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Sample records for psychologists remains uneven

  1. Identifying School Psychologists' Intercultural Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyana, Olivia E.; Edwards, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are encouraged to analyze their intercultural sensitivity because they may be subject to personal attitudes and beliefs that pejoratively influence their work with students and clients who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). However, gaps remain in the literature regarding whether school psychologists are prepared…

  2. Forensic psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of different issues that a forensic psychologists encounter at work. Forensic assessment might be needed in civil law cases, administrative procedures and in criminal law cases. The paper focuses on referrals in criminal law cases regarding matters such as assessing competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility and violence risk assessment. Finally, the role of expert testimony on eyewitness memory, which is not used in practice in Slovenia yet, is presented.

  3. Psychologists in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto M. Alonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ince the beginning of Psychology as an university career, 55853 graduate student have obtained their degree as a psychologist. These professionals studied in 34 universities (7 federal and 27 private universities. 46777 psychologists in activity have been detected up to date. Graduate psychologists who are not in activity are 9076. University psychology students are 56387. In 2005, 12268 have started these studies in the field. Taking into account the amount of graduate psychologists related to national population it yields 154 psychologists every 100.000 citizens or in other way 649 inhabitants per psychologist

  4. Find a Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ages Served refers to a particular populations a psychologist has the most experience treating. Registrants have ranked ... 64 yrs.) Older adults (65 yrs. or older) ? Psychologists have education, training, and expertise in specific areas ...

  5. Psychologists in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Modesto M. Alonso

    2015-01-01

    ince the beginning of Psychology as an university career, 55853 graduate student have obtained their degree as a psychologist. These professionals studied in 34 universities (7 federal and 27 private universities). 46777 psychologists in activity have been detected up to date. Graduate psychologists who are not in activity are 9076. University psychology students are 56387. In 2005, 12268 have started these studies in the field. Taking into account the amount of graduate psychologists related...

  6. Psychologist Retention Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RETENTION(PSYCHOLOGY), *JOB SATISFACTION, *ALL VOLUNTEER, MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), DEMOGRAPHY, ATTRITION, SURVEYS, QUESTIONNAIRES, PERCEPTION (PSYCHOLOGY), PSYCHOLOGISTS .

  7. Danish psychologists as psychotherapists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Nielsen, Jan; Orlinsky, David

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists are by far the biggest group of professional psychotherapists in Denmark, and this article presents data from two samples of psychologist psychotherapists collected at an interval of 15 years. The subjects in both samples responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core...

  8. The Uneven Legal Push for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Marlene; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg; Rotger, Gabriel Pons

    2009-01-01

    National courts have been key players in the legal push for Europe, though notably to varying degrees. This paper examines the persisting variations in the referral rates of national courts and the underlying causal factors, aiming to better understand why some member states' courts have been more...... reluctant to join in the legal push for Europe. By using econometric methods, it challenges the modified neofunctionalist argument that the extent of intra-EC trade explains the referral practice of the individual member states. Majoritarian democracy is hypothesized as a causal factor in the low referral...... of majoritarian democracy on the number of referrals. The paper concludes that, owing to the uneven legal push for Europe, some member states and their citizens remain at arms' length from the legal integration process - and, in consequence, from the full impact of European integration....

  9. New psychologist at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain, started work at CERN on 1 November. The psychologist’s office, formerly part of the Social Affairs Service in Human Resources, has now moved to the Medical Service (office 57-1-024). It is open every Tuesday and Thursday.   The new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain. Working in an organisation like CERN has numerous advantages. However, as in any professional setting, the work can sometimes bring stress, anxiety, overwork and so on. For this reason, a few years ago CERN brought in a psychologist for the staff. “As a psychologist, my role isn’t just to deal with known problems, but also to make assessments and, if possible, prevent difficult situations arising. Sometimes people realise that something is wrong, but they can’t say why. In such cases, I may be able to use a discussion to assess the nature of the problem and determine if further sessions are needed. If that is the case, I can either conduct the session...

  10. Behavioral Econometrics for Psychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    We make the case that psychologists should make wider use of structural econometric methods. These methods involve the development of maximum likelihood estimates of models, where the likelihood function is tailored to the structural model. In recent years these models have been developed...

  11. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  12. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  13. Perceptions of Leadership Practices of School Psychologists: Views of Multiple Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine; Kilanowski, Lisa; Privitera, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership ability is necessary in the work of school psychologists, yet formal investigation of leadership processes engaged in by school psychologists has not occurred in the field. Likewise, perceptions of the leadership ability of school psychologists by other key school professionals, such as administrators and teachers, remain undocumented.…

  14. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists share an inevitable, if rather uneasy, relationship. So very much like a modern marriage. Can't do without it, can't get out of it. Both sides contemplate divorce often. Think of separation by mutual consent. Even keep threatening as they rave and rant. Have secret, and not so secret, flings on the side. But, like the proverbial homing bird, or the conservative Indian arranged marriage, have no option but to stick it out with each other. Psychiatrists are otherwise good people. But that does not make them immune to handling clinical psychologists with the condescending tolerance and patronizing acceptance that teachers, for example, have towards rambling students. Or the rich have towards the poor. This does not take long to get converted into exasperation and smirky asides in the less charitable amongst the psychiatrists. Not that clinical psychologists are very helpful in motivating the psychiatrists to change for the better. For they, like most people in their position, over react and get aggressive when confronted with this attitude. And understandably so. However, it is time both realized their attitudes were not helpful either for mutual interaction, or growth of the Mental Health Movement at large. We can understand why psychiatrists behave the way they do. They are exposed to this same condescending-patronising attitude from their own peers in the medical profession. Their medical colleagues have yet to develop a feeling of healthy respect for psychiatry. Psychiatrists, no doubt, feel this is unjustified, but their peers are still in a position to deny them the respect and acceptance they seek. What they get from their medical colleagues, they unwittingly pass on to their clinical psychologist colleagues. But understanding why it occurs does not absolve them of their responsibility to behave more rationally, rather than emotionally, with the latter. [No abstract available.

  15. Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xinlei; Dong, Feng; Lei, Fumin

    2016-01-01

    species. ENMs supported these conclusions in that the northern part of the Eurasian continent was unsuitable during the LGM, whereas southern parts remained suitable. The recent divergences and poor structure in the mitochondrial tree contrasts strongly with the pronounced, well defined phenotypical...

  16. George Kelly: cognitive psychologist, humanistic psychologist, or something else entirely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, John G

    2008-11-01

    George Kelly was regarded by some of his contemporaries as a cognitive psychologist and by others as a humanistic psychologist. Kelly himself resisted being rubricized. He did, however, name several people who had been influential in his life and work, one of whom was J.F. Herbart. A comparison of Herbart and Kelly reveals several similarities. Both shared a belief that psychology was fundamentally a mathematical discipline. Both eliminated distinctions usually taken for granted in psychology, such as emotion versus cognition. Reconstructing Kelly's relation to Herbart allows one to see more clearly why Kelly was such a unique figure in 20th century psychology.

  17. Selected Leading American Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2015-01-01

    There are selected psychologists who have contributed much toward studying problems in teaching and learning. They have suggested plans from research, carefully conducted, which enable educational practices to be set on more secure and justifiable grounds. The writer will briefly write about ten leaders, although there are salient others.

  18. Illumination Compensation Algorithm for Unevenly Lighted Document Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Zhiyong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of segmenting the unevenly lighted document image, this paper proposes an illumination compensation segmentation algorithm which can effectively segment the unevenly lighted document. The illumination compensation method is proposed to equivalently convert unevenly lighted document image to evenly lighted document image, then segment the evenly lighted document directly. Experimental results show that the proposed method can get the accurate evenly lighted document images so that we can segment the document accurately and it is more efficient to process unevenly lighted document  images than traditional binarization methods. The algorithm effectively overcomes the difficulty in handling uneven lighting and enhances segmentation quality considerably.

  19. Educational Psychologists' Constructions of Sexuality and the Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    Despite an underlying inclusion agenda, sexuality equality remains a low priority in education. Review of literature suggests the marginalization of sexual minority young people (SMYP) in schools. This study explores educational psychologists' (EPs') constructions of sexuality and the implications for practice. Discursive psychology was used to…

  20. Gesell: The First School Psychologist. Part II. Practice and Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    This article describes what is known of Arnold L. Gesell's position in Connecticut between 1914-1919, including conditions of employment and responsibilities. While some questions remain unanswered regarding Gesell's acquisition of the title "school psychologist," it is concluded that he was the first U.S. practitioner to hold that title.…

  1. 10 CFR 712.33 - Designated Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated Psychologist. 712.33 Section 712.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.33 Designated Psychologist. (a) The Designated Psychologist reports to the SOMD and determines the psychological fitness of an individual...

  2. [A proposal for reforming psychologists' training in France and in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, J-P

    2009-02-01

    In France, as in the European Union, the number of psychologists continues to increase and constitutes by far the most important source of professionals in this field. The requests for services of psychologists in many various domains have also increased in an unprecedented way over a number of years. In spite of this development, which should continue to increase considerably, the initial training of psychologists remains uneven and disparate and often remote from, even unsuitable to, the legitimate expectations of users. It is therefore important to reform this training by extending, updating, homogenising and adapting it to current knowledge and needs, and by marking it by a single and specific degree: that of a doctorate. This new eight-year doctoral curriculum would be at the same time more complete and simpler than the European Diploma in Psychology model (EuroPsy), for instance. This latter is a very complicated and insufficient subject and would not completely resolve the great problems of psychologists' training and the competences they need to gain in order to access professional practise, research and teaching. This extension of the psychologists' training would make it possible to integrate new data concerning traditional fields of psychology and data concerning new fields of application of psychology and should obviously include the essential training for psychotherapies referred to the great theoretical and practical models, since their interest is clinically acknowledged (psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical therapies, cognitive and behavioural therapies, systemic therapies, therapies for individuals, couples, families, groups...). This polyreferred training would make it possible to go from a culture still too often axed on orientation and deficiencies of the therapist, to a culture of indication, opening and competence, focused on the patient's interest. Teaching of psychophysiology and neurosciences should be updated and harmonised by taking into

  3. Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... styles, and employee morale. They also work with management on matters such as policy planning, ... Hospitals; state, local, and private 6 Individual and family ...

  4. Child Psychologist:Jean Piaget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大任

    2006-01-01

    Jean Piaget(1896-1980),a professor of psychology at theUniversity of Geneva from 1929 to 1954,was a French Swissdevelopmental psychologist who is most well known for organizingcognitive development into a series of stages,including Sensorimotor,Pheoperational,Concrete Operational,and Formal Operational.Piaget’s theory supposes that people develop schemas(conceptualmodels)by either assimilating or accommodating new information.These concepts can be explained as fitting information in to existingschemas,and altering existing schemas in order to accommodate newinformation,respectively.

  5. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    OpenAIRE

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investigation from the perspective of the reflexive capacities of the psychologist as one among other human beings and/or members of a specific culture. Most obvious was the emergence – in the late nineteent...

  6. Biomechanics and energetics of running on uneven terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Alexandra S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2015-03-01

    In the natural world, legged animals regularly run across uneven terrain with remarkable ease. To gain understanding of how running on uneven terrain affects the biomechanics and energetics of locomotion, we studied human subjects (N=12) running at 2.3 m s(-1) on an uneven terrain treadmill, with up to a 2.5 cm height variation. We hypothesized that running on uneven terrain would show increased energy expenditure, step parameter variability and leg stiffness compared with running on smooth terrain. Subject energy expenditure increased by 5% (0.68 W kg(-1); Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Step width and length variability also increased by 27% and 26%, respectively (Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Calculations of gravitational potential energy fluctuations suggest that about half of the energetic increases can be explained by additional positive and negative mechanical work for up and down steps on the uneven surface. This is consistent between walking and running, as the absolute increases in energetic cost for walking and running on uneven terrain were similar: 0.68 and 0.48 W kg(-1), respectively. These results provide insight into how surface smoothness can affect locomotion biomechanics and energetics in the real world.

  7. Evaluating a primary care psychology service in Ireland: a survey of stakeholders and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark; Byrne, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Primary care psychology services (PCPS) represent an important resource in meeting the various health needs of our communities. This study evaluated the PCPS in a two-county area within the Republic of Ireland. The objectives were to (i) examine the viewpoints of the service for both psychologists and stakeholders (healthcare professionals only) and (ii) examine the enactment of the stepped care model of service provision. Separate surveys were sent to primary care psychologists (n = 8), general practitioners (GPs; n = 69) and other stakeholders in the two counties. GPs and stakeholders were required to rate the current PCPS. The GP survey specifically examined referrals to the PCPS and service configuration, while the stakeholder survey also requested suggestions for future service provision. Psychologists were required to provide information regarding their workload, time spent on certain tasks and productivity ideas. Referral numbers, waiting lists and waiting times were also obtained. All 8 psychologists, 23 GPs (33% response rate) and 37 stakeholders (unknown response rate) responded. GPs and stakeholders reported access to the PCPS as a primary concern, with waiting times of up to 80 weeks in some areas. Service provision to children and adults was uneven between counties. A stepped care model of service provision was not observed. Access can be improved by further implementation of a stepped care service, developing a high-throughput service for adults (based on a stepped care model), and employing a single waiting list for each county to ensure equal access.

  8. Structural and evolutionary versatility in protein complexes with uneven stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Rees, Holly A; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-03-16

    Proteins assemble into complexes with diverse quaternary structures. Although most heteromeric complexes of known structure have even stoichiometry, a significant minority have uneven stoichiometry--that is, differing numbers of each subunit type. To adopt this uneven stoichiometry, sequence-identical subunits must be asymmetric with respect to each other, forming different interactions within the complex. Here we first investigate the occurrence of uneven stoichiometry, demonstrating that it is common in vitro and is likely to be common in vivo. Next, we elucidate the structural determinants of uneven stoichiometry, identifying six different mechanisms by which it can be achieved. Finally, we study the frequency of uneven stoichiometry across evolution, observing a significant enrichment in bacteria compared with eukaryotes. We show that this arises due to a general increased tendency for bacterial proteins to self-assemble and form homomeric interactions, even within the context of a heteromeric complex.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Delivered by Psychologists and Non-Psychologists in an NHS Community Adult Mental Health Service: a Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Bell, Lorraine; Bolderston, Helen; Clarke, Sue

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is effective for depression and may be useful for complex transdiagnostic clients. To conduct a preliminary evaluation of whether ACT is feasible and effective when delivered by psychologists and non-psychologists for complex clients in a National Health Service (NHS) community mental health service for adults. Staff were trained in ACT and conducted one-to-one therapy with clients. Measures on general mental health, depression, fusion and values were given pre-therapy, post-therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Standardized measures showed significant improvements post-therapy for global mental health, depression, cognitive fusion and values post-treatment. These were partially maintained at follow-up and remained after an intent-to-treat analysis. There were no differences in outcomes between psychologists and non-psychologists. ACT may be delivered effectively with limited training for complex cases in secondary care, though further research is needed.

  10. [Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Isabelle; Cludy, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration. The collaboration between nurses and psychologists is relatively recent within healthcare institutes. Gaining maximum value from such a collaboration requires solid knowledge of the roles and the limits of each profession as well as a real desire to work together, for the benefit of the greater well-being of the patient and, indirectly, of the teams.

  11. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investi

  12. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investi

  13. The Legalization of the School Psychologists' World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirp, David L.; Kirp, Lauren M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the increasing tendency of legal rules to shape school psychologist's conduct. The article suggests that "the legalization of the school psychologist's world" may afford an opportunity to reshape, in more "nonformal" and collegial ways, relationships with other school professions, students, and parents. (Author)

  14. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under

  15. A New Role for the Psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Mel

    1976-01-01

    The educational psychologist and the school staff of an ESN(M) (educationally sub-normal) special school in Great Britain could relate more meaningfully if the assessments of the students by both teachers and psychologists were related to a curriculum based on sequencing of skills. (IM)

  16. How Uneven National Income Distribution Dampens Growth and Consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangChuanshi,; ZhaoBaohua; DavidKelly

    2004-01-01

    Comparing the distribution of rural and urban residents' incomes we find negative correlations between the Gini coefficient and national economic growth. Unevenly distributed individual incomes hamper a country's economic development. Great income disparities divert the populace's expenditure to dietary items,

  17. Learning from Manchester: Uneven Development, Class and the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacper Pobłocki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that one of the greatest challenges mounted to urban theory is accounting for the simultaneous unfolding in the Global South of “planetary urbanization” and world’s greatest industrial revolution. In order to showthat industrial cities are still pertinent to urban theory, I revisit Victorian Manchester and Fredrick Engels’ classic account of it. I argue that Engels was a pioneer of what I dub “anthropology of the impersonal” and his “discovery” of classbecame the cornerstone for Marxist thought. Yet, his innovation has remained under-appreciated, and the astonishingcareer of the “dual city” concept is a good case in point.I argue that its popular embrace stems from the way it brings “uneven development”, “class” and the “city” in a gripping metaphor. Although Engels showed how these concepts were intertwined, he kept them theoretically separate. He did so because he used them not only for describing how capitalism worked, but also as tools for triggering a political change.

  18. Psychologists and child psychological maltreatment severity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, Ignacia; De Paúl, Joaquín; Indias, Silvia; Ullate, María

    2013-01-01

    Psychological maltreatment (PM) is probably the most difficult child maltreatment form to detect and evaluate. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of an instrument developed to improve accuracy in the assessment of PM severity in Child Protection Services (CPS). Case vignettes representing different severity levels of PM situations were used. 146 CPS psychologists participated in the study. A first group was made up of 115 psychologists who had been trained in the use of the instrument for 4 hours. The second group was made up of 31 psychologists who had been using the instrument for more than 12 months at the time of the study. Psychologists from the first group rated the severity of the vignettes in two ways: applying their own daily work criteria and applying the instrument after the training. Accurate ratings clearly improved when psychologists used the instrument criteria. However, only psychologists who had used the instrument for more than 12 months at the time of the study obtained more than 80% of accurate ratings. Results support the importance for CPS psychologists to use psychological maltreatment severity assessment instruments and show the conditions under which they could be effective.

  19. Why isn’t everyone an Evolutionary Psychologist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBurke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with Evolutionary Psychology, and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success.

  20. Why isn't everyone an evolutionary psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with "Evolutionary Psychology," and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success.

  1. Social justice issues related to uneven distribution of resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Naomi E; Bell, Sue Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the social justice issues resulting from the uneven distribution of resources. In this article, justice theories are discussed in relation to two of these issues: lack of adequate food and shelter and inequitable access to an appropriate continuum of health care. Public health nurses have the obligation to deal with the results of poverty and the uneven distribution of resources, which pose a threat to the common good in the United States and throughout the global community.

  2. A Load Balance Routing Algorithm Based on Uneven Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of uneven load in clustering Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, a kind of load balance routing algorithm based on uneven clustering is proposed to do uneven clustering and calculate optimal number of clustering. This algorithm prevents the number of common node under some certain cluster head from being too large which leads load to be overweight to death through even node clustering. It constructs evaluation function which can better reflect residual energy distribution of nodes and at the same time constructs routing evaluation function between cluster heads which uses MATLAB to do simulation on the performance of this algorithm. Simulation result shows that the routing established by this algorithm effectively improves network’s energy balance and lengthens the life cycle of network.  

  3. The National Association of School Psychologists' Self-Assessment Tool for School Psychologists: Factor Structure and Relationship to the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Rossen, Eric; Charvat, Jeff; Meyer, Lauren; Tanner, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (2010a), often referred to as the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model, describes the comprehensive range of professional skills and competencies available from school psychologists across 10 domains. The…

  4. Vietnamese Diasporic Placemaking: An Ethnographic Moment in Uneven Geographic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu Su'o'ng Thi

    2010-01-01

    The article explores the ways "uneven geographical development" conditions and is conditioned by local placemaking practices. Guided by David Harvey's work along with Henri Lefebvre's three dimensions of spatial production--spatial practices, representations of space, and spaces of representation or the "spatial imaginary"--I look at the ways a…

  5. Prevention of environmental vibrations from uneven roads and sleeping policemen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.; Waarts, P.H.; Pelgröm, L.J.W.

    1999-01-01

    KOAC•WMD Dutch Road Research Laboratories and TNO Building and Construction Research have developed the perfect tool to predict the level of vibrations generated by traffic passing sleeping policemen and/or uneven roads. The tool consists of a quick investigation of the wave propagation through soil

  6. Differential translation tunes uneven production of operon-encoded proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Wolf, Y.I.; Koehorst, J.J.; Wurtzel, O.; Oost, van der R.; Ran, W.; Blombach, F.; Makarova, K.S.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Forster, A.C.; Wagner, E.G.H.; Sorek, R.; Koonin, E.V.; Oost, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    Clustering of functionally related genes in operons allows for coregulated gene expression in prokaryotes. This is advantageous when equal amounts of gene products are required. Production of protein complexes with an uneven stoichiometry, however, requires tuning mechanisms to generate subunits in

  7. Unevenness Point Descriptor for Terrain Analysis in Mobile Robot Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bellone

    2013-07-01

    The proposed algorithm is based on the analysis of the normal vector of a surface obtained through Principal Component Analysis and it leads to the definition of a novel, so defined, Unevenness Point Descriptor. Experimental results, obtained with vehicles operating in indoor and outdoor environments, are presented to validate this approach.

  8. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  9. Training Ethical Psychologists: An Acculturation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael C.; Handelsman, Mitchell M.; Knapp, Samuel

    This paper posits the thesis that socialization into the profession of psychology is a process of acculturation. Students enter training with their own value traditions but are required to learn new ones when they become psychologists. The assumptions of the framework are that this "professional acculturation" (a) takes place over time, (b)…

  10. The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist The aim of this presentation is to illuminate and discuss some connections between the therapeutic profession and development of music pedagogic theory. A topic that initially emerged as a result of a sub-study in my PhD -project about professiona...

  11. Sex Bias in Clinical Judgment among School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, H. Thompson; Frederickson, Anne K.

    1991-01-01

    Used analogue case study format to examine sex bias in clinical judgment among school psychologists. Varied sex of adolescent and problem type in 2 X 2 design. School psychologists read case study and rated perceived disturbance and importance of intervention. Psychologists rated it more important to intervene when subject was male; no differences…

  12. School Psychologists' Role Concerning Children with Chronic Illnesses in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Camille; Machek, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the role of school psychologists in working with children with chronic illnesses in the schools. A total of 300 practicing school psychologists in public schools, drawn from the National Association of School Psychologists membership directory, completed a standard mail survey. The survey solicited information on (a) graduate…

  13. 38 CFR 1.514a - Disclosure to private psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... psychologists. 1.514a Section 1.514a Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Disclosure to private psychologists. When a beneficiary elects to obtain therapy or analysis as a private patient from a private psychologist, such information in the medical record as may be pertinent may...

  14. School Psychologist Diagnostic Decision-Making: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Robinson, Eric; Holt, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the diagnostic decision-making of school psychologists as a function of a student's disability and academic performance with three research questions using a randomly-selected sample of school psychologists from the state of Texas. Results from the first research question indicated that school psychologists significantly…

  15. Cognitive Assessment Practices: A Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Dixon, Shauna G.

    2014-01-01

    The present article describes an exploratory study regarding the preferred cognitive assessment practices of current school psychologists. Three hundred and twenty-three school psychologists participated in the survey. The results suggest that the majority of school psychologists endorsed that they base their assessment practices on an underlying…

  16. National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  17. 42 CFR 410.71 - Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services. 410.71 Section 410.71 Public Health CENTERS FOR... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.71 Clinical psychologist...

  18. History's mysteries demystified: becoming a psychologist-historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Blount, Kelli; Rutherford, Alexandra; Baker, David; Johnson, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, psychologist-historian Robert Watson argued that the study of history was of particular salience to psychology. In this article we explore the relationship between psychology and history and argue that the psychologist-historian plays a vital role in the discipline of psychology. We provide a brief overview of the emergence of the history of psychology as a professional subdiscipline, describe who psychologist-historians are, explain why they are needed, and detail how to join their ranks. We argue that increasing historical sophistication among psychologists will have beneficial effects on research and teaching, and we invite all psychologists to participate in the making of psychology's history.

  19. Chronic headache: the role of the psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    The role of the psychologist in chronic headache needs to be tailored to the patient's presentation. For some patients, psychological issues need to be directly addressed (eg, psychiatric comorbidity, difficulties coping with headache, significant problems with sleep and/or stress, medication overuse, and history of abuse). Other situations (eg, patients' beliefs about their readiness to change ability to actively manage headaches, medication adherence, and managing triggers) involve behavioral/psychological principles even when there is no direct contact with a psychologist. This article reviews the literature on the importance of psychological issues in headache management and provides suggestions for how to address behavioral and cognitive factors and their potential for improved headache care.

  20. Pavlov as a psychologist. A reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1987-01-01

    American psychologists are informed on Pavlov's work on conditional reflexes but not on the full development of his theory of higher nervous activity. This article shows that Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity dealt with concepts that concerned contemporary psychologists. Pavlov used the conditioning of the salivary reflex for methodological purposes. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity encompassed overt behavior, neural processes, and the conscious experience. The strong Darwinian element of Pavlov's theory, with its stress on the higher organisms' adaptation, is described. With regard to learning, Pavlov, at the end of his scholarly career, proposed that although all learning involves the formation of associations, the organism's adaptation to the environment is established through conditioning, but the accumulation of knowledge is established by trial and error.

