosophies on the teacher and teaching on what, how and why should be integrated. In this paper we describe our philosophy of science education (ASSET approach) which is composed of bounded rationalism as a guideline for understanding teachers' practical reasoning, liberal education underlying the why of teaching, scientific perspectivism as guideline for the what and educational social constructivism as guiding choices about the how of science education. Integration of multiple philosophies into a coherent philosophy of science education is necessary but not sufficient to make it practical for teachers. Philosophies are still formulated at a too abstract level to guide teachers' practical reasoning. For this purpose, a heuristic model must be developed on an intermediate level of abstraction that will provide teachers with a bridge between these abstract ideas and their specific teaching situation. We have developed and validated such a heuristic model, the CLASS model in order to complement our ASSET approach. We illustrate how science teachers use the ASSET approach and the CLASS model to make choices about the what, the how and the why of science teaching.

  3. Cognitive Psychology--An Educational Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive psychology offers relevant insights into improving the teaching and learning process. The author has selected ten questions from a graduate class in cognition and learning taken at The Teachers College, Columbia University. The questions will be used to examine the most effective ways to learn and recall information.

  4. Science and Society - Problems, issues and dilemmas in science education

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Next in CERN's series of Science and Society speakers is Jonathan Osborne, Senior Lecturer in Science Education at King's College London. On Thursday 26 April, Dr Osborne will speak in the CERN main auditorium about current issues in science education in the light of an ever more science-based society. Jonathan Osborne, Senior Lecturer in Science Education at King's College London. Does science deserve a place at the curriculum high table of each student or is it just a gateway to a set of limited career options in science and technology? This question leads us to an important change in our ideas of what science education has been so far and what it must be. Basic knowledge of science and technology has traditionally been considered as just a starting point for those who wanted to build up a career in scientific research. But nowadays, the processes of science, the analysis of risks and benefits, and a knowledge of the social practices of science are necessary for every citizen. This new way of looking at s...

  5. TO THE PROBLEM OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SECURITY OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Popova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is review of psychological safety parameters in inclusive education. Expertise of  psychological  safety in  education  analysis  co nsidered including macroand micro levels and specifics of inclusive education. General factors of ps ychological safety in education established as effe ctive organization (including management procedures and hiring of competent workers, attention to co mmunicative and personality-based parameters of interaction,  that  influence  satisfaction  of  personal and educational needs of educational environment participants. Effective realisation of educational environment emphasized as important factor of personality   potential   development.   Emphasized   i mportance of considering different levels of inclusive educational environment safety: organising (inclu ding factors of educational environment complexity, educational  (educational  programs  variety that  i mportant for fulfilment of different educational needs, corrective  (based  on  fulfilment  of  different  educ ational needs.  Also, important to consider different measures of assessment of educational impacts efficiency.   Special   attention   called   to   psycho pedagogical  specialists  training,  need  to  develop their psychological culture and ability to flexibly manage educational means considering goals of inclusive education. Also, potential manageabil ity of said parameters is described.

  6. The psychological safety of the educational environment and the psychological well-being of Russian secondary school pupils and teachers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeva I.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The interest of psychologists in the study of safety in the educational environment and its psychological characteristics is increasing. The aim of this study was to select, substantiate, and disclose the psychological factors in the educational environment that influence the psychological well-being of pupils. There were three stages in our research: clarifying the level of psychological safety in the schools in the study; revealing the consistency of the teachers’ and the students’ evaluations of the level of psychological safety in those schools; determining the nature of the influence of the psychological safety of the educational environment on the psychological well-being of the students. The study involved 172 teachers and 876 students in Moscow and St. Petersburg schools. Psychological safety is a condition of educational environments that are free from psychological violence in the interactions of the people in them; psychological safety contributes to the satisfaction of the needs for personal trust and communication, creates for the participants a sense of belonging (the referential importance of the environment, and contributes to their mental health. The empirical study revealed that (1 the level of the psychological safety of the educational environment in the evaluations of the teachers was higher and had more expressed differentiation than did the level in the students’ evaluations; (2 the psychological well-being of the students was closely correlated with the level of psychological safety for the teachers; (3 such components of the well-being of the students as emotional comfort, self-confidence, a higher level of cognitive activity were developed in those schools with high levels of psychological safety for the teachers. The results can be useful in educational psychology and environmental psychology as well as when creating technologies to support the safety of school environments and of the people in them, including

  7. The role of science education in education for the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, A.M.

    Although it is commonly believed that environmental education requires input from several disciplines, including science, there is little evidence that science education has made a successful contribution to the preservation of the environment. Some of the literature relating science and environmental education is reviewed. The belief that environmental education should focus on the development of attitudes as its major goal is probably the most pervasive position in the literature. (29 references)

  8. Earth System Science Education Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Kaufman, C.; Humphreys, R. R.; Colgan, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The College of Charleston is developing several new geoscience-based education modules for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). These three new modules provide opportunities for science and pre-service education students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences. The three new modules will be discussed in this session. Coastal Crisis is a module that analyzes rapidly changing coastlines and uses technology - remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor changes in coastal environments. The beaches near Charleston, SC are undergoing erosion and therefore are used as examples of rapidly changing coastlines. Students will use real data from NASA, NOAA and other federal agencies in the classroom to study coastal change. Through this case study, learners will acquire remotely sensed images and GIS data sets from online sources, utilize those data sets within Google Earth or other visualization programs, and understand what the data is telling them. Analyzing the data will allow learners to contemplate and make predictions on the impact associated with changing environmental conditions, within the context of a coastal setting. To Drill or Not To Drill is a multidisciplinary problem based module to increase students’ knowledge of problems associated with nonrenewable resource extraction. The controversial topic of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) examines whether the economic benefit of the oil extracted from ANWR is worth the social cost of the environmental damage that such extraction may inflict. By attempting to answer this question, learners must balance the interests of preservation with the economic need for oil. The learners are exposed to the difficulties associated with a real world problem that requires trade-off between environmental trust and economic well-being. The Citizen Science module challenges students to translate scientific

  9. University Science and Mathematics Education in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole; Valero, Paola; Christensen, Ole Ravn

    configuration poses to scientific knowledge, to universities and especially to education in mathematics and science. Traditionally, educational studies in mathematics and science education have looked at change in education from within the scientific disciplines and in the closed context of the classroom...... clear that the transformation of knowledge outside universities has implied a change in the routes that research in mathematics, science and technology has taken in the last decades. In this context, it is difficult to avoid considering seriously the challenges that such a complex and uncertain social...... of educational, cultural, administrative and ideological views and practices that permeate and constitute science and mathematics education in universities today. University Science and Mathematics Education in Transition contributes to an understanding of the multiple aspects and dimensions of the transition...

  10. Are you afraid of the dark? Notes on the psychology of belief in histories of science and the occult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2016-04-02

    The popular view of the inherent conflict between science and the occult has been rendered obsolete by recent advances in the history of science. Yet, these historiographical revisions have gone unnoticed in the public understanding of science and public education at large. Particularly, reconstructions of the formation of modern psychology and its links to psychical research can show that the standard view of the latter as motivated by metaphysical bias fails to stand up to scrutiny. After highlighting certain basic methodological maxims shared by psychotherapists and historians, I will try to counterbalance simplistic claims of a 'need to believe' as a precondition of scientific open-mindedness regarding the occurrence of parapsychological phenomena by discussing instances revealing a presumably widespread 'will to disbelieve' in the occult. I shall argue that generalized psychological explanations are only helpful in our understanding of history if we apply them in a symmetrical manner.

  11. Translating psychological science: Highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings: Comment on Kaslow (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In her presidential address, N. J. Kaslow (see record 2015-33530-002) argued that psychologists have a responsibility to translate psychological science to the public and identifies various platforms for doing so. In this comment on her article, I advocate that psychology as a field immediately heed her call in the area of psychological science highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings. I point out the psychological science documenting media contagion for suicide and mass shootings, the World Health Organization's (2008) guidelines for media in reporting suicide deaths to prevent that contagion, and discuss ways-based on Dr. Kaslow's suggestions-that psychologists can disseminate psychological science to prevent similar tragedies in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Research Methodologies in Science Education: Qualitative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libarkin, Julie C.; Kurdziel, Josepha P.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts and terminology of qualitative research methodologies in the context of science education. Discusses interviewing, observing, validity, reliability, and confirmability. (Author/MM)

  13. Reforming Science and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-09-01

    Since 1991, the National Science Foundation has signed cooperative agreements with 26 states to undertake ambitious and comprehensive initiatives to reform science, mathematics, and technology education. Collectively, those agreements are known as the State Systemic Initiatives (SSI's). Two complimentary programs, The Urban and Rural Systemic Initiatives (USI's and RSI's), address similar reforms in the nation's largest cities and poorest rural areas. The SSI Program departs significantly from past NSF practice in several ways. The funding is for a longer term and is larger in amount, and the NSF is taking a more activist role, seeking to leverage state and private funds and promote the coordination of programs within states. The Initiatives also have a stronger policy orientation than previous NSF programs have had. The NSF strategy is a reflection of the growing and widely held view that meaningful reforms in schools are most likely to be achieved through state initiatives that set clear and ambitious learning goals and standards; align all of the available policy levers in support of reform; stimulate school-level initiatives; and mobilize human and financial resources to support these changes. Two premises underlie systemic reform: (1) all children can meet significantly higher standards if they are asked to do so and given adequate opportunities to master the content, and (2) state and local policy changes can create opportunities by giving schools strong and consistent signals about the changes in practice and performance that are expected. Because this is an enormous investment of Federal resources that is intended to bring about deep, systemic improvement in the nation's ability to teach science and mathematics effectively, the NSF has contracted with a consortium of independent evaluators to conduct a review of the program. The first of the SSI's were funded in 1991, sufficiently long ago to begin to formulate some initial impressions of their impact. Take

  14. Mountain Climbing in the Dark: Introduction to the Special Symposium on the Future Direction of Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2017-07-01

    This special symposium in Perspectives on Psychological Science answers the question, "Do you believe the field of psychological science is headed in the right direction?" Respondents are a sampling of Association for Psychological Science award winners over the past 5 years dating back from publication of this symposium.

  15. Educational Psychology in New Zealand: Results of the 2006 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Annan, Jean; Skokut, Mary; Renshaw, Tyler L.

    2009-01-01

    The International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) was used to gather information about New Zealand educational psychologists' characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and the challenges they experienced in their work. The results of this survey were considered in relation to the social and cultural context of…

  16. Educational Technology Classics: The Science Teacher and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The science teacher is the key person who has the commitment and the responsibility for carrying out any brand of science education. All of the investments, predictions, and expressions of concern will have little effect on the accomplishment of the broad goals of science education if these are not reflected in the situations in which learning…

  17. Mainstreaming ESd into Science teacher Education Courses:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-12-11

    Dec 11, 2007 ... ESD in the context of mathematics and science teacher education. ... effective pedagogical approaches, teacher education, teaching ..... concepts do not add any value to the students' personal lives (Open-response text).

  18. Research facility access & science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

    1994-10-01

    As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

  19. Science Education: Issues, Approaches and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shairose Irfan Jessani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global education system, science education is much more than fact-based knowledge. Science education becomes meaningless and incomprehensible for learners, if the learners are unable to relate it with their lives. It is thus recommended that Pakistan, like many other countries worldwide should adopt Science Technology Society (STS approach for delivery of science education. The purpose of the STS approach lies in developing scientifically literate citizens who can make conscious decisions about the socio-scientific issues that impact their lives. The challenges in adopting this approach for Pakistan lie in four areas that will completely need to be revamped according to STS approach. These areas include: the examination system; science textbooks; science teacher education programs; and available resources and school facilities.

  20. Science education in a secular age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David E.

    2013-03-01

    A college science education instructor tells his students he rejects evolution. What should we think? The scene unfolds in one of the largest urban centers in the world. If we are surprised, why? Expanding on Federica Raia's (2012) first-hand experience with this scenario, I broaden her discussion by considering the complexity of science education in a secular age. Enjoining Raia within the framework of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, I task the science education community to consider the broad strokes of science, religious faith, and the complexity of modernity in its evolving, hybridized forms. Building upon anthropological approaches to science education research, I articulate a framework to more fully account for who, globally, is a Creationist, and what this means for our views of ethically responsive science education.

  1. The Nature of Science and Science Education: A Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad; Lederman, Norman G.; Mccomas, William F.; Matthews, Michael R.

    Research on the nature of science and science education enjoys a long history, with its origins in Ernst Mach's work in the late nineteenth century and John Dewey's at the beginning of the twentieth century. As early as 1909 the Central Association for Science and Mathematics Teachers published an article - A Consideration of the Principles that Should Determine the Courses in Biology in Secondary Schools - in School Science and Mathematics that reflected foundational concerns about science and how school curricula should be informed by them. Since then a large body of literature has developed related to the teaching and learning about nature of science - see, for example, the Lederman (1992)and Meichtry (1993) reviews cited below. As well there has been intense philosophical, historical and philosophical debate about the nature of science itself, culminating in the much-publicised Science Wars of recent time. Thereferences listed here primarily focus on the empirical research related to the nature of science as an educational goal; along with a few influential philosophical works by such authors as Kuhn, Popper, Laudan, Lakatos, and others. While not exhaustive, the list should prove useful to educators, and scholars in other fields, interested in the nature of science and how its understanding can be realised as a goal of science instruction. The authors welcome correspondence regarding omissions from the list, and on-going additions that can be made to it.

  2. Types of Generalization: Introduction to Special Section of Perspectives on Psychological Science on Cultural Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Cultural psychology represents one of the broadest types of generalization of psychological findings. We all need to pay attention to cultural findings because many of our most treasured "truisms" fail to generalize when looked at across cultural contexts.

  3. Enhancing science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2014-03-01

    This editorial provides a brief update related to the present and future of School Psychology Quarterly as an international resource to enhance and advance science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the world. Information is presented regarding; (a) the breadth of important topics relevant to school psychology, (b) the international contributions, (c) the value of high quality and timely reviews, (d) the structure of and opportunity to contribute to special topic sections of School Psychology Quarterly, and (e) the importance of an international emphasis on children's rights and the relevance for school psychology.

  4. Psychological processes and paranoia: implications for forensic behavioural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentall, Richard P; Taylor, Jayne L

    2006-01-01

    Paranoid delusions have recently become the focus of empirical research. In this article, we review studies of the psychological mechanisms that might be involved in paranoid thinking and discuss their implications for forensic behaviour science. Paranoia has not been consistently associated with any specific neuropsychological abnormality. However, evidence supports three broad types of mechanism that might be involved in delusional thinking in general and paranoia in particular: anomalous perceptual experiences, abnormal reasoning, and motivational factors. There is some evidence that paranoia may be associated with hearing loss, and good evidence that paranoid patients attend excessively to threatening information. Although general reasoning ability seems to be unaffected, there is strong evidence that a jumping- to-conclusions style of reasoning about data is implicated in delusions in general, but less consistent evidence specifically linking paranoia to impaired theory of mind. Finally, there appears to be a strong association between paranoia and negative self-esteem, and some evidence that attempts to protect self-esteem by attributing negative events to external causes are implicated. Some of these processes have recently been implicated in violent behaviour, and they therefore have the potential to explain the apparent association between paranoid delusions and offending.

  5. Science of learning is learning of science: why we need a dialectical approach to science education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-06-01

    Research on learning science in informal settings and the formal (sometimes experimental) study of learning in classrooms or psychological laboratories tend to be separate domains, even drawing on different theories and methods. These differences make it difficult to compare knowing and learning observed in one paradigm/context with those observed in the other. Even more interestingly, the scientists studying science learning rarely consider their own learning in relation to the phenomena they study. A dialectical, reflexive approach to learning, however, would theorize the movement of an educational science (its learning and development) as a special and general case—subject matter and method—of the phenomenon of learning (in/of) science. In the dialectical approach to the study of science learning, therefore, subject matter, method, and theory fall together. This allows for a perspective in which not only disparate fields of study—school science learning and learning in everyday life—are integrated but also where the progress in the science of science learning coincides with its topic. Following the articulation of a contradictory situation on comparing learning in different settings, I describe the dialectical approach. As a way of providing a concrete example, I then trace the historical movement of my own research group as it simultaneously and alternately studied science learning in formal and informal settings. I conclude by recommending cultural-historical, dialectical approaches to learning and interaction analysis as a context for fruitful interdisciplinary research on science learning within and across different settings.

  6. San Diego Science Alliance Education Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Anne P.

    1996-11-01

    The General Atomics Science Education Outreach Activities as well as those of several other San Diego area institutions led to the formation in 1994 of the San Diego Science Alliance. The Science Alliance is a consortium of science-related industries, institutions of research and higher education, museums, medical health networks, and science competitions in support of K-12 science education. Some Alliance accomplishments include printing over 4000 resource catalogs for teachers, workshops presented by over 20 of their business members at the San Diego Science Education Conference, and hosting of 3 eight-week courses for teachers. The Alliance provides an important forum for interaction between schools and teachers and local industries and institutions. The Science Alliance maintains a World Wide Web Home Page at elvbf http://www.cerf.net/sd_science/. General Atomics' role in the San Diego Science Alliance will be presented.(Presented by Patricia S. Winter for the General Atomics Science Education Groups and San Diego Science Alliance.)

  7. Symposium 1: Challenges in science education and popularization of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildeo de Castro Moreira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Science education and popularization of science are important elements for social inclusion. The Brazil exhibits strong inequalities regarding the distribution of wealth, access to cultural assets and appropriation of scientific and technological knowledge. Each Brazilian should have the opportunity to acquire a basic knowledge of science and its operation that allow them to understand their environment and expand their professional opportunities. However, the overall performance of Brazilian students in science and math is bad. The basic science education has, most often, few resources and is discouraging, with little appreciation of experimentation, interdisciplinarity and creativity. Beside the shortage of science teachers, especially teachers with good formation, predominate poor wage and working conditions, and deficiencies in instructional materials and laboratories. If there was a significant expansion in access to basic education, the challenge remains to improve their quality. According to the last National Conference of STI, there is need of a profound educational reform at all levels, in particular with regard to science education. Already, the popularization of science can be an important tool for the construction of scientific culture and refinement of the formal teaching instrument. However, we still lack a comprehensive and adequate public policy to her intended. Clearly, in recent decades, an increase in scientific publication occurred: creating science centers and museums; greater media presence; use of the internet and social networks; outreach events, such as the National Week of CT. But the scenario is shown still fragile and limited to broad swathes of Brazilians without access to scientific education and qualified information on CT. In this presentation, from a general diagnosis of the situation, some of the main challenges related to education and popularization of science in the country will address herself.

  8. From Procedures To Objects: A Research Agenda For The Psychology Of Object-oriented Programming Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorma Sajaniemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Programming education has experienced a shift from imperative and procedural programming to object-orientation. This shift has been motivated by educators' desire to please the information technology industry and potential students; it is not motivated by research either in psychology of programming or in computer science education. There are practically no results that would indicate that such a shift is desirable, needed in the first place, or even effective for learning programming. Moreover, there has been an implicit assumption that classic results on imperative and procedural programming education and learning apply to object-oriented programming (OOP as well. We argue that this is not the case and call for systematic research into the fundamental cognitive and educational issues in learning and teaching OOP. We also present a research agenda intended to improve the understanding of OOP and OOP education.

  9. Science Education Research vs. Physics Education Research: A Structural Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to introduce physics education research (PER) to researchers in other fields. Topics include discussion of differences between science education research (SER) and physics education research (PER), physics educators, research design and methodology in physics education research and current research traditions and…

  10. Science Education Research vs. Physics Education Research: A Structural Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to introduce physics education research (PER) to researchers in other fields. Topics include discussion of differences between science education research (SER) and physics education research (PER), physics educators, research design and methodology in physics education research and current research traditions and trends (e.g. current research ideas) within PER.

  11. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Cognitive Structures Regarding Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacioglu, Yasemin; Yamak, Havva; Kavak, Nusret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal pre-service science teachers' cognitive structures regarding Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and science education. The study group of the study consisted of 192 pre-service science teachers. A Free Word Association Test (WAT) consisting of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and…

  12. Galileo, Aristotle, and Science in Counseling Psychology: To Theorize or Not to Theorize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelso, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    Responds to previous article by Strong on theory-driven science and naive empiricism in counseling psychology. Contrasts theory-driven science with discovery-oriented science, seeing two as complementary. Contends that findings from discovery-oriented research must eventually be placed in theoretical context to have optimum impact. Questions some…

  13. The Nature of Science in Science Education: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, William F.; Almazroa, Hiya; Clough, Michael P.

    After providing a definition of the nature of science (NOS) for science education, we argue that a pragmatic consensus exists regarding NOS topics most important for a scientifically literate society. Hence, NOS instruction should take a more prominent role in the science curriculum. While the relationship between a teacher's NOS knowledge and their pedagogical decision-making is not straight- forward, we maintain that a complex interplay does exist. While more science coursework and research experience have been suggested to improve science teachers' understanding of NOS, neither approach is empirically supported. However, explicit attempts at NOS instruction in science teacher education have been effective. This article, which is an abridged version of one appearing in McComas (1998), concludes with the suggestion of a desired state for NOS instruction.Hence, it is vital that science teachers and their students gain an understanding of the nature of science, a hybrid field blending aspects of various social studies of science such as the history, sociology and philosophy of science with research from the cognitive science into a rich and useful description of what science is and how it functions.

  14. Modern Engineering : Science and Education

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book draws together the most interesting recent results to emerge in mechanical engineering in Russia, providing a fascinating overview of the state of the art in the field in that country which will be of interest to a wide readership. A broad range of topics and issues in modern engineering are discussed, including dynamics of machines, materials engineering, structural strength and tribological behavior, transport technologies, machinery quality and innovations. The book comprises selected papers presented at the conference "Modern Engineering: Science and Education", held at the Saint Petersburg State Polytechnic University in 2014 with the support of the Russian Engineering Union. The authors are experts in various fields of engineering, and all of the papers have been carefully reviewed. The book will be of interest to mechanical engineers, lecturers in engineering disciplines and engineering graduates.

  15. Mediated Modeling in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloun, Ibrahim A.

    2007-08-01

    Following two decades of corroboration, modeling theory is presented as a pedagogical theory that promotes mediated experiential learning of model-laden theory and inquiry in science education. Students develop experiential knowledge about physical realities through interplay between their own ideas about the physical world and particular patterns in this world. Under teacher mediation, they represent each pattern with a particular model that they develop through a five-phase learning cycle, following particular modeling schemata of well-defined dimensions and rules of engagement. Significantly greater student achievement has been increasingly demonstrated under mediated modeling than under conventional instruction of lecture and demonstration, especially in secondary school and university physics courses. The improved achievement is reflected in more meaningful understanding of course materials, better learning styles, higher success rates, lower attrition rates and narrower gaps between students of different backgrounds.

  16. Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

  17. Ethno-Psychological Aspects Of Modern Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiya Kukubaeva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the role and influence of social factors on the development of education in Kazakhstan.Transformation of consciousness of the people led to the of the Kazakh people. The educational system defines alevel of formation of youth outlooks. The last is thatpsychological environment within the limits of there is anacquisition of knowledge. On the basis of interests, valuableorientations processes of training, education anddevelopment of a personality are carried out. Thus, theoutlook allows to integrate knowledge, defines a vitalposition and spiritual shape of people. In other words,formation, and outlook are interconnected amongthemselves that speaks about an urgency of formation of outlook in teaching and educational process. One of the basic directions of formation is education of Kazakhpatriotism, formation of national consciousness. InKazakhstan purposeful work on formation of positive tolerant relation is necessary. 

  18. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the concept of «inclusive ed ucation» as a process of training and education of children with special educational needs in mainstream institutions. The basic values of inclusive education, first of all respect, tolerance, mutual aid, the development of the deposits of all students. We describe  the  function  and  status  of  the  assistant coordinator in the conditions of inclusive education, carrying out individual or group support students. Determined psycho-pedagogical conditions of inclusive education pedagogical support and educational support, set their differences. Pedagogical maintenance is considered as the creation of resource conditions methodical support; subjectdeveloping environment; participate fully in  school life for all students; education in schools located in the  community;  availability  of  psycho -pedagogical diagnosis of subjective manifestations of the child; development and implementation of individual educational routes of children; pedagogical and social support; changing social attitudes towards the child with disabilities. We give interpretation of pedagog ical support of a direct interaction of the teacher and the child, characterized by unity of purpose in the education of a child's responsibility; subjectivity of the pedagogical process, is a special way of its o rganization; intersubject interaction, based on coo peration and dialogue; social and individual character development of child socio-cultural experiences; integrality of the pedagogical process, lies in its continuity and  Polystructural  pedagogical  process, including target, informative, efficient organizational, productive components. We consider the line teacher interaction with other professionals in the cond itions of inclusive education, «psychologist -teacher», «social    pedagogue-teacher»,    «teacher-therapist», «teacher-therapist», «teacher-specialist physiotherapy (physical therapy

  19. Finding Science in the School Body: Reflections on Transgressing the Boundaries of Science Education and the Social Studies of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the framings that the fields of the social studies of science and science education use for each other. It is shown that the social studies of science frames science education as passive and timeless. Science education frames science studies as a set of representations to better capture how science works. The paper then…

  20. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  1. Game based learning for computer science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Czauderna, André; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Czauderna, A., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2011). Game based learning for computer science education. In G. van der Veer, P. B. Sloep, & M. van Eekelen (Eds.), Computer Science Education Research Conference (CSERC '11) (pp. 81-86). Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  2. Global Reproduction and Transformation of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Neoliberalism has spread globally and operates hegemonically in many fields, including science education. I use historical auto/ethnography to examine global referents that have mediated the production of contemporary science education to explore how the roles of teachers and learners are related to macrostructures such as neoliberalism and…

  3. Information Search Process in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Mary Jane; Kuhlthau, Carol C.

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of the development of an information skills curriculum focuses on science education. Topics addressed include information seeking behavior; information skills models; the search process of scientists; science education; a process approach for student activities; and future possibilities. (Contains 15 references.) (LRW)

  4. Library Education in Information Science: Present Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, Howard

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are present trends in library education in information science, as based on a survey of course offerings found in library school catalogs. The courses offered are divided into five basic categories, and new directions in library education for information science are discussed. Recommendations for improvement of curricula are included.…

  5. Should Science and Arts Education Be Separated?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China’s practice of separating science and arts education has a long and complicated history. Back in the early 1950s, China decided to adopt the Soviet Union’s practice of separating science and arts education into two systems, the upshot of which was many universities finding themselves divided into

  6. Convergence between science and environmental education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.; Brody, M.; Dillon, J.; Stevenson, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    Urgent issues such as climate change, food scarcity, malnutrition, and loss of biodiversity are highly complex and contested in both science and society (1). To address them, environmental educators and science educators seek to engage people in what are commonly referred to as sustainability challe

  7. Developing Intercultural Science Education in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article traces the recent development of intercultural science education in Ecuador. It starts by situating this development within the context of a growing convergence between Western and indigenous sciences. It then situates it within the larger historical, political, cultural, and educational contexts of indigenous communities in Ecuador,…

  8. Enhancing science education in the elementary schools

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, M W; Cole, Milton W.; Zembal-Saul, Carla

    2002-01-01

    This article describes some collaborative activities of the authors, aimed at improving science education in elementary schools. These include curriculum enhancement, development of new apparatus (a wind tunnel), science-education web site contributions and production of a film about the physics of flight. The output of these projects is intended to be generally accessible or reproducible.

  9. The Impact of Changing Scientific Knowledge on Science Education in the United States Since 1850

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giorno, Bette J.

    1969-01-01

    Presents the findings and conclusions of research study into the impact of changing scientific knowledge on the content and methodology of science education during the period 1850-1954. The results showed that changing scientific knowledge had a greater and more direct influence on educational psychology and philosophy than on the science…

  10. Scientists Interacting With University Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, B. S.

    2004-12-01

    Scientists with limited time to devote to educating the public about their work will get the greatest multiplier effect for their investment of time by successfully interacting with university science educators. These university professors are the smallest and least publicized group of professionals in the chain of people working to create science literate citizens. They connect to all aspects of formal and informal education, influencing everything from what and how youngsters and adults learn science to legislative rulings. They commonly teach methods of teaching science to undergraduates aspiring to teach in K-12 settings and experienced teachers. They serve as agents for change to improve science education inside schools and at the state level K-16, including what science content courses are acceptable for teacher licensure. University science educators are most often housed in a College of Education or Department of Education. Significant differences in culture exist in the world in which marine scientists function and that in which university science educators function, even when they are in the same university. Subsequently, communication and building relationships between the groups is often difficult. Barriers stem from not understanding each other's roles and responsibilities; and different reward systems, assumptions about teaching and learning, use of language, approaches to research, etc. This presentation will provide suggestions to mitigate the barriers and enable scientists to leverage the multiplier effect saving much time and energy while ensuring the authenticity of their message is maintained. Likelihood that a scientist's message will retain its authenticity stems from criteria for a university science education position. These professors have undergraduate degrees in a natural science (e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, geology), and usually a master's degree in one of the sciences, a combination of natural sciences, or a master's including

  11. Science and the Ideals of Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Robert N.

    This article examines the influence of mathematics and science on the formation of culture. It then examines several definitions of liberal education, including the notion that languages and fields of study constitute the substrate of articulate intelligence. Finally, it examines the linkages between science, scientific culture, liberal education, and democracy, and proposes that science cannot be taught merely as a body of facts and theories, but must be presented to students as integral with cultural studies. The use of a contextualist approach to science education is recommended.

  12. Psychological perspectives on gifted education – selected problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sękowski Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article reviews the psychological literature on selected problems of gifted education. It discusses issues which are particularly important from the point of view of the skills and tools used by psychologists, educational specialists, teachers and tutors in their daily work with gifted children and adolescents. The problems described include diagnosis of giftedness in education, types of educational support provided to the gifted, and the requirements placed on teachers of gifted students. A particular emphasis is put on the contemporary research-related and practical challenges faced by gifted support specialists in schools.

  13. Why won't it Stick? Positive Psychology and Positive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mathew A

    Following the launch of the positive psychology movement teachers and educators emerged as early adopters of this fledgling science. This approach was called positive education. It describes scientifically validated programs from positive psychology, taught in schools, that have an impact on student well-being. The growing body of evidence about the reach of positive psychology has formed a convincing case to consider well-being an operational goal for educational systems. It is argued that this goal is pivotal and should be pursued in the same way in which we develop strategies to harness academic growth, school retention rates, and student engagement. National education policies can have widespread influence at the grassroots level on school improvement, good quality of classroom teaching and learning, student performance, creating confident and creative individuals and active and informed citizens, but not necessarily on the preventative skills for lifelong well-being. In this article I take stock on the positive education movement. Three approaches to positive education are identified and eight hurdles to the field are noted as reasons why positive education won't stick in policy. Then, I reflect on two case studies: a Well-being Summit and Round Table held at Wellington College and No. 10 Downing Street and Dr. Martin Seligman's role as Adelaide's Thinker in Residence as examples of grass-roots initiatives in well-being. Finally, six strategies are suggested for researchers and practitioners to grow the field. Last, I argued that until research centers focus on the development of common definitions of the key terms underpinning positive psychology, positive education and well-being the impact of the movement will be limited to a handful of institutions as models of best practice.

  14. Constructivism in Science and Science Education: A Philosophical Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, Robert

    This paper argues that constructivist science education works with an unsatisfactory account of knowledge which affects both its account of the nature of science and of science education. The paper begins with a brief survey of realism and anti-realism in science and the varieties of constructivism that can be found. In the second section the important conception of knowledge and teaching that Plato develops in the Meno is contrasted with constructivism. The section ends with an account of the contribution that Vico (as understood by constructivists), Kant and Piaget have made to constructivist doctrines. Section three is devoted to a critique of the theory of knowledge and the anti-realism of von Glaserfeld. The final section considers the connection, or lack of it, between the constructivist view of science and knowledge and the teaching of science.

  15. Science Education: From Separation to Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Marcia C.; Gerard, Libby; Matuk, Camillia; McElhaney, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in technology, science, and learning sciences research over the past 100 years have reshaped science education. This chapter focuses on how investigators from varied fields of inquiry who initially worked separately began to interact, eventually formed partnerships, and recently integrated their perspectives to strengthen science…

  16. Hermeneutics and science education: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Martin

    1992-12-01

    This paper is a programmatic sketch of a line of theoretical investigation in the philosophy of science education. The basic idea is that philosophical hermeneutics is an appropriate framework for science education in most of its aspects. A brief discussion is given of hermeneutics in general, of the version of it developed by H. G. Gadamer, and of the reasons for its relevance to science and to the problem of meaning in science education. A key element in this approach is the suggestion that each science be biewed as a language. Arguments against the appropriateness of hermeneutics to natural science are also discussed. One application of the theory to ongoing educational research — ‘misconceptions’ — is specifically treated.

  17. Redesigning a General Education Science Course to Promote Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Matthew P; Gillespie, B Marcus; Harris, Kevin R; Koether, Steven D; Shannon, Li-Jen Y; Rose, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies question the effectiveness of a traditional university curriculum in helping students improve their critical thinking and scientific literacy. We developed an introductory, general education (gen ed) science course to overcome both deficiencies. The course, titled Foundations of Science, differs from most gen ed science offerings in that it is interdisciplinary; emphasizes the nature of science along with, rather than primarily, the findings of science; incorporates case studies, such as the vaccine-autism controversy; teaches the basics of argumentation and logical fallacies; contrasts science with pseudoscience; and addresses psychological factors that might otherwise lead students to reject scientific ideas they find uncomfortable. Using a pretest versus posttest design, we show that students who completed the experimental course significantly improved their critical-thinking skills and were more willing to engage scientific theories the general public finds controversial (e.g., evolution), while students who completed a traditional gen ed science course did not. Our results demonstrate that a gen ed science course emphasizing the process and application of science rather than just scientific facts can lead to improved critical thinking and scientific literacy.

  18. A sociohistorical examination of George Herbert Mead's approach to science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michelle L

    2016-07-01

    Although George Herbert Mead is widely known for his social psychological work, his views on science education also represent a significant, yet sometimes overlooked contribution. In a speech delivered in March 1906 entitled "The Teaching of Science in College," Mead calls for cultural courses on the sciences, such as sociology of science or history of science courses, to increase the relevancy of natural and physical science courses for high school and university students. These views reflect Mead's perspective on a number of traditional dualisms, including objectivity versus subjectivity and the social sciences versus natural and physical sciences. Taking a sociohistorical outlook, I identify the context behind Mead's approach to science education, which includes three major influences: (1) German intellectual thought and the Methodenstreit debate, (2) pragmatism and Darwin's theory of evolution, and (3) social reform efforts in Chicago and the General Science Movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The Portrayal of Intelligence in Introductory Educational Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Danielle L.; Jones, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Because of the importance of students' and teachers' implicit beliefs about intelligence, we designed a study to determine: (a) How is intelligence defined--as a malleable or fixed entity--in introductory educational psychology textbooks? and (b) To what extent are classroom applications of intelligence topics included in the textbooks? We…

  20. Black African Parents' Experiences of an Educational Psychology Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zena

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base that explores Black African parents' experiences of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) is limited. This article describes an exploratory mixed methods research study undertaken during 2009-2011, that explored Black African parents' engagement with a UK EPS. Quantitative data were gathered from the EPS preschool database and…

  1. Black African Parents' Experiences of an Educational Psychology Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zena

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base that explores Black African parents' experiences of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) is limited. This article describes an exploratory mixed methods research study undertaken during 2009-2011, that explored Black African parents' engagement with a UK EPS. Quantitative data were gathered from the EPS preschool database and…

  2. Leadership of Education Psychological Services: Fit for Purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of…

  3. A "Narrowing of Inquiry" in American Moral Psychology and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael J.; Slife, Brent D.

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a priori philosophical commitments continue to result in a narrowing of inquiry in moral psychology and education where theistic worldviews are concerned. Drawing from the theories of Edward L. Thorndike and John Dewey, we examine naturalistic philosophical commitments that influenced the study of moral psychology…

  4. Education in Statistics and Research Design in School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Lee, Howard B.; Akin-Little, Angeleque

    2003-01-01

    Examines statistics and research design requirements at various levels of school psychology education in the United States. Results indicated more required courses in statistics and research design at the doctoral level. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of statistics and research design competency at all levels of the profession.…

  5. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, Sharyn L.; Koons, Heather H.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates aspects of validity reflected in a large and diverse sample of published measures used in educational and psychological testing contexts. The current edition of "Mental Measurements Yearbook" served as the data source for this study. The validity aspects investigated included perspective on validity represented, number and…

  6. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  7. Attributions of Productive Authors in Educational Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Are there similarities in the writing approaches and practices among the top-producing authors in our field? If so, perhaps knowing this information may benefit graduate students or recent graduates. In this paper, I asked 13 authors to explain why they were so productive in terms of publishing in educational psychology journals. Four categories…

  8. Methodological and Psychological Analysis of a Multimedia Educational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyves-Toth, Elod; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A CD-I disk entitled "KLEINBILD-FOTOGRAPHIE" published with an interactive course in photography is examined as an example of a multimedia educational program. Topics include multimedia in the twenty-first century; possibilities and limitations of CD-I; a description of the program; and its psychological perspectives in terms of motivation,…

  9. Building a Regional Science Education Infrastructure: The Accomplishments of the Sanford Science Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverness Research, 2016

    2016-01-01

    For the past five years, the education and outreach effort of the Sanford Underground Research Facility has been supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to plan, develop, prototype, and prioritize the suite of educational outreach activities of the lab. Now known as the Sanford Science Education Center (SSEC), education and…

  10. Informal Science: Family Education, Experiences, and Initial Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.; Scott, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research and public policy have indicated the need for increasing the physical science workforce through development of interest and engagement with informal and formal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics experiences. This study examines the association of family education and physical scientists' informal experiences in…

  11. Hermeneutics of Science and Multi-Gendered Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginev, Dimitri Jordan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I consider the relevance of the view of cognitive existentialism to a multi-gendered picture of science education. I am opposing both the search for a particular feminist standpoint epistemology and the reduction of philosophy of science to cultural studies of scientific practices as championed by supporters of postmodern political…

  12. Informal Science: Family Education, Experiences, and Initial Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.; Scott, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research and public policy have indicated the need for increasing the physical science workforce through development of interest and engagement with informal and formal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics experiences. This study examines the association of family education and physical scientists' informal experiences in…

  13. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  14. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  15. Science and technology related global problems: An international survey of science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Mau, Teri

    This survey evaluated one aspect of the Science-Technology-Society theme, namely, the teaching of global problems related to science and technology. The survey was conducted during spring 1984. Two hundred sixty-two science educators representing 41 countries completed the survey. Response was 80%. Findings included a ranking of twelve global problems (the top six were: World Hunger and Food Resources, Population Growth, Air Quality and Atmosphere, Water Resources, War Technology, and Human Health and Disease). Science educators generally indicated the following: the science and technology related global problems would be worse by the year 2000; they were slightly or moderately knowledgeable about the problems; print, audio-visual media, and personal experiences were their primary sources of information; it is important to study global problems in schools; emphasis on global problems should increase with age/grade level; an integrated approach should be used to teach about global problems; courses including global problems should be required of all students; most countries are in the early stages of developing programs including global problems; there is a clear trend toward S-T-S; there is public support for including global problems; and, the most significant limitations to implementation of the S-T-S theme (in order of significance) are political, personnel, social, psychological, economic, pedagogical, and physical. Implications for research and development in science education are discussed.

  16. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Irving I. Gottesman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Gottesman's work, is provided.

  17. Learning to View Psychology as a Science: Self-Persuasion through Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, James

    1990-01-01

    Finds that introductory students who wrote an essay supporting an empirical orientation toward psychology were more likely to conduct an experiment when given a choice of assignment, compared to a control group. Discusses implications for teaching students to view psychology as a science. (Author/NL)

  18. Prevention in the Twenty-First Century: Promoting Health and Well-Being in Education and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, John L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the science of prevention, with special attention to prevention research and applications in education and psychology, and the importance of prevention in Asian countries. One example that will be highlighted is the recently adopted Korean government policy on Internet addiction which addresses the problem from prevention to…

  19. Concepts of matter in science education

    CERN Document Server

    Sevian, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Bringing together a wide collection of ideas, reviews, analyses and new research on particulate and structural concepts of matter, Concepts of Matter in Science Education informs practice from pre-school through graduate school learning and teaching and aims to inspire progress in science education. The expert contributors offer a range of reviews and critical analyses of related literature and in-depth analysis of specific issues, as well as new research. Among the themes covered are learning progressions for teaching a particle model of matter, the mental models of both students and teachers of the particulate nature of matter, educational technology, chemical reactions and chemical phenomena, chemical structure and bonding, quantum chemistry and the history and philosophy of science relating to the particulate nature of matter. The book will benefit a wide audience including classroom practitioners and student teachers at every educational level, teacher educators and researchers in science education.

  20. Gender Equity in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Johanna R.

    2011-01-01

    The dearth of females in high-level science courses and professions is a well-documented phenomenon in modern society. Inequality in science instruction is a crucial component to the under representation of females in science. This paper provides a review of current literature published concerning gender inequality in K-12 science instruction.…

  1. Alcohol and Violence in the Emergency Room: A Review and Perspectives from Psychological and Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Cherpitel; Joel Swendsen; Lucie Pennel; Maurice Dematteis; Françoise Carpentier; Georges Brousse; Laurent Bègue; Oulmann Zerhouni

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to present a focused review of the scientific literature on the effect of alcohol consumption on violence related-injuries assessed in the emergency room (ER) and to show how psychological and behavioral sciences could lead to a better understanding of the factors contributing to alcohol-related injuries in the ER. We retrieved published literature through a detailed search in Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE with Full Text PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Col...

  2. Integrating psychology with interpersonal communication skills in undergraduate nursing education: addressing the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bridie; Trace, Anna; O'Donovan, Moira

    2014-05-01

    The inclusion of the social, behavioural and bio-sciences is acknowledged as essential to the development of the art and science of nursing. Nonetheless, the literature highlights on-going debate about the content and delivery of these subject areas in undergraduate nursing education. The bio-sciences and social sciences in particular have received much attention but more recently the inclusion of psychology in nursing curricula is gaining momentum. Studies conducted on nursing students' views of these supporting sciences have also highlighted problems with their understanding, relevance and application to nursing practice. Although broad guidelines are given as to what should be included, no detail is given as to how much detail or at what level these subjects should be taught. Subsequently, approved institutions are responsible for their own course content. This has resulted in inconsistent and varied approaches to integrating the sciences in undergraduate nursing curricula. Following a recent review of the undergraduate nursing curriculum in one university in the Republic of Ireland a decision was made to combine the teaching, learning and assessment of Applied Psychology with Interpersonal Communication skills. This paper will describe the developmental process and evaluation of the integrated module.

  3. The Needs Assessment in order to develop the Service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiporn Pongpisanrat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the needs assessment in order to develop the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University. This study aimed to compare the realistic service and the desirable service, as well as, to explore the directions to improve the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center among the service recipients based on their gender, age range, and field of studies. A total sample of 150 participants were service recipients; college students, lecturers, staff during the first semester academic year 2014 until the first semester academic year 2015. The instruments used included: the Questionnaire on needs assessment of the development of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, and a focus group discussion. Frequency distribution, percentage, means, standard deviation, and variance were used to analyze the data. The needs assessment results showed as follows: 1 Overall the realistic basis of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center service was in an “above level of needs” while “the highest level of needs” was found in the desirable qualification. After having divided into categories, the result yielded an “above level” on the realistic basis of the counselor characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement. For the desired qualification, the results showed that the needs on the counselors’ characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement were identified as at a highest level of needs. 2 No differences were found on the realistic basis needs of the clients, the services provided, gender, and age range of the clients although they responded differently to the questionnaire. The clients who responded to the questionnaire from different field of studies showed the different needs of services provided in the realistic basis significantly at the level of .05 in which the General Sciences

  4. Psychology Is a Science: At Least Some Students Think So

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Beins, Bernard C.

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Association's (2007) curricular guidelines recommend that students develop both an understanding of how psychologists do research and an appreciation for why scientific thinking is necessary. We surveyed a large sample of psychology majors on specific interests, as well as individual difference variables relevant to…

  5. Science, Worldviews and Education: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    This special issue of Science & Education deals with the theme of ‘Science, Worldviews and Education’. The theme is of particular importance at the present time as many national and provincial education authorities are requiring that students learn about the Nature of Science (NOS) as well as learning science content knowledge and process skills. NOS topics are being written into national and provincial curricula. Such NOS matters give rise to questions about science and worldviews: What is a worldview? Does science have a worldview? Are there specific ontological, epistemological and ethical prerequisites for the conduct of science? Does science lack a worldview but nevertheless have implications for worldviews? How can scientific worldviews be reconciled with seemingly discordant religious and cultural worldviews? In addition to this major curricular impetus for refining understanding of science and worldviews, there are also pressing cultural and social forces that give prominence to questions about science, worldviews and education. There is something of an avalanche of popular literature on the subject that teachers and students are variously engaged by. Additionally the modernisation and science-based industrialisation of huge non-Western populations whose traditional religions and beliefs are different from those that have been associated with orthodox science, make very pressing the questions of whether, and how, science is committed to particular worldviews. Hugh Gauch Jr. provides a long and extensive lead essay in the volume, and 12 philosophers, educators, scientists and theologians having read his paper, then engage with the theme. Hopefully the special issue will contribute to a more informed understanding of the relationship between science, worldviews and education, and provide assistance to teachers who are routinely engaged with the subject.

  6. Erikson after Dewey: Education, Psychology, and Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the psychoanalytic initiative in education, where Freud encouraged expanding his work into schools. The article examines Dewey and Erikson, emphasizing how Erikson's work helps explain the meaning of being a Deweyan, considering related features of their vocations, and proposing that, despite differences, their vocations reveal shared…

  7. Dyscalculia: Issues for Practice in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, James

    2012-01-01

    Dyscalculia has been described as a specific learning difficulty affecting the ability to acquire arithmetical skills. In recent years, it has become a topic for discussion in the popular media, yet there has been little research undertaken by educational psychologists. This paper provides a summary of neuroscientific research into the development…

  8. Dyscalculia: Issues for Practice in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, James

    2012-01-01

    Dyscalculia has been described as a specific learning difficulty affecting the ability to acquire arithmetical skills. In recent years, it has become a topic for discussion in the popular media, yet there has been little research undertaken by educational psychologists. This paper provides a summary of neuroscientific research into the development…

  9. The seemingly quixotic pursuit of a cumulative psychological science: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Patrick J

    2009-06-01

    The goal of any empirical science is to pursue the construction of a cumulative base of knowledge upon which the future of the science may be built. However, there is mixed evidence that the science of psychology can accurately be characterized by such a cumulative progression. Indeed, some argue that the development of a truly cumulative psychological science is not possible with the current paradigms of hypothesis testing in single-study designs. The author explores this controversy as a framework to introduce the 6 articles that make up this special issue on the integration of data and empirical findings across multiple studies. The author proposes that the methods and techniques described in this set of articles can significantly propel researchers forward in their ongoing quest to build a cumulative psychological science. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Hanford`s innovations for science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In recognition of declining science literacy in the United States and a projected shortfall of scientists, engineers and technologists to address environmental problems nationally and internationally during the 21st century, Westinghouse Hanford Company has launched several innovative science education projects at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is very rich in resources that can be brought to bear on the problem: world-class technical experts, state of the art facilities and equipment, and the largest environmental laboratory in the world. During the past two years, several innovative science education initiatives have been conceived and pursued at the secondary education level including the International Academy for the Environment (residential high school with an environmental theme), Environmental BATTmobile Program (mobile middle school science education program), and Multicultural Experiences in Math and Science (education program based on cultural contributions to math and science). Hanford scientists, engineers and administrators have worked with the education community (K-12 and college-university) to develop innovative approaches to science education.

  11. Foundations of educational psychology: Howard Gardner's neoclassical psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, R

    2001-12-01

    This article is a theoretical examination of the implications of Howard Gardner's work in developmental and educational psychology (1983, 1993, 1999a, 1999b) for the structure of the psyche. The author accepts as axiomatic, in the context of this article, Gardner's educational manifesto (1999a) that all students should be taught disciplinary understandings of truth, beauty, and goodness. Rational inferences are then made indicating that the psyche that Gardner intends to educate and help develop is in the form of a neoclassical psyche and that it is structured by the capacities to know truth, to love beauty, and to will goodness.

  12. Psychological implications of outdoor adventure model of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is a synthetic analysis of the Outdoor Adventure Education model in the context of three elementary components: the environment – in relation to the theory of space from the perspective of sociological and pedagogical theory of space; personal perspective and growth as well as social development – in relation to psychological phenomena that accompany the individual and group involved in the process of Outdoor Adventure Education. The aim is to present how these processes determine the effects of education and what personalities’ elements are involved.

  13. Trends of Science Education Research: An Automatic Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Chun-Yen; Tseng, Yuen-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    This study used scientometric methods to conduct an automatic content analysis on the development trends of science education research from the published articles in the four journals of "International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Research in Science Education, and Science Education" from 1990 to 2007. The…

  14. Trends of Science Education Research: An Automatic Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Chun-Yen; Tseng, Yuen-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    This study used scientometric methods to conduct an automatic content analysis on the development trends of science education research from the published articles in the four journals of "International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Research in Science Education, and Science Education" from 1990 to 2007. The…

  15. Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research, sustained by Vygotsky's original and successor theories, has been appropriating meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism. Once we identified Cultural Studies of Science Education as a journal that would probably concentrate papers that follow these perspectives, we decided to take it as the context of this study. In the process of selecting the corpus to be reviewed from the editions published from 2006 to 2011, we have found that 16 % of the articles that matched keywords denoting frameworks related to the Vygotskian tradition developed and appropriated the categories of dialectical materialism. The quality and originality of contemporary development of CHAT denote that this framework has been playing a very important role in recent expansion of Vygotskian approaches to research in science education. Among the papers that we considered to develop and appropriate Vygotskian frameworks, incompletion in the appropriation of meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism and the misusage of dialectics intertwined with dialogism were highlighted. Our findings suggest that overcoming these limitations can enhance political analysis of sociocultural phenomena in the context of science education. It also represents a strengthening of the role of dialectical materialism in expanding sociocultural perspectives toward a better articulation between individual and institutional-centered analyses.

  16. Introductory Psychology: How Student Experiences Relate to Their Understanding of Psychological Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Thomas; Richardson, Deborah; Hammock, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Many students who declare a psychology major are unaware that they are studying a scientific discipline, precipitating a need for exercises and experiences that help students understand the scientific nature of the discipline. The present study explores aspects of an introductory psychology class that may contribute to students' understanding of…

  17. Science education needs a multilevel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Matthias; Labudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Triggered by an increasing consensus on the importance of science education for the economy and society as a whole, in recent years, a growing number of educational programs, initiatives and projects have been launched by various players (from educational policy makers over teacher education institutions to industry). Many of these initiatives have a direct or indirect link to molecular sciences. In this article, we develop a two-dimensional framework which can be used as a guideline in the classification and discussion of existing projects as well as in the planning and design of future initiatives. The framework incorporates three organizational levels or groups of persons and the two very central fields of objectives 'knowledge and skills' and 'motivation and interest'. On the basis of this framework, we discuss four projects in which our science and technology education center has been involved, with respect to their influence on the knowledge, skills and interest of pupils, teachers and school administration representatives in science.

  18. A Critical Politics of Knowledge: Analyzing the Role of Educational Psychology in Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincheloe, Joe L.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the ideological dimensions of educational psychology and psychometrics as they relate to the validation of the "intelligence" of the privileged and the "deficiency" of the marginalized. In this critique a critical psychology emerges that takes seriously the lifeworld experiences of culturally and…

  19. Untapped Potential: The Status of Middle School Science Education in California. Strengthening Science Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartry, Ardice; Dorph, Rena; Shields, Patrick; Tiffany-Morales, Juliet; Romero, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Despite the expressed need for high-quality science education, very little research has been conducted on what middle school science learning opportunities look like in practice. This study was conducted in support of "Strengthening Science Education in California", a research, policy, and communications initiative. Partners in this…

  20. Identifying Teacher Needs for Promoting Education through Science as a Paradigm Shift in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, J.; Rannikmae, M.; Valdmann, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies an "education through science" philosophy for school science teaching at the secondary level and determines its interrelationship with approaches to student acquisition of key educational competences and the identification of teacher needs to promote meaningful learning during science lessons. Based on the…

  1. Mario Bunge, Systematic Philosophy and Science Education: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Mario Bunge was born in Argentina in 1919 and is now in his mid-90s. He studied atomic physics and quantum mechanics with Guido Beck (1903-1988), an Austrian refugee and student of Heisenberg. Additionally he studied modern philosophy in an environment that was a philosophical backwater becoming the first South American philosopher of science to be trained in science. His publications in physics, philosophy, psychology, sociology and the foundations of biology, are staggering in number, and include a massive 8-volume Treatise on Philosophy. The unifying thread of his scholarship is the constant and vigorous advancement of the Enlightenment Project, and criticism of cultural and academic movements that deny or devalue the core planks of the project: namely its naturalism, the search for truth, the universality of science, the value of rationality, and respect for individuals. At a time when specialisation is widely decried, and its deleterious effects on science, philosophy of science, educational research and science teaching are recognised, and at a time when `grand narratives' are thought both undesirable and impossible—it is salutary to appraise the fruits of one person's pursuit of the `Big' scientific and philosophical picture or grand narrative. In doing so this special issue brings together philosophers, physicists, biologists, sociologists, logicians, cognitive scientists, economists and mathematicians to examine facets of Mario Bunge's systematic philosophy and to appraise its contribution to important issues in current philosophy and, by implication, education.

  2. Beyond Nature of Science: The Case for Reconceptualising "Science" for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that contemporary accounts of nature of science (NoS) are limited in their depiction of "science" and that new perspectives are needed to broaden their characterisation and appeal for science education. In particular, I refer to the role of interdisciplinary characterisations of science in informing the theory and…

  3. Psychological resources of modern Russian adolescents’ resilience to violence in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeva, Irina A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the personality’s psychological resources that ensure its resilience to negative effects of the social environment is a priority problem in modern society, science, and education, since we currently see a sharp increase in the number of factors that affect psychological hardiness and security. One of these is intensification of violent and aggressive forms of interaction in educational institutions. Such manifestations are especially dangerous in schools, since, by virtue of their age-specific features, students are the most vulnerable and they subsequently translate the acquired values and behaviors to society as a whole. The goal of this empirical study was to identify teenagers’ psychological resources that determine their resilience to various forms of psychological violence in the educational environment. The study covered four St. Petersburg high schools, with 437 teenagers aged from 16.5 to 17 (189 boys and 248 girls. A questionnaire was developed to divide the subjects into groups with high and low levels of protection (security against psychological violence in the educational environment. The questionnaire lists forms of psychological violence in the educational environment (identified by theoretical review that can occur in interpersonal communication between peers and between teachers and students. The respondents evaluated each item of the questionnaire in accordance with the proposed scale of frequency with which each form of violence occurred. Theoretical analysis determined that psychological violence is traumatic for the adolescent personality’s cognitive, emotional, and behavioral spheres. The teenagers’ psychological resources of resilience to violence in the educational environment were identified with the aid of psychodiagnostic methods addressing each of them. Our study allows us to conclude that the resources that ensure the teenager’s resilience to the negative effect of psychological violence

  4. Secondary education and psychology in the decade of 1930: the Antônio Carneiro Leão perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odair Sass

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the organization of secondary education based on two works by Antônio Carneiro Leão (1887-1966: Tendências e diretrizes da escola secundária (1936 and Introdução à Administração Escolar (1939. It explores the hypothesis that the recurrence of psychology joins the demands of industrialization, as in his works Carneiro Leão criticizes education based on science knowledge, which leads to the spread of instrumental reason and the strengthening of industrial society ideology. Carneiro Leão’s propositions are linked to those that endorse the country modernization through science and education; vocational education based on work; new school principles; experimental psychology and active methods; nationalism and social and economic development within order (positivism and evolutionism.

  5. Exploring Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book addresses new research directions focusing on the emotional and aesthetic nature of teaching and learning science informing more general insights about wellbeing. It considers methodological traditions including those informed by philosophy, sociology, psychology and education and how...... they contribute to our understanding of science education. In this collection, the authors provide accounts of the underlying ontological, epistemological, methodological perspectives and theoretical assumptions that inform their work and that of others. Each chapter provides a perspective on the study of emotion......, aesthetics or wellbeing, using empirical examples or a discussion of existing literature to unpack the theoretical and philosophical traditions inherent in those works. This volume offers a diverse range of approaches for anyone interested in researching emotions, aesthetics, or wellbeing. It is ideal...

  6. THE MAIN DIRECTIONS OF PSYCHOLOGIZATION OF TEACHERS’ HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Iskanderovna Bezuglaya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal – the article is devoted to the determination of the scope and structure of psychological knowledge in teachers’ higher education.The methodological basis of the research consists of philosophical, psychological and educational, psychodidactic and methodical theories: development and self-development ideas of individuality and personality of Bakhtin M.M., Berdyaev N.A., Bibler V.S., Losskiy O.N., Solovjev V.S. and others; research on personality formation and development of Amonashvili Sh.A., Ananjev B.G., Asmolova A.G., Leontjeva A.N. and others; teaching theories in higher education of Bespalko V.P., Zagvyazinskiy V.I., Lerner I.Y., Pidksistiy P.I. and others; research on modeling problems of educational systems of Arnold V.I., Bogoslovskiy V.I., Gastev Y.A., Izvozchikov V.A., Klaus G., Kozlova S.N., Potemkina M.N., Sapps P. Talyavieva M.S., Testova V.A., Ujemova A.I. and others; research on  teachers training of psychologists - Verbitskiy A.A., Djachenko V.K., Zimnyaya I.A., Markova A.K., of teachers – Verba M.A., Grebenuk T.B., Klarin M.V., Kozlov P.P., Kukanov E.V., Lysov E.B., Mikhalevskaya G.I., Mychko E.I., Orlov A.A., Pishchulin N.P.,  Salimov K.I., Sarantsev T.I., Tagariev R.G., Teregulov F.Sh., Uznadze D.H., Khamitov E.Sh., Yakovlev N.M. and others; research on problems of university pedagogics and psychology, teacher’s personality formation of Arkhangelskiy S.I., Gonobolin F.N., Grishin E.A., Kuzmina N.V., Kulikova L.N., Slastenin V.A. and others; development theories of students personality – future teachers of Bogdanova R.U., Grebenuk T.B., Grebenuk O.S., Kluev A.S., Pavlova I.Y., Shabanova O.P. and others; multidisciplinary field of scientific knowledge – psychodidaktika (Rubtsov V.V., Panov V.I., Lebedeva V.P., Usanov V.E. and othersResearch methods. The scientific and theoretical methods for the determination of the theoretical modeling foundation of content structure of psychological knowledge have been

  7. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, EMOTIONAL EDUCATION AND THE HAPPY CLASSROOMS PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bisquerra Alzina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology has multiple applications. This article is focused on formal education, from the ages of 3 to 18 years. The development of well-being should be one of the aims of education, which would affect teachers, students, families and by extension society at large. This has been a clear aim for emotional education (Bisquerra, 2000, 2009, from the outset. With the emergence of positive psychology, there was a renewed effort in this direction, as a means of providing a better foundation. GROP (Grup de Recerca en Orientación Psicopedagógica [Research in Psychopedagogical Education Group] at the University of Barcelona is conducting research on this subject. The Happy Classrooms (“Aulas felices” program developed by the SATI team is the first program in Spanish aimed at working on positive education. It is designed for children and youths in pre-school, primary and secondary education. The program focuses its applications on character strengths and mindfulness. It is freely available for access and distribution. This article argues for the importance of enhancing well-being in education. Practical activities and intervention strategies are presented, with special reference to the importance of teacher training.

  8. 75 FR 65305 - National Board for Education Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... National Board for Education Sciences AGENCY: Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences... proposed agenda of an upcoming meeting of the National Board for Education Sciences. The notice also..., Designated Federal Official, National Board for Education Sciences, 555 New Jersey Ave., NW., Room 602...

  9. Reconceptualising Inquiry in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Stuart; Price, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Decades of discussion and debate about how science is most effectively taught and learned have resulted in a number of similar but competing inquiry models. These aim to develop students learning of science through approaches which reflect the authenticity of science as practiced by professional scientists while being practical and manageable…

  10. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use and secure becomes freely available. PMID:27602010

  11. Strengthening the educational value of undergraduate participation in research as part of a psychology department subject pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Anne; Franklin, Nancy

    2011-03-01

    Participating in research must be an educational experience for students in order to ethically justify its inclusion as a requirement in college courses. Introductory Psychology students (N = 280) completed a written class assignment describing their research participation as a means to enhance this educational mission. Approximately half of students spontaneously mentioned something positive about the significance of the research or what they learned, with the remainder providing neutral, mixed, or negative comments. Students could articulate clearly and knowledgeably about the research in which they had participated. Such an assignment is an effective means to foster an understanding of the science of psychology.

  12. The concept of alienation in educational psychology: History and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osin E.N.,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the explanatory power and limitations of the concept of alienation in educational research. Psychological studies of the phenomena associated with alienation (burnout, extrinsic motivation, cynicism, etc. are limited by the context of individual mind, whereas the concept of alienation refers to a set of processes unfolding at both individual and sociocultural levels. The paper demonstrates the heuristic possibilities offered by the cultural-historical activity approach to meaning and meaning regulation in the analysis of alien-ation phenomena. The author reviews the findings of empirical studies of alienation in education, as well as existing theoretical works discussing the genesis of alienation and ways to overcome it. According to these works, the ongoing growth of the body of human knowledge results in increasing alienation in the educational context, but individual activity aimed at finding the meaning of collective action and of one’s place in it may help to overcome the challenge of alienation. Despite being too abstract to serve as a tool for designing psychological studies, the category of alienation may be useful for their interpretation, helping to integrate psychological findings into the interdisciplinary context, in order to review and improve existing educational institutions and practices.

  13. Toward the sociopolitical in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara; Bazzul, Jesse

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we explore how Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: five lessons in intellectual emancipation. Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) notions of radical equality and dissensus reveal horizons for activism and sociopolitical engagement in science education theory, research, and practice. Drawing on Rochelle Gutiérrez' (J Res Math Educ 44(1):37-68, 2013a. doi: 10.5951/jresematheduc.44.1.0037; J Urban Math Educ 6(2):7-19, b) "sociopolitical turn" for mathematics education, we identify how the field of science education can/is turning from more traditional notions of equity, achievement and access toward issues of systemic oppression, identity and power. Building on the conversation initiated by Lorraine Otoide who draws from French philosopher Jacques Rancière to experiment with a pedagogy of radical equality, we posit that a sociopolitical turn in science education is not only imminent, but necessary to meet twenty-first century crises.

  14. Toward the sociopolitical in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara; Bazzul, Jesse

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we explore how Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: five lessons in intellectual emancipation. Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) notions of radical equality and dissensus reveal horizons for activism and sociopolitical engagement in science education theory, research, and practice. Drawing on Rochelle Gutiérrez' (J Res Math Educ 44(1):37-68, 2013a. doi: 10.5951/jresematheduc.44.1.0037; J Urban Math Educ 6(2):7-19, b) "sociopolitical turn" for mathematics education, we identify how the field of science education can/is turning from more traditional notions of equity, achievement and access toward issues of systemic oppression, identity and power. Building on the conversation initiated by Lorraine Otoide who draws from French philosopher Jacques Rancière to experiment with a pedagogy of radical equality, we posit that a sociopolitical turn in science education is not only imminent, but necessary to meet twenty-first century crises.

  15. Scientometric trend analyses of publications on the history of psychology: Is psychology becoming an unhistorical science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampen, Günter

    Examines scientometrically the trends in and the recent situation of research on and the teaching of the history of psychology in the German-speaking countries and compares the findings with the situation in other countries (mainly the United States) by means of the psychology databases PSYNDEX and PsycINFO. Declines of publications on the history of psychology are described scientometrically for both research communities since the 1990s. Some impulses are suggested for the future of research on and the teaching of the history of psychology. These include (1) the necessity and significance of an intensified use of quantitative, unobtrusive scientometric methods in historiography in times of digital "big data", (2) the necessity and possibilities to integrate qualitative and quantitative methodologies in historical research and teaching, (3) the reasonableness of interdisciplinary cooperation of specialist historians, scientometricians, and psychologists, (4) the meaningfulness and necessity to explore, investigate, and teach more intensively the past and the problem history of psychology as well as the understanding of the subject matter of psychology in its historical development in cultural contexts. The outlook on the future of such a more up-to-date research on and teaching of the history of psychology is-with some caution-positive.

  16. Science Education in Bhutan: Issues and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann; Tenzin, Wangpo; Johnson, David; Ramachandran, Kiran

    2012-02-01

    Science education in a developing country is pivotal in the developmental process. Bhutan, like other developing countries, places great importance in institutionalising a relevant and challenging science curriculum for all of its school-aged children. A number of factors have made the review of the science curriculum in Bhutan a priority including international debates about scientific literacy and the changing time and needs of Bhutanese society and its students. This article reports on the findings of a study to investigate the present status and challenges of the current science curriculum from interviews with teachers, students, and other key stakeholders such as higher education lecturers and employers. The study also draws on observations of science classes and key curriculum documents. This study was conducted as a prelude to the major science curriculum reform prioritised in the government's 10th Five Year Plan (2008-2012) in order to provide a research informed perspective for science curriculum development. The findings from the research are reported here and show a number of positive issues in science education including good student motivation in lower classes. Challenges are identified including issues of teacher development, resourcing, and fragmentation and discontinuity in the current curriculum. These issues and challenges are discussed in the light of literature on science education in developing countries.

  17. Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D; Forman, Dawn

    2015-05-01

    Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students' views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students' attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students' awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.

  18. Expanding the scope of educational psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J; Laishley, J

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the way in which a psychologist has workded in day nurseries in an Inner London Borough. The work has involved the development of an assessment form to be used with the children, and the planning of support groups for the day nursery staff. A brief outline is given of the research design necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. It is to be hoped that the study indicates one way in which educational psychologists may extend their range of activities into the preschool area, and maximize the use of their skills in the field of childhood disadvantage.

  19. "Everybody knows psychology is not a real science": Public perceptions of psychology and how we can improve our relationship with policymakers, the scientific community, and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    In a recent seminal article, Lilienfeld (2012) argued that psychological science is experiencing a public perception problem that has been caused by both public misconceptions about psychology, as well as the psychological science community's failure to distinguish itself from pop psychology and questionable therapeutic practices. Lilienfeld's analysis is an important and cogent synopsis of external problems that have limited psychological science's penetration into public knowledge. The current article expands upon this by examining internal problems, or problems within psychological science that have potentially limited its impact with policymakers, other scientists, and the public. These problems range from the replication crisis and defensive reactions to it, overuse of politicized policy statements by professional advocacy groups such as the American Psychological Association (APA), and continued overreliance on mechanistic models of human behavior. It is concluded that considerable problems arise from psychological science's tendency to overcommunicate mechanistic concepts based on weak and often unreplicated (or unreplicable) data that do not resonate with the everyday experiences of the general public or the rigor of other scholarly fields. It is argued that a way forward can be seen by, on one hand, improving the rigor and transparency of psychological science, and making theoretical innovations that better acknowledge the complexities of the human experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Math/science education action conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    On October 8--10, 1989, the US Department of Energy, the Lawrence Hall of Science, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory sponsored a Math/Science Education Action Conference in Berkeley, California. The conference was co-chaired by Admiral James D. Watkins, Secretary of Energy, and Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg Chairman of the Lawrence Hall of Science. Nearly 250 scientists, educators, business executives, and government leaders came together to develop a concrete plan of action for restructuring and revitalizing mathematics and science education. Their target was to improve education for an entire cohort of children--the Class of 2007, the children born this school year--and their governing principle was one of collaboration, both between Federal agencies, and between public and private sectors. The report of the conference co-chairmen and participants is provided in this document. 41 figs.

  1. Global reproduction and transformation of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Neoliberalism has spread globally and operates hegemonically in many fields, including science education. I use historical auto/ethnography to examine global referents that have mediated the production of contemporary science education to explore how the roles of teachers and learners are related to macrostructures such as neoliberalism and derivative sensibilities, including standards, competition, and accountability systems, that mediate enacted curricula. I investigate these referents in relation to science education in two geographically and temporally discrete contexts Western Australia in the 1960s and 1970s and more recently in an inner city high school in the US. In so doing I problematize some of the taken for granted aspects of science education, including holding teachers responsible for establishing and maintaining control over students, emphasizing competition between individuals and between collectives such as schools, school districts and countries, and holding teachers and school leaders accountable for student achievement.

  2. SURVEY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG THE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS OF ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGES IN MANGALORE, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Bhat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND There is paucity of data related to the psychological and physical status of undergraduate college students in India. METHOD The sample consisted of 2708 undergraduate students of various arts and science colleges across the city of Mangalore, Karnataka. The study was approved by Nitte University Institutional Ethics Committee and permission was sought from the concerned colleges. Students were cross-sectionally assessed with a specially constructed semi-structured proforma and SRQ-20 (WHO, which was self-administered by the students after giving the students brief instructions. The score of 6 was taken as cut off for the SRQ screening purpose. The score of 6 and above indicates psychological morbidity and need for further detailed evaluation. RESULTS Of the 2708 participants who took part in the study, 64.1% (n=1736 were females and 35.9% (n=972 were males. The mean age of participants was 18.6±1.15 years. 75.6% students were staying at home. Nearly 7.6% of students were using alcohol or some other form of substances. Percentage of students with SRQ scores of 6 and above was 37.9%, which indicates that those many students were having psychological distress and needed further detailed evaluation psychiatrically. On SRQ individual item score, it was found that 42.8% had regular headaches, 43.3% always felt nervous, worried, and tense, 32.2% felt tired all the time. All these are somatic symptoms of depression in students. Alarming finding was 15.6% of students felt to end their life, which indicates suicidal risk among students and indirectly points towards the unnoticed depression among them. CONCLUSION Our results show that the psychiatric morbidity like depression, suicidal ideation, and somatic symptoms of psychiatric illness is very high among undergraduate college students and needs to be addressed very seriously at institutional level and also at policy level by educational department and colleges.

  3. Theory-Driven Science and Naive Empiricism in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stanley R.

    1991-01-01

    Asserts that counseling psychologists' aversion to theory-driven science and their enthusiasm for naive empiricism impede scientific progress. Identifies "received view" of science as theory-driven science, points out symptoms and consequences of the failure to apply this view, and argues that greater scientific progress will result from moving…

  4. Catalyzing Effective Science Education: Contributions from the NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Bartolone, L.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Schultz, G. R.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-06-01

    Advancing scientific literacy and strengthening the Nation’s future workforce through stimulating, informative, and effective learning experiences are core principles of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (E/PO) program. To support and coordinate its E/PO community in offering a coherent suite of activities and experiences that effectively meet the needs of the education community, NASA SMD has created four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Planetary Science, Heliophysics, Earth Science). Forum activities include: professional development to raise awareness of the existing body of best practices and educational research; analysis and cataloging of SMD-funded education materials with respect to AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy; Working Groups that assemble needs assessment and best practices data relevant to Higher Education, K-12 Formal Education, and Informal Science Education audiences; and community collaborations that enable SMD E/PO community members to develop new partnerships and to learn and share successful strategies and techniques. This presentation will highlight examples of Forum and community-based activities related to astronomy education and teacher professional development, within the context of the principles articulated within the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards. Among these are an emerging community of practice for K-12 educators and online teacher professional development and resources that incorporate misconception research and authentic experiences with NASA Astrophysics data.

  5. Recent Developments in High School Psychology Education: An Extension of Hakala (1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Adam S.; Gillis, Jennifer M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a development in high school psychology called the Psychology of Partnerships Project (P3). Addresses the creation of national teaching standards in psychology and considers the uses of computer technology. Advocates a new national survey to evaluate high school psychology education. (CMK)

  6. Sport Psychology: Myths in Sport Education and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Joy

    2008-01-01

    From a sport and exercise psychology viewpoint, this article describes the increasing professionalization of youth sport and how many well-intentioned people are using misconceptions or myths to organize and administer youth sport programs. For example, professionalization has led to specialization and year-round training, while playing multiple…

  7. The Lure of Psychology for Education and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyers, Paul; Depaepe, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Psychology has penetrated many domains of society and its vocabulary and discourse has become part of our everyday conversations. It not only carries with it the promise that it will deliver insights into human behaviour, but it is also believed that it can address many of the problems human beings are confronted with. As a discipline it thrives…

  8. Sport Psychology: Myths in Sport Education and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Joy

    2008-01-01

    From a sport and exercise psychology viewpoint, this article describes the increasing professionalization of youth sport and how many well-intentioned people are using misconceptions or myths to organize and administer youth sport programs. For example, professionalization has led to specialization and year-round training, while playing multiple…

  9. The Lure of Psychology for Education and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyers, Paul; Depaepe, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Psychology has penetrated many domains of society and its vocabulary and discourse has become part of our everyday conversations. It not only carries with it the promise that it will deliver insights into human behaviour, but it is also believed that it can address many of the problems human beings are confronted with. As a discipline it thrives…

  10. Sustainability in Higher Education:Psychological Research for Effective Pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Olin Eugene; Beringer, Almut

    2010-01-01

    Psychological theory and research can make key contributions to sustainability scholarship and practice, as is demonstrated here in the field of higher education pedagogy. College students undergo profound changes in epistemological assumptions and in identity during their undergraduate years. Data on the Measure of Intellectual Development for students participating in learner-centred pedagogies at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington, showed a trend toward more complex th...

  11. Internship in School Psychology: Education and practice of the supervisor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Neto, Walter Mariano de Faria; Guzzo,Raquel Souza Lobo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the training and practice of the internship supervisor in the field of Educational Psychology. The research was carried out through semi-structured interviews with six internship supervisors. Data was collected into three groups, as follows: characteristics of the supervisor (emphasis on the importance of his/her personal and professional background); relationship with the working setting (knowledge on curriculum structure and on the relationship betwee...

  12. Philosophy of Education and Other Educational Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    This article largely agrees with John White's characterizations of the relationships among philosophy of education, philosophy more generally, and the conventional world. It then extends what White identifies as the fundamental problem that should now be occupying philosophy of education--the irreconcilable opposition between education for…

  13. Philosophy of Education and Other Educational Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    This article largely agrees with John White's characterizations of the relationships among philosophy of education, philosophy more generally, and the conventional world. It then extends what White identifies as the fundamental problem that should now be occupying philosophy of education--the irreconcilable opposition between education for…

  14. Rural Science Education: Valuing Local Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Leanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether playing outdoors or working on the farm, rural children acquire science and engineering skills throughout their daily lives. Although 11.4 million children in the United States grow up in rural areas, compared to 14.6 million in urban areas, relatively little attention is given to rural science education. This article demonstrates that…

  15. Science Education in a Secular Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A college science education instructor tells his students he rejects evolution. What should we think? The scene unfolds in one of the largest urban centers in the world. If we are surprised, why? Expanding on Federica Raia's (2012) first-hand experience with this scenario, I broaden her discussion by considering the complexity of science education…

  16. ACSES, An Automated Computer Science Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Jurg; And Others

    A project to accommodate the large and increasing enrollment in introductory computer science courses by automating them with a subsystem for computer science instruction on the PLATO IV Computer-Based Education system at the University of Illinois was started. The subsystem was intended to be used for supplementary instruction at the University…

  17. Pseudoscience, the Paranormal, and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Given the widespread acceptance of pseudoscientific and paranormal beliefs, this article suggests that science educators need to seriously consider the problem of how these beliefs can be combated. Proposes teaching science students to critically evaluate the claims of pseudoscience and the paranormal. (LZ)

  18. Russian Science and Education: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education in Russia is not able to provide the science personnel and research that the country needs for its future economic well-being. Urgent changes are needed to improve the situation, not least among them being significant increases in the salaries of scientists, bringing Russian science into line with world standards of scientific…

  19. Science Education in a Secular Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A college science education instructor tells his students he rejects evolution. What should we think? The scene unfolds in one of the largest urban centers in the world. If we are surprised, why? Expanding on Federica Raia's (2012) first-hand experience with this scenario, I broaden her discussion by considering the complexity of science education…

  20. Pseudoscience, the Paranormal, and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Given the widespread acceptance of pseudoscientific and paranormal beliefs, this article suggests that science educators need to seriously consider the problem of how these beliefs can be combated. Proposes teaching science students to critically evaluate the claims of pseudoscience and the paranormal. (LZ)

  1. Psychological effects and epistemological education through mathematics "abstraction" and "construction"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel Pera

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a broader research which will be found in future work, Psychology and epistemology of mathematical creation, complementary work of experimental research psychology mathematics, whose investigative approach, promoting the combination type cross section paradigms and quantitative methods and qualitative and comparative method and the analytic-synthetic, based on the following idea: to make learning as efficient, contents and methods must be appropriate to the individual particularities of the pupils, a measure of the balance between converging and diverging dosing tasks as a promising opening to the transition from education proficiency in math performance. At this juncture, mathematical existence as ontological approach against the background of a history of "abstraction" mathematical and theoretical observations on the abstraction, realization and other mathematical thought processes, explanatory approach fulfills the context in which s mathematics constituted an important factor in psychological and methodological perspective, in a context of maximizing the educational effectiveness that depends on the quality of the methods used in teaching, focused on knowledge of the general principles of psycho-didactics not only mathematical and mental organization individual student or knowledge of the factors that make possible psycho-educational learning process.

  2. Computers in Education and Education in Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis SIERRA-RODRÍGUEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selection of the extended papers related to Computers in Education and Computer Science Education topics presented at the sixteenth edition of the International Symposium on Computers in Education (SIIE 2014, held between 12 and 14 November 2014 in Logroño, La Ri-oja, Spain.

  3. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  4. Interdisciplinary Science Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P. J.; Hine, D.; Barnard, R. T.

    2013-01-01

    Science history shows us that interdisciplinarity is a spontaneous process that is intrinsic to, and engendered by, research activity. It is an activity that is done rather than an object to be designed and constructed. We examine three vignettes from the history of science that display the interdisciplinary process at work and consider the…

  5. Interdisciplinary Science Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P. J.; Hine, D.; Barnard, R. T.

    2013-01-01

    Science history shows us that interdisciplinarity is a spontaneous process that is intrinsic to, and engendered by, research activity. It is an activity that is done rather than an object to be designed and constructed. We examine three vignettes from the history of science that display the interdisciplinary process at work and consider the…

  6. Culture Matters in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Valerie Ooka; Lafferty, Karen Elizabeth; Pang, Jennifer M.; Griswold, Joan; Oser, Rick

    2014-01-01

    On the Saturday before Halloween, hundreds of students and their parents went from booth to booth participating in science activities at an annual Fall Festival and Learning Fair. The Fall Festival and Learning Fair is a valuable annual partnership where culturally relevant teaching engages each child in hands-on, standards-based science lessons.…

  7. The Educational Psychology of Self-Regulation: A Conceptual and Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack; McLellan, Ann-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The multiplicity of definitions and conceptions of self-regulation that typifies contemporary research on self-regulation in psychology and educational psychology is examined. This examination is followed by critical analyses of theory and research in educational psychology that reveal not only conceptual confusions, but misunderstandings of…

  8. Disciplinary power and education: A foucaultian approach in Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Villa Moral Jiménez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available As a descendant of the Enlightenment, the school is still a vital modern institution, albeit in contemporary post-modern conditions. This article takes a Foucaultian perspective to analyse the power / knowledge and the regimes of truth involved. The arguments is that the power of the school comes from the inertial force of custom, which normalises  the school's disciplinary, sanctionary, instructional, and corrective practices. The modern educational project uses disciplinary methods that promote autoidiscipline and auto-regulation. Its instructional processes promote individualist learning, and its rituals turn habituation into internalisation. Consistent with the critical sentiments of a Social Psychology of Education, we propose a comprehensive approach to education and its links to acculturation, instruction, and schooling.  We use a critical radical pedagogy and post-structuralist analysis to argue for the need to rethink contemporary education.   

  9. Disciplinary power and education: A foucaultian approach in Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moral Jiménez, María de la Vila

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available As a descendant of the Enlightenment, the school is still a vital modern institution, albeit in contemporary post-modern conditions. This article takes a Foucaultian perspective to analyse the power / knowledge and the regimes of truth involved. The arguments is that the power of the school comes from the inertial force of custom, which normalises the school's disciplinary, sanctionary, instructional, and corrective practices. The modern educational project uses disciplinary methods that promote autoidiscipline and auto-regulation. Its instructional processes promote individualist learning, and its rituals turn habituation into internalisation.Consistent with the critical sentiments of a Social Psychology of Education, we propose a comprehensive approach to education and its links to acculturation, instruction, and schooling. We use a critical radical pedagogy and post-structuralist analysis to argue for the need to rethink contemporary education.

  10. The social psychology of disintegrative shaming in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joel H; Clarey, Amy M

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable research concerning drug education and zero tolerance policies, few have examined their combined youth impact. Comprehensive and nationally recognized mixed method evidence is drawn from 77 school districts and 118 schools in the Drug, Alcohol and Tobacco Education (DATE) evaluation. For the first time it is found that the combined negative impact of traditional prevention and intervention efforts--e.g., Life Skills Training (LST) and zero tolerance policies-are so serious that they extend into the wider conditions of educational achievement. Findings are explained by the social psychological processes of "disintegrative shaming," where young people are to be shamed into abstinence and experiencing or witnessing school removal rather than help when needed. With more research needed the negative effects of traditional prevention and intervention-particularly salient among disproportionately affected urban/minority youth-suggest that related efforts be reconsidered together as well as part of mainstream education.

  11. Psychology studies' drive to educational reform in the last 20 years in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Da-jun; Xu Xing-chun

    2006-01-01

    In order to better understand the relationship between educational psychology research and educational reform,this essay reviews the development of educational psychology studies in the last 20 years in China.The study shows that:(1) Rapid development has been made in the areas of establishing discipline systems;(2) Research fields have been expanded and research directions have been localized;(3) The theoretical basis for quality education has been derived from education psychology studies;(4) The psychological foundation for curriculum reform and instruction has been implemented,and (5) China has committed to serve and expand current educational practices.

  12. Fundamentalism in Psychological Science. The Publication Manual as "Bible."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Bowers, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the content of the fourth edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (1994) as if it were a biblical text. Draws on socio-historical studies and critical feminist perspectives to discuss the manual's function as a fundamentalist "bible" in relation to psychologists' culture. (SLD)

  13. The Neglected 95%, a Challenge to Psychology's Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Jeffrey Jensen

    2009-01-01

    Responds to the comments of LoSchiavo F. M. and Shatz M. A.; Webster G. D., Nichols A. L., and Schember T. O.; Stroebe W. and Nijstad B.; and Haeffel et al. on the author's original article regarding the assertion that American psychology focuses too narrowly on Americans while neglecting the other 95% of the world's population. The author…

  14. Improving Training in Methodology Enriches the Science of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Leona S.; West, Stephen G.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2009-01-01

    Replies to the comment Ramifications of increased training in quantitative methodology by Herbet Zimiles on the current authors original article "Doctoral training in statistics, measurement, and methodology in psychology: Replication and extension of Aiken, West, Sechrest, and Reno's (1990) survey of PhD programs in North America". The…

  15. Fundamentalism in Psychological Science. The Publication Manual as "Bible."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Bowers, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the content of the fourth edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (1994) as if it were a biblical text. Draws on socio-historical studies and critical feminist perspectives to discuss the manual's function as a fundamentalist "bible" in relation to psychologists' culture. (SLD)

  16. Advancing science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this editorial to inform both readers and potential authors, the editor provides a few details relevant to the School Psychology Quarterly (SPQ) including: the mission, contemporary context, the new emphases of SPQ, the editorial board, and advice for authors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Simulations as Scaffolds in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renken, Maggie; Peffer, Melanie; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    This book outlines key issues for addressing the grand challenges posed to educators, developers, and researchers interested in the intersection of simulations and science education. To achieve this, the authors explore the use of computer simulations as instructional scaffolds that provide strat...

  18. On the Reconstruction of Educational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzell, Christer

    2006-01-01

    Ever since its formative years in the USA a century ago, the discipline of education has taken an uneasy stand on its own "scientific" status, not least with regard to the basic issue of the relationships between theory and practice. When a science of education was introduced as a panacea for rational planning in the fields of schooling and…

  19. Catalyzing curriculum evolution in graduate science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutlerner, Johanna L; Van Vactor, David

    2013-05-09

    Strategies in life science graduate education must evolve in order to train a modern workforce capable of integrative solutions to challenging problems. Our institution has catalyzed such evolution through building a postdoctoral Curriculum Fellows Program that provides a collaborative and scholarly education laboratory for innovation in graduate training.

  20. The making of a bilingual science educator: An autobiographical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Hugo Alejandro

    This qualitative study explores the journey of a Latino educator in becoming a bilingual high school science teacher and university professor. It focuses on discovering how the practice of teaching and learning is shaped through social, psychological, and cultural factors. Through the use of an autobiographical method known as currere, the researcher recounts personal and educational experiences that address important issues in education related to language, science, culture, and social class through the perspective of one doing the work. The study reviews the literature on autobiographical forms of research in the field of education and suggests how autobiography in education, an emerging genre, holds the promise for creating new meanings of the self while at the same time attempts to develop a theory of autobiography that acknowledges the importance of people of color and other marginalized groups. Data collected include 22 hours of audiotaped recordings, conversations, and educational artifacts including notes from innovative classroom projects, lesson plans, conference presentations, computer files, graduate coursework, classroom videotaping, university course evaluations, and department memos. Findings of this study revealed that: (a) the process of becoming a transformative educator involves critical self-reflection on one's cultural/ethnic identity and linguistic heritage; (b) the importance of self-reflection on one's teaching is a critical component in moving towards a more culturally and linguistically responsive curriculum; (c) the bilingual educator can achieve a greater understanding of the important role in the maintenance, implementation, and promotion of minority language education through a reflective practice; and (d) the development of the underrepresented voice in education and the awakening to one's personal and philosophical worldviews is as important as the preparation one receives in becoming a bilingual teacher.

  1. An international comparison of the science education priorities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Higher Education ... An international comparison of the science education priorities of science teachers, lecturers and students in two ... to utilise better science teaching methods; and to acquire more resources for ...

  2. University Science and Mathematics Education in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole; Valero, Paola; Christensen, Ole Ravn

    of science and mathematics education in the current information society and provides insight essential for developing possibilities to improve science and mathematics education in universities all around the world. The uniquely broad treatment offered by University Science and Mathematics Education......More than ever, our time is characterized by rapid changes in the organization and the production of knowledge. This movement is deeply rooted in the evolution of the scientific endeavor, as well as in the transformation of the political, economic and cultural organization of society It is also...... clear that the transformation of knowledge outside universities has implied a change in the routes that research in mathematics, science and technology has taken in the last decades. In this context, it is difficult to avoid considering seriously the challenges that such a complex and uncertain social...

  3. Educational psychology and the effectiveness of inclusive education/mainstreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Geoff

    2007-03-01

    Inclusive education/mainstreaming is a key policy objective for the education of children and young people with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities. This paper reviews the literature on the effectiveness of inclusive education/mainstreaming. The focus is on evidence for effects in terms of child outcomes with examination also of evidence on processes that support effectiveness. The review covers a range of SEN and children from pre-school to the end of compulsory education. Following an historical review of evidence on inclusive education/mainstreaming, the core of the paper is a detailed examination of all the papers published in eight journals from the field of special education published 2001-2005 (N=1373): Journal of Special Education, Exceptional Children, Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, Journal of Learning Disabilities, Remedial and Special Education, British Journal of Special Education, European Journal of Special Needs Education, and the International Journal of Inclusive Education. The derived categories were: comparative studies of outcomes: other outcome studies; non-comparative qualitative studies including non-experimental case studies; teacher practice and development; teacher attitudes; and the use of teaching assistants. Only 14 papers (1.0%) were identified as comparative outcome studies of children with some form of SEN. Measures used varied but included social as well as educational outcomes. Other papers included qualitative studies of inclusive practice, some of which used a non-comparative case study design while others were based on respondent's judgements, or explored process factors including teacher attitudes and the use of teaching assistants. Inclusive education/mainstreaming has been promoted on two bases: the rights of children to be included in mainstream education and the proposition that inclusive education is more effective. This review focuses on the latter issue. The evidence from this review does not

  4. The feasibility of educating trainee science teachers in issues of science and religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This article reflects on Roussel De Carvalho's paper `Science initial teacher education and superdiversity: educating science teachers for a multi-religious and globalized science classroom'. It then offers suggestions for making some of the ambitious goals of the science-and-religion components of the science initial teacher education project more manageable.

  5. Plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Svyrydenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the types and severity of plagiarism violations at the modern educational and scientific spheres using the philosophic methodological approaches. The author analyzes Ukrainian context as well as global one and tries to formulate "order of the day" of plagiarism challenges. The plagiarism phenomenon is intuitively comprehensible for academicians but in reality it has a very complex nature and a lot of manifestation. Using approaches of ethics, philosophical anthropology, philosophy of science and education author formulates the series of recommendation for overcoming of plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education.

  6. Affect in Complex Decision-Making Systems: From Psychology to Computer Science Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chohra, Amine; Chohra, Aziza; Madani, Kurosh

    2014-01-01

    Part 2: MHDW Workshop; International audience; The increasing progresses in both psychology and computer science allow continually to deal with more and more complex systems and closer to real-world applications in order to solve particularly the decision-making process with uncertain and incomplete information. The aim of this research work is to highlight the irrationality (affect) and to understand some different ways in which the irrationality enter into the decision-making from psycholog...

  7. Interactions of Economics of Science and Science Education: Investigating the Implications for Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel; Mugaloglu, Ebru Z.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been upsurge of interest in the applications of interdisciplinary perspectives on science in science education. Within this framework, the implications of the so-called "economics of science" is virtually an uncharted territory. In this paper, we trace a set of arguments that provide a dialectic engagement with…

  8. The psychological disengagement model among women in science, engineering, and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Ann M; Tougas, Francine; Rinfret, Natalie; Monger, Tanya

    2015-09-01

    Psychological responses to personal relative deprivation based on self/outgroup comparisons (named self/outgroup PRD) were explored among women in science, engineering, and technology according to the Psychological Disengagement Model. Three studies revealed that the experience of self/outgroup PRD increased women's likelihood of discounting the feedback they received at work. In turn, discounting led them to devalue their profession. Each study further documented the damaging effect of both psychological disengagement mechanisms. Study 1 (N = 93) revealed that discounting and devaluing were associated with decreased self-esteem. These results were replicated in Studies 2 and 3. Study 2 (N = 163) demonstrated that discounting and devaluing were also associated with reduced self-esteem stability. Study 3 (N = 187) further showed that psychological disengagement was also associated with women's occupational commitment. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are considered. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  9. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL BASES OF SCIENCE--A PROCESS APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAGNE, ROBERT

    THE TEXTS OF THREE LECTURES CONSTITUTE THIS BOOKLET. TWO OF THESE LECTURES WERE USED TO SET THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND FUNCTIONAL TONE FOR THE 1963 AND 1964 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE WRITING CONFERENCES DURING WHICH "SCIENCE--A PROCESS APPROACH" WAS PRODUCED. THE THIRD LECTURE WAS PRESENTED TO TEACHERS WHO WERE…

  10. Rhetoric and Reality: Science Teacher Educators' Views and Practice Regarding Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molefe, Leonard; Stears, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The importance of teaching science process skills in science education is well documented in the literature. Yet the issue of process skills had also been associated with debates on validity of a process approach to science education. This research was conducted to explore views of science teacher educators in initial teacher education programmes…

  11. First-Person Educational Psychology for Teacher Education Majors: A Biofunctional Understanding Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iran-Nejad, Asghar; Stewart, William; Robinson, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    This is a semester-long study of the development of first-person biofunctional understanding in educational psychology for teacher education majors. We defined biofunctional understanding as a spontaneous intellectual capacity. To reach its deep biological levels, sculpted by countless evolutionary millennia, students identified and dwelled in…

  12. Learner Engagement: A Review of Approaches in the Psychology of Education and Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Claire; Putwain, David W.; Kaye, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    This article critically examines the concept of "engagement" as it has emerged within two distinct bodies of literature in the fields of art education and the psychology of education. In order to grapple with the heterogeneous nature of this literature, a meta-narrative review was conducted whereby recurring narratives from various…

  13. Popular evolutionary psychology in the UK: an unusual case of science in the media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Angela

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents findings from quantitative analyses of UK press and print media coverage of evolutionary psychology during the 1990s. It argues that evolutionary psychology presents an interesting case for studies of science in the media in several different ways. First, press coverage of evolutionary psychology was found to be closely linked with the publications of popular books on the subject. Secondly, when compared to coverage of other subjects, a higher proportion of academics and authors wrote about evolutionary psychology in the press, contributing to the development of a scientific controversy in the public domain. Finally, it was found that evolutionary psychology coverage appeared in different areas of the daily press, and was rarely written about by specialist science journalists. The possible reason for these features are then explored, including the boom in popular science publishing during the 1990s, evolutionary psychology's status as a new subject of study and discussion, and the nature of the subject its as theoretically based and with a human, "everyday" subject matter.

  14. PROVIDING PSYCHOLOGICAL SECURITY TO PARTICIPANTS OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Yurchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the education of children with disabilities is one of the most topical and controversial issues of modern education. The main problem is that today children with disabilities face many barriers to getting a quality education related to social inequalities that are possible and necessary to overcome. A big obstacle for the successful implementation of inclusion plays a conservative society and, in particular, the ossification views of parents of healthy children, who are often opposed to their children studying together with people with disabilities. A big obstacle for the successful implementation of inclusion is played by social ossification and, in particular, by obsolescent opinions of parents of healthy children that are often opposed to their kids studying together with disabled children. This article declares that many schools and, moreover, the teachers are not ready for changes in traditional forms, principles and teaching methods as for working with children with special educational demands requires knowledge in correctional and special education and psychology. There is no developed unified national Russian program of social integration of children with special needs that increases the level of tolerance, selfawareness and helping behavior from healthy people. The article describes the results of the authorial program in providing psychological security of individuals in inclusive education which report the development of sufficient skills of coping with emotional distress, decrease in anxiety manifestations, development of children's'  emotional  stability.  The  study notes  that  the main purpose of the program is to eliminate discrimination and promote tolerance: children who receive inclusive education are taught the acts of kindness, mutual respect and tolerance.

  15. Productivity of Educational Psychologists in Educational Psychology Journals, 1991-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith; Locke; Boisse; Gallagher; Krengel; Kuczek; McFarland; Rapoo; Wertheim

    1998-04-01

    The scholarly productivity of educational psychologists, indexed in terms of the number of papers published in professional journals in the field was the focus of this investigation. Five journals considered to be among the "core journals" in the field and, thus, those in which educational psychologists are likely to publish their scholarship were examined for the years 1991-1996. Both institutions (i.e., universities) and individuals were identified. The top-rated institution, in terms of educational psychology productivity, was the University of Maryland and the most prolific individual contributor to the journals was Herbert Marsh. The findings partially replicate several previous productivity studies in psychology and educational psychology. The most productive scholars in the field include both seasoned, established leaders in the discipline, as well as younger individuals who are making their mark. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Constructing a Mental Health Education Mechanism and a Psychological Crisis Intervention Mechanism for Science and Engineering Postgraduate%理工类研究生心理健康教育工作机制和心理危机干预机制的建构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the literature , history , art , and other professional graduate , mental health problems of science and engineering graduate students are more complicated ,such as depression , social psychological disorder ,learning burnout and gender psychological barriers .As for the situation of postgraduate mental health education ,a general impression is the lack of planning and system , the simple methods ,the insufficiency of professional staff ,weak capacity for prevention and the lack of both theory and experience of emergency treatment .Considering these factors ,this paper puts forward the construct of the three security system to promote graduate students ’ mental health from multi -level and multi -dimensional ;building a three -level of university ,faculty ,graduate students to carry out and implement the work system of mental health education ;building a integration mechanism for post-graduate psychological problems screening , intervention , controlling and tracking to deal with psychological crisis .%  与文史等专业的研究生相比,理工科研究生的心理健康问题突出表现为精神抑郁、社交心理障碍、学习倦怠、性别心理障碍。目前研究生心理健康教育工作总体上表现为计划性、系统性欠缺,方法单薄,专业人员配备不足,预防能力薄弱,应急处理的理论和经验缺乏等。本文基于上述这些因素,提出构建能从多层次、多方位促进研究生心理健康的三大保障体系;构建高校、院系、学生三级贯彻并落实研究生心理健康教育的工作体制;建立研究生心理问题筛查、干预、控制、跟踪一体化的工作机制,以应对心理危机。

  17. A collective unconscious reconsidered: Jung's archetypal imagination in the light of contemporary psychology and social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Harry T

    2012-02-01

    A needed rapprochement between Jung and the contemporary human sciences may rest less on the much debated relevance of a biologistic collective unconscious than on a re-inscribing of an archetypal imagination, as the phenomenological and empirical core of Jungian psychology. The most promising approaches in this regard in terms of theory and research in psychology come from combining the cognitive psychology of metaphor and synaesthesia, individual differences in imaginative absorption and openness to numinous experience and spirituality as a form of symbolic intelligence. On the socio-cultural side, this cognitive psychology of archetypal imagination is also congruent with Lévi-Strauss on the metaphoric roots of mythological thinking, and Durkheim on a sociology of collective consciousness. This conjoined perspective, while validating the cross cultural commonality of physical metaphor intuited by Jung and Hillman on alchemy, also shows Jung's Red Book, considered as the expressive source for his more formal psychology, to be far closer in spirit to a socio-cultural collective consciousness, based on metaphoric imagination, than to a phylogenetic or evolutionary unconscious. A mutual re-inscribing of Jung into congruent areas of contemporary psychology, anthropology, sociology, and vice versa, can help to further validate Jung's key observations and is fully consistent with Jung's own early efforts at synthesis within the human sciences. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  18. Designing Introductory (Adaptation Graduate Module in Psychology and Education for Students with Undergraduate Degree in Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyurova S.A.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the authors’experience of developingan introductory (adaptation module of the basic master’s programme in Psychology and Education, involving in-depth practice in the context of networking, aimed at graduate students with bachelor degree in Pedagogy. The authors carried out a comparative analysis of the content of competencies defined by the federal state educational standards of graduate education “44.03.01 Pedagogy” and “44.03.02 Psychology and Education” and revealed the following areas in which undergraduate students applying for master’s degree clearly lack necessary competencies: organization of psychological and educational support for children with disabilities; providing psychological information; psychological assessment and prevention. Given that training for professional careers in the field of correctional and developmental work, psychological assessment and psychological prevention is an essential part of the master’s programme in Psychology and Education, developing these competencies becomes the main task of the programme’s respective modules. Thus the content of the introductory (adaptation module should, firstly, provide an insight into the professional activities of an educational psychologist, and, secondly, develop the competencies required for providing psychological information to all participants of the educational process.The authors propose the structure of the introductory (adaptation module that would serve to fill in the gaps in the graduates’ general knowledge in psychology and help them to study successfully in the master’s programme in Psychology and Education.

  19. Contextual assessment in science education: Background, issues, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Contemporary assessment practices in science education have undergone significant changes in recent decades. The basis for these changes and the resulting new assessment practices are the subject of this two-part paper. Part 1 considers the basis of assessment that, more than 25 years ago, was driven by the assumptions of decomposability and decontextualization of knowledge, resulting in a low-inference testing system, often described as traditional. This assessment model was replaced not on account of direct criticism, but rather on account of a larger revolution - the change from behavioral to cognitive psychology, developments in the philosophy of science, and the rise of constructivism. Most notably, the study of the active cognitive processes of the individual resulted in a major emphasis on context in learning and assessment. These changes gave rise to the development of various contextual assessment methodologies in science education, for example, concept mapping assessment, performance assessment, and portfolio assessment. In Part 2, the literature relating to the assessment methods identified in Part 1 is reviewed, revealing that there is not much research that supports their validity and reliability. However, encouraging new work on selected-response tests is forming the basis for reconsideration of past criticisms of this technique. Despite the major developments in contextual assessment methodologies in science education, two important questions remain unanswered, namely, whether grades can be considered as genuine numeric quantities and whether the individual student is the appropriate unit of assessment in public accountability. Given these issues and the requirement for science assessment to satisfy the goals of the individual, the classroom, and the society, tentative recommendations are put forward addressing these parallel needs in the assessment of science learning.

  20. Science and Common Sense: Perspectives from Philosophy and Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara

    2016-01-01

    knowledge, distinguished by an increase in systematicity. On the other, he argues that scientific knowledge often comes to deviate from common sense as science develops. Specifically, he argues that a departure from common sense is a price we may have to pay for increased systematicity. I argue...... that to clarify the relation between common sense and scientific reasoning, more attention to the cognitive aspects of learning and doing science is needed. As a step in this direction, I explore the potential for cross-fertilization between the discussions about conceptual change in science education...... and philosophy of science. Particularly, I examine debates on whether common sense intuitions facilitate or impede scientific reasoning. While arguing that these debates can balance some of the assumptions made by Hoyningen-Huene, I suggest that a more contextualized version of systematicity theory could...