WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychology model europsy

  1. Evacuation models and disaster psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C.M. Vorst

    2010-01-01

    In evacuation models of buildings, neighborhoods, areas, cities and countries important psychological parameters are not frequently used. In this paper the relevance of some important variables from disaster psychology will be discussed. Modeling psychological variables will enhance prediction of hu

  2. Psychological models of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, Shira; Apter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is highly complex and multifaceted. Consequent to the pioneering work of Durkheim and Freud, theoreticians have attempted to explain the biological, social, and psychological nature of suicide. The present work presents an overview and critical discussion of the most influential theoretical models of the psychological mechanisms underlying the development of suicidal behavior. All have been tested to varying degrees and have important implications for the development of therapeutic and preventive interventions. Broader and more in-depth approaches are still needed to further our understanding of suicidal phenomena.

  3. Mathematical modeling in psychological researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zyolko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The author considers the nature of mathematical modeling and its significance in psychological researches. The author distinguishes the types of mathematical models: deterministic, stochastic models and synergetic models. The system approach is proposed as an instrument of implementation of mathematical modelling in psychological research.

  4. [Representation models and clinical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, P

    1993-01-01

    Clinical psychology often borrows vocabulary from medicine as well as its analysis schemes and explanation models. This survey will deal with all analysis schemes used by the clinical psychologist, explicitly or implicitly, to make it possible to understand the psychological functioning, and work on it as soon as a problem arises.

  5. Desiderata: Towards Indigenous Models of Vocational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Pearce, Marina

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a relative lack of cross-cultural validity in most current (Western) psychological models, indigenous models of psychology have recently become a popular approach for understanding behaviour in specific cultures. Such models would be valuable to vocational psychology research with culturally diverse populations. Problems facing…

  6. Desiderata: Towards Indigenous Models of Vocational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Pearce, Marina

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a relative lack of cross-cultural validity in most current (Western) psychological models, indigenous models of psychology have recently become a popular approach for understanding behaviour in specific cultures. Such models would be valuable to vocational psychology research with culturally diverse populations. Problems facing…

  7. Aspirational Model Teaching Criteria for Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Aaron S.; Boysen, Guy A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.; Tazeau, Yvette N.; Meyers, Steven A.; Sciutto, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Society for the Teaching of Psychology commissioned a presidential task force to document teaching criteria for model psychology teachers in undergraduate education. The resulting list of criteria reflects activities related to face-to-face course interaction and online teaching, training, and education; course design; implementation…

  8. Psychological Empowerment Model in Iranian Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Taghipour; Narjes Sadat Borghei; RobabLatifnejad Roudsari; Afsaneh Keramat; Hadi Jabbari Nooghabi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Women’s empowerment programs during pregnancy focus primarily on increasing women’s health goals and psychological empowerment has been considered important in most issues related to pregnant mothers’ mental health. Using path analysis, this study aims to examine the direct and indirect components of psychological empowerment of pregnant mothers. Methods: This model-testing study was conducted in Gorgan, northwest of Iran during three months in spring of 2015. Through ran...

  9. Psychological Empowerment Model in Iranian Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Ali; Sadat Borghei, Narjes; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Keramat, Afsaneh; Jabbari Nooghabi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Women’s empowerment programs during pregnancy focus primarily on increasing women’s health goals and psychological empowerment has been considered important in most issues related to pregnant mothers’ mental health. Using path analysis, this study aims to examine the direct and indirect components of psychological empowerment of pregnant mothers. Methods: This model-testing study was conducted in Gorgan, northwest of Iran during three months in spring of 2015. Through random cluster sampling, a total number of 160 pregnant women were selected from 10 urban medical centers and clinics as primary centers. We used Spritzer’s Psychological empowerment scale. Suitable sampling based on Nunally and Bernstein was followed in the model. The relationships between the dependent variables were then examined by means of path analysis using Amos 18. Results: The psychological empowerment of pregnant mothers (PEPW) model is impacted by individual factors, such as marriage age and employment, including some subjectively rated factors such as marital satisfaction and experience of violence. The PEPW model was deemed appropriate as optimum conditions indicators of goodness of fit; low index of χ2/df shows little difference between the conceptual model and observed data, while RMSEA value indicated the goodness of fit. Other indicators such as CMIN=0.957, CMIN/DF=0.957, P-CLOSE=0.418, χ2=0.957 and probability level=0.328 the fact that the model is ideal. The mothers’ employment had the highest coefficient in the PEPW path model .731 (0.443, 0.965) bootstrap confidence intervals by 95%, and with a p-value of less than 0.05. Conclusions: The mothers’ employment is the most important factor in psychological empowerment, but it cannot be addressed quickly. Programming to increase marital satisfaction followed by a decrease in family violence and prevention of early marriage are necessary for promotion of psychological empowerment during pregnancy. PMID

  10. Psychological Empowerment Model in Iranian Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taghipour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women’s empowerment programs during pregnancy focus primarily on increasing women’s health goals and psychological empowerment has been considered important in most issues related to pregnant mothers’ mental health. Using path analysis, this study aims to examine the direct and indirect components of psychological empowerment of pregnant mothers. Methods: This model-testing study was conducted in Gorgan, northwest of Iran during three months in spring of 2015. Through random cluster sampling, a total number of 160 pregnant women were selected from 10 urban medical centers and clinics as primary centers. We used Spritzer’s Psychological empowerment scale. Suitable sampling based on Nunally and Bernstein was followed in the model. The relationships between the dependent variables were then examined by means of path analysis using Amos 18. Results: The psychological empowerment of pregnant mothers (PEPW model is impacted by individual factors, such as marriage age and employment, including some subjectively rated factors such as marital satisfaction and experience of violence. The PEPW model was deemed appropriate as optimum conditions indicators of goodness of fit; low index of χ2/df shows little difference between the conceptual model and observed data, while RMSEA value indicated the goodness of fit. Other indicators such as CMIN=0.957, CMIN/DF=0.957, P-CLOSE=0.418, χ2=0.957 and probability level=0.328 the fact that the model is ideal. The mothers’ employment had the highest coefficient in the PEPW path model .731 (0.443, 0.965 bootstrap confidence intervals by 95%, and with a p-value of less than 0.05. Conclusions: The mothers’ employment is the most important factor in psychological empowerment, but it cannot be addressed quickly. Programming to increase marital satisfaction followed by a decrease in family violence and prevention of early marriage are necessary for promotion of psychological empowerment during

  11. Fitting Hidden Markov Models to Psychological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Visser

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Markov models have been used extensively in psychology of learning. Applications of hidden Markov models are rare however. This is partially due to the fact that comprehensive statistics for model selection and model assessment are lacking in the psychological literature. We present model selection and model assessment statistics that are particularly useful in applying hidden Markov models in psychology. These statistics are presented and evaluated by simulation studies for a toy example. We compare AIC, BIC and related criteria and introduce a prediction error measure for assessing goodness-of-fit. In a simulation study, two methods of fitting equality constraints are compared. In two illustrative examples with experimental data we apply selection criteria, fit models with constraints and assess goodness-of-fit. First, data from a concept identification task is analyzed. Hidden Markov models provide a flexible approach to analyzing such data when compared to other modeling methods. Second, a novel application of hidden Markov models in implicit learning is presented. Hidden Markov models are used in this context to quantify knowledge that subjects express in an implicit learning task. This method of analyzing implicit learning data provides a comprehensive approach for addressing important theoretical issues in the field.

  12. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  13. Application of Chaos Theory to Psychological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackerby, Rae Fortunato

    This dissertation shows that an alternative theoretical approach from physics--chaos theory--offers a viable basis for improved understanding of human beings and their behavior. Chaos theory provides achievable frameworks for potential identification, assessment, and adjustment of human behavior patterns. Most current psychological models fail to address the metaphysical conditions inherent in the human system, thus bringing deep errors to psychological practice and empirical research. Freudian, Jungian and behavioristic perspectives are inadequate psychological models because they assume, either implicitly or explicitly, that the human psychological system is a closed, linear system. On the other hand, Adlerian models that require open systems are likely to be empirically tenable. Logically, models will hold only if the model's assumptions hold. The innovative application of chaotic dynamics to psychological behavior is a promising theoretical development because the application asserts that human systems are open, nonlinear and self-organizing. Chaotic dynamics use nonlinear mathematical relationships among factors that influence human systems. This dissertation explores these mathematical relationships in the context of a sample model of moral behavior using simulated data. Mathematical equations with nonlinear feedback loops describe chaotic systems. Feedback loops govern the equations' value in subsequent calculation iterations. For example, changes in moral behavior are affected by an individual's own self-centeredness, family and community influences, and previous moral behavior choices that feed back to influence future choices. When applying these factors to the chaos equations, the model behaves like other chaotic systems. For example, changes in moral behavior fluctuate in regular patterns, as determined by the values of the individual, family and community factors. In some cases, these fluctuations converge to one value; in other cases, they diverge in

  14. A threshold model of investor psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod; Grinfeld, Michael; Lamba, Harbir; Seaman, Tim

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a class of agent-based market models founded upon simple descriptions of investor psychology. Agents are subject to various psychological tensions induced by market conditions and endowed with a minimal ‘personality’. This personality consists of a threshold level for each of the tensions being modeled, and the agent reacts whenever a tension threshold is reached. This paper considers an elementary model including just two such tensions. The first is ‘cowardice’, which is the stress caused by remaining in a minority position with respect to overall market sentiment and leads to herding-type behavior. The second is ‘inaction’, which is the increasing desire to act or re-evaluate one's investment position. There is no inductive learning by agents and they are only coupled via the global market price and overall market sentiment. Even incorporating just these two psychological tensions, important stylized facts of real market data, including fat-tails, excess kurtosis, uncorrelated price returns and clustered volatility over the timescale of a few days are reproduced. By then introducing an additional parameter that amplifies the effect of externally generated market noise during times of extreme market sentiment, long-time volatility correlations can also be recovered.

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology and health psychology: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, Susan K; Costanzo, Erin S

    2003-08-01

    The biopsychosocial model describes interactions between psychosocial and biological factors in the etiology and progression of disease. How an individual interprets and responds to the environment determines responses to stress, influences health behaviors, contributes to the neuroendocrine and immune response, and may ultimately affect health outcomes. Health psychology interventions are designed to modulate the stress response and improve health behaviors by teaching individuals more adaptive methods of interpreting life challenges and more effective coping responses. These interactions are discussed in the context of aging.

  16. Modeling Psychological Attributes in Psychology - An Epistemological Discussion: Network Analysis vs. Latent Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Hervé; Falissard, Bruno; Kop, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Network Analysis is considered as a new method that challenges Latent Variable models in inferring psychological attributes. With Network Analysis, psychological attributes are derived from a complex system of components without the need to call on any latent variables. But the ontological status of psychological attributes is not adequately defined with Network Analysis, because a psychological attribute is both a complex system and a property emerging from this complex system. The aim of this article is to reappraise the legitimacy of latent variable models by engaging in an ontological and epistemological discussion on psychological attributes. Psychological attributes relate to the mental equilibrium of individuals embedded in their social interactions, as robust attractors within complex dynamic processes with emergent properties, distinct from physical entities located in precise areas of the brain. Latent variables thus possess legitimacy, because the emergent properties can be conceptualized and analyzed on the sole basis of their manifestations, without exploring the upstream complex system. However, in opposition with the usual Latent Variable models, this article is in favor of the integration of a dynamic system of manifestations. Latent Variables models and Network Analysis thus appear as complementary approaches. New approaches combining Latent Network Models and Network Residuals are certainly a promising new way to infer psychological attributes, placing psychological attributes in an inter-subjective dynamic approach. Pragmatism-realism appears as the epistemological framework required if we are to use latent variables as representations of psychological attributes.

  17. Positive Psychology versus the Medical Model?: Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen; Linley, P. Alex

    2006-01-01

    Comments on "Positive psychology progress: Empirical validation of interventions" by Seligman, Steen, Park, and Peterson (see record 2005-08033-003). Seligman and colleagues provided a progress report on positive psychology, reviewing the impressive developments over the past five years. We wholeheartedly support the positive psychology movement…

  18. Randomly Stopped Sums: Models and Psychological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSmithson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach to modeling the sums of a continuous random variable over a number of measurement occasions when the number of occasions also is a random variable. A typical example is summing the amounts of time spent attending to pieces of information in an information search task leading to a decision to obtain the total time taken to decide. Although there is a large literature on randomly stopped sums in financial statistics, it is largely absent from psychology. The paper begins with the standard modeling approaches used in financial statistics, and then extends them in two ways. First, the randomly stopped sums are modeled as ``life distributions'' such as the gamma or log-normal distribution. A simulation study investigates Type I error rate accuracy and power for gamma and log-normal versions of this model. Second, a Bayesian hierarchical approach is used for constructing an appropriate general linear model of the sums. Model diagnostics are discussed, and three illustrations are presented from real datasets.

  19. The Psychology of Delivering a Psychological Service: Self-Organised Learning as a Model for Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steve; Jenner, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article describes how one Educational Psychology Service in the UK developed a service delivery based on self-organised learning (SOL). This model is linked to the paradigms and discourses within which educational psychology and special educational needs work. The work described here is dedicated to the memory of Brian Roberts, academic, close…

  20. Towards a Model of Language Attrition: Neurobiological and Psychological Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Asako

    1992-01-01

    Presents a tentative cognitive-psychological model of language attrition, which draws on information from studies in second language attrition, neurobiology and psychology. Notes that this model is presented to demonstrate that a model based on consideration of the brain has the potential of providing a plausible account of the process of language…

  1. Personal Construct Psychology Model of School Counselling Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truneckova, Deborah; Viney, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    With increasing focus on the mental health of young people by schools, greater attention is directed to the responsiveness and effectiveness of models of psychological practice in schools. A model will be presented with a coherent theoretical structure within which the school counsellor can understand the diverse psychological symptoms and…

  2. Five Facets of Mindfulness and Psychological Health: Evaluating a Psychological Model of the Mechanisms of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David B.; Bravo, Adrian J.; Roos, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus on determining the psychological mechanisms underlying the broad effects of mindfulness on psychological health. Mindfulness has been posited to be related to the construct of reperceiving or decentering, defined as a shift in perspective associated with decreased attachment to one’s thoughts and emotions. Decentering is proposed to be a meta-mechanism that mobilizes four psychological mechanisms (cognitive flexibility, values clarification, self-regulation, and exposure), which in turn are associated with positive health outcomes. Despite preliminary support for this model, extant studies testing this model have not examined distinct facets of mindfulness. The present study used a multidimensional measure of mindfulness to examine whether this model could account for the associations between ive facets of mindfulness and psychological symptoms (depressive symptoms, stress, anxiety symptoms, alcohol-related problems) in a sample of college students (N = 944). Our findings partially support this model. We found significant double-mediated associations in the expected directions for all outcomes (stress, anxiety symptoms, and depressive symptoms) except alcohol-related problems, and for each of the facets of mindfulness except observing. However, decentering and the specific mechanisms did not fully mediate the associations among mindfulness facets and psychological health outcomes. Experimental and ecological momentary assessment designs are needed to understand the psychological processes that account for the beneficial effects of mindfulness. PMID:26504498

  3. ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES IN APPLICATION SCORING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Rogers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of psychological variables and scales suggested by Economic Psychology in predicting individuals’ default. Therefore, a sample of 555 individuals completed a self-completion questionnaire, which was composed of psychological variables and scales. By adopting the methodology of the logistic regression, the following psychological and behavioral characteristics were found associated with the group of individuals in default: a negative dimensions related to money (suffering, inequality and conflict; b high scores on the self-efficacy scale, probably indicating a greater degree of optimism and over-confidence; c buyers classified as compulsive; d individuals who consider it necessary to give gifts to children and friends on special dates, even though many people consider this a luxury; e problems of self-control identified by individuals who drink an average of more than four glasses of alcoholic beverage a day.

  4. A psychological cascade model for persisting voice problems in teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, FICRS; Cornelis, BE; Wuyts, FL; Kooijman, PGC; Schutte, HK; Oudes, MJ; Graamans, K

    2003-01-01

    In 76 teachers with persisting voice problems, the maintaining factors and coping strategies were examined. Physical, functional, psychological and socioeconomic factors were assessed. A parallel was drawn to a psychological cascade model designed for patients with chronic back pain. The majority of

  5. A psychological cascade model for persisting voice problems in teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, FICRS; Cornelis, BE; Wuyts, FL; Kooijman, PGC; Schutte, HK; Oudes, MJ; Graamans, K

    2003-01-01

    In 76 teachers with persisting voice problems, the maintaining factors and coping strategies were examined. Physical, functional, psychological and socioeconomic factors were assessed. A parallel was drawn to a psychological cascade model designed for patients with chronic back pain. The majority of

  6. Towards a Model of Language Attrition: Neurobiological and Psychological Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitomi, Asako

    1992-01-01

    Research in L2 attrition is a relatively new enterprise which is in need of a comprehensive theory/model. This paper presents a tentative cognitive-psychological model of language attrition, which draws on information from studies in L2 attrition, neurobiology, and psychology. This is to demonstrate that a model based on consideration of the brain has the potential of providing a plausible account of the process of language attrition, as well as the process of language acquisition.

  7. Using a topological model in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mammen, Jens Skaun

    2016-01-01

    in this world encountering, selecting, and attaching to objects beyond our sensory interactions and in this way also relating to the individual objects’ history. This duality is necessary if we shall understand man as relating to the historical depth of our natural and cultural world, and to understand our...... the gap between psychology as part of Naturwissenschaft and of Geisteswissenschaft, and at the same time establish a common frame for understanding cognition and affection, and our practical and cultural life (Mammen and Mironenko 2015). The duality of sense and choice categories can be described formally...... are bridging psychology and mathematics and not only enriching psychology but also opening for a new interpretation of parts of the foundation of mathematics and logic....

  8. Multilevel modeling: overview and applications to research in counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeffrey H

    2011-04-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is rapidly becoming the standard method of analyzing nested data, for example, data from students within multiple schools, data on multiple clients seen by a smaller number of therapists, and even longitudinal data. Although MLM analyses are likely to increase in frequency in counseling psychology research, many readers of counseling psychology journals have had only limited exposure to MLM concepts. This paper provides an overview of MLM that blends mathematical concepts with examples drawn from counseling psychology. This tutorial is intended to be a first step in learning about MLM; readers are referred to other sources for more advanced explorations of MLM. In addition to being a tutorial for understanding and perhaps even conducting MLM analyses, this paper reviews recent research in counseling psychology that has adopted a multilevel framework, and it provides ideas for MLM approaches to future research in counseling psychology.

  9. A conceptual overview of a proactive health psychology service: the Tripler Health Psychology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Porter, R I; Kellar, M A

    1999-06-01

    The military patient population, the demanding environment in which medical services are provided, and the rigors of the operational environment create a unique challenge for service members as well as military health care providers. Within the military medical system, the subspecialty of clinical health psychology may provide patient care and consultation interventions necessary to meet the demands of the unique Army medical and military communities. As funding and other resources decrease, military health psychologists can provide high-quality care to difficult-to-manage patients while increasing outcome efficacy and decreasing costs to the hospital. This paper provides a definition of clinical health psychology and a description of its unique interventions and applications and how these unique skills augment medical services. Moreover, we offer a conceptual model for an innovative health psychology program that will assist other military treatment facilities in designing programs to increase outcome efficacy and concurrently reduce costs and utilization of services.

  10. Bayesian structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenling, Andreas; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban; Lindwall, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Bayesian statistics is on the rise in mainstream psychology, but applications in sport and exercise psychology research are scarce. In this article, the foundations of Bayesian analysis are introduced, and we will illustrate how to apply Bayesian structural equation modeling in a sport and exercise psychology setting. More specifically, we contrasted a confirmatory factor analysis on the Sport Motivation Scale II estimated with the most commonly used estimator, maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian approach with weakly informative priors for cross-loadings and correlated residuals. The results indicated that the model with Bayesian estimation and weakly informative priors provided a good fit to the data, whereas the model estimated with a maximum likelihood estimator did not produce a well-fitting model. The reasons for this discrepancy between maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation are discussed as well as potential advantages and caveats with the Bayesian approach.

  11. Framework of Pattern Recognition Model Based on the Cognitive Psychology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to the fundamental theory of visual cognition mechanism and cognitive psychology,the visual pattern recognition model is introduced briefly.Three pattern recognition models,i.e.template-based matching model,prototype-based matching model and feature-based matching model are built and discussed separately.In addition,the influence of object background information and visual focus point to the result of pattern recognition is also discussed with the example of recognition for fuzzy letters and figures.

  12. Queuing Network Modeling of the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changxu; Liu, Yili

    2008-01-01

    The psychological refractory period (PRP) is a basic but important form of dual-task information processing. Existing serial or parallel processing models of PRP have successfully accounted for a variety of PRP phenomena; however, each also encounters at least 1 experimental counterexample to its predictions or modeling mechanisms. This article…

  13. A model of psychological resilience for the Netherlands Armed Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Venrooij, W.; Berg, C. van den

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, a model of psychological resilience was developed for the Netherlands Armed Forces and a number of important relations were tested using a longitudinal design. The model of resilience was based on a systematic literature review of resilience in high-risk professions and intervi

  14. Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  15. Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Susan; Fouad, Nadya; Kagan, Jerome; Kosslyn, Stephen; Posner, Michael; Sternburg, Robert; Driscoll, Marcy; Ge, Xun; Parrish, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of psychology were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Susan Blackmore, Nadya Fouad, Jerome Kagan, Stephen Kosslyn, Michael Posner, and Robert Sternberg.…

  16. Mixture Modeling: Applications in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2016-01-01

    Model-based clustering methods, commonly referred to as finite mixture modeling, have been applied to a wide variety of cross-sectional and longitudinal data to account for heterogeneity in population characteristics. In this article, we elucidate 2 such approaches: growth mixture modeling and latent profile analysis. Both techniques are…

  17. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. A Model for a Doctor of Psychology Program in Forensic Psychology: Curriculum and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, C. Abraham; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and courses of a doctoral program in forensic psychology is provided. Forensic psychology is the application of psychological methods, principles, and skills to the relevant needs of the legal system. (DE)

  19. A Model and a Metalanguage for Research on Psychological Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A model of two-person interaction in psychological counseling, which is derived from Alfred Schutz's phenomenological theory of social relations, and a computer-assisted metalanguage based on case-grammar theory are presented, and their applicability to the analysis of natural language in counseling is argued. (Author)

  20. Trauma and Victimization: A Model of Psychological Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, I. Lisa; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Synthesizes theoretical and empirical findings about psychological responses to traumatization across survivors of rape, childhood sexual or physical abuse, domestic violence, crime, disasters, and the Vietnam War. Describes five major categories of response and presents new theoretical model for understanding individual variations in victim…

  1. A Constructive Neural-Network Approach to Modeling Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a particular computational modeling approach to the study of psychological development--that of constructive neural networks. This approach is applied to a variety of developmental domains and issues, including Piagetian tasks, shift learning, language acquisition, number comparison, habituation of visual attention, concept…

  2. Multilevel Modeling: Overview and Applications to Research in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is rapidly becoming the standard method of analyzing nested data, for example, data from students within multiple schools, data on multiple clients seen by a smaller number of therapists, and even longitudinal data. Although MLM analyses are likely to increase in frequency in counseling psychology research, many readers…

  3. Multilevel Modeling: Overview and Applications to Research in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is rapidly becoming the standard method of analyzing nested data, for example, data from students within multiple schools, data on multiple clients seen by a smaller number of therapists, and even longitudinal data. Although MLM analyses are likely to increase in frequency in counseling psychology research, many readers…

  4. A Constructive Neural-Network Approach to Modeling Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a particular computational modeling approach to the study of psychological development--that of constructive neural networks. This approach is applied to a variety of developmental domains and issues, including Piagetian tasks, shift learning, language acquisition, number comparison, habituation of visual attention, concept…

  5. A generalized item response tree model for psychological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Minjeong; De Boeck, Paul

    2016-09-01

    A new item response theory (IRT) model with a tree structure has been introduced for modeling item response processes with a tree structure. In this paper, we present a generalized item response tree model with a flexible parametric form, dimensionality, and choice of covariates. The utilities of the model are demonstrated with two applications in psychological assessments for investigating Likert scale item responses and for modeling omitted item responses. The proposed model is estimated with the freely available R package flirt (Jeon et al., 2014b).

  6. A model of psychological adaptation to migration and resettlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, K J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the implications of migration for emotional status over time. Analysis of interview data provided by 25 Polish immigrants, who resided in the United States ranging from 4 months to 39 years, allowed the construction of a model describing migrants' psychological adaptation. Loss and disruption, novelty, occupational adjustment, language accommodation, and subordination were described as predominant aspects of migration and resettlement. Psychological adaptation required the dual task of resolving grief over losses and disruption involved with leaving Poland and of mastering resettlement conditions associated with novelty, occupation, language, and subordination. The model provides assessment parameters and direction for intervening with migrants who are distressed. The model may also be generalized to other types of life change as well.

  7. Integrating psychological research on girls with feminist activism: a model for building a liberation psychology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathryn E; Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S; Lyons, Aoife L

    2003-03-01

    A liberation psychology is needed to bridge the gap between psychology's focus on individual distress and broad social forces that foster such distress. We offer a model for bridging this gap by focusing on a specific area of psychology (psychological research on girls) and a specific social movement (feminist activism). Psychological research on girls and feminist activism share the common goal of improving the lives of girls and women. However, both have fallen short of this goal. This is due, in part, to the weaknesses associated with each endeavor and to the fact that the complementary strengths of each have remained isolated from the other. In this paper, we propose a common language and shared framework to integrate psychological research with feminist activism. First, we review the basic strengths and weaknesses associated with psychological research and feminist activism, with a particular focus on how they are distinct from one another. Second, we provide a taxonomic framework for integrating these two areas on the basis of the stress paradigm, with specific examples provided from our recent reviews of the literature and our own empirical work with adolescent girls. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future work needed to integrate psychological research on girls with feminist activism toward the goal of building a liberation psychology in the United States.

  8. Motorcycle accidents, rider behaviour, and psychological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo; Doğruyol, Burak; Yıldırım, Zümrüt; Çoymak, Ahmet

    2012-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (a) investigate the factor structure of the Motorcycle Rider Behaviour Questionnaire (MRBQ) [Elliott, M.A., Baughan, B.J., Sexton, B.F., 2007. Errors and violations in relation to motorcyclists' crash risk. Accident Analysis and Prevention 39, 491-499] in among Turkish riders, and (b) study the relationships between different types of rider behaviour and motorcyclists' active and passive accidents and offences, and (c) investigate the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Health Belief Model (HBM), and Locus of Control (T-LOC) in explaining rider behaviours. MRBQ was administered to a sample of motorcyclists (N=451). Principal components analysis yielded a 5-factor solution including traffic errors, control errors, speed violations, performance of stunts, and use of safety equipment. Annual mileage was related to higher number of active and passive accidents and offences whereas age was related to lower number of active and passive accidents. Stunts were the main predictors of active accidents and offences. Speeding violations predicted offences. Stunts and speeding violations were associated with the fate factor of the T-LOC, and with attitudes, subjective norms, and intention components of TPB, and cues to action and perceived severity components of the HBM. Use of safety equipment was related to the high level of perceived behavioural control and intention components of the TPB, the low score of perceived barriers component of the HBM, and the low fate factor of the T-LOC. While traffic errors were associated with the high score of perceived barriers and cues to action component of the HBM, control errors were related to the high score of vehicle and environment factor of the T-LOC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Counseling Psychology's Positive Psychological Agenda: A Model for Integration and Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, P. Alex

    2006-01-01

    Each of the Major Contribution's articles has traced counseling psychology's rich positive heritage. This reaction assesses this heritage in relation to positive psychology and considers the fundamental question of "To whose agenda are we working?" as psychological practitioners, locating the answer within the impact it has on our practice. The…

  10. Diffusion models in experimental psychology: a practical introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Andreas; Nagler, Markus; Lerche, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic diffusion models (Ratcliff, 1978) can be used to analyze response time data from binary decision tasks. They provide detailed information about cognitive processes underlying the performance in such tasks. Most importantly, different parameters are estimated from the response time distributions of correct responses and errors that map (1) the speed of information uptake, (2) the amount of information used to make a decision, (3) possible decision biases, and (4) the duration of nondecisional processes. Although this kind of model can be applied to many experimental paradigms and provides much more insight than the analysis of mean response times can, it is still rarely used in cognitive psychology. In the present paper, we provide comprehensive information on the theory of the diffusion model, as well as on practical issues that have to be considered for implementing the model.

  11. Psychological implications of outdoor adventure model of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is a synthetic analysis of the Outdoor Adventure Education model in the context of three elementary components: the environment – in relation to the theory of space from the perspective of sociological and pedagogical theory of space; personal perspective and growth as well as social development – in relation to psychological phenomena that accompany the individual and group involved in the process of Outdoor Adventure Education. The aim is to present how these processes determine the effects of education and what personalities’ elements are involved.

  12. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eLehne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life. The omnipresence of tension experiences suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying experiences of tension. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena.

  13. Can Psychological Expectation Models Be Adapted for Placebo Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Winfried; Petrie, Keith J

    2016-01-01

    Placebo responses contribute substantially to the effect and clinical outcome of medical treatments. Patients' expectations have been identified as one of the major mechanisms contributing to placebo effects. However, to date a general theoretical framework to better understand how patient expectations interact with features of medical treatment has not been developed. In this paper we outline an expectation model that can be used as framework for experimental studies on both placebo and nocebo mechanisms. This model is based on psychological concepts of expectation development, expectation maintenance, and expectation change within the typical paradigms used in placebo research. This theoretical framework reflects the dynamic aspects of the interaction between expectations and medical treatment, and offers a platform to combine psychological and neurophysiological research activities. Moreover, this model can be used to identify important future research questions. For example, we argue that the dynamic processes of expectation maintenance vs. expectation changes are not sufficiently addressed in current research on placebo mechanisms. Therefore, the question about how to change and optimize patients' expectations prior to treatment should be a special focus of future clinical research.

  14. Global Dynamics of Avian Influenza Epidemic Models with Psychological Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and China after the outbreaks of the avian influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 viruses show a high degree of awareness of human avian influenza in both urban and rural populations, a higher level of proper hygienic practice among urban residents, and in particular a dramatically reduced number of visits to live markets in urban population after the influenza A H7N9 outbreak in China in 2013. In this paper, taking into account the psychological effect toward avian influenza in the human population, a bird-to-human transmission model in which the avian population exhibits saturation effect is constructed. The dynamical behavior of the model is studied by using the basic reproduction number. The results demonstrate that the saturation effect within avian population and the psychological effect in human population cannot change the stability of equilibria but can affect the number of infected humans if the disease is prevalent. Numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results and sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number in terms of model parameters that are performed to seek for effective control measures for avian influenza.

  15. Application of Z-Number Based Modeling in Psychological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Aliev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilates exercises have been shown beneficial impact on physical, physiological, and mental characteristics of human beings. In this paper, Z-number based fuzzy approach is applied for modeling the effect of Pilates exercises on motivation, attention, anxiety, and educational achievement. The measuring of psychological parameters is performed using internationally recognized instruments: Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, Test of Attention (D2 Test, and Spielberger’s Anxiety Test completed by students. The GPA of students was used as the measure of educational achievement. Application of Z-information modeling allows us to increase precision and reliability of data processing results in the presence of uncertainty of input data created from completed questionnaires. The basic steps of Z-number based modeling with numerical solutions are presented.

  16. Understanding Social-Force Model in Psychological Principles of Collective Behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    To well understand crowd behavior, microscopic models have been developed in recent decades, in which an individual's behavioral/psychological status can be modeled and simulated. A well-known model is the social-force model innovated by physical scientists. This model has been widely accepted and mainly used in simulation of mass evacuation in the past decade. A problem, however, is that the testing results of the model were not explained in consistency with the social-psychological findings, resulting in misunderstanding of the model by social-psychologists. This paper will bridge the gap between psychological studies and physical explanation about this model. We interpret this physics-based model from a psychological perspective, clarifying that the model is consistent with psychological studies on stress and time-pressure. The simulation result of this model actually explicates how stress could improve or impair collective performance of crowd behaviors.

  17. Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counseling Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and as discussed in the Guidelines and…

  18. Multilevel Autoregressive Modeling in Psychology: Snags and Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Psychological processes are of interest in all areas of psychology, and all such processes occur within individuals over time. Some examples of psychological processes are the regulation of daily mood, the effect of job motivation on job performance and vice versa, or social interactions between a p

  19. Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counseling Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Respect for diversity and for values different from one's own is a central value of counseling psychology training programs. The valuing of diversity is also consistent with the profession of psychology as mandated by the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and as discussed in the Guidelines and…

  20. Applying the cube model to pediatric psychology: development of research competency skills at the doctoral level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan-Swain, Avi; Hankins, Shirley L; Gilliam, Margaux Barnes; Ross, Kelly; Reynolds, Nina; Milby, Jesse; Schwebel, David C

    2012-03-01

    This article considers the development of research competencies in professional psychology and how that movement might be applied to training in pediatric psychology. The field of pediatric psychology has a short but rich history, and experts have identified critical competencies. However, pediatric psychology has not yet detailed a set of research-based competencies. This article initially reviews the competency initiative in professional psychology, including the cube model as it relates to research training. Next, we review and adapt the knowledge-based/foundational and applied/functional research competencies proposed by health psychology into a cube model for pediatric psychology. We focus especially on graduate-level training but allude to its application throughout professional development. We present the cube model as it is currently being applied to the development of a systematic research competency evaluation for graduate training at our medical/clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Based on the review and synthesis of the literature on research competency in professional psychology we propose future initiatives to develop these competencies for the field of pediatric psychology. The cube model can be successfully applied to the development of research training competencies in pediatric psychology. Future research should address the development, implementation, and assessment of the research competencies for training and career development of future pediatric psychologists.

  1. Supervision in School Psychology: The Developmental/Ecological/Problem-Solving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dennis J.; Cruise, Tracy K.; Huber, Brenda J.; Swerdlik, Mark E.; Newman, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective supervision models guide the supervisory relationship and supervisory tasks leading to reflective and purposeful practice. The Developmental/Ecological/Problem-Solving (DEP) Model provides a contemporary framework for supervision specific to school psychology. Designed for the school psychology internship, the DEP Model is also…

  2. Associations between psychological variables and pain in experimental pain models. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M S; Horjales-Araujo, E; Dahl, J B

    2015-10-01

    The association between pain and psychological characteristics has been widely debated. Thus, it remains unclear whether an individual's psychological profile influences a particular pain experience, or if previous pain experience contributes to a certain psychological profile. Translational studies performed in healthy volunteers may provide knowledge concerning psychological factors in healthy individuals as well as basic pain physiology. The aim of this review was to investigate whether psychological vulnerability or specific psychological variables in healthy volunteers are predictive of the level of pain following experimental pain models. A systematic search on the databases, PubMed, Embase, Cochcrane library, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed during September 2014. All trials investigating the association between psychological variables and experimental pain in healthy volunteers were considered for inclusion. Twenty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 2637 healthy volunteers. The included trials investigated a total of 45 different psychological tests and 27 different types of pain models. The retrieved trials did not present a sufficiently homogenous group to perform meta-analysis. The collected results were diverse. A total of 16 trials suggested that psychological factors may predict the level of pain, seven studies found divergent results, and six studies found no significant association between psychological variables and experimental pain. Psychological factors may have predictive value when investigating experimental pain. However, due to substantial heterogeneity and methodological shortcomings of the published literature, firm conclusions are not possible. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A conceptual model of psychological contracts in construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Ke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The strategic importance of relationship style contracting is recognised in the construction industry. Both public and private sector clients are stipulating more integrated and collaborative forms of procurement. Despite relationship and integrated contractual arrangement being available for some time, it is clear that construction firms have been slow to adopt them. Hence it is timely to examine how social exchanges, via unwritten agreement and behaviours, are being nurtured in construction projects. This paper adopted the concept of Psychological Contracts (PC to describe unwritten agreement and behaviours. A conceptual model of the PC is developed and validated using the results from a questionnaire survey administered to construction professionals in Australia. The results uncovered the relationships that existed amongst relational conditions and relational benefits, the PC and the partners’ satisfaction. The results show that all the hypotheses in the conceptual model of the PC are supported, suggesting the PC model is important and may have an effect on project performance and relationship quality among contracting parties. A validated model of the PC in construction was then developed based on the correlations among each component. The managerial implications are that past relationships and relationship characteristics should be taken into account in the selection of procurement partners and the promise of future resources, support and tangible relational outcomes are also vital. It is important for contracting parties to pay attention to unwritten agreements (the PC and behaviours when managing construction projects.

  4. A Preventative Model of School Consultation: Incorporating Perspectives from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Little, K. Angeleque; Little, Steven G.; Delligatti, Nina

    2004-01-01

    Using the principles of mental health and behavioral consultation, combined with concepts from positive psychology, this paper generates a new preventative model of school consultation. This model has two steps: (1) the school psychologist aids the teacher in the development and use of his/her personal positive psychology (e.g., optimism,…

  5. Biographies of Eminent Women in Psychology: Models for Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Laurel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    In order to recognize women's contributions to the field of psychology, biographies of Margaret Floy Washburn, Mary Cover Jones, Karen Horney, Susan Grey, Edna Heidbreder, Ann Roe, and Mary Whitton Calkins are presented. (BEF)

  6. Associations between psychological variables and pain in experimental pain models. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M S; Horjales-Araujo, E; Dahl, J B

    2015-01-01

    . Translational studies performed in healthy volunteers may provide knowledge concerning psychological factors in healthy individuals as well as basic pain physiology. The aim of this review was to investigate whether psychological vulnerability or specific psychological variables in healthy volunteers...... are predictive of the level of pain following experimental pain models. METHODS: A systematic search on the databases, PubMed, Embase, Cochcrane library, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed during September 2014. All trials investigating the association between psychological variables and experimental pain...... a sufficiently homogenous group to perform meta-analysis. The collected results were diverse. A total of 16 trials suggested that psychological factors may predict the level of pain, seven studies found divergent results, and six studies found no significant association between psychological variables...

  7. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas.

  8. Multicultural Grand Rounds: Competency-Based Training Model for Clinical Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Shana D.; Warholic, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing students to enter the field of psychology as competent professionals requires that multicultural practices be infused into all areas of training. This article describes how the Grand Rounds model was adapted to a graduate clinical psychology training program to foster applied learning in multicultural competence. This extension of Grand…

  9. Application of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity to the Admission Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Michael I.; Juntunen, Cindy L.; Duan, Changming

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the responsibility of counseling psychology programs to communicate and implement the professional training values regarding diversity as articulated in the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") clearly and directly in the advertising and admission…

  10. Simple Quantum Model of Learning Explains the Yerkes-Dodson Law in Psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Vol, E D

    2012-01-01

    We propose the simple model of learning based on which we derive and explain the Yerkes-Dodson law - one of the oldest laws of experimental psychology. The approach uses some ideas of quantum theory of open systems (QTOS) and develops the method of statistical description of psychological systems that was proposed by author earlier.

  11. Application of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity to the Admission Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Michael I.; Juntunen, Cindy L.; Duan, Changming

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the responsibility of counseling psychology programs to communicate and implement the professional training values regarding diversity as articulated in the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") clearly and directly in the advertising and admission…

  12. Applying the Team Identification-Social Psychological Health Model to Older Sport Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann, Daniel L.; Rogers, Kelly; Dooley, Keith; Foley, Mary

    2011-01-01

    According to the Team Identification-Social Psychological Health Model (Wann, 2006b), team identification and social psychological health should be positively correlated because identification leads to important social connections which, in turn, facilitate well-being. Although past research substantiates the hypothesized positive relationship…

  13. Multicultural Grand Rounds: Competency-Based Training Model for Clinical Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Shana D.; Warholic, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing students to enter the field of psychology as competent professionals requires that multicultural practices be infused into all areas of training. This article describes how the Grand Rounds model was adapted to a graduate clinical psychology training program to foster applied learning in multicultural competence. This extension of Grand…

  14. Parental Support, Coping Strategies, and Psychological Adjustment: An Integrative Model with Late Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Charles J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    An integrative predictive model was applied to responses of 241 college freshmen to examine interrelationships among parental support, adaptive coping strategies, and psychological adjustment. Social support from both parents and a nonconflictual parental relationship were positively associated with adolescents' psychological adjustment. (SLD)

  15. A new psychological intervention: "512 Psychological Intervention Model" used for military rescuers in Wenchuan Earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengjun; Zhu, Xia; Zhang, Yinling; Liang, Jie; Liu, Xufeng; Yang, Yebing; Yang, Hai; Miao, Danmin

    2012-07-01

    We sought to compare the efficacy of the "512 Psychological Intervention Model" (that is, "512 PIM", a new psychological intervention) with debriefing on symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression of Chinese military rescuers in relation to a control group that had no intervention. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with 2,368 military rescuers 1 month after this event and then at follow-up 1, 2 and 4 months later to evaluate changes in symptoms of PTSD, anxiety and depression based on DSM-IV criteria, respectively. Baseline analysis suggested no significant differences between the study groups. Severity of PTSD, anxiety and depression decreased over time in all three groups, with significant differences between the groups in symptoms of PTSD (P military rescuers in reducing symptoms of PTSD, anxiety and depression after a crisis.

  16. An application of Huber model on the effect of psychological empowerment of employees on organizational learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdie Mirzaiefar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this descriptive–survey study is to determine the effect of psychological empowerment of employees on organizational learning based on Huber model. The study selects a sample of 54 people randomly from 499 regular employees of a Gas distribution firm located in province of Lorestan, Iran. For collecting data, two questionnaires of Huber organizational learning and psychological empowerment based on Spreitzer (1995 model [Spreitzer, G. M. (1995. Psychological empowerment in the workplace: Dimensions, measurement, and validation. Academy of management Journal, 38(5, 1442-1465.] are used. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of organizational and psychological empowerment questionnaires are 0.706 and 0.92, respectively. SPSS software and linear regression test, binomial test, Pearson correlation test, and Friedman tests are used to analyze data and examine the hypotheses. The results of the data analysis show that psychological empowerment of employees could influence on organizational learning aspects in organization, significantly.

  17. A model of real estate and psychological factors in decision-making to buy real estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Grum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the psychological characteristics of potential real estate buyers connected with their decision to buy. Through a review of research, it reveals that most studies of psychological factors in the decision to buy real estate have a partial and dispersed orientation, and examine individual factors independently. It appears that the research area is lacking clearly defined models of psychological factors in the decision to buy real estate that would integrally and relationally explain the role of psychological characteristics of real estate buyers and their expectations in relation to a decision to buy. The article identifies two sets of psychological factors, motivational and emotional, determines their interaction with potential buyers’ expectations when deciding to purchase real estate and offers starting points for forming a model.

  18. Neighborhood disorder, sleep quality, and psychological distress: testing a model of structural amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Terrence D; Burdette, Amy M; Hale, Lauren

    2009-12-01

    Using data from the 2004 Survey of Texas Adults (n=1504), we examine the association between perceived neighborhood disorder and psychological distress. Building on previous research, we test whether the effect of neighborhood disorder is mediated and moderated by sleep quality. Our specific analytic strategy follows a two-stage theoretical model of structural amplification. In the first stage, perceptions of neighborhood disorder increase psychological distress indirectly by reducing sleep quality. In the second stage, the effect of neighborhood disorder on psychological distress is amplified by poor sleep quality. The results of our analyses are generally consistent with our theoretical model. We find that neighborhood disorder is associated with poorer sleep quality and greater psychological distress. We also observe that the positive association between neighborhood disorder and psychological distress is mediated (partially) and moderated (amplified) by poor sleep quality.

  19. A pragmatic basis for judging models and theories in health psychology: the axiomatic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedslund, G

    2000-03-01

    Psychology and its subfield of health psychology suffer from a lack of standardized terminology and a unified theoretical framework for the prediction and explanation of health behaviour. Hence, it is difficult to establish whether a given theory is logically consistent and to compare different theories. Science involves both empirical and conceptual issues. It is asserted that psychology has overemphasized the former and underemphasized the latter. Empirical psychology needs an explicit, shared conceptual system in order to develop its theories. An example of an axiomatic method (Psycho-Logic; see e.g. J. Smedslund.Psychological Inquiry 1991a; 2: 325-338) is applied to show how the Health Belief Model,the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Social Cognitive Theory all conform to the a priori conditions of acting. One implication is that studies of the predictive power of theories stated as definitional truths only assess auxiliary hypotheses, i.e. the extent to which the measuring instruments are reliable and valid. On the other hand, the introduction of logic into health psychology can facilitate genuine empirical studies by helping to avoid so-called 'pseudoempirical' work (Smedslund, J. In Smith, Harré & Van Langenhove (Eds.) Rethinking psychology, 1995). Systems such as Psycho-Logic can also enhance conceptual integration by using logic to explicate and demonstrate intuitive relations. Implications for practitioners are discussed briefly.

  20. The role of psychological inflexibility in Beck's cognitive model of depression in a sample of undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ruiz

    Full Text Available Beck's cognitive model of depression proposes that depressogenic schemas have an effect on depressive symptoms by increasing the frequency of negative automatic thoughts in response to negative life events. We aimed to test a moderated, serial mediation model where psychological inflexibility, a core concept of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT model of psychopathology, both mediates and moderates the relationship between depressogenic schemas and the frequency of negative automatic thoughts. A cross-sectional design was used in which 210 undergraduates responded to questionnaires assessing the constructs of interest. Results supported the proposed moderated mediation model. Both psychological inflexibility and negative automatic thoughts were significant mediators of the relationship between depressogenic schemas and depressive symptoms, and psychological inflexibility also moderated the effect of depressogenic schemas on negative automatic thoughts. We conclude that the role of psychological inflexibility in the cognitive model of depression deserves more attention.

  1. Studying the existence and attributes of consensus on psychological concepts by a cognitive psychological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oravecz, Zita; Faust, Katherine; Batchelder, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Psychological research can take a variety of directions while building on theoretical concepts that are commonly shared among the population of researchers. We investigate the question of how agreement or consensus on basic scientific concepts can be measured. Our approach to the problem is based...... on a state-of-the-art cognitive psychometric technique, implemented in the theoretical framework of Cultural Consensus Theory (CCT). With this approach, consensus-based answers for questions exploring shared knowledge can be derived while basic factors of the human decision making process are accounted for...... of the individual, and is typically not a developmental change." The general goal of the paper is to demonstrate the utility of the CCT based approach as a method for investigating what current, working definitions of scientific concepts are....

  2. Research Models of the Future for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Gerald V.

    This paper presents three different aspects of research in industrial and organizational psychology. First, characteristics of major advances in science, and in the social and behavioral sciences are given, including: (1) team research is more common for major advances; and (2) young men under 35 are responsible for many major contributions.…

  3. Automan : A psychologically based model of a human driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quispel, L; Warris, S; Heemskerk, A; Mulder, LJM; van Wolffelaar, PC; Maarse, FJ; Akkerman, AE; Brand, AN; Mulder, LJM

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an autonomous agent for controlling vehicles in a traffic simulator. This agent is based on recent developments in artificial intelligence, autonomous robotics and cognitive psychology. The goal of the agent is to simulate realistic driving behavior. The agent is c

  4. Automan : A psychologically based model of a human driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quispel, L; Warris, S; Heemskerk, A; Mulder, LJM; van Wolffelaar, PC; Maarse, FJ; Akkerman, AE; Brand, AN; Mulder, LJM

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an autonomous agent for controlling vehicles in a traffic simulator. This agent is based on recent developments in artificial intelligence, autonomous robotics and cognitive psychology. The goal of the agent is to simulate realistic driving behavior. The agent is c

  5. A THEORETICAL MODEL OF SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL SUPPORT WORK PROCESSES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PRODUCTION TEAM

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana Gennadevna Pronyushkina

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the management of production team, in particular the developed theoretical model of socio-psychological support work processes for management of production team. The author of the research are formulated the purpose and objectives of social-psychological work on management of the production team. Developed in the study a theoretical model aimed at determining the conditions and the identification of features of effective management of the enterprise taking into account ...

  6. The psychological disengagement model among women in science, engineering, and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Ann M; Tougas, Francine; Rinfret, Natalie; Monger, Tanya

    2015-09-01

    Psychological responses to personal relative deprivation based on self/outgroup comparisons (named self/outgroup PRD) were explored among women in science, engineering, and technology according to the Psychological Disengagement Model. Three studies revealed that the experience of self/outgroup PRD increased women's likelihood of discounting the feedback they received at work. In turn, discounting led them to devalue their profession. Each study further documented the damaging effect of both psychological disengagement mechanisms. Study 1 (N = 93) revealed that discounting and devaluing were associated with decreased self-esteem. These results were replicated in Studies 2 and 3. Study 2 (N = 163) demonstrated that discounting and devaluing were also associated with reduced self-esteem stability. Study 3 (N = 187) further showed that psychological disengagement was also associated with women's occupational commitment. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are considered. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Distinguishing Mediational Models and Analyses in Clinical Psychology: Atemporal Associations Do Not Imply Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, E Samuel; Cervone, Daniel; Bryant, Jessica; McKinney, Cliff; Liu, Richard T; Nadorff, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    A popular way to attempt to discern causality in clinical psychology is through mediation analysis. However, mediation analysis is sometimes applied to research questions in clinical psychology when inferring causality is impossible. This practice may soon increase with new, readily available, and easy-to-use statistical advances. Thus, we here provide a heuristic to remind clinical psychological scientists of the assumptions of mediation analyses. We describe recent statistical advances and unpack assumptions of causality in mediation, underscoring the importance of time in understanding mediational hypotheses and analyses in clinical psychology. Example analyses demonstrate that statistical mediation can occur despite theoretical mediation being improbable. We propose a delineation of mediational effects derived from cross-sectional designs into the terms temporal and atemporal associations to emphasize time in conceptualizing process models in clinical psychology. The general implications for mediational hypotheses and the temporal frameworks from within which they may be drawn are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Psychological resilience, pain catastrophizing, and positive emotions: perspectives on comprehensive modeling of individual pain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a complex construct that contributes to profound physical and psychological dysfunction, particularly in individuals coping with chronic pain. The current paper builds upon previous research, describes a balanced conceptual model that integrates aspects of both psychological vulnerability and resilience to pain, and reviews protective and exacerbating psychosocial factors to the process of adaptation to chronic pain, including pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and positive psychological resources predictive of enhanced pain coping. The current paper identifies future directions for research that will further enrich the understanding of pain adaptation and espouses an approach that will enhance the ecological validity of psychological pain coping models, including introduction of advanced statistical and conceptual models that integrate behavioral, cognitive, information processing, motivational and affective theories of pain.

  9. The Role of Wellbeing and Wellness: A Positive Psychological Model in Supporting Young People With ASCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years sport psychology expanded its applicability in a variety of fields which have helped to address some of the challenges related to high level performance and sport competition. When we talk about performance in its wider sense, sport psychology is able to help develop a better understanding on how strategies can be adopted in improving general human performance levels. This includes increasing the knowledge of key concepts such as motivation, self-confidence and resilience. Furthermore performance in its wider sense helps in the understanding of the impact of stress and arousal and how these can affect both positively and negatively performance levels including appreciating individual differences as well as dynamics between groups of individuals. In this paper performance rather than solely be related to the field of competitive or professional sport has been discussed in people with ASCs and aims to explore how by adopting a positive psychological model in the formulation of individual assessments and subsequent interventions have led to improvement in individual skills, participation, engagement and ultimately quality of life. Positive psychological principles, such as the role of wellbeing and wellness, the PERMA Model has increased our understanding of human potentials, performance and wellbeing. The aim of this paper is to present and reflect on the applicability and benefits of adopting sport psychology models, the PERMA model and positive psychological principles in special education and care settings with the presentation and discussion of their theoretical and some practical implementation in two case studies.

  10. Impact of structural and psychological empowerment on job strain in nursing work settings: expanding Kanter's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, H K; Finegan, J; Shamian, J; Wilk, P

    2001-05-01

    In this study, we tested an expanded model of Kanter's structural empowerment, which specified the relationships among structural and psychological empowerment, job strain, and work satisfaction. Strategies proposed in Kanter's empowerment theory have the potential to reduce job strain and improve employee work satisfaction and performance in current restructured healthcare settings. The addition to the model of psychological empowerment as an outcome of structural empowerment provides an understanding of the intervening mechanisms between structural work conditions and important organizational outcomes. A predictive, nonexperimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 404 Canadian staff nurses. The Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire, the Psychological Empowerment Questionnaire, the Job Content Questionnaire, and the Global Satisfaction Scale were used to measure the major study variables. Structural equation modelling analyses revealed a good fit of the hypothesized model to the data based on various fit indices (chi 2 = 1140, df = 545, chi 2/df ratio = 2.09, CFI = 0.986, RMSEA = 0.050). The amount of variance accounted for in the model was 58%. Staff nurses felt that structural empowerment in their workplace resulted in higher levels of psychological empowerment. These heightened feelings of psychological empowerment in turn strongly influenced job strain and work satisfaction. However, job strain did not have a direct effect on work satisfaction. These results provide initial support for an expanded model of organizational empowerment and offer a broader understanding of the empowerment process.

  11. A Scientist-Practitioner Model of Psychological Assessment: Implications for Training, Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Paul M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Proposes a prototypical model for psychological assessment that reformulates a model of the counselor-as-scientist. Integrates the model's theory and research on human inference, judgment, and decision making; research on threats to accurate clinical prediction; and findings about counselor characteristics associated with effective judgment…

  12. Toward an integrated, causal, and psychological model of climato-economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, Steve; Bratanova, Boyka; Kuppens, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Van de Vliert puts forward a model of how climate and economics interact to shape human needs, stresses, and freedoms. Although we applaud the construction of this model, we suggest that more needs to be done. Specifically, by adopting a multi-level and experimental approach, we can develop an integrated, causal, and psychological model of climato-economics.

  13. A model for the effects of psychological pricing in Gabor-Granger price studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M; Leeflang, PSH

    We present a model of consumers' price sensitivity that explicitly deals with the existence of so-called psychological price levels or odd prices, i.e. prices ending in an odd number. The model is formulated in a latent class framework, in which splines are used to model utility as a function of

  14. A model for the effects of psychological pricing in Gabor-Granger price studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M; Leeflang, PSH

    1998-01-01

    We present a model of consumers' price sensitivity that explicitly deals with the existence of so-called psychological price levels or odd prices, i.e. prices ending in an odd number. The model is formulated in a latent class framework, in which splines are used to model utility as a function of pri

  15. From Mental Game to Cultural Praxis: A Cultural Studies Model's Implications for the Future of Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryba, Tatiana V.; Wright, Handel Kashope

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of a cultural studies as praxis heuristic "model: for transforming sport psychology". It provides a brief introduction to both cultural studies and sport psychology and discusses a cultural studies intersection with sport studies and sport psychology. Cultural studies, it asserts, provides one of several…

  16. Strengthening introductory psychology: A new model for teaching the introductory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Regan A R; Hackathorn, Jana; Enns, Carolyn; Frantz, Susan; Cacioppo, John T; Loop, Trudy; Freeman, James E

    2016-01-01

    Introductory psychology (Intro Psych) is one of the most popular and frequently taught courses on college campuses, yet educators in psychology have limited knowledge about what is covered in classes around the nation or the extent to which class content reflects the current scope of the discipline. There is no explicit model to guide course content selection for the intro course, which poses substantial challenges for instructors. This article proposes a new model for teaching the intro course that integrates (a) scientific foundations, (b) 5 major domains or pillars of knowledge (biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental and physical health), and (c) cross-cutting themes relevant to all domains (cultural and social diversity, ethics, variations in human functioning, and applications; American Psychological Association, 2014). We advocate for national assessment of the course, a similar introductory course for majors and nonmajors, the inclusion of experiential or laboratory components, and additional training resources for instructors of the intro course. Given the exponential growth of psychological knowledge and applications during the past decades, we caution against attempting to provide exhaustive coverage of all topic areas of psychology in a one-semester course. We conclude by discussing the challenges that lie ahead for the discipline of psychology as it launches this new model for Intro Psych.

  17. A reciprocal effects model of the temporal ordering of basic psychological needs and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinent, Guillaume; Guillet-Descas, Emma; Moiret, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Using self-determination theory as the framework, we examined the temporal ordering between satisfaction and thwarting of basic psychological needs and motivation. We accomplished this goal by using a two-wave 7-month partial least squares path modeling approach (PLS-PM) among a sample of 94 adolescent athletes (Mage = 15.96) in an intensive training setting. The PLS-PM results showed significant paths leading: (a) from T1 satisfaction of basic psychological need for competence to T2 identified regulation, (b) from T1 external regulation to T2 thwarting and satisfaction of basic psychological need for competence, and (c) from T1 amotivation to T2 satisfaction of basic psychological need for relatedness. Overall, our results suggest that the relationship between basic psychological need and motivation varied depending on the type of basic need and motivation assessed. Basic psychological need for competence predicted identified regulation over time whereas amotivation and external regulation predicted basic psychological need for relatedness or competence over time.

  18. School Culture, Basic Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Achievement: Testing a Casual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Badri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture is s common system of believes, values and artifacts that the members of a society use it in their relations, and it transfers from one generation to another. The school culture is a system of norms, meanings and values between school members. One of STD (self-determination theory components is basic psychological needs that emphasizes on Relatedness, Competence and Autonomy to accomplish the motivation. Motivation involves the processes that energize, direct, and sustain behavior. It seems that school culture, basic psychological needs and motivation has immense effect on academic achievement. The purpose of the present research was to examine the relation between students' perceived school culture, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation and academic achievement in a causal model. 296 high school students (159 females and 137 males in Tabriz, north - west of Iran, participated in this research and completed the students' perceived school culture questionnaire based on Hofstede's cultural dimensions (femininity, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism and power distance, basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation. The results of the path analysis showed that fulfillment of basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation has positive effect on academic achievement. Uncertainty avoidance and power distance have also negative effect on fulfillment of psychological needs, but the influence of femininity on this variable was positive. Also, collectivism has no significant effect on it. In general, the findings showed that if school culture supports students' autonomy, they will experience fulfillment of their basic psychological needs, and attain higher intrinsic motivation and academic achievement.

  19. Virtue ethics, positive psychology, and a new model of science and engineering ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2015-04-01

    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students' moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of motivation for self-improvement by connecting the notion of morality and eudaimonic happiness. Thus this essay attempts to apply virtue ethics and positive psychology to science and engineering ethics education and to develop a new conceptual framework for more effective education. In addition to the conceptual-level work, this essay suggests two possible educational methods: moral modeling and involvement in actual moral activity in science and engineering ethics classes, based on the conceptual framework.

  20. Conception and Organizational and Structural Models of Psychological Service in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrodin Yu.M.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the discussion of the key problems of practical psychology of education and to formulation of the main principles of conception of the psychological service in education, which is considered as one of the most important elements of the whole educational system modernization. Based on the data obtained by the monitoring of the psychological service in Russian education, conducted in 2006-2008, as well as on the analysis of the research materials, the service development strategy is formulated that determines the key directions of its' work till 2020 year. The mechanism of this strategy realization will be formulated as a suggested structural and functional model of the psychological service in education. The variants of organization of psychological service in education on the federal, as well as regional and municipal levels, specified under the regional and other contextual peculiarities, can be applied in creating particular versions of psychological service aimed at the different categories: gifted children and children with special educational needs, orphans and deviant children, children that suffer difficulties in learning, etc. the example of concrete target model of work with child's giftedness is widely described in the article.

  1. A THEORETICAL MODEL OF SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL SUPPORT WORK PROCESSES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PRODUCTION TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Gennadevna Pronyushkina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the management of production team, in particular the developed theoretical model of socio-psychological support work processes for management of production team. The author of the research are formulated the purpose and objectives of social-psychological work on management of the production team. Developed in the study a theoretical model aimed at determining the conditions and the identification of features of effective management of the enterprise taking into account the socio-psychological characteristics of its staff. Tasks include: definition of the main characteristics of the production team and their severity, the analysis of these characteristics and identifying opportunities for their transformation, development of recommendations for management of social-psychological work on effects on the characteristics of the collective enterprise.Practical study of the activities of a number of businesses have shown the need to improve socio-psychological support of management processes production team: introducing a social and psychological planning team and develop the practice of sociological research on the state of the team, to ensure the smoothing of relations between workers and management through periodic meetings, creations of conditions for feedback, maintaining healthy competition among team members.

  2. Modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goona Fathi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ethical leadership appeared as a new approach in the leadership perspective and provided the ground for promoting individual and organizational efficiency by giving priorities to ethics in organizations. In this regard, the present study was conducted with the aim of modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment among nurses of public hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: the research method was descriptive survey. The study sample consisted of all nurses (n=550 working in public hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Science for whom 163 nurses were selected using simple random sampling. The tools for data collection were ethical leadership, clinical governance and psychology empowerment questionnaires whose validity and reliability were confirmed. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed a significant relationship between ethical leadership and clinical governance (P<0.01 and psychological empowerment (P<0.01. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between clinical governance and psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Based on the results of the research, ethical leadership directly and through clinical governance affected the nurses’ psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Conclusion: reliance on ethics and ethical leadership in hospitals, in addition to providing the space and ground for improving the effectiveness of clinical governance approach, can promote the feeling of psychological empowerment in nurses. Accordingly, the ethical issues are required to be taken into consideration in hospitals.

  3. Visualizing the impact of art: An update and comparison of current psychological models of art experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew ePelowski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art.

  4. Diffusion versus linear ballistic accumulation: different models but the same conclusions about psychological processes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkin, C.; Brown, S.; Heathcote, A.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative models for response time and accuracy are increasingly used as tools to draw conclusions about psychological processes. Here we investigate the extent to which these substantive conclusions depend on whether researchers use the Ratcliff diffusion model or the Linear Ballistic

  5. Maori Cultural Efficacy and Subjective Wellbeing: A Psychological Model and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houkamau, Carla A.; Sibley, Chris G.

    2011-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, experience a range of negative outcomes. Psychological models and interventions aiming to improve outcomes for Maori tend to be founded on a "culture-as-cure" model. This view promotes cultural efficacy as a critical resilience factor that should improve outcomes for Maori. This is a founding…

  6. A Review of Metacognition in Psychological Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S.; Anderson, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural models and interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have always included some metacognitive elements but until recently these have been predominantly construed of as cognitive as opposed to metacognitive processes. Increasingly, psychological models of OCD are now recognising the importance of metacognitive…

  7. Response Grouping in the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) Paradigm: Models and Contamination Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Rolf; Miller, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Response grouping is a ubiquitous phenomenon in psychological refractory period (PRP) tasks, yet it hampers the analysis of dual-task performance. To account for response grouping, we developed several extended versions of the standard bottleneck model, each of which incorporates a possible grouping mechanism into this model. Computer simulations…

  8. The Strength-Based Counseling Model: A Paradigm Shift in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elsie J.

    2006-01-01

    Sometimes, it is difficult for a profession to move forward because its members interpret emerging conceptual models from the perspective of old frameworks. Each of the five reactants in this issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" interpreted the strength-based counseling model within their own self-adopted framework--Adlerian psychology, role…

  9. Maori Cultural Efficacy and Subjective Wellbeing: A Psychological Model and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houkamau, Carla A.; Sibley, Chris G.

    2011-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, experience a range of negative outcomes. Psychological models and interventions aiming to improve outcomes for Maori tend to be founded on a "culture-as-cure" model. This view promotes cultural efficacy as a critical resilience factor that should improve outcomes for Maori. This is a founding premise…

  10. A Review of Metacognition in Psychological Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S.; Anderson, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural models and interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have always included some metacognitive elements but until recently these have been predominantly construed of as cognitive as opposed to metacognitive processes. Increasingly, psychological models of OCD are now recognising the importance of metacognitive…

  11. Models of Temporal Discounting 1937-2000: An Interdisciplinary Exchange between Economics and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüne-Yanoff, Till

    2015-12-01

    Today's models of temporal discounting are the result of multiple interdisciplinary exchanges between psychology and economics. Although these exchanges did not result in an integrated discipline, they had important effects on all disciplines involved. The paper describes these exchanges from the 1930s onwards, focusing on two episodes in particular: an attempted synthesis by psychiatrist George Ainslie and others in the 1970s; and the attempted application of this new discounting model by a generation of economists and psychologists in the 1980s, which ultimately ended in the diversity of measurements disappointment. I draw four main conclusions. First, multiple notions of temporal discounting must be conceptually distinguished. Second, behavioral economics is not an integration or unification of psychology and economics. Third, the analysis identifies some central disciplinary markers that distinguish modeling strategies in economics and psychology. Finally, it offers a case of interdisciplinary success that does not fit the currently dominant account of interdisciplinarity as integration.

  12. The effects of nutrition labeling on consumer food choice: a psychological experiment and computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Peter; Shultz, Thomas R

    2014-12-01

    The widespread availability of calorie-dense food is believed to be a contributing cause of an epidemic of obesity and associated diseases throughout the world. One possible countermeasure is to empower consumers to make healthier food choices with useful nutrition labeling. An important part of this endeavor is to determine the usability of existing and proposed labeling schemes. Here, we report an experiment on how four different labeling schemes affect the speed and nutritional value of food choices. We then apply decision field theory, a leading computational model of human decision making, to simulate the experimental results. The psychology experiment shows that quantitative, single-attribute labeling schemes have greater usability than multiattribute and binary ones, and that they remain effective under moderate time pressure. The computational model simulates these psychological results and provides explanatory insights into them. This work shows how experimental psychology and computational modeling can contribute to the evaluation and improvement of nutrition-labeling schemes.

  13. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA. I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory high in descriptive power, explanatory power and predictive power. I propose a model (my own conceptualization in which I analyze information flow between the domains of scientific research (psychology as a science and professional practice (psychology as a profession. In the subsequent and final part I discuss my own model which links theory and practice: Scientific Research and Professional Practice in Psychology (SRPPP. The article ends with a presentation of three contexts in which the interrelationship between theory and practice is immersed: the ethical, psychological and cultural contexts.

  14. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA. I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory high in descriptive power, explanatory power and predictive power. I propose a model (my own conceptualization in which I analyze information flow between the domains of scientific research (psychology as a science and professional practice (psychology as a profession. In the subsequent and final part I discuss my own model which links theory and practice: Scientific Research and Professional Practice in Psychology (SRPPP. The article ends with a presentation of three contexts in which the interrelationship between theory and practice is immersed: the ethical, psychological and cultural contexts.

  15. Psychological and physical dimensions explaining life satisfaction among the elderly: a structural model examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Tomás, José Manuel; Oliver, Amparo; Navarro, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to analyze the effects of psychological well-being, physical functioning and socio-demographic factors on life satisfaction. Both a bivariate and a multivariate level of analyses have been used. Finally, a structural model explaining life satisfaction has been developed and validated. With respect to bivariate relations, there was evidence of significant positive relations between psychological well-being dimensions and life satisfaction and between physical conditions and life satisfaction as well. Also, as age increased there was a slow decrease in life satisfaction. Educational level was positively related to life satisfaction. A structural model gave valuable information about the pattern of multivariate relationships among the variables. A first result of the model was the large effect of physical and psychological well-being on life satisfaction, albeit it was psychological well-being the major predictor of life satisfaction. A second result was that the effects of socio-demographic variables on life satisfaction were low and they operated through the effects that maintain either on psychological well-being (or its individual indicators) or on physical conditions. The role gender or age played was indirect rather than direct.

  16. From Practice to Praksis - models in Danish coaching psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Kyndesen, Anna Imer; Palmer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The article gives a brief outline of the broadness of coaching models and moves on to describe in detail the model PRAKSIS, which has been developed from the English language PRACTICE model. This model is considered to be a key tool in solution-focused coaching and therapy. Thus, PRAKSIS...

  17. Capable of Suicide: A Functional Model of the Acquired Capability Component of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phillip N.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    A functional model of the acquired capability for suicide, a component of Joiner's (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide, is presented. A component of Joiner's (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide a functional model of the acquired capability for suicide is presented. The model integrates the points discussed by…

  18. Advanced Applications of Structural Equation Modeling in Counseling Psychology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Matthew P.; Haase, Richard F.

    2006-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a data-analytic technique that allows researchers to test complex theoretical models. Most published applications of SEM involve analyses of cross-sectional recursive (i.e., unidirectional) models, but it is possible for researchers to test more complex designs that involve variables observed at multiple…

  19. Schizophrenia: A Cognitive Model and Its Implications for Psychological Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a cognitive model of schizophrenia stating that schizophrenic behavior is caused by a disturbance in sensory input and stored material integration. Cites research to support this model. Outlines the manner in which a disturbance in sensory input integration relates to schizophrenic symptoms and discusses the model's relevance for…

  20. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  1. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  2. Cold and hot cognition: quantum probability theory and realistic psychological modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Philip J

    2013-06-01

    Typically, human decision making is emotionally "hot" and does not conform to "cold" classical probability (CP) theory. As quantum probability (QP) theory emphasises order, context, superimposition states, and nonlinear dynamic effects, one of its major strengths may be its power to unify formal modeling and realistic psychological theory (e.g., information uncertainty, anxiety, and indecision, as seen in the Prisoner's Dilemma).

  3. The psychological influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby: a social relational model of disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Haslett

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport and exercise psychology research in disability sport seldom engages with social models of disability. As a result, the socio-historical landscape of disability is underrepresented in sport psychology research. The aim of this study is to interpret influences on participation in disability sport through the conceptual lens of the social relational model (SRM of disability (Thomas, 1999, 2004, 2007. Ten Irish adult male athletes with physical disabilities participated in semi-structured interviews exploring the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in Wheelchair Rugby. Deductive thematic analysis produced four themes influenced by the social relational model: impairment effects; societal attitudes and discourse; opportunities and access; and psychological well-being. Links were made to the experience of embodied impairment, classification, oppression, inequality, media, independence, and self-efficacy. The analysis illustrates how cultural constructions of disability are inextricably linked to individual influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby. The results indicate that in disability sport participation, the experience of social oppression, inequality and cultural stereotypes of disability can be synonymous with the personal experience of physical impairment. The implication of this research is that there is a value in sport and exercise psychology practitioners utilising the social relational model as a tool to conceptualise the lived experience of physical disability.

  4. Relations between Minuchin's Structural Family Model and Kohut's Self-Psychology Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosa, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationship between structural family model and self-psychology constructs. College women (n=164) completed the Structural Family Interaction Scale-Revised (SFIS-R), the Parental Relations Inventory, and the Goal Instability and Superiority scales from the Self-Expression Inventory. Indicated that women raised in families with strong…

  5. Models of knowledge management in Russian institutions: social and psychological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestik Timofei Aleksandrovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents socio-psychological analysis of five knowledge management models used in Russian institutions: knowledge management in projects, virtual expert groups, competence centers, knowledge management via organization development and open innovations. Special attention is given to the consequences of transition to network-based knowledge management.

  6. The Need for a Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Neville, Helen A.; Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Winterowd, Carrie L.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    The authors articulate the need for a "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth "Values Statement"). They discuss the historic unwillingness of the field to address values in a sophisticated or complex way and highlight the increasingly common training scenario in which trainees state that certain…

  7. A Model of Parental Achievement-Oriented Psychological Control in Academically Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated achievement-oriented parent socialization as it pertains to school avoidance in a sample of gifted students. A serial mediation model examining relationships among parental achievement-oriented psychological control (APC), fear of academic failure, academic amotivation, and school avoidance was tested. The sample included…

  8. Promises from Afar: A Model of International Student Psychological Contract in Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordia, Sarbari; Bordia, Prashant; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their significant presence in western business schools, the needs and experiences of international students have not been adequately reflected in the business education literature. We draw upon psychological contract theory--used to understand employer-employee relationships--to develop a novel theoretical model on the international…

  9. Utilizing Natural Structure of the Research Literature in Psychology as a Model for Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetti, L. James

    1979-01-01

    Offered as an alternative to the search strategy model for bibliographic instruction, the approach to library instruction in psychology which is described involves analysis of the natural structure of the research literature. An example using Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance is presented. Twelve references are cited. (EJS)

  10. Utilizing Natural Structure of the Research Literature in Psychology as a Model for Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetti, L. James

    1979-01-01

    Offered as an alternative to the search strategy model for bibliographic instruction, the approach to library instruction in psychology which is described involves analysis of the natural structure of the research literature. An example using Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance is presented. Twelve references are cited. (EJS)

  11. Adherence to a Wellness Model and Perceptions of Psychological Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermon, David A.; Hazler, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between college students' perceived psychological well-being and the quality of their lives on five variables associated with a five-factor holistic wellness model. Results revealed a significant relationship between five dimensions of wellness and both short-term state and long-term trait constructs of psychological…

  12. Somatic Expression of Psychological Problems (Somatization: Examination with Structural Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Seda Çolak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the research is to define which psychological symptoms (somatization, depression, obsessive ‐ compulsive, hostility, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation and psychoticism cause somatic reactions at most. Total effect of these psychological symptoms on somatic symptoms had been investigated. Study was carried out with structural equation model to research the relation between the psychological symptoms and somatization. The main material of the research is formed by the data obtained from 492 people. SCL‐90‐R scale was used in order to obtain the data. As a result of the structural equation analysis, it has been found that 1Psychoticism, phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation do not predict somatic symptoms.2There is a negative relation between interpersonal sensitivity level mand somatic reactions.3Anxiety symptoms had been found as causative to occur the highest level of somatic reactions.

  13. Reporting Results from Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Archives of Scientific Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Rick H; Isherwood, Jennifer C

    2013-02-01

    Psychological research typically involves the analysis of data (e.g., questionnaire responses, records of behavior) using statistical methods. The description of how those methods are used and the results they produce is a key component of scholarly publications. Despite their importance, these descriptions are not always complete and clear. In order to ensure the completeness and clarity of these descriptions, the Archives of Scientific Psychology requires that authors of manuscripts to be considered for publication adhere to a set of publication standards. Although the current standards cover most of the statistical methods commonly used in psychological research, they do not cover them all. In this manuscript, we propose adjustments to the current standards and the addition of additional standards for a statistical method not adequately covered in the current standards-structural equation modeling (SEM). Adherence to the standards we propose would ensure that scholarly publications that report results of data analyzed using SEM are complete and clear.

  14. Ethnic identity, identity coherence, and psychological functioning: testing basic assumptions of the developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Moin; Juang, Linda P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test three fundamental theoretical propositions from Phinney's (1990) developmental model about the relations among ethnic identity, identity coherence, and psychological functioning: (a) ethnic identity is more strongly related to identity coherence for ethnic minorities than for Whites; (b) ethnic identity is more strongly related to psychological functioning for ethnic minorities than for Whites; and (c) identity coherence mediates the association between ethnic identity and psychological functioning for ethnic minorities, but not for Whites. These hypotheses were tested in three independent samples of ethnically diverse youth. In general, we found weak to moderate support for these three hypotheses, suggesting that the theoretically proposed differences in ethnic identity between ethnic minorities and Whites may not be supported by data. Implications for theory and measurement of ethnic identity are discussed.

  15. Dynamic P-Technique for Modeling Patterns of Data: Applications to Pediatric Psychology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Brandon S.; Rausch, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Dynamic p-technique (DPT) is a potentially useful statistical method for examining relationships among dynamic constructs in a single individual or small group of individuals over time. The purpose of this article is to offer a nontechnical introduction to DPT. Method An overview of DPT analysis, with an emphasis on potential applications to pediatric psychology research, is provided. To illustrate how DPT might be applied, an example using simulated data is presented for daily pain and negative mood ratings. Results The simulated example demonstrates the application of DPT to a relevant pediatric psychology research area. In addition, the potential application of DPT to the longitudinal study of adherence is presented. Conclusion Although it has not been utilized frequently within pediatric psychology, DPT could be particularly well-suited for research in this field because of its ability to powerfully model repeated observations from very small samples. PMID:21486938

  16. Bayesian latent variable models for the analysis of experimental psychology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Edgar C; Wang, Ting

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we address the use of Bayesian factor analysis and structural equation models to draw inferences from experimental psychology data. While such application is non-standard, the models are generally useful for the unified analysis of multivariate data that stem from, e.g., subjects' responses to multiple experimental stimuli. We first review the models and the parameter identification issues inherent in the models. We then provide details on model estimation via JAGS and on Bayes factor estimation. Finally, we use the models to re-analyze experimental data on risky choice, comparing the approach to simpler, alternative methods.

  17. Much Pain, Little Gain? Paradigm-Specific Models and Methods in Experimental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Thorsten

    2011-03-01

    Paradigm-oriented research strategies in experimental psychology have strengths and limitations. On the one hand, experimental paradigms play a crucial epistemic and heuristic role in basic psychological research. On the other hand, empirical research is often limited to the observed effects in a certain paradigm, and theoretical models are frequently tied to the particular features of the given paradigm. A paradigm-driven research strategy therefore jeopardizes the pursuit of research questions and theoretical models that go beyond a specific paradigm. As one example of a more integrative approach, recent research on illusory and spurious correlations has attempted to overcome the limitations of paradigm-specific models in the context of biased contingency perception and social stereotyping. Last but not least, the use of statistical models for the analysis of elementary cognitive functions is a means toward a more integrative terminology and theoretical perspective across different experimental paradigms and research domains. © The Author(s) 2011.

  18. An Interdisciplinary Model for Connecting Writing, Psychology, and Printmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Staci

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an effective model for a manageable interdisciplinary project that shows students the connections among art, English, and other disciplines; gives composition students an external audience for their writing; and emphasizes the importance of research in the process of creating arguments and art. This interdisciplinary project…

  19. Neurocomputational Models of Cognitive Development and Processing: Proceedings of the 14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents peer-reviewed versions of papers presented at the 14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop (NCPW14), which took place in July 2014 at Lancaster University, UK. The workshop draws international attendees from the cutting edge of interdisciplinary research in psychology, computational modeling, artificial intelligence and psychology, and aims to drive forward our understanding of the mechanisms underlying a range of cognitive processes.

  20. A Sense of Place: Integrating Environmental Psychology into Marine Socio-Ecological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, I. E.; Fleming, A.; Fulton, E.; Plaganyi-Lloyd, E.

    2016-02-01

    Sense of place is a concept that is increasingly applied in different social research contexts where it can act as a bridge between disciplines that might otherwise work in parallel. A sense of place is a well established and flexible concept that has been empirically measured using different survey methods. The psychological principals and theories that underpin sense of place have been inextricably linked to the quality of ecological systems and the impact on development of the system, and vice versa. Ecological models and scenario analyses play an important role in characterising, assessing and predicting the potential impacts of alternative developments and other changes affecting ecological systems. To improve the predictive accuracy of ecological models, human drivers, interactions, and uses have been dynamically incorporated, for instance, through management strategy evaluation applied to marine ecosystem models. However, to date no socio-ecological models (whether terrestrial or marine) have been developed that incorporate a dynamic feedback between ecosystem characteristics and peoples' sense of place. These models thus essentially ignore the influence of environmental psychology on the way people use and interact with ecosystems. We develop a proof of concept and provide a mathematical basis for a Sense of Place Index (SoPI) that allows the quantitative integration of environmental psychology into socio-ecological models. Incorporating dynamic feedback between the SoPI for different resource user groups and the ecological system improves the accuracy and precision of predictions regarding future resource use as well as, ultimately, the potential state of the resource to be developed.

  1. Verification of a Predictive Model of Psychological Health at Work in Canada and France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Boudrias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the invariance of a predictive model of psychological health at work (PHW in Canada and France. The model a defines PHW as an integrative second-order variable (low distress, high well-being and b includes three categories of PHW inductors (job demands, personal resources and social-organizational resources and one psychological intermediate variable (needs satisfaction that were found to be directly or indirectly related to PHW in a previous study on a sample of French teachers (Boudrias, Desrumaux, Gaudreau, Nelson, Savoie and Brunet, 2011. To test if this model is invariant across countries, these data from French teachers ('N' = 391 were reanalyzed and compared with data from a sample of Canadian teachers ('N' = 480 who completed the same set of questionnaires. Results from structural equation modeling analyses indicated that the model is completely invariant across the two samples. Therefore, pathways to PHW appeared to generalize across these samples of teachers without the addition of other cultural variables. This PHW model suggests that personal resources exert considerable influence directly and indirectly on psychological health through multiple mediators. Research implications and study limitations are discussed.

  2. Multilevel models from biology to psychology: mission impossible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Robert M; Howe, Andrew G; Howe, Andrew S; Sabb, Fred W

    2013-08-01

    Systematic efforts are underway to address major flaws in the current diagnostic taxonomy of mental disorders, fostering hope that a new nosology might be based on brain biology. The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domains Criteria (RDoC) initiative aims to redefine mental illness leveraging information that spans molecular to behavioral levels of analysis. Major effort is still needed to forge multilevel conceptual and measurement models capable of representing knowledge within and across these levels. The development of such models may help refine and share complex hypotheses, and reduce the risk of replacing the current taxonomy with dimensions and/or categories that manifest little incremental biological validity. To create useful models we need to define concepts, relations among concepts, and links to supporting evidence. Some methods already enable representation of concepts and measures at the levels of behavioral and basic biological processes, but a major gap at the level of neural circuitry must be bridged to link basic biological and behavioral levels. We provide a schematic framework, using as an example the representation of selected "working memory" concepts and evidence across multiple levels of analysis as these have been described in the RDoC Workshops. This example illustrates multiple challenges and some possible solutions that may help clarify the aims of individual research projects and enable integration of diverse efforts on RDoC and related initiatives. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. A model of psychological evaluation of educational environment and its empirical indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Laktionova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the study is to identify ways of complex psychological assessment of educational en-vironment quality, the nature of conditions that affect positive personal development of its members. The solution to this problem is to develop science-based content and technology sup-port for psychological evaluation of the educational environment. The purpose of the study was theoretical rationale and empirical testing of a model of psychological examination of education-al environment. The study is based on the assumption that in order to assess the quality of the educational environment in the aspect of its personality developing potential, we need to create a model of psychological examination as a special developmental system, reflected in terms of the personal characteristics of its subjects. The empirical material is based on a study sample of 717 students and 438 teachers from 28 educational institutions that participated in the program of urban pilot sites of the Department of Education of Moscow. In total, 1,155 people took part it the study.

  4. Models of proximate and ultimate causation in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, G

    1992-11-01

    B. F. Skinner saw behavior as a product of three levels of evolution. J. R. Kantor and Gregory Bateson noted similar relations. This article describes and applies basic evolutionary concepts to each level: (a) phylogenic, (b) ontogenic, and (c) cultural evolution. Each level is analyzed in terms of (a) units of selection, (b) variety of units required for the selection process, (c) selection pressures, (d) interactions among levels, and (e) implications for understanding and predicting behavior. Distinguishing between models of proximate and ultimate causation, as in biology, may help clarify research problems posed by, and facilitate better communication among, psychologists.

  5. Models and theories of brain function in cognition within a framework of behavioral cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Sirel; Başar, Erol

    2006-05-01

    The present article presents a nonexhaustive collection of contemporary models and theories on brain function and discusses these models and theories within a framework of explanatory formulations in behavioral cognitive psychology. Such a mission was accomplished by evaluating the cognitive implications in the explanatory formulations with respect to established laws/principles and models/theories of behavioral cognitive psychology. The article also points to problem areas of behavioral cognitive psychology for which the explanatory formulations have solutions to offer. The article shows that the cinematographic hypothesis, the new visual model, the synergetic model, and the theory of whole-brain-work emphasize various aspects of perception. The formulations on P300 theory emphasize attention and also working memory. The theory on cognits is a comprehensive account of memory. Characteristic to all of these explanatory formulations and also to that on the complexity and its evolution and that on neurocognitive networks is the emphasis on selective distribution, integration to the point of supersynergy, and dynamicity. Such a viewpoint was not only applied to the operations of the brain but also of cognition. With such a conceptualization, the explanatory formulations could account for cognitive processes other than the ones emphasized. A common aspect in a majority of the formulations is the utilization of the oscillatory activity as the valid activity of the brain. The article points out that a frontier in cognitive psychophysiology would be the study of the genetics of brain oscillations.

  6. A New Stress-Based Model of Political Extremism: Personal Exposure to Terrorism, Psychological Distress, and Exclusionist Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Halperin, Eran; Sharvit, Keren; Hobfoll, Stevan E.

    2009-01-01

    Does exposure to terrorism lead to hostility toward minorities? Drawing on theories from clinical and social psychology, we propose a stress-based model of political extremism in which psychological distress--which is largely overlooked in political scholarship--and threat perceptions mediate the relationship between exposure to terrorism and…

  7. A New Stress-Based Model of Political Extremism: Personal Exposure to Terrorism, Psychological Distress, and Exclusionist Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Halperin, Eran; Sharvit, Keren; Hobfoll, Stevan E.

    2009-01-01

    Does exposure to terrorism lead to hostility toward minorities? Drawing on theories from clinical and social psychology, we propose a stress-based model of political extremism in which psychological distress--which is largely overlooked in political scholarship--and threat perceptions mediate the relationship between exposure to terrorism and…

  8. FILLING IN THE GAPS OF CHRONIC PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS DISEASE MODELS: WHAT'S METABOLIC PROFILING HAVE TO DO WITH IT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic psychological stress has profound effects on human health and well being, and it is generally accepted that psychological stress is a burgeoning public health problem in modern day life. However, models used to describe or predict stress-related disease are generally plagued by the paucity o...

  9. The Relational-Behavior Model: The Relationship between Intrinsic Motivational Instruction and Extrinsic Motivation in Psychologically Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study examined the relational-behavior model (RBM) as a method of intrinsic motivational instruction in psychology courses. Among a sample of 33 college students enrolled in two undergraduate psychology courses, a Spearman rho analysis revealed a significant relationship between the intrinsic motivational factors (e.g. student/class…

  10. The psychological contract: is the UK National Health Service a model employer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Sandra; Whiting, Fiona

    2007-05-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is facing recruitment challenges that mean it will need to become an 'employer of choice' if it is to continue to attract high-quality employees. This paper reports the findings from a study focusing on allied health professional staff (n = 67), aimed at establishing the expectations of the NHS inherent in their current psychological contract and to consider whether the government's drive to make the NHS a model employer meets those expectations. The findings show that the most important aspects of the psychological contract were relational and based on the investment made in the employment relationship by both parties. The employment relationship was one of high involvement but also one where transactional contract items, such as pay, were still of some importance. Although the degree of employee satisfaction with the relational content of the psychological contract was relatively positive, there was, nevertheless, a mismatch between levels of importance placed on such aspects of the contract and levels of satisfaction, with employees increasingly placing greater emphasis on those items the NHS is having the greatest difficulty providing. Despite this apparent disparity between employee expectation and the fulfilment of those expectations, the overall health of the psychological contract was still high.

  11. Integrating economic and psychological insights in binary choice models with social interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ostasiewicz, K; Magnuszewski, P; Radosz, A; Sendzimir, J; Tyc, M H; Goliczewski, Piotr; Magnuszewski, Piotr; Ostasiewicz, Katarzyna; Radosz, Andrzej; Sendzimir, Jan; Tyc, Michal H.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate a class of binary choice models with social interactions. We propose a unifying perspective that integrates economic models using a utility function and psychological models using an impact function. A general approach for analyzing the equilibrium structure of these models within mean-field approximation is developed. It is shown that within a mean-field approach both the utility function and the impact function models are equivalent to threshold models. The interplay between heterogeneity and randomness in model formulation is discussed. A general framework is applied in a number of examples leading to some well-known models but also showing the possibility of more complex dynamics related to multiple equilibria. Our synthesis can provide a basis for many practical applications extending the scope of binary choice models.

  12. The Structural Model of Spirituality and Psychological Well-Being for Pregnancy-Specific Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatian, Mahrokh; Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Dilgony, Taibeh; Shams, Jamal; Zaeri, Farid

    2017-04-26

    Women experience different types of stress in their lifetime. The present study was conducted to examine the structural model of spirituality and psychological well-being for pregnancy-specific stress. The present descriptive correlational study was conducted on 450 pregnant Iranian women (150 women from each trimester) in Dehdasht city in 2015. Data were collected using the personal-social questionnaire, the pregnancy-specific stress questionnaire, the spirituality questionnaire and the psychological well-being questionnaire and were then analyzed in SPSS-16 and Lisrel-8.8 for carrying out a path analysis. The fit indices of the model indicate the good fit and high compatibility of the model and rational relationships between the variables (GFI = 0.94, NFI = 0.85, CFI = 0.94 and RMSEA = 0.048). Of the variables that affected pregnancy-specific stress through both paths, spirituality had a positive effect (B = 0.11) and the personal-social variable a negative effect (B = -0.37). Psychological well-being affected pregnancy-specific stress negatively and directly and through one path only (B = -0.59). The results obtained through the model confirm the effect of spirituality and psychological well-being in reducing pregnancy-specific stress. Given that handling stress has a major role in the quality of daily life in pregnant women, stress management skills are recommended to be promoted among pregnant women so as to mitigate stress and its negative consequences.

  13. Which psychological factors influence Internet addiction? Evidence through an integrative model

    OpenAIRE

    Burnay, Jonathan; Billieux, Joël; Blairy, Sylvie; Laroi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Since the appearance of Internet, several preoccupations have appeared as a result, with Internet addiction being one of the most common. The goals of the present study were two-fold. First, to examine which psychological factors are relevant to explain Internet addiction, including impulsivity, passion and social provision. Second, to incorporate all these factors into an integrative model. Based on multiple regressions and path analysis, results revealed a positive relation between Internet...

  14. Positive Instruction in Music Studios: Introducing a New Model for Teaching Studio Music in Schools Based upon Positive Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Patston, Tim; Waters, Lea

    2015-01-01

    This practice paper explores the intersection of school studio-music pedagogy and positive psychology in order to enhance students’ learning and engagement. The paper has a practitioner focus and puts forward a new model of studio teaching, the Positive Instruction in Music Studios (PIMS) model that guides teachers through four key positive psychology processes that can be used in a music lesson: positive priming, strengths spotting, positive pause, and process praise. The model provides a ne...

  15. Positive Instruction in Music Studios: Introducing a New Model for Teaching Studio Music in Schools Based upon Positive Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Patston, Tim; Waters, Lea

    2015-01-01

    This practice paper explores the intersection of school studio-music pedagogy and positive psychology in order to enhance students? learning and engagement. The paper has a practitioner focus and puts forward a new model of studio teaching, the Positive Instruction in Music Studios (PIMS) model that guides teachers through four key positive psychology processes that can be used in a music lesson: positive priming, strengths spotting, positive pause, and process praise. The model provides a ne...

  16. The trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of psychological trauma: intrusive memories and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ella L; Lau-Zhu, Alex; Clark, Ian A; Visser, Renée M; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Holmes, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of psychological trauma is fundamental to clinical psychology. Following traumatic event(s), a clinically significant number of people develop symptoms, including those of Acute Stress Disorder and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The trauma film paradigm offers an experimental psychopathology model to study both exposure and reactions to psychological trauma, including the hallmark symptom of intrusive memories. We reviewed 74 articles that have used this paradigm since the earliest review (Holmes & Bourne, 2008) until July 2014. Highlighting the different stages of trauma processing, i.e. pre-, peri- and post-trauma, the studies are divided according to manipulations before, during and after film viewing, for experimental as well as correlational designs. While the majority of studies focussed on the frequency of intrusive memories, other reactions to trauma were also modelled. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of trauma, consider ethical issues, and suggest future directions. By understanding the basic mechanisms underlying trauma symptom development, we can begin to translate findings from the laboratory to the clinic, test innovative science-driven interventions, and in the future reduce the debilitating effects of psychopathology following stressful and/or traumatic events.

  17. Stereotypes Can "Get Under the Skin": Testing a Self-Stereotyping and Psychological Resource Model of Overweight and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Luis M; Paredez, Stefanie M

    2014-06-01

    The authors draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to propose and test a self-stereotyping and psychological resource model of overweight and obesity. The model contends that self-stereotyping depletes psychological resources, namely self-esteem, that help to prevent overweight and obesity. In support of the model, mediation analysis demonstrates that adult Hispanics who highly self-stereotype had lower levels of self-esteem than those who self-stereotype less, which in turn predicted higher levels of body mass index (overweight and obesity levels). Furthermore, the model did not hold for the referent sample, White participants, and an alternative mediation model was not supported. These data are the first to theoretically and empirically link self-stereotyping and self-esteem (a psychological resource) with a strong physiological risk factor for morbidity and short life expectancy in stigmatized individuals. Thus, this research contributes to understanding ethnic-racial health disparities in the United States and beyond.

  18. Ecological Interventionist Causal Models in Psychosis: Targeting Psychological Mechanisms in Daily Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininghaus, Ulrich; Depp, Colin A; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2016-03-01

    Integrated models of psychotic disorders have posited a number of putative psychological mechanisms that may contribute to the development of psychotic symptoms, but it is only recently that a modest amount of experience sampling research has provided evidence on their role in daily life, outside the research laboratory. A number of methodological challenges remain in evaluating specificity of potential causal links between a given psychological mechanism and psychosis outcomes in a systematic fashion, capitalizing on longitudinal data to investigate temporal ordering. In this article, we argue for testing ecological interventionist causal models that draw on real world and real-time delivered, ecological momentary interventions for generating evidence on several causal criteria (association, time order, and direction/sole plausibility) under real-world conditions, while maximizing generalizability to social contexts and experiences in heterogeneous populations. Specifically, this approach tests whether ecological momentary interventions can (1) modify a putative mechanism and (2) produce changes in the mechanism that lead to sustainable changes in intended psychosis outcomes in individuals' daily lives. Future research using this approach will provide translational evidence on the active ingredients of mobile health and in-person interventions that promote sustained effectiveness of ecological momentary interventions and, thereby, contribute to ongoing efforts that seek to enhance effectiveness of psychological interventions under real-world conditions.

  19. Selected neurophysiological, psychological, and behavioral influences on subjective sleep quality in nurses: a structure equation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Huey Chung

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined relationships among neurophysiological, psychological, and behavioral factors with regard to their effects on sleep quality. We used a structure equation model to investigate behavioral and psychological factors that influence neurophysiological regulation of sleep in shift workers. Using a cross-sectional study design, we tested the model with a sample of 338 female nurses working rotating shifts at an urban regional hospital. The Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ and short-form Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ were used to measure neurophysiological factors involved in morningness-eveningness and menstrual distress. The Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practice Scale (SHAPS and Profile of Mood States Short Form (POMS-SF were completed to measure behavioral factors of sleep hygiene practices and psychological factors of mood states. In addition, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI measured participant's self-reported sleep quality. The results revealed that sleep hygiene practices and mood states mediated the effects of morningness-eveningness and menstrual distress on sleep quality. Our findings provide support for developing interventions to enhance sleep hygiene and maintain positive mood states to reduce the influence of neurophysiological factors on sleep quality among shift workers.

  20. Selected neurophysiological, psychological, and behavioral influences on subjective sleep quality in nurses: a structure equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Min-Huey; Liu, Wen-I; Lee, Hui-Ling; Hsu, Nanly

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined relationships among neurophysiological, psychological, and behavioral factors with regard to their effects on sleep quality. We used a structure equation model to investigate behavioral and psychological factors that influence neurophysiological regulation of sleep in shift workers. Using a cross-sectional study design, we tested the model with a sample of 338 female nurses working rotating shifts at an urban regional hospital. The Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and short-form Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) were used to measure neurophysiological factors involved in morningness-eveningness and menstrual distress. The Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practice Scale (SHAPS) and Profile of Mood States Short Form (POMS-SF) were completed to measure behavioral factors of sleep hygiene practices and psychological factors of mood states. In addition, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) measured participant's self-reported sleep quality. The results revealed that sleep hygiene practices and mood states mediated the effects of morningness-eveningness and menstrual distress on sleep quality. Our findings provide support for developing interventions to enhance sleep hygiene and maintain positive mood states to reduce the influence of neurophysiological factors on sleep quality among shift workers.

  1. Psychological Assessment with the DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders: Tradition and Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Mark H; Hopwood, Christopher J; Krueger, Robert F; Morey, Leslie C; Pincus, Aaron L; Wright, Aidan G C

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Section III Alternative Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD; APA, 2013) represents an innovative system for simultaneous psychiatric classification and psychological assessment of personality disorders (PD). The AMPD combines major paradigms of personality assessment and provides an original, heuristic, flexible, and practical framework that enriches clinical thinking and practice. Origins, emerging research, and clinical application of the AMPD for diagnosis and psychological assessment are reviewed. The AMPD integrates assessment and research traditions, facilitates case conceptualization, is easy to learn and use, and assists in providing patient feedback. New as well as existing tests and psychometric methods may be used to operationalize the AMPD for clinical assessments.

  2. The hoarding dimension of OCD: psychological comorbidity and the five-factor personality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSalle-Ricci, V Holland; Arnkoff, Diane B; Glass, Carol R; Crawley, Sarah A; Ronquillo, Jonne G; Murphy, Dennis L

    2006-10-01

    Although hoarding has been associated with several psychological disorders, it is most frequently linked to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study assessed hoarding obsessions and compulsions in 204 individuals with OCD, and evaluated how hoarding was related to obsessive-compulsive symptom severity, psychological comorbidity, and personality as measured by the five-factor model. Results indicated that hoarding in OCD is a dimensional variable that is positively associated with dysphoria, total number of lifetime Axis I disorders, and lifetime histories of bipolar I, PTSD, and body dysmorphic disorder. Hoarding was negatively correlated with the NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R) factor of Conscientiousness and positively associated with the NEO-PI-R factor of Neuroticism. When all personality and psychopathology variables were entered into a regression equation, dysphoria, bipolar II disorder, Conscientiousness, age, and Extraversion emerged as significant predictors of hoarding severity. Recommendations are made for clinicians and for future research.

  3. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in postgraduate psychology students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachel Margaret Roberts; Melissa eDavis

    2015-01-01

    .... Twenty three postgraduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual...

  4. Structural Model of psychological risk and protective factors affecting on quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A psychocardiology model

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Khayyam Nekouei; Alireza Yousefy; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Gholamreza Manshaee; Masoumeh Sadeghei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conducted researches show that psychological factors may have a very important role in the etiology, continuity and consequences of coronary heart diseases. This study has drawn the psychological risk and protective factors and their effects in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a structural model. It aims to determine the structural relations between psychological risk and protective factors with quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. Materials and M...

  5. Computational Models of Cognitive Processes: Proceedings of the 13th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop (Ncpw13)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayor, Julien; Gomez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Computational Models of Cognitive Processes collects refereed versions of papers presented at the 13th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop (NCPW13) that took place in July 2012, in San Sebastian (Spain). This workshop series is a well-established and unique forum that brings together researchers from such diverse disciplines as artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, neurobiology, philosophy and psychology to discuss their latest work on models of cognitive proces...

  6. The multi-component model of working memory: explorations in experimental cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovs, G; Baddeley, A

    2006-04-28

    There are a number of ways one can hope to describe and explain cognitive abilities, each of them contributing a unique and valuable perspective. Cognitive psychology tries to develop and test functional accounts of cognitive systems that explain the capacities and properties of cognitive abilities as revealed by empirical data gathered by a range of behavioral experimental paradigms. Much of the research in the cognitive psychology of working memory has been strongly influenced by the multi-component model of working memory [Baddeley AD, Hitch GJ (1974) Working memory. In: Recent advances in learning and motivation, Vol. 8 (Bower GA, ed), pp 47-90. New York: Academic Press; Baddeley AD (1986) Working memory. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press; Baddeley A. Working memory: Thought and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press, in press]. By expanding the notion of a passive short-term memory to an active system that provides the basis for complex cognitive abilities, the model has opened up numerous questions and new lines of research. In this paper we present the current revision of the multi-component model that encompasses a central executive, two unimodal storage systems: a phonological loop and a visuospatial sketchpad, and a further component, a multimodal store capable of integrating information into unitary episodic representations, termed episodic buffer. We review recent empirical data within experimental cognitive psychology that has shaped the development of the multicomponent model and the understanding of the capacities and properties of working memory. Research based largely on dual-task experimental designs and on neuropsychological evidence has yielded valuable information about the fractionation of working memory into independent stores and processes, the nature of representations in individual stores, the mechanisms of their maintenance and manipulation, the way the components of working memory relate to each other, and the role they play in other

  7. Positive Psychological Interventions for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Rationale, Theoretical Model, and Intervention Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff C. Huffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D have suboptimal adherence to recommended diet, physical activity, and/or medication. Current approaches to improve health behaviors in T2D have been variably effective, and successful interventions are often complex and intensive. It is therefore vital to develop interventions that are simple, well-accepted, and applicable to a wide range of patients who suffer from T2D. One approach may be to boost positive psychological states, such as positive affect or optimism, as these constructs have been prospectively and independently linked to improvements in health behaviors. Positive psychology (PP interventions, which utilize systematic exercises to increase optimism, well-being, and positive affect, consistently increase positive states and are easily delivered to patients with chronic illnesses. However, to our knowledge, PP interventions have not been formally tested in T2D. In this paper, we review a theoretical model for the use of PP interventions to target health behaviors in T2D, describe the structure and content of a PP intervention for T2D patients, and describe baseline data from a single-arm proof-of-concept (N=15 intervention study in T2D patients with or without depression. We also discuss how PP interventions could be combined with motivational interviewing (MI interventions to provide a blended psychological-behavioral approach.

  8. Aspects of Piaget's cognitive developmental psychology and neurobiology of psychotic disorders - an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Stefan; Grant, Phillip; von Georgi, Richard; Huber, Martin T

    2008-09-01

    Psychological, neurobiological and neurodevelopmental approaches have frequently been used to provide pathogenic concepts on psychotic disorders. However, aspects of cognitive developmental psychology have hardly been considered in current models. Using a hypothesis-generating approach an integration of these concepts was conducted. According to Piaget (1896-1980), assimilation and accommodation as forms of maintenance and modification of cognitive schemata represent fundamental processes of the brain. In general, based on the perceived input stimuli, cognitive schemata are developed resulting in a conception of the world, the realistic validity and the actuality of which is still being controlled and modified by cognitive adjustment processes. In psychotic disorders, however, a disproportion of environmental demands and the ability to activate required neuronal adaptation processes occurs. We therefore hypothesize a failure of the adjustment of real and requested output patterns. As a consequence autonomous cognitive schemata are generated, which fail to adjust with reality resulting in psychotic symptomatology. Neurobiological, especially neuromodulatory and neuroplastic processes play a central role in these perceptive and cognitive processes. In conclusion, integration of cognitive developmental psychology into the existing pathogenic concepts of psychotic disorders leads to interesting insights into basic disease mechanisms and also guides future research in the cognitive neuroscience of such disorders.

  9. Personality is of central concern to understand health: towards a theoretical model for health psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn

    2013-01-01

    This paper sets out the case that personality traits are central to health psychology. To achieve this, three aims need to be addressed. First, it is necessary to show that personality influences a broad range of health outcomes and mechanisms. Second, the simple descriptive account of Aim 1 is not sufficient, and a theoretical specification needs to be developed to explain the personality-health link and allow for future hypothesis generation. Third, once Aims 1 and 2 are met, it is necessary to demonstrate the clinical utility of personality. In this review I make the case that all three Aims are met. I develop a theoretical framework to understand the links between personality and health drawing on current theorising in the biology, evolution, and neuroscience of personality. I identify traits (i.e., alexithymia, Type D, hypochondriasis, and empathy) that are of particular concern to health psychology and set these within evolutionary cost-benefit analysis. The literature is reviewed within a three-level hierarchical model (individual, group, and organisational) and it is argued that health psychology needs to move from its traditional focus on the individual level to engage group and organisational levels. PMID:23772230

  10. Personality is of central concern to understand health: towards a theoretical model for health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn

    2013-05-01

    This paper sets out the case that personality traits are central to health psychology. To achieve this, three aims need to be addressed. First, it is necessary to show that personality influences a broad range of health outcomes and mechanisms. Second, the simple descriptive account of Aim 1 is not sufficient, and a theoretical specification needs to be developed to explain the personality-health link and allow for future hypothesis generation. Third, once Aims 1 and 2 are met, it is necessary to demonstrate the clinical utility of personality. In this review I make the case that all three Aims are met. I develop a theoretical framework to understand the links between personality and health drawing on current theorising in the biology, evolution, and neuroscience of personality. I identify traits (i.e., alexithymia, Type D, hypochondriasis, and empathy) that are of particular concern to health psychology and set these within evolutionary cost-benefit analysis. The literature is reviewed within a three-level hierarchical model (individual, group, and organisational) and it is argued that health psychology needs to move from its traditional focus on the individual level to engage group and organisational levels.

  11. Changing Behavior by Memory Aids: A Social Psychological Model of Prospective Memory and Habit Development Tested with Dynamic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a social psychological model of prospective memory and habit development. The model is based on relevant research literature, and its dynamics were investigated by computer simulations. Time-series data from a behavior-change campaign in Cuba were used for calibration and validation of the model. The model scored well in…

  12. Evaluating psychological interventions in a novel experimental human model of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Ben; Marshall, Jemma E; Meron, Daniel; Baldwin, David S; Chadwick, Paul; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide increases anxiety and autonomic arousal and provides a novel experimental model of anxiety with which to evaluate pharmacological and psychological treatments for anxiety. To date several psychotropic drugs including benzodiazepines, SSRIs and SNRIs have been evaluated using the 7.5% CO2 model; however, it has yet to be used to evaluate psychological interventions. We compared the effects of two core psychological components of mindfulness-meditation (open monitoring and focused attention) against general relaxation, on subjective, autonomic and neuropsychological outcomes in the 7.5% CO2 experimental model. 32 healthy screened adults were randomized to complete 10 min of guided open monitoring, focused attention or relaxation, immediately before inhaling 7.5% CO2 for 20 min. During CO2-challenge participants completed an eye-tracking measure of attention control and selective attention. Measures of subjective anxiety, blood pressure and heart rate were taken at baseline and immediately following intervention and CO2-challenge. OM and FA practice reduced subjective feelings of anxiety during 20-min inhalation of 7.5% CO2 compared to relaxation control. OM practice produced a strong anxiolytic effect, whereas the effect of FA was more modest. Anxiolytic OM and FA effects occurred in the absence of group differences in autonomic arousal and eye-movement measures of attention. Our findings are consistent with neuropsychological models of mindfulness-meditation that propose OM and FA activate prefrontal mechanisms that support emotion regulation during periods of anxiety and physiological hyper-arousal. Our findings complement those from pharmacological treatment studies, further supporting the use of CO2 challenge to evaluate future therapeutic interventions for anxiety.

  13. Periodic and chaotic psychological stress variations as predicted by a social support buffered response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard J.; Gallas, Jason A. C.; Schuldberg, David

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has introduced social dynamic models of people's stress-related processes, some including amelioration of stress symptoms by support from others. The effects of support may be ;direct;, depending only on the level of support, or ;buffering;, depending on the product of the level of support and level of stress. We focus here on the nonlinear buffering term and use a model involving three variables (and 12 control parameters), including stress as perceived by the individual, physical and psychological symptoms, and currently active social support. This model is quantified by a set of three nonlinear differential equations governing its stationary-state stability, temporal evolution (sometimes oscillatory), and how each variable affects the others. Chaos may appear with periodic forcing of an environmental stress parameter. Here we explore this model carefully as the strength and amplitude of this forcing, and an important psychological parameter relating to self-kindling in the stress response, are varied. Three significant observations are made: 1. There exist many complex but orderly regions of periodicity and chaos, 2. there are nested regions of increasing number of peaks per cycle that may cascade to chaos, and 3. there are areas where more than one state, e.g., a period-2 oscillation and chaos, coexist for the same parameters; which one is reached depends on initial conditions.

  14. Family support and acceptance, gay male identity formation, and psychological adjustment: a path model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizur, Y; Ziv, M

    2001-01-01

    While heterosexist family undermining has been demonstrated to be a developmental risk factor in the life of persons with same-gender orientation, the issue of protective family factors is both controversial and relatively neglected. In this study of Israeli gay males (N = 114), we focused on the interrelations of family support, family acceptance and family knowledge of gay orientation, and gay male identity formation, and their effects on mental health and self-esteem. A path model was proposed based on the hypotheses that family support, family acceptance, family knowledge, and gay identity formation have an impact on psychological adjustment, and that family support has an effect on gay identity formation that is mediated by family acceptance. The assessment of gay identity formation was based on an established stage model that was streamlined for cross-cultural practice by defining three basic processes of same-gender identity formation: self-definition, self-acceptance, and disclosure (Elizur & Mintzer, 2001). The testing of our conceptual path model demonstrated an excellent fit with the data. An alternative model that hypothesized effects of gay male identity on family acceptance and family knowledge did not fit the data. Interpreting these results, we propose that the main effect of family support/acceptance on gay identity is related to the process of disclosure, and that both general family support and family acceptance of same-gender orientation play a significant role in the psychological adjustment of gay men.

  15. Exploring Environmental Factors in Nursing Workplaces That Promote Psychological Resilience: Constructing a Unified Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lynette; Smith, Morgan; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare S.; Breen, Lauren J.; Witt, Regina R.; Rogers, Cath; Williams, Allison; Cross, Wendy; Cheung, Kin

    2016-01-01

    Building nurses' resilience to complex and stressful practice environments is necessary to keep skilled nurses in the workplace and ensuring safe patient care. A unified theoretical framework titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM), is presented to explain the environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. The framework builds on a previously-published theoretical model of individual resilience, which identified the key constructs of psychological resilience as self-efficacy, coping and mindfulness, but did not examine environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. This unified theoretical framework was developed using a literary synthesis drawing on data from international studies and literature reviews on the nursing workforce in hospitals. The most frequent workplace environmental factors were identified, extracted and clustered in alignment with key constructs for psychological resilience. Six major organizational concepts emerged that related to a positive resilience-building workplace and formed the foundation of the theoretical model. Three concepts related to nursing staff support (professional, practice, personal) and three related to nursing staff development (professional, practice, personal) within the workplace environment. The unified theoretical model incorporates these concepts within the workplace context, linking to the nurse, and then impacting on personal resilience and workplace outcomes, and its use has the potential to increase staff retention and quality of patient care. PMID:27242567

  16. Exploring Environmental Factors in Nursing Workplaces That Promote Psychological Resilience: Constructing a Unified Theoretical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lynette; Smith, Morgan; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare S; Breen, Lauren J; Witt, Regina R; Rogers, Cath; Williams, Allison; Cross, Wendy; Cheung, Kin

    2016-01-01

    Building nurses' resilience to complex and stressful practice environments is necessary to keep skilled nurses in the workplace and ensuring safe patient care. A unified theoretical framework titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM), is presented to explain the environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. The framework builds on a previously-published theoretical model of individual resilience, which identified the key constructs of psychological resilience as self-efficacy, coping and mindfulness, but did not examine environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. This unified theoretical framework was developed using a literary synthesis drawing on data from international studies and literature reviews on the nursing workforce in hospitals. The most frequent workplace environmental factors were identified, extracted and clustered in alignment with key constructs for psychological resilience. Six major organizational concepts emerged that related to a positive resilience-building workplace and formed the foundation of the theoretical model. Three concepts related to nursing staff support (professional, practice, personal) and three related to nursing staff development (professional, practice, personal) within the workplace environment. The unified theoretical model incorporates these concepts within the workplace context, linking to the nurse, and then impacting on personal resilience and workplace outcomes, and its use has the potential to increase staff retention and quality of patient care.

  17. Psychobiological responses to social threat: evolution of a psychological model in psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, Margaret E

    2009-01-01

    There exists a bidirectional network of interactions between the central nervous system, the endocrine system and the immune system. The existence of these pathways allows stressful life experience to impact the immune system with important implications for health. One powerful elicitor of changes in the autonomic, endocrine and immune systems is threat to social status. This review describes the development of a human model of social status threat that specifies a set of contextual, psychological and biological pathways that may underlie the health consequences of threats to social status and regard. The role of cognitive processes in shaping the physiological response to the social world will be emphasized.

  18. The model of complexity against common psychological anxiety towards death models

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez, Leonardo Yovany; Universidad Autónoma de Bucaramanga

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety towards death has been a subject of investigation since different psychological perspectives. It takes part in tanatology courses directed for health careers students and for health professional attending terminal patients. Anxiety towards death is a complex phenomenon which involves the individual coping skills but also the confrontation of the individual´s whole life experience, the integration of it and the expectations and living resolutions, the mourning into a implacable time. T...

  19. Gibson’s ecological approach – a model for the benefits of a theory driven psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Golonka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most other sciences, psychology has no true core theory to guide a coherent research programme. It does have James J Gibson’s ecological approach to visual perception, however, which we suggest should serve as an example of the benefits a good theory brings to psychological research. Here we focus on an example of how the ecological approach has served as a guide to discovery, shaping and constraining a recent hypothesis about how humans perform coordinated rhythmic movements (Bingham 2004a, b. Early experiments on this task were framed in a dynamic pattern approach. This phenomenological, behavioural framework (e.g. Jeka & Kelso 1989 classifies the behaviour of complex action systems in terms of the key order parameters, and describes the dynamical stability of the system as it responds to perturbations. Dynamical systems, however, while a valuable toolkit, is not a theory of behaviour, and this style of research is unable to successfully predict data it is not explicitly designed to fit. More recent work by Bingham & colleagues has used dynamical systems to formalise hypotheses derived from Gibson’s ecological approach to perception and action, with a particular emphasis on perceptual information. The resulting model (Bingham 2001, 2004a, b; Snapp-Childs et al. 2011 has had great success with both the phenomena it was designed to explain as well as a wide range of empirical results from a version of the task it is not specifically designed to explain (specifically, learning a novel coordination. This model and the research programme that produced it stand as an example of the value of theory driven research, and we use it to illustrate the contemporary importance the ecological approach has for psychology.

  20. Models of traumatic experiences and children's psychological adjustment: the roles of perceived parenting and the children's own resources and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punamäki, R L; Qouta, S; el Sarraj, E

    1997-08-01

    The relations between traumatic events, perceived parenting styles, children's resources, political activity, and psychological adjustment were examined among 108 Palestinian boys and girls of 11-12 years of age. The results showed that exposure to traumatic events increased psychological adjustment problems directly and via 2 mediating paths. First, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more negative parenting they experienced. And, the poorer they perceived parenting, the more they suffered from high neuroticism and low self-esteem. Second, the more traumatic events children had experienced, the more political activity they showed, and the more active they were, the more they suffered from psychological adjustment problems. Good perceived parenting protected children's psychological adjustment by making them less vulnerable in two ways. First, traumatic events decreased their intellectual, creative, and cognitive resources, and a lack of resources predicted many psychological adjustment problems in a model excluding perceived parenting. Second, political activity increased psychological adjustment problems in the same model, but not in the model including good parenting.

  1. An explanatory model regarding the relationships between psychological traits and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research tested a theoretical model of the relationships between certain psychological variables and creativity. Specifically, the relationships among intelligence, personality, intrinsic motivation, creative self-efficacy, and ideational creativity were examined. This study was conducted with a sample of 180 college students (136 women and 44 men who were evaluated with regard to the variables above in two sessions outside the regular academic schedule. The results obtained via structural equation analysis supported the model and revealed that the independent variables (intelligence and personality and the intermediate variables (intrinsic motivation and creative self-efficacy that comprise the proposed model influenced creativity. Furthermore, creative self-efficacy was the most significant trait associated with ideational creativity.

  2. Integrating behavioral-motive and experiential-requirement perspectives on psychological needs: a two process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Kennon M

    2011-10-01

    Psychological need theories offer much explanatory potential for behavioral scientists, but there is considerable disagreement and confusion about what needs are and how they work. A 2-process model of psychological needs is outlined, viewing needs as evolved functional systems that provide both (a) innate psychosocial motives that tend to impel adaptive behavior and (b) innate experiential requirements that when met reinforce adaptive behavior and promote mental health. The literature is reviewed to find support for 8 hypotheses derived from this model: that certain basic psychosocial motives are present at birth; that successful enactment of these motives supports the functioning and wellness of all humans; that individual differences in these motives develop in childhood; that these strong motive dispositions tend to produce the satisfying experiences they seek; that motive dispositions do not moderate the effect of motive-corresponding need satisfaction on well-being but do moderate the effect of assigned goal-type on rated self-concordance for those goals; that need dissatisfaction and need satisfaction correspond to the separable behavioral-motive and experiential-reward aspects of needs; and that motives and needs can become decoupled when chronic dissatisfaction of particular requirements warps or depresses the corresponding motives, such that the adaptive process fails in its function. Implications for self-determination theory and motive disposition theory are considered.

  3. Psychological Empowerment of the Devotees by Use of Structural Equations Modeling Case study: All Devotees of Ilam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seid Mehdi Veiseh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychological empowerment refers to the process of increase of internal motivation proportional to the performance of delivered duties, including recognition aspects such as being affective, worthiness, meaningfulness and right of choice. This study is Objective to investigate the relationship between psychological empowerment of the devotees and the variables work life quality, organizational justice, social support and social health. Methodology research: This is a descriptive – correlation study in which the structural equation modeling is used. The populations include all devotees of Ilam who were selected by use of Cochrane's formula. From the results, it became clear that psychological empowerment of the devotees is directly affected by the factors such as social health, social support, work life quality and organizational justice. Moreover, the variable work life quality has more influence on the psychological empowerment of the devotees.

  4. Structural Model for the Effects of Environmental Elements on the Psychological Characteristics and Performance of the Employees of Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Realyvásquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effects of environmental elements on the psychological characteristics and performance of employees in manufacturing systems using structural equation modeling. Increasing the comprehension of these effects may help optimize manufacturing systems regarding their employees’ psychological characteristics and performance from a macroergonomic perspective. As the method, a new macroergonomic compatibility questionnaire (MCQ was developed and statistically validated, and 158 respondents at four manufacture companies were considered. Noise, lighting and temperature, humidity and air quality (THAQ were used as independent variables and psychological characteristics and employees’ performance as dependent variables. To propose and test the hypothetical causal model of significant relationships among the variables, a data analysis was deployed. Results found that the macroergonomic compatibility of environmental elements presents significant direct effects on employees’ psychological characteristics and either direct or indirect effects on the employees’ performance. THAQ had the highest direct and total effects on psychological characteristics. Regarding the direct and total effects on employees’ performance, the psychological characteristics presented the highest effects, followed by THAQ conditions. These results may help measure and optimize manufacturing systems’ performance by enhancing their macroergonomic compatibility and quality of life at work of the employees.

  5. Structural Model for the Effects of Environmental Elements on the Psychological Characteristics and Performance of the Employees of Manufacturing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realyvásquez, Arturo; Maldonado-Macías, Aidé Aracely; García-Alcaraz, Jorge; Cortés-Robles, Guillermo; Blanco-Fernández, Julio

    2016-01-05

    This paper analyzes the effects of environmental elements on the psychological characteristics and performance of employees in manufacturing systems using structural equation modeling. Increasing the comprehension of these effects may help optimize manufacturing systems regarding their employees' psychological characteristics and performance from a macroergonomic perspective. As the method, a new macroergonomic compatibility questionnaire (MCQ) was developed and statistically validated, and 158 respondents at four manufacture companies were considered. Noise, lighting and temperature, humidity and air quality (THAQ) were used as independent variables and psychological characteristics and employees' performance as dependent variables. To propose and test the hypothetical causal model of significant relationships among the variables, a data analysis was deployed. Results found that the macroergonomic compatibility of environmental elements presents significant direct effects on employees' psychological characteristics and either direct or indirect effects on the employees' performance. THAQ had the highest direct and total effects on psychological characteristics. Regarding the direct and total effects on employees' performance, the psychological characteristics presented the highest effects, followed by THAQ conditions. These results may help measure and optimize manufacturing systems' performance by enhancing their macroergonomic compatibility and quality of life at work of the employees.

  6. Positive Instruction in Music Studios: Introducing a New Model for Teaching Studio Music in Schools Based upon Positive Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patston, Tim; Waters, Lea

    This practice paper explores the intersection of school studio-music pedagogy and positive psychology in order to enhance students' learning and engagement. The paper has a practitioner focus and puts forward a new model of studio teaching, the Positive Instruction in Music Studios (PIMS) model that guides teachers through four key positive psychology processes that can be used in a music lesson: positive priming, strengths spotting, positive pause, and process praise. The model provides a new, positively oriented approach to studio-music pedagogy that can be integrated into specific methods-based programs to enhance student learning and engagement.

  7. Environmental, psychological, and social influences on physical activity among Japanese adults: structural equation modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Kaori

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of the contributing factors to be considered when examining how individuals engage in physical activity is important for promoting population-based physical activity. The environment influences long-term effects on population-based health behaviors. Personal variables, such as self-efficacy and social support, can act as mediators of the predictive relationship between the environment and physical activity. The present study examines the direct and indirect effects of environmental, psychological, and social factors on walking, moderate-intensity activity excluding walking, and vigorous-intensity activity among Japanese adults. Methods The participants included 1,928 Japanese adults aged 20-79 years. Seven sociodemographic attributes (e.g., gender, age, education level, employment status, psychological variables (self-efficacy, pros, and cons, social variables (social support, environmental variables (home fitness equipment, access to facilities, neighborhood safety, aesthetic sensibilities, and frequency of observing others exercising, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were assessed via an Internet-based survey. Structural equation modeling was conducted to determine associations between environmental, psychological, and social factors with physical activity. Results Environmental factors could be seen to have indirect effects on physical activity through their influence on psychological and social variables such as self-efficacy, pros and cons, and social support. The strongest indirect effects could be observed by examining the consequences of environmental factors on physical activity through cons to self-efficacy. The total effects of environmental factors on physical activity were 0.02 on walking, 0.02 on moderate-intensity activity excluding walking, and 0.05 on vigorous-intensity activity. Conclusions The present study indicates that environmental factors had indirect effects on

  8. The Model of Unreliable Elements (Human Resources) Intellectual Management System on the Basis of Their Psychological and Personal Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ryabtsev, Timofey; Antonova, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Article suggests a possible approach to creation of the Intellectual Management System for human resources and personnel (during their professional tasks solving), and that could consider personal characteristics and psychological condition of the human resources as an “unreliable” element. The Article describes some elements of the Intellectual Management System: professional activity model and “unreliable” element (human resources) model.

  9. Mentoring ethnic minority counseling and clinical psychology students: A multicultural, ecological, and relational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Anne W; Yeh, Christine J; Krumboltz, John D

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to understand the role of race and culture in successful mentoring relationships in graduate school. We examined the practices of 9 faculty mentors working with 15 ethnic minority doctoral students in counseling and clinical psychology. Grounded theory was used to discern unifying patterns and to formulate a theory of multicultural mentoring. Five overall themes significant to multicultural mentoring emerged: (a) career support and guidance tailored for ethnic minorities, (b) relationality between mentors and protégés, (c) significance of contexts, (d) interconnections across contexts, and (e) multidirectionality of interactions between contexts. The 5 themes combined to form a multicultural, ecological, and relational model of mentoring. Our findings suggest that mentoring ethnic minority students can be successful, productive, and satisfying for both mentors and protégés when mentors possess the necessary skills, time, commitment, and multicultural competencies. Implications for doctoral programs in counseling and clinical psychology are discussed, along with recommendations for future research directions.

  10. Testing a social psychological model of strategy use with students of english as a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tsung-Yuan

    2004-12-01

    This replication study tested MacIntyre's Social Psychological Model of Strategy Use. Participants were 137 first-year college students (100 men and 37 women), all in their late teens or early 20s, learning English as a foreign language in a university in Taiwan. McIntyre specified three conditions for use of language-learning strategies in his model: awareness of the strategy, having a reason to use it, and not having a reason not to use it. Stepwise multiple regression analyses of data measured by Oxford's 50-item Strategy Inventory for Language Learning partially support this model because only Knowledge about the Strategy (representing the first condition) and Difficulty about Using It (representing the third condition) made significant independent contributions to the prediction of use of most of the 50 strategies. Close examination of the results poses questions about MacIntyre and Noels' thesis, as implied in their revised model, that reason to use the strategy and reason not to use the strategy are independent. The present replication suggests a need for further revision of the model. Use of methods more advanced than the multiple regression is recommended to test and refine the model.

  11. FORMULATION OF A THE ORETICAL MODEL OF QUALITY OF LIFE FROM PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO TRUJILLO*

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is a modest theoretical contribution to the study of the quality of life over the life cycle span,with emphasis on the older adult. The collective writing is the result of debates which took place during the twoyears of the social practice project «Quality of Life and Life Cycle Span» carried out at the Psychology Faculty ofthe Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, which had as one of its objectives the investigation of the psychologicaldimension of the quality of life. The teamwork consisted in the compilation of some theoretical fundamentals ofthe process, after which a model is formulated proposing the dynamic integration of the dimensions, especially thepsychological, which affect the quality of life.

  12. A model of quantum-like decision-making with applications to psychology and cognitive science

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    We consider the following model of decision-making by cognitive systems. We present an algorithm -- quantum-like representation algorithm (QLRA) -- which provides a possibility to represent probabilistic data of any origin by complex probability amplitudes. Our conjecture is that cognitive systems developed the ability to use QLRA. They operate with complex probability amplitudes, mental wave functions. Since the mathematical formalism of QM describes as well (under some generalization) processing of such quantum-like (QL) mental states, the conventional quantum decision-making scheme can be used by the brain. We consider a modification of this scheme to describe decision-making in the presence of two ``incompatible'' mental variables. Such a QL decision-making can be used in situations like Prisoners Dilemma (PD) as well as others corresponding to so called disjunction effect in psychology and cognitive science.

  13. Logotherapy and positive psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar R. Oro

    2015-01-01

    Psychology omitted to approach, during almost a century, the positive aspects from persons, like creativity, humor, optimism, hope, forgiveness, life meaning, and happiness. These themes are approached by Positive Psychology, with Seligman like the principal exponent. Psychology was dedicated to explore the negative aspects from human beings improving human health. Nevertheless, this pathogenic model could not prevent mental disease. Concepts of Positive Psychology have a solid antecedent in ...

  14. The strength model of self-control in sport and exercise psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eEnglert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The strength model of self-control assumes that all acts of self-control (e.g., emotion regulation, persistence are empowered by a single global metaphorical strength that has limited capacity. This strength can become temporarily depleted after a primary self-control act, which, in turn, can impair performance in subsequent acts of self-control. Recently, the assumptions of the strength model of self-control also have been adopted and tested in the field of sport and exercise psychology. The present review paper aims to give an overview of recent developments in self-control research based on the strength model of self-control. Furthermore, recent research on interventions on how to improve and revitalize self-control strength will be presented. Finally, the strength model of self-control has been criticized lately, as well as expanded in scope, so the present paper will also discuss alternative explanations of why previous acts of self-control can lead to impaired performance in sport and exercise.

  15. Psychological contract breaches, organizational commitment, and innovation-related behaviors: a latent growth modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas W H; Feldman, Daniel C; Lam, Simon S K

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the relationships among psychological contract breaches, organizational commitment, and innovation-related behaviors (generating, spreading, implementing innovative ideas at work) over a 6-month period. Results indicate that the effects of psychological contract breaches on employees are not static. Specifically, perceptions of psychological contract breaches strengthened over time and were associated with decreased levels of affective commitment over time. Further, increased perceptions of psychological contract breaches were associated with decreases in innovation-related behaviors. We also found evidence that organizational commitment mediates the relationship between psychological contract breaches and innovation-related behaviors. These results highlight the importance of examining the nomological network of psychological contract breaches from a change perspective.

  16. An Empirical Assessment of REBT Models of Psychopathology and Psychological Health in the Prediction of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Horea-Radu; Hyland, Philip; Vallières, Frédérique; David, Daniel Ovidiu

    2017-03-28

    This study aimed to assess the validity of two models which integrate the cognitive (satisfaction with life) and affective (symptoms of anxiety and depression) aspects of subjective well-being within the framework of rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT) theory; specifically REBT's theory of psychopathology and theory of psychological health. 397 Irish and Northern Irish undergraduate students completed measures of rational/irrational beliefs, satisfaction with life, and anxiety/depression symptoms. Structural equation modelling techniques were used in order to test our hypothesis within a cross-sectional design. REBT's theory of psychopathology (χ2 = 373.78, d.f. = 163, p < .001; comparative fit index (CFI) = .92; Tucker Lewis index (TLI) = .91; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .06 (95% CI = .05 to .07); standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = .07) and psychological health (χ2 = 371.89, d.f. = 181, p < .001; CFI = .93; TLI = .92; RMSEA = .05 (95% CI = .04 to .06); SRMR = .06) provided acceptable fit of the data. Moreover, the psychopathology model explained 34% of variance in levels of anxiety/depression, while the psychological health model explained 33% of variance. This study provides important findings linking the fields of clinical and positive psychology within a comprehensible framework for both researchers and clinicians. Findings are discussed in relation to the possibility of more effective interventions, incorporating and targeting not only negative outcomes, but also positive concepts within the same model.

  17. Cognitive Psychology Meets Psychometric Theory: On the Relation between Process Models for Decision Making and Latent Variable Models for Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maas, Han L. J.; Molenaar, Dylan; Maris, Gunter; Kievit, Rogier A.; Borsboom, Denny

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes latent variable models from a cognitive psychology perspective. We start by discussing work by Tuerlinckx and De Boeck (2005), who proved that a diffusion model for 2-choice response processes entails a 2-parameter logistic item response theory (IRT) model for individual differences in the response data. Following this line…

  18. Relational health, alexithymia, and psychological distress in college women: testing a mediator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Belle; West, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Relational health refers to interpersonal interactions that are growth-fostering or mutually empathic and empowering. Poor relational health increases an individual's risk for developing psychological distress. Alexithymia is the inability to recognize and express one's own internal emotional experience. In this study, the associations of relational health, psychological distress, and alexithymia were examined by surveying 197 female undergraduate psychology students. Support was found for the hypothesis that alexithymic symptoms mediate the direct effect of poor relational health on psychological distress. The importance of assessing relational health and tailoring counseling interventions for people with low relational health and alexithymic symptoms is discussed.

  19. Chess databases as a research vehicle in psychology: Modeling large data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaci, Nemanja; Bilalić, Merim

    2016-09-01

    The game of chess has often been used for psychological investigations, particularly in cognitive science. The clear-cut rules and well-defined environment of chess provide a model for investigations of basic cognitive processes, such as perception, memory, and problem solving, while the precise rating system for the measurement of skill has enabled investigations of individual differences and expertise-related effects. In the present study, we focus on another appealing feature of chess-namely, the large archive databases associated with the game. The German national chess database presented in this study represents a fruitful ground for the investigation of multiple longitudinal research questions, since it collects the data of over 130,000 players and spans over 25 years. The German chess database collects the data of all players, including hobby players, and all tournaments played. This results in a rich and complete collection of the skill, age, and activity of the whole population of chess players in Germany. The database therefore complements the commonly used expertise approach in cognitive science by opening up new possibilities for the investigation of multiple factors that underlie expertise and skill acquisition. Since large datasets are not common in psychology, their introduction also raises the question of optimal and efficient statistical analysis. We offer the database for download and illustrate how it can be used by providing concrete examples and a step-by-step tutorial using different statistical analyses on a range of topics, including skill development over the lifetime, birth cohort effects, effects of activity and inactivity on skill, and gender differences.

  20. Psychological Factors in the Development of Football-Talent from the Perspective of an Integrative Sport-Talent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Robert; Mezo, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, integrative model of sports talent. Following the theoretical part of the study a football-talent research is presented, in which a theoretical framework is provided by this new theory of sports talent. This research examines the role of psychological factors in football talent development. The sample was N = 425…

  1. Case Studies' Effect on Undergraduates' Achievement, Attitudes, and Team Shared Mental Models in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzouk, Rim; Johnson, Tristan E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of case studies on learning outcomes, attitudes toward instructions, and team shared mental models (SMM) in a team-based learning environment in an undergraduate educational psychology course. Approximately 105 students who participated in this study were randomly assigned to either a case-study…

  2. Case Studies' Effect on Undergraduates' Achievement, Attitudes, and Team Shared Mental Models in Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzouk, Rim; Johnson, Tristan E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of case studies on learning outcomes, attitudes toward instructions, and team shared mental models (SMM) in a team-based learning environment in an undergraduate educational psychology course. Approximately 105 students who participated in this study were randomly assigned to either a case-study…

  3. Promoting Psychological Well-Being in an Urban School Using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrick B.; Summerville, Meredith A.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Patterson, Julie; Earnshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School psychology has recently reconceptualized its service provision model to include multitiered systems of academic and psychosocial promotion, prevention, and intervention. The availability of evidence-based programs and advances in school consultation theory accompany the paradigm shift of the field. Despite these advances, implementing…

  4. Evaluation Capacity Building in the Context of Military Psychological Health: Utilizing Preskill and Boyle's Multidisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Lara; Libretto, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The need for evaluation capacity building (ECB) in military psychological health is apparent in light of the proliferation of newly developed, yet untested programs coupled with the lack of internal evaluation expertise. This study addresses these deficiencies by utilizing Preskill and Boyle's multidisciplinary ECB model within a post-traumatic…

  5. Maternal Psychological Control and Peer Victimization in Early Adolescence: An Application of the Family Relational Schema Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batanova, Milena D.; Loukas, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Guided by the family relational schema model, the current study examined the direct and indirect contributions of maternal psychological control to subsequent relational and overt peer victimization, via early adolescents' conduct problems, fear of negative evaluation, and depressive symptoms. Participants were 499 10- to 14-year-olds (53% female;…

  6. Promoting Psychological Well-Being in an Urban School Using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrick B.; Summerville, Meredith A.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Patterson, Julie; Earnshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School psychology has recently reconceptualized its service provision model to include multitiered systems of academic and psychosocial promotion, prevention, and intervention. The availability of evidence-based programs and advances in school consultation theory accompany the paradigm shift of the field. Despite these advances, implementing…

  7. Psychological determinants of paying attention to eco-labels in purchase decisions: Model development and multinational validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    Environmental labels are useful from an environmental policy perspective only if they are noticed by the consumer in the shopping situation and next - and related - understood, trusted, and valued as a tool for decision-making. In this paper, a psychological model explaining variations in consumer...

  8. A Work Psychological Model that Works: Expanding the Job Demands-Resources Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xanthopoulou, D.

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of the current thesis was to test and expand the recently developed Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. The advantage of this model is that it recognizes the uniqueness of each work environment, which has its own specific job demands and job resources. According to the JD-R model, j

  9. A Work Psychological Model that Works: Expanding the Job Demands-Resources Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xanthopoulou, D.

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of the current thesis was to test and expand the recently developed Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. The advantage of this model is that it recognizes the uniqueness of each work environment, which has its own specific job demands and job resources. According to the JD-R model,

  10. Ecological, psychological, and cognitive components of reading difficulties: testing the component model of reading in fourth graders across 38 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ming Ming; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the component model of reading (CMR) among 186,725 fourth grade students from 38 countries (45 regions) on five continents by analyzing the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study data using measures of ecological (country, family, school, teacher), psychological, and cognitive components. More than 91% of the differences in student difficulty occurred at the country (61%) and classroom (30%) levels (ecological), with less than 9% at the student level (cognitive and psychological). All three components were negatively associated with reading difficulties: cognitive (student's early literacy skills), ecological (family characteristics [socioeconomic status, number of books at home, and attitudes about reading], school characteristics [school climate and resources]), and psychological (students' attitudes about reading, reading self-concept, and being a girl). These results extend the CMR by demonstrating the importance of multiple levels of factors for reading deficits across diverse cultures.

  11. The trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of psychological trauma : intrusive memories and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Ella L; Lau-Zhu, Alex; Clark, Ian A; Visser, Renée M; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Holmes, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of psychological trauma is fundamental to clinical psychology. Following traumatic event(s), a clinically significant number of people develop symptoms, including those of Acute Stress Disorder and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The trauma film paradigm offers an experimen

  12. The Model Does Matter II: Admissions and Training in APA-Accredited Counseling Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C.; Evans, Krystle L.; Ellis, Jeannette L.

    2010-01-01

    This study collected information on the acceptance rates, admission standards, financial assistance, student characteristics, theoretical orientations, and select outcomes of American Psychological Association-accredited counseling psychology programs (99% response rate). Results are presented collectively for all 66 counseling programs as well as…

  13. The trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of psychological trauma : intrusive memories and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Ella L; Lau-Zhu, Alex; Clark, Ian A; Visser, Renée M; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Holmes, Emily A

    A better understanding of psychological trauma is fundamental to clinical psychology. Following traumatic event(s), a clinically significant number of people develop symptoms, including those of Acute Stress Disorder and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The trauma film paradigm offers an

  14. Structural Modeling on the Relationship between Basic Psychological Needs, Academic Engagement, and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maralani, Farnaz Mehdipour; Lavasani, Masoud Gholamali; Hejazi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Some of the key issues in educational psychology are the way of students' engagement at school, controlling anxiety, and academic achievement. In line with that, the purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between variables that are basic psychological needs, academic engagement, and test anxiety with regard to structural…

  15. Outcomes of Parental Use of Psychological Aggression on Children: A Structural Model from Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zoysa, Piyanjali; Newcombe, Peter A.; Rajapakse, Lalini

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the existence and, if so, the nature of the association between parental use of psychological aggression and psychological maladjustment in a 12-year-old Sri Lankan school population. A stratified random sampling technique was used to select 1,226 children from Colombo district schools. Three instruments,…

  16. A Convenient Model for the Evolution of Early Psychology as a Scientific Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Robert

    1981-01-01

    To help college students understand psychology, the article suggests that instructors develop curriculum based on the relationship between scientific and technological advances and the development of early psychology. Views of many nineteenth century psychologists are summarized, including Johann Friedrich Herbart, Hermann Lotze, and Georg…

  17. Relationships among Abuse Characteristics, Coping Strategies, and Abused Women's Psychological Health: A Path Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Glennys; Lee, Christina

    2007-01-01

    We examined relationships between abuse, coping, and psychological health among 143 women who had experienced abuse in adult relationships. Measures included characteristics of the abuse, problem-focused and emotion-focused coping, Sense of Coherence, and four measures of psychological wellbeing--the SF-36 Mental Component Scale, the General…

  18. The Cost Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Interventions for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Model-Based Economic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigeneia Mavranezouli

    Full Text Available Social anxiety disorder is one of the most persistent and common anxiety disorders. Individually delivered psychological therapies are the most effective treatment options for adults with social anxiety disorder, but they are associated with high intervention costs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the relative cost effectiveness of a variety of psychological and pharmacological interventions for adults with social anxiety disorder.A decision-analytic model was constructed to compare costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs of 28 interventions for social anxiety disorder from the perspective of the British National Health Service and personal social services. Efficacy data were derived from a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Other model input parameters were based on published literature and national sources, supplemented by expert opinion.Individual cognitive therapy was the most cost-effective intervention for adults with social anxiety disorder, followed by generic individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT, phenelzine and book-based self-help without support. Other drugs, group-based psychological interventions and other individually delivered psychological interventions were less cost-effective. Results were influenced by limited evidence suggesting superiority of psychological interventions over drugs in retaining long-term effects. The analysis did not take into account side effects of drugs.Various forms of individually delivered CBT appear to be the most cost-effective options for the treatment of adults with social anxiety disorder. Consideration of side effects of drugs would only strengthen this conclusion, as it would improve even further the cost effectiveness of individually delivered CBT relative to phenelzine, which was the next most cost-effective option, due to the serious side effects associated with phenelzine. Further research needs to determine more accurately the long

  19. The Cost Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Interventions for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Model-Based Economic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavranezouli, Ifigeneia; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Dias, Sofia; Kew, Kayleigh; Clark, David M.; Ades, A. E.; Pilling, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder is one of the most persistent and common anxiety disorders. Individually delivered psychological therapies are the most effective treatment options for adults with social anxiety disorder, but they are associated with high intervention costs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the relative cost effectiveness of a variety of psychological and pharmacological interventions for adults with social anxiety disorder. Methods A decision-analytic model was constructed to compare costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) of 28 interventions for social anxiety disorder from the perspective of the British National Health Service and personal social services. Efficacy data were derived from a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Other model input parameters were based on published literature and national sources, supplemented by expert opinion. Results Individual cognitive therapy was the most cost-effective intervention for adults with social anxiety disorder, followed by generic individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), phenelzine and book-based self-help without support. Other drugs, group-based psychological interventions and other individually delivered psychological interventions were less cost-effective. Results were influenced by limited evidence suggesting superiority of psychological interventions over drugs in retaining long-term effects. The analysis did not take into account side effects of drugs. Conclusion Various forms of individually delivered CBT appear to be the most cost-effective options for the treatment of adults with social anxiety disorder. Consideration of side effects of drugs would only strengthen this conclusion, as it would improve even further the cost effectiveness of individually delivered CBT relative to phenelzine, which was the next most cost-effective option, due to the serious side effects associated with phenelzine. Further research needs to determine more accurately

  20. Modelling psychological responses to the Great East Japan earthquake and nuclear incident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Goodwin

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan (Tōhoku/Kanto earthquake of March 2011 was followed by a major tsunami and nuclear incident. Several previous studies have suggested a number of psychological responses to such disasters. However, few previous studies have modelled individual differences in the risk perceptions of major events, or the implications of these perceptions for relevant behaviours. We conducted a survey specifically examining responses to the Great Japan earthquake and nuclear incident, with data collected 11-13 weeks following these events. 844 young respondents completed a questionnaire in three regions of Japan; Miyagi (close to the earthquake and leaking nuclear plants, Tokyo/Chiba (approximately 220 km from the nuclear plants, and Western Japan (Yamaguchi and Nagasaki, some 1000 km from the plants. Results indicated significant regional differences in risk perception, with greater concern over earthquake risks in Tokyo than in Miyagi or Western Japan. Structural equation analyses showed that shared normative concerns about earthquake and nuclear risks, conservation values, lack of trust in governmental advice about the nuclear hazard, and poor personal control over the nuclear incident were positively correlated with perceived earthquake and nuclear risks. These risk perceptions further predicted specific outcomes (e.g. modifying homes, avoiding going outside, contemplating leaving Japan. The strength and significance of these pathways varied by region. Mental health and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the continuing uncertainties in Japan following the March 2011 events.

  1. Modelling psychological responses to the Great East Japan earthquake and nuclear incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Takahashi, Masahito; Sun, Shaojing; Gaines, Stanley O

    2012-01-01

    The Great East Japan (Tōhoku/Kanto) earthquake of March 2011 was followed by a major tsunami and nuclear incident. Several previous studies have suggested a number of psychological responses to such disasters. However, few previous studies have modelled individual differences in the risk perceptions of major events, or the implications of these perceptions for relevant behaviours. We conducted a survey specifically examining responses to the Great Japan earthquake and nuclear incident, with data collected 11-13 weeks following these events. 844 young respondents completed a questionnaire in three regions of Japan; Miyagi (close to the earthquake and leaking nuclear plants), Tokyo/Chiba (approximately 220 km from the nuclear plants), and Western Japan (Yamaguchi and Nagasaki, some 1000 km from the plants). Results indicated significant regional differences in risk perception, with greater concern over earthquake risks in Tokyo than in Miyagi or Western Japan. Structural equation analyses showed that shared normative concerns about earthquake and nuclear risks, conservation values, lack of trust in governmental advice about the nuclear hazard, and poor personal control over the nuclear incident were positively correlated with perceived earthquake and nuclear risks. These risk perceptions further predicted specific outcomes (e.g. modifying homes, avoiding going outside, contemplating leaving Japan). The strength and significance of these pathways varied by region. Mental health and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the continuing uncertainties in Japan following the March 2011 events.

  2. Rationality of 17 cities' public perception of SARS and predictive model of psychological behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Kan; LU Jiafang; FAN Hongxia; JIA Jianming; SONG Zhaoli; LI Wendong; GAO Jing; CHEN Xuefeng; HU Weipeng

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the feature of Chinese peoples' perception of SARS by surveying a stratified sample of 4231 people from 17 cities in China, and primarily pro- posed a risk perception centered predictive model of psy- chological behavior in crisis. The results indicated that, negative SARS-related information, especially information of personal interest, will arouse people's risk perception of high level, and lead to irrational nervousness or scare; but positive SARS-related information, including recovery in- formation and that with measures taken by government, can decrease the level of risk perception. In the middle of May, people felt the highest level of risk on the SARS pathogens; the following are the physical health condition and infectiv- ity after recovering from SARS; they are factors that need special attention. SEM result analyses supported our hy- potheses in that SARS-related information affect people's coping behavior and mental health through their risk perception, the four indices of risk assessment, feeling of nerv- ousness, coping behavior and mental health are effective presentimental indices for public psychological behavior in risky events.

  3. [An integrative model of the psychological benefits of gardening in older adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Isabelle; Postal, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    This review of the literature tackles the question of the psychological benefits linked to gardening in older adults. First, the current data on these benefits are reviewed, and the findings reveal that gardening is linked to feelings of accomplishment, well-being and peace, a decrease of depressive symptoms, a protective effect on cognitive functions as well as to the development of social links for community living older adults. In institutionalized older adults, gardening promotes internal locus of control and well-being, and is related to a decrease of sadness and anxiety. Second, several explanatory theories are discussed. All of them postulate an action on the cognitive and/or emotional spheres, which were included into a integrated model that must be tested in future research. In conclusion, gardening appears to be a beneficial activity for promoting older adults' functioning but the current knowledge still has to be extended to understand the specific mechanisms of action. This deeper understanding is necessary in order to improve the future actions depending on this activity.

  4. Model of yoga intervention in industrial organizational psychology for counterproductive work behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Umesh C; Kumari, Sony; Nagendra, H R

    2015-01-01

    Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) has long been recognized as a broad spectrum of job behaviors and its link with negative affectivity and hostile behaviors. It is a major concern practically for all organizations. Repeated exposure to workplace stressor can result in a strain, an outcome of the job stress process that can be psychological, physical, or behavioral in nature, leading to CWBs. Yoga is a technique that brings an improvement on mental and physical level by means of posture, breathing control methods, and silencing the mind through meditation. Though yoga has received less scientific consideration, there has been a significant growth in the study of yoga in the healthy population. Mindfulness and self-control practices like yoga encourage individuals to be aware and accept their aggression linked thoughts and emotions simply as a short-lived state rather than to control them. The positive effects of yoga on the improvement of personality traits are already proven. This paper introduces a simple model of cost-effective, trials of yoga intervention at the workplace which could result in the twin benefits of substantial savings from losses for the employers by reducing the CWB and health improvements for the employees by reducing the negative affectivity and aggression. Internet databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, and APA PsycNET were accessed. The available data were systematically reviewed in a structured manner and analyzed.

  5. Model of yoga intervention in industrial organizational psychology for counterproductive work behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C Dwivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Counterproductive work behavior (CWB has long been recognized as a broad spectrum of job behaviors and its link with negative affectivity and hostile behaviors. It is a major concern practically for all organizations. Repeated exposure to workplace stressor can result in a strain, an outcome of the job stress process that can be psychological, physical, or behavioral in nature, leading to CWBs. Yoga is a technique that brings an improvement on mental and physical level by means of posture, breathing control methods, and silencing the mind through meditation. Though yoga has received less scientific consideration, there has been a significant growth in the study of yoga in the healthy population. Mindfulness and self-control practices like yoga encourage individuals to be aware and accept their aggression linked thoughts and emotions simply as a short-lived state rather than to control them. The positive effects of yoga on the improvement of personality traits are already proven. This paper introduces a simple model of cost-effective, trials of yoga intervention at the workplace which could result in the twin benefits of substantial savings from losses for the employers by reducing the CWB and health improvements for the employees by reducing the negative affectivity and aggression. Internet databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, and APA PsycNET were accessed. The available data were systematically reviewed in a structured manner and analyzed.

  6. The potential of socio-psychological models for the development of prevention programs (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovina I.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of designing prevention programs in health and disease. We note that smoking cessation on the planet would reduce mortality from various types of cancer by 25%, and would also save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who die each year from heart attacks. Losing weight by only 10% through proper nutrition and exercise would reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease, as well as certain types of cancer. Based on the literature review, we reveal the different types of prevention, show the importance of preventive measures aimed at the patient's immediate environment. Among the main difficulties associated with the development of effective prevention programs we discuss the following: 1 ignoring the psychological mechanisms of behavior change; 2 irrelevance of media broadcast methods in prevention campaigns; 3 the time between the problem behavior and its negative effects on health. We discuss the potential of social influence models for the development of prevention programs in the field of health and disease.

  7. Regime switching state-space models applied to psychological processes: handling missing data and making inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, E.L.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Many psychological processes are characterized by recurrent shifts between distinct regimes or states. Examples that are considered in this paper are the switches between different states associated with premenstrual syndrome, hourly fluctuations in affect during a major depressive episode, and

  8. A Social-Cognitive Moderated Mediated Model of Psychological Safety and Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, Daniel V; Narayan, Anupama; Nelson, Courtney A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the indirect role of psychological safety in shaping the four cognitions of psychological empowerment (i.e., meaning, competence, self-determination, impact) through three social mechanisms: authentic interactions, spiritual development, and perceived organizational voice. Data were collected from 229 congregation members of a nondenominational church. Preliminary analyses reveal psychological safety is: (a) linked to all four empowerment cognitions, (b) associated with the three proximal social mechanisms, and (c) indirectly predicts three of the four empowerment cognitions through heightened level of authentic interactions, spiritual development, and perceived organizational voice. Moreover, extraversion moderated the relationship of psychological safety with authentic interactions which, in turn, strengthened the size of the indirect effect for the meaning subcomponent of empowerment. Overall, this study suggests empowerment research can draw upon the potential, but frequently untapped, benefits of cultivating a secure space to facilitate member motivation through sincerity, personal development, and perceived voice.

  9. Gibson’s ecological approach – a model for the benefits of a theory driven psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Golonka; Wilson, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike most other sciences, psychology has no true core theory to guide a coherent research programme. It does have James J Gibson’s ecological approach to visual perception, however, which we suggest should serve as an example of the benefits a good theory brings to psychological research. Here we focus on an example of how the ecological approach has served as a guide to discovery, shaping and constraining a recent hypothesis about how humans perform coordinated rhythmic movements (Bingham ...

  10. A Meta-Meta-Analysis: Empirical Review of Statistical Power, Type I Error Rates, Effect Sizes, and Model Selection of Meta-Analyses Published in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafri, Guy; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Brannick, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses meta-analyses published in "Psychological Bulletin" from 1995 to 2005 to describe meta-analyses in psychology, including examination of statistical power, Type I errors resulting from multiple comparisons, and model choice. Retrospective power estimates indicated that univariate categorical and continuous moderators, individual…

  11. Can We Predict Burnout among Student Nurses? An Exploration of the ICWR-1 Model of Individual Psychological Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S.; Heritage, Brody; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Chamberlain, Diane; Cusack, Lynette; Anderson, Judith; Terry, Victoria; Rogers, Cath; Hemsworth, David; Cross, Wendy; Hegney, Desley G.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of nursing work is demanding and can be stressful. Previous studies have shown a high rate of burnout among employed nurses. Recently, efforts have been made to understand the role of resilience in determining the psychological adjustment of employed nurses. A theoretical model of resilience was proposed recently that includes several constructs identified in the literature related to resilience and to psychological functioning. As nursing students are the future of the nursing workforce it is important to advance our understanding of the determinants of resilience in this population. Student nurses who had completed their final practicum were invited to participate in an online survey measuring the key constructs of the ICWR-1 model. 422 students from across Australia and Canada completed the survey between July 2014 and July 2015. As well as several key demographics, trait negative affect, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, resilience, and burnout were measured. We used structural equation modeling and found support for the major pathways of the model; namely that resilience had a significant influence on the relationship between mindfulness, self-efficacy and coping, and psychological adjustment (burnout scores). Furthermore, as predicted, Neuroticism moderated the relationship between coping and burnout. Results are discussed in terms of potential approaches to supporting nursing students who may be at risk of burnout. PMID:27486419

  12. Psychological pathway to suicidal ideation among men who have sex with men in Shanghai, China: A structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Cai, Yong; Wang, Ying; Gan, Feng; Shi, Rong

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to explore the relationships and develop an inter-theoretical model among psychological variables in the progression to suicidal ideation among men who have sex with men (MSM). A cross-sectional study was conducted among 547 MSM in four districts in Shanghai from March to May in 2014. Socio-demographic, psychological, and behavioral information of the participants was collected. A structural equation model (SEM)-Path Analysis was constructed to interpret the intricate relationships among various psychological variables. Suicidal ideation among MSM during the past year was 10.6%. The developed model agreed well with existing suicide models and had a good fit to the data (χ(2)/df = 2.497, comparative fit index = 0.983, root mean squared error of approximation = 0.052). Suicidal ideation was predicted by perceived defeat and entrapment (β = 0.21, p types of temperament might be predisposed to a higher perception of defeat and entrapment. Perceived social support can effectively alleviate the negative appraisals and emotions and lower the risk for suicidal ideation among MSM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Can We Predict Burnout among Student Nurses? An Exploration of the ICWR-1 Model of Individual Psychological Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S; Heritage, Brody; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Chamberlain, Diane; Cusack, Lynette; Anderson, Judith; Terry, Victoria; Rogers, Cath; Hemsworth, David; Cross, Wendy; Hegney, Desley G

    2016-01-01

    The nature of nursing work is demanding and can be stressful. Previous studies have shown a high rate of burnout among employed nurses. Recently, efforts have been made to understand the role of resilience in determining the psychological adjustment of employed nurses. A theoretical model of resilience was proposed recently that includes several constructs identified in the literature related to resilience and to psychological functioning. As nursing students are the future of the nursing workforce it is important to advance our understanding of the determinants of resilience in this population. Student nurses who had completed their final practicum were invited to participate in an online survey measuring the key constructs of the ICWR-1 model. 422 students from across Australia and Canada completed the survey between July 2014 and July 2015. As well as several key demographics, trait negative affect, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, resilience, and burnout were measured. We used structural equation modeling and found support for the major pathways of the model; namely that resilience had a significant influence on the relationship between mindfulness, self-efficacy and coping, and psychological adjustment (burnout scores). Furthermore, as predicted, Neuroticism moderated the relationship between coping and burnout. Results are discussed in terms of potential approaches to supporting nursing students who may be at risk of burnout.

  14. {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi E-mail: GZL13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p<0.05). Serum corticosterone level ratio appeared to be slightly elevated in 3-DAY and 5-DAY, although this elevation was not significant. These data suggest that {sup 125}I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress.

  15. Linear mixed-effects models for within-participant psychology experiments: an introductory tutorial and free, graphical user interface (LMMgui)

    OpenAIRE

    Magezi, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMMs) are increasingly being used for data analysis in cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology, where within-participant designs are common. The current article provides an introductory review of the use of LMMs for within-participant data analysis and describes a free, simple, graphical user interface (LMMgui). LMMgui uses the package lme4 (Bates et al., 2014a,b) in the statistical environment R (R Core Team).

  16. Linear mixed-effects models for within-participant psychology experiments: an introductory tutorial and free, graphical user interface (LMMgui).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magezi, David A

    2015-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMMs) are increasingly being used for data analysis in cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology, where within-participant designs are common. The current article provides an introductory review of the use of LMMs for within-participant data analysis and describes a free, simple, graphical user interface (LMMgui). LMMgui uses the package lme4 (Bates et al., 2014a,b) in the statistical environment R (R Core Team).

  17. Applications of puni’s link model to the psychological preparation of a football team before competition

    OpenAIRE

    Ureña Bonilla, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The link model proposed by Puni is based on a number of key steps for the psychological preparation of athletes before competition. Reference is made to (a) the selection of necessary, sufficient, and reliable information regarding details of the next competition and the particularities of the opponent; (b) analysis of the team’s own resources and potential; (c) definition of game strategies and specific individual objectives; (d) updating of personally and socially important motivations in a...

  18. Psychological stress promotes neutrophil infiltration in colon tissue through adrenergic signaling in DSS-induced colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Que; Chen, Hongyu; Liu, Yanjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Guo, Liang; Liu, Dan; Cheng, Xiang; Zhao, Min; Wang, Xiaomeng; Xie, Shuai; Qi, Siyong; Yin, Zhaoyang; Gao, Jiangping; Chen, Xintian; Wang, Jiangong; Guo, Ning; Ma, Yuanfang; Shi, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition. Psychological stress has been postulated to affect the clinical symptoms and recurrence of IBD. The exact molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that psychological stress promotes neutrophil infiltration into colon tissues in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model. The psychological stress resulted in abnormal expression of the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, and IL-22) and neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and overactivation of the STAT3 inflammatory signaling pathway. Under chronic unpredictable stress, the adrenergic nervous system was markedly activated, as the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, in bone marrow and colonic epithelium was enhanced, especially in the myenteric ganglia. The β-AR agonist isoproterenol mimicked the effects of psychological stress on neutrophilia, neutrophil infiltration, and colonic damage in DSS-induced colitis. The β1-AR/β2-AR inhibitor propranolol reduced the numbers of the neutrophils in the circulation, suppressed neutrophil infiltration into colonic tissues, and attenuated the colonic tissue damage promoted by chronic stress. Propranolol also abolished stress-induced upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil chemokines. Our data reveal a close linkage between the β1-AR/β2-AR activation and neutrophil trafficking and also suggest the critical roles of adrenergic nervous system in exacerbation of inflammation and damage of colonic tissues in experimental colitis. The current study provides a new insight into the mechanisms underlying the association of psychological stress with excessive inflammatory response and pathophysiological consequences in IBD. The findings also suggest a potential application of neuroprotective agents to prevent relapsing immune activation in the treatment of IBD.

  19. Psychological stress increases expression of aortic plaque intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and serum inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerotic rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muwei Li; Xianpei Wang; Lei Yang; Chuanyu Gao; Yexin Ma

    2008-01-01

    Plaque rupture,platelet aggregation,and thrombogenesis are the main mechanisms of acute coronary syndrome (ACS),and inflammation factors play key roles in plaque unstability.Psychological stress promotes acute inflammatory response,leading to increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP),IL-6,and serum intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1.But it is not clear that whether psychological stress has a direct effect on atherosclerotic plaque stability.The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of chronic psychological stress on inflammatory marker (ICAM-1 ) in atherosclerotic plaque,and inflammatory markers in peripheral blood.Materials and methods Sixty male rabbits were randomized into 2 groups:the control group (n =10) and the atherosclerotic group (n =50).The latter were fed on high fatty diet and were given a large dose of vitamin D3 (3 600 000IU/kg) via intraperitoneal injection.After 8 weeks,the atherosclerotic model was estaslished.Then the 50 atherosclerotic model rabbits were divided into 3 subgroups:no-stress subgroup (n = 16),physiological stress subgroup (n = 16) and psychological stress subgroup (n =18).In physiological stress subgroup and psychological stress subgroup,drinking was cut from twice a day to once a day.At the same time,psychological stress subgroup was given empty bottle stress,and this process lasted for 2 weeks.One hour after the last stress,the blood samples were collected and the serum levels of CRP,IL-6 amd ICAM-1 were tested by radioimmunoassay or enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.The aorta and heart were extracted for pathology examination,and the express of ICAM-1 was tested by immunohistochemical examination.Results (1) After effective atherosclerotic animal model construction,the expression of ICAM-1 in aorta was higher in atherosclerotic group than that in control group (P<0.01),and was notably higher in psychological stress subgroup than that in no-stress subgroup or in physiological stress subgroup (2

  20. Discrimination, acculturation, acculturative stress, and Latino psychological distress: a moderated mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas; Driscoll, Mark W; Voell, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has found that perceived discrimination is associated with adverse mental health outcomes among Latinos. However, the process by which this relationship occurs remains an understudied area. The present study investigated the role of acculturative stress in underlying the relationship between perceived discrimination and Latino psychological distress. Also examined was the ability of acculturation to serve as a moderator between perceived discrimination and acculturative stress. Among a sample of Latino adults (N = 669), moderated mediational analyses revealed that acculturative stress mediated the perceived discrimination-psychological distress relationship, and that the link between perceived discrimination and acculturative stress was moderated by Anglo behavioral orientation but not Latino behavioral orientation. The findings are discussed within a stress and coping perspective that identifies the psychological consequences associated with perceived discrimination and acculturative stress.

  1. A Case Study of the Introductory Psychology Blended Learning Model at McMaster University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review of blended learning as a didactic method, and discusses the issues and challenges of using blended learning models in post-secondary education. Blended learning refers to mixed modes of instruction that combine traditional face-to-face classroom teaching methods and online learning materials. The paper will address challenges faced by large classrooms with a diverse student body, and the ways blended learning models can help alleviate those concerns (i.e. technologically savvy students, the need for course scheduling flexibility. In addition, a case study of blended learning in higher education in the context of a unique first year Introductory Psychology program at McMaster University will be discussed. Lastly, the important learning benefits offered by blended learning systems, along with the potential barriers to their implementation will be addressed.Cet article présente un bref compte rendu de l’apprentissage hybride en tant que méthode didactique. Il traite des problèmes et des enjeux relatifs à l’utilisation des modèles d’apprentissage hybride dans le domaine de l’enseignement postsecondaire. L’apprentissage hybride renvoie aux modes d’enseignement mixtes qui combinent les méthodes d’enseignement traditionnel en présentiel et l’accès à des documents d’apprentissage en ligne. L’article traite des difficultés rencontrées dans les grands groupes comprenant une diversité d’étudiants et des façons dont les modèles d’apprentissage hybride peuvent contribuer à atténuer ces préoccupations (c.-à-d. les étudiants calés en technologie, la nécessité d’une offre de cours souple. De plus, l’article traite d’une étude de cas sur l’apprentissage hybride dans l’enseignement supérieur dans le cadre de la première année d’un programme d’introduction à la psychologie à l’Université McMaster. Enfin, l’article aborde les importants avantages offerts par

  2. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in post-graduate psychology students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Rachel M; Davis, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    .... Twenty three post-graduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test...

  3. Regime Switching State-Space Models Applied to Psychological Processes: Handling Missing Data and Making Inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaker, E. L.; Grasman, R. P. P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Many psychological processes are characterized by recurrent shifts between distinct regimes or states. Examples that are considered in this paper are the switches between different states associated with premenstrual syndrome, hourly fluctuations in affect during a major depressive episode, and shifts between a "hot hand" and a…

  4. A Structural Equation Modeling Approach to the Study of Stress and Psychological Adjustment in Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asberg, Kia K.; Bowers, Clint; Renk, Kimberly; McKinney, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    Today's society puts constant demands on the time and resources of all individuals, with the resulting stress promoting a decline in psychological adjustment. Emerging adults are not exempt from this experience, with an alarming number reporting excessive levels of stress and stress-related problems. As a result, the present study addresses the…

  5. Modeling Community Engagement in an Undergraduate Course in Psychology at an HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dawn X.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate course in community psychology at an Historically Black University. The course integrated community engagement using a local neighborhood revitalization project as a platform for students to volunteer, prepare a historical analysis, and sense of community project. The course aims to fulfill a requirement…

  6. An Integrative Psychological Developmental Model of Supervision for Professional School Counselors-in-Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Sias, Shari M.

    2009-01-01

    Professional school counselors (PSCs) at higher levels of psychological development negotiate complex situations and perform counselor-related tasks with empathy, flexibility, tolerance for ambiguity, boundary setting, personal and interpersonal awareness, and self-care more effectively than do individuals at lower levels of development. This…

  7. Toward a Model of Psychological Health Empowerment: Implications for Health Care in Multicultural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sanjay T.

    2002-01-01

    The context for health empowerment includes individuals, health providers, and the regulatory environment. Psychological health empowerment consists of perceived control, perceived competence, and goal internalization. In multicultural communities, barriers to empowerment include locus of control, access to health care, and language and cultural…

  8. Beyond the Sponge Model: Encouraging Students' Questioning Skills in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Stuart M.; Ali, Rahan; Gebing, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Argues that educators should provide students with explicit training in asking critical questions. Describes a training strategy taught in abnormal psychology courses at Bowling Green State University (Ohio). Based on a pre- and post-test, results support the promise of using explicit questioning training in promoting the evaluative aspects of…

  9. Modeling Community Engagement in an Undergraduate Course in Psychology at an HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dawn X.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate course in community psychology at an Historically Black University. The course integrated community engagement using a local neighborhood revitalization project as a platform for students to volunteer, prepare a historical analysis, and sense of community project. The course aims to fulfill a requirement…

  10. Regime Switching State-Space Models Applied to Psychological Processes: Handling Missing Data and Making Inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaker, E. L.; Grasman, R. P. P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Many psychological processes are characterized by recurrent shifts between distinct regimes or states. Examples that are considered in this paper are the switches between different states associated with premenstrual syndrome, hourly fluctuations in affect during a major depressive episode, and shifts between a "hot hand" and a…

  11. Regime switching state-space models applied to psychological processes: handling missing data and making inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, E.L.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Many psychological processes are characterized by recurrent shifts between distinct regimes or states. Examples that are considered in this paper are the switches between different states associated with premenstrual syndrome, hourly fluctuations in affect during a major depressive episode, and shif

  12. 竞技排球运动心理战理论模型的构建%Theoretical Models of Psychological Warfare Built in Competitive Volleyball

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪庆

    2011-01-01

    通过对军事心理学中心理战思想的精心研读,结合竞技排球运动与战场心理战的共通之处,从理论建设、专业人才建设、规章制度建设、谋略创新建设以及球队心理素质建设五个方面构建了竞技排球运动心理战的理论模型。%This article through the study of thoughts of psychological warfare in military psychology carefully, combined with the commons of volleyball and psychological warfare, from five aspects that construction of theory, construction of professional, and construction of rules and regulations, construction of counsel innovation and construction of team psychological quality to construct the theoretical model of psychological warfare of volleyball.

  13. Psychological Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ... IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complimentary or Alt Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments ...

  14. Psychological Factors in the Development of Football-Talent from the Perspective of an Integrative Sport-Talent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert OROSZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new, integrative model of sports talent. Following the theoretical part of the study a football-talent research is presented, in which a theoretical framework is provided by this new theory of sports talent. This research examines the role of psychological factors in football talent development. The sample was N=425 football-players of the First Division Men’s Junior and Adolescent Football Championships of the Hungarian Football League, and their coaches (N=21. The applied instruments were: Sporting Background Questionnaire, The Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS – Hungarian version, Psychological Immune Competence Inventory (PICI, Athletic Coping Skills Inventory (ACSI, Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM, Co-Player Questionnaire, and Coach Questionnaire. As a result, significant differences were found between talented and control groups in the case of 27 variables out of 48 (6 scales of the SBQ, 5 scales of the ACSI-28, 9 scales of the PISI, 5 subscales and the Total self-concept scale of the TSCS, and in APM. More talented players showed more favourable values in each of the 27 intra-, and interpersonal dimensions. According to our results, the development of psychological factors (e.g. concentration, lack of anxiety, self-confidence, coping skills, and social skills within an integrative approach can enhance personal efficiency in developing football giftedness.

  15. Discursive Psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molder, te H.

    2015-01-01

    Discursive psychology was established in the United Kingdom by the end of the 1980s, mainly in response to the dominant cognitivist approach in social psychology. While it borrowed notions from poststructuralism and sociology of science, it is most akin to conversation analysis. Discursive psycholog

  16. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  17. Identity of psychology, identity and psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Nastran Ule

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with epistemic issues of modern psychology with the starting hypothesis being that scientific psychology must satisfy three main interests: scientific, practical and emancipatory interest. Particularly important is the emancipatory interest, which is based on the social reflection of scientific work and conclusions. Psychological knowledge involves not only neutral descriptions of facts, but also implicit rules, expectations regarding values or norms, and criticism of undesirable behavior. The traditional psychological model attempts to satisfy the scientific interest and partly practical interest, while avoiding emancipatory interest. But I believe modern socio-historical models of psychology to be significant precisely owing to the inclusion of emancipatory interest. The difference between these two models of psychology is most obvious in their perception of identity i.e. individuality. Conventional perceptions follow the logic of "possessive individualism" in which the individual is seen as an autonomous bearer and owner of his/her psychological states and processes. The conventional model of identity supports the modernist concept of the individual as being focused on his/her self or personal identity. Socio-historical models, on the other hand, see the individual as a being embedded in social relations and social interactions, and one who builds and expresses his/her individuality through the reflection on social interactions, discursive practices, and response to the hierarchy of power and social mechanisms of control. According to this model, identity evolves through a series of social constructions which are embodied in the individual and represent him/her in society. Identity thus becomes a notion that combines individuality and social context, subjectivation and objectivation of the individual, and historical and biographical time.

  18. Experiences in disaster-related mental health relief work: An exploratory model for the interprofessional training of psychological relief workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, ZhengJia; Wang, HongTao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to generate an exploratory model of the disaster-related mental health education process associated with the training experiences of psychological relief workers active during the Sichuan earthquake in China. The data consisted of semi-structured interviews with 20 psychological relief workers from four different professions (social workers, psychiatric nurses, psychiatrists, and counsellors) regarding their experiences in training and ideas for improvement. The model explains the need to use a people-centred community interprofessional education approach, which focuses on role-modelling of the trainer, caring for relief workers, paying attention to the needs of the trainee, and building systematic interprofessional education strategies. The proposed model identifies areas for the comprehensive training of relief workers and aims to address the importance of people-centred mental health service provisions, ensure intentional and strategic training of relief workers using interprofessional concepts and strategies, and use culturally attuned and community-informed strategies in mental health training practices.

  19. Model of yoga intervention in industrial organizational psychology for counterproductive work behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Umesh C.; Sony Kumari; Nagendra, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) has long been recognized as a broad spectrum of job behaviors and its link with negative affectivity and hostile behaviors. It is a major concern practically for all organizations. Repeated exposure to workplace stressor can result in a strain, an outcome of the job stress process that can be psychological, physical, or behavioral in nature, leading to CWBs. Yoga is a technique that brings an improvement on mental and physical level by means of posture, b...

  20. 组织员工心理契约修复模望——心理契约违背的延伸%Model of Employees' Psychological Contract Repair: a Further Study of Psychological Contract Violation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭

    2012-01-01

    Based on the psychological contracts' violation developing model, this paper studies a new psychological contract's violation process and sets up its repair model. To further illustrate the repair model, this paper also brings up the topic of repair mechanisms. In conclusion the paper points out that to promote psychological contract's stimulation effect, it is important to decrease psychological contract's breaking sources, advance managers' sensitivity to the breaking sources and other significant managerial conclusions.%在组织员工心理契约违背发展模型的基础上,从心理契约的形成、契约破裂源、契约破裂和契约违背几个节点出发对心理契约的违背过程进行研究,构造出心理契约修复模型,提出心理契约的修复机制和修复机理。文章给出要提高组织心理契约的激励效能必须减少破裂源发生频次、提高组织对破裂源的敏感性、构建破裂源预警机制以及提高员工自我修复和组织修复能力的管理结论。

  1. Thermal comfort modelling of body temperature and psychological variations of a human exercising in an outdoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanos, Jennifer K.; Warland, Jon S.; Gillespie, Terry J.; Kenny, Natasha A.

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal comfort assessments pertaining to exercise while in outdoor environments can improve urban and recreational planning. The current study applied a simple four-segment skin temperature approach to the COMFA (COMfort FormulA) outdoor energy balance model. Comparative results of measured mean skin temperature ( {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{Msk}} ) with predicted {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} indicate that the model accurately predicted {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} , showing significantly strong agreement ( r = 0.859, P compared to the original and updated COMFA models. This psychological improvement, plus {{bar{T}}}nolimits_{{sk}} and T c validations, enables better application to a variety of outdoor spaces. This model can be used in future research studying linkages between thermal discomfort, subsequent decreases in physical activity, and negative health trends.

  2. Indigenisation of Psychology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ajit K.

    2011-01-01

    Academic psychology which made a new beginning in India in the early part of 20th century was modelled on the Western scientific tradition. The teaching of psychology was very much on the British pattern since the colonial rule, whereas the research was mostly an extension of the Western work in India. Psychology went through massive expansion…

  3. Psychological model of ART adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS in Mexico: a structural equation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarduy, José Luis Ybarra; López, Julio Alfonso Piña; Ramírez, Mónica Teresa González; Dávila, Luis Enrique Fierros

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study has been to test the ability of variables of a psychological model to predict antiretroviral therapy medication adherence behavior. METHODS We have conducted a cross-sectional study among 172 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), who completed four self-administered assessments: 1) the Psychological Variables and Adherence Behaviors Questionnaire, 2) the Stress-Related Situation Scale to assess the variable of Personality, 3) The Zung Depression Scale, and 4) the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to construct a model to predict medication adherence behaviors. RESULTS Out of all the participants, 141 (82%) have been considered 100% adherent to antiretroviral therapy. Structural equation modeling has confirmed the direct effect that personality (decision-making and tolerance of frustration) has on motives to behave, or act accordingly, which was in turn directly related to medication adherence behaviors. In addition, these behaviors have had a direct and significant effect on viral load, as well as an indirect effect on CD4 cell count. The final model demonstrates the congruence between theory and data (x 2/df. = 1.480, goodness of fit index = 0.97, adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.94, comparative fit index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.05), accounting for 55.7% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study support our theoretical model as a conceptual framework for the prediction of medication adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Implications for designing, implementing, and evaluating intervention programs based on the model are to be discussed. PMID:28876412

  4. Using a Topological Model in Psychology: Developing Sense and Choice Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    A duality of sense categories and choice categories is introduced to map two distinct but co-operating ways in which we as humans are relating actively to the world. We are sensing similarities and differences in our world of objects and persons, but we are also as bodies moving around in this world encountering, selecting, and attaching to objects beyond our sensory interactions and in this way also relating to the individual objects' history. This duality is necessary if we shall understand man as relating to the historical depth of our natural and cultural world, and to understand our cognitions and affections. Our personal affections and attachments, as well as our shared cultural values are centered around objects and persons chosen as reference points and landmarks in our lives, uniting and separating, not to be understood only in terms of sensory selections. The ambition is to bridge the gap between psychology as part of Naturwissenschaft and of Geisteswissenschaft, and at the same time establish a common frame for understanding cognition and affection, and our practical and cultural life (Mammen and Mironenko 2015). The duality of sense and choice categories can be described formally using concepts from modern mathematics, primarily topology, surmounting the reductions rooted in the mechanistic concepts from Renaissance science and mathematics. The formal description is based on 11 short and simple axioms held in ordinary language and visualized with instructive figures. The axioms are bridging psychology and mathematics and not only enriching psychology but also opening for a new interpretation of parts of the foundation of mathematics and logic.

  5. Four Social Psychological Lenses for Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2009-01-01

    How can the advances of social and developmental psychology be integrated? This conceptual paper proposes to examine four basic theoretical models of social situations through which learning and development have been observed in the post-piagetian tradition: the psychosocial triangle, the frame, models of transfer and transitions, and models…

  6. Four Social Psychological Lenses for Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2009-01-01

    How can the advances of social and developmental psychology be integrated? This conceptual paper proposes to examine four basic theoretical models of social situations through which learning and development have been observed in the post-piagetian tradition: the psychosocial triangle, the frame, models of transfer and transitions, and models…

  7. Theorising context in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to address the issue of what context is and how it can be incorporated in psychological theory by using the case study of creativity research. It starts from a basic definition of context as the spatiotemporal continuum that, together with psychological phenomena, constitutes...... a totality and should be considered a single, integrated whole. As such, contexts are neither subjective, existing only in perception, nor are they a set of variables external to the person, but participate directly in the processes under study in psychology. We can therefore distinguish between “flat......” theorising, one-dimensional and overconcerned with intra-psychological factors, and “3-D” models trying to articulate the psychological, the spatial (sociomaterial), and the temporal. These categories are illustrated by different theoretical approaches to creativity. It is argued here that a cultural...

  8. [The contribution of persuasion social psychology to the retention of donors: models to elaborate mailing to the donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callé, N; Plainfossé, C; Georget, P; Sénémeaud, C; Rasonglès, P

    2011-12-01

    The supply of blood cell products required from the National French Blood Institute (Établissement français du sang [EFS]) relies upon regular blood donors. Contact with donors, tailored to individuals as much as possible, helps them to donate on a regular basis. To communicate as efficiently as possible, the content of the mailings has to be adapted to individuals, each according to his/her motivation and the way he or she perceives and processes the information. Within the context of a research program conducted with the Psychology Department of the University of Caen Basse-Normandie, persuasive theoretical models from social psychology have been tested. These models allow adapting messages according to various combinations of types of information processing, motivations and content of the messages. Different types of mailing invitations have been sent to 1987 donors from the Normandy database, requesting them to donate blood. Every experimental letter worked better than the standard EFS letter (which was used as the "control" letter) in terms of effective blood donation after reception of the letter. Some of the letters are more efficient in motivating donors than others. When the systematic type of processing (deep and thorough processing) is activated it appears important to supply elaborate content. On the contrary, when a heuristic type of processing (fast and superficial) is activated, adaptation of the content is less essential. Last but not least, the nearness of the last blood donation plays a key role.

  9. ENED-GEM: A Conceptual Framework Model for Psychological Enjoyment Factors and Learning Mechanisms in Educational Games about the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjællingsdal, Kristoffer S.; Klöckner, Christian A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on a thorough review of psychological literature, this article seeks to develop a model of game enjoyment and environmental learning (ENvironmental EDucational Game Enjoyment Model, ENED-GEM) and delineate psychological processes that might facilitate learning and inspire behavioral change from educational games about the environment. A critically acclaimed digital educational game about environmental issues (Fate of the World by Red Redemption/Soothsayer Games) was used as a case study. Two hundred forty-nine reviews of the game from the popular gaming and reviewing platform known as Steam were analyzed by means of a thematic content analysis in order to identify key player enjoyment factors believed to be relevant to the process of learning from games, as well as to gain an understanding of positive and negative impressions about the game’s general content. The end results of the thematic analysis were measured up to the suggested ENED-GEM framework. Initial results generally support the main elements of the ENED-GEM, and future research into the importance of these individual core factors is outlined. PMID:28701988

  10. ENED-GEM: A Conceptual Framework Model for Psychological Enjoyment Factors and Learning Mechanisms in Educational Games about the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjællingsdal, Kristoffer S; Klöckner, Christian A

    2017-01-01

    Based on a thorough review of psychological literature, this article seeks to develop a model of game enjoyment and environmental learning (ENvironmental EDucational Game Enjoyment Model, ENED-GEM) and delineate psychological processes that might facilitate learning and inspire behavioral change from educational games about the environment. A critically acclaimed digital educational game about environmental issues (Fate of the World by Red Redemption/Soothsayer Games) was used as a case study. Two hundred forty-nine reviews of the game from the popular gaming and reviewing platform known as Steam were analyzed by means of a thematic content analysis in order to identify key player enjoyment factors believed to be relevant to the process of learning from games, as well as to gain an understanding of positive and negative impressions about the game's general content. The end results of the thematic analysis were measured up to the suggested ENED-GEM framework. Initial results generally support the main elements of the ENED-GEM, and future research into the importance of these individual core factors is outlined.

  11. The Practice-oriented Model of «School Psychology» Master's Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andruschenko T.Y.,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented the experience in the development and testing the module “Psychological diagnosis of students” of the “School psychology” master program in “Psychological and pedagogical education” training direction. We discussed contemporary contexts of design educational modules that are defined by ideas of cultural-historical approach of the scientific school of L.S. Vygotsky, educational theories and activities of developing education by D.B. Elkonin, V.V. Davydov, collectively distributed educational activity of V.V. Rubtsov. We analyzed the issue of professional competence training in educational psychologists at higher education. We presented the connection between the content of masters training and the requirements of the Professional standard “Teacher-psychologist (the psychologist in education”. Within the context of the network of educational organizations we paid special attention to the content and organization of distributed practice as the basic condition of master’s professional competences formation and their readiness for the implementation of the working activities.

  12. Developing a fluid intelligence scale through a combination of Rasch modeling and cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primi, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    Ability testing has been criticized because understanding of the construct being assessed is incomplete and because the testing has not yet been satisfactorily improved in accordance with new knowledge from cognitive psychology. This article contributes to the solution of this problem through the application of item response theory and Susan Embretson's cognitive design system for test development in the development of a fluid intelligence scale. This study is based on findings from cognitive psychology; instead of focusing on the development of a test, it focuses on the definition of a variable for the creation of a criterion-referenced measure for fluid intelligence. A geometric matrix item bank with 26 items was analyzed with data from 2,797 undergraduate students. The main result was a criterion-referenced scale that was based on information from item features that were linked to cognitive components, such as storage capacity, goal management, and abstraction; this information was used to create the descriptions of selected levels of a fluid intelligence scale. The scale proposed that the levels of fluid intelligence range from the ability to solve problems containing a limited number of bits of information with obvious relationships through the ability to solve problems that involve abstract relationships under conditions that are confounded with an information overload and distraction by mixed noise. This scale can be employed in future research to provide interpretations for the measurements of the cognitive processes mastered and the types of difficulty experienced by examinees.

  13. Testing the physiological plausibility of conflicting psychological models of response inhibition: A forward inference fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criaud, Marion; Longcamp, Marieke; Anton, Jean-Luc; Nazarian, Bruno; Roth, Muriel; Sescousse, Guillaume; Strafella, Antonio P; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Boulinguez, Philippe

    2017-08-30

    The neural mechanisms underlying response inhibition and related disorders are unclear and controversial for several reasons. First, it is a major challenge to assess the psychological bases of behaviour, and ultimately brain-behaviour relationships, of a function which is precisely intended to suppress overt measurable behaviours. Second, response inhibition is difficult to disentangle from other parallel processes involved in more general aspects of cognitive control. Consequently, different psychological and anatomo-functional models coexist, which often appear in conflict with each other even though they are not necessarily mutually exclusive. The standard model of response inhibition in go/no-go tasks assumes that inhibitory processes are reactively and selectively triggered by the stimulus that participants must refrain from reacting to. Recent alternative models suggest that action restraint could instead rely on reactive but non-selective mechanisms (all automatic responses are automatically inhibited in uncertain contexts) or on proactive and non-selective mechanisms (a gating function by which reaction to any stimulus is prevented in anticipation of stimulation when the situation is unpredictable). Here, we assessed the physiological plausibility of these different models by testing their respective predictions regarding event-related BOLD modulations (forward inference using fMRI). We set up a single fMRI design which allowed for us to record simultaneously the different possible forms of inhibition while limiting confounds between response inhibition and parallel cognitive processes. We found BOLD dynamics consistent with non-selective models. These results provide new theoretical and methodological lines of inquiry for the study of basic functions involved in behavioural control and related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Flohrer, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Instilling psychological empowerment in employees is one of the most important tasks of modern leadership. Building on quantitative research and the development of a new psychometric scale related to project management this thesis shows: First, individuals' characteristics and their work team environment influence perceptions of access to information and resources – two important antecedents of psychological empowerment. Second, while a project briefing strengthens the link of the psychologic...

  15. [Political psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2013-04-21

    In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects.

  16. Pilots'Psychological Health Based on Diathesis-stress Model%基于素质-应激模型的飞行员心理健康

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敬强; 赵宁; 徐开勇

    2015-01-01

    目的:飞行员的心理健康对于保证飞行安全、确保飞行任务的完成具有重要意义,探讨飞行员心理健康的根源,即特定的心理素质,对保障飞行安全将有重要意义。方法:主要介绍心理健康与心理素质的内涵与联系,通过分析影响心理健康的素质-应激模型,理论推导出飞行员心理健康的心理素质-应激交互作用模型,并由心理健康状态的测量佐证其合理性。结果:制约飞行员心理健康的心理素质有7个维度,21个因子。结论:心理素质是制约心理健康的内源性因素,飞行员素质-应激交互作用模型的建立对飞行员心理健康的研究有一定的参考。%Objective:The pilot's psychological health is critical to flight safety and the completion of the task.Discussing the root of pilot's psychological health, namely the specific psychological diathesis, will have important significance to ensure the flight safety.Methods:The paper presented the connotation and relationship of psychological health and psychological diathesis.Through analyzing the theoretical model of affecting psychological health, namely diathesis-stress model, diathesis -stress interaction model of pilots was derived, and its rationality was proven by the result of psychological health status measurement.Results:The diathesis -stress interaction model of pilots had been established, and the component consisted of 7 dimensions and 21 factors.Conclusion:Psychological diathesis is an endoge-nous factor of psychological health, and the establishment of the model will provide a reference for the re-search on pilot's psychological health.

  17. Modeling rational, psychological, and social behavior toward diffusion of new technology using agent-based simulation: the case of the public utility jeepney (PUJ) fleet in Metro Manila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahanchian, Mohammad; Biona, Jose Bienvenido Manuel

    2017-01-01

    is to assist policymakers for energy and environmental policy design based on consumers’ behavior. The jeepney owners in the old public utility jeepney (PUJ) fleet in Metro Manila are chosen as case study to prove the applicability of the model. The results show that rational, psychological, and social...... configuration affect diffusion of innovation. This study presents an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate the rational decision-making, psychological behavior, and social interaction of people to explore their reaction to policy scenarios toward adopting technological changes over time. The aim of model...

  18. Psychology Models of Modeling and Simulation on Information Spreading%信息传播建模仿真中的心理模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳; 司光亚; 罗批

    2013-01-01

    Researching propagation mechanism, such as rumor, by modeling and simulation, can provide an important theory basis and technical support for social applications including of crisis management. Because the individual psychological factors have important influence on the process and results of propagation, this paper put forward a mental modeling idea with the core of attitude and made an asymmetric influence function mental model based on the direct interaction and a nonlinear mental model based on indirect exchange. Simulation results show that the model is consistent with the law of human psychological changes and is a good description of individual psychological reaction in information communication. These models offer psychology description for modeling and simulation for information propagation in the social area.%研究谣言等信息的传播机理,可以为危机管理等社会应用提供重要的理论依据和技术支持.鉴于信息传播中个体心理因素对传播过程、效果等的重要影响,提出了以态度为核心的心理模型建模思想,并针对信息传播过程中个体交流模式的不同,建立了基于直接交流的不对称影响函数心理模型,以及基于间接交流的非线性描述心理模型.模型运行结果显示,所建立的模型符合人类心理变化的基本规律,能较好地表现信息传播时个体对信息刺激所做出的心理反应,为信息传播中Agent的心理变化提供了可以描述的机制.

  19. Quantum physics in neuroscience and psychology: a neurophysical model of mind-brain interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey M; Stapp, Henry P; Beauregard, Mario

    2005-06-29

    Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behaviour generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus, terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g. 'feeling', 'knowing' and 'effort') are not included as primary causal factors. This theoretical restriction is motivated primarily by ideas about the natural world that have been known to be fundamentally incorrect for more than three-quarters of a century. Contemporary basic physical theory differs profoundly from classic physics on the important matter of how the consciousness of human agents enters into the structure of empirical phenomena. The new principles contradict the older idea that local mechanical processes alone can account for the structure of all observed empirical data. Contemporary physical theory brings directly and irreducibly into the overall causal structure certain psychologically described choices made by human agents about how they will act. This key development in basic physical theory is applicable to neuroscience, and it provides neuroscientists and psychologists with an alternative conceptual framework for describing neural processes. Indeed, owing to certain structural features of ion channels critical to synaptic function, contemporary physical theory must in principle be used when analysing human brain dynamics. The new framework, unlike its classic-physics-based predecessor, is erected directly upon, and is compatible with, the prevailing principles of physics. It is able to represent more adequately than classic concepts the neuroplastic mechanisms relevant to the growing number of empirical studies of the capacity of directed attention and mental

  20. Model Selection and Psychological Theory: A Discussion of the Differences between the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieze, Scott I.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) in model selection and the appraisal of psychological theory. The focus is on latent variable models, given their growing use in theory testing and construction. Theoretical statistical results in regression are discussed, and more important…

  1. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism. PMID:22478175

  2. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, A W

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism.

  3. Goals and Psychological Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander Karl; Nafziger, Julia

    -induced reference points make substandard performance psychologically painful and motivate the individual to stick to his goals. How strong the commitment to goals is depends on the type of psychological account. We provide conditions when it is optimal to evaluate goals in narrow accounts. The key intuition......We model how people formulate and evaluate goals to overcome self-control problems. People often attempt to regulate their behavior by evaluating goal-related outcomes separately (in narrow psychological accounts) rather than jointly (in a broad account). To explain this evidence, our theory...... of endogenous narrow or broad psychological accounts combines insights from the literatures on goals and mental accounting with models of expectations-based reference-dependent preferences. By formulating goals the individual creates expectations that induce reference points for task outcomes. These goal...

  4. Psychological experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, Martijn; Emmanuel, Steven M.; McDonald, William; Stewart, Jon

    2015-01-01

    For Kierkegaard the ‘psychological experiment’ is a literary strategy. It enables him to dramatize an existential conflict in an experimental mode. Kierkegaard’s aim is to study the source of movement that animates the existing individual (this is the psychological part). However, he is not interest

  5. Advancing psychotherapy and evidence-based psychological interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; David, D.; Beckers, T.; Muris, P.; Cuijpers, P.; Lutz, W.; Andersson, G.; Araya, R.; Banos Rivera, R.M.; Barkham, M.; Berking, M.; Berger, T.; Botella, C.; Carlbring, P.; Colom, F.; Essau, C.; Hermans, D.; Hofmann, S.G.; Knappe, S.; Ollendick, T.H.; Raes, F.; Rief, W.; Riper, H.; van der Oord, S.; Vervliet, B.

    2014-01-01

    Psychological models of mental disorders guide research into psychological and environmental factors that elicit and maintain mental disorders as well as interventions to reduce them. This paper addresses four areas. (1) Psychological models of mental disorders have become increasingly

  6. Advancing psychotherapy and evidence-based psychological interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; David, D.; Beckers, T.; Muris, P.; Cuijpers, P.; Lutz, W.; Andersson, G.; Araya, R.; Banos Rivera, R.M.; Barkham, M.; Berking, M.; Berger, T.; Botella, C.; Carlbring, P.; Colom, F.; Essau, C.; Hermans, D.; Hofmann, S.G.; Knappe, S.; Ollendick, T.H.; Raes, F.; Rief, W.; Riper, H.; van der Oord, S.; Vervliet, B.

    2014-01-01

    Psychological models of mental disorders guide research into psychological and environmental factors that elicit and maintain mental disorders as well as interventions to reduce them. This paper addresses four areas. (1) Psychological models of mental disorders have become increasingly transdiagnost

  7. Neuropsychiatric Model of Biological and Psychological Processes in the Remission of Delusions and Auditory Hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, van der M.

    2006-01-01

    This selective review combines cognitive models and biological models of psychosis into a tentative integrated neuropsychiatric model. The aim of the model is to understand better, how pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy come forward as partners in the treatment of psychosis and play

  8. Optimism, pessimism, and positive and negative affectivity in middle-aged adults: a test of a cognitive-affective model of psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E C; Sanna, L J

    2001-09-01

    This study attempted to address limitations in the understanding of optimism and pessimism among middle-aged adults. Specifically, a model of affectivity as a mediator of the link between outcome expectancies and psychological adjustment (life satisfaction and depressive symptoms) was presented and examined in a sample of 237 middle-aged adults. Consistent with a mediation model, results of path analyses indicated that optimism and pessimism (particularly the former) had significant direct and indirect links (by means of positive and negative affectivity) with depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. These results add to the small but growing literature identifying optimism and pessimism as important concomitants of psychological adjustment in more mature adults.

  9. A cognitive-perceptual model of symptom perception in males and females: the roles of negative affect, selective attention, health anxiety and psychological job demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Laura; Fairclough, Stephen H; Poole, Helen M

    2013-06-01

    Kolk et al.'s model of symptom perception underlines the effects of trait negative affect, selective attention and external stressors. The current study tested this model in 263 males and 498 females from an occupational sample. Trait negative affect was associated with symptom reporting in females only, and selective attention and psychological job demands were associated with symptom reporting in both genders. Health anxiety was associated with symptom reporting in males only. Future studies might consider the inclusion of selective attention, which was more strongly associated with symptom reporting than negative affect. Psychological job demands appear to influence symptom reporting in both males and females.

  10. Using a topological model in psychology: Developing sense and choice categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mammen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A duality of sense categories and choice categories is introduced to map two distinct but co-operating ways in which we as humans are relating actively to the world. We are sensing similarities and differences in our world of objects and persons, but we are also as bodies moving around in this wo......A duality of sense categories and choice categories is introduced to map two distinct but co-operating ways in which we as humans are relating actively to the world. We are sensing similarities and differences in our world of objects and persons, but we are also as bodies moving around...... in this world encountering, selecting, and attaching to objects beyond our sensory interactions and in this way also relating to the individual objects’ history. This duality is necessary if we shall understand man as relating to the historical depth of our natural and cultural world, and to understand our...... the gap between psychology as part of Naturwissenschaft and of Geisteswissenschaft, and at the same time establish a common frame for understanding cognition and affection, and our practical and cultural life (Mammen and Mironenko 2015). The duality of sense and choice categories can be described formally...

  11. DEVELOPING A MODULAR PORTFOLIO SELECTION MODEL FOR SHORT-TERM AND LONGTERM MARKET TRENDS AND MASS PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jasemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In an effort to model stock markets, many researchers have developed portfolio selection models to maximise investor satisfaction. However, this field still needs more accurate and comprehensive models. Development of these models is difficult because of unpredictable economic, social, and political variables that affect stock market behaviour. In this paper, a new model with three modules for portfolio optimisation is presented. The first module derives the efficient frontier through a new approach; the second presents an intelligent mechanism for emitting trading signals; while the third module integrates the outputs of the first two modules. Some important features of the model in comparison with others are: 1 consideration of investors’ emotions – the psychology of the market – that arises from the three above-mentioned factors; 2 significant loosening of simplifying assumptions about markets and stocks; and 3 greater sensitivity to new data.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: In ‘n poging om aandelemarkte te modelleer het verskeie navorsers portefeulje-seleksiemodelle ontwikkel om beleggers se tevredenheid te maksimiseer. Desnieteenstaande word meer akkurate en omvattende modelle benodig. Die ontwikkeling van hierdie modelle word bemoeilik deur die onvoorspelbare ekonomiese, sosiale en politiese veranderlikes wat aandelemarkte se gedrag raak. In hierdie artikel word ‘n nuwe model voorgehou wat bestaan uit drie modules vir portefeulje-optimisering. Die eerste module bepaal die doelmatigheidsgrens op ‘n nuwe metode; die tweede hou ‘n intelligente meganisme voor om transaksieseine te lewer terwyl die derde module die uitsette van die eerste twee modules integreer. Sommige van die belangrike eienskappe van die model wat dit van ander onderskei is: 1 konsiderasie van die beleggers se emosies – die sielkunde van die mark – wat ontstaan vanweë die genoemde faktore; 2 betekenisvolle verslapping van die

  12. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model.

  13. Linking family cohesion and flexibility with expressed emotion, family burden and psychological distress in caregivers of patients with psychosis: A path analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutra, Katerina; Simos, Panagiotis; Triliva, Sofia; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-06-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate a path analytic model accounting for caregivers' psychological distress that takes into account perceived family cohesion and flexibility, expressed emotion and caregiver's burden associated with the presence of mental illness in the family. 50 first-episode and 50 chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (most recent episode manic severe with psychotic features) recruited from the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, and their family caregivers participated in the study. Family functioning was assessed in terms of cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV), expressed emotion (FQ), family burden (FBS) and caregivers' psychological distress (GHQ-28). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of family dynamics on caregivers' psychological distress. The results showed that neither family cohesion nor family flexibility exerted significant direct effects on caregivers' psychological distress. Instead, the effect of flexibility was mediated by caregivers' criticism and family burden indicating an indirect effect on caregivers' psychological distress. These results apply equally to caregivers of first episode and chronic patients. Family interventions aiming to improve dysfunctional family interactions by promoting awareness of family dynamics could reduce the burden and improve the emotional well-being of family caregivers.

  14. Exploring application of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour to self-injurious behaviour among women prisoners: Proposing a new model of understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Jane L; York, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines the application of capacity, psychological distress, coping and personality to an understanding of self-injurious behaviour, with a specific focus on testing the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour (IPTSB). One hundred and ninety women prisoners took part, completing a history questionnaire and measures of personality, coping styles and psychological distress. It was expected that self-injurious behaviour would be predicted by higher levels of emotional functioning difficulties, by an increased capacity to engage in such behaviours, by previous self-injurious behaviour, decreased levels of emotional stability and increased levels of emotional coping behaviour. Results supported the capacity component of the IPTSB, indicating that an increased history of self-injurious behaviour and of engagement in reckless behaviour were particular predictors. Increased psychological distress in some domains was also a predictor although the exact domain varied across the type of self-injurious engagement Increased levels of extraversion and decreased emotional coping predicted increased self-injurious engagement, although emotional coping only related to threats and cognition. The results point to the applicability of Interpersonal-Psychological Theory to understanding self-injurious behaviour and the importance of developing a revised model. The paper presents this in the form of the Integrated Model of Self-Injurious Activity.

  15. Stereotypes Can “Get Under the Skin”: Testing a Self-Stereotyping and Psychological Resource Model of Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Luis M.; Paredez, Stefanie M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to propose and test a self-stereotyping and psychological resource model of overweight and obesity. The model contends that self-stereotyping depletes psychological resources, namely self-esteem, that help to prevent overweight and obesity. In support of the model, mediation analysis demonstrates that adult Hispanics who highly self-stereotype had lower levels of self-esteem than those who self-stereotype less, which in turn predicted higher levels of body mass index (overweight and obesity levels). Furthermore, the model did not hold for the referent sample, White participants, and an alternative mediation model was not supported. These data are the first to theoretically and empirically link self-stereotyping and self-esteem (a psychological resource) with a strong physiological risk factor for morbidity and short life expectancy in stigmatized individuals. Thus, this research contributes to understanding ethnic-racial health disparities in the United States and beyond. PMID:25221353

  16. Validation of the internalization of the Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4) and its link to academic performance and psychological adjustment among Asian American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyung Chol; Miller, Matthew J; Yip, Pansy

    2015-04-01

    There is limited research examining psychological correlates of a uniquely racialized experience of the model minority stereotype faced by Asian Americans. The present study examined the factor structure and fit of the only published measure of the internalization of the model minority myth, the Internalization of the Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4; Yoo et al., 2010), with a sample of 155 Asian American high school adolescents. We also examined the link between internalization of the model minority myth types (i.e., myth associated with achievement and myth associated with unrestricted mobility) and psychological adjustment (i.e., affective distress, somatic distress, performance difficulty, academic expectations stress), and the potential moderating effect of academic performance (cumulative grade point average). Results suggested the 2-factor model of the IM-4 had an acceptable fit to the data and supported the factor structure using confirmatory factor analyses. Internalizing the model minority myth of achievement related positively to academic expectations stress; however, internalizing the model minority myth of unrestricted mobility related negatively to academic expectations stress, both controlling for gender and academic performance. Finally, academic performance moderated the model minority myth associated with unrestricted mobility and affective distress link and the model minority myth associated with achievement and performance difficulty link. These findings highlight the complex ways in which the model minority myth relates to psychological outcomes.

  17. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in postgraduate psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Margaret Roberts

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients’ lives. Twenty three postgraduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of postgraduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment.

  18. Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Admissions: Differential Values as a Function of Program Characteristics and the Implications of the Mentor-Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research were to 1) examine the qualities for which applicants are selected for entrance into clinical psychology Ph.D. programs, and 2) investigate the prevalence and impact of the mentor-model approach to admissions on multiple domains of programs and the field at large. Fifty Directors of Clinical Training (DCTs) provided data…

  19. Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Admissions: Differential Values as a Function of Program Characteristics and the Implications of the Mentor-Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jesse A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this research were to 1) examine the qualities for which applicants are selected for entrance into clinical psychology Ph.D. programs, and 2) investigate the prevalence and impact of the mentor-model approach to admissions on multiple domains of programs and the field at large. Fifty Directors of Clinical Training (DCTs) provided data…

  20. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  1. The transmission of early Christian thought : Toward a cognitive psychological model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czachesz, Istvan

    2007-01-01

    This article uses current developments in cognitive science to explore the emergence of early Christian religion. In particular, it considers Sperber's epidemiology model, Rubin's serial recall model, ritual form theory and Boyer's theory of religious concepts for understanding the transmission of

  2. Toward an Integrative Model of Suicide Attempt: A Cognitive Psychological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieserud, Gudrun; Roysamb, Espen; Ekeberg, Oivind; Kraft, Pal

    2001-01-01

    Applying a cognitive approach, this study expanded previous research on stress vulnerability models of depression and problem solving deficits, as it relates to suicide attempt. Results indicated a two path model of suicide attempt. The importance of addressing both depression/hopelessness, and problem solving deficits when working with suicide…

  3. Reaction to the Major Contribution: Training for Skills Competency in Counseling Psychology--Integrating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Roberta L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors of the Major Contribution have developed a complex and elegant three-level training model on which they suggest advanced microskills may be built. Prior to the description of their model, they have built a case that current microskills training has proved foundationally important but insufficient to training needs. They then invite…

  4. Characterization of Psychological and Biological Factors in an Animal Model of Warrior Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Publications Inc. 92. Foda MA, Marmarou A. 1994. A new model of diffuse brain injury in rats. Part II: Morphological characterization. J. Neurosurg...Research 5:37-56 156. Marmarou A, Foda MA, van den Brink W, Campbell J, Kita H, Demetriadou K. 1994. A new model of diffuse brain injury in rats. Part

  5. Combining Psychological Models with Machine Learning to Better Predict People’s Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    in some applications (Kaelbling, Littman, & Cassandra, 1998; Neumann & Morgenstern, 1944; Russell & Norvig , 2003). However, research into people’s...scientists often model peoples’ decisions through machine learning techniques (Russell & Norvig , 2003). These models are based on statistical methods such as...A., & Kraus, S. (2011). Using aspiration adaptation theory to improve learning. In Aamas (p. 423-430). Russell, S. J., & Norvig , P. (2003

  6. Use of measurement theory for operationalization and quantification of psychological constructs in systems dynamics modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitkov-Norris, Elena; Yeghiazarian, Ara

    2016-11-01

    The analytical tools available to social scientists have traditionally been adapted from tools originally designed for analysis of natural science phenomena. This article discusses the applicability of systems dynamics - a qualitative based modelling approach, as a possible analysis and simulation tool that bridges the gap between social and natural sciences. After a brief overview of the systems dynamics modelling methodology, the advantages as well as limiting factors of systems dynamics to the potential applications in the field of social sciences and human interactions are discussed. The issues arise with regards to operationalization and quantification of latent constructs at the simulation building stage of the systems dynamics methodology and measurement theory is proposed as a ready and waiting solution to the problem of dynamic model calibration, with a view of improving simulation model reliability and validity and encouraging the development of standardised, modular system dynamics models that can be used in social science research.

  7. Dyadic effects of attitude toward aging on psychological well-being of older Malaysian couples: an actor–partner interdependence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momtaz YA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yadollah Abolfathi Momtaz, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Jariah Masud, Sharifah Azizah Haron, Rahimah IbrahimInstitute of Gerontology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaBackground: There is a growing body of literature indicating that attitudes toward aging significantly affect older adults’ psychological well-being. However, there is a paucity of scientific investigations examining the role of older adults’ attitudes toward aging on their spouses' psychological well-being. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the dyadic effects of attitude toward aging on the psychological well-being of older couples.Methods: Data for the present study, consisting of 300 couples aged 50 years and older, were drawn from a community-based survey entitled “Poverty among Elderly Women: Case Study of Amanah Ikhtiar” conducted in Peninsular Malaysia. An actor–partner interdependence model using AMOS version 20 (Europress Software, Cheshire, UK was used to analyze the dyadic data.Results: The mean ages of the husbands and wives in this sample were 60.37 years (±6.55 and 56.33 years (±5.32, respectively. Interdependence analyses revealed significant association between older adults’ attitudes toward aging and the attitudes of their spouses (intraclass correlation =0.59; P<0.001, and similar interdependence was found for psychological well-being (intraclass correlation =0.57; P<0.001. The findings from AMOS revealed that the proposed model fits the data (CMIN/degrees of freedom =3.23; goodness-of-fit index =0.90; confirmatory fit index =0.91; root mean square error of approximation =0.08. Results of the actor–partner independence model indicated that older adults’ psychological well-being is significantly predicted by their spouses' attitudes toward aging, both among older men (critical ratio =2.92; P<0.01 and women (critical ratio =2.70; P<0.01. Husbands’ and wives’ own reports of their attitudes toward aging were significantly

  8. A Research on College Students' Psychological Crisis In-tervention Models in Privately-Run College%民办高校大学生心理危机干预模式探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯小花

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the concept of psychological crisis and psychological crisis intervention, and explored the basic model of psychological crisis intervention in privately-run college. We thought privately-run college should insist on three psychological crisis intervention models, like equilibrium model, cognitive model, psychosocial transition model, and they had to explore the other useful methods, such as:exploring new method of psycho-logical heath education;enhancing the function of the psycholog-ical consultation teachers in psychological crisis intervention;in-sisting on the six steps of psychological crisis intervention.%  本文从心理危机和心理危机干预的概念出发,探析了民办高校大学生心理危机干预的基本模式。本文认为民办高校在坚持心理危机干预的三种模式外,即平衡模式、认知模式、心理转变模式,还应积极探索其他有效途径,如:大胆尝试心理健康教育和活动新方式方法;努力发挥心理咨询师在心理危机干预中的作用;坚持心理危机干预六步法。

  9. Sociogenomic Personality Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W.; Jackson, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology. PMID:19012657

  10. Sociogenomic personality psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent W; Jackson, Joshua J

    2008-12-01

    In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology.

  11. Applications of meta-analytic structural equation modelling in health psychology: examples, issues, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mike W-L; Hong, Ryan Y

    2017-09-01

    Statistical methods play an important role in behavioural, medical, and social sciences. Two recent statistical advances are structural equation modelling (SEM) and meta-analysis. SEM is used to test hypothesised models based on substantive theories, which can be path, confirmatory factor analytic, or full structural equation models. Meta-analysis is used to synthesise research findings in a particular topic. This article demonstrates another recent statistical advance - meta-analytic structural equation modelling (MASEM) - that combines meta-analysis and SEM to synthesise research findings for the purpose of testing hypothesised models. Using the theory of planned behaviour as an example, we show how MASEM can be used to address important research questions that cannot be answered by univariate meta-analyses on Pearson correlations. Specifically, MASEM allows researchers to: (1) test whether the proposed models are consistent with the data; (2) estimate partial effects after controlling for other variables; (3) estimate functions of parameter estimates such as indirect effects; and (4) include latent variables in the models. We illustrate the procedures with an example on the theory of planned behaviour. Practical issues in MASEM and suggested solutions are discussed.

  12. Work overload, burnout, and psychological ill-health symptoms: a three-wave mediation model of the employee health impairment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Leon T; Pienaar, Jaco; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-07-01

    The study reported here investigated the causal relationships in the health impairment process of employee well-being, and the mediating role of burnout in the relationship between work overload and psychological ill-health symptoms, over time. The research is deemed important due to the need for longitudinal evidence of the health impairment process of employee well-being over three waves of data. A quantitative survey design was followed. Participants constituted a longitudinal sample of 370 participants, at three time points, after attrition. Descriptive statistics and structural equation modeling methods were implemented. Work overload at time one predicted burnout at time two, and burnout at time two predicted psychological ill-health symptoms at time three. Indirect effects were found between work overload time one and psychological ill-health symptoms time three via burnout time two, and also between burnout time one and psychological ill-health symptoms time three, via burnout time two. The results provided supportive evidence for an "indirect-only" mediation effect, for burnout's causal mediation mechanism in the health impairment process between work overload and psychological ill-health symptoms.

  13. Establishing a structured animal model for screening anti-psychological drugs of schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Li; Zhemeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Although some traditional animal models for studying schizophrenia have been wildly used,many problems remain in their credibility and validity.We propose that structured animal models with the integration of multiple symptom-inducing factors are be better in simulating the symptoms of schizophrenia and represent the new direction of the future ani-mal-model development.In this article,we review previous studies in this line of research and emphasize the importance of combining the behavior paradigm of the structured top-down attentional modulation of prepulse inhibition with multiple path-ogenic factors related to schizophrenia to establish a new model generation,which will be of great significance in investigating both the pathogenesis and the treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. A Model for Predicting the Presence of School Psychology: An International Examination of Sociocultural, Sociopolitical and Socioeconomic Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Clayton R.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Begeny, John C.

    2010-01-01

    School psychology exists in many countries around the world; however, it is far from ubiquitous. The extant literature offers limited empirical information addressing why school psychology may be present in some countries but not in others. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative investigation examining four sociocultural and…

  15. Aesthetic Perception of Visual Textures: A Holistic Exploration using Texture Analysis, Psychological Experiment and Perception Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli eLiu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Modeling human aesthetic perception of visual textures is important and valuable in numerous industrial domains, such as product design, architectural design and decoration. Based on results from a semantic differential rating experiment, we modeled the relationship between low-level basic texture features and aesthetic properties involved in human aesthetic texture perception. First, we compute basic texture features from textural images using four classical methods. These features are neutral, objective and independent of the socio-cultural context of the visual textures. Then, we conduct a semantic differential rating experiment to collect from evaluators their aesthetic perceptions of selected textural stimuli. In semantic differential rating experiment, eights pairs of aesthetic properties are chosen, which are strongly related to the socio-cultural context of the selected textures and to human emotions. They are easily understood and connected to everyday life. We propose a hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception and assign 8 pairs of aesthetic properties to different layers. Finally, we describe the generation of multiple linear and nonlinear regression models for aesthetic prediction by taking dimensionality-reduced texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the relationships between each layer and its neighbors in the hierarchical feed-forward layer model of aesthetic texture perception can be fitted well by linear functions, and the models thus generated can successfully bridge the gap between computational texture features and aesthetic texture properties.

  16. Models and Strategies for Factor Mixture Analysis: An Example Concerning the Structure Underlying Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shaunna L.; Muthén, Bengt; Kaprio, Jaakko; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The factor mixture model (FMM) uses a hybrid of both categorical and continuous latent variables. The FMM is a good model for the underlying structure of psychopathology because the use of both categorical and continuous latent variables allows the structure to be simultaneously categorical and dimensional. This is useful because both diagnostic class membership and the range of severity within and across diagnostic classes can be modeled concurrently. While the conceptualization of the FMM has been explained in the literature, the use of the FMM is still not prevalent. One reason is that there is little research about how such models should be applied in practice and, once a well fitting model is obtained, how it should be interpreted. In this paper, the FMM will be explored by studying a real data example on conduct disorder. By exploring this example, this paper aims to explain the different formulations of the FMM, the various steps in building a FMM, as well as how to decide between a FMM and alternative models. PMID:24302849

  17. Family incivility and job performance: a moderated mediation model of psychological distress and core self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sandy; Tai, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    This study extends the stress literature by exploring the relationship between family incivility and job performance. We examine whether psychological distress mediates the link between family incivility and job performance. We also investigate how core self-evaluation might moderate this mediated relationship. Data from a 2-wave study indicate that psychological distress mediates the relationship between family incivility and job performance. In addition, core self-evaluation moderates the relationship between family incivility and psychological distress but not the relationship between psychological distress and job performance. The results hold while controlling for general job stress, family-to-work conflict, and work-to-family conflict. The findings suggest that family incivility is linked to poor performance at work, and psychological distress and core self-evaluation are key mechanisms in the relationship.

  18. Testing a model of minority identity achievement, identity affirmation, and psychological well-being among ethnic minority and sexual minority individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Negin; Fingerhut, Adam; Peplau, Letitia A; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A

    2011-01-01

    How is social identity related to psychological well-being among minority individuals? Drawing on developmental models of identity formation (e.g., Erikson, 1968) and on Social Identity Theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), we tested a conceptual model examining links between two key aspects of social identity and psychological well-being. We proposed that the association between identity achievement (exploring and understanding the meaning of one's identity) and psychological well-being is mediated by identity affirmation (developing positive feelings and a sense of belonging to one's social group). Across three studies, including ethnic minority high school students (Study 1), ethnic minority college students (Study 2) and lesbian and gay male adults (Study 3), we found strong support for the model. Results suggest that the process of exploring and understanding one's minority identity can serve as an important basis for developing positive feelings toward and an enhanced sense of attachment to the group, which can in turn confer psychological benefits for minority individuals. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  19. The Impact of CBT and ACT Models Using Psychology Trainee Therapists: A Preliminary Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Raimo; Lehtonen, Tuula; Skarp, Eerika; Taubert, Eija; Ojanen, Markku; Hayes, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares the impact of individualized treatment provided by trainee therapists based on a traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) model. Fourteen therapists were given initial training in CBT and ACT. Outpatients (N = 28) were randomized to either approach, with each therapist…

  20. Role Models and the Psychological Characteristics That Buffer Low-Socioeconomic-Status Youth from Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Lee, William K.; Cavey, Lisa; Ho, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Little is understood about why some youth from low-socioeconomic-status (SES) environments exhibit good health despite adversity. This study tested whether role models and "shift-and-persist" approaches (reframing stressors more benignly while persisting with future optimism) protect low-SES youth from cardiovascular risk. A total of 163…

  1. The "p"-Median Model as a Tool for Clustering Psychological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Hans-Friedrich; Steinley, Douglas; Brusco, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The "p"-median clustering model represents a combinatorial approach to partition data sets into disjoint, nonhierarchical groups. Object classes are constructed around "exemplars", that is, manifest objects in the data set, with the remaining instances assigned to their closest cluster centers. Effective, state-of-the-art implementations of…

  2. A Case Study of the Introductory Psychology Blended Learning Model at McMaster University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Faria; Fenesi, Barbara; Kim, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of blended learning as a didactic method, and discusses the issues and challenges of using blended learning models in post-secondary education. Blended learning refers to mixed modes of instruction that combine traditional face-to-face classroom teaching methods and online learning materials. The paper will…

  3. Role Models and the Psychological Characteristics That Buffer Low-Socioeconomic-Status Youth from Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Lee, William K.; Cavey, Lisa; Ho, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Little is understood about why some youth from low-socioeconomic-status (SES) environments exhibit good health despite adversity. This study tested whether role models and "shift-and-persist" approaches (reframing stressors more benignly while persisting with future optimism) protect low-SES youth from cardiovascular risk. A total of 163…

  4. Psychological IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Stine Willum

    2015-01-01

    During ethnographic fieldwork at a fertility clinic in Denmark, I became intrigued by emotions. In particular, I found an incidence labelled ‘psychological IVF’ theoretically provocative as it challenged my views on materializations, which I was preparing to study. This paper centres on the story...... of psychological IVF, and I use this narrative to consider emotions and materialization methodologically. I also ask how emotions at fertility clinics can be conceptualized to enable analysis of their materialization, change, and effects. In order to do so, I develop the term ‘emotional choreography......’. This theoretical work has three aims. First, it seeks to illustrate how the story of psychological IVF offers a rich range of materializations of emotions. Secondly, this work proposes a feminist materialist conceptualization of emotions that is both non-representational and posthuman. This conceptualization draws...

  5. An Explanatory Model of Poverty from the Perspective of Social Psychology and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Muñoz, Alfonso; Chacón, Fernando; Martínez Arias, Rosario

    2015-12-09

    Poverty is a social problem, entailing not only an economical perspective but above all a human and social issue. Poverty is promoted, justified and maintained by unique individuals and groups by means of our own attitudes, interests and behavior, as well as with our social structures and social relationships. From this interactive, psychosocial and sociostructural perspective, and also considering poverty as a denial of basic human rights (UNDP, 1998), we carried out a study with the primary objective to design and verify an Explanatory Model of Poverty. This research may helps to increase the validity of diagnostics and the effectiveness of interventions. Most of the hypotheses were accepted during the analysis and verification of the Model (p definition of poverty including its effects, processes and causes; (b) the need for everybody to accept the social responsibility in the prevention and solution to poverty; and (c) the need to conduct longitudinal interventions with scientific methodology and social participation.

  6. Modelling and Measuring the Irrational behaviour of Agents in Financial Markets: Discovering the Psychological Soliton

    OpenAIRE

    Dhesi, Gurjeet; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Following a Geometrical Brownian Motion extension into an Irrational Fractional Brownian Motion model, we re-examine agent behaviour reacting to time dependent news on the log-returns thereby modifying a financial market evolution. We specifically discuss the role of financial news or economic information positive or negative feedback of such irrational (or contrarian) agents upon the price evolution. We observe a kink-like effect reminiscent of soliton behaviour, suggesting how analysts' for...

  7. Efficient Work Team Scheduling: Using Psychological Models of Knowledge Retention to Improve Code Writing Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Pelosi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development teams and programmers must retain critical information about their work during work intervals and gaps in order to improve future performance when work resumes. Despite time lapses, project managers want to maximize coding efficiency and effectiveness. By developing a mathematically justified, practically useful, and computationally tractable quantitative and cognitive model of learning and memory retention, this study establishes calculations designed to maximize scheduling payoff and optimize developer efficiency and effectiveness.

  8. Nonlinear bifurcations of psychological stress negotiation: new properties of a formal dynamical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Lawrence R; Yao, Weiguang; McGuire, George; Vollick, Dan N; Jette, Jennifer; Shanahan, Matthew J; Hay, James M; Neufeld, Richard W J

    2012-10-01

    Dynamical systems analysis is applied to a nonlinear model of stress and coping (Neufeld, 1999). The model is composed of 6 order parameters and 11 control parameters, and integrates core constructs of the topic domain, including variants of cognitive appraisal, differential stress susceptibility, stress activation, and coping propensity. In part owing to recent advances in Competitive Modes Theory (Yao, Yu & Essex, 2002), previously intractable but substantively significant dynamical properties of the 6-dimensional model are identified. They include stable and unstable fixed-point equilibria (higher-dimensional saddle-node bifurcation), oscillatory patterns attending fixed-point de-stabilization, and chaotic behaviors. Examination of the nature of system fixed-point de-stabilization, in relation to its control parameters, unveils mechanisms of re-stabilization, and dynamic stability control. All identified dynamics emerge naturally from a system whose construction guideposts are lodged in the addressed content domain. Dynamical complexities therefore may be intrinsic to the present content domain, possibly no less so than in other disciplines where the presence of such attributes has been established.

  9. Craving to quit: psychological models and neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness training as treatment for addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Judson A; Elwafi, Hani M; Davis, Jake H

    2013-06-01

    Humans suffer heavily from substance use disorders and other addictions. Despite much effort that has been put into understanding the mechanisms of the addictive process, treatment strategies have remained suboptimal over the past several decades. Mindfulness training, which is based on ancient Buddhist models of human suffering, has recently shown preliminary efficacy in treating addictions. These early models show remarkable similarity to current models of the addictive process, especially in their overlap with operant conditioning (positive and negative reinforcement). Further, they may provide explanatory power for the mechanisms of mindfulness training, including its effects on core addictive elements, such as craving, and the underlying neurobiological processes that may be active therein. In this review, using smoking as an example, we will highlight similarities between ancient and modern views of the addictive process, review studies of mindfulness training for addictions and their effects on craving and other components of this process, and discuss recent neuroimaging findings that may inform our understanding of the neural mechanisms of mindfulness training. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Understanding the psychology of bullying: Moving toward a social-ecological diathesis-stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearer, Susan M; Hymel, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    With growing recognition that bullying is a complex phenomenon, influenced by multiple factors, research findings to date have been understood within a social-ecological framework. Consistent with this model, we review research on the known correlates and contributing factors in bullying/victimization within the individual, family, peer group, school and community. Recognizing the fluid and dynamic nature of involvement in bullying, we then expand on this model and consider research on the consequences of bullying involvement, as either victim or bully or both, and propose a social-ecological, diathesis-stress model for understanding the bullying dynamic and its impact. Specifically, we frame involvement in bullying as a stressful life event for both children who bully and those who are victimized, serving as a catalyst for a diathesis-stress connection between bullying, victimization, and psychosocial difficulties. Against this backdrop, we suggest that effective bullying prevention and intervention efforts must take into account the complexities of the human experience, addressing both individual characteristics and history of involvement in bullying, risk and protective factors, and the contexts in which bullying occurs, in order to promote healthier social relationships.

  11. Craving to Quit: psychological models and neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness training as treatment for addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Judson A.; Elwafi, Hani M.; Davis, Jake H.

    2012-01-01

    Humans suffer heavily from substance use disorders and other addictions. Despite much effort that has been put into understanding the mechanisms of the addictive process, treatment strategies have remained sub-optimal over the past several decades. Mindfulness training, which is based on ancient Buddhist models of human suffering, has recently shown preliminary efficacy in treating addictions. Interestingly, these early models show remarkable similarity to current models of the addictive process, especially in their overlap with operant conditioning (positive and negative reinforcement). Further, they may provide explanatory power for the mechanisms of mindfulness training, including its effects on core addictive elements, such as craving, and the underlying neurobiological processes that may be active therein. In this review, using smoking as an example, we will highlight similarities between ancient and modern views of the addictive process, review studies of mindfulness training for addictions and their effects on craving and other components of this process, and discuss recent neuroimaging findings that may inform our understanding of the neural mechanisms of mindfulness training. PMID:22642859

  12. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Patil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Education Psychology is one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines which is concerned with the description, explanation and control of the educational processes arising from the interaction between the teacher and learner in the context of a specified or unspecified subject. The concept of educational psycology is changing as a result of the general impact of the disciplines such as sociology, anthropology,economics, political science and so on. The subject matter of educational psychology is also reflecting a diversity of structures and emphases in its connection.

  13. Introducing positive psychology to SLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mercer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding subfield in psychology that has important implications for the field of second language acquisition (SLA. This paper introduces positive psychology to the study of language by describing its key tenets. The potential contributions of positive psychology are contextualized with reference to prior work, including the humanistic movement in language teaching, models of motivation, the concept of an affective filter, studies of the good language learner, and the concepts related to the self. There are reasons for both encouragement and caution as studies inspired by positive psychology are undertaken. Papers in this special issue of SSLLT cover a range of quantitative and qualitative methods with implications for theory, research, and teaching practice. The special issue serves as a springboard for future research in SLA under the umbrella of positive psychology.

  14. Educating the Psychology Workforce in the Age of the Affordable Care Act: A Graduate Course Modeled after the Priorities of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) represents a paradigm shift in the U.S. healthcare system, which has implications for psychology programs producing the next generation of trainees. In particular, the ACA has established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which has been tasked with developing national priorities and funding research aimed at improving healthcare quality by helping patients and providers to make informed healthcare decisions. PCORI's national priorities span five broad domains: person-centered outcomes research, health disparities research, healthcare systems research, communication and dissemination research, and methodologic research. As these national priorities overlap with the knowledge and skills often emphasized in psychology training programs, initiatives by training programs to bolster strengths in these domains could place trainees at the forefront of this emerging research paradigm. As a part of a new Masters program in behavioral health, our program developed a health psychology course modeled around PCORI's five national priorities, and an initial evaluation in a small sample supported student learning in the five PCORI domains. In summary, the current report has implications for familiarizing readers with PCORI's national priorities for U.S. healthcare, stimulating debate surrounding psychology's response to the largest healthcare paradigm shift in recent U.S. history, and providing a working model for programs seeking to implement PCORI-related changes to their curricula. PMID:26843899

  15. Psychological drivers in doping: The life-cycle model of performance enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidman Eugene

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Performance enhancement (PE is a natural and essential ingredient of competitive sport. Except for nutritional supplement contamination, accidental use of doping is highly unlikely. It requires deliberation, planning and commitment; and is influenced by a host of protective and risk factors. Hypothesis In the course of their career, athletes constantly set goals and make choices regarding the way these goals can be achieved. The cycle of choice – goal commitment – execution – feedback on goal attainment – goal evaluation/adjustment has numerous exit points, each providing an opportunity for behaviour change, which may or may not be related to the use of prohibited methods. The interplay between facilitating and inhibiting systemic and personality factors, constantly influenced by situational factors could result in an outcome vector of 'doping attitudes', which combines with subjective norms to influence intentions to choose prohibited PE methods. These influences also vary from one stage of athlete development to the next, making some athletes more vulnerable to engaging in doping practices than others, and more vulnerable at certain time periods – and not others. Testing the hypothesis Model-testing requires a series of carefully planned and coordinated studies. Correlational studies can establish relationships where the directionality is not-known or not important. Experimental studies with the manipulation of doping expectancies and risk factors can be used to demonstrate causality and evaluate potential intervention strategies. The final model can be tested via a behavioural simulation, with outcomes compared to those expected from literature precedence or used as a simulated computer game for empirical data collection. Implications A hypothesized life-cycle model of PE identifies vulnerability factors across the stages of athlete development with the view of informing the design of anti-doping assessment and

  16. Modelling and measuring the irrational behaviour of agents in financial markets: Discovering the psychological soliton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhesi, Gurjeet; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Following a Geometrical Brownian Motion extension into an Irrational Fractional Brownian Motion model, we re-examine agent behaviour reacting to time dependent news on the log-returns thereby modifying a financial market evolution. We specifically discuss the role of financial news or economic information positive or negative feedback of such irrational (or contrarian) agents upon the price evolution. We observe a kink-like effect reminiscent of soliton behaviour, suggesting how analysts' forecasts errors induce stock prices to adjust accordingly, thereby proposing a measure of the irrational force in a market.

  17. The primary care prescribing psychologist model: medical provider ratings of the safety, impact and utility of prescribing psychology in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S; Harmon, S Cory; Seavey, Brian M; Tiu, Alvin Y

    2012-12-01

    Family medicine providers at a large family medicine clinic were surveyed regarding their impression of the impact, utility and safety of the Primary Care Prescribing Psychologist (PCPP) model in which a prescribing psychologist is embedded in a primary care clinic. This article describes the model and provides indications of its strengths and weaknesses as reported by medical providers who have utilized the model for the past 2 years. A brief history of prescribing psychology and the challenges surrounding granting psychologists the authority to prescribe psychotropic medication is summarized. Results indicate family medicine providers agree that having a prescribing psychologist embedded in the family medicine clinic is helpful to their practice, safe for patients, convenient for providers and for patients, and improves patient care. Potential benefits of integrating prescribing psychology into primary care are considered and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Social and psychological aspects of criminal juvenile justice in the world practice (Anglo-Saxon model of juvenile justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Oshevsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is the final part of the review of existing foreign models of juvenile criminal justice system. We analyze the principles of juvenile justice in the criminal trial: protective orientation, personalization and social richness of the trial, the emphasis on educational influences. We present the foreign experience of incorporating social, psychological and clinical special knowledge into specialized justice concerning juvenile offenders. We analyze modern trends in the development of juvenile justice in the United States and Canada. We present material related to methods of risk assessment of re-offending among adolescents. We highlight approaches to complex long-term follow-up of juvenile offenders in Anglo-Saxon juvenile justice. We describe some aspects of the probation service using the method of case management. In the context of the accepted “National Strategy for Action for the Benefit of Children for 2012-2017”, the prospects for the development of specialized criminal justice for young offenders in the Russian Federation are discussed

  19. PSYCHOLOGICAL MODEL OF THE SYSTEM "SPECIAL CHILD – LIVING ENVIRONMENT" AS A BASIS FOR SUPPORT OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Анатольевна Калашникова

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed to determine the content characteristic of interaction of a child with disabilities and his living environment, psychological analysis of the options for the child development in different types of this interaction. It is based on the principles of system analysis. Child development is presented as a process and the result of interaction between the system components "child with disabilities – living environment". Interaction is considered in terms of compliance, non-compliance of system components.The article identifies the types of system interactions "special child – living environment" (adaptive, developing, maladaptive, deforming and gives their content characteristics. Integrative potential is considered as a condition, the result and complete description of the system "special child – living environment". It includes the personal potential possibilities of a child with disabilities and the resources of living environment according to the child’s needs.  The presented model is applicable to the analysis of family or  education environment  of disabled child to create and carry out the individual program of child development and creation of optimal conditions for the socialization and integration.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-3-13

  20. Space psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  1. Psychology Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  2. Psychology Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderssen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the University of Texas Austin's Seay Psychology and Child Development & Family Relationships building. With modern technique and materials, the Seay building adds to the established architectural language of the campus, offering a richly tactile structure and adjoining outdoor space embracing the tenets of successful…

  3. Psychology Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  4. Modeling the Relationship between Trauma and Psychological Distress among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

    OpenAIRE

    Delany-Brumsey, A; Joseph, NT; Myers, HF; Ullman, JB; Wyatt, GE

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between cumulative exposure to multiple traumatic events and psychological distress, as mediated by problematic substance use and impaired psychosocial resources. A sample of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women were assessed for a history of childhood and adult sexual abuse and non-sexual trauma as predictors of psychological distress (i.e., depression, non-specific anxiety, and posttraumatic stress), as mediated by problematic alcohol and drug use and ...

  5. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling of the Influences of Family-Centered Care on Parent and Child Psychological Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dunst, Carl J.; Carol M. Trivette

    2009-01-01

    Background. Family-centered care is now practiced throughout the world by physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. The call for adoption of family-centered care is based on the contention that the physical and psychological health of a child is influenced by parents' psychological health where family-centered care enhances parent well-being which in turn influences child well-being. We empirically assessed whether these relationships are supported by available evidence. Metho...

  6. Preliminary examination of the relations between disease activity, illness perceptions, coping strategies, and psychological morbidity in Crohn's disease guided by the common sense model of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, S R; Wilson, J L; Connell, W R; Kamm, M A

    2011-12-01

    An individual's psychological adjustment to illness is influenced by disease severity, illness perceptions, and coping strategies. A more precise understanding of the contribution of each of these factors to a patient's well-being may influence the kind of psychological support required by patients. This study therefore aimed to characterize the contributors to psychological well-being in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The design was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Ninety-six CD patients (34 males, 62 females, mean age 38 years) attending a tertiary hospital inflammatory bowel disease outpatient clinic were studied. Disease severity was evaluated according to the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), coping styles assessed with the Carver Brief COPE scale, illness perceptions explored with the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ), and anxiety and depression measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Combining the questionnaire data using structural equation modeling resulted in a final model with an excellent fit (χ(2) (7) = 10.42, P = 0.17, χ(2) /N = 1.49, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) 0.97, Goodness-of-fit index (GFI) > 0.97). Disease activity had a significant direct influence on illness perceptions (β = 51, P illness perceptions had a significant direct influence on depression and anxiety (β = 41, P disease activity, illness perceptions, coping strategies, and depression and anxiety. These aspects of psychological processing provide a framework and direction for the psychological support that patients with CD require. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  7. Significance of Cultural-Historical Theory of Psychological Development of L.S. Vygotsky for the Development of Modern Models of Social Cognition and Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholmogorova A.B.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article acknowledges the situation of methodical crisis in modern research of social cognition related to the domination of reductive approaches that ignore the uniqueness of human psyche. Heuristicity of concepts of cultural-historical theory of psychological development of L.S. Vygotsky, which serves to overcome the apparent inconsistencies is substantiated. Models of social cognition based on the principles of cultural-historical psychology are described, those being the model of social cognition within phylogenesis of M. Tomasello, and the model of social cognition within ontogenesis of C. Fernyhough. Current situation in the area of mental health is reviewed from the standpoint of cultural-historical psychology, its specifics reflected in the increased burden on reflexive functions, that is, skills lying within the sphere of social cognition is substantiated. Modern psychotherapeutic apparatus directed to compensate social cognition deficits due to various psychiatric disorders is reviewed. The assumption that adolescense is sensitive period for the development of higher forms of social cognition is made, and a summary of researches supporting this assertion is presented. Main contradictions of modern-day maturing are enunciated. To conclude the presented theoretical analysis, a comprehensive multiple-factor model of social cognition is presented based on concepts of cultural-historical theory of L.S. Vygotsky.

  8. The model-building up of the college students' psychological health education based on the positive psychology perspective%积极心理学视野下大学生心理健康教育模式构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓沄

    2014-01-01

    21世纪高校心理健康教育的根本功能是促进和实现大学生的心理发展,心理健康教育模式应从心理问题干预模式向积极心理品质培育模式转变。本文借鉴积极心理学的理论和观点,探讨了大学生心理健康教育模式的转变与构建。%In the 21st century, the fundamental function of psychological health education in colleges and universities should be promoted and achieved psychological growth of the students. Accordingly, the psychological health education model should change from the model of psychological intervention to that of cultivating the positive psychological character. The paper discussed the change and model-building of psychological education on students based on the theories and viewpoints of the positive psychology.

  9. Toward an Understanding of Media Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Bernard J.

    1996-01-01

    Considers the psychology of multimedia. Topics include software development, including decisions about sound and image quality; theories of multiple intelligences; the psychology of learning; a model that includes semantics, semiotics, and synthetics; and the impact of media psychology on the use of multimedia for learning. (LRW)

  10. Industrial Psychology in the Seventies and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Gerald V.; And Others

    This document contains three papers which speculate about the future of industrial and organizational psychology in the years ahead. The papers are: (1) "Research Models of the Future for Industrial and Organizational Psychology" by G.W. Barrett, which looks at three aspects of research in industrial and organizational psychology,…

  11. Cultural psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Steven J; Ruby, Matthew B

    2010-03-01

    Humans are a cultural species, constantly navigating a complex web of culturally bound practices, norms, and worldviews. This article provides a brief overview of the relatively young field of cultural psychology, which investigates the many ways psychology and culture interweave with one another. Highlighting the cultural nature of the human species, it draws upon research on cultural evolution, enculturation, and developmental processes. This review further summarizes a number of cultural differences in how people perceive the self, and the behavioral consequences that follow from these differences, in the domains of internal and external attribution styles, motivations for self-enhancement, approach/avoidance, primary and secondary control, as well as motivations for distinctiveness and conformity. Additionally, the review discusses research on the intersection of culture and emotion, as well as cultural differences in cognition, perception, and reasoning. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The effects of physical and psychological stress on the gastro-intestinal tract: lessons from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Javier R; Leza, Juan C; Menchén, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Physical and psychological stresses are widely accepted as triggers and / or modifiers of the clinical course of diverse gastrointestinal disorders such as peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease. Growing experimental evidence from a variety of models such as immobilization, thermal injury or early maternal deprivation in laboratory animals uniformly supports the ability of stress to induce the development of gastric ulcers, altered gastrointestinal motility and ion secretion, and increased intestinal permeability leading to the passage of antigens to the lamina propria and bacterial translocation. Stress can also synergize with other pathogenic factors such as Helicobacter pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or colitis-inducing chemicals to produce gastrointestinal disease. The brain-gut axis provides the anatomical basis through emotions and environmental influences modulate the gastrointestinal function through the regulation of gastrointestinal immune system and mucosal inflammation; in this sense, mucosal mast cells - at cellular level - and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) - at molecular level - seem to play a crucial role. On the other hand, an array of adaptive responses have been evolved in order to maintain the homeostasis and to ensure the survival of the individual. In the gut mucosa anti-inflammatory pathways counteract the deleterious effect of the stressful stimuli on the gastrointestinal homeostasis. In the present review we discuss the several experimental approaches used to mimic human stressful events or chronic stress in laboratory animals, the evidence of stress-induced gastrointestinal inflammation and dysfunction derived from them, and the involved cellular and molecular mechanisms that are being discovered during the last years.

  13. Facial expression judgments support a socio-relational model, rather than a negativity bias model of political psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Jacob M; Strenth, Chance

    2014-06-01

    Self-reported opinions and judgments may be more rooted in expressive biases than in cognitive processing biases, and ultimately operate within a broader behavioral style for advertising the capacity - versus the trustworthiness - dimension of human reciprocity potential. Our analyses of facial expression judgments of likely voters are consistent with this thesis, and directly contradict one major prediction from the authors' "negativity-bias" model.

  14. Positive Psychology and Leisure Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John Dattilo

    2015-01-01

      The purpose of this paper is to present a balanced and systematic leisure education service model grounded in positive psychology principles that are applied across diverse audiences and in various...

  15. Psychology of religion: perspectives from cultural psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper tries to establish what type of psychology the psychology of religion is. Having introduced cultural psychology in general, some theories applicable in research on religion are presented, and some examples of cultural psychological research of religious

  16. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  17. Psychological workload and body weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; Gyntelberg, F; Heitmann, B L

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to Karasek's Demand/Control Model, workload can be conceptualized as job strain, a combination of psychological job demands and control in the job. High job strain may result from high job demands combined with low job control. Aim To give an overview of the literature...... on the association between obesity and psychological workload. METHOD: We carried out a review of the associations between psychological workload and body weight in men and women. In total, 10 cross-sectional studies were identified. RESULTS: The review showed little evidence of a general association between...... psychological workload and body mass index. Only weak positive associations were found, and only between elements of psychological workload and overall body weight. For body fat distribution, two out of three studies showed a positive association in men, but the associations became insignificant after...

  18. Reasoning, logic, and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenning, Keith; van Lambalgen, Michiel

    2011-09-01

    We argue that reasoning has been conceptualized so narrowly in what is known as 'psychology of reasoning' that reasoning's relevance to cognitive science has become well-nigh invisible. Reasoning is identified with determining whether a conclusion follows validly from given premises, where 'valid' is taken to mean 'valid according to classical logic'. We show that there are other ways to conceptualize reasoning, more in line with current logical theorizing, which give it a role in psychological processes ranging from (verbal) discourse comprehension to (nonverbal) planning. En route we show that formal logic, at present marginalized in cognitive science, can be an extremely valuable modeling tool. In particular, there are cases in which probabilistic modeling must fail, whereas logical models do well. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 555-567 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.134 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  19. 警卫专业心理训练模式研究%A Study of a Psychological Training Model for the Undergraduates of the Security Department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国烨

    2012-01-01

    Psychological training is an effective method to improve the level of mental quality for the security personnel. Psychological training for the undergraduates of the security department has its own characters and the goal. It is significant to establish a scientific and reasonable training model, and to make a study of a research training system in accordance with the requirement of security specialty systemically, which is meaningful for the forces and academy.%心理训练是提高警卫专业学员心理素质的有效途径之一。警卫专业心理训练有着自身的特征和训练目标。构建科学合理的训练模式,系统研究符合警卫专业需求的训练体系对部队和院校有着长远的意义。

  20. Applying occupational and organizational psychology theory to entrustment decision-making about trainees in health care: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhausen, Ylva; Maaz, Asja; Cianciolo, Anna T; Ten Cate, Olle; Peters, Harm

    2017-04-01

    In medical contexts around the world, supervising physicians continuously decide what degree of supervision to apply as trainees carry out professional activities. Although the implications for patients can be far-reaching, little is known about how these entrustment decisions are formed. The concept of 'Entrustable Professional Activities' has initiated interest and valuable research on factors that may influence the entrustment decision process.The aim of the current article is to link models of entrustment developed in the fields of occupational and organizational psychology and military psychology to medical education studies that have explored the factors influencing physicians' entrustment decisions. We provide a conceptual framework of the entrustment decision-making process, which we suggest will contribute to the understanding of how supervising physicians arrive at the decision to entrust a medical trainee with a professional activity.

  1. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-08-15

    There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by children and adolescents. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model. A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 30 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being improved self-esteem, social interaction followed by fewer depressive symptoms. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health above and beyond improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, team sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the fact that the majority of studies identified (n=21) were cross-sectional. It is recommended that community sport participation is advocated as a form of leisure time PA for children

  2. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by children and adolescents. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model. Methods A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. Results A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 30 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being improved self-esteem, social interaction followed by fewer depressive symptoms. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health above and beyond improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, team sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the fact that the majority of studies identified (n=21) were cross-sectional. Conclusion It is recommended that community sport participation is advocated as a

  3. Does the Model Matter? The Relationship between Science-Practice Emphasis and Outcomes in Academic Training Programs in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Saferstein, Jocelyn; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2005-01-01

    The emphasis on the commitment to science and practice varies among counseling psychology training programs, and this article reports two studies that examine whether these different emphases are linked to distinctive outcomes. Study 1 examined outcomes related to students and faculty within science-oriented, balanced science-practice, and…

  4. Study of Impact on Undergraduates' Entrepreneurial Failure Based on the Model of Psychological Resilience-Knowledge Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Tang; Dancheng, Luo; Ye, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The entrepreneurship is a course of gaining knowledge from the failure and stimulating positive energy constantly. The entrepreneur's psychological resilience is the key to gain knowledge (positive energy) from failure (negative energy). The education of undergraduate entrepreneurship is one of the priorities these days. Educators shall…

  5. From Behavioral Psychology to Acceleration Modeling: Calibration, Validation, and Exploration of Drivers Cognitive and Safety Parameters in a Risk-Taking Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdar, Samer H; Treiber, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a utility-based approach for driver car-following behavioral modeling while analyzing different aspects of the model characteristics especially in terms of capturing different fundamental diagram regions and safety proxy indices. The adopted model came from an elementary thought where drivers associate subjective utilities for accelerations (i.e. gain in travel times) and subjective dis-utilities for decelerations (i.e. loss in travel time) with a perceived probability of being involved in rear-end collision crashes. Following the testing of the model general structure, the authors translate the corresponding behavioral psychology theory - prospect theory - into an efficientmicroscopic traffic modeling with more elaborate stochastic characteristics considered in a risk-taking environment. The formulated model offers a better understanding of drivers behavior, particularly under extreme/incident conditions.

  6. Logotherapy and positive psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar R. Oro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychology omitted to approach, during almost a century, the positive aspects from persons, like creativity, humor, optimism, hope, forgiveness, life meaning, and happiness. These themes are approached by Positive Psychology, with Seligman like the principal exponent. Psychology was dedicated to explore the negative aspects from human beings improving human health. Nevertheless, this pathogenic model could not prevent mental disease. Concepts of Positive Psychology have a solid antecedent in Víktor Frankl ́s studies, which is the Logotherapy founder. This allows incorporating another perspective to approach positive aspects, from a philosophical and anthropological focus. Although the ways adopted by Frank and Seligman are different, both considered main aspects of human existence. Nevertheless, they investigated in different countries (from Europe and EE.UU.; in different circumstances (concentration camps, deaths, tortures; vs. academic context; in different historical periods and different social contexts (a country that lost the war and other that gave freedom to Europeans. In this work is used the concept life sense as the focus in professional formation and psychotherapy approach. 

  7. Socio-psychological Analytic Model of Code-Switching%语码转换的社会心理分析模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蓓

    2011-01-01

    Code-switching is a common linguistic phenomenon in language communication, especially in hilin- gual or multilingual communities. Code-switching is triggered as a consequence of both social context and indi- vidual psychological factors. This paper adopts theories regarding language use and social psychology to study the code-switching phenomena in social context. Code-switching thus is being regarded as a social action, an interpersonal action, a contextualized action, a coordinated action and a thoughtful action. Based on these considerations, a socio-psychological analytic model of code-switching is proposed, aiming at probing into the socio-psychological mechanism of code-switching. According to the socio-psychological analytical model of code-switching, code-switching is defined as a dynamic process of language choice within social context. The mterlocutor's choice of one certain language or language variable was affected first by the existing social con- ~:ext and the interpersonal relationships, and then determined by one's motivations, perceptions or other indi- vidual psychological factors as well as soeio-psychological factors such as conformity, persuading and cultural :!actors. During this psychological procedure, the coordinated activities between the interlocutors will also cause the emergence of code-switching. The major coordinated activities involve perspective taking, coopera- live principles and politeness theory. In addition, this paper discusses that code-switching is not only by itself a consequence of the social context, but also a promoter in constructing a new conversational context and a factor affecting the current interpersonal relationship. This effect can either be positive or negative in maintai- ning interpersonal relationship.%语码转换是语言交际中出现的一种现象,它普遍存在于双语或多语社会中。一般来说,语码转换是说话人在特定语境中主观选择不同语码的有意识行为

  8. 园林美学评价的心理结构模型研究%Study on the Psychological Structure Model for Gardens Landscape Aesthetics Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴余青; 熊兴耀

    2015-01-01

    Landscape aesthetic evaluation is of vital significance for the development of landscape design and engineering.Research on aesthetic evaluation system is an interdisciplinary study, including the discipline of aes-thetic psychology as a significant part.This paper focused on the psychological structure model for landscape aes-thetic comprehensive evaluation using the structural equation model, and the results showed that the structural mod-el composed of the four aspects of index system, i.e., the fitting degree of theme, ecological suitability, sense of visual beauty and sense of comprehensive beauty, performed well in the landscape aesthetic comprehensive evalua-tion for the landscape aesthetic psychological.An empirical research based on the sampling survey of Humble Administrator's Garden verified that the model has a good reliability.%园林美学评价对园林设计与工程发展具有重要的意义,而美学评价体系是一个多学科相互渗透融合的领域,其中心理学的感受至关重要.本文以结构方程模型为工具,对园林美学综合评价的心理结构模型进行研究.结果表明,以主题符合度、生态适宜度、视觉美感度及综合美感度4个指标体系构成的园林美学评价心理结构模型可以较好地对园林美学进行综合评价.以拙政园为实例,证实了该模型具有较好的可靠性.

  9. [Effects in the adherence treatment and psychological adjustment after the disclosure of HIV/AIDS diagnosis with the "DIRE" clinical model in Colombian children under 17].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejos, Ana María; Reyes, Lizeth; Bahamon, Marly Johana; Alarcón, Yolima; Gaviria, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    A study in five Colombian cities in 2006, confirms the findings of other international studies: the majority of HIV-positive children not know their diagnosis, caregivers are reluctant to give this information because they believe that the news will cause emotional distress to the child becoming primary purpose of this study to validate a model of revelation. We implemented a clinical model, referred to as: "DIRE" that hypothetically had normalizing effects on psychological adjustment and adherence to antiretroviral treatment of HIV seropositive children, using a quasi-experimental design. Test were administered (questionnaire to assess patterns of disclosure and non-disclosure of the diagnosis of VIH/SIDA on children in health professionals and participants caregivers, Family Apgar, EuroQol EQ- 5D, MOS Social Support Survey Questionnaire Information treatment for VIH/SIDA and child Symptom Checklist CBCL/6-18 adapted to Latinos) before and after implementation of the model to 31 children (n: 31), 30 caregivers (n: 30) and 41 health professionals. Data processing was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Science version 21 by applying parametric tests (Friedman) and nonparametric (t Student). No significant differences in adherence to treatment (p=0.392), in the psychological adjustment were found positive significant differences at follow-ups compared to baseline 2 weeks (p: 0.001), 3 months (p: 0.000) and 6 months (p: 0.000). The clinical model demonstrated effectiveness in normalizing of psychological adjustment and maintaining treatment compliance. The process also generated confidence in caregivers and health professionals in this difficult task.

  10. Darwinian Theory, Functionalism, and the First American Psychological Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    American functionalist psychology constituted an effort to model scientific psychology on the successes of English evolutionary theory. In part it was a response to the stagnation of Wundt's psychological research program, which had been grounded in German experimental physiology. In part it was an attempt to make psychology more appealing within…

  11. Social capital and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    The author proposes a conceptual model to explain the diverse roles of social capital--resources embedded in social networks--in the social production of health. Using a unique national U.S. sample, the author estimated a path analysis model to examine the direct and indirect effects of social capital on psychological distress and its intervening effects on the relationships between other structural antecedents and psychological distress. The results show that social capital is inversely associated with psychological distress, and part of that effect is indirect through subjective social status. Social capital also acts as an intervening mechanism to link seven social factors (age, gender, race-ethnicity, education, occupational prestige, annual family income, and voluntary participation) with psychological distress. This study develops the theory of social capital as network resources and demonstrates the complex functions of social capital as a distinct social determinant of health.

  12. Psychological and Educational Intervention to Improve Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence in Ethiopia Based on Health Belief Model: A Cluster Randomized Control Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habteyes Hailu Tola

    Full Text Available Treatment non-adherence results in treatment failure, prolonged transmission of disease and emergence of drug resistance. Although the problem widely investigated, there remains an information gap on the effectiveness of different methods to improve treatment adherence and the predictors of non-adherence in resource limited countries based on theoretical models. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of psychological counseling and educational intervention on tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence based on Health Belief Model (HBM.A cluster randomized control trial was conducted in Addis Ababa from May to December, 2014. Patients were enrolled into study consecutively from 30 randomly selected Health Centers (HCs (14 HCs intervention and 16 HCs control groups. A total of 698 TB patients, who were on treatment for one month to two months were enrolled. A structured questionnaire was administered to both groups of patients at baseline and endpoint of study. Control participants received routine directly-observed anti-TB therapy and the intervention group additionally received combined psychological counseling and adherence education. Treatment non-adherence level was the main outcome of the study, and multilevel logistic regression was employed to assess the impact of intervention on treatment adherence.At enrollment, the level of non-adherence among intervention (19.4% and control (19.6% groups was almost the same. However, after intervention, non-adherence level decreased among intervention group from 19.4 (at baseline to 9.5% (at endpoint, while it increased among control group from 19.4% (baseline to 25.4% (endpoint. Psychological counseling and educational interventions resulted in significant difference with regard to non-adherence level between intervention and control groups (Adjusted OR = 0.31, 95% Confidence Interval (CI (0.18-0.53, p < 0.001.Psychological counseling and educational interventions, which were guided by HBM, significantly

  13. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL POTENTIALS OF THE MANAGEMENT TEAM IN THE CONDITIONS OF INNOVATIVE INTRODUCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Gryazeva-dobshinskaya, V.; Dmitrieva, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The current issue of the organized consultation practice is a selection of the managers that are efficient in learning new professional purviews during the introduction of innovations. The research of the existing problem is based on complex program of psychological advanced audit of V.G. Gryazeva-Dobshynskaya, who's one of the main subjects is identification of the command and role structure of enterprises management (technique of R.M. Belbin "Roles in the teamwork"). 155 managers of enterpr...

  14. A Psychological Model of Translation Quality Assessment: Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives to Grade English Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Pourdana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the possibility of grading English texts based on the psychological processes a non-native English translator might go through by applying Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain. The researchers’ primary assumption was that the difficulty of English texts would increase as the translator’s performance proceeds from translating an English text that requires their only language Knowledge through the texts requiring increasing demands of their Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Aynthesis and Evaluation abilities. To the researchers, the quality of the translation performance could be assessed based on the type of psychological processing they conduct in translating a given text. To fulfil the ultimate purpose of the research, 30 undergraduate students majoring in English translation at Islamic Azad University, Karaj Branch, Iran took part in this investigation in 2012. In addition to Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT, the participants were given a translation essay-type test that included six short English passages of 150 to 200 words. The texts were carefully graded based on the type of behavioural objectives (i.e., psychological processes demanded of the translator and listed according to the hierarchy of Bloom’s cognitive domain. A non-parametric test of Kruskal Wallis proved that except for the fifth level, the Synthesis text, the trainee translators’ quality of performance was graded properly based on the difficulty levels expected and explored in Bloom’s levels of cognitive domain. The findings in this study are considerately practical in translation quality assessment, upgrading the reliability estimate of translation tests and teaching translation skills and strategies. Keywords: EFL, Bloom’s Cognitive Domain, Grading, Psychological Processing, Translation Quality Assessment

  15. A Psychological Model of Translation Quality Assessment: Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives to Grade English Texts

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Pourdana; John S. Rajeski

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the possibility of grading English texts based on the psychological processes a non-native English translator might go through by applying Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain. The researchers’ primary assumption was that the difficulty of English texts would increase as the translator’s performance proceeds from translating an English text that requires their only language Knowledge through the texts requiring increasing demands of ...

  16. Polycultural psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael W; Chiu, Chi-yue; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We review limitations of the traditional paradigm for cultural research and propose an alternative framework, polyculturalism. Polyculturalism assumes that individuals' relationships to cultures are not categorical but rather are partial and plural; it also assumes that cultural traditions are not independent, sui generis lineages but rather are interacting systems. Individuals take influences from multiple cultures and thereby become conduits through which cultures can affect each other. Past literatures on the influence of multiple cultural identities and cultural knowledge legacies can be better understood within a polyculturalist rubric. Likewise, the concept elucidates how cultures are changed by contact with other cultures, enabling richer psychological theories of intercultural influence. Different scientific paradigms about culture imply different ideologies and policies; polyculturalism's implied policy of interculturalism provides a valuable complement to the traditional policy frames of multiculturalism and colorblindness.

  17. Performance consequences of psychological empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Tuuli, MM; Rowlinson, S

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between psychological empowerment and job performance, and whether three intermediate performance determinants; motivation, ability, and opportunity to perform hold the key to unlocking the empowerment-performance relationship dilemma are addressed. Using hierarchical linear modeling to analyze responses from 380 project management-level staff, the results show that psychological empowerment not only has direct and positive performance consequences, but also indirect effects,...

  18. A comparison of the psychological refractory period and prioritized processing paradigms: Can the response-selection bottleneck model explain them both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Durst, Moritz

    2015-10-01

    Four experiments examined whether well-established phenomena from the psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm are also observed in the prioritized processing paradigm, as would be expected from a common description of the 2 paradigms with the response selection bottleneck (RSB) model. Consistent with a generalization of the RSB model to the prioritized processing paradigm, Experiments 1 and 2 showed that this paradigm yields effects of SOA and stimulus discriminability analogous to those observed in the PRP paradigm. In Experiments 3 and 4, however, overall RTs and effect sizes differed between the PRP and prioritized processing paradigms in ways that are difficult to explain within the RSB model. Understanding the differences between these 2 paradigms offers considerable promise as a way to extend the RSB model beyond the domain of the PRP paradigm and to generalize our understanding of multitasking interference.

  19. Psychological Capital and Performance: The Mediating Role of Work Family Spillover and Psychological Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Polatcı; Asuman Akdoğan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychological capital and performance and to identify work family spillover and psychological well-being as a mediator of the effects of psychological capital on performance. Data was gathered from 361 white-collar employees from different occupations. The results based on Structural Equation Modeling reveal that psychological capital plays an important role in providing employees to have high performance. The results also i...

  20. The Dialectic Psychology perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveros M., Ricardo; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The present paper exposes the dialectic psychology perspectives in the twentieth first century Peru. We ponder about the dialectics psychology denomination, connecting them to other denominations used in the materialist psychology trend. We analyze the relations between dialectics psychology and social neuroscience, delimiting both the psychological sciences field and the neuroscience field. We develop issues from the emancipator project of dialectics psychology, precising personal developmen...

  1. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for adults: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Payne, Warren R

    2013-12-07

    The definition of health incorporates the physical, social and mental domains, however the Physical Activity (PA) guidelines do not address social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by adults. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model of Health through Sport. A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 11 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being wellbeing and reduced distress and stress. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health in addition to improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, club-based or team-based sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. Notwithstanding this, individuals who prefer to participate in sport by themselves can still derive mental health benefits which can enhance the development of true-self-awareness and personal growth which is essential for social health. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is limited by the cross

  2. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for adults: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The definition of health incorporates the physical, social and mental domains, however the Physical Activity (PA) guidelines do not address social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by adults. Secondly, the information arising from the systematic review has been used to develop a conceptual model of Health through Sport. Methods A systematic review of 14 electronic databases was conducted in June 2012, and studies published since 1990 were considered for inclusion. Studies that addressed mental and/or social health benefits from participation in sport were included. Results A total of 3668 publications were initially identified, of which 11 met the selection criteria. There were many different psychological and social health benefits reported, with the most commonly being wellbeing and reduced distress and stress. Sport may be associated with improved psychosocial health in addition to improvements attributable to participation in PA. Specifically, club-based or team-based sport seems to be associated with improved health outcomes compared to individual activities, due to the social nature of the participation. Notwithstanding this, individuals who prefer to participate in sport by themselves can still derive mental health benefits which can enhance the development of true-self-awareness and personal growth which is essential for social health. A conceptual model, Health through Sport, is proposed. The model depicts the relationship between psychological, psychosocial and social health domains, and their positive associations with sport participation, as reported in the literature. However, it is acknowledged that the capacity to determine the existence and direction of causal links between participation and health is

  3. EVALUACIÓN OBJETIVA DE LOS TRATAMIENTOS PSICOLÓGICOS: MODELOS BASADOS EN LA CIENCIA/ OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENTS: SCIENCE-BASED MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBA ELISABETH MUSTACA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have seen an increase in clinical researchthat uses the scientific method for its validation, mainly due tothe influence of the empirically supported treatments (ESTsmovement that started in the 1990s. The article describes thebackground, objectives, and results of ESTs, as well as two intervention models that complement them: one that promotesresearch on the type of therapeutic relation that guaranteesgreater success of the therapies, and one that seeks to optimizemental health care systems. The conclusion is that mostESTs are techniques based on experimental psychology, andthat the scientific method is the best tool available to addressthe complex problem of human behavior.

  4. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  5. The componential model of reading: predicting first grade reading performance of culturally diverse students from ecological, psychological, and cognitive factors assessed at kindergarten entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Miriam; Folsom, Jessica S; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Greulich, Luana; Thomas-Tate, Shurita; Connor, Carol M

    2012-01-01

    This study, framed by the component model of reading (CMR), examined the relative importance of kindergarten-entry predictors of first grade reading performance. Specifically, elements within the ecological domain included dialect, maternal education, amount of preschool, and home literacy; elements within the psychological domain included teacher-reported academic competence, social skills, and behavior; and elements within the cognitive domain included initial vocabulary, phonological, and morpho-syntactic skills, and alphabetic and word recognition skills. Data were obtained for 224 culturally diverse kindergarteners (58% Black, 34% White, and 8% Hispanic or other; 58% received free or reduced-price lunch) from a larger study conducted in seven predominantly high poverty schools (n = 20 classrooms) in a midsized city school district in northern Florida. Results from a hierarchical multiple regression (with variables in the ecological domain entered first, followed by the psychological and cognitive domains) revealed a model that explained roughly 56% of the variance in first grade reading achievement, using fall-of-kindergarten predictors. Letter-word reading and morpho-syntactic skill were the strongest significant predictors. The findings largely support the CMR model as a means to understand individual differences in reading acquisition and, in turn, to support data-based instructional decisions for a wider range of children.

  6. Psychology Ethics in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchero, Renee' A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed that introductory psychology textbooks included limited information about psychology ethics. This study reviewed 48 current introductory psychology textbooks for research and other APA ethics content. These textbooks included slightly more total ethics content and were more thorough in their review of research ethics…

  7. Psychology Ethics in Introductory Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchero, Renee' A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed that introductory psychology textbooks included limited information about psychology ethics. This study reviewed 48 current introductory psychology textbooks for research and other APA ethics content. These textbooks included slightly more total ethics content and were more thorough in their review of research ethics…

  8. Chronic Pain of Psychological Concept Model%慢性疼痛的心理概念模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秀芬

    2014-01-01

    Pain is more than just a feeling ,and it contains the emotional and cognitive component and its sensory component are equally important .Any forms of pain have a psychological component ,and all stages of its occurrence and development are influenced by psychological factors .However ,a lot of people do not understand the principle and influence of pain in daily life ,and they believe that the pain is only as a disease or tissue damage of prompt signal ,ignoring the individual physical ,psychological and the negative effects of brain function .Therefore ,to explore the pain of psychological effects and its internal mechanism that can help people with all‐round understanding of the pain brought the negative effect of people , improve the degree of attention to the pain , to promote the diagnosis of pain and take appropriate countermeasures .%疼痛绝不仅仅只是一种感觉,它所包含的情感和认知成分与其感觉成分同等重要。任何一种形式的疼痛都有心理成分的参与,在其发生、发展的各个阶段都受到心理因素的影响。然而在日常生活中,很多人由于不了解疼痛的原理和影响,只把疼痛看做是疾病或组织损伤的提示信号,忽视了其对个体生理、心理乃至大脑功能的消极影响。因此,探索疼痛对心理的影响及其内在机制,有助于人们多方位地了解疼痛带给人们的消极作用,提高对疼痛的重视程度,促进对疼痛的诊断并采取适当的对策。

  9. Toward a cogenetic cultural psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The dialogue between cultural psychology and phenomenological and semiotic philosophy seems to be extremely promising. I have tried to present some relevant aspects of this dialogue and to use them as cornerstones to elaborate a metatheoretical and epistemological discourse about the way of build......The dialogue between cultural psychology and phenomenological and semiotic philosophy seems to be extremely promising. I have tried to present some relevant aspects of this dialogue and to use them as cornerstones to elaborate a metatheoretical and epistemological discourse about the way...... to account for developmental processes must emerge from a triadic system, rather than following the procedures of a binary logic, in order to have any correspondence between concept building and phenomenological world in psychology. Then, I sketch an epistemological approach called method of complementary...... negation that could help cultural psychology to build more developmental abstract models of very concrete human phenomena....

  10. Household composition and psychological health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Lene Eide; Willaing, Ingrid; Holt, Richard I G

    2017-01-01

    in the association between household composition and psychological health. METHODS: The study is part of the DAWN2 study conducted in 17 countries. The population comprised 8596 people with diabetes (PWD). Multiple regression models (linear and binary) were applied. RESULTS: People living with 'other adult......AIMS: 1) To explore the effect of household composition on the psychological health of adults with diabetes by comparing those living with other adult(s) including a partner with those living with neither partner nor other adult(s); 2) to examine potential mediation of social support...... to the other household composition groups. The association between household composition and psychological health was not mediated by diabetes-specific social support. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates the psychological vulnerability of respondents living without a partner but with other adult(s). Appropriate...

  11. Psychology of psychology? A theoretization of psychological science through historical and socio-anthropological analysis of Psychology as institution

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Žužek-Kres

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a "new" history of psychology, which is also termed as "psychology of psychology". In some academic communities this unconventional history of psychology represents today an accepted approach to epistemological questions about psychological concepts and it enables an insight into social contextualization of Psychology as an institution. The conclusion presents a referential and institutional context where this psychology of psychology is realized.

  12. The Bayesian Revolution Approaches Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    This commentary reviews five articles that apply Bayesian ideas to psychological development, some with psychology experiments, some with computational modeling, and some with both experiments and modeling. The reviewed work extends the current Bayesian revolution into tasks often studied in children, such as causal learning and word learning, and…

  13. Psychology's epistemological identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Černigoj

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is first to present three different, mutually irreducible approaches to the study of human psyche, and then to offer a conceptual model that allows their meaningful integration. I begin the article with the common knowledge about three main determinants of human behavior: genetic inheritance, social environment, and one's own activity, which I then link with Stevens' (1998 conceptualization of three appropriate epistemologies in psychology. Nomothetic epistemology is adequate for the study of behavior rooted in our biological dispositions, hermeneutic epistemology for the study of behavior founded on symbolic meanings, and transformative epistemology for the study of behavior steaming from our capacity for reflexive awareness. I then interrelate these epistemologies using Gergen's (1973 idea about the continuum of temporal stability of events supplemented with the dimension of the abstractness of their treatment. I presuppose that nomothetic treatment of temporally less stable events demands a higher level of abstraction and vice versa. This is very important for psychology, because it acknowledges the possibility of psychology being a nomothetic science, but at the same time warns for the necessity of complementing its findings with the interpretive and phenomenological realizations.

  14. Introduction to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lesley

    Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an…

  15. Introduction to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lesley

    Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an…

  16. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  17. Can social psychological models be used to promote bicycle helmet use among teenagers? A comparison of the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior and the Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, Timo; Räsänen, Mikko

    2004-01-01

    The bicycle helmet use rate is still low among teenagers despite the cumulating evidence that bicycle helmets can prevent cyclists from serious injuries and death. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the Health Belief Model (HBM; Health Education Monographs, 2 (1974) (1), Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, I. (1988). Attitudes, personality and behavior. Open University Press, Milton Keynes) and Locus of Control model (LC; Psychological Monographs, (1966) (80) in understanding the intention to use bicycle helmet use among bicycle helmet owners. Data were collected at two schools in Helsinki, Finland. Students (N=965) completed a questionnaire including three social psychological models applied to helmet use. Models were compared by structural equation modeling techniques. Results showed that the TPB and LC model fitted the data well, whereas fit of the HBM model was lower than the fit of TPB and LC models. All components of TPB and external LC orientation were significantly related to the intention to use a helmet. TPB together with LC model provide a promising theoretical framework for helmet use promotion campaigns. Practical suggestions for future bicycle helmet campaigns were provided.

  18. Positive Psychology: possible future and clinical derivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gancedo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A possible future for the Positive Psychology movement could be to merge it into a new enunciative subsystem of psychology, which is named here as psychoeulogy. Psychoeulogy is defined as: the psychology subsystem that studies psychological well-being, and its conditions, characteristics and promotion. It could be understood as the conceptual reversal of psychopathology. Together, psychoeulogy and psychopathology, can complete the spectre of knowledge about the psyche. The target of this article is to introduce an epistemological model for this future psychoeulogy, and, at the same time, display its derivations on a clinical psychoeulogical model that can integrate the contributions of positive psychology and those of others psychological movements. 

  19. Entrepreneurial Psychological Capital: A Different Way of Understanding Entrepreneurial Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Pease, Peter; Cunningham, James

    2016-01-01

    The development of a model of entrepreneurial psychological capital will provide both an advance in the theoretical understanding of entrepreneurship, and has practical implications for policy makers and those who design entrepreneurship education. Derived from the positive psychological capital model, first developed by Luthans et al. (2007), in the organisational context, this new model of entrepreneurial psychological capital will also draw on the existing entrepreneurship psychology liter...

  20. Application of Structural Equation Modeling in Clinical Psychology%在临床心理学领域运用结构方程模型的思路与步骤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭; Gail; Huon; 等

    2001-01-01

    Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) has become an increasingly used methodological strategy in clinical psychology. The purpose of this paper is to outline a set of procedures for the optimizing use of SEM. The steps involved: (1) clarification of the phenomenon; (2) development of the model; (3)tesing of the model; (4) refinement of the model; and (5) assessment of the model.A research on adolescents' initiation of dieting was applied to illustrate the use of SEM.

  1. Psychology in the education of nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Silva Bandeira de Melo; Rodrigo Miranda; Sérgio Dias Cirino; Regina Helena de Freitas Campos

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the teaching of psychology in the education of nurses in the first decades of the twentieth century in Brazil. We present aspects related to nursing schools from Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte. Topics presented in the psychology courses in the education of nurses were connected to the psychological debates at that time. During this period, we can see the changing from a training based on working experiences to a new model based on the scientific knowledge. The Brazilian governme...

  2. Establishment of Competency Model for Psychological Graduates%心理学专业研究生胜任特征模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛伟; 孙晓敏; 苗丹民

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a competency model for the graduates who major in psychology. Firstly,fourteen qualified and professional tutors and doctoral students were interviewed through Behavioral Event Interview( BEI). A few analyze on themes and con-texts was done on the differences between excellent and ordinary graduates mentioned in the interviews,and initial 17 competencies were extracted. According to that,a questionnaire on competencies for psychological graduates was developed and administered to psychologi-cal tutors and doctoral students in the whole country. The results turned out that 11 competencies are finally extracted,they are savvy、analytic and comprehensive capacity、persistence、initiative、planning and organizing、implementation capacity、self-monitoring、morality and honesty、conscientiousness、teamwork and promise in one’s field.%该研究通过关键事件访谈法和专家访谈法对14名心理学专业优秀导师以及博士生进行访谈,通过编码初步提取了心理学专业研究生的17项胜任特征。再根据上述胜任特征编制《心理学专业研究生胜任特征问卷》,并在全国范围内针对心理学专业导师、博士生以及硕士毕业生发放,最终建立心理学专业研究生的11项胜任特征模型。结果发现,心理学专业研究生的胜任特征模型包括:领悟能力、综合分析、坚持性、主动性、计划与组织、执行力、自我监控、道德与诚实、尽责性、团队合作和本领域的承诺。

  3. Parental Psychological Control, Psychological Autonomy, and Acceptance as Predictors of Self-Esteem in Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Roy A.; Northrup, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines several key parenting variables (psychological control, psychological autonomy, and acceptance) in predicting self-esteem among Latino adolescents using structural equation modeling analyses. Nested models are tested and parental acceptance variables are omitted from the model and group gender comparisons are examined. Two…

  4. Parental Psychological Control, Psychological Autonomy, and Acceptance as Predictors of Self-Esteem in Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Roy A.; Northrup, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines several key parenting variables (psychological control, psychological autonomy, and acceptance) in predicting self-esteem among Latino adolescents using structural equation modeling analyses. Nested models are tested and parental acceptance variables are omitted from the model and group gender comparisons are examined. Two…

  5. Psychology's "Crisis" and the Need for Reflection. A Plea for Modesty in Psychological Theorizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Martin

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the need for contextualization and reflection of psychological theorizing within its respective cultural and historical context. By acknowledging the anthropological assumptions which form a key part of every psychological theory and connect psychological thinking with broader cultural values, norms, ideals and meanings, psychologists can gain a deeper understanding of the limits of their own theories. It is argued that the prolonged debate within academic psychology concerning its status and methodology which became famous as "psychology's crisis" is an effect of the neglect of these implicit anthropological assumptions. Especially as cultural and cultural-historical psychologists, we should avoid the improper universalization of particular models of what defines a human being.

  6. A Review on Theoretical Models About Psychological Mechanisms of Ambivalent Attitude%矛盾态度心理机制的理论模型述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨青松; 钟毅平

    2011-01-01

    On the psychological mechanisms of ambivalent attitude (AA), Cacioppo and Berntson advanced the model of evaluation spacein 1994, and Priester and Petty proposed the GTM (The gradual threshold model) in 1996, both of which focus on the formation of AA and form the theoretical basis of the internal mechanism of AA, but there is a lack of studies in such respects as the representation and resolution of AA, and its impact on information processing. With more thorough research on AA, there has been a growing need for the guidance of theories on psychological mechanism. This article attempts to do some generalization and appraisal of the theoretical models of the psychological mechanism of AA. Moreover, the current progress in attitude theories and empirical studies provides a possible method for in-depth explanation of the internal mechanism. By virtue of literature research, the article introduces four new theoretical models associated with the analysis of psychological mechanisms underlying AA, i.e. the model of attitude as object-evaluation association, the meta-coguitive model of attitude, the iterative reprocessing model, the model of distributed connectionist representation and so on, and conbined recent empirical findings with our analysis and evaluation. For different theoretical hypothesis and construction, the four models on attitude focus differently on the representation, formation and resolution of AN. The object-evaluation association model stresses the attitude formation process to analyze how ambivalence generates, provides a novel explanation of AN from the scenarios interaction and the diversity of classification, and holds that ambivalence is not caused by two kinds of evaluation activated spontaneously, but by the rapid conversion among different assessment classifications. The meta-cognitive model of attitude pays more attention to the analysis of how ambivalence is represented in the memory, and classifies AN into two forms from the angle

  7. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Mutsumi; Kyougoku, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the hypothetical model based on structural relationship with the occupational dysfunction on psychological problems (stress response, burnout syndrome, and depression) in healthcare workers. Method. Three cross sectional studies were conducted to assess the following relations: (1) occupational dysfunction on stress response (n = 468), (2) occupational dysfunction on burnout syndrome (n = 1,142), and (3) occupational dysfunction on depression (n = 687). Personal characteristics were collected through a questionnaire (such as age, gender, and job category, opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships) as well as the Classification and Assessment of Occupational Dysfunction (CAOD). Furthermore, study 1 included the Stress Response Scale-18 (SRS-18), study 2 used the Japanese Burnout Scale (JBS), and study 3 employed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and path analysis of structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis were used in all of the studies. EFA and CFA were used to measure structural validity of four assessments; CAOD, SRS-18, JBS, and CES-D. For examination of a potential covariate, we assessed the correlation of the total and factor score of CAOD and personal factors in all studies. Moreover, direct and indirect effects of occupational dysfunction on stress response (Study 1), burnout syndrome (Study 2), and depression (Study 3) were also analyzed. Results. In study 1, CAOD had 16 items and 4 factors. In Study 2 and 3, CAOD had 16 items and 5 factors. SRS-18 had 18 items and 3 factors, JBS had 17 items and 3 factors, and CES-D had 20 items and 4 factors. All studies found that there were significant correlations between the CAOD total score and the personal factor that included opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure

  8. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsumi Teraoka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the hypothetical model based on structural relationship with the occupational dysfunction on psychological problems (stress response, burnout syndrome, and depression in healthcare workers.Method. Three cross sectional studies were conducted to assess the following relations: (1 occupational dysfunction on stress response (n = 468, (2 occupational dysfunction on burnout syndrome (n = 1,142, and (3 occupational dysfunction on depression (n = 687. Personal characteristics were collected through a questionnaire (such as age, gender, and job category, opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships as well as the Classification and Assessment of Occupational Dysfunction (CAOD. Furthermore, study 1 included the Stress Response Scale-18 (SRS-18, study 2 used the Japanese Burnout Scale (JBS, and study 3 employed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, exploratory factor analysis (EFA, and path analysis of structural equation modeling (SEM analysis were used in all of the studies. EFA and CFA were used to measure structural validity of four assessments; CAOD, SRS-18, JBS, and CES-D. For examination of a potential covariate, we assessed the correlation of the total and factor score of CAOD and personal factors in all studies. Moreover, direct and indirect effects of occupational dysfunction on stress response (Study 1, burnout syndrome (Study 2, and depression (Study 3 were also analyzed.Results. In study 1, CAOD had 16 items and 4 factors. In Study 2 and 3, CAOD had 16 items and 5 factors. SRS-18 had 18 items and 3 factors, JBS had 17 items and 3 factors, and CES-D had 20 items and 4 factors. All studies found that there were significant correlations between the CAOD total score and the personal factor that included opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure

  9. The psychology of humanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  10. Historizing epistemology in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    The conflict between the psychometric methodological framework and the particularities of human experiences reported in psychotherapeutic context led Michael Schwarz to raise the question whether psychology is based on a methodological error. I take this conflict as a heuristic tool for the reconstruction of the early history of psychology, which bears witness to similar epistemological conflicts, though the dominant historiography of psychology has largely forgotten alternative conceptions and their valuable insights into complexities of psychic phenomena. In order to work against the historical amnesia in psychology I suggest to look at cultural-historical contexts which decisively shaped epistemological choices in psychology. Instead of keeping epistemology and history of psychology separate, which nurtures individualism and naturalism in psychology, I argue for historizing epistemology and for historical psychology. From such a historically reflected perspective psychology in contemporary world can be approached more critically.

  11. Psychological Theories of Acculturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of cultural transition and intercultural contact has highlighted the importance of psychological theories of acculturation. Acculturation, understood as contact between diverse cultural streams, has become prevalent worldwide due to technological, economical, and educational...... advancements, together with greater mobility. Acculturation psychology aims to comprehend the dynamic psychological processes and outcomes emanating from intercultural contact. Acculturation psychology has been a growing field of research within cross-cultural psychology. Today, psychological theories...... of acculturation also include cognate disciplines such as cultural psychology, social psychology, sociology, and anthropology.The expansion of psychological theories of acculturation has led to advancements in the field of research as well as the bifurcation of epistemological and methodological approaches...

  12. Psychological dimensions of Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonello, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious current environmental problems is the depletion of non renewable natural resources. The vast majority of our daily actions involve the consumption of energy and they increase the problem. Environmental psychology studies the psychological motivations that determine pro-ecological behaviour. In this context the aim of this review was to determine which psychological models and variables are better descriptors of residential energy conservation, comparing the predictive power of different models related to behaviour, residential consumption as well as to the acceptability of energy policies. Results suggest that energy saving is mainly linked to altruistic motivations, followed by egoistic reasons and in a minor way to environmental concerns. People would act according to these dimensions when contextual conditions are perceived as appropriate.

  13. Psychology in the education of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Silva Bandeira de Melo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the teaching of psychology in the education of nurses in the first decades of the twentieth century in Brazil. We present aspects related to nursing schools from Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte. Topics presented in the psychology courses in the education of nurses were connected to the psychological debates at that time. During this period, we can see the changing from a training based on working experiences to a new model based on the scientific knowledge. The Brazilian government sponsored this transformation, which was grounded in a broad context of the raising of the worth of sciences in the country. Psychological knowledge contributed for the establishment of a new theoretical and practical nursing training. Analyzing teaching of psychology in the education of nurses contributes to a better understanding of psychology as a discipline in Brazil.

  14. Integrating psychological and neurobiological considerations regarding the development and maintenance of specific Internet-use disorders: An Interaction of Person-Affect-Cognition-Execution (I-PACE) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Young, Kimberly S; Laier, Christian; Wölfling, Klaus; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-12-01

    Within the last two decades, many studies have addressed the clinical phenomenon of Internet-use disorders, with a particular focus on Internet-gaming disorder. Based on previous theoretical considerations and empirical findings, we suggest an Interaction of Person-Affect-Cognition-Execution (I-PACE) model of specific Internet-use disorders. The I-PACE model is a theoretical framework for the processes underlying the development and maintenance of an addictive use of certain Internet applications or sites promoting gaming, gambling, pornography viewing, shopping, or communication. The model is composed as a process model. Specific Internet-use disorders are considered to be the consequence of interactions between predisposing factors, such as neurobiological and psychological constitutions, moderators, such as coping styles and Internet-related cognitive biases, and mediators, such as affective and cognitive responses to situational triggers in combination with reduced executive functioning. Conditioning processes may strengthen these associations within an addiction process. Although the hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of specific Internet-use disorders, summarized in the I-PACE model, must be further tested empirically, implications for treatment interventions are suggested. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal hierarchical linear modeling analyses of California Psychological Inventory data from age 33 to 75: an examination of stability and change in adult personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Constance J; Livson, Norman; Peskin, Harvey

    2003-06-01

    Twenty aspects of personality assessed via the California Psychological Inventory (CPI; Gough & Bradley, 1996) from age 33 to 75 were examined in a sample of 279 individuals. Oakland Growth Study and Berkeley Guidance Study members completed the CPI a maximum of 4 times. We used longitudinal hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to ask the following: Which personality characteristics change and which do not? Five CPI scales showed uniform lack of change, 2 showed heterogeneous change giving an averaged lack of change, 4 showed linear increases with age, 2 showed linear decreases with age, 4 showed gender or sample differences in linear change, 1 showed a quadratic peak, and 2 showed a quadratic nadir. The utility of HLM becomes apparent in portraying the complexity of personality change and stability.

  16. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyougoku, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the hypothetical model based on structural relationship with the occupational dysfunction on psychological problems (stress response, burnout syndrome, and depression) in healthcare workers. Method. Three cross sectional studies were conducted to assess the following relations: (1) occupational dysfunction on stress response (n = 468), (2) occupational dysfunction on burnout syndrome (n = 1,142), and (3) occupational dysfunction on depression (n = 687). Personal characteristics were collected through a questionnaire (such as age, gender, and job category, opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships) as well as the Classification and Assessment of Occupational Dysfunction (CAOD). Furthermore, study 1 included the Stress Response Scale-18 (SRS-18), study 2 used the Japanese Burnout Scale (JBS), and study 3 employed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and path analysis of structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis were used in all of the studies. EFA and CFA were used to measure structural validity of four assessments; CAOD, SRS-18, JBS, and CES-D. For examination of a potential covariate, we assessed the correlation of the total and factor score of CAOD and personal factors in all studies. Moreover, direct and indirect effects of occupational dysfunction on stress response (Study 1), burnout syndrome (Study 2), and depression (Study 3) were also analyzed. Results. In study 1, CAOD had 16 items and 4 factors. In Study 2 and 3, CAOD had 16 items and 5 factors. SRS-18 had 18 items and 3 factors, JBS had 17 items and 3 factors, and CES-D had 20 items and 4 factors. All studies found that there were significant correlations between the CAOD total score and the personal factor that included opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure

  17. Peace Psychology for a Peaceful World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Daniel J.; Tint, Barbara S.; Wagner, Richard V.; Winter, Deborah DuNann

    2008-01-01

    Although the literature in peace psychology has been growing rapidly, many American psychologists are unaware of how conflict is resolved and peace is conceptualized and achieved. This article reviews the long history and broadening scope of peace psychology and introduces a model of peace that is useful for organizing the literature. The model…

  18. Peace Psychology for a Peaceful World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Daniel J.; Tint, Barbara S.; Wagner, Richard V.; Winter, Deborah DuNann

    2008-01-01

    Although the literature in peace psychology has been growing rapidly, many American psychologists are unaware of how conflict is resolved and peace is conceptualized and achieved. This article reviews the long history and broadening scope of peace psychology and introduces a model of peace that is useful for organizing the literature. The model…

  19. Integrating Buddhist Psychology into Grief Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kaori; Park, Jeeseon

    2009-01-01

    The field of grief counseling has yet to see an integration of Buddhist psychology. Drawing on Buddhist psychology literature and Western models of grief, this article explores possible integrations of two approaches. To lay the foundation for this discussion, the authors introduced a brief overview of the history of Buddhism as well as a Buddhist…

  20. Behavioural model in social psychology: Model development and model studies on the behavioral intentions of individuals and groups in energy policy problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergius, R.; Engemann, A.; Guenther, R.; Kimmelmann, G.; Radtke, M.; Sachs, S.; Schmidt, F.

    1982-10-01

    We describe a model which allows to simulate inference and evaluation processes and also the resulting behavioral intentions. The model is the base of the program REASON. The program needs as input knowledge about the part of the world which is to be evaluated and values and criteria which are used to judge the conclusions of the inference process. The program provides as output the scores of the various criteria and accumulated evaluations of the options. Also if desired a protocol of the inference process is available. The program is demonstrated by examples showing support in generating concepts. A detailed concept was developed for the installation of the heating system in a new home. REASON is applied together with this concept to simulate the behavioral intentions of the home owners towards the installation of the various heating systems.

  1. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  2. Psychology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Matsumi, Junko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about Japan and its psychology in advance of the 31st International Congress of Psychology (ICP), to be held in Yokohama, Japan, in 2016. The article begins with the introduction of the Japanese Psychological Association (JPA), the hosting organization of the ICP 2016, and the Japanese Union of Psychological Associations consisting of 51 associations/societies, of which the JPA is a member. This is followed by a brief description of a history of psychology of Japan, with emphasis on the variation in our approach to psychology in three different periods, that is, the pre- and post-Pacific War periods, and the post-1960 period. Next, the international contributions of Japanese psychology/psychologists are discussed from the point of view of their visibility. Education and training in psychology in Japanese universities is discussed with a final positive remark about the long-awaited enactment of the Accredited Psychologist Law in September, 2015.

  3. IFE PsychologIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Parenting Styles on Psychological Well-Being and School Adjustment of ... Aviation Psychological Practice in the Nigerian Air Force: Challenges and ... Psychosocial Predictors of Quality of Life among Caregivers of Chronically Ill ...

  4. Personality theory, abnormal psychology, and psychological measurement. A psychological behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, A W

    1993-01-01

    Behaviorism, because it has not had a theory of personality, has been separated from the rest of psychology, unable in large part to draw from or contribute to it. Traditional psychology has not had a theory of personality that says what personality is, how it comes about, or how it functions. An antagonism has resulted that weakens rather than complements each tradition. Psychological behaviorism presents a new type of theory of personality. Derived from experimentation, it is constructed from basic theories of emotion, language, and sensory-motor behavior. It says personality is composed of learned basic behavioral repertoires (BBRs) that affect behavior. Personality measurement instruments are analyzed in terms of the BBRs, beginning the behaviorization of this field and calling for much additional research. These multilevel developments are then basic in psychological behaviorism's theory of abnormal behavior and of clinical treatment. The approach opens many new avenues of empirical and theoretical work.

  5. Eating--A Psychological Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews advancements in psychology relating to nutrition education, including models for explaining food choice and strategies for treating obesity, comprehensive nutrition education programs, use in one-to-one counseling, and community nutrition behavior change. Describes the Heart Health Program, a social learning nutrition change curriculum.…

  6. Psychology of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Ulu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter of book that entitled Science, Religion and Society: An Encyclopedia of History, Culture, and Controversy has been given important informations about psychology of religion’s historical development as well as pioneer figures’ contributions. In this text some evaluations has been made by categorizing studies in field of psychology of religion. Finally some informations are provided about current status of the psychology of religion and position of the psychology of religion ...

  7. Postgraduate'Psychological Crisis Intervention Model in Medical Colleges%医学院校研究生心理危机干预模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李力生; 郭华星

    2016-01-01

    Objective :To explore the effect of psychological crisis intervention model of health education - group counseling intervention on reducing vulnerability graduate psychological crisis ,increase mental toughness through mental health education and group counseling for students .Methods :Extracting 40 postgraduates whose crisis vulner‐ability scores were greater than 15 in psychological crisis survey as experimental group ,and matching same samples as the control group ;The experimental group received health education and eight - time group counseling ,the control group received no intervention .Results :There were significantly different at post - test crisis vulnerabilities (t =‐8 .31 ,P < 0 .01)and mental toughness(t = ‐2 .62 ,P < 0 .05)between two groups .Conclusion :Health education - group counseling intervention has a significant effect on vulnerability reduction and increase mental toughness of postgradu ‐ates in medical colleges .%目的:通过心理健康教育、团体心理辅导对研究生心理危机进行干预,研究健康教育-团体心理辅导干预模式对减少研究生心理危机的脆弱性,增加心理韧性的效果。方法:抽取在我校研究生心理危机调查中危机脆弱性分数大于15的学生40名,通过匹配分成实验组和对照组;实验组接受健康教育,然后进行8次团体心理辅导,对照组不做任何干预。结果:实验组与对照组在危机脆弱性的后测中有显著差异(t =‐8.31,P <0.01),同时心理韧性也有显著增加(t =‐2.62,P <0.05)。结论:健康教育-团体心理辅导干预模式对医学院校研究生心理危机脆弱性的降低和心理韧性的增加具有明显的效果。

  8. Psychology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushma, B.; Padmaja, G.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology forms the basis of every human activity. The scope of psychology is increasingly widening in various economic, political, social, cultural and technological aspects. Though the application of psychology is extending to various aspects of life, it needs to be indigenised to address the dynamic needs in the various socio-economic contexts…

  9. Psychology in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  10. Psychology and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1987-01-01

    Psychology and literature focus on human behavior. There are several points where the interests of psychologists and literary scholars converge. This convergence is evident in the use of literature to test psychological theories and to understand human behavior in historical times, in the psychological analyses of literature, and in psychological…

  11. Humanistic Psychology: How Realistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebel, Linda

    1982-01-01

    Overviews themes relating to humanistic psychology. Discusses the tendency of theorists to unconsciously externalize their own psyches. Examines the historical context of humanistic psychology. Discusses humanistic psychology's contribution to understanding the less healthy person. Provides instances of unrealistic thinking by humanistic…

  12. Intro through Internet Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Sandra K.; Kelliher, Thomas P.

    Psychology and computer science were clustered into a course in "Internet Psychology" with the goal of enabling students to use electronic networks responsibly and creatively and to understand the principles of psychology as they operate in the electronic context. Fourteen students from a variety of majors registered for the class.…

  13. Existential Coaching Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Langdridge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article I seek to elaborate a model of existential coaching psychology that is both grounded in existentialphenomenological philosophy but also informed by work in coaching. To date, many attempts to develop anexistential approach to coaching have – in my view – described an approach to coaching that is either indistinguishablefrom existential counselling and psychotherapy or a rather crude form of technical eclecticism.In this article, I discuss the key elements of existential coaching, as I understand it, and the need to modify theexistential therapeutic approach for coaching practise. To this end, I draw on extant work on coaching and,in particular, the need for both a goal and solution directed approach if an existential model of psychologicalcoaching is going to provide the basis for effective practise.

  14. Psychological diagnosis in sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giommi, R

    2003-01-01

    The author presents a model based on verbal and non-verbal instruments in order to elaborate a psychological diagnosis in troubles of sexual behavior. The instruments usually employed are the following: the map aimed at verifying harmony or conflict with significant people; family drawing, another means to check harmony or conflict in the nuclear family; genogram, in order to reconstruct family myths; body drawing aimed at discovering the body parts that give pleasure, uneasiness, annoyance-tickle and the problems connected with genitals; questionnaire on the couple aimed at finding out areas of mutual dissatisfaction; the drawing of the shared space in the couple, represented by the WE area, in order to identify the relational/emotional deficiencies. Using this model we can simplify the anamnesis, focus on the problematic areas, quickly check the unconscious contents and define a diagnosis with the subsequent hypothesis of intervention.

  15. Bridging history and social psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre; Yamamoto, Koji

    2012-01-01

    This special issue aims to bridge history and social psychology by bringing together historians and social psychologists in an exercise of reading and learning from each other’s work. This interdisciplinary exercise is not only timely but of great importance for both disciplines. Social psycholog......This special issue aims to bridge history and social psychology by bringing together historians and social psychologists in an exercise of reading and learning from each other’s work. This interdisciplinary exercise is not only timely but of great importance for both disciplines. Social...... psychologists can benefit from engaging with historical sources by being able to contextualise their findings and enrich their theoretical models. It is not only that all social and psychological phenomena have a history but this history is very much part of present-day and future developments. On the other...... hand historians can enhance their analysis of historical sources by drawing upon the conceptual tools developed in social psychology. They can “test” these tools and contribute to their validation and enrichment from completely different perspectives. Most important, as contributions to this special...

  16. The psychology of suicide terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Jerrold M; Ali, Farhana; Henderson, Schuyler W; Shanfield, Steven; Victoroff, Jeff; Weine, Stevan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews current understandings of the psychology of suicide terrorism for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to help them better understand this terrifying phenomenon. After discussing key concepts and definitions, the paper reviews both group and individual models for explaining the development of suicide terrorists, with an emphasis on "collective identity." Stressing the importance of social psychology, it emphasizes the "normality" and absence of individual psychopathology of the suicide bombers. It will discuss the broad range of terrorisms, but will particularly emphasize terrorism associated with militant Islam. The article emphasizes that comprehending suicide terrorism requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes anthropological, economic, historical, and political factors as well as psychological ones. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for research, policy, and prevention, reviewing the manner in which social psychiatric knowledge and understandings applied to this phenomenon in an interdisciplinary framework can assist in developing approaches to counter this deadly strategy.

  17. Analysis of the ecological conservation behavior of farmers in payment for ecosystem service programs in eco-environmentally fragile areas using social psychology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Sun, Pingsheng; Zhao, Fazhu; Han, Xinhui; Yang, Gaihe; Feng, Yongzhong

    2016-04-15

    Studies on the ecological conservation behavior of farmers usually focus on individual and socio-economic characteristics without consideration of the underlying psychological constructs, such as farmers' intention and perceptions. This study uses the theory of planned behavior (TPB), a typical social psychology construct, to analyze the factors affecting the intention and behavior of farmers for conserving the ecological achievements from payment for ecosystem service (PES) programs in eco-environmentally fragile areas. Questionnaires based on TPB were administered to 1004 farmers from the Grain to Green Program area in the Loess Plateau, China, with the resulting dataset used to identify the underlying factors determining farmers' intention and behavior based on the structural equation model. The results show that the farmers' intention and behavior toward conserving ecological achievements were explained well by TPB. The farmers'behavior was significantly positively affected by their intention toward conserving ecological achievements, and their intention was significantly influenced by their attitude (positive or negative value of performance), the subjective norm (social pressure in engaging behavior), and perceived behavioral control (perceptions of their ability). The farmers' degree of support for PES programs and their recognition of environmental effects were the factors that most influenced the farmers' attitude. Pressure from neighbors was the most potent driver of the subjective norm. Meanwhile, perceptions of their ability to perform the behavior were the most potent factors affecting intention and it was mostly driven by the farmers' feelings toward environmental improvement and perceived ability (time and labor) to participate in ecological conservation. The drivers of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control can be used by policy makers to direct farmers' intention and behavior toward conserving ecological achievements in fragile

  18. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in post-graduate psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M; Davis, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients' lives. Twenty three post-graduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers) may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of post-graduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment.

  19. Bio-Psycho-Spiritual Modeling in Drug Dependents and Compiling of Intervention Program for Promotion of Resiliency Based on Cognitive Narratology and Positive Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezat ollah Kordmirza Nikoozadeh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the past few decades, the concentration of researches on drug abuse and drugs dependency have shift from risk factor to protective factors. In the past two decades, the concept of resiliency was increasingly considered by developmental psychology. The concentration shifted from risk to resiliency originates from disadvantage in emphasizing on identification of risk factors. Method: Target population was all volunteer addicts who referred to clinics in Tehran city. The group selected based on random cluster sampling. In total 319 persons (male composed of two groups, dependent to drug (150 persons and independent to drug (169 persons were participated in research and in general, 108 questionnaires of non-addicts and 126 of addicts were analyzed. In order to determine the fit model based on assumed variables in the research, by utilizing LISREL softwar99e, initially the relation between primary fundamental variables and final endogenous variables were reviewed. In continuation, the - relations between intermediary and endogenous variables were determined. Results: The results showed the fitting of predicted model of resiliency. Conclusion: In this research the program based on bio-psycho-spiritual model for instructional intervention in order to enhance of resiliency of addict people provided.

  20. Modeling the Interplay Between Psychological Processes and Adverse, Stressful Contexts and Experiences in Pathways to Psychosis : An Experience Sampling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klippel, Annelie; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Chavez-Baldini, UnYoung; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Kempton, Matthew; Valmaggia, Lucia; Calem, Maria; So, Suzanne; Beards, Stephanie; Hubbard, Kathryn; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Onyejiaka, Adanna; Wichers, Marieke; McGuire, Philip; Murray, Robin; Garety, Philippa; van Os, Jim; Wykes, Til; Morgan, Craig; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Several integrated models of psychosis have implicated adverse, stressful contexts and experiences, and affective and cognitive processes in the onset of psychosis. In these models, the effects of stress are posited to contribute to the development of psychotic experiences via pathways through affec

  1. State-Space Modeling of Dynamic Psychological Processes via the Kalman Smoother Algorithm: Rationale, Finite Sample Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hairong; Ferrer, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a state-space modeling (SSM) technique for fitting process factor analysis models directly to raw data. The Kalman smoother via the expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood parameter estimates is used. To examine the finite sample properties of the estimates in SSM when common factors are involved, a…

  2. Thinking, Feeling, Intuiting and Sensing: Using the Four Psychological Functions as a Model to Empower Student Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lori Ann

    Writing is an act of self construction. Considering how students process information can improve the quality of instruction in composing courses, but only if quantifiable, verified models of cognitive functions are taken to heart and applied to teaching methods in the classroom. C. G. Jung's model of the four functions (thinking, sensation,…

  3. Using a Participatory Culture-Specific Model to Increase the Effectiveness of Social Justice Courses in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Greenberg, Daphne; Roach, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The Participatory Culture-Specific Model of Course Development (PCSMCD), adapted from the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model, is a proposed framework to address challenges to social justice education by addressing the following four course variables: instructor characteristics, instructor experiences, student characteristics, and…

  4. A Study on the Psychological Crisis Early-Warning Model for Students of Pre-school Education Major%幼师生心理危机预警模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2011-01-01

    幼师生心理危机是影响学校稳定和发展的重要因素。针对预警在幼师生心理危机管理中的重要性,结合心理危机产生的原因,提出了幼师生心理危机预警指标体系。考虑到指标信息的模糊性,引入多层次模糊综合评判方法,建立了幼师生心理危机预警模型,以期在实践中得到应用。%The psychological crisis of students' of pre-school education major is an important factor influencing the stability and development of the school. In view of the importance of early warning in management of psychological crisis of students of pre-school education major and the causes of psychological crisis, this paper proposes the psychological crisis early- warning system for students of pre-school education major. Taking into account the ambiguity of index information, multi- level fussy comprehensive evaluation is introduced to construct a psychological crisis early-warning model for students of preschool education major, aiminz to be annlied in nractice.

  5. Modelling semantic emotion space using a 3D hypercube-projection: an innovative analytical approach for the psychology of emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Radek eTrnka; Alek eLačev; Karel eBalcar; Martin eKuška; Peter eTavel

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm....

  6. 基于心理学博弈理论的互惠行为模型分析%Analysis of Psychological Game Model Based on Reciprocal Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐俊; 王翊

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal Behavior is a regulation of behavior in human activity and has an important affect on human social activity.In this paper reciprocal function is given according to the characteristic of reciprocal behavior.Accordingly,we put forward an equilibrium concept of reciprocal behavior Game and build a Game model based on psychology.The property of reciprocal equilibrium is furtherly studied and explain behavior phenomena in interaction based on this model.Eventually,the psychological game model is applied to analyze the employment contract in labor market and explain Akerlof' s view that regards labor contract as a partial “Gift Exchange”.The research enriches economic theory and has practical implications.%互惠行为是人类社会活动中的一种基本的行为方式,它不同于主流经济学中“理性人”的行为方式,并对社会经济活动和制度产生重要的影响.本文主要的工作是根据互惠行为的特征,给出了反映互惠行为程度的互惠函数,并在“心理学”博弈理论的分析框架下提出了互惠均衡的概念,由此建立模型进行分析.在此基础上,进一步讨论互惠均衡的一些性质和应用模型结果解释互动中的一些行为现象.最后,将互惠博弈模型应用于劳动经济学中的雇佣关系分析,解释阿克洛夫把雇用关系理解为“礼物交换”的观点.本文所探讨的理论和应用研究进一步丰富了经济学行为理论,并有着一定的理论作用和现实意义.

  7. Usefulness of an ability-based health model in work ability assessments provided by psychiatrists and psychology specialists writing social security certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Hans Magnus; Barbosa da Silva, António; Egeland, Jens

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether adding descriptions of the health factors "ability," "environment" and "intentions/goals" to the officially sanctioned biomedical disability model (BDM) would improve assessments of work ability for social security purposes. The study was based on a theoretical design consisting of textual analysis and interpretation. Two further work ability models were defined: the mixed health model (MHM), which describes health factors without assessing a person's abilities in context, and the ability-based health model (AHM), which assesses abilities in a concrete context of environment and intention. Eighty-six social security certificates, written by psychiatrists and psychology specialists in a Norwegian hospital-based mental health clinic, were analysed in relation to the three work ability/disability models. In certificates based on the BDM, a general pattern was found of "gradual work training". The MHM added health factors, but without linking them together in a concrete way. With the AHM, work ability was assessed in terms of a concrete unified evaluation of the claimant's abilities, environments and intentions/goals. Applying the AHM in work ability assessments, in comparison with the BDM and the MHM, is useful because this foregrounds claimants' abilities in a context of concrete goals and work-related opportunities, as a unity. Implications for Rehabilitation A concept of health should include ability, environment and intentions/goals as components. When all three of these components are described in concrete terms in a work ability assessment, an integrated picture of the individual's abilities in the context of his/her particular intentions/goals and work opportunities comes to the fore. This kind of assessment makes it possible to meet the individual's needs for individual follow-up in a work environment.

  8. Psychological distress among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Birgitte; Bistrup, Pernille Envold; Johansen, Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Psychological distress is common in the cancer continuum. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of distress and to investigate the related problems and the characteristics of women with breast cancer who experienced psychological distress at the time of diagnosis. METHODS: We...... thermometer' to measure psychological distress and the accompanying 'problem list' to identify related problems. Logistic regression models with 95% confidence intervals were used to estimate the associations between psychological distress, age, social support and domains on the problem list. RESULTS...

  9. MODELO DE INTERVENCIÓN PSICOLÓGICA EN PERSONAS ENFRENTADAS A PSICOTRAUMAS Model of psychological intervention in persons faced to psycho traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrudys Torres Martínez

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este artículo teórico es presentar un modelo de intervención psicológica en personas que han enfrentado un evento traumático. Sus antecedentes parten de la experiencia de la autora en este campo y en la revisión de la literatura pertinente para estas intervenciones. El modelo tiene tres ejes, los cuales se conjugan entre si para dar cuerpo a la estructura del mismo. Estos ejes son: la resiliencia, la logoterapia y la narrativa, esta última dentro del enfoque de la terapia cognitiva. El artículo explica cada uno de los componentes e indica que la intervención en una primera instancia debe ser un acompañamiento y solo en los casos que lo ameriten se hará una intervención psicoterapéutica.The purpose of this theoretical article is to present a model of psychological intervention in persons who have faced a traumatic event. Antecedents depart from the authoress‘ experience in this field and a critical review of the pertinent literature for these interventions. This model in based on three axes: resilience, logotherapy and narrative. The latest within cognitive therapy. This article explains each of the components and indicates that intervention in the first instance must be an accompaniment, and only if needed, a psychotherapeutic intervention must be done.

  10. Essential competencies in contemporary applied sport psychology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... keeping the training, education and regulation standards of applied sport psychology (ASP) ... An interdisciplinary training model in ASP with acquired competency in both kinesiology ...

  11. Simple Unawareness in Dynamic Psychological Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher; Nielsen, Carsten Søren

    2017-01-01

    Building on Battigalli and Dufwenberg (2009)’s framework of dynamic psychological games and the progress in the modeling of dynamic unawareness by Heifetz, Meier, and Schipper (2013a) we model and analyze the impact of asymmetric awareness in the strategic interaction of players motivated...... by reciprocity and guilt. Specifically we characterize extensive-form games with psychological payoffs and simple unawareness, define extensive-form rationalizability and, using this, show that unawareness has a pervasive impact on the strategic interaction of psychologically motivated players. Intuitively...

  12. 定序变量回归模型在心理数据分析中的应用%A Regression Analysis Model of Ordinal Variable to Psychological Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐芃; 祁禄; 熊健; 叶浩生

    2015-01-01

    定序变量在心理现象和心理数据中随处可见, 采用综合的定序变量回归分析模型可以对"镜像模式"和"漏斗模型"的心理现象做出合理的解释和预测.首先通过非参数检验对影响因素进行初步降维, 其次用 Probit 定序回归对降维后的影响因素贡献率进行判别, 从而进一步筛选具有显著性判断水平的有效指标,最后用Logistic回归模型对某种特定的心理现象发生与否进行信息量足够大的解释和预测.大学毕业生工作生活质量满意度的预测对这种综合定序变量回归分析模型的实例拟合, 证实了综合定序变量回归分析模型在心理现象和心理数据分析中的应用价值.%Ordinal variables are the common form of categorical variables in random phenomenon. Ordinal data which is formed from the level of ordinal variables by sequencing scale measurement has been widely used in psychological research. Psychological data is a kind of data from randomized hidden variable, which seems to be noticeable but could not be touched such as degree of satisfaction, preference degree, cognition degree, sentiment perceptibility, behavioral level and so on. The mental impression is hard to be calculated. To be exposed for calculated ordinal data is a kind of judgment standard or decision threshold criteria of an individual psychological activity in implicit psychological data. When a certain degree of psychological feeling happens to be just between two adjacent thresholds, the individual would be given a numerical value like a scale to project this "Mirror mode" of the psychological decision threshold criteria. Meanwhile, people are always concerned about what factors or conditions decide the high-low of threshold value of these ordinal variables based on cognitive instinct. This sort of "Hopper model" which is used to study the factors affecting to the psychological decision threshold criteria is a typical regression model. The paper

  13. MODEL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT OF CHILDREN OF PRIMARY SCHOOL AGE WITH PROBLEMS IN INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Petrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basis  of  presentation  the  research  supports  the need to reform the education system and the education of younger schoolboys with problems in inte llectual development in inclusive education model. Actual value of psycho-pedagogical support is to improve the quality of socialization and social adaptation of younger schoolboys with infringements in the intellectual sphere. The main purpose of psychopedagogical support is the organization and maint enance of adaptive educational environment, which in turn is represented in the model complex blocks: diagnostic problems, educational problems, corre ctional  and  developmental  problems,  health,  educ ation and the advisory unit. Expected results and e ffects of the implementation of the presented model associated with a reduction and correction of def iciencies mental and physical development of youn ger schoolboys with problems in intellectual development, the activation mechanisms of their personal compensation,  prevention  of  secondary abnormal ities in the formation of personality.  The article describes the methodological basis for the creation of psycho-pedagogical model escort younger students with  problems  in  intellectual  development;  concr etized complex tasks, guidelines and structural components of the functioning of the model; proposed hierarchy  of  subordination  of  subjects  of  psycho pedagogical support provided by environmental and personal levels. The novelty of the present study is to develop a selfmodel to highlight the hierarchy of subordination of its structural components, their correlation,  interrelation  and interdependence.  Pr esents performance criteria model of psychopedagogical support to ensure the systematic mon itoring of the quality of the process.

  14. Social competence in pediatric brain tumor survivors: application of a model from social neuroscience and developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C; McCurdy, Mark; Turner, Elise; Kazak, Anne E; Noll, Robert B; Phillips, Peter; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric brain tumor (BT) survivors are at risk for psychosocial late effects across many domains of functioning, including neurocognitive and social. The literature on the social competence of pediatric BT survivors is still developing and future research is needed that integrates developmental and cognitive neuroscience research methodologies to identify predictors of survivor social adjustment and interventions to ameliorate problems. This review discusses the current literature on survivor social functioning through a model of social competence in childhood brain disorder and suggests future directions based on this model. Interventions pursuing change in survivor social adjustment should consider targeting social ecological factors.

  15. Adolescent health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paula G; Holmbeck, Grayson N; Greenley, Rachel Neff

    2002-06-01

    In this article, a biopsychosocial model of adolescent development is used as an organizing framework for a review of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention research with adolescent populations. During adolescence many critical health behaviors emerge, affecting future disease outcomes in adulthood. In addition, most of the predominant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescence are unique to this period of development, indicating that health-focused interventions must be tailored specifically to adolescents. Moreover, it is during adolescence that lifelong patterns of self-management of and adjustment to chronic health conditions are established. Thus, an increased focus on adolescence in health psychology research is important both to improve the health of adolescents per se and to optimize health trajectories into adulthood.

  16. Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald I. Templer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP taken by professional (Vail Model graduates had a failure rate of 30.82% in contrast to 7.60% for EPPP licensing exams taken by traditional (Boulder Model graduates of clinical psychology programs. Thus, exams taken by professional graduates were 4.06 more likely to result in failure. It was acknowledged that it is not known whether EPPP performance is related to psychotherapy outcome.

  17. Psychological elements in car-following models: Mental workload in case of incidents in the other driving lane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.G.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Brookhuis, K.A.; Daamen, W.

    2010-01-01

    Estimations of parameter values of car-following models show considerable differences between individuals and experiments. These differences may be caused by a different effect of external circumstances on mental workload of drivers. This effect may especially play a considerable role in case of

  18. Mainstreaming culture in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M

    2012-11-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks.

  19. Psychological culture of a class teacher as the foundation of modern schoolchildren’s psychological security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana I. Kulikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the role that psychological culture of class teacher plays in theestablishment and maintenance of psychological safety in a modern schoolchild.The problem of protection against psychological abuse within the educational environmentof a school is particularly important in the current socio-cultural realm.The article analyzes many pedagogical and psychological studies regarding theproblem of psychological education of teachers. It discusses contradiction betweenthe objective need to create a psychologically safe learning environmentand the unwillingness of teachers to work on it due to low own level of psychologicalculture. The author introduced the original structural model of psychologicalculture of a class teacher, representing the integration of the three main components:the culture of pedagogical refl ection, emotional culture and culture ofpedagogical infl uence.

  20. 基于结构方程模型的派遣员工心理契约研究%Study on dispatched labors' psychological contract based on structural equation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽平; 许娜; 马毓

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of psychological contract, dispatched labors' psychological contract model is set up, and the concluded index of dispatched labors' psychological contract is built. Tianjin 129 employees have been investigated by using structural equation model to test theoretical models. Research results show that employees' job satisfaction and employees' complain have a strong impact on the psychological contract, and job satisfaction is impacted by dispatch expectation and perception difference. Moreover, the concluded index of dispatched labors' psychological contract is 49.8 in this investigation, belong to the sensitive area, and it's easy to be impacted by the guide and encouragement.%从心理契约的角度出发,建立了派遣员工心理契约结构模型,并构建了派遣员工心理契约缔结指数.以天津市129位派遣员工为研究对象,采用结构方程模型对理论模型进行检验.研究结果验证了员工满意度、员工抱怨均对派遣员工的心理契约产生较强影响,而员工满意度受派遣期望和感知差异的影响;研究对象心理契约缔结指数为49.8,为敏感区,易受引导与激励的影响.

  1. Perceived control predicting the recovery of individual-specific walking behaviours following stroke: testing psychological models and constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, D; Johnston, M

    2008-09-01

    Perceived control predicts activity limitations, but there are many control belief concepts and how these are defined and measured has implications for intervention design. This study examined whether individual-specific activity limitations and recovery were predicted by theoretically derived control conceptualizations, the Theory of Planned Behaviour and an integrated model (Theory of Planned Behaviour with the World Health Organization ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) model). This predictive cohort study used measures of impairment, intention and perceived control (perceived behavioural control, Theory of Planned Behaviour; self-efficacy, Social Cognitive Theory; locus of control, Social Learning Theory), assessed 2 weeks after hospital discharge, to predict walking limitation (UK SIP: FLP) and recovery after 6 months. Theoretically derived items were individually tailored for patients' baseline walking limitation. Two hundred and three stroke patients (124 men and 79 women; mean age = 68.88, SD = 12.31 years) Walking limitation and walking recovery (respectively) were predicted by perceived behavioural control (r = -.36(**), .26(**)) and self-efficacy (r = -.30(**), .22(**)), but not locus of control (r = -.07, .02). Both theoretical models accounted for significant variance in walking limitation and recovery--but not beyond that explained by perceived behavioural control. Predictive power was not improved by modifying the control component or by including impairment in regression equations. Results suggest that perceived control predicts individual-specific disability and recovery and that reductions in activity limitations may be achieved by manipulating control cognitions. In addition, reducing impairments may not have maximal effect on reducing disability unless beliefs about control over performing the behaviour are also influenced.

  2. Ethnographic Fieldwork in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    It is argued in the present article that ethnographic fieldwork can serve useful methodological ends within psychology and open the discipline to the cultural landscape of psychological phenomena in everyday life in social practices. Furthermore, a positive case is made for the soundness...... of ethnographic fieldwork. That is, rather than disputing the claim that qualitative methods can serve scientific ends, it is argued that ethnographic fieldwork is suitable for studying the constitution of psychological phenomena in social practices across time....

  3. Psychological Test Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical overview of current aspects about the validity problems of psychological tests. The article demonstrates the importance of the development of psychological tests and the scientific studies of their validity, describes the different types of validity and the possible ways of measurement and determination of the validity coefficients. The paper is recommended for researchers, whose work is dedicated to the development, modification or adaptation of the psychological test.

  4. Psychological violence against children

    OpenAIRE

    Jurkovič, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    The topic of my thesis is a study of how parents and primary school teachers perceive and identify psychological abuse of children. Psychological abuse is an especially sensitive area because children do not perceive interpersonal relations and activities in their environment in the same way as adults. Children also do not possess the physical or psychological power required to withstand or defend themselves against different forms of violence, abuse and harassment. Children who are the victi...

  5. CONCEPTUAL AND METHODOLOGICAL MISTAKES IN PSYCHOLOGY AND HEALTH: A CASE STUDY ON THE USE AND ABUSE OF STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alfonso Piña López

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a research paper is analysed, which was justified based on the theory of developmental psychopathology, the protective factors, self-regulation, resilience, and quality of life among individuals who lived with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Structural equation modelling (SEM was used for the data analysis. Although the authors conclude that the data are adequate to the theory tested, they commit errors of logic, concept, methodology and interpretation which, taken together, demonstrate a flagrant rupture between the theory and the data.

  6. Public Image of Counseling Psychology: What Introductory Psychology Textbooks Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David N.; Vrochopoulos, Sam; Burton, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines the adequacy of descriptions of counseling psychology and its professionals in introductory psychology textbooks compared to the descriptions of other applied areas of psychology. Results indicate that counseling psychology is less represented than industrial or organizational and clinical psychology and more represented than school…

  7. Positive Psychology: Considerations and Implications for Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollen, Debra; Ethington, Lanaya L.; Ridley, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Why has the specialty of counseling psychology been overlooked in the larger conversation about positive psychology? Is it reasonable that counseling psychology claims positive psychology as its own? What are some of the problems in defining "positive psychology," and how does the lack of consensus around operationalization thwart discourse on…

  8. A New Model of Psychological Adaptation of Southern Shaanxi Immigrants%陕南移民文化适应干预新模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何树勋

    2016-01-01

    Immigrants,especially the old folks and the left-behind young wives experience great cultural and psychological pains during the replacement. Chen Guoming's cross-border intercultural adaptation theory is applied as a theoretical tool, emphasizing the importance of the equality and maintaining their cultural identity, on which the collective efforts of government agencies, experts, volunteers, community workers and families are made. By employing a new model of comprehensive interference, psychiatric seminar, family-based tutoring and supporting, the U-shape route and a shortcut of cultural adaptation can be smoothly achieved.%押在陕南移民搬迁过程中,许多移民,尤其是老年人和留守妇女的文化适应困难较为突出.以陈国明的跨文化适应理论为依据,强调移民在平等和保持自身文化认同的基础上,采用社区、志愿者和移民共同协作的新模式,达到移民与当地居民、老移民与新移民相互包容的动态平衡,最终实现移民身心融入城镇,顺利完成文化适应的U形路径.

  9. 大学生心理健康评价模型研究%Research on Psychological Health Evaluation Model for College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the existing literature, the eval-uation of psychological health indicators, and makes six evalua-tion indexes. Using fuzzy analytic hierarchy theory, based on fuzzy complementary matrix to determine a common framework for methods based on the local college mental health evaluation index. Mathematical model has been target weight to guide the management of mental health of college students.%  综述现有文献中大学生心理健康的评价指标,并提出6个评价指标。利用模糊层次分析法理论,依据模糊互补判断矩阵的通用框架,建立了基于一类排序方法的大学生心理健康评价指标的数学模型,得到了指标权重。指导大学生心理健康的管理工作。

  10. The common sense model of self-regulation and psychological adjustment to predictive genetic testing: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H J T; van Asperen, Christi J; Sijmons, Rolf H; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R; Klijn, Jan G M; Tibben, Aad

    2007-12-01

    This prospective study explored the contribution of illness representations and coping to cancer-related distress in unaffected individuals undergoing predictive genetic testing for an identified mutation in BRCA1/2 (BReast CAncer) or an HNPCC (Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer)-related gene, based on the common sense model of self-regulation. Coping with hereditary cancer (UCL), illness representations (IPQ-R) and risk perception were assessed in 235 unaffected applicants for genetic testing before test result disclosure. Hereditary cancer distress (IES) and cancer worry (CWS) were assessed before, 2 weeks after and 6 months after result disclosure. Timeline (r = 0.30), consequences (r = 0.25), illness coherence (r = 0.21) and risk perception (r = 0.20) were significantly correlated to passive coping. Passive coping predicted hereditary cancer distress and cancer worry from pre-test (beta = 0.46 and 0.42, respectively) up to 6 months after result disclosure (beta = 0.32 and 0.19, respectively). Illness coherence predicted hereditary cancer distress up to 6 months after result disclosure (beta = 0.24), too. The self-regulatory model may be useful to predict the cognitive and emotional reactions to genetic cancer susceptibility testing. Identifying unhelpful representations and cognitive restructuring may be appropriate interventions to help distressed individuals undergoing genetic susceptibility testing for a BRCA1/2 or a HNPCC-related mutation.

  11. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  12. Nonlinear dynamics in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Guastello

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a survey of the applications of nonlinear dynamical systems theory to substantive problems encountered in the full scope of psychological science. Applications are organized into three topical areas – cognitive science, social and organizational psychology, and personality and clinical psychology. Both theoretical and empirical studies are considered with an emphasis on works that capture the broadest scope of issues that are of substantive interest to psychological theory. A budding literature on the implications of NDS principles in professional practice is reported also.

  13. Psychological Component of Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  14. Psychological contracts of hospice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Audrey Elizabeth; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-12-01

    Psychological contracts have been described as individuals' beliefs regarding the obligations, expectations, and contributions that exist between them and their employer. They can be influenced by the organization's culture and philosophy, through human resources policies, and through the employee's personality and characteristics. Owing to the recent economic crisis, hospices in the UK are currently in a transitional phase and are being expected to demonstrate efficiencies that might be more in line with a business model than a health-care environment. This may conflict with the philosophical views of hospice nurses. To support nurses through this transition, it might be helpful to understand the antecedents of hospice nurses' behaviour and how they construct their psychological contracts. Failure to offer adequate support might lead to negative outcomes such as a desire to leave the organisation, poorer quality work, or disruptive behaviour. This study used a modified grounded theory approach involving in-depth interviews to explore the context and content of the psychological contracts of hospice nurses in the UK. Four main themes emerged: the types of psychological contracts formed, how the contracts are formed, their contents, and the breaches and potential violations the nurses perceive.

  15. The Impacts of Dispositional Optimism and Psychological Resilience on the Subjective Well-Being of Burn Patients: A Structural Equation Modelling Analysis: e82939

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fei He; Rong Cao; Ziqi Feng; Hao Guan; Jiaxi Peng

    2013-01-01

    .... The present study aimed to investigate the impact of dispositional optimism on the subjective well-being of burn patients, and mainly focused on the confirmation of the mediator role of psychological resilience...

  16. 高校心理委员分级培养模式探析%The Exploration of the Hierarchical Training Model for College Psychological Monitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      本文旨在结合心理委员工作实践的基础上,探讨建立高校心理委员“三三二制”分级培养模式构建的可行性,为高校心理委员职责的明确化提供思路,为高校心理委员的选拔、培训和考核模式搭建理论平台。%Based on the practice of psychological monitors, the paper explores the feasibility to construct the three-three-two system classification training mode for college psychological monitors. This paper provides clear thinking of defending the du-ties of college psychological monitors, and builds a theoretical platform of selection, training and assessment mode for college psychological monitors.

  17. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport

    OpenAIRE

    Eime, Rochelle M.; Young, Janet A; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J.; Payne, Warren R.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are specific guidelines regarding the level of physical activity (PA) required to provide health benefits. However, the research underpinning these PA guidelines does not address the element of social health. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence about the levels or types of PA associated specifically with psychological health. This paper first presents the results of a systematic review of the psychological and social health benefits of participation in sport by childr...

  18. Psychological and demographic correlates of early academic skill development among American Indian and Alaska Native youth: a growth modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Amy Kerivan; Coll, Cynthia García

    2007-05-01

    Research regarding the development of early academic skills among American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students has been very limited to date. Using a nationally representative sample of AIAN, Hispanic, African American, and White children at school entry, the authors used latent growth models to estimate the associations among poverty, low parental education, living in a rural location, as well as child attitudes toward learning and internalizing/externalizing behaviors, with mathematical and reading cognitive skill development across the 1st 4 years of school. Results indicate that AIAN children entered kindergarten with scores on both mathematical and reading cognitive tests that were comparable to their peers from other ethnic groups of color. Importantly, all children who entered kindergarten with lower cognitive skill scores also acquired skills more slowly over the next 4 years. Having a positive approach to learning at the start of kindergarten was associated with cognitive skill levels at school entry nearly 1 standard deviation above the population average. Results are discussed with reference to the shared early educational profiles observed between AIAN and other children of color. These findings provide a much-needed update regarding early academic development among AIAN children. Copyright (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. DISTANCE FORMAT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL COMPETENCIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunona M. Ilina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the conceptual model of the distance learning course (DLC “Success” aimed at the development of psychological competencies. The course was developed on the basis of design technology method and intended for adults that are in need of psychological competencies development, i.e. inhabitants of villages, towns, people with special needs, university faculty, trainers and social workers, educators, who want to use DLC in the process of psychological competencies development that are the result in enhancement of life quality. The structure of the distance learning course “Success” and underlying principles is described.

  20. Motor cognition and neuroscience in sport psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J

    2017-08-01

    Advances in technology have allowed research in cognitive neuroscience to contribute significantly to the discipline of sport psychology. In most cases, the research has become more rigorous and has directed current thinking on the mechanisms subserving a number of psychological theories and models of practice. Currently, the three most common neuroscience techniques informing sport and exercise research are electroencephalography, transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging. In this review, we highlight and discuss the contributions to sport psychology that have been made in recent years by applying these techniques, with a focus on the development of expertise, motor cognition, motor imagery and action observation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond Artificial Intelligence toward Engineered Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovski, Stevo; Bozinovska, Liljana

    This paper addresses the field of Artificial Intelligence, road it went so far and possible road it should go. The paper was invited by the Conference of IT Revolutions 2008, and discusses some issues not emphasized in AI trajectory so far. The recommendations are that the main focus should be personalities rather than programs or agents, that genetic environment should be introduced in reasoning about personalities, and that limbic system should be studied and modeled. Engineered Psychology is proposed as a road to go. Need for basic principles in psychology are discussed and a mathematical equation is proposed as fundamental law of engineered and human psychology.

  2. The phenomenological model of psychotic vulnerability and its possible implications for psychological interventions in the ultra-high risk ('prodromal') population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Barnaby; Sass, Louis A; Skodlar, Borut

    2009-01-01

    The early intervention movement for treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders has extended to include pharmacological and psychological treatment of putatively prodromal (or 'ultra-high risk') patients. The psychotherapy that has been trialed to date is cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), due to its apparent success with patients with established psychotic disorder and its current popularity as a therapeutic modality. This paper presents phenomenological models of psychotic, particularly schizophrenic, vulnerability, which emphasise a disturbed basic sense of self (ipseity) and intersubjectivity. We argue that these phenomenological models indicate that CBT may not be the most suitable therapy for prodromal patients, and may even be counterproductive. A central element of this argument is that CBT's emphasis on cognitive reflection and challenging may encourage a core pathological process in these patients (hyper-reflexive awareness). The paper explores alternatives for psychotherapy that emerge from phenomenological accounts of psychosis, while recognising the paradoxical aspects of psychotherapy with these patients. These alternatives include strategies that provide an intersubjective space where patients can evolve a more robust pre-reflective self-awareness (first-person perspective), second-person perspective and experience of trustworthy relationships when encountering others, empathic attunement afforded by the phenomenological approach's sensitivity to psychotic experience, and strategies that encourage a form of immersion or absorption in present activity, including mindfulness and creative 'flow'. We also suggest the possible value of combining therapeutic modalities (even ones that may seem contradictory) and of the need to empirically test therapeutic strategies other than CBT in the ultra-high risk population.

  3. Anxiety Sensitivity and Psychological Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In I. Hand & H. U. Wittchen ( Eds .), Panic and Phobias: Empirical evidence of theoretical models and long-term effects of psychological treatments (pp...isolated attacks (Weissman, 1988; Wittchen , 1986). The onset of panic disorder in treatment populations tends to occur in the late teens through 3 the late...References American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed .). Washington, DC: Author. Barlow, D.H

  4. The psychology of HPA axis activation: Examining subjective emotional distress and control in a phobic fear exposure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stefanie E; Snodgrass, Michael; Liberzon, Israel; Briggs, Hedieh; Curtis, George C; Abelson, James L

    2017-02-09

    The HPA axis plays a key role in mediating the effects of "stress" on health, but clarifying mechanisms requires an understanding of psycho-biological linkages. There has long been an implicit assumption that subjective emotional distress (e.g., fear) should activate the HPA axis. Although this assumption was challenged 25 years ago (Curtis, 1976), laboratory studies in humans are limited. In this study we sought to replicate Curtis' findings and extend it by investigating if presence or absence of stressor control shapes HPA axis reactivity in a phobic fear exposure model. We recruited 19-45-year-old specific phobia participants (n=32 spider/snake phobia; n=14 claustrophobia) and gradually exposed them to their feared object or situation while measuring hormonal (ACTH and cortisol) and subjective (emotional distress, perceived control) responses. Utilizing a dyadic yoked design, we compared HPA reactivity when the pace of exposure was controlled by participants to identical exposure given to matched participants in the absence of control. Results showed that phobic fear exposure generated intense emotional distress without a corresponding increase in HPA axis activity. Although our actual manipulation of control failed to impact HPA responses, perceived control during exposure was associated with lower cortisol, an effect that was moderated by actual availability of stressor control. Our findings replicate Curtis' findings and challenge the still common but unsupported assumption that HPA axis activity reflects subjective distress. These results also highlight the importance of both perceived and actual aspects of stressor control in understanding what is truly "stressful" to the HPA axis system.

  5. Simulation and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Krage, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is relevant for improving the use of simulation in anesthesiology, as it allows us to describe, explain and optimize the interactions of learners and instructors as well as the design of simulation scenarios and debriefings. Much psychological expertise is not used for simulation...

  6. The Psychology of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, A.; Balasubramanian, P.; Nirmala, R. Sweety

    2007-01-01

    Psychology plays a significant role in the life of each and every human being. Starting from childhood, if psychology of learning is utilized positively it would play a vital role in the building up of a bright career of a child. The explosion of information technology has been exercising far reaching influence on the area of educational…

  7. The psychology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swencionis, Charles; Rendell, Sarah Litman

    2012-10-01

    G. Stanley Hall, the first person to earn a Ph.D. in psychology in the United States, did research on eating behaviors in the nineteenth century (Lepore in The New Yorker, 2011). Research on psychological aspects of obesity accelerated in the 1950s and there has been a great deal done at this point. We review areas of considerable activity and relevance.

  8. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs) in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space. The research benefits of using VEs, in areas of psychology such as spatial learning and cognition, include…

  9. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  10. Psychology and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsterburg, Hugo

    1994-01-01

    This essay considers the discipline of psychology as distinct from history, defining it as a science within philosophy dedicated to the study of the causal structure of the human mind. Although Hugo Munsterburg was considered an important figure in applied psychology, this essay represents an earlier epistemology. (SLD)

  11. Psychologism and Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Bekir S.; Wiley, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Little of the work in critical and hermeneutical psychology has been linked to instructional technology (IT). This article provides a discussion in order to fill the gap in this direction. The article presents a brief genealogy of American IT in relation to the influence of psychology. It also provides a critical and hermeneutical framework for…

  12. Psychology for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Nash

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008) John Radford explores and attempts to initiate a debate on what is or should be the place and role of psychology in Higher Education, primarily as a main subject for a first degree. In this paper, the author raises the stakes, and argues that Higher Education should provide a certain form of practical psychology…

  13. Child Psychology Experiences Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walla Walla Coll., WA.

    Recognizing the need for trained teachers to enter the classroom with confidence and professional capacity, Walla Walla College introduced a Child Psychology Experience program. Personnel from several departments contribute to this program. In connection with the child psychology courses, the project features a laboratory/demonstration center…

  14. Alchemical crossings in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Marculino de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to discuss the contributions of Alchemy to the field of Psychology, especially for Analytical Psychology as a proposal of an Alchemical Psychology, whose representatives highlighted here are Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman. It is understood that the knowledge of Alchemy have been applied in various areas such as metallurgy, chemistry, philosophy, and it has a possible application in the field of Psychology. In this sense, it is observed that if to Jung the concepts of Alchemy interlace connections with the knowledge proposed by Analytical Psychology, on the other hand Hillman adopts this knowledge to develop a strategy for use in the field of psychotherapy, proposing to think alchemically. Thus, for this second author in the exercise of Psychology, the meetings with the patient go beyond the application of theories, constituting as a “do-soul” in the office. This is, more than translating symbols, it is proposed to “stay with the image”, with an attention from both the patient and the psychologist for that the words expressed in this dialogue does not become “wordthings” or be reduced to a unique meaning that tends to discard the image. It is hoped, through this work, to promote knowledge of the professionals about the Analytical Psychology and Alchemy Psychology in their connections with Alchemy and its reverberations in the field of psychotherapy in these approaches.

  15. Anthropomorphism in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, David

    This article presents an address on anthropomorphism in psychology. Anthropomorphism assures that human beings are given human characteristics when participating in psychological research. This is significant because the research community does not often report results of studies in the language of feelings, thoughts, or desires, which has led to…

  16. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  17. Historiography of Czech psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskovcová, Simona; Hoskovec, Jirí; Plháková, Alena; Sebek, Michael; Svancara, Josef; Voboril, Dalibor

    2010-08-01

    The paper is aimed at presenting the development of the Czech historiography of psychology, which was strongly influenced by the political changes in Central and Eastern Europe. The authors deal with the historiography of psychology at the three universities offering an undergraduate program in psychology, located in Prague, Brno, and Olomouc, and at the Institute of Psychology of the Czech Academy of Sciences. Recent research, teaching, textbooks, and journal articles published in Czech and in foreign languages are showcased. The historiography of Czech psychotherapy is mentioned as a special thematic development. Contemporary problems and perspectives in the field of the history of psychology in the Czech Republic are discussed, sources of information are given.

  18. Game Theory and Social Psychology: Conformity Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, Danielle; Kilgour, D. Marc

    2011-11-01

    Game models can contribute to understanding of how social biases and pressures to conform can lead to puzzling behaviour in social groups. A model of the psychological biases false uniqueness and false consensus is set out. The model predicts the phenomenon of pluralistic ignorance, which is well-studied in social psychology, showing how it arises as a result of the prevalence of false uniqueness and the desire to conform. An efficient method is developed for finding Nash equilibria of the model under certain restrictions.

  19. Political Psychology of European Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Manners, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    The chapter engages in a survey of what political psychology and European integration have to say to each other in the understanding of the European Union. The chapter draws on five strands of political psychology as part of this engagement – conventional psychology, social psychology, social construction, psychoanalysis, and critical political psychology. Within each strand a number of examples of scholarship at the interface of political psychology and European integration are examined. The...

  20. 癌症病人家庭照顾者心理行为干预模式研究进展%Research progress on psychological behavioral intervention model for family caregivers of cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡彩平; 林毅; 李秋萍

    2012-01-01

    阐述了癌症病人家庭照顾者生理、心理及精神等方面的变化,癌症病人及其家庭照顾者的心理行为干预模式.提出以夫妻为中心的心理行为干预模式将是未来发展的方向,探讨并开发适合国情的癌症病人综合健康促进支持系统(CHESS),且与病人电子健康档案及适当的专业人员干预有机结合,将有利于满足以夫妻为中心的个体化干预模式.%It expounded the physiological, psychological and spiritual changes of the family caregivers, and psychological behavioral intervention model for cancer patients and their family caregivers. It put forward the psychological behavioral intervention model which took husband and wife as the center will be the future development direction, probe into and develop the cancer patient comprehensive health promotion support system (CHESS) for the cancer patients which is suitable for the development of the national conditions. And the organic union was carried out between the system, patients' electronic health records and appropriate professional intervention, which will be conducive to meet the individual intervention model which took husband and wife as the center.