  1. The activity model of legal psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Bogdanovich,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose an activity model of legal psychologist work. As a basis for the construction of the system of legal psychologist activity, we use trajectory of teenager living in the legal field. As the main activities within their respective specializations, we highlighted prevention, maintenance and rehabilitation. We define the main activities necessary for the development within the FGOSIII specialization 050407 “Pedagogy and Psychology of deviant behavior”: general and pathopsychologic diagnostics, development activity and psychological education, psycho-correction, psychological counseling. Accordingly, we define the types of psychological practices. We highlight the motivational and integrative practice (teaching introductory and trainee. We propose a system of training modules, ensuring the formation of the necessary competencies. The modules feature is their focus on practice (the association of training courses with the main types of psychological practice.

  2. Research contributions of counseling psychologists to neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S J; Ryan, J J; Sumerall, S W

    1998-10-01

    Research productivity of counseling psychologists with credentials in clinical neuropsychology were examined. Eighteen were ABPP/ABCN Diplomates. Division 40 Fellows, or both. They published an average of 3.06 (SD= 4.82; range = 0 to 20) neuropsychologically relevant, first-authored articles over the past 5 years. When counseling psychologists were compared to a random sample of ABPP/ABCN diplomates with doctoral degrees in other areas of psychology, no reliable differences emerged between the groups in age, research productivity, or number of years between graduation and receipt of the ABPP/ABCN diploma. Research contributions of neuropsychologists with degrees in counseling psychology are comparable to those of ABPP/ABCN diplomates who were trained in other areas of psychology (e.g., clinical, developmental, and physiological).

  3. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-01-01

    Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple case...

  4. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Franca; Wicherts, Jelte M; Veldkamp, Coosje L S; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants' estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes.

  5. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants’ estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes. PMID:28296929

  6. Restoration of uneven illumination in light sheet microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Shorif; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Preibisch, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2011-08-01

    Light microscopy images suffer from poor contrast due to light absorption and scattering by the media. The resulting decay in contrast varies exponentially across the image along the incident light path. Classical space invariant deconvolution approaches, while very effective in deblurring, are not designed for the restoration of uneven illumination in microscopy images. In this article, we present a modified radiative transfer theory approach to solve the contrast degradation problem of light sheet microscopy (LSM) images. We confirmed the effectiveness of our approach through simulation as well as real LSM images.

  7. Fish remains and humankind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K G Jones

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The four papers in this issue represent a trawl of the reports presented to the Fourth meeting of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ Fish Remains Working Group, which met at the University of York in 1987. The conference discussed material from many parts of the world - from Australasia to the north-west coast of America - and many eras, ranging in date from the early Pleistocene to the 1980s. It demonstrated both the variety of work being carried out and the growing interest in ancient fish remains. Internet Archaeology plans to publish other batches of papers from this conference. These reports will demonstrate the effort being made to distinguish between assemblages of fish remains which have been deposited by people and those which occur in ancient deposits as a result of the action of other agents. To investigate this area, experiments with modern material and observations of naturally occurring fish bone assemblages are supplemented with detailed analysis of ancient and modern fish remains. The papers published here illustrate the breadth of research into osteology, biogeography, documentary research, and the practicalities of recovering fish remains. Read, digest and enjoy them! Using the Internet for publishing research papers is not only ecologically sound (saving paper, etc. it disseminates scholarship to anyone anywhere on the planet with access to what is gradually becoming necessary technology in the late 20th century. Hopefully, future groups of papers will include video and audio material recorded at the conference, and so enable those who could not attend to gain further insights into the meeting and the scholarship underpinning this area of research.

  8. Compliant Biped Walking on Uneven Terrain with Point Feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Hou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to realize compliant biped walking on uneven terrain with point feet. A control system is designed for a 5-link planar biped walker. According to the role that each leg plays, the control system is decomposed into two parts: the swing leg control and the support leg control. The trajectory of the swing foot is generated in realtime to regulate the walking speed. By considering the reaction torque of the swing leg’s hip joint as disturbance, a sliding model controller is implemented at the support leg’s hip joint to control the torso’s posture angle. In order to make sure the landing foot does not rebound after impact, the vertical contact force control is set as the internal loop of the hip’s height control. In simulation, the control system is tested on a virtual 5-link planar biped walker in Matlab. Finally, stable biped walking is realized on uneven terrain with roughness up to 2cm.

  9. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population.

  10. Gait efficiency on an uneven surface is associated with falls and injury in older subjects with a spectrum of lower limb neuromuscular function: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurales, Katie; DeMott, Trina K.; Kim, Hogene; Allet, Lara; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine which gait measures on smooth and uneven surfaces predict falls and fall-related injuries in older subjects with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Design Twenty-seven subjects (12 women) with a spectrum of peripheral nerve function ranging from normal to moderately severe DPN walked on smooth and uneven surfaces, with gait parameters determined by optoelectronic kinematic techniques. Falls and injuries were then determined prospectively over the following year. Results Seventeen subjects (62.9%) fell and 12 (44.4%) sustained a fall-related injury. As compared to non-fallers, the subject group reporting any fall, as well as the subject group reporting fall-related injury, demonstrated decreased speed, greater step width (SW), shorter step length (SL) and greater step-width-to-step-length ratio (SW:SL) on both surfaces. Uneven surface SW:SL was the strongest predictor of falls (pseudo-R2 = 0.65; p = .012) and remained so with inclusion of other relevant variables into the model. Post-hoc analysis comparing injured with non-injured fallers showed no difference in any gait parameter. Conclusion SW:SL on an uneven surface is the strongest predictor of falls and injuries in older subjects with a spectrum of peripheral neurologic function. Given the relationship between SW:SL and efficiency, older neuropathic patients at increased fall risk appear to sacrifice efficiency for stability on uneven surfaces. PMID:26053187

  11. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  12. Effects of Lens Motion and Uneven Magnification on Image Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2015-01-01

    Counter to intuition, the images of an extended galaxy lensed by a moving galaxy cluster should have slightly different spectra in any metric gravity theory. This is mainly for two reasons. One relies on the gravitational potential of a moving lens being time-dependent (the Moving Cluster Effect, MCE). The other is due to uneven magnification across the extended, rotating source (the Differential Magnification Effect, DME). The time delay between the images can also cause their redshifts to differ because of cosmological expansion. This Differential Expansion Effect is likely to be small. Using a simple model, we derive these effects from first principles. One application would be to the Bullet Cluster, whose large tangential velocity may be inconsistent with the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm. This velocity can be estimated with complicated hydrodynamic models. Uncertainties with such models can be avoided using the MCE. We argue that the MCE should be observable with ALMA. However, such measurements can be corrupted...

  13. Differential Translation Tunes Uneven Production of Operon-Encoded Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa E.F. Quax

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Clustering of functionally related genes in operons allows for coregulated gene expression in prokaryotes. This is advantageous when equal amounts of gene products are required. Production of protein complexes with an uneven stoichiometry, however, requires tuning mechanisms to generate subunits in appropriate relative quantities. Using comparative genomic analysis, we show that differential translation is a key determinant of modulated expression of genes clustered in operons and that codon bias generally is the best in silico indicator of unequal protein production. Variable ribosome density profiles of polycistronic transcripts correlate strongly with differential translation patterns. In addition, we provide experimental evidence that de novo initiation of translation can occur at intercistronic sites, allowing for differential translation of any gene irrespective of its position on a polycistronic messenger. Thus, modulation of translation efficiency appears to be a universal mode of control in bacteria and archaea that allows for differential production of operon-encoded proteins.

  14. The Role of a School Psychologist in Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Rieger, Brian

    2009-01-01

    School psychologists historically have received little training on topics such as mild traumatic brain injury or concussion, yet they could play a significant role in assessment, consultation, and intervention with students who have sustained a concussion. The purpose of this article is to educate school psychologists with regard to definition,…

  15. Preparing School Psychologists to Testify at Due Process Hearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Carol A.

    Guidelines are presented for school psychologists in order to make their testimony at special education due process hearings as effective as possible. Recommendations are offered to prepare the school psychologist to: (1) accept the role of expert witness; (2) organize and review case materials; (3) state relevant rules, procedures, and criteria;…

  16. The Preparation of Educational Psychologists in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong

    2014-01-01

    Modeled after the British system, school psychologists in Hong Kong are called educational psychologists. Hong Kong is the first location in Asia to have a recognized specialty vocation in educational psychology and a program for their professional preparation. The first program in Hong Kong, established by the University of Hong Kong in 1981…

  17. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  18. The Preparation of Educational Psychologists in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong

    2014-01-01

    Modeled after the British system, school psychologists in Hong Kong are called educational psychologists. Hong Kong is the first location in Asia to have a recognized specialty vocation in educational psychology and a program for their professional preparation. The first program in Hong Kong, established by the University of Hong Kong in 1981…

  19. School Psychologists Working with Children Affected by Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezen, Kristin A.; Gurl, Aaron; Ping, Jenn

    2010-01-01

    School psychologists encounter children regularly who have been affected by abuse and neglect. Maltreatment adversely affects the mental health status and academic achievement of youth, thereby making the topic an area of concern for school psychologists. More recently, child protection laws have been expanded to include mandatory child abuse…

  20. Training for Tragedy: Critical Challenges for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNisco, Alison

    2013-01-01

    School psychologists are often the first professionals to reach students with mental illness, and part of their role is to help identify threats that can lead to events such as the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., which left 20 children and six adults dead, including school psychologist Mary Sherlach, who was one of the…

  1. Practice Guidelines regarding Psychologists' Involvement in Pharmacological Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The guidelines presented in this document are intended to provide a resource to psychologists interested in the issue of what represents optimal practice in relation to pharmacotherapy. They are not intended to apply to those psychologists who choose not to become directly or indirectly involved in medication management regardless of their level…

  2. Preparation of School/Educational Psychologists in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negovan, Valeria; Dinca, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the academic and professional training of educational/school psychologists in Romania. Their training mirrors the country's history, legal provisions, social qualities, and current professional status of psychologists and their specialization. Efforts to increase the quality of training for educational/school psychologists…

  3. Bilingual School Psychologists' Assessment Practices with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored bilingual school psychologists' assessment practices with students identified as English language learners (ELL). One thousand bilingual National Association of School Psychologist members were recruited nationwide, and 276 participated. Among those conducting language proficiency assessments of ELLs, many (58%) use…

  4. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  5. A School Psychologist's Self-Study Guide to Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesyk, Jack J.

    2005-01-01

    School psychologists may find the field of sport psychology beneficial to them in extending their skills and effectiveness. As trained psychologists, they are likely to already have some of the knowledge and skills necessary for working in the area of sport psychology. However, without additional training, this may not be sufficient for ethical…

  6. Elementary School Psychologists and Response to Intervention (RTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne; Marrs, Heath; Bogue, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) in elementary schools may have important implications for school psychologists. Therefore, it is important to better understand how elementary school psychologists perceive RTI and what barriers to successful RTI implementation they identify. Although previous research has investigated the…

  7. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  8. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  9. What School Psychologists Can Do for Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Bruce M.; Bramer, Dawn H. H.; French, Lisa R.; Assouline, Susan L. G.

    2006-01-01

    The term "twice exceptional" is used to describe gifted students who also have specific academic, behavioral, and social-emotional difficulties. This is a population of gifted students for whom the expertise and experience of school psychologists may be particularly relevant. This article discusses the ways in which school psychologists can help…

  10. Slovenian psychologists about the use of psychological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Boben

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The Committee for Psychological Tests of the Slovenian Psychological Association (SPA is participating actively in the work of the Task Force for Tests and Testing of the European Federation of Professional Psychological Associations (EFPPA. This task force developed the questionnaire on tests and testing for psychologists, members of the national associations in the European states, which are members of EFPPA. 321 psychologists answered the questionnaire in Slovenia. We have collected the opinions of psychologists about various topics regarding the use of psychological tests: knowledge and competence, legal standards and control, missuse and abuse of tests and testing, testing procedures and their limitations, significance of tests and testing etc. In addition, psychologists named three psychological tests they use most frequently. The respondents also provided useful commentaries on test use. In our study, Slovenian results are also compared with answers of psychologists in Great Britain, Spain, Croatia and Germany.

  11. The dilemma of the academic industrial psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Orpen

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available The university industrial psychologist is often faced with a conflict between his roles as an 'academic scientist' and as a 'professional technician'. It is argued that this problem of 'dual allegiance' can be resolved to a large extent if the industrial psychologist: (i reminds himself (and his students that industrial psychology is not a special discipline on its own, but is an integral part of psychology-in-general, (ii does not view his subject as just a mirror of professional practice, (iii has regard for his subject as a scientific discipline, and not just as a useful tool for management, and (iv convinces practitioners of the value of the subject in a variety of areas, ranging from testing to consumer behaviour.OpsommingDie bedryfsielkundige aan die universiteit kom dikwels te staan voor 'n konflik tussen sy rol as "akademiese wetenskaplike" en "professionele tegnikus". Dit word beweer dat hierdie probleem van "tweeledige verbondenheid" tot ‘n groot mate opgelos kan word as die bedryfsielkundige (en sy studente: (a dit in gedagte hou dat bedryfsielkunde nie wesentlik 'n onafhanklike dissipline is nie, maar 'n integrale deel van sielkunde-in-diealgemeen vorm, (b nie sy vak as slegs 'n weerspieëling van die professionele praktyk beskou nie, (c agting vir sy vak as 'n wetenskaplike dissipline het en nie net as 'n gerieflike werktuig vir bestuur beskou word nie, en (d die praktyk kan oortuig van die waarde van die vak in 'n verskeidenheid gebiede, wat strek van toetsing tot verbruikersgedrag.

  12. Effects of Pine and Hardwood Basal Areas After Uneven-Aged Silvicultural Treatments on Wildlife Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darren A. Miller; Bruce D. Leopold; L. Mike Conner; Michael G. Shelton

    1999-01-01

    Uneven-aged management (UEAM) is becoming increasingly popular in the southeastern United States. However, effects of UEAM on wildlife habitat have not been adequately documented. We examined response of habitat within stands of varying levels of pine and hardwood basal area under an uneven-aged managegement regime in southern Mississippi. Summer and winter trends in...

  13. Walking Robots Dynamic Control Systems on an Uneven Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents ZPM dynamic control of walking robots, developing an open architecture real time control multiprocessor system, in view of obtaining new capabilities for walking robots. The complexity of the movement mechanism of a walking robot was taken into account, being a repetitive tilting process with numerous instable movements and which can lead to its turnover on an uneven terrain. The control system architecture for the dynamic robot walking is presented in correlation with the control strategy which contains three main real time control loops: balance robot control using sensorial feedback, walking diagram control with periodic changes depending on the sensorial information during each walk cycle, predictable movement control based on a quick decision from the previous experimental data. The results obtained through simulation and experiments show an increase in mobility, stability in real conditions and obtaining of high performances related to the possibility of moving walking robots on terrains with a configuration as close as possible to real situations, respectively developing new technological capabilities of the walking robot control systems for slope movement and walking by overtaking or going around obstacles.

  14. Unevenness Point Descriptor for Terrain Analysis in Mobile Robot Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bellone

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of imaging sensors that produce a three-dimensional representation of the environment has become an efficient solution to increase the degree of perception of autonomous mobile robots. Accurate and dense 3D point clouds can be generated from traditional stereo systems and laser scanners or from the new generation of RGB-D cameras, representing a versatile, reliable and cost-effective solution that is rapidly gaining interest within the robotics community. For autonomous mobile robots, it is critical to assess the traversability of the surrounding environment, especially when driving across natural terrain. In this paper, a novel approach to detect traversable and non-traversable regions of the environment from a depth image is presented that could enhance mobility and safety through integration with localization, control and planning methods. The proposed algorithm is based on the analysis of the normal vector of a surface obtained through Principal Component Analysis and it leads to the definition of a novel, so defined, Unevenness Point Descriptor. Experimental results, obtained with vehicles operating in indoor and outdoor environments, are presented to validate this approach.

  15. Home dispossession: the uneven geography of evictions in Palma (Majorca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vives-Miró, Sònia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Affordable housing, either owner-occupied or rented, is regarded as a key element of social reproduction. However, processes of housing commodification and financialization have increasingly resulted in precariatization of the population and the loss of the right to housing. In the Spanish case, neoliberal policies geared to the revalorization of built environments had caused a housing bubble of historical magnitude. Since it burst, a large number of households have been dispossessed of housing, clearly reflected in the avalanche of foreclosures and evictions that hit Spanish cities as the crisis unfolded. This paper focuses on the urban area of Palma (Majorca by analyzing the foreclosures exerted on home­owners and the evictions of tenants who, from the start of the crisis of 2008, have not been able to afford their mortgage payments or rents. These evictions and foreclosures are correlated with the social status of the urban areas affected. The results show that the increase of evictions and foreclosures has emerged unevenly around the city. While tenant evictions have affected all types of urban areas, foreclosures have become much more evident in urban areas of low social status.

  16. The Uneven Diffusion of Collaborative Technology in a Large Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarulaitis, Gasparas

    This paper investigates the large-scale diffusion of a collaborative technology in a range of different business contexts. The empirical data used in the article were obtained from a longitudinal (2007-2009) case study of a global oil and gas company (OGC). Our study reports on ongoing efforts to deploy an inte grated collaborative system that uses Microsoft SharePoint (MSP) technology. We assess MSP as a configurational technology and analyze the diffusion of a metadata standard developed in-house, which forms an embedded component of MSP. We focus on two different organizational contexts, namely research and development (R&D) and oil and gas production (OGP), and illustrate the key differences between the ways in which configurational technology is managed and used in these contexts, which results in an uneven diffusion. In contrast with previous studies, we unravel the organizational and technological complexity involved, and thus empirically illustrate the flexibility of large-scale technology and show how the trajectories of the various components are influenced by multiple modes of ordering.

  17. Unevenness of lung perfusion images and pulmonary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Takeo; Isawa, Toyoharu; Hirano, Tomio; Anazawa, Yoshiki; Miki, Makoto; Konno, Kiyoshi; Motomiya, Masakichi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the unevenness of perfusion distribution in the lungs in conjunction with underlying lung pathology. Twenty-one parameters as described previously were defined out of horizontal radioactive count profiles on perfusion lung image data taken in 64x64 matrixes. Principal component analysis has revealed that the 1st component or Z1 is represented by AREA, the area of the lung, and ANG, the slope of the mean count profile, Z2, by N, the number of peaks, Z3 and Z4, by YG and XG, the barycentric coordinates of count distribution, Z5, by MAC, the maximal count and Z6, by CSD, the degree of scatter in count from the peak count. How those parameters differ in each lung pathology has been determined from 657 lung perfusion image data. In pulmonary emphysema, the lung volumes are larger than those in normal subjects. The AREA and ANG were consequently larger in value and N was also significantly larger, indicating the increased regional alveolar pressure and the compressed or destroyed vascular beds. In diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), N was increased probably because the distal airways were either narrowed or obstructed by inflammatory processes inducing regional alveolar hypoxia and/or alveolar hyperinflation. In fibrosis, both AREA and N were significantly smaller. In congestive heart failure with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension, YG was smaller probably because of 'reversal of perfusion'. In pulmonary sarcoidosis, an increase in YG was the only abnormality. (author).

  18. Integrating psychologists into the Canadian health care system: the example of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulding, Richard; Grenier, Jean; Blashki, Grant; Ritchie, Pierre; Pirkis, Jane; Chomienne, Marie-Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Canada and Australia share many similarities in terms of demographics and the structure of their health systems; however, there has been a divergence in policy approaches to public funding of psychological care. Recent policy reforms in Australia have substantially increased community access to psychologists for evidence-based treatment for high prevalence disorders. In Canada, access remains limited with the vast majority of consultations occurring in the private sector, which is beyond the reach of many individuals due to cost considerations. With the recent launch of the Mental Health Commission of Canada, it is timely to reflect on the context of the current Canadian and Australian systems of psychological care. We argue that integrating psychologists into the publicly-funded primary care system in Canada would be feasible, beneficial for consumers, and cost-effective.

  19. Evolving Expectations for Personality Traits in Counselling Psychologist in Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakare Aveez Oluwatoyin

    2016-01-01

    ... of a counsellor's personality characteristics has been linked to effective outcome. In view of these, this paper examines evolvement of expectations for personality traits among the counselling psychologist-in training...

  20. Sources Informing Undergraduate College Student Perceptions of Psychologists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, Dana N; Wantz, Richard A; Firmin, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    ... psychologists from other HSPs.We surveyed 259 students enrolled in a general psychology class at a selective private comprehensive university in the Midwest in order to determine the sources that inform their perceptions...

  1. 20 CFR 30.402 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 30.402 Section 30.402 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist may serve as a physician within the scope of his or her practice as defined by state law. Therefore, a clinical psychologist...

  2. 20 CFR 10.312 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 10.312 Section 10.312 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... § 10.312 What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist.... Therefore, a clinical psychologist may not serve as a physician for conditions that include a...

  3. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or...) Of a type that the clinical psychologist or clinical social worker who furnishes the services...

  4. Alterations of hippocampal glucose metabolism by even versus uneven medium chain triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tanya S; Tan, Kah Ni; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) are used to treat neurologic disorders with metabolic impairments, including childhood epilepsy and early Alzheimer's disease. However, the metabolic effects of MCTs in the brain are still unclear. Here, we studied the effects of feeding even and uneven MCTs on brain glucose metabolism in the mouse. Adult mice were fed 35% (calories) of trioctanoin or triheptanoin (the triglycerides of octanoate or heptanoate, respectively) or a matching control diet for 3 weeks. Enzymatic assays and targeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were used to quantify metabolites in extracts from the hippocampal formations (HFs). Both oils increased the levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, but no other significant metabolic alterations were observed after triheptanoin feeding. The levels of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate were increased in the HF of mice fed trioctanoin, whereas levels of metabolites further downstream in the glycolytic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway were reduced. This indicates that trioctanoin reduces glucose utilization because of a decrease in phosphofructokinase activity. Trioctanoin and triheptanoin showed similar anticonvulsant effects in the 6 Hz seizure model, but it remains unknown to what extent the anticonvulsant mechanism(s) are shared. In conclusion, triheptanoin unlike trioctanoin appears to not alter glucose metabolism in the healthy brain. PMID:24169853

  5. Contemporary roles of the pediatric psychologist in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichler, Jessica C; Harris, Michael A; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Important stakeholders, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), recognize the need for psychologists to be an integral part of diabetes care. This review paper aims to provide a comprehensive examination of pediatric psychologists' roles in working with children and adolescents with diabetes, including during distinct phases of treatment (e.g., diagnosis, outpatient diabetes clinic visits, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient psychology visits) and with different modalities of psychological interventions (e.g., screening, individual, family, and group therapy). In addition, the role of the psychologist in diabetes care within various settings (e.g., private practice, academic medical centers, and community organizations) will be explored. Finally, this paper will outline other roles in which psychologists contribute to diabetes-specific efforts (e.g., translational research, program development in transition to adult care, advocacy for health care reform initiatives, health care billing/reimbursement, and alternative methods to psychosocial care delivery) as well as future directions for working with children and adolescents with diabetes. Pediatric psychologists have multiple professional roles in a wide variety of settings; however, there is more that can be done in the future to fully utilize pediatric psychologists in diabetes care for children and adolescents, such as embedding psychologists into integrated clinic visits where families receive comprehensive medical and psychological services to support overall health and well-being. Therefore, there is a need for increased advocacy to obtain even more pediatric psychology engagement in diabetes care to provide new clinical services and develop more translational research.

  6. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  7. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-09-25

    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946-1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  8. The work of a clinical psychologist in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M

    1978-11-01

    The data presented suggest that general practitioners would be likely to refer a large number of patients with diverse problems to clinical psychologists working in health centres. Compared with a centrally organized clinical psychology service, the work of the primary care psychologist is likely to offer the following advantages:1. Access to psychological help for patients with a need for such help, but who could not attend a central clinic owing to problems associated with travel, work, physical disability, or even a presenting problem such as agoraphobia.2. Greater continuity of care of patients.3. Increased communication between the psychologist and members of the primary care teams.4. Possibility of the psychologist seeing the patient earlier, before the problems have become entrenched.5. Less need for referral to other agencies.6. Reduced stigma for the patient.7. Development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to problems presenting in primary care.8. More flexible and more relevant therapy due to seeing the patients in their home setting.9. Greater therapeutic involvement of the patient's family.10. Reduced costs and inconvenience for the patient's family.11. Reduced administrative and ambulance service costs.While these points do not overcome the need for a formal evaluation of the work of psychologists in primary care, they do suggest that there are advantages in this type of service over the services which are currently available and that a full evaluation would be worth undertaking.

  9. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern John H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946–1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  10. Psychologists abandon the Nuremberg ethic: concerns for detainee interrogations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kenneth S; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of 9-11, the American Psychological Association, one of the largest U.S. health professions, changed its ethics code so that it now runs counter to the Nuremberg Ethic. This historic post-9-11 change allows psychologists to set aside their ethical responsibilities whenever they are in irreconcilable conflict with military orders, governmental regulations, national and local laws, and other forms of governing legal authority. This article discusses the history, wording, rationale, and implications of the ethical standard that U.S. psychologists adopted 7 years ago, particularly in light of concerns over health care professionals' involvement in detainee interrogations and the controversy over psychologists' prominent involvement in settings like the Guantánamo Bay Detainment Camp and the Abu Ghraib prison. It discusses possible approaches to the complex dilemmas arising when ethical responsibilities conflict with laws, regulations, or other governing legal authority.

  11. Research on the horizontal curve's radius under coupling effects of uneven adhesion coefficient and crosswind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of uneven adhesion coefficient and crosswind on alignment design indexes, a six-axle semi-trailer is selected as the typical vehicle model to investigate the effects of uneven adhesion coefficient caused by superelevation under the condition of rainfall on the truck's lateral stability, quantifying the crosswind using TruckSim. Based on the basic theory of vehicle dynamics, vehicle safety driving model is established. Also, the minimum radius is calculated with the consideration of uneven adhesion coefficient and crosswind. The results show that the effects of uneven adhesion coefficient and crosswind on the truck's lateral stability increase with the increasing of the truck's speed. Truck's lateral slide instability begins to appear when crosswind grade grows up to 9 or above. According to sensitive analysis, speed, rainfall, crosswind, and the interaction of the speed and rainfall have significant influences on the truck's lateral stability. The results quantify the effects of uneven adhesion coefficient and crosswind on truck's lateral stability. The advised index for horizontal curve design control is proposed, which provides a good reference for road safety design and safety protective measures. It can also provide theoretical basis and guidelines for highway safe operation in the windy and rainy areas.

  12. Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, focusing on introduction and applicability; preamble; general principles; and ethical standards (resolving ethical issues, competence, human relations, privacy and confidentiality, advertising and other public statements, record keeping and…

  13. Stereotype Threat and Test Performance: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alexander H.; Lovett, Benjamin J.

    2007-01-01

    Ethical guidelines require school psychologists to ensure that their assessment practices are nondiscriminatory, but typical discussions on this topic neglect the possible discriminatory effects of cultural stereotypes on assessment results. Recent research on "stereotype threat" shows that students' knowledge of stereotype-based negative…

  14. Ethically Challenging Situations Reported by School Psychologists: Implications for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailor, A. Nichole; Jacob, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Practitioner-members of the National Association of School Psychologists (N = 208) completed questionnaires regarding their ethics training, preparedness, the types of ethical transgressions and dilemmas encountered in the previous year, and the strategies used to solve problems. Respondents who received multilevel training in ethics (ethics…

  15. Changing Conceptualization of the Role of Educational Psychologists in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Phey Ling; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra; Burgetova, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a young discipline in Singapore. Hence, perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of an educational psychologist (EP) are still constantly being negotiated and redefined. This qualitative study examined how role negotiations and redefinitions could be actively facilitated through an experiential and intensive two-day Basic…

  16. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  17. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  18. Do First and Later Borns Agree with Psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Diane

    Research has found firstborns to be more ambitious, rule-oriented, authority-oriented, helpful, and responsible, and less oriented toward peers, their own needs, social activities, and group cooperation than are laterborns. To explore whether those occupying different birth order positions perceive themselves as psychologists have described them,…

  19. School Psychologists' Experiences with Teacher-to-Student Mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Sharon R. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, transcendental, phenomenological study was to describe school psychologists' experiences with teacher-to-student mistreatment in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational setting. There are few United States studies presented in the literature on the topic of teacher-to-student mistreatment and its…

  20. Training, Degrees, and Credentials in the Hiring of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'donnell, Patrick S.; Dunlap, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    A national sample of 246 Directors of Pupil Personnel Services and Directors of Special Education were surveyed to assess the importance they place on training, degrees, and credentials in the hiring of school psychologists. High, but varying, levels of importance were found for the content knowledge and skill areas in the National Association of…

  1. School Psychologists' Family-School Partnering Experiences with Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Fernandez, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify the beliefs, perceptions, and actions of school psychologists toward family-school partnering (FSP) with Latino families in the public school system. Existing research in this area is extremely limited; therefore, the present study has significant implications for pre- and in-service…

  2. Global Migration: The Need for Culturally Competent School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Plotts, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Never before have more children lived away from their home countries. Given the unique social, emotional, and academic needs of children who have migrated, school psychologists must be well prepared to meet these growing demands. Consequently, school psychology training programs must invest in the preparation of culturally competent future school…

  3. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  4. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  5. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  6. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  7. Primary Care Psychologists in the Netherlands: 30 Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, J.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary care psychologist (PCP) in the Netherlands has 30 years of experience. The PCP is a generalist who, in close cooperation with the family physician and other providers of primary health care, has a mindset and manner of working that is largely determined by the context in which the PCP

  8. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  9. Children and Natural Disasters: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda; Oehler-Stinnett, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide children are impacted by natural disasters, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, landslides and sandstorms, winter and severe storms, heat waves, volcanoes and tsunamis. School psychologists should understand natural disaster effects, such as economic loss, relocation and health concerns and mental health…

  10. Human Resource Planning: Challenges for Industrial/Organizational Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Susan E.; Schuler, Randall S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes activities that industrial/organizational psychologists engage in as they seek to improve the competitiveness of organizations through effective human resource planning. Presents a model for describing human resource short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term planning. (JS)

  11. Primary Care Psychologists in the Netherlands: 30 Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, J.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary care psychologist (PCP) in the Netherlands has 30 years of experience. The PCP is a generalist who, in close cooperation with the family physician and other providers of primary health care, has a mindset and manner of working that is largely determined by the context in which the PCP wo

  12. What Counseling Psychologists Can Do to Help Returning Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Steven J.; Antonides, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the needs of service members and their families who have fought or are fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and who have sustained psychological and/or physical injuries and how counseling psychologists can help. The focus is twofold: (a) to help the reader better understand those who have served and how what…

  13. Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: School Psychologists' Practices and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Allen, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    From its inception as a disability category in the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, serving students under the special education category Emotional Disturbance (ED) has been a challenging task for school psychologists. In particular, the vague and ambiguous federal definition has created an environment in which inconsistent assessment…

  14. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Stakeholder Engagement in Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) continues to be implemented in schools, it is important to consider how this initiative is perceived by the educational professionals involved in the implementation and effectiveness of the process. This study utilized a survey intended to investigate the perceptions of school psychologists regarding their…

  15. The Role of School Psychologists in Child Protection and Safeguarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Bond, Caroline; Tyldesley, Kath; Farrell, Peter; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Child protection and safeguarding are important aspects of work for all professionals working with children. The current article outlines the international context of school psychologists' work in relation to child protection and safeguarding and describes the United Kingdom context in more detail. Given the relatively recent broadening of the UK…

  16. A Comparison of Two Measures of School Psychologists' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael B.; Hardison, Ashley; Bolen, Larry M.; Walcott, Christy M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the concurrent and construct validity of the Job Satisfaction Scales (JSS) and a modified version of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) using a sample of practicing school psychologists. Strong internal consistency was determined within each of the job satisfaction instruments. Correlations…

  17. Letters to a Young Psychologist: An Invitation to Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Tania

    2012-01-01

    In this response to the major contribution, "Voices of Early Career Psychologists in the Society of Counseling Psychology," the past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP) expresses appreciation, describes aspects of her early career experience in light of the survey findings in the major contribution, offers reflections…

  18. Educational Psychologists' Report-Writing: Acts of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major tasks of educational psychologists is the writing of reports. Often, all involvement, assessment and intervention culminate in the production of a report. This paper explores critically the tensions involved in writing reports which are closed down in their conformity to requirements of different bodies, while looking for…

  19. Classroom Behaviour Management: Educational Psychologists' Views on Effective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of children and young people in schools is a perennial concern to educators and the wider public alike. It also represents a significant focus for the work of educational psychologists (EPs). Research evidence has identified a number of strategies that teachers, students and school inspectors believe contribute to effective classroom…

  20. Albert Sidney Beckham: The First African American School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Albert Sidney Beckham was the first African American to hold the title school psychologist. This article examines the life and professional career of Beckham in the context of his contributions to the field of school psychology. It explores his graduate education, the founding of Howard University's Psychological Laboratory and his research and…

  1. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  2. Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery.

  3. Parasite remains in archaeological sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Françoise; Guidon, Niéde; Dittmar, Katharina; Harter, Stephanie; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Chaves, Sergio Miranda; Reinhard, Karl; Araújo, Adauto

    2003-01-01

    Organic remains can be found in many different environments. They are the most significant source for paleoparasitological studies as well as for other paleoecological reconstruction. Preserved paleoparasitological remains are found from the driest to the moistest conditions. They help us to understand past and present diseases and therefore contribute to understanding the evolution of present human sociality, biology, and behavior. In this paper, the scope of the surviving evidence will be briefy surveyed, and the great variety of ways it has been preserved in different environments will be discussed. This is done to develop to the most appropriated techniques to recover remaining parasites. Different techniques applied to the study of paleoparasitological remains, preserved in different environments, are presented. The most common materials used to analyze prehistoric human groups are reviewed, and their potential for reconstructing ancient environment and disease are emphasized. This paper also urges increased cooperation among archaeologists, paleontologists, and paleoparasitologists.

  4. Parasite remains in archaeological sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bouchet

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic remains can be found in many different environments. They are the most significant source for paleoparasitological studies as well as for other paleoecological reconstruction. Preserved paleoparasitological remains are found from the driest to the moistest conditions. They help us to understand past and present diseases and therefore contribute to understanding the evolution of present human sociality, biology, and behavior. In this paper, the scope of the surviving evidence will be briefly surveyed, and the great variety of ways it has been preserved in different environments will be discussed. This is done to develop to the most appropriated techniques to recover remaining parasites. Different techniques applied to the study of paleoparasitological remains, preserved in different environments, are presented. The most common materials used to analyze prehistoric human groups are reviewed, and their potential for reconstructing ancient environment and disease are emphasized. This paper also urges increased cooperation among archaeologists, paleontologists, and paleoparasitologists.

  5. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  6. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  7. Job Satisfaction, Burnout, and Perceived Effectiveness of "In-House" versus Traditional School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Briley E.; Steadman, Tara

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined whether school psychologists who serve a single school ("In-House" group) differed from school psychologists who serve several schools concurrently ("Traditional" group) in the three areas of job satisfaction, burnout, and effectiveness as perceived by the school psychologist. A total of 63 school psychology…

  8. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  9. 20 CFR 404.1617 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 404.1617 Section 404.1617 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see §...

  10. 42 CFR 414.62 - Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.62 Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services. The fee schedule for clinical psychologist services is set at 100 percent of the amount determined for...

  11. 20 CFR 416.1017 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 416.1017 Section 416.1017 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see §...

  12. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  13. 20 CFR 220.58 - Objections to the designated physician or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychologist. 220.58 Section 220.58 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE... designated physician or psychologist. A claimant or his or her representative may object to his or her being examined by a designated physician or psychologist. If there is a good reason for the objection, the...

  14. A Comparison of Special Education Teacher and Psychologist Scoring of the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glen G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Ten special education teachers and two school psychologists scored the Bender-Gestalt protocals of elementary school children using the Koppitz scoring system. The reported correlations between teachers and school psychologists compared favorably to correlations between school psychologists as well as to interrater reliabilities reported in the…

  15. Incest and Parental Contact: A Psychologist's Personal Case and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A psychologist's husband molested their young daughter. Consulting psychologists purported that research indicated it would be developmentally advantageous for their daughter to continue a relationship with the father following the marital separation. The consulting psychologists did not reference the literature, prompting the mother to conduct a…

  16. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  17. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  18. Colloids in sepsis: evenly distributed molecules surrounded by uneven questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2013-05-01

    Colloids are frequently used for fluid expansion in the intensive care unit, although its use on several clinical scenarios remains unproven of any relevant clinical benefit. The purpose of this article was to carry out a narrative review regarding the safety and efficacy of colloids in patients with sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the most commonly used colloids, albumin and starches. Colloids are effective fluid expanders and are able to restore the hemodynamic profile with less total volume than crystalloids. These properties appear to be preserved even in patients with sepsis with increased capillary permeability. However, some colloids are associated with renal impairment and coagulation abnormalities. Starch use was associated with increased mortality in two large clinical trials. Also, starches probably have significant renal adverse effects and may be related to more need for renal replacement therapy in severe sepsis. Albumin is the only colloid that has been shown safe in patients with sepsis and that may be associated with improved outcomes on specific subpopulations. No trial so far found any robust clinical end point favoring colloid use in patients with sepsis. Because there is no proven benefit of the use of most colloids in patients with sepsis, its use should not be encouraged outside clinical trials. Albumin is the only colloid solution that has proven to be safe, and its use may be considered on hypoalbuminemic patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, there are no robust data to recommend routine albumin administration in sepsis. Starch use should be avoided in patients with sepsis because of the recent findings of a multicenter randomized study until further evidence is available.

  19. Organic Chemicals Remain High Prices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Phenol In early April 2007, China's phenol price remained bullish, and with the restart of phenol/acetone units in Sinopec Beijing Yanhua Petrochemical being ahead of schedule, there were few trading actions in the market, and the price of phenol dropped considerably afterwards.

  20. An Uneven Illumination Correction Algorithm for Optical Remote Sensing Images Covered with Thin Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaole Shen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The uneven illumination phenomenon caused by thin clouds will reduce the quality of remote sensing images, and bring adverse effects to the image interpretation. To remove the effect of thin clouds on images, an uneven illumination correction can be applied. In this paper, an effective uneven illumination correction algorithm is proposed to remove the effect of thin clouds and to restore the ground information of the optical remote sensing image. The imaging model of remote sensing images covered by thin clouds is analyzed. Due to the transmission attenuation, reflection, and scattering, the thin cloud cover usually increases region brightness and reduces saturation and contrast of the image. As a result, a wavelet domain enhancement is performed for the image in Hue-Saturation-Value (HSV color space. We use images with thin clouds in Wuhan area captured by QuickBird and ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3 satellites for experiments. Three traditional uneven illumination correction algorithms, i.e., multi-scale Retinex (MSR algorithm, homomorphic filtering (HF-based algorithm, and wavelet transform-based MASK (WT-MASK algorithm are performed for comparison. Five indicators, i.e., mean value, standard deviation, information entropy, average gradient, and hue deviation index (HDI are used to analyze the effect of the algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively eliminate the influences of thin clouds and restore the real color of ground objects under thin clouds.

  1. Ecological Unequal Exchange: International Trade and Uneven Utilization of Environmental Space in the World System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the argument that international trade influences disproportionate cross-national utilization of global renewable natural resources. Such uneven dynamics are relevant to the consideration of inequitable appropriation of environmental space in particular and processes of ecological unequal exchange more generally. Using OLS regression…

  2. Age structure of a southern pine stand following 72 years of uneven-aged silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg

    2012-01-01

    Work on uneven-aged silviculture in southern pine stands on the Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF) began in the 1930s, when a number of 16.2-ha compartments were placed into a series of demonstration projects and studies (Reynolds 1980). Two of these compartments, the Good and Poor Farm Forestry Forties, have been maintained continuously in this silvicultural regime...

  3. Moving dynamic loads caused by bridge deck joint unevenness - a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJV

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on the general guidelines regarding maximum unevenness from bridge deck joints for typical South African heavy vehicles, in order to minimize the generation of moving variable loads. In a recent investigation it was found that areas...

  4. Regenerating uneven-aged stands of loblolly and shortleaf pines: the current state of knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Shelton; Michael D. Cain

    2000-01-01

    Periodic regeneration is crucial to creating or sustaining uneven-aged (UEA) stands of loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and shortleaf (P. echinata Mill.) pines. Although both species are shade intolerant, they have silvical characteristics that are conducive to natural regeneration in UEA stands. Their seed production is fairly consistent...

  5. Uneven batch data alignment with application to the control of batch end-product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jian; Marjanovic, Ognjen; Lennox, Barry

    2014-03-01

    Batch processes are commonly characterized by uneven trajectories due to the existence of batch-to-batch variations. The batch end-product quality is usually measured at the end of these uneven trajectories. It is necessary to align the time differences for both the measured trajectories and the batch end-product quality in order to implement statistical process monitoring and control schemes. Apart from synchronizing trajectories with variable lengths using an indicator variable or dynamic time warping, this paper proposes a novel approach to align uneven batch data by identifying short-window PCA&PLS models at first and then applying these identified models to extend shorter trajectories and predict future batch end-product quality. Furthermore, uneven batch data can also be aligned to be a specified batch length using moving window estimation. The proposed approach and its application to the control of batch end-product quality are demonstrated with a simulated example of fed-batch fermentation for penicillin production. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Divorce: Using Psychologists' Skills for Transformation and Conflict Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    The litigious divorce process often leaves children with parents who are at "war" and have little ability to coparent effectively. This article discusses some of the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes designed to lessen conflict both before and after divorce. It also addresses the important work of psychologists serving in the roles of child therapists and reunification clinicians doing the difficult work of helping to heal fractured child-parent relationships. Ethical challenges are addressed and future directions for applied research are suggested.

  7. Positive psychology and the training of psychologists: Students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharina Guse

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The development of positive psychology interventions have burgeoned internationally and are relevant to the professional training of psychologistsResearch purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the personal and professional impact of including positive psychology in the professional training of clinical and counselling psychologists.Motivation for the study: It is not known how students previously educated in a pathogenic paradigm experience the exposure to positive psychology, and resultant paradigm shift, as part of their professional training.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design was implemented. Data consisted of written documents submitted by the participants and was analyzed by means of thematic analysis.Main findings: Integrating positive psychology in the professional training curriculum was valuable and enriching on both a professional and personal level. The participants reported an experience of positive emotions and increased sense of self-understanding and psychological well-being. Professionally they experienced a sense of increased self-efficacy.Practical/managerial implications: Positive psychology should be considered as part of the basic training of psychologists since it may enhance the development of trainee psychologists’ professional self, enhance aspects of psychological well-being as well as prevent stress and burnout.Contribution/value-add: This is the first South African study to explore the impact of including positive psychology principles and interventions in professional training.

  8. Alarms Remain,Efforts Continue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice

    2007-01-01

    @@ China must come to terms with the fact that it has quality problems in at least 1% of its products.Though there is no country in the world that can completely avoid problems,given the responsible role China plays on the intemational stage,China should stop to take a look at itself and find ways to improve.China must examine herself carefully,when looking at the production chain;we have to keep aware that some alarms still remain.

  9. What Is a Bilingual School Psychologist? A National Survey of the Credentialing Bodies of School Psychologists: Implications for the Assessment of Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the credentialing practices for bilingual school psychologists in the United States. Credentialing agencies of school psychologists, mostly State Departments of Education, across the 50 states and the District of Columbia were contacted via telephone by trained graduate student research assistants. Only two of the…

  10. Professional Competences of Young Psychologists: The Dimensions of Self-Rated Competence Domains and Their Variation in the Early Years of the Psychologist's Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuittinen, Matti; Meriläinen, Matti; Räty, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The study set out to explore an array of key competencies required by psychologists, along with a method for assessing them. The respondents (n?=?353) were a representative sample of young Finnish psychologists with professional experience of between 1 and 6 years. They were requested to rate 52 statements of competence. A set of explorative…

  11. And the Dead Remain Behind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In most cultures the dead and their living relatives are held in a dialogic relationship. The dead have made it clear, while living, what they expect from their descendants. The living, for their part, wish to honour the tombs of their ancestors; at the least, to keep the graves of the recent dead from disrepair. Despite the strictures, the living can fail their responsibilities, for example, by migration to foreign countries. The peripatetic Chinese are one of the few cultures able to overcome the dilemma of the wanderer or the exile. With the help of a priest, an Australian Chinese migrant may summon the soul of an ancestor from an Asian grave to a Melbourne temple, where the spirit, though removed from its earthly vessel, will rest and remain at peace. Amongst cultures in which such practices are not culturally appropriate, to fail to honour the family dead can be exquisitely painful. Violence is the cause of most failure.

  12. Walking Algorithm of Humanoid Robot on Uneven Terrain with Terrain Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Humanoid robots are expected to achieve stable walking on uneven terrains. In this paper, a control algorithm for humanoid robots walking on previously unknown terrains with terrain estimation is proposed, which requires only minimum modification to the original walking gait. The swing foot trajectory is redesigned to ensure that the foot lands at the desired horizontal positions under various terrain height. A compliant terrain adaptation method is applied to the landing foot to achieve a firm contact with the ground. Then a terrain estimation method that takes into account the deformations of the linkages is applied, providing the target for the following correction and adjustment. The algorithm was validated through walking experiments on uneven terrains with the full-size humanoid robot Kong.

  13. Even-Aged vs. Uneven-Aged Silviculture: Implications for Multifunctional Management of Southern Pine Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Sharma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated even- and uneven-aged silvicultural options for slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. using empirical data and the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS model. Data were collected from a mature unthinned slash pine plantation in a flatwoods site in Florida, and used to simulate six scenarios of even- and uneven-aged silvicultural regimes applied to slash pine stands, including a no-action option. These alternative silvicultural regimes were evaluated for multiple benefits including timber production, carbon storage and stand structural diversity over a period of 100 years. None of the silvicultural regimes maximized all the benefits. While even-aged management options were more efficient in total merchantable timber production (9.78 to 11.02 m3·ha−1·year−1 and overall carbon stocks (3.05 to 3.47 metric tons·ha−1·year−1, uneven-aged management options created overall more complex stand structure (Stand Structural Diversity (computed from Shannon’s Indices values = 1.92 and maintained a steady flow of yields, particularly sawtimber (34.29 to 58.46 m3·ha−1 every 10 year and aboveground carbon stocks (56.9 to 77.2 metric tons·ha−1. Optimal achievement of multiple benefits across the landscape, therefore, may require maintaining an assortment of management strategies. Both even- and uneven-aged management options have the potential to improve production and carbon storage of pine forests and are a substantial improvement over no action.

  14. Nonlinear unified equations for water waves propagating over uneven bottoms in the nearshore region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Considering the continuous characteristics for water waves propagating over complex topography in the nearshore region, the unified nonlinear equations, based on the hypothesis for a typical uneven bottom, are presented by employing the Hamiltonian variational principle for water waves. It is verified that the equations include the following special cases: the extension of Airy's nonlinear shallow-water equations, the generalized mild-slope equation, the dispersion relation for the second-order Stokes waves and the higher order Boussinesq-type equations.

  15. Uneven-aged forest management in boreal Sweden: local forestry stakeholders' perceptions of different sustainability dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Robert; Angelstam, Per

    2011-01-01

    To implement policies on sustainable forest management (SFM), there is a need to satisfy economical, ecological and socio-cultural sustainability objectives. Due to a long history of sustained yield wood production to satisfy the needs of the forest industry, clearfelling management systems are used in similar to 96 per cent of managed forests in Sweden. To satisfy the intentions of contemporary forest and land use policies, uneven-aged forest management systems as a complement are currently ...

  16. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  17. Classification Scheme for Random Longitudinal Road Unevenness Considering Road Waviness and Vehicle Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldřich Kropáč

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to the road unevenness classification based on the power spectral density with consideration of vehicle vibration response and broad interval of road waviness (road elevation PSD slope is presented. This approach enables transformation of two basic parameters of road profile elevation PSD (unevenness index, C, and waviness, w into a single-number indicator Cw when using a correction factor Kw accounting for w. For the road classification proposal two planar vehicle models (passenger car and truck, ten responses (reflecting ride comfort, dynamic load of road and cargo, ride safety and three different vehicle velocities have been considered. The minimum of ten estimated vibration response ranges sum for a broad waviness interval typical for real road sections (w = 1.5 to 3.5 has been used for the correction factor estimation. The introduced unevenness indicator, Cw, reflects the vehicle vibration response and seems to be a suitable alternative to the other currently used single-number indicators or as an extension of the road classification according to the ISO 8608: 1995, which is based on constant waviness value, w = 2.

  18. Reinforcing unevenness: post-crisis geography and the spatial selectivity of the state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Omstedt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the unevenness of the 2007–08 crisis by examining the literature of England's North–South divide. From the 1980s this longstanding divide was exacerbated as a result of promoting London as a global financial hub, so when the crisis hit many expected some regional economic convergence as redundancies spread throughout the financial sector. This has, however, not taken place and previous patterns of uneven development have rather been reinforced. Attempts have been made to explain this deepening of established geographical patterns as the result of different regions’ degrees of economic resilience, but this approach is, however, problematic because it naturalizes crises, downscales responsibility and neglects politics. Inspired by Martin Jones’s concept of the ‘spatial selectivity of the state’, the paper will rather argue that to understand the uneven geography of the economic crisis, one has to look beyond localized resilience to how the state’s austerity policies have displaced the crisis’s impacts away from its origins in a London-centred financial sector.

  19. The relationship between Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ and uneven intellectual development in school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Melling

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found correlations between uneven intellectual development and autistic symptom severity but thus far each study has looked only at specific types of discrepancy score and results have been inconsistent. This study used the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ and the British Ability Scales (second edition to look for a correlation between autistic-like traits and an overall index of unevenness based on three types of discrepancy score, namely: discrepancies between IQ subscales; discrepancies between IQ domain scores; and, discrepancies between overall IQ and word-level literacy skills. The AQ scale was designed to measure autistic-like symptoms both in those with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and at all levels across the general population. The study sample was therefore not restricted to children with an ASD. The 106 school age participants had a mean IQ of 97 (SD 19.6 and a mean AQ (child version score of 69.6 (SD 24.6. After controlling for IQ, each of the three intellectual discrepancy types accounted for unique variance in AQ with a large overall effect size. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies are recommended to examine how far uneven intellectual development may be an analogue for aberrant cortical connectivity.

  20. Perspectives of an Iranian psychologist practicing in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalimi, Hamid

    2010-06-01

    My experience as a male psychologist who was born and raised in Iran has had a tremendous impact on my professional practice in the United States. After providing a brief history of Iran to put this article in context, I explore 5 elements of that impact: Description of my diversity status, key practice issues raised for me as an Iranian therapist, my background and its impact on case formulation, key clinical issues raised for my clients given my diversity status, and effective strategies for addressing my diversity status and its impact on the treatment.

  1. The role of the psychologist in social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderman, Peter

    2014-06-01

    On 1 September 1967, the Nobel Prize-winning civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech entitled 'The role of the behavioral scientist in the civil rights movement' to the American Psychological Association (APA, 1999; King, 1968). With eloquence and passion, Martin Luther King championed the civil rights struggle and spoke to the interests of his audience. He stressed how behavioural scientists could and should support the civil rights movement. King's eloquent and passionate speech is still relevant today - explaining how psychologists and other mental health professionals could help address today's pressing social issues.

  2. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  3. Current assessment practice, personality measurement, and rorschach usage by psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musewicz, John; Marczyk, Geoffrey; Knauss, Linda; York, David

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we investigated current personality assessment practice and attitudes toward Rorschach (Exner, 2003) usage by 215 psychologists. We administered an Internet survey to members of the Society for Personality Assessment (SPA) and the American Psychological Association. Results were similar to those of past surveys, but the importance of using tests with strong psychometric properties was greater in this study. The majority of respondents reported using the Rorschach and supporting efforts to standardize and psychometrically validate the test. However, SPA members agreed more strongly than non-SPA members that the Rorschach is an effective test. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  4. [Collaborative relationship between psychiatrists and psychologists: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the empirical literature concerning the collaborative relationship between psychiatrists and psychologists. Despite the scarcity of published studies about this topic, three main areas of interest could be identified: 1. Literature regarding combined treatments (psychotherapy plus medication); 2. The development of therapeutic programs for specific conditions within a biopsychosocial framework; 3. The discussion about the team role in the approach of difficult cases. In general terms, it could be stated that collaborative treatments are a valid and effective option in mental health settings.

  5. Where do counselling psychologists based in the UK disseminate their research? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Terry; Ruth, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Research is frequently cited as core to counselling psychology. Yet we know little about where counselling psychologists publish their own findings. The present study aims to answer the following two research questions: (1) Where do UK-based counselling psychologists disseminate their research? (2) To what extent do counselling psychologists disseminate their research in British Psychological Society outlets? Method: A systematic review examining research by UK-based counselling psycholo...

  6. The role of psychologists in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahass, Saeed H

    2005-05-01

    Advances in the biomedical and the behavioral sciences have paved the way for the integration of medical practice towards the biopsychosocial approach. Therefore, dealing with health and illness overtakes looking for the presence or absence of the disease and infirmity (the biomedical paradigm) to the biopsychosocial paradigm in which health means a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Psychology as a behavioral health discipline is the key to the biopsychosocial practice, and plays a major role in understanding the concept of health and illness. The clinical role of psychologists as health providers is diverse with the varying areas of care giving (primary, secondary and tertiary care) and a variety of subspecialties. Overall, psychologists assess, diagnose, and treat the psychological problems and the behavioral dysfunctions resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. In addition, they play a major role in the promotion of healthy behavior, preventing diseases and improving patients' quality of life. They perform their clinical roles according to rigorous ethical principles and code of conduct. This article describes and discusses the significant role of clinical health psychology in the provision of health care, following a biopsychosocial perspective of health and illness. Professional and educational issues have also been discussed.

  7. Training Educational Psychologists: A Model of Working with Diagnostic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubina A.S.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a model of working with a diagnostic case in educational psychological practice and analyses its compliance with the requirements of the professional standard for educational psychologists as well as with the theoretical bases of psychological assessment as a form of professional activity of a psychologist. The paper reviews the possibilities for making the requirements of the professional standard more specific by means of relating its components to the stages of the diagnostic process. As it is shown, a number of aspects in the diagnostic activity are deficient and require to be specially developed during professional and advanced training. The paper analyses the necessity of designing the content of psychodiagnostic disciplines so that they involve working with diagnostic hypotheses. It also outlines the tasks of mastering psychodiagnostic disciplines which, if solved successfully, would prevent students from making typical diagnostic mistakes. Finally, the paper discusses the difficulties with the development of the gnostic component of diagnostic activity in graduate students with bachelor degrees in a non-psychology field.

  8. Interprofessional education: preparing psychologists for success in integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubic, Barbara; Mance, Janette; Turgesen, Jeri N; Lamanna, Jennifer D

    2012-03-01

    Rapidly occurring changes in the healthcare arena mean time is of the essence for psychology to formalize a strategic plan for training in primary care settings. The current article articulates factors affecting models of integrated care in Academic Health Centers (AHCs) and describes ways to identify and utilize resources at AHCs to develop interprofessional educational and clinical integrated care opportunities. The paper asserts that interprofessional educational experiences between psychology and other healthcare providers are vital to insure professionals value one another's disciplines in health care reform endeavors, most notably the patient-centered initiatives. The paper highlights ways to create shared values and common goals between primary care providers and psychologists, which are needed for trainee internalization of integrated care precepts. A developmental perspective to training from pre-doctoral, internship and postdoctoral levels for psychologists in integrated care is described. Lastly, a call to action is given for the field to develop more opportunities for psychology trainees to receive education and training within practica, internships and postdoctoral fellowships in primary care settings to address the reality that most patients seek their mental health treatment in primary care settings.

  9. Psychologists in preoperative programmes for children undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Costa, Sebastiano; Gugliandolo, Maria Cristina; Larcan, Rosalba

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to verify whether psychologists and game activities could reduce preoperative anxiety and promote compliance in paediatric patients. More specifically, we sought to evaluate whether it would be better to propose contextualized games or just distracting activities. A total of 104 children undergoing surgery were assigned to the following 4 conditions of treatment: (1) contextual games and psychological accompaniment, (2) only contextual games, (3) distracting activities, and (4) only psychological accompaniment. Observed children's anxiety was assessed using modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale and compliant behaviours with modified form of Induction Compliance Checklist. Children in the first condition (complete intervention - contextual games and psychological accompaniment) were less anxious and more cooperative in the preoperative period and during the induction of anaesthesia than in the other three conditions. In particular, contextual activities (second condition) were found to be more efficient than psychological accompaniment (fourth condition), whereas the worst condition was proposing only distracting activities (third condition). In order to help young hospitalized patients in paediatric surgery structures, it is necessary to propose games that can prepare them for what will happen as well as the support of a psychologist.

  10. A General Linear Wave Theory for Water Waves Propagating over Uneven Porous Bottoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    锁要红; 黄虎

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the widespread phenomena of porous bottoms in the near shore region, considering fully the diversity of bottom topography and wave number variation, and including the effect of evanescent modes, a general linear wave theory for water waves propagating over uneven porous bottoms in the near shore region is established by use of Green's second identity. This theory can be reduced to a number of the most typical mild-slope equations currently in use and provide a reliable research basis for follow-up development of nonlinear water wave theory involving porous bottoms.

  11. An Approach to Stable Walking over Uneven Terrain Using a Reflex-Based Adaptive Gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Asif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an adaptive gait in a six-legged walking robot that is capable of generating reactive stepping actions with the same underlying control methodology as an insect for stable walking over uneven terrains. The proposed method of gait generation uses feedback data from onboard sensors to generate an adaptive gait in order to surmount obstacles, gaps and perform stable walking. The paper addresses its implementation through simulations in a visual dynamic simulation environment. Finally the paper draws conclusions about the significance and performance of the proposed gait in terms of tracking errors while navigating in difficult terrains.

  12. An Uneven Vacuum Energy Fluid as $\\Lambda$, Dark Matter, MOND and Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hongsheng

    2008-01-01

    Various TeVeS-inspired and f(R)-inspired theories of gravity have added an interesting twist to the search for dark matter and vacuum energy, modifying the landscape of astrophysics day by day. These theories can be together called a {\\bf N}on-{\\bf u}niform Dark Energy fluid (a Nu-Lambda fluid or a ${\\mathbf V\\Lambda}$ fluid); a common thread of these theories, according of an up-to-date summary by HZL \\cite{Halle}, is a non-uniform vector field, describing an uneven vacuum energy fluid. The ...

  13. Weighted statistics for unevenly spaced SEM-grids on Linac4 line.

    CERN Document Server

    Granemann Souza, E; Lombardi, A; Comblin, J-F

    2013-01-01

    A beam profile may be measured in several ways [1]. Independent of the method chosen, the agreement between the simulation and measurements need to be accurate enough to minimize errors. In order to improve this comparison, we introduce new beam size estimators based in weighted statistics. We show that, for the situations in which the SEM-grid wires are unevenly spaced, the weighted standard deviation reveal us as an efficient alternative for determine the beam rms size. These theoretical predictions, implemented in the java application Linac4 SEM-grids 1.0, are than compared with measurements of the Linac4 line showing the pros and cons together with Gaussian fittings.

  14. Clinical Psychologists' Judgments of the Scientific Merit and Clinical-Relevance of Psychotherapy Outcome Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lawrence H.

    1979-01-01

    Result of this study indicated psychologists' judgments of scientific merit were influenced by patient assignment and follow-up but not by therapists' experience. Judgments of clinical relevance were influenced by patient population, the findings' applicability, and nature of therapy. Psychologists were more critical of methodology of studies…

  15. Effects of Social Psychological Phenomena on School Psychologists' Ethical Decision-Making: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Lasser, Jon; Reardon, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary, exploratory study examines the impact of select social psychological phenomena on school-based ethical decision-making of school psychologists. Responses to vignettes and hypothetical statements reflecting several social psychological phenomena were collected from 106 practicing school psychologists. Participants were asked to…

  16. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  17. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  18. Sexual Health Education: Social and Scientific Perspectives and How School Psychologists Can Be Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Ashley A.; Perfect, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' (NASP) official stand on sexual education is that it should be taught in schools to help young people make healthy decisions regarding sex throughout their lives. Accordingly, school psychologists have a responsibility to use their expertise to facilitate these programs. Without a comprehensive…

  19. School Psychologists' Ethical Strain and Rumination: Individual Profiles and Their Associations with Weekly Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtala, Mari; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated school psychologists' experiences of ethical strain (the frequency of ethical dilemmas at work and the stress caused by these dilemmas) and dilemma-related rumination outside working hours. Individual latent profiles were estimated at the study baseline based on these three dimensions. The psychologists' weekly well-being (vigor,…

  20. National Study of School Psychologists' Use of Evidence-Based Assessment in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rachel; Ruble, Lisa; Esler, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to better understand predictors of evidence-based assessment practices for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Nationwide, 402 school psychologists were surveyed for their knowledge of and training and experience with ASD on assessment practices, including reported areas of training needs. The majority of school psychologists reported…

  1. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  2. Psychologist suicide: Incidence, impact, and suggestions for prevention, intervention, and postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Phillip M; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Bongar, Bruce; Bridgeman, Diane; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Hillbrand, Marc; Yufit, Robert I

    2011-06-01

    Psychologist practitioners are not immune to some mental health problems, including suicidality, for which they provide services. In the aftermath of two recent psychologist suicides, the American Psychological Association's Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance (ACCA) initiated the formation of a conjoint ad hoc committee consisting of members from ACCA, the American Psychological Association (APA) Practice Directorate, and the Section on Clinical Emergencies and Crises (Section VII of APA's Division 12) to investigate the incidence of psychologist suicide and its impact on colleagues, students or interns, patients or clients, and the profession. The committee reviewed the extant empirical literature on suicide rates for psychologists, evaluated unpublished data on psychologist suicide provided by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), interviewed colleague survivors, reviewed published case reports of the impact of therapist suicides, and linked their findings to the literature on professional distress, impairment, and self-care. The committee concluded that there is evidence suggestive of an elevated risk of suicide for psychologists in past decades. It further concluded that there is a need for further research to confirm if there is a heightened risk of suicide for psychologists in the present day, and to determine factors that might contribute to such risk. Accounts from colleague-survivors suggest that the impact of a psychologist's suicide can affect many people including family, colleagues, students, and patients or clients. This article offers suggestions for possible preventive approaches, for intervention with potentially at-risk colleagues, and for postvention efforts in the wake of a colleague suicide.

  3. [What role can the psychologist have in patient education in nephrology? An out-center example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, Laëtitia; Untas, Aurélie; Aguirrezabal, Maïder; Larroumet, Nicole; Rascle, Nicole; Chauveau, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the experience of a psychologist in the development of a multidisciplinary and collective Therapeutic Patient Education program for dialysis patients in out-center (self-dialysis). The role of the psychologist is situated at different levels: construction of the program, animation and co-animation of interventions and evaluation of the program.

  4. [The role of the psychologist with a death in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The psychologist within a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit intervenes in accordance with the condition of the patient and those at whom their services are aimed. The psychological practice in this particular context comprises certain specificities. As the child nears the end of life the psychologist must find his place within the unit and adapt his care to the needs expressed.

  5. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  6. School Psychologists' Ethical Strain and Rumination: Individual Profiles and Their Associations with Weekly Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtala, Mari; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated school psychologists' experiences of ethical strain (the frequency of ethical dilemmas at work and the stress caused by these dilemmas) and dilemma-related rumination outside working hours. Individual latent profiles were estimated at the study baseline based on these three dimensions. The psychologists' weekly well-being (vigor,…

  7. Perceptions of Spanish/English Bilingual School Psychologists Regarding Competency in Assessment and Future Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    With the changing demographics of the school population, the need for bilingually competent school psychologists has become increasingly important. The current study examined the influence of training and regional factors on Spanish-speaking, bilingual school psychologists' self-perceptions of competence regarding assessment of non-native…

  8. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  9. School Psychologists' Knowledge and Use of Evidence-Based, Social-Emotional Learning Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKevitt, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of a national survey pertaining to school psychologists' knowledge and use of evidence-based, social-emotional learning (SEL) interventions. For the study, 331 school psychologists responded to a survey that listed (a) techniques for identifying SEL interventions, (b) 16 SEL programs that have been identified by…

  10. The Interrelationship between the Society of Indian Psychologists and Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jacqueline S.; Carter, Paula M.; LaFromboise, Teresa D.; BigFoot, Dolores Subia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the Society of Indian Psychologists (SIP) has grown from a small network of indigenous psychologists and students to a well-established network among the ethnic minority psychology organizations. SIP embraces both Western psychology and indigenous values of cooperation, group harmony, respect, generosity, careful…

  11. Considerations for School Psychologists Working with Arab American Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N.

    2011-01-01

    There are an estimated three million Arab Americans in the United States, with 25% of the population under the age of 18. Given this significant population, it is likely that some school psychologists come across children from Arab backgrounds during their career. Many school psychologists, however, may not be aware of the unique cultural…

  12. Thai and Korean Students' Perceptions about the Roles and Functions of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangdhanakanond, Kamonwan; Lee, Dong Hun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare Thai and Korean college students on their perceptions of the roles and functions of school psychologists. One hundred and ninety-three Thai college students and 238 Korean counterparts participated in this study. Students rated the importance of various roles/functions of a school psychologist and…

  13. School Psychologists' Perceived Competence and Training Needs for Student Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow-Sanchez, Jason; Call, Megan E.; Adolphson, S. Lillian; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: School psychologists are some of the most likely personnel to deliver mental health services, including substance abuse, in school settings, but there is limited research on the perceived competence of school psychologists to address student substance abuse concerns. The 3 aims of this study were to determine how school psychologists…

  14. Assessment of Teacher and School Psychologist Knowledge of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L.; Fulton, Katherine M.; Schepman, Steve B.; Verdi, Genevieve R.; Wilson, Kimberly G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher and school psychologists' knowledge of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). One hundred thirty-two kindergarten through 12th-grade general education teachers, special education teachers, and school psychologists responded to a 24-item questionnaire concerning treatment and possible…

  15. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  16. Facilitators and Barriers to the Provision of Therapeutic Interventions by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Muscutt, Janet; Wasilewski, David

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern internationally about the prevalence of mental health problems among school-aged children and their access to specialist services. School psychologists (SPs) may be one group of professionals well-positioned to support the well-being of children and young people, due to their position as applied psychologists working…

  17. An Examination of Factors Associated with School Psychologists' Provision of Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFago, Jennifer Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors that predict provision of counseling services by Ohio-based school psychologists. In order to address the research questions, a survey instrument was created and a sample of school psychologists working in Ohio completed a questionnaire regarding their counseling practices. The data were…

  18. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  19. Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Andres Bedoya, C.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    A central part of providing evidence-based practice is appropriate cultural competence to facilitate psychological assessment and intervention with diverse clients. At a minimum, cultural competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people involves adequate scientific and supervised practical training, with increasing depth and complexity across training levels. In order to further this goal, we offer 28 recommendations of minimum standards moving toward ideal training for LGBT-specific cultural competence. We review and synthesize the relevant literature to achieve and assess competence across the various levels of training (doctoral, internship, post-doctoral, and beyond) in order to guide the field towards best practices. These recommendations are aligned with educational and practice guidelines set forth by the field and informed by other allied professions in order to provide a roadmap for programs, faculty, and trainees in improving the training of psychologists to work with LGBT individuals. PMID:26279609

  20. Functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Justin M; McKay, Kevin M; Vogel, Mark E; Masters, Kevin S

    2012-03-01

    Psychologists are presented with unprecedented opportunities to integrate their work in primary care settings. Although some roles of psychologists in primary care overlap with those in traditional psychology practice settings, a number are distinct reflecting the uniqueness of the primary care culture. In this paper, we first describe the integrated primary care setting, with a focus on those settings that have components of patient centered medical home. We then describe functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care. The description of functional roles emphasizes the diversity of roles performed. The foundational characteristics identified are those that we consider the 'primary care ethic,' or core characteristics of psychologists that serve as the basis for the various functional roles in integrated primary care. The 'primary care ethic' includes attitudes, values, knowledge, and abilities that are essential to the psychologist being a valued, effective, and productive primary care team member.

  1. Modeling the rail surface unevenness of a high-precision radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Li, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Duan, Bao-Yan

    2017-02-01

    This study proposed a coarse-fine mixed model for describing the rail surface unevenness of an ultra-large fully steerable radio telescope (Qi Tai Telescope) with a diameter of 110 meters. The rail surface unevenness includes information on error arising from two different scales, i.e., the long-period-short-change and the short-period-long-change. Consequently, in this study an idea of a mixed model was proposed, in which trigonometric and fractal functions were, respectively, used to describe information on error from two scales. Key parameters were determined by using the least squares method and the wavelet transform method, and finally, a specific mathematical expression of the model was obtained by optimization. To validate the effectiveness of the new modeling method, the mixed model was then used to describe the rails of the Green Bank Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope, and a radio telescope in Miyun, Beijing. A comparative study revealed that the maximum error was less than 15%, thus the result was superior to those of existing modeling methods.

  2. Human and avian running on uneven ground: a model-based comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, A. V.; Blum, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Birds and humans are successful bipedal runners, who have individually evolved bipedalism, but the extent of the similarities and differences of their bipedal locomotion is unknown. In turn, the anatomical differences of their locomotor systems complicate direct comparisons. However, a simplifying mechanical model, such as the conservative spring–mass model, can be used to describe both avian and human running and thus, provides a way to compare the locomotor strategies that birds and humans use when running on level and uneven ground. Although humans run with significantly steeper leg angles at touchdown and stiffer legs when compared with cursorial ground birds, swing-leg adaptations (leg angle and leg length kinematics) used by birds and humans while running appear similar across all types of uneven ground. Nevertheless, owing to morphological restrictions, the crouched avian leg has a greater range of leg angle and leg length adaptations when coping with drops and downward steps than the straight human leg. On the other hand, the straight human leg seems to use leg stiffness adaptation when coping with obstacles and upward steps unlike the crouched avian leg posture. PMID:27655670

  3. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. II - Statistical aspects of spectral analysis of unevenly spaced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    Detection of a periodic signal hidden in noise is frequently a goal in astronomical data analysis. This paper does not introduce a new detection technique, but instead studies the reliability and efficiency of detection with the most commonly used technique, the periodogram, in the case where the observation times are unevenly spaced. This choice was made because, of the methods in current use, it appears to have the simplest statistical behavior. A modification of the classical definition of the periodogram is necessary in order to retain the simple statistical behavior of the evenly spaced case. With this modification, periodogram analysis and least-squares fitting of sine waves to the data are exactly equivalent. Certain difficulties with the use of the periodogram are less important than commonly believed in the case of detection of strictly periodic signals. In addition, the standard method for mitigating these difficulties (tapering) can be used just as well if the sampling is uneven. An analysis of the statistical significance of signal detections is presented, with examples

  4. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2452 Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a clinical psychologist's...

  5. 20 CFR 220.59 - Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer hearing level. 220.59 Section 220.59 Employees... Consultative Examinations § 220.59 Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution... examination by a particular physician, psychologist or institution. Some examples include the following:...

  6. Psychologists' views of inter-disciplinary psychosocial communication within the cancer care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Butow, P; Davis, E; Turner, J; Mason, C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about how psychologists working in cancer care centres communicate clinical information to other members of the multidisciplinary team or what information is communicated. This study surveyed Australian cancer care psychologists regarding their communication practices and their views on barriers to and facilitators of effective inter-disciplinary communication. Psychologists were invited to complete an online survey containing purpose-designed items that addressed study aims. Forty-four psychologists completed the survey. Psychologists' most common method of recording initial consultations was in patient medical records, with 69 % of respondents recording notes in either most of the time or all of the time. Twenty-two percent of psychologists said they did not regularly feedback the results of an initial assessment to a referrer and more than 40 % used verbal and e-mail communication to do so. This study provides data that will assist in the development of guidelines for inter-professional communication between psychologists and other members of the cancer care team.

  7. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose.Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists.Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education.Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  8. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in the study. The results show some problematic issues such as: record keeping, exceptions of confidentiality, access to personal data, the content of informed consent, incompetence, copying of literature and diagnostic instruments – even not standardised ones, psychology students as subjects in psychological research, and lack of information on ethical aspects of students' practical work. Psychologists and students reported inadequate knowledge of professional ethics and suggested various kinds of ethical education. Institutions mostly enable psychologists to work within the Code of ethics. There are, however, conflicts regarding access to data and professional autonomy. Psychologists report conflicts between law and ethics, incorrect reports in media and lack of control over professional ethics. In the case of ethical violation psychologists do less than they should. They emphasise the problem of incompetence. The frequency and seriousness of certain violation were estimated. Ways of verifying knowledge, stimulating ethical conduct and taking different measures in the case of violations were suggested. The state of affairs in different working environments of psychologists was also described. Results show that psychologist who have worked in the field for a shorter period answer more frequently contrary to the Code of Ethics. Students' knowledge of ethics is mostly very satisfactory. The study emphasises the ethical aspects of psychological practice in Slovenia. It

  9. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  10. When psychologists work with religious clients: applications of the general principles of ethical conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarhouse, M A; VanOrman, B T

    1999-12-01

    Psychologists become more effective and relevant when they appreciate that many clients hold religious values and commitments. Greater awareness of religion and religious values in the lives of clients may aid clinicians' efforts to provide more accurate assessments and effective treatment plans. The authors use the American Psychological Association's (1992) "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" as a framework to examine many of the ethical issues relevant when psychologists work with religious clients. This article also provides suggestions for ways in which clinicians may obtain the skills needed to offer competent assessments and interventions with religiously committed clients.

  11. Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration.

  12. Implementing the Five-A Model of Technical Refinement: Key Roles of the Sport Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Howie J; Collins, Dave

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the significant contribution provided by sport psychologists within applied coaching environments. However, this rarely considers their skills/knowledge being applied when refining athletes' already learned and well-established motor skills. Therefore, this article focuses on how a sport psychologist might assist a coach and athlete to implement long-term permanent and pressure proof refinements. It highlights key contributions at each stage of the Five-A model-designed to deliver these important outcomes-providing both psychomotor and psychosocial input to the support delivery. By employing these recommendations, sport psychologists can make multiple positive contributions to completion of this challenging task.

  13. Jung as psychologist of religion and Jung as philosopher of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Is it possible to be both a psychologist and a philosopher? Is it possible for a psychologist, or more generally a social scientist, to use social scientific findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, is it possible for a social scientist to use social scientific findings to determine the existence of God? Did Jung profess to be only a psychologist or also a philosopher? If he professed to be both, did he enlist his psychological findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, did he enlist his psychological findings to determine the existence of God?

  14. Jehovah's Witness parents' refusal of blood transfusions: Ethical considerations for psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Psychologists in medical settings may be confronted with Jehovah's Witness parents refusing blood transfusions for their children as an ethical dilemma. The purpose of this discussion is to help psychologists provide informed, ethical consultations and support by investigating the values of the Jehovah's Witness community and the origin of the blood transfusion taboo, how medical and legal professionals have approached this dilemma, exploring relevant ethical principles and standards for psychologists, and suggestions for how to move toward a better understanding of harm with Jehovah's Witness families.

  15. Uneven HAK/KUP/KT protein diversity among angiosperms: species distribution and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eNieves-Cordones

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available HAK/KUP/KT K+ transporters have been widely associated with K+ transport across membranes in bacteria, fungi and plants. Indeed some members of the plant HAK/KUP/KT family contribute to root K+ uptake, notably at low external concentrations. Besides such role in acquisition, several studies carried out in Arabidopsis have shown that other members are also involved in developmental processes. With the publication of new plant genomes, a growing interest on plant species other than Arabidopsis has become evident. In order to understand HAK/KUP/KT diversity in these new plant genomes, we discuss the evolutionary trends of 913 HAK/KUP/KT sequences identified in 46 genomes revealing five major groups with an uneven distribution among angiosperms, notably between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species. This information evidenced the richness of crop genomes in HAK/KUP/KT transporters and supports their study for unraveling novel physiological roles of such transporters in plants.

  16. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Yuanwen [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: kuangyw@scbg.ac.cn; Wen Dazhi [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: dzwen@scbg.ac.cn; Zhou Guoyi [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: gyzhou@scbg.ac.cn; Liu Shizhong [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: lsz@scbg.ac.cn

    2007-02-15

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd,) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle and base sections, and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants.

  17. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Yuanwen [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: kuangyw@scbg.ac.cn; Wen Dazhi [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: dzwen@scbg.ac.cn; Zhou Guoyi [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: gyzhou@scbg.ac.cn; Liu Shizhong [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: lsz@scbg.ac.cn

    2007-01-15

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle, base sections and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants.

  18. MATHEMATIC MODEL AND ANALYTIC SOLUTION FOR CYLINDER SUBJECT TO UNEVEN PRESSURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen

    2006-01-01

    According to the inverse solution of elasticity mechanics, a stress function is constructed which meets the space biharmonic equation, this stress functions is about cubic function pressure on the inner and outer surfaces of cylinder. When borderline condition that is predigested according to the Saint-Venant's theory is joined, an equation suit is constructed which meets both the biharmonic equations and the boundary conditions. Furthermore, its analytic solution is deduced with Matlab.When this theory is applied to hydraulic bulging rollers, the experimental results inosculate with the theoretic calculation. Simultaneously, the limit along the axis invariable direction is given and the model building of hollow cylinder and for the analytic solution of hollow cylinder with randomly uneven pressure.

  19. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera Gontard, Lionel, E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ozkaya, Dogan [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blount' s Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-01-15

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of an uneven background. The approach is based on adaptive thresholding, making use of local threshold values that change with spatial coordinate. The algorithm allows particles to be detected and characterized with greater accuracy than using more conventional methods, in which a global threshold is used. Its application to images of heterogeneous catalysts is presented. -- Research Highlights: {yields}The paper describes a novel algorithm for segmenting TEM images of nanoparticles which is simple but robust. {yields}A Graphical User Interface allows interactivity during the processing of images. This allows maximise the success of local thresholding. {yields}The method described can be used to provide more accurate measurements of particle size distributions.

  20. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yuan Wen; Wen, Da Zhi; Zhou, Guoyi; Liu, Shi Zhong

    2007-02-01

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd,) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle and base sections, and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al.

  1. Uneven distribution of NG2 cells in the rat cerebellar vermis and changes in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomoio, S.; Necchi, D.; Scherini, E.

    2012-01-01

    We describe by NG2 (neuron-glia chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 2) immunocytochemistry an uneven distribution of NG2 glial cells in the rat cerebellum, being them more represented in the central lobules of the cerebellar vermis, belonging to the cerebrocerebellum. The cerebellar distribution of NG2 cells changes in aging rats, in which the area where the cells appear to be densely scattered throughout all cerebellar layers involves also more rostral and caudal lobules. In addition, in aging rats, in the most rostral and caudal lobules belonging to the spinocerebellum, punctate reaction product is present at the apical pole of Purkinje cells, i.e. in the area where the majority of synapses between olivary climbing fibers and Purkinje cells occur. Data suggest that the different distribution of NG2 cells is correlated to differences in physiology among cerebellar areas and reflects changes during aging. PMID:23027343

  2. Effect of the rail unevenness on the pointing accuracy of large radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wu, Jiang; Duan, Bao-Yan; Wang, Cong-Si

    2017-03-01

    Considering the stringent requirement of the pointing accuracy up to 2.5″ of the World largest full steerable telescope, this paper presents a coarse-fine mixed model to describe the azimuth rail unevenness. First, the coarse-fine mixed model is proposed. In the model, the trigonometric function is utilized to describe the error with long wavelength whilst the fractal function is used for the short wavelength errors, separately. Then the mathematic model of the pointing accuracy is developed mathematically. Finally, the coarse-fine model and point accuracy model are applied to Green Bank Telescope with valuable result. This paved the way for predicting point error of Qi Tai Telescope.

  3. Uneven exchange and urban binational complexes in Dominican Republic’s border with Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo Dilla Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dominican/Haitian border is signed by profound asymmetries and the predominance of a relation of uneven exchange in benefit of Dominican Republic. Transborder relations summary this contradictory relation, but at the same time constitute the only form of survival for more than half million of Haitians that inhabit the region. This article discusses the history of this relation and its present tendencies, including the formation of economic regions and urban binational systems. The weakness of regulatory public policies and the aggressive action of the market generate a very contradictory setting that could lead to conflicts by the use of shared natural resources, the exploitation of the Haitian labour force, and the agitation of nationalist positions.

  4. Uneven distribution of NG2 cells in the rat cerebellar vermis and changes in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lomoio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe by NG2 (neuron-glia chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 2 immunocytochemistry an uneven distribution of NG2 glial cells in the rat cerebellum, being them more represented in the central lobules of the cerebellar vermis, belonging to the cerebrocerebellum. The cerebellar distribution of NG2 cells changes in aging rats, in which the area where the cells appear to be densely scattered throughout all cerebellar layers involves also more rostral and caudal lobules. In addition, in aging rats, in the most rostral and caudal lobules belonging to the spinocerebellum, punctate reaction product is present at the apical pole of Purkinje cells, i.e. in the area where the majority of synapses between olivary climbing fibers and Purkinje cells occur. Data suggest that the different distribution of NG2 cells is correlated to differences in physiology among cerebellar areas and reflects changes during aging.

  5. Referral decisions of teachers and school psychologists for twice-exceptional students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer Marie

    The accurate and timely referral and identification of twice-exceptional students remains a challenge. In a statewide study, the referral decisions for both special education and gifted programming evaluations made by four participant groups (i.e., general education teachers, special education teachers, gifted education teachers, and school psychologists) were compared. Participants were randomly assigned to read one of three identically described students in a vignette that differed only in the presence of a diagnostic label--- autism spectrum disorder (ASD), specific learning disability (SLD), or no diagnostic label. In all, special education teachers made the most special education referrals, while gifted education teachers made the most gifted programming referrals, both regardless of the diagnostic label present. The students with diagnostic labels were recommended for special education referrals significantly more than for gifted programming, while this difference was not evident in the no diagnostic label condition. Moreover, the student with the ASD label was the most likely to be referred for evaluations for both special education and gifted programming out of all three vignette conditions. Overall findings indicated the importance of considering the referral source as well as how the presence of a diagnostic label might influence educational referral decisions, particularly in how this might influence overall multidisciplinary team decisions for these unique learners.

  6. Que Podemos Hacer?: Roles for School Psychologists with Mexican and Latino Migrant Children and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning-Stout, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Literature review provides social and cultural information needed by school psychologists serving Latino and Mexican migrant farmworking children and families, examples of school-based programs, and implications for public policy and practice. (Author/JDM)

  7. Creating a Space for Clinical Psychologists in Healthcare System in Ghana: Is it Necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel Akpene Atefoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the clinical psychologists in the health sector cannot be underestimated. It is now recognized that psychological issues play a crucial role in almost every health care condition, and that addressing these issues will increase well-being and quality of life. One important role is the prevention of diseases, through behavior medicine (Ogden, 2000; whereby people can be helped to behave in healthier ways, given that many illnesses or disabilities could be prevented. However, there is a misconception among Ghanaians that clinical psychologists are only meant for the mental hospitals which is due to ignorance about what exactly the field is about. This paper argues that Clinical psychologists can do more in providing healthcare services to Ghanaians beyond mental health services and also makes recommendations concerning the training and placement of Clinical psychologists in Ghana.

  8. Continuing Education in Micro-Computers for Academic and Practicing Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, James V.; Ware, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    A workshop designed to teach participants how to use microcomputers for practice management, psychological testing, word processing, peripheral interface, and data analysis was found to meet the interests and needs of both academic and practicing psychologists. (RM)

  9. [The role of the psychologist in the intensive care unit with patients and their relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, François

    2012-06-01

    The ICU stay is a potential source of psychological trauma for patients but also for their relatives. The presence of a psychologist can help overcome these difficulties. The nursingteam should be alerted to the identification of symptoms of distress.

  10. Practicing what we know: Multicultural counseling competence among clinical psychology trainees and experienced multicultural psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Radhika; Saules, Karen; Young, Amy; Grey, Melissa J; Gillem, Angela R; Nabors, Nina A; Byrd, Michelle R; Jefferson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural (MC) competence is considered a necessary skill for clinical and counseling psychologists; however, there is little to no research on the assessment of demonstrated multicultural counseling competence (DMCCC) of clinical psychology graduate students. In this study, we developed a MC assessment instrument to assess DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students compared with MC-experienced psychologists. In addition, we assessed for differences between the endorsement of MC-appropriate strategies and actual use of these strategies in clinical practice, both by MC-experienced psychologists and clinical psychology students. Results revealed significant differences between the DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students and MC-experienced psychologists. Significant differences also emerged between endorsement of strategies as multiculturally appropriate and likelihood of actual use of these strategies. Findings suggest that future training and competence models should incorporate participants' ability to not only identify multiculturally appropriate strategies but also use these strategies in therapy.

  11. Scott's Lake Excavation Letters on Human Remains

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is two letters written about the repatriation of Santee Indian human remains and funerary objects to Santee Sioux Tribe. Includes an inventory of human remains...

  12. Training the industrial and organisational psychologist as counsellor: Are we doing enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial and organisational (I-O psychologists are responsible for workplacecounselling. Workplace counselling requires specific skills and training for the I-O psychologist.Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to explore the role of training the I-Opsychologist as workplace counsellor.Motivation for the study: Studies show that the I-O psychologist does not feel adequatelyprepared for their role as workplace counsellor. It is important to explore which skills andtraining are needed to equip the I-O psychologist as counsellor.Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research design with convenience andsnowball sampling was used to identify I-O psychologists (n = 22 from different businesssectors in Gauteng and North-West. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gatherdata and content analysis was utilised to extract themes and sub-themes from the results.Main findings: The findings showed that the participants know about the process of counselling, but they did not feel adequately prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. From the findings, recommendations for the training of future I-O psychologists are made.Practical implications: This study adds to the knowledge about ensuring that the I-Opsychologist is equipped during their training for the workplace to address the counselling needs of employees in the workplace in South Africa.Contribution/value-add: This study contributes towards ensuring that the I-O psychologistis sufficiently prepared for their role as workplace counsellor by making knowledge available regarding the skills required by I-O psychologists to be applied in practice.Keywords: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologist; Counsellor; Skills and competencies; Qualitative research; Training

  13. Modern Approaches to Professional Spoken English Interaction Teaching of Future Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Zinovyeva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the modern approaches to English professional spoken interaction teaching of future psychologists. The points of view of methodologists on the concept of professional spoken interaction were analysed. The main stages of professional spoken interaction teaching process in the context of foreign languages for specific purposes are defined. The most effective teaching model of foreign languages for specific purposes which is used for future psychologists is described.

  14. Teachers or Psychologists: Who Should Facilitate Depression Prevention Programs in Schools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie S. Wahl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study evaluates a depression prevention program for adolescents led by psychologists vs. teachers in comparison to a control. The universal school-based prevention program has shown its efficacy in several studies when implemented by psychologists. The current study compares the effects of the program as implemented by teachers versus that implemented by psychologists under real-life conditions. A total of 646 vocational track 8th grade students from Germany participated either in a universal prevention program, led by teachers (n = 207 or psychologists (n = 213, or a teaching-as-usual control condition (n = 226. The design includes baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up (at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. The cognitive-behavioral program includes 10 sessions held in a regular school setting in same-gender groups and is based on the social information-processing model of social competence. Positive intervention effects were found on the change in girls’ depressive symptoms up to 12 months after program delivery when the program was implemented by psychologists. No such effects were found on boys or when program was delivered by teachers. The prevention program can successfully be implemented for girls by psychologists. Further research is needed for explanations of these effects.

  15. Psychologists' Perspectives on Therapy Termination and the Use of Therapy Engagement/Retention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2016-08-25

    Practicing psychologists (n = 269) were surveyed regarding their perspectives on client reasons for termination at different points in therapy and their use of strategies to engage and retain clients in therapy. Psychologists estimated that one-third of their caseload unilaterally terminated (M = 13% before the third therapy session; M = 20% after the third session). They viewed lack of readiness for change/insufficient motivation as the most important barrier to early treatment engagement, and symptom improvement as the most important reason for clients' unilateral decisions to end therapy after the third session. Most psychologists reported occasional use of the majority of engagement and retention strategies. Although some strategies were used by most psychologists (e.g., building the early working alliance), fewer than 25% of psychologists reported the frequent use of time-limited treatment, appointment reminders or case management procedures. As the implementation of these strategies in clinical practice has the potential to greatly influence client retention rates, future research should examine psychologists' perspectives on and barriers to using these strategies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A general mixed mode fracture mechanics test specimen: The DCB-specimen loaded with uneven bending moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jørgensen, K.; Jacobsen, T.K.;

    2004-01-01

    A mixed mode specimen is proposed for fracture mechanics characterisation of adhesive joints, laminates and multilayers. The specimen is a double cantilever beam specimen loaded with uneven bending moments at the two free beams. By varying the ratiobetween the two applied moments, the full mode...

  17. Militarism, human welfare, and the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Craig

    1992-01-01

    A case study is presented of the American Psychological Association (APA), as a health care organization that promotes human welfare. APA includes policies on human welfare in its Ethical Principles of Psychologists and even lists the advancement of psychology "as a means of promoting human welfare" on its letterhead. Nevertheless, APA has other policies and activities based on military and weapons work that appear to conflict with its promotion of human welfare. Although military work in and of itself may not necessarily be problematic, work that contributes to people purposely being harmed or killed should be squared with the association's ethical guidelines. The results presented here show that this may not be the case: There currently appears to be little justification in the Ethical Principles for work intended to harm people. APA's active lobbying, research, and development for the military are documented here, in relation to an analysis of the Ethical Principles. APA's uncritical support for Operation Desert Storm is examined specifically, with regard to weapons technology and therapeutic treatment of U.S. soldiers on the battlefield. This one-sided support for victims of the war is not in keeping with a Hippocratic health care ethic to treat patients needing care, and to do so with neutrality and impartiality. Similarities to a historical example of nationalistic mental health ethics are discussed, with a review of the development of the German Institute for Psychological Research and Psychotherapy and of the German Society for Psychology in the Nazi wartime effort and the Holocaust. The results here show similar deficiencies in APA's ethical standards, not the least of which is that the code applies to individual members but not to APA policies, committees, or activities. This article concludes with suggested criteria for the Ethical Principles that would at least (a) recognize the ambiguities in systematically developing and using weapons to hurt people

  18. The In-House Psychologist: Do We Speak the Same Language? Short Report of a Qualitative Practice Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Birgitte; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2013-01-02

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is gaining importance. Although general practices (GP's) have a comprehensive experience in collaboration with psychologists, research on this topic is scarce. In house referrals to a psychologist are assumed to lower the thresholds for patients and GP's. In this study it was investigated whether the GP's reasons to refer in were accordance with the treatment strategy of the residing psychologist. The study is performed in a retrospective, observational cross section design. The studied population were the residing psychologist and GP's. Both were asked to complete a questionnaire. Outcome measures where the referral reasons of the GP's and the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A total sample of 92 patients of 6 GP's was studied. Over 60% of the patients were referred for counseling but only in 25% of the cases this proposal was carried out by the psychologist. Overall, the referral reasons of the GP's were not in accordance with the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A close collaboration and communication between general practitioners and psychologists is both difficult and indispensable. This practice research demonstrated that the referral motives of the GP's usually do not correspond to the treatment policy of the psychologist. This observation is partly explained by a lack of understanding of the GP in the treatment strategies of the psychologists. Another part of the explanation is that there is a pre-selection of the GPs referrals rather influenced by patient characteristics than by pathology.

  19. Influence of optimization constraints in uneven parallel bar dismount swing simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L; Hubbard, Mont

    2009-08-07

    Forward dynamics simulations of a dismount preparation swing on the uneven parallel bars were optimized to investigate the sensitivity of dismount revolution potential to the maximum bar force before slipping, and to low-bar avoidance. All optimization constraints were classified as 1-anatomical/physiological; limiting maximum hand force on the high bar before slipping, joint ranges of motion and maximum torques, muscle activation/deactivation timing and 2-geometric; avoiding low-bar contact, and requiring minimum landing distance. The gymnast model included torso/head, arm and two leg segments connected by a planar rotating, compliant shoulder and frictionless ball-and-socket hip joints. Maximum shoulder and hip torques were measured as functions of joint angle and angular velocity. Motions were driven by scaling maximum torques by a joint torque activation function of time which approximated the average activation of all muscles crossing the joint causing extension/flexion, or adduction/abduction. Ten joint torque activation values, and bar release times were optimized to maximize dismount revolutions using the downhill simplex method. Low-bar avoidance and maximum bar-force constraints are necessary because they reduce dismount revolution potential. Compared with the no low-bar performance, optimally avoiding the low bar by piking and straddling (abducting) the hips reduces dismount revolutions by 1.8%. Using previously reported experimentally measured peak uneven bar-force values of 3.6 and 4.0 body weight (BW) as optimization constraints, 1.40 and 1.55 revolutions with the body extended and arms overhead were possible, respectively. The bar-force constraint is not active if larger than 6.9 BW, and instead performances are limited only by maximum shoulder and hip torques. Bar forces accelerate the mass center (CM) when performing muscular work to flex/extend the joints, and increase gymnast mechanical energy. Therefore, the bar-force constraint inherently

  20. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Bester

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement , and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual’s set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one’s occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5% responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy

  1. Soft Sensor for Oxide Scales on the Steam Side of Superheater Tubes under Uneven Circumferential Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A soft sensor for oxide scales on the steam side of superheater tubes of utility boiler under uneven circumferential loading is proposed for the first time. First finite volume method is employed to simulate oxide scales growth temperature on the steam side of superheater tube. Then appropriate time and spatial intervals are selected to calculate oxide scales thickness along the circumferential direction. On the basis of the oxide scale thickness, the stress of oxide scales is calculated by the finite element method. At last, the oxide scale thickness and stress sensors are established on support vector machine (SMV optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO with time and circumferential angles as inputs and oxide scale thickness and stress as outputs. Temperature and stress calculation methods are validated by the operation data and experimental data, respectively. The soft sensor is applied to the superheater tubes of some power plant. Results show that the soft sensor can give enough accurate results for oxide scale thickness and stress in reasonable time. The forecasting model provides a convenient way for the research of the oxide scale failure.

  2. Methodological survey of designed uneven randomization trials (DU-RANDOM): a protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darong; Akl, Elie A; Guyatt, Gordon H; Devereaux, Philip J; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Prediger, Barbara; Patel, Krupesh; Patel, Namrata; Lu, Taoying; Zhang, Yuan; Falavigna, Maicon; Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem A; Zhou, Qi; Briel, Matthias; Schünemann, Holger J

    2014-01-23

    Although even randomization (that is, approximately 1:1 randomization ratio in study arms) provides the greatest statistical power, designed uneven randomization (DUR), (for example, 1:2 or 1:3) is used to increase participation rates. Until now, no convincing data exists addressing the impact of DUR on participation rates in trials. The objective of this study is to evaluate the epidemiology and to explore factors associated with DUR. We will search for reports of RCTs published within two years in 25 general medical journals with the highest impact factor according to the Journal Citation Report (JCR)-2010. Teams of two reviewers will determine eligibility and extract relevant information from eligible RCTs in duplicate and using standardized forms. We will report the prevalence of DUR trials, the reported reasons for using DUR, and perform a linear regression analysis to estimate the association between the randomization ratio and the associated factors, including participation rate, type of informed consent, clinical area, and so on. A clearer understanding of RCTs with DUR and its association with factors in trials, for example, participation rate, can optimize trial design and may have important implications for both researchers and users of the medical literature.

  3. An Uneven Vacuum Energy Fluid as Λ, Dark Matter, MOND and Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong Sheng

    Various TeVeS-inspired and f(R)-inspired theories of gravity have added an interesting twist to the search for dark matter and vacuum energy, modifying the landscape of astrophysics day by day. These theories can be together called a Non-uniform Dark Energy fluid (a Nu-Lambda fluid or a VΛ fluid); a common thread of these theories, according of an up-to-date summary by HZL1, is a non-uniform vector field, describing an uneven vacuum energy fluid. The so-called "alternative" gravity theories are in fact in the standard GR gravity framework except that the cosmological "constant" is replaced by a nontrivial non-uniform vacuum energy, which couples the effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy together by a single field. Built initially bottom-up rather than top-down as most gravity theories, TeVeS-inspired theories are healthily rooted on empirical facts. Here we attempt a review of some sanity checks of these fast-developing theories from galaxy rotation curves, solar system constraints, and gravitational lensing. We will also discuss some theoretical aspects of these theories related to the vacuum energy, and point out some analogies with electromagnetism and the Casimir effect.

  4. Why infrastructure still matters: unravelling water reform processes in an uneven waterscape in rural Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeltsje Sanne Kemerink

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, a major change took place in public policies for water resources management. Whereas before governments primarily invested in the development, operation and maintenance of water infrastructure and were mainly concerned with the distribution of water, in the new approach they mainly focus on managing water resources systems by stipulating general frameworks for water allocation. This paper studies the rationales used to justify the water reform process in Kenya and discusses how and to what extent these rationales apply to different groups of water users within Likii catchment in the central part of the country. Adopting a critical institutionalist's perspective, this paper shows how the water resource configurations in the catchment are constituted by the interplay between a normative policy model introduced in a plural institutional context and the disparate infrastructural options available to water users as result of historically produced uneven social relations. We argue that, to progressively redress the colonial legacy, direct investments in infrastructure for marginalized water users and targeting the actual (redistribution of water to the users might be more effective than focusing exclusively on institutional reforms.

  5. Musculoskeletal work preceding the outward and inward Tkachev on uneven bars in artistic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, David G; Irwin, Gareth

    2010-03-01

    Outward facing Tkachevs on uneven bars have been the traditional technique employed by artistic gymnasts. Changes in bar spacing and judging have increased the popularity of the inward version of the skill, in which the gymnast faces towards the low bar as she straddles over the high bar. The purpose of this study was to compare these two variants of the women's Tkachev to examine the influence of the positioning of the low bar on the musculoskeletal demands placed on the gymnast. 3-D DLT reconstructed data sets from digitised video images of straddle Tkachevs performed at the 2000 Sydney Olympics were analysed. Five performances of each variant were compared using kinematics and inverse dynamics. Mean hip and shoulder kinematics were similar for both variants of the Tkachev, but for the inward, gymnasts released later, travelled higher and re-grasped earlier than for the outward. Hip joint moments were similar for both variants while shoulder moments were different. Total musculoskeletal demands were similar for both variants, although the distribution was markedly different with the shoulders contributing positively for the outward and negatively for the inward. Implications for training specificity, along with potential future developments for the inward variant, have been highlighted.

  6. Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maktabi, Sepehr; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-08-01

    In materials printing applications, the ability to generate fine droplets is critical for achieving high-resolution features. Other desirable characteristics are high print speeds, large stand-off distances, and minimal instrumentation requirements. In this work, a tunable electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique capable of generating micron-sized droplets is reported. This method was used to print organic resistors on flat and uneven substrates. These ubiquitous electronic components were built using the commercial polymer-based conductive ink poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which has been widely used in the manufacturing of organic electronic devices. Resistors with widths from 50 to 500 μm and resistances from 1 to 70 Ω/μm were created. An array of emission modes for EHD printing was identified. Among these, the most promising is the microdripping mode, where droplets 10 times smaller than the nozzle's inner diameter were created at frequencies in excess of 5 kHz. It was found that the ink flow rate, applied voltage, and stand-off distance all significantly influence the droplet generation frequency. In particular, the experimental results reveal that the frequency increases nonlinearly with the applied voltage. The non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior of PEDOT:PSS strongly influenced the droplet frequency. Finally, the topology of a 3-dimensional target substrate had a significant effect on the structure and function of a printed resistor.

  7. Next generation sequencing and FISH reveal uneven and nonrandom microsatellite distribution in two grasshopper genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cuadrado, Ángeles; Montiel, Eugenia E; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-06-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, are one of the prominent DNA sequences shaping the repeated fraction of eukaryotic genomes. In spite of their profuse use as molecular markers for a variety of genetic and evolutionary studies, their genomic location, distribution, and function are not yet well understood. Here we report the first thorough joint analysis of microsatellite motifs at both genomic and chromosomal levels in animal species, by a combination of 454 sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques performed on two grasshopper species. The in silico analysis of the 454 reads suggested that microsatellite expansion is not driving size increase of these genomes, as SSR abundance was higher in the species showing the smallest genome. However, the two species showed the same uneven and nonrandom location of SSRs, with clear predominance of dinucleotide motifs and association with several types of repetitive elements, mostly histone gene spacers, ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers (IGS), and transposable elements (TEs). The FISH analysis showed a dispersed chromosome distribution of microsatellite motifs in euchromatic regions, in coincidence with chromosome location patterns previously observed for many mobile elements in these species. However, some SSR motifs were clustered, especially those located in the histone gene cluster.

  8. Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

  9. Electrohydrodynamic printing of organic polymeric resistors on flat and uneven surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maktabi, Sepehr; Chiarot, Paul R., E-mail: pchiarot@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    In materials printing applications, the ability to generate fine droplets is critical for achieving high-resolution features. Other desirable characteristics are high print speeds, large stand-off distances, and minimal instrumentation requirements. In this work, a tunable electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique capable of generating micron-sized droplets is reported. This method was used to print organic resistors on flat and uneven substrates. These ubiquitous electronic components were built using the commercial polymer-based conductive ink poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which has been widely used in the manufacturing of organic electronic devices. Resistors with widths from 50 to 500 μm and resistances from 1 to 70 Ω/μm were created. An array of emission modes for EHD printing was identified. Among these, the most promising is the microdripping mode, where droplets 10 times smaller than the nozzle's inner diameter were created at frequencies in excess of 5 kHz. It was found that the ink flow rate, applied voltage, and stand-off distance all significantly influence the droplet generation frequency. In particular, the experimental results reveal that the frequency increases nonlinearly with the applied voltage. The non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior of PEDOT:PSS strongly influenced the droplet frequency. Finally, the topology of a 3-dimensional target substrate had a significant effect on the structure and function of a printed resistor.

  10. Globalization and the uneven application of international regulatory standard : the case of oil exploration in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adalikwu, J.

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted to increase the awareness of the current economic situation that exists in the Niger Delta, a region that has been devastated by the activities of oil multinational corporations (MNCs). In particular, the study linked the Obelle and Obagi communities to the political economy of global capital which creates inequalities that divide societies into hierarchies of the rich and poor. The strategies adopted by the people to improve the negative consequences of oil exploration in the communities were also examined. The researcher postulated that there is a relationship between the uneven application of international and national regulations in oil production by MNCs and environmental degradation. A critical ethnographic paradigm was used to explore and explain the processes of globalization that affect the people's lives and means of livelihood. Data were collected and analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Data was then analyzed using several methods, such as statistics based on cross-tabulation, analysis of themes that emerged from interviews, and Atlas.ti 5.0 qualitative analysis computer programme to show the relationship between variables that emerged from the study. The study revealed that resource exploitation by oil MNCs in Obagi/Obelle communities of the Nigeria Delta, together with the Nigerian government, has resulted in economic expropriation, political disenfranchisement, social instability and environmental damage.

  11. The family physician and the psychologist in the office together: a response to fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Luigi; Pirrotta, Enzo; Ingravalle, Veronica; Fayella, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that motives for consulting the family physician, though expressed as physical symptoms, often derive from problems needing a holistic, psychosocial approach. Progressive differentiation between medicine and psychology makes co-operation through referral to the psychologist by the physician quite problematic, in terms of both which patients are referred and the modalities of referral. Acceptance of psychological referral may, in any case, be difficult, due to the social stigma that still surrounds mental distress.The authors report a possible solution in an experiment implemented by the postgraduate Health Psychology School of the Rome University 'Sapienza', entailing joint, direct co-operation between a family physician and a psychologist through the psychologist's presence in the doctor's office during consultations. This allowed direct access to a psychologist in the absence of any filter and without the need for a formal request on the patient's part and a biopsychosocial approach to distress. In a small number of cases, more formal consultation with the psychologist was proposed. Cases were always discussed between the two professionals. To date, the experiment has involved nine psychologists and seven physicians over a period of nine years. It appears to be entirely feasible, though requiring a period of adaptation between the two professionals. Patients have welcomed the presence of the psychologist and, as expected, take a broader approach in reporting their distress.An illustrative case is presented, in which finding the meaning of a symptom avoided unnecessary and costly investigations, and facilitated the patient in taking a new direction in his life.

  12. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah; van de Goot, Frank; Ruijter, Jan; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof Jan

    2017-01-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered

  13. Mammalian Remains from Indian Sites on Aruba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1960-01-01

    Mr. H. R. VAN HEEKEREN and Mr. C. J. DU RY, of the Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde at Leiden, entrusted me with the identification of some animal remains collected from Indian sites on Aruba by Professor J. P. B. DE JOSSELIN DE JONG in 1923. These remains relate for the most part to marine turtles (Che

  14. Improving Accident Statistics and Expanding the Role of Traffic Psychologists in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus A J M de Wit

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the mandatory assessment of psychological fitness to drive of prospective drivers, Brazil has a relatively large amount of traffic psychologists. Since, in general, assessment only happens upon first licensing, the task of these psychologists is fairly limited (as is the scope of the assessment itself. Intention and method: this study aims to perform a critical analysis of possibilities to expand the role of psychologists working in the traffic system in Brazil. A systematic review study of databases and international documents was conducted and a scope of activity of psychologists in this area was built. First result statistical data is scattered over many agencies. First conclusion in order to better identify specific tendencies and risk groups in Brazil, statistical data related to accident involvement needs to be better, perhaps centrally, coordinated and consolidated. Second result international research related to three subgroups of drivers that constitute a significantly increased safety risk can inform future directions for traffic psychology in Brazil. Psychological processes that may underlie these risk increases are discussed. Second conclusion two subgroups (young drivers and aggressive drivers could benefit from more than assessment, they could benefit from specific psychological interventions. The third subgroup (elderly drivers is expected to increase significantly in the future, which asks for clearer policies, with a significant input form psychologists and psychological research.

  15. Remaining Life Expectancy With and Without Polypharmacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastesson, Jonas W; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the remaining life expectancy with and without polypharmacy for Swedish women and men aged 65 years and older. DESIGN: Age-specific prevalence of polypharmacy from the nationwide Swedish Prescribed Drug Register (SPDR) combined with life tables from Statistics Sweden...... was used to calculate the survival function and remaining life expectancy with and without polypharmacy according to the Sullivan method. SETTING: Nationwide register-based study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1,347,564 individuals aged 65 years and older who had been prescribed and dispensed a drug from July 1...... to September 30, 2008. MEASUREMENTS: Polypharmacy was defined as the concurrent use of 5 or more drugs. RESULTS: At age 65 years, approximately 8 years of the 20 remaining years of life (41%) can be expected to be lived with polypharmacy. More than half of the remaining life expectancy will be spent...

  16. DEFINITION OF LOCOMOTIVE TRACTION FORCE WITH REGARD TO UNEVEN LOADING OF WHEEL-MOTOR BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ye. Bodnar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article describes the most common methods for determining the locomotive traction force. Solving the tasks of traction calculations involves determination of the forces influencing the train at every point of the way. When choosing a rational trajectory of the train motion and the development of operational regulations of train driving it is necessary to determine the actual value of the locomotive traction force. Considering various factors, power value of traction electric motor of locomotive may have significant differences. Advancement of the operational definition system of the locomotive traction force during the calculations by electrical parameters of traction electric motor with regard to uneven load of wheel-motor block is the purpose of the article. Methodology. The method of determining the traction force of locomotives and diesel locomotives with electric transmission, which is based on primary data acquisition of traction electric engines of direct current behavior, was proposed. Sensors and their integration into the electrical circuitry of the locomotive in order to get the data in digital form and for operational calculation of the each traction motor mode and the definition of locomotive traction force are presented. Findings. The experimental investigation of the system of locomotive traction force determination with the electric traction motor ED-105 was offered. A comparison of electrical and mechanical power of the electric motor was conducted. Originality. The system of locomotives power operational definition, which takes into account the variable electro-mechanical factors of wheel and motor blocks and increases the accuracy of the calculations, was proposed. Practical value. The system is a part of an onboard complex in definition of energy-efficient regimes for trains movement and provides the definition of accelerating and decelerating forces.

  17. Molecular characterization of a genomic interval with highly uneven recombination distribution on maize chromosome 10 L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Xu, Jianping; Tang, Yuanping; Zhou, Liangliang; Wang, Fei; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2011-09-01

    Homologous recombination in meiosis provides the evolutionary driving force in eukaryotic organisms by generating genetic variability. Meiotic recombination does not always occur evenly across the chromosome, and therefore genetic and physical distances are not consistently in proportion. We discovered a 278 kb interval on the long arm of chromosome 10 (10 L) through analyzed 13,933 descendants of backcross population. The recombinant events distributed unevenly in the interval. The ratio of genetic to physical distance in the interval fluctuated about 47-fold. With the assistance of molecular markers, the interval was divided into several subintervals for further characterization. In agreement with previous observations, high gene-density regions such as subinterval A and B were also genetic recombination hot subintervals, and repetitive sequence-riched region such as subinterval C was also found to be recombination inert at the detection level of the study. However, we found an unusual subinterval D, in which the 72-kb region contained 6 genes. The gene-density of subinterval D was 5.8 times that of the genome-wide average. The ratio of genetic to physical distance in subinterval D was 0.58 cM/Mb, only about 3/4 of the genome average. We carried out an analysis of sequence polymorphisms and methylation status in subinterval D, and the potential causes of recombination suppression were discussed. This study was another case of a detailed genetic analysis of an unusual recombination region in the maize genome. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  18. Optimal Placement Method of RFID Readers in Industrial Rail Transport for Uneven Rail Traflc Volume Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmangulov, Aleksandr; Muravev, Dmitri; Mishkurov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    The issue of operative data reception on location and movement of railcars is significant the constantly growing requirements of the provision of timely and safe transportation. The technical solution for efficiency improvement of data collection on rail rolling stock is the implementation of an identification system. Nowadays, there are several such systems, distinguished in working principle. In the authors' opinion, the most promising for rail transportation is the RFID technology, proposing the equipping of the railway tracks by the stationary points of data reading (RFID readers) from the onboard sensors on the railcars. However, regardless of a specific type and manufacturer of these systems, their implementation is affiliated with the significant financing costs for large, industrial, rail transport systems, owning the extensive network of special railway tracks with a large number of stations and loading areas. To reduce the investment costs for creation, the identification system of rolling stock on the special railway tracks of industrial enterprises has developed the method based on the idea of priority installation of the RFID readers on railway hauls, where rail traffic volumes are uneven in structure and power, parameters of which is difficult or impossible to predict on the basis of existing data in an information system. To select the optimal locations of RFID readers, the mathematical model of the staged installation of such readers has developed depending on the non-uniformity value of rail traffic volumes, passing through the specific railway hauls. As a result of that approach, installation of the numerous RFID readers at all station tracks and loading areas of industrial railway stations might be not necessary,which reduces the total cost of the rolling stock identification and the implementation of the method for optimal management of transportation process.

  19. Kinematic comparison of walking on uneven ground using powered and unpowered prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Deanna H; Aldridge, Jennifer M; Wilken, Jason M

    2013-04-01

    Recent research has focused on the design of intelligent prosthetic ankle devices with the goal of adapting behavior of the device to accommodate all walking surfaces that an individual encounters in daily life. To date, no studies have looked at how such devices perform on uneven terrain. 11 young adults with unilateral transtibial amputation participated in two data collection sessions spaced approximately 3 weeks apart. In each session they walked across a loose rock surface at three controlled speeds. In the first session, they wore a passive, energy storage and return prosthesis and in the second, they wore a powered prosthesis (BiOM, iWalk, Bedford, MA, USA). Subjects had a 10% faster self-selected walking speed when wearing the powered (1.16 m/s) compared to unpowered prosthesis (1.05 m/s; p=0.031). They walked with increased ankle plantarflexion on their prosthetic limb throughout the gait cycle when wearing the powered compared to unpowered prosthesis. This was especially evident in the increased plantarflexion during push-off (p<0.001). There was a small (<3°), but statistically significant decrease in knee flexion during early stance when wearing the powered device (p=0.045). Otherwise, the kinematics of the knee and hip were nearly identical when wearing the different devices. Subjects had decreased medial-lateral motion of their center of mass when wearing the powered prosthesis (p=0.020), but there were no differences in medial-lateral margins of stability between the devices (p=0.662). Subjects did not significantly alter their proximal joint kinematics on this irregular surface as a result of the addition of power. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Barrier Vibration Isolation to Work-Place Vibration and Its Influence on Uneven Subsidence of Pillar Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aiming at practice, the wave propagation in soil has been comprehensively studied on the basis of FEM analyzing model being established. An investigation has also been performed on how to solve the problems of simulating transient vibration in actual foundation with FEM, and the result of calculating to the real transient vibration of actual foundation with FEM software ANSYS agrees with that of measuring. The vibration variation in the ground and the uneven subsidence of the factory houses' pillars, with and without barrier vibration isolation, are calculated by employing FEM. The results show that proper barrier isolation can diminish the ground vibration displacement but likely to magnify the dynamic stress and vibration frequency within a certain region, which would aggravate the uneven subsidence of the factory house pillars.

  1. R-bUCRP: A Novel Reputation-Based Uneven Clustering Routing Protocol for Cognitive Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy of nodes is an important factor that affects the performance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, especially in the case of existing selfish nodes, which attracted many researchers’ attention recently. In this paper, we present a reputation-based uneven clustering routing protocol (R-bUCRP considering both energy saving and reputation assessment. In the cluster establishment phase, we adopt an uneven clustering mechanism which controls the competitive scope of cluster head candidates to save the energy of WSNs. In the cluster heads election phase, the residual energy and reputation value are used as the indexes to select the optimal cluster head, where the reputation mechanism is introduced to support reputation assessment. Simulation results show that the proposed R-bUCRP can save node energy consumption, balance network energy distribution, and prolong network lifetime.

  2. Reconciling Biodiversity Conservation and Timber Production in Mixed Uneven-Aged Mountain Forests: Identification of Ecological Intensification Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, Valentine; Cordonnier, Thomas; Courbaud, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Mixed uneven-aged forests are considered favorable to the provision of multiple ecosystem services and to the conciliation of timber production and biodiversity conservation. However, some forest managers now plan to increase the intensity of thinning and harvesting operations in these forests. Retention measures or gap creation are considered to compensate potential negative impacts on biodiversity. Our objectives were to assess the effect of these management practices on timber production and biodiversity conservation and identify potential compensating effects between these practices, using the concept of ecological intensification as a framework. We performed a simulation study coupling Samsara2, a simulation model designed for spruce-fir uneven-aged mountain forests, an uneven-aged silviculture algorithm, and biodiversity models. We analyzed the effect of parameters related to uneven-aged management practices on timber production, biodiversity, and sustainability indicators. Our study confirmed that the indicators responded differently to management practices, leading to trade-offs situations. Increasing management intensity had negative impacts on several biodiversity indicators, which could be partly compensated by the positive effect of retention measures targeting large trees, non-dominant species, and deadwood. The impact of gap creation was more mitigated, with a positive effect on the diversity of tree sizes and deadwood but a negative impact on the spruce-fir mixing balance and on the diversity of the understory layer. Through the analysis of compensating effects, we finally revealed the existence of possible ecological intensification pathways, i.e., the possibility to increase management intensity while maintaining biodiversity through the promotion of nature-based management principles (gap creation and retention measures).

  3. Preliminary Validation of the Scale of Attitudes from Psychologists and psychology students (IAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Guerra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of training psychologists involves addressing both technical skills and generic or attitudinal competencies. However, there are not instruments for assessing attitudinal skills in psychologists and psychology students. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the process of construction and preliminary validation of an instrument of attitudinal competencies in psychologists and psychology students (IAPE. 152 students and graduates of psychology were considered in the different phases of the study. Participants answered the IAPE and another two instruments to assess convergent and divergent validity. Results showed that the final instrument consist of 17 items has one-factor structure with adequate internal consistency. Furthermore, they showed the validity (convergent, divergent and discriminant of the instrument. Finally, it is discussed the usefulness of this instrument in the national context. At the same time it is been said that this is a preliminary study, being necessary futher researchs to conclude about IAPE validity.

  4. Behavioral Treatment for Headaches in Children: A Practical Guide for the Child Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benore, Ethan; Monnin, Kara

    2016-03-29

    Headache is a highly prevalent condition and is the leading cause for school absences. Despite the rich literature supporting behavioral treatments for headache, many child psychologists mistakenly perceive that they lack appropriate training to treat children with headache. Likewise, many physicians feel underprepared to refer the child for behavioral treatments. This article serves as a primer, providing tools for the general child psychologist or mental health provider by answering frequently asked questions. First, we provide a concise background on pathophysiology and medical care for headache. We then detail aspects of behavioral interventions for headache, including a case example. We included a limited list of up-to-date references most relevant to the child psychologist who does not treat headache on a regular basis to support further reading. By reviewing this primer, local mental health professionals can provide children with headache access to high-quality, evidence-based clinical care closer to home.

  5. [The role of the psychologist in hospitals and maternity wards in the state of Sergipe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lyvia de Jesus; Vieira, Maria Jésia

    2012-05-01

    This article seeks to reflect on the professional activity of the psychologist in the hospital context by examining the role of psychologists working in hospitals and maternity wards in the State of Sergipe. It seeks to identify the specific role of these professionals in hospitals and maternity wards, as well as their motivating forces and the difficulties encountered. This work is part of a broader project that sought to study not only the activity per se, but also training aspects of these professionals. The sample was analyzed using a qualitative and quantitative approach for thematic analysis. Results revealed that the characterization of the role of psychologists has a focus on psychotherapeutic work with patients before and after surgery, as well as the caregivers and family members of critically ill patients in the following units: ICU, ICC, oncology, dialysis and surgical wards, offering support, especially at the pre- and post-surgery phase.

  6. The psychologist and the bombardier: the Army Air Forces' aircrew classification program in WWII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Marcia E

    2014-03-01

    During World War II, psychologists in the Army Air Forces were given an unprecedented opportunity to showcase their discipline by developing examinations to test the aptitude of aviation cadets as pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. These psychologists enjoyed success in classifying pilots and navigators, but became quickly frustrated by their results for bombardiers. The trouble lay not in their choice of tests but in their performance measures for bombardiering, a difficulty that came to be known as 'the problem of the criterion.' This episode in the history of military mental testing exemplifies the challenges faced by psychologists at the moment they were poised to gain the support of the armed services, and highlights how these new hazards shaped postwar military psychology.

  7. Combating elder and dependent adult mistreatment: the role of the clinical psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiglesworth, Aileen; Kemp, Bryan; Mosqueda, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Among the many different professionals who work to address elder and dependent adult mistreatment, the clinical psychologist performs a function that is not well documented. The experiences of a clinical psychologist attached to a medical response team and an elder abuse forensic center provide insight into this complex and multifaceted role. Case examples from an elder abuse forensic center illustrate the breadth of referral questions that a clinical psychologist addresses. This information may be of use to those who would argue that these services be made widely available to elder abuse professionals such as social workers, public guardians, and those in the criminal justice system. The case studies also may be useful for training purposes.

  8. Psychology in the community: a community psychologist looks at 30 years in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John R

    2008-01-01

    I review my 30 years in the community mental health field, emphasizing the personal and historical context that shaped this career. I especially highlight the origins of the values that guided significant career decisions, including family, neighborhood, religious and educational influences. The core guiding value was the belief that public service is both a privilege and an obligation, and that righting social injustice through such service is a noble calling. I trace the evolution of my thoughts and actions reflecting this value, from an early desire to "help children," through preparation to become a child psychologist, and ultimately to practice in a public community mental health setting and a career dedicated first to primary prevention and then to broader safety net services for those in need. I highlight a corresponding intellectual evolution as well, a progressive change in identity from "clinical psychologist in the community" to community psychologist.

  9. Noninvasive detection of unevenly magnetized permanent magnet of a brushless dc motor by characterizing back electromotive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. I.; Jang, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    Uneven magnetization of permanent magnets (PMs) is one of the major sources of unbalanced magnetic force and torque ripple, which excite a brushless dc (BLDC) motor. This paper investigates the frequency contents of the back electromotive force (BEMF) due to the unevenly magnetized PMs in a BLDC motor. The magnetic field of a BLDC motor is solved by using the finite element method, and the BEMF is calculated by differentiating the flux linkage with respect to time. The characteristics of BEMF are investigated by using the spectral analysis. Magnetic flux density of the ideally magnetized PMs has the harmonics of the pole-pair number, but unevenly magnetized PMs generate the additional harmonics. This research shows numerically and experimentally that the frequency components of the BEMF are determined by the least common multiple between the frequency contents of magnetic flux density from the PMs and the slot number per phase. It also shows that the magnetized status of the PMs of a BLDC can be noninvasively identified by monitoring the frequencies and the amplitudes of BEMF.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF MECHANISMS CAUSING OCCURRENCE OF SEISMIC OSCILLATION SOURCES IN CASE OF INTERACTIONS OF UNEVEN SURFACES IN FAULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ruzhich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were carried out using TRIBO, a specially designed testing stand including a concrete plate that can be moved at different rates. In our experiment, the plate served as an artificial allochtonous wing placed at the uneven surface of the segment of the Angarsky fault in Pribaikalie. Tribological effects of contact interaction of the uneven surfaces in the zone of sliding movements of the plate were recorded by strain gauges, linear displacement gauges and four Baikal-7HR seismic stations; such stations are commonly used for earthquake recording. The effect of shocks in initiation of seismic oscillation sources was studied with changes of the regimes of destruction of the uneven surfaces (underneath the base of the plate which differ in size and strength. The study was focused on stages in the process of friction at preparation to transition from quasi-regular decelerated sliding movement of the plate to its breakaway and occurrence of a high-energy seismic impulse.The applied method of large-scale modelling at natural objects in field provides new data that may prove useful for stu­dies of mechanisms causing seismicity, identification of stages in occurrence of earthquakes in fault zones and interpretation of seismic monitoring data. Results of such physical tests can contribute to the development of methods aimed at forecasting of rock shocks and earthquakes and also for the development of new physical models showing formation of earthquake foci of various scales in tectonic faults.

  11. The role of the psychologist with disorders of consciousness in inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Sarah; Beaulieu, Cynthia; Sandbach, Karen; Colaiezzi, Angela; Balkan, Staci

    2017-08-01

    The psychologist in an inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation setting provides a vital role in the assessment, treatment, and management of pediatric patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC). Competencies are drawn from several specialty areas of professional psychology, including rehabilitation psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, and pediatric psychology. This specialized knowledge forms the basis for tailoring assessment and treatment plans specific to the individual brain injury profile, with the goals of enhancing diagnosis, prognosis, and care transition decision. To describe the role of the psychologist in the differential diagnosis and treatment of pediatric patients with severe brain injury and DoC during inpatient rehabilitation. Research Method/Design: Three pediatric cases admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with suspected DoC illustrate the psychologist's role in diagnostics, case conceptualization, assessment design, and data collection based on patient-specific brain injury profiles. Customized data collection informs diagnostic decisions and treatment planning, with the goal of improved of care and resource utilization. The psychologist also provides ongoing psychoeducation, psychotherapy, and supportive interventions to the patient's family and caregivers to facilitate family adjustment to disability and promote long-term adaptation and adjustment. This case series illustrates the role of the psychologist in the use of individual brain injury profiles to coordinate assessment, diagnosis, and care for children with severe brain injury. Implications include the need for focused research to demonstrate the value-added role of the psychologist on the interdisciplinary team working in the neurorehabilitation of this complex patient population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-07-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  13. [Physician and medical psychologist: complementary approaches in providing psychological care to cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkova, V A; Pesterëva, E V

    2014-01-01

    In providing psychological care to an oncological patient a physician and a medical psychologist come from a variety of professional positions that require different approaches and methods. It is proposed a three-phase model of the dynamics of the psychological state of the person in the situation of cancer reflecting the process of psychological adaptation of a particular patient. Focusing on this model, the authors conclude that psychological care to cancer patient, performed by a doctor and a medical psychologist, are different kinds of psychological care that does not replace but complement each other.

  14. Competence Approach to the Training of Organizational Psychologists in the Context of Reforms in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogodina A.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a model of professional competences of organizational psycholo- gists developed by the authors and provides outcomes of a study carried out to verify the model. The study aimed to explore content and structural features of notions about professional competences of the organizational psychologist in high- and mid-level executives of various fields (manufacture; trading and services; education. The paper presents results of the correlation analysis of such representations in different groups of executives and argues that it is important to take into account prospective employers’ expectations and preferences regarding organizational psychologists in the training of the latter.

  15. The (even) bolder model. The clinical psychologist as metaphysician-scientist-practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W

    1989-12-01

    Is the clinical psychologist best characterized as a scientist-practitioner? Or does the practice of science and psychotherapy involve metaphysics to such an extent that the clinical psychologist ought to be considered a metaphysician-scientist-practitioner? To answer these questions, the roles, if any, of metaphysics in science and psychotherapy are examined. This article investigates this question by examining the views of the logical positivists, Karl Popper and Imre Lakatos, and concludes that the practice of science and psychotherapy involves metaphysics in (a) problem choice, (b) research and therapy design, (c) observation statements, (d) resolving the Duhemian problem, and (e) modifying hypotheses to encompass anomalous results.

  16. Fish remains and humankind: part two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K G Jones

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The significance of aquatic resources to past human groups is not adequately reflected in the published literature - a deficiency which is gradually being acknowledged by the archaeological community world-wide. The publication of the following three papers goes some way to redress this problem. Originally presented at an International Council of Archaeozoology (ICAZ Fish Remains Working Group meeting in York, U.K. in 1987, these papers offer clear evidence of the range of interest in ancient fish remains across the world. Further papers from the York meeting were published in Internet Archaeology 3 in 1997.

  17. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  18. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  19. Identification of ancient remains through genomic sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Matthew J.; Zhang, Tao; Woyke, Tanja; Speller, Camilla F.; Krivoshapkin, Andrei; Yang, Dongya Y.; Derevianko, Anatoly; Rubin, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of ancient DNA have been hindered by the preciousness of remains, the small quantities of undamaged DNA accessible, and the limitations associated with conventional PCR amplification. In these studies, we developed and applied a genomewide adapter-mediated emulsion PCR amplification protocol for ancient mammalian samples estimated to be between 45,000 and 69,000 yr old. Using 454 Life Sciences (Roche) and Illumina sequencing (formerly Solexa sequencing) technologies, we examined over 100 megabases of DNA from amplified extracts, revealing unbiased sequence coverage with substantial amounts of nonredundant nuclear sequences from the sample sources and negligible levels of human contamination. We consistently recorded over 500-fold increases, such that nanogram quantities of starting material could be amplified to microgram quantities. Application of our protocol to a 50,000-yr-old uncharacterized bone sample that was unsuccessful in mitochondrial PCR provided sufficient nuclear sequences for comparison with extant mammals and subsequent phylogenetic classification of the remains. The combined use of emulsion PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing allows for the generation of large quantities of DNA sequence data from ancient remains. Using such techniques, even small amounts of ancient remains with low levels of endogenous DNA preservation may yield substantial quantities of nuclear DNA, enabling novel applications of ancient DNA genomics to the investigation of extinct phyla. PMID:18426903

  20. Kadav Moun PSA (:60) (Human Remains)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This is an important public health announcement about safety precautions for those handling human remains. Language: Haitian Creole.  Created: 2/18/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  1. The case for fencing remains intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, C; Swanson, A; Canney, S; Loveridge, A; Garnett, S; Pfeifer, M; Burton, A C; Bauer, H; MacNulty, D

    2013-11-01

    Creel et al. argue against the conservation effectiveness of fencing based on a population measure that ignores the importance of top predators to ecosystem processes. Their statistical analyses consider, first, only a subset of fenced reserves and, second, an incomplete examination of 'costs per lion.' Our original conclusions remain unaltered.

  2. Removing the remaining ridges in fingerprint segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU En; ZHANG Jian-ming; YIN Jian-ping; ZHANG Guo-min; HU Chun-feng

    2006-01-01

    Fingerprint segmentation is an important step in fingerprint recognition and is usually aimed to identify non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions and exclude them as background so as to reduce the time expenditure of image processing and avoid detecting false features. In high and in low quality ridge regions, often are some remaining ridges which are the afterimages of the previously scanned finger and are expected to be excluded from the foreground. However, existing segmentation methods generally do not take the case into consideration, and often, the remaining ridge regions are falsely classified as foreground by segmentation algorithm with spurious features produced erroneously including unrecoverable regions as foreground. This paper proposes two steps for fingerprint segmentation aimed at removing the remaining ridge region from the foreground. The non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions are removed as background in the first step, and then the foreground produced by the first step is further analyzed for possible remove of the remaining ridge region. The proposed method proved effective in avoiding detecting false ridges and in improving minutiae detection.

  3. Why Agricultural Educators Remain in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Nina; Ritz, Rudy; Burris, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors that are related to agricultural educator career retention and to explore the relationships between work engagement, work-life balance, occupational commitment, and personal and career factors as related to the decision to remain in the teaching profession. The target population for…

  4. Essential Qualities of Math Teaching Remain Unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    According to a new federal report, the qualities of an effective mathematics teacher remain frustratingly elusive. The report of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel does not show what college math content and coursework are most essential for teachers. While the report offered numerous conclusions about math curriculum, cognition, and…

  5. Juveniles' Motivations for Remaining in Prostitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shu-Ling; Bedford, Olwen

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were collected in 1990-1991, 1992, and 2000 with 49 prostituted juveniles remanded to two rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. These data are analyzed to explore Taiwanese prostituted juveniles' feelings about themselves and their work, their motivations for remaining in prostitution, and their difficulties…

  6. Current and Future School Psychologists' Preparedness to Work with LGBT Students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Goldstein, Thalia R.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess current and future school psychologists' attitudes toward and preparedness to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Two-hundred seventy-nine school psychologists (n = 162, 58%) and school psychology graduate students (n = 117, 42%) were included in the study.…

  7. The Psychologist as an Interlocutor in Autism Spectrum Disorder Assessment: Insights from a Study of Spontaneous Prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Daniel; Lee, Chi-Chun; Black, Matthew P.; Williams, Marian E.; Lee, Sungbok; Levitt, Pat; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between prosodic speech cues and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) severity, hypothesizing a mutually interactive relationship between the speech characteristics of the psychologist and the child. The authors objectively quantified acoustic-prosodic cues of the psychologist and of the…

  8. Assessment in the Digital Age: An Overview of Online Tools and Considerations for School Psychologists and School Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellins, Laura

    2015-01-01

    With recent developments in technology, online tests and digital tools offer school psychologists and school counsellors alternate modes of assessment. These new technologies have the potential to increase accessibility to tests (through greater portability), allow school psychologists and school counsellors to service more students (through…

  9. Methods of Identification of Students with Learning Disabilities in Reading: Perceptions of Administrators in Illinois and Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists' training provides a variety of skills from which its practitioners may draw, including consultation, intervention, counseling, staff development, and assessment. Despite these broad skills, school psychologists' primary roles involve assessment and assessment-related tasks, generally as related to eligibility determination…

  10. The School Psychologist and Sport: A Natural Interface to Promote Optimal Functioning Between, Student-Athlete, Family and School Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Marshall L.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a background and logical explanation for school psychologists to feel justified in the pursuit of providing sport psychology services. This perspective is useful for the school psychologist or other school administrative personnel who may question or be questioned about the value or need for the provision of sport psychology…

  11. Methods of Identification of Students with Learning Disabilities in Reading: Perceptions of Administrators in Illinois and Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists' training provides a variety of skills from which its practitioners may draw, including consultation, intervention, counseling, staff development, and assessment. Despite these broad skills, school psychologists' primary roles involve assessment and assessment-related tasks, generally as related to eligibility determination…

  12. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  13. Remaining Phosphorus Estimate Through Multiple Regression Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. E. ALVES; A. LAVORENTI

    2006-01-01

    The remaining phosphorus (Prem), P concentration that remains in solution after shaking soil with 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 containing 60 μg mL-1 P, is a very useful index for studies related to the chemistry of variable charge soils. Although the Prem determination is a simple procedure, the possibility of estimating accurate values of this index from easily and/or routinely determined soil properties can be very useful for practical purposes. The present research evaluated the Premestimation through multiple regression analysis in which routinely determined soil chemical data, soil clay content and soil pH measured in 1 mol L-1 NaF (pHNaF) figured as Prem predictor variables. The Prem can be estimated with acceptable accuracy using the above-mentioned approach, and PHNaF not only substitutes for clay content as a predictor variable but also confers more accuracy to the Prem estimates.

  14. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA's Ethics Code or current research.

  15. New paradigms on the school psychologist's practice / Novos paradigmas na prática do psicólogo escolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edla Grisard Caldeira de Andrada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on the paradigmatic implications involved on the practice of the school psychologist, which has been modified towards a relational practice, based on the presupposition of the historical social constitution of the human being. However, when this professional works in an educational institution faces several difficulties, such as: lack of comprehension from the other professional of the school board about the role of the psychologist at school; maintenance of a excluding and individualist practice (the problem is in the mind of the student or in his family, characterizing a linear and Cartesian thought. However, confronting practices, the school psychologist may create situations in order to think together with school board on better and fair existing conditions. Based on the presuppositions of the cultural-historical psychologist as well as the systemic theory, new forms of creation of these situations are presented and the results point to a new practice of the school psychologist.

  16. "God save us from psychologists as expert witnesses": the battle for forensic psychology in early twentieth-century Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2015-11-01

    This article is focused on the jurisdictional battle between psychiatrists and psychologists over psychological expertise in legal contexts that took place during the first decades of the 20th century. Using, as an example, the debate between the psychologist William Stern, the psychiatrist Albert Moll, and the jurist Albert Hellwig, which occurred at the International Congress for Sexual Research held in Berlin in 1926, it aims to demonstrate the manner in which psychiatrists' responses to psychologists' attempts to gain admittance to Germany's courtrooms were shaped not only by epistemological and methodological objections, but also by changes to expert witnessing that had already encroached on psychiatrists' professional territory. Building upon recent work examining the relationship between psychologists and jurists prior to the First World War, this article also seeks to examine the role of judges and lawyers in the contest over forensic psychology in the mid-1920s, arguing that they ultimately became referees in the increasingly public disputes between psychiatrists and psychologists.

  17. Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, J F; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chemicals used for the manufacturing of rubber are known causes of allergic contact dermatitis on the hands. Recent European studies have suggested a decrease in thiuram contact allergy. Moreover, while an association with hand dermatitis is well established, we have recently observ.......2% (19/54) and 35.4% (17/48) of the cases respectively. CONCLUSION: Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent. Clinicians should be aware of the hitherto unexplored clinical association with facial dermatitis....

  18. [Professional confidentiality: speak out or remain silent? ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubigney, Jean-claude

    2014-01-01

    People who work with children, in their daily tasks, must choose whether to disclose information entrusted to them. However, they are subject to the law, which authorises or imposes speaking out or remaining silent. In terms of ethics, they can seek the best possible response while respecting professional secrecy when meeting an individual, in a situation, in a place or at a particular time. They must then take responsibility for that decision.

  19. Terminology for houses and house remains

    OpenAIRE

    Rosberg, Karin

    2013-01-01

    In order to obtain lucidity, it is essential to choose adequate terminology when speaking of prehistoric houses. The understanding of house construction requires a terminology with a focus on construction. Very often, archaeologists instead use a terminology with a focus on the remains, and use an inadequate terminology for constructions, indicating that they do not fully consider how the constructions work. The article presents some suggestions for adequate construction terminology.

  20. Why do some cores remain starless ?

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2016-01-01

    Physical conditions that could render a core starless(in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. The density profile of a typical core extracted from an earlier simulation developed to study core-formation in a molecular cloud was used for the purpose. We demonstrate - (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of $\\sim 10^{5}$ years. Those that remained starless did briefly acquire a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the density profile of a unstable Bonnor Ebert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three of our test cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16 and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. On the contrary B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other cores viz. B68, ...

  1. Uneven biofilm and current distribution in three-dimensional macroporous anodes of bio-electrochemical systems composed of graphite electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Hu, Linbin; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Ding-Ding; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    A 3-D macroporous anode was constructed using different numbers of graphite rod arrays in fixed-volume bio-electrochemical systems (BESs), and the current and biofilm distribution were investigated by dividing the 3-D anode into several subunits. In the fixed-volume chamber, current production was not significantly improved after the electrode number increased to 36. In the case of 100 electrodes, a significant uneven current distribution was found in the macroporous anode. This was attributed to a differential pH distribution, which resulted from proton accumulation inside the macroporous anode. The pH distribution influenced the biofilm development and led to an uneven biofilm distribution. With respect to current generation, the uneven distribution of both the pH and biofilm contributed to the uneven current distribution. The center had a low pH, which led to less biofilm and a lower contribution to the total current, limiting the performance of the BESs.

  2. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  3. The 2002 Revision of the American Psychological Association's Ethics Code: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Rosemary; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Jacob, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The Ethical Principles for Psychologists and Code of Conduct has been recently revised. The organization of the code changed, and the language was made more specific. A number of points relevant to school psychology are explicitly stated in the code. A clear advantage of including these items in the code is the assistance to school psychologists…

  4. Nonromantic/Nonsexual Relationships with Former Clients: Implications for Psychologists' Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon K.

    The ethical principles and code of conduct of the American Psychological Association are clear: psychologists are to avoid sexual relationships with former clients. But guidelines offer scant guidance on nonromantic and nonsexual relationships with former clients; the ethical risks of such relationships are explored in this paper. The information…

  5. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Afifi, Amanda F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, school psychologists have increasingly recognized the importance of using valid and reliable methods to assess culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students for special education eligibility. However, little is known about their assessment practices or preparation in this area. To address these questions, a Web-based survey…

  6. Psychotropic Medication Consultation in Schools: An Ethical and Legal Dilemma for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Thaler, Cara L.; Hirsch, Amanda J.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing, consulting, and intervening with students being treated with psychotropic medications is an increasingly common activity for school psychologists. This article reviews some of the literature providing evidence for the greater need for training in school psychopharmacology. A legal and ethical case study is presented that highlights the…

  7. School Psychologists Ethical Decision Making: Implications from Selected Social Psychological Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Jon; Klose, Laurie McGarry

    2007-01-01

    School psychologists routinely engage in ethical decision making, and existing models have served as useful tools for systematically approaching ethical dilemmas. However, a few of these models have taken account of the rich and salient body of social psychology research. This article reviews social psychological phenomena that present clear…

  8. Children and Traumatic Events: Therapeutic Techniques for Psychologists Working in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Gutierrez, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    It is clear that exposure to traumatic events is not uncommon in childhood and adolescence, and psychologists working in schools should have some training in meeting the needs of this segment of the population. One intervention that has been empirically supported in the trauma field is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT). This…

  9. Counseling Psychologists Who View Their Careers as a Calling: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Foley, Pamela F.; Raque-Bodgan, Trisha L.; Reid-Marks, Laura; Dik, Bryan J.; Castano, Megan C.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Interviews were completed with eight counseling psychologists who viewed their careers as a calling. Using the Consensual Qualitative Research guidelines, six domains emerged: definition, process of discerning, content of the calling, professional impact, personal impact, and maintenance. Generally, interviewees viewed the discernment of their…

  10. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  11. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  12. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Childhood Internalizing Disorders: Perceived Knowledge, Role Preferences and Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.; Jome, Larae M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of a national sample of school psychologists in the United States regarding their knowledge, preferred roles and training needs in the assessment of nine prominent childhood internalizing disorders. Knowledge about all disorders was rated by respondents as being at least fairly important. In particular,…

  13. A Competency-Based Approach to Hiring School Counselors, Psychologists and Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Dennis P.; Probst, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Hiring decisions offer an immense opportunity for school leaders to influence the trajectory of their organizations in the immediate and long-term. However, very few school administrators have appropriate training, if any at all, in how to select the best candidates. Effective hiring for school counselors, psychologists, and social workers…

  14. Psychologizing and the Anti-Psychologist: Dewey, Lacan, and Contemporary Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Art education throughout the 20th and into the 21st century has drawn on both psychology and psychoanalysis to support approaches to teaching and learning in the arts. This article examines the concept of "psychologizing" as it appears in the writing of psychologist/philosopher John Dewey (1859-1952) and psychiatrist/psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan…

  15. Single-Case Design and Evaluation in R: An Introduction and Tutorial for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    For the appraisal of single-case intervention data, school psychologists have been encouraged to focus most, if not all, of their interpretive weight on the visual inspection of graphed data. However, existing software programs provide practitioners with limited features for systematic visual inspection. R (R Development Core Team, 2014) is a…

  16. Social Justice and Multicultural Issues: Implications for the Practice and Training of Counselors and Counseling Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Hage, Sally M.; Kindaichi, Mai M.; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the historical and contemporary connection to social justice issues in the fields of counseling and counseling psychology via the multicultural counseling movement. In addition, the authors present ways in which social justice issues can be addressed in counselors' and counseling psychologists' work with clients from diverse…

  17. Single-Case Design and Evaluation in R: An Introduction and Tutorial for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    For the appraisal of single-case intervention data, school psychologists have been encouraged to focus most, if not all, of their interpretive weight on the visual inspection of graphed data. However, existing software programs provide practitioners with limited features for systematic visual inspection. R (R Development Core Team, 2014) is a…

  18. Diabetes Management in the School Setting: The Role of the School Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Alan M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The epidemiology and characteristics of diabetes mellitus in children are discussed. Empirical studies focusing on personality and family variables, stress, behavior management, problems related to newly diagnosed cases, and cognitive functioning are reviewed. The role of school psychologists is highlighted, and guidelines are offered for…

  19. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  20. THE ETHICAL ISSUES IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PSYCHOLOGIST AS THERAPIST AND THE PATIENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    The two main ethical issues in the relationship between the psychotherapist and patient have been mentioned to be: Sexual involvement between the Psychologist and patient, and the dilemma of confidentiality so called the double loyalty of the therapist. This article will professionally discuss the nature and implications of these two phenomena; and it will propose preventive measures and strategies to cope with.

  1. Medication-Related Practice Roles: An Ethical and Legal Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Given the prevalence of school-age children and adolescents who are prescribed with and are taking psychotropic medications, a critical issue that school psychologists may likely encounter in contemporary practice is providing both quality and continuity of care to these students in the context of relevant legal and ethical parameters. With a…

  2. Commentary on the Future of Community Psychology: Perspective of a Research Community Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Norweeta G

    2016-12-01

    Community psychology is commented upon from the perspective of a community psychologist who was trained in the Community Psychology Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Her background and training are reviewed. A brief survey of research on homelessness as a frame for community psychology research is presented. Concluding remarks are provided on the future of research in community psychology.

  3. Acceptability of Functional Behavioral Assessment Procedures to Special Educators and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert E.; Bundock, Kaitlin; Kladis, Kristin; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2015-01-01

    This survey study assessed the acceptability of a variety of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures (i.e., functional assessment interviews, rating scales/questionnaires, systematic direct observations, functional analysis manipulations) to a national sample of 123 special educators and a state sample of 140 school psychologists.…

  4. Practice Placement Experiences and Needs of Trainee Educational Psychologists in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Atkinson, Cathy; Bond, Caroline; Gibbs, Simon; Hill, Vivian; Howe, Julia; Morris, Sue

    2015-01-01

    As part of initial professional training, educational psychologists in England undertake substantial periods of practice placement, within which the role of supervision is instrumental to their professional learning and effectiveness. The research reported here provides up-to-date and comprehensive information on the experiences and needs of…

  5. What Makes an Effective Psychoeducational Report? Perceptions of Teachers and Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Janet; Hawkins, Tara; Thornton, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    The psychoeducational report has many purposes and many readers. Given this, it is imperative that psychoeducational reports are well written, as well as acceptable to and understood by the readers. This study aimed to determine from the perspective of both teacher (report reader) and psychologist (report writer) the factors that make an effective…

  6. [The role of the psychologist with children or adolescents with a bone tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The psychologist practising both in a paediatric orthopaedic surgery department and a paediatric oncology department provides continuity for children and teenagers suffering from a malignant bone tumour, as well as for their family. Psychological support aims to help these young patients face the somatic and psychological upheavals with which they will be confronted throughout their treatment.

  7. The Significance of the Interculturally Competent School Psychologist for Achieving Equitable Education Outcomes for Migrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This article examines procedures and processes that result in the over-referral of migrant students to separate special education programmes and, as a consequence, their exclusion from general education. The particular focus is on the role of the school psychologist in this process. The empirical study is a comparison of Swiss teachers' and school…

  8. How Russian Teachers, Mothers and School Psychologists Perceive Internalising and Externalising Behaviours in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Elena; Moskovtseva, Ludmila; Naumenko, Oksana; Zilberberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perception of children's internalising and externalising behaviours by Russian teachers, mothers and school psychologists. The participants rated their agreement about the causes, seriousness and recommended interventions for the problem behaviour of a fictitious girl/boy described in two vignettes. Mixed ANOVAs indicated…

  9. Physics Envy: Psychologists' Perceptions of Psychology and Agreement about Core Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Collisson, Brian; King, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of psychology and its consensus regarding core content. We hypothesized that psychology possesses little agreement regarding its core content areas and thus may "envy" more canonical sciences, such as physics. Using a global sample, we compared psychologists' and physicists' perceptions regarding…

  10. An Innovative Model of Integrated Behavioral Health: School Psychologists in Pediatric Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Carolyn D.; Hinojosa, Sara; Armstrong, Kathleen; Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an innovative example of integrated care in which doctoral level school psychology interns and residents worked alongside pediatric residents and pediatricians in the primary care settings to jointly provide services to patients. School psychologists specializing in pediatric health are uniquely trained to recognize and…

  11. Should social psychologists create a disciplinary affirmative action program for political conservatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweder, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Freely staying on the move between alternative points of view is the best antidote to dogmatism. Robert Merton's ideals for an epistemic community are sufficient to correct pseudo-empirical studies designed to confirm beliefs that liberals (or conservatives) think deserve to be true. Institutionalizing the self-proclaimed political identities of social psychologists may make things worse.

  12. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work with…

  13. A case report of embryo donation: ethical and clinical implications for psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marianne; Pawlak, Stacey

    2016-10-01

    Third-party reproduction is a growing field, and an increasing body of literature considers the ethics of embryo donation. Due to the psychosocial complexities that generally accompany the donation and/or use of donor embryos, psychologists can play a pivotal role in these specialised fertility cases. While laws in the USA are in place to regulate the medical procedures involved in embryo donation, only unenforceable guidelines exist for psychologists specialising in fertility cases. The presentation of this case study aims to: (1) clarify the ethical concerns that fertility psychologists should consider in similar situations by assessing whether American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines compete or complement one another within this case of embryo donation and (2) consider the interests, obligations and rights of all parties involved. Several principles, standards and guidelines that must be considered are described. Overall, the APA Ethics Code and the ASRM Guidelines appear to complement one another for most aspects of this case. Fertility psychologists should consider the clinical implications of the interests, rights and duties of all involved parties, including themselves.

  14. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of Hypnosis by Psychologists in a Pediatric Setting: Establishing and Maintaining Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Donald J.; Hoffmann, Claudia

    The use of hypnosis in a pediatric setting has the potential for yielding effective results. Obstacles to its use are inappropriate training of psychologists in pediatric psychology, resistance to hypnosis from the pediatricians and mental health professionals, fragmented communication, and constant demand for space and time. Success of hypnosis…

  16. Providing Psychological Intervention Following Traumatic Events: Understanding and Managing Psychologists' Own Stress Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ben; Frederickson, Norah

    2008-01-01

    The role of the educational psychology service in crisis support is well established. This paper examines a key aspect of this role, the impact on psychologists themselves, and reviews literature on secondary stress, considering the term "stress" itself as part of the discussion. It examines recommendations for professional practice and self care…

  17. Evaluating Childhood Bipolar Disorder--A Survey of School Psychologists' Knowledge and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Linda A.; Mayo, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Using data gathered from the "Childhood Bipolar Disorder Survey," this study explored Pennsylvania school psychologists' knowledge and practices when evaluating children for Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Results indicate that only a small percentage of school referrals involved children or adolescents with BPD. Participating school…

  18. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  19. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  20. Crisis Response in the Public Schools: A Survey of School Psychologists' Experiences and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Austin D.; Peacock, Gretchen Gimpel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 228 school psychologists completed a survey regarding crisis intervention teams and plans. The majority of respondents indicated their schools had crisis plans (95.1%) and teams (83.6%). The most common team activities endorsed by participants involved providing direct assistance and services to students, staff, and the media. The…

  1. Survey of School Psychologists' Attitudes, Feelings, and Exposure to Gay and Lesbian Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-sook; Thul, Candrice A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Norris, James L.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists' attitudes and feelings toward gay and lesbian parents were surveyed in relation to their training and exposure, and professional services offered to gay and lesbian parents and their children. The relationship between attitudes, feelings, training, exposure, and demographic characteristics was explored as well. A stratified…

  2. Gesell: The First School Psychologist Part I. The Road to Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Arnold Gesell's (1880-1960) qualifications, career, experiences, and the events which led to his official appointment as the first school psychologist in the United States are discussed. Gesell was influenced by Hall's thinking, and his graduate studies were a combination of experimental, developmental, and clinical psychology. (JAZ)

  3. [Involvement of psychologists in the organ procurement procedure after 'controlled' cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernay, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    A protocol for the provision of psychological support for family members has been put in place by a hospital coordination team, in the framework of organ donation after the limitation or cessation of treatment. The support takes into account the needs of the families in terms of information, listening and follow-up. The unit psychologist plays an important role in this approach.

  4. Using Consultation to Support English Learners: The Experiences of Bilingual School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Through semi-structured interviews, this study explored 11 bilingual school psychologists' (BSPs) consultation experiences with teachers of English learners (EL) to determine referral concerns, recommendations made, challenges encountered, preparation experiences, and skills most needed. The most common referral issue concerned students' academic…

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury: The Efficacy of a Half-Day Training for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Ray, Ashlyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are increasing, yet educators continue to be inadequately trained in assessing and serving students with TBIs. This study examined the efficacy of a half-day TBI training program for school psychologists designed to improve their knowledge and skills. Results of quantitative and qualitative…

  6. Modeling Psychologists' Ethical Intention: Application of an Expanded Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz-Kaddari, Michall; Shifman, Annie; Koslowsky, Meni

    2016-06-01

    At the core of all therapeutic and medical practice lies ethics. By applying an expanded Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior formulation, the present investigation tested a model for explaining psychologists' intention to behave ethically. In the pretest, dual relationships and money conflicts were seen as the most prevalent dilemmas. A total of 395 clinical psychologists filled out questionnaires containing either a dual relationship dilemma describing a scenario where a psychologist was asked to treat a son of a colleague or a money-focused dilemma where he or she was asked to treat a patient unable to pay for the service. Results obtained from applying the expanded Ajzen's model to each dilemma, generally, supported the study hypotheses. In particular, attitudes were seen as the most important predictor in both dilemmas followed by a morality component, defined here as the commitment of the psychologist to the patient included here as an additional predictor in the model. The expanded model provided a better understanding of ethical intention. Practical implications were also discussed.

  7. The Likelihood of Use of Social Power Strategies by School Psychologists when Consulting with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristen E.; Erchul, William P.; Raven, Bertram H.

    2008-01-01

    The Interpersonal Power Inventory (IPI) has been applied previously to investigate school psychologists engaged in problem-solving consultation with teachers concerning students having various learning and adjustment problems. Relevant prior findings include (a) consultants and teachers both perceive soft power strategies as more effective than…

  8. Black Students' Recollections of Pathways to Resilience: Lessons for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on narrative data from a multiple case study, I recount the life stories of two resilient Black South African university students to theorize about the processes that encouraged these students, familiar with penury and parental illiteracy, to resile. I aimed to uncover lessons for school psychologists about resilience, and their role in…

  9. American Psychologist Task Force Report: Clarifying Mission, Coverage, Communication, and Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2002-01-01

    An American Psychological Association task force reviewed the role and function of "American Psychologist," (AP) focusing on its coverage domain and issues related to its editorial review process. This report examines AP editorial domain, AP editorial instructions, AP editorship, communications within the AP editorial process, use of ad…

  10. Introduction and Overview: Counseling Psychologists' Roles, Training, and Research Contributions to Large-Scale Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sue C.; Leach, Mark M.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    Counseling psychologists have responded to many disasters, including the Haiti earthquake, the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, and Hurricane Katrina. However, as a profession, their responses have been localized and nonsystematic. In this first of four articles in this contribution, "Counseling Psychology and Large-Scale Disasters,…

  11. A Discussion of the Developing Role of Educational Psychologists within Children's Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Kate; Woods, Kevin; Rooney, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the developing role of educational psychologists (EPs) within the local authority Children's Services, from the starting point that the EP role has, through numerous reviews, been clearly conceptualised. Detailing the philosophy and framework for the inception of Children's Services in England, the authors propose two…

  12. Intermarried Couples Negotiating Mixedness in Everyday Life in Denmark: Lessons for Psychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    be doing to help society meet the challenges and grasp the opportunities in education, at work, and in clinical practice. The increasingly international and globalized nature of modern societies means that psychologists in particular face new challenges and have new opportunities in all areas of practice...

  13. The Ever Evolving Identity of Counseling Psychologists: Musings of the Society of Counseling Psychology President

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding our identity as counseling psychologists has been an issue since the inception of our specialty in the 1940s and one that the authors of these two articles (Goodyear et al., 2008 [this issue]; Munley, Pate, & Duncan, 2008 [this issue]) tackle in new and different ways. In this response, this author (a) identifies additional reasons…

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury: The Efficacy of a Half-Day Training for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Ray, Ashlyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are increasing, yet educators continue to be inadequately trained in assessing and serving students with TBIs. This study examined the efficacy of a half-day TBI training program for school psychologists designed to improve their knowledge and skills. Results of quantitative and qualitative…

  15. What Makes an Effective Psychoeducational Report? Perceptions of Teachers and Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Janet; Hawkins, Tara; Thornton, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    The psychoeducational report has many purposes and many readers. Given this, it is imperative that psychoeducational reports are well written, as well as acceptable to and understood by the readers. This study aimed to determine from the perspective of both teacher (report reader) and psychologist (report writer) the factors that make an effective…

  16. The Provision of Counseling Services among School Psychologists: An Exploration of Training, Current Practices, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Fernald, Lori N.

    2013-01-01

    Although school psychologists have been called on in recent literature to assume a leadership role in a collective and comprehensive effort to address students' mental health needs, many practitioners find that their professional roles continue to be narrowly focused on special education-related activities, such as individualized assessment…

  17. A Survey of School Psychologists' Preparation, Participation, and Perceptions Related to Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Long, Lori; Kucera, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Positive behavior interventions and supports are increasingly utilized in school systems throughout the nation, particularly the school-wide multi-tiered support framework. Given such trends, and the basis of these practices in psychological principles and research, it is important to identify how school psychologists are trained to contribute to…

  18. Assessing the Cognitive Functioning of Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Practices and Perceptions of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costner, Ashley Nicole

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are faced with the task of conducting evaluations of students in order to determine special education eligibility. This often equates to administering a cognitive assessment measure to obtain information about skills or abilities. Although this may be a straightforward task when working with children of average or higher…

  19. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Primary Care Partnerships: Implications for Building the Collaborative Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Jeffries-DeLoatche, Kendall L.; Walsh, Audra St. John; Bateman, Lisa P.; Nadeau, Josh; Powers, Derek J.; Cunningham, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need to increase communication and collaboration across the educational and medical systems on behalf of students with paediatric health issues. The purpose of the current study was to investigate school psychologists' perceptions of their communication and collaboration practices with paediatric professionals (e.g.…

  20. How Vocational Psychologists Can Make a Difference in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Shannon, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In general, vocational psychologists have not been engaged in applied research that demonstrates how career interventions can improve educational problems that matter to relevant decision-makers and stakeholders. This article describes how vocational psychology can make a difference in K-12 education by embracing an interdisciplinary…

  1. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  2. Conceptualising the professional identity of industrial or organisational psychologists within the South African context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, Llewellyn E.; Nel, Elzabe; Stander, Marius W.; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: Lack in congruence amongst industrial and organisational psychologists (IOPs) as to the conceptualisation of its profession poses a significant risk as to the relevance, longevity and professional identity of the profession within the South African context. Research purpose: This study

  3. The Role of the School Psychologist in the Examination of Complex Language Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Hans

    1988-01-01

    School psychologists must utilize an interdisciplinary approach to understand and analyze language disturbances, by examining the student's motor coordination, sensorium, perception, cognition, emotionality, and sociability. Implications for the practice of school psychology are offered in the areas of dyslalia, dysgrammatia, retardation of…

  4. Associations between psychologists' thinking styles and accuracy on a diagnostic classification task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, A.A.; Witteman, C.L.M.; Souren, P.M.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether individual differences between psychologists in thinking styles are associated with accuracy in diagnostic classification. We asked novice and experienced clinicians to classify two clinical cases of clients with two co-occurring psychological disorders. No sig

  5. The Role of School Counsellors and Psychologists in Supporting Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Damien W.; Bartholomaeus, Clare

    2015-01-01

    As growing numbers of transgender people--including students, parents, and educators--become visible within schools, so comes with this the requirement that schools ensure their full inclusion. This article suggests that school counsellors and psychologists have an important role to play in supporting transgender people within schools. As an…

  6. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  7. Physics Envy: Psychologists' Perceptions of Psychology and Agreement about Core Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Collisson, Brian; King, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of psychology and its consensus regarding core content. We hypothesized that psychology possesses little agreement regarding its core content areas and thus may "envy" more canonical sciences, such as physics. Using a global sample, we compared psychologists' and physicists' perceptions regarding…

  8. Use of Hypnosis by Psychologists in a Pediatric Setting: Establishing and Maintaining Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Donald J.; Hoffmann, Claudia

    The use of hypnosis in a pediatric setting has the potential for yielding effective results. Obstacles to its use are inappropriate training of psychologists in pediatric psychology, resistance to hypnosis from the pediatricians and mental health professionals, fragmented communication, and constant demand for space and time. Success of hypnosis…

  9. School Safety and Crisis Planning Considerations for School Psychologists. Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly-Wilson, Christina; Reeves, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, people across the country are asking if schools in their communities are safe. School psychologists not only play a pivotal role in answering that question, but they can also provide leadership in helping to ensure a safe school climate. A critical component to answering…

  10. Supervision and Mentoring for Early Career School Psychologists: Availability, Access, Structure, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlene E.; Newman, Daniel S.; Guiney, Meaghan C.; Valley-Gray, Sarah; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors thank Jeffrey Charvat, Director of Research, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), for his guidance regarding survey development and administration, and Wendy Finn, former Director of Membership and Marketing, NASP, for her assistance with sampling and data collection. The authors thank Concetta Panuccio for her…

  11. Distribution of albatross remains in the Far East regions during the Holocene, based on zooarchaeological remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Many albatross remains have been found in the Japanese Islands and the surrounding areas, such as Sakhalin and South Korea. These remains are interesting for two reasons: numerous sites from which albatross remains have been found are located in coastal regions of the Far East where no albatrosses have been distributed recently, and there are some sites in which albatross remains represent a large portion of avian remains, although albatrosses are not easily preyed upon by human beings. We collected data on albatross remains from archaeological sites in the Far East regions during the Holocene and arranged the remains geographically, temporally and in terms of quantity. Based on these results, we showed that coastal areas along the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan have rarely been used by albatrosses in Modern times, though formerly there were many albatrosses. We proposed two explanations for the shrinkage of their distributional range: excessive hunting in the breeding areas, and distributional changes of prey for albatrosses.

  12. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach. PMID:25506221

  13. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients' pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach.

  14. Psychologists experience of cognitive behaviour therapy in a developing country: a qualitative study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayub Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological therapies especially Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT are used widely in the West to help patients with psychiatric problems. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has an established evidence base for the treatment of different emotional disorders. In spite of these developments in the developed world, patients in most developing countries hardly benefit from non pharmacological interventions. Although a significant number of psychologists are trained in Pakistan each year, psychological interventions play only a minor role in treatment plans in Pakistan. We conducted interviews with psychologists in Pakistan, to explore their experiences and their views on "providing CBT in Pakistan". These interviews were conducted as part of a project whose focus was to try to develop culturally-sensitive CBT in Pakistan. Methods In depth semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 psychologists working in psychiatry departments in Lahore, Pakistan. Results All the psychologists reported that psychotherapies, including CBT, need adjustments for use in Pakistan, although they were not able to elicit on these in details. Four major themes were discovered, hurdles in therapy, therapy related issues, involvement of the family and modification in therapy. The biggest hurdles in therapy were described to be service and resource issues. Conclusions For CBT to be acceptable, accessible and effective in Non Western cultures numerous adjustments need to be made, taking into consideration; factors related to service structure and delivery, patient's knowledge and beliefs about health and the therapy itself. Interviews with the psychologists in these countries can give us insights which can guide development of therapy and manuals to support its delivery.

  15. So close: remaining challenges to eradicating polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, Michael J

    2016-03-14

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, is close to achieving its goal. In 2015, reported cases of wild poliovirus were limited to just two countries - Afghanistan and Pakistan. Africa has been polio-free for more than 18 months. Remaining barriers to global eradication include insecurity in areas such as Northwest Pakistan and Eastern and Southern Afghanistan, where polio cases continue to be reported. Hostility to vaccination is either based on extreme ideologies, such as in Pakistan, vaccination fatigue by parents whose children have received more than 15 doses, and misunderstandings about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness such as in Ukraine. A further challenge is continued circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus in populations with low immunity, with 28 cases reported in 2015 in countries as diverse as Madagascar, Ukraine, Laos, and Myanmar. This paper summarizes the current epidemiology of wild and vaccine-derived poliovirus, and describes the remaining challenges to eradication and innovative approaches being taken to overcome them.

  16. Improvement of vehicle stability in cornering on uneven road; Akuro senkaiji ni okeru sharyo no anzensei kojo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobimatsu, K.; Harada, M.; Harada, H. [National Defense Academy, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The active control of vehicle suspensions and rear wheel steering systems in turning on uneven roads is analyzed by means of LQR control theory, assuming that cornering forces depend on tire normal loads in addition to tire slip angles. The authors quantitatively investigated the effectiveness of the integrated control of the active suspension and the rear wheel steering, comparing the contributions of each individual system. Furthermore, in this paper, the role of the chassis control and driver control are studied in order to improve the stability of vehicle motion disturbed by the road surface. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

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    Gholamreza Pourmand

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61% patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8% the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%. A total of 166 (41.5% patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5% had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2% developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8% remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45% patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55% didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  18. Remaining Useful Lifetime (RUL - Probabilistic Predictive Model

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    Ephraim Suhir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability evaluations and assurances cannot be delayed until the device (system is fabricated and put into operation. Reliability of an electronic product should be conceived at the early stages of its design; implemented during manufacturing; evaluated (considering customer requirements and the existing specifications, by electrical, optical and mechanical measurements and testing; checked (screened during manufacturing (fabrication; and, if necessary and appropriate, maintained in the field during the product’s operation Simple and physically meaningful probabilistic predictive model is suggested for the evaluation of the remaining useful lifetime (RUL of an electronic device (system after an appreciable deviation from its normal operation conditions has been detected, and the increase in the failure rate and the change in the configuration of the wear-out portion of the bathtub has been assessed. The general concepts are illustrated by numerical examples. The model can be employed, along with other PHM forecasting and interfering tools and means, to evaluate and to maintain the high level of the reliability (probability of non-failure of a device (system at the operation stage of its lifetime.

  19. The Human Remains from HMS Pandora

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    D.P. Steptoe

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1977 the wreck of HMS Pandora (the ship that was sent to re-capture the Bounty mutineers was discovered off the north coast of Queensland. Since 1983, the Queensland Museum Maritime Archaeology section has carried out systematic excavation of the wreck. During the years 1986 and 1995-1998, more than 200 human bone and bone fragments were recovered. Osteological investigation revealed that this material represented three males. Their ages were estimated at approximately 17 +/-2 years, 22 +/-3 years and 28 +/-4 years, with statures of 168 +/-4cm, 167 +/-4cm, and 166cm +/-3cm respectively. All three individuals were probably Caucasian, although precise determination of ethnicity was not possible. In addition to poor dental hygiene, signs of chronic diseases suggestive of rickets and syphilis were observed. Evidence of spina bifida was seen on one of the skeletons, as were other skeletal anomalies. Various taphonomic processes affecting the remains were also observed and described. Compact bone was observed under the scanning electron microscope and found to be structurally coherent. Profiles of the three skeletons were compared with historical information about the 35 men lost with the ship, but no precise identification could be made. The investigation did not reveal the cause of death. Further research, such as DNA analysis, is being carried out at the time of publication.

  20. Smart Point Cloud: Definition and Remaining Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, F.; Hallot, P.; Neuville, R.; Billen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dealing with coloured point cloud acquired from terrestrial laser scanner, this paper identifies remaining challenges for a new data structure: the smart point cloud. This concept arises with the statement that massive and discretized spatial information from active remote sensing technology is often underused due to data mining limitations. The generalisation of point cloud data associated with the heterogeneity and temporality of such datasets is the main issue regarding structure, segmentation, classification, and interaction for an immediate understanding. We propose to use both point cloud properties and human knowledge through machine learning to rapidly extract pertinent information, using user-centered information (smart data) rather than raw data. A review of feature detection, machine learning frameworks and database systems indexed both for mining queries and data visualisation is studied. Based on existing approaches, we propose a new 3-block flexible framework around device expertise, analytic expertise and domain base reflexion. This contribution serves as the first step for the realisation of a comprehensive smart point cloud data structure.

  1. SMART POINT CLOUD: DEFINITION AND REMAINING CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Poux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dealing with coloured point cloud acquired from terrestrial laser scanner, this paper identifies remaining challenges for a new data structure: the smart point cloud. This concept arises with the statement that massive and discretized spatial information from active remote sensing technology is often underused due to data mining limitations. The generalisation of point cloud data associated with the heterogeneity and temporality of such datasets is the main issue regarding structure, segmentation, classification, and interaction for an immediate understanding. We propose to use both point cloud properties and human knowledge through machine learning to rapidly extract pertinent information, using user-centered information (smart data rather than raw data. A review of feature detection, machine learning frameworks and database systems indexed both for mining queries and data visualisation is studied. Based on existing approaches, we propose a new 3-block flexible framework around device expertise, analytic expertise and domain base reflexion. This contribution serves as the first step for the realisation of a comprehensive smart point cloud data structure.

  2. Turbidite plays` immaturity means big potential remains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettingill, H.S. [Repsol Exploracion SA, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-10-05

    The international exploration and production industry is increasingly focusing on deepwater plays. Turbidites are not the only reservoir type that occurs in deepwater frontiers, but they are the primary reservoir type of those plays. A worldwide data base assembled from published information on 925 fields and discoveries with deepwater clastic reservoirs (turbidites sensu lato) has been employed to investigate the large-scale exploration and production trends. Coverage of the Former Soviet Union, China, and the Indian subcontinent has been minor, but with the large data base of fields and discoveries from the rest of the world, the broad conclusions should remain valid. This article describes the global turbidite play in terms of: (1) basins of the world where turbidite fields have been discovered; (2) the five largest basins in terms of total discovered resources; and (3) a summary of trap type, which is a critical geological factor in turbidite fields. The second article will summarize a population of the world`s 43 largest turbidite fields and discoveries.

  3. Changing educational needs of psychologists: do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belar, Cynthia D

    2008-03-01

    Psychologists of the 21st century must be highly skilled and versatile to function effectively in academic health centers (AHCs). Thus, the current paper focuses on the training psychologists receive to prepare them for their diverse roles in AHCs. The paper is framed around the question: Do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science? posed to the author by the conference organizers of the 3rd National Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Conference and is based on the perspective of the author.

  4. Uneven distribution of hepatic copper concentration and diagnostic value of double-sample biopsy in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggi, Mauro; Mais, Claudia; Demurtas, Mauro; Sorbello, Orazio; Demelia, Enrico; Civolani, Alberto; Demelia, Luigi

    2013-12-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS. Determination of hepatic copper (Cu) concentration is important in Wilson's disease (WD) diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate uneven distribution of liver Cu concentration and the utility of double-sample biopsy in WD diagnosis. METHODS. Thirty-five WD patients (20 male; mean age 41 ± 9 years) were enrolled in the study and double-liver samples for biopsy were obtained. A further 30 WD patients, in whom Cu determination was performed using single-liver samples, were also enrolled as controls. RESULTS. A marked difference in hepatic Cu concentration was observed between the two sample groups (p liver fibrosis (p liver biopsy compared to 93% for single-sample liver biopsy. CONCLUSIONS. Liver Cu content was unevenly distributed in the WD subjects, irrespective of fibrosis levels and disease phenotypes; hence WD can be misdiagnosed using single-sample liver Cu measurement. Double-sample biopsy sensitivity is greater than that obtained with single-sample biopsy and should therefore be considered to evaluate liver Cu concentration at initial diagnosis in all patients.

  5. A novel fuzzy logic correctional algorithm for traction control systems on uneven low-friction road conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ran, Xu; Wu, Kaihui; Song, Jian; Han, Zongqi

    2015-06-01

    The traction control system (TCS) might prevent excessive skid of the driving wheels so as to enhance the driving performance and direction stability of the vehicle. But if driven on an uneven low-friction road, the vehicle body often vibrates severely due to the drastic fluctuations of driving wheels, and then the vehicle comfort might be reduced greatly. The vibrations could be hardly removed with traditional drive-slip control logic of the TCS. In this paper, a novel fuzzy logic controller has been brought forward, in which the vibration signals of the driving wheels are adopted as new controlled variables, and then the engine torque and the active brake pressure might be coordinately re-adjusted besides the basic logic of a traditional TCS. In the proposed controller, an adjustable engine torque and pressure compensation loop are adopted to constrain the drastic vehicle vibration. Thus, the wheel driving slips and the vibration degrees might be adjusted synchronously and effectively. The simulation results and the real vehicle tests validated that the proposed algorithm is effective and adaptable for a complicated uneven low-friction road.

  6. The Effects of Moon¡¯s Uneven Mass Distribution on the Critical Inclinations of a Lunar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahoma, Walid A.; Abd El-Salam, Fawzy A.

    2014-12-01

    The uneven mass distribution of the Moon highly perturbs the lunar spacecrafts. This uneven mass distribution leads to peculiar dynamical features of the lunar orbiters. The critical inclination is the value of inclination which keeps the deviation of the argument of pericentre from the initial values to be zero. Considerable investigations have been performed for critical inclination when the gravity field is assumed to be symmetric around the equator, namely for oblate gravity field to which Earth¡¯s satellites are most likely to be subjected. But in the case of a lunar orbiter, the gravity field of mass distribution is rather asymmetric, that is, sectorial, and tesseral, harmonic coefficients are big enough so they can¡¯t be neglected. In the present work, the effects of the first sectorial and tesseral harmonic coefficients in addition to the first zonal harmonic coefficients on the critical inclination of a lunar artificial satellite are investigated. The study is carried out using the Hamiltonian framework. The Hamiltonian of the problem is cconstructed and the short periodic terms are eliminated using Delaunay canonical variables. Considering the above perturbations, numerical simulations for a hypothetical lunar orbiter are presented. Finally, this study reveals that the critical inclination is quite different from the critical inclination of traditional sense and/or even has multiple solutions. Consequently, different families of critical inclination are obtained and analyzed.

  7. Are the Economically Optimal Harvesting Strategies of Uneven-Aged Pinus nigra Stands Always Sustainable and Stabilizing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Fullana-Belda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional uneven-aged forest management seeks a balance between equilibrium stand structure and economic profitability, which often leads to harvesting strategies concentrated in the larger diameter classes. The sustainability (i.e., population persistence over time and influence of such economically optimal strategies on the equilibrium position of a stand (given by the stable diameter distribution have not been sufficiently investigated in prior forest literature. This article therefore proposes a discrete optimal control model to analyze the sustainability and stability of the economically optimal harvesting strategies of uneven-aged Pinus nigra stands. For this model, we rely on an objective function that integrates financial data of harvesting operations with a projection matrix model that can describe the population dynamics. The model solution reveals the optimal management schedules for a wide variety of scenarios. To measure the distance between the stable diameter distribution and the economically optimal harvesting strategy distribution, the model uses Keyfitz’s delta, which returns high values for all the scenarios and, thus, suggests that those economically optimal harvesting strategies have an unstabilizing influence on the equilibrium positions. Moreover, the economically optimal harvesting strategies were unsustainable for all the scenarios.

  8. Node Self-Deployment Algorithm Based on an Uneven Cluster with Radius Adjusting for Underwater Sensor Networks

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    Peng Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing move-restricted node self-deployment algorithms are based on a fixed node communication radius, evaluate the performance based on network coverage or the connectivity rate and do not consider the number of nodes near the sink node and the energy consumption distribution of the network topology, thereby degrading network reliability and the energy consumption balance. Therefore, we propose a distributed underwater node self-deployment algorithm. First, each node begins the uneven clustering based on the distance on the water surface. Each cluster head node selects its next-hop node to synchronously construct a connected path to the sink node. Second, the cluster head node adjusts its depth while maintaining the layout formed by the uneven clustering and then adjusts the positions of in-cluster nodes. The algorithm originally considers the network reliability and energy consumption balance during node deployment and considers the coverage redundancy rate of all positions that a node may reach during the node position adjustment. Simulation results show, compared to the connected dominating set (CDS based depth computation algorithm, that the proposed algorithm can increase the number of the nodes near the sink node and improve network reliability while guaranteeing the network connectivity rate. Moreover, it can balance energy consumption during network operation, further improve network coverage rate and reduce energy consumption.

  9. A High-Efficiency Uneven Cluster Deployment Algorithm Based on Network Layered for Event Coverage in UWSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanen Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most existing deployment algorithms for event coverage in underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs usually do not consider that network communication has non-uniform characteristics on three-dimensional underwater environments. Such deployment algorithms ignore that the nodes are distributed at different depths and have different probabilities for data acquisition, thereby leading to imbalances in the overall network energy consumption, decreasing the network performance, and resulting in poor and unreliable late network operation. Therefore, in this study, we proposed an uneven cluster deployment algorithm based network layered for event coverage. First, according to the energy consumption requirement of the communication load at different depths of the underwater network, we obtained the expected value of deployment nodes and the distribution density of each layer network after theoretical analysis and deduction. Afterward, the network is divided into multilayers based on uneven clusters, and the heterogeneous communication radius of nodes can improve the network connectivity rate. The recovery strategy is used to balance the energy consumption of nodes in the cluster and can efficiently reconstruct the network topology, which ensures that the network has a high network coverage and connectivity rate in a long period of data acquisition. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm improves network reliability and prolongs network lifetime by significantly reducing the blind movement of overall network nodes while maintaining a high network coverage and connectivity rate.

  10. Remaining phosphorus estimated by pedotransfer function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Cagliari

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the determination of remaining phosphorus (Prem is simple, accurate values could also be estimated with a pedotransfer function (PTF aiming at the additional use of soil analysis data and/or Prem replacement by an even simpler determination. The purpose of this paper was to develop a pedotransfer function to estimate Prem values of soils of the State of São Paulo based on properties with easier or routine laboratory determination. A pedotransfer function was developed by artificial neural networks (ANN from a database of Prem values, pH values measured in 1 mol L-1 NaF solution (pH NaF and soil chemical and physical properties of samples collected during soil classification activities carried out in the State of São Paulo by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas (IAC. Furthermore, a pedotransfer function was developed by regressing Prem values against the same predictor variables of the ANN-based PTF. Results showed that Prem values can be calculated more accurately with the ANN-based pedotransfer function with the input variables pH NaF values along with the sum of exchangeable bases (SB and the exchangeable aluminum (Al3+ soil content. In addition, the accuracy of the Prem estimates by ANN-based PTF were more sensitive to increases in the experimental database size. Although the database used in this study was not comprehensive enough for the establishment of a definitive pedotrasnfer function for Prem estimation, results indicated the inclusion of Prem and pH NaF measurements among the soil testing evaluations as promising ind order to provide a greater database for the development of an ANN-based pedotransfer function for accurate Prem estimates from pH NaF, SB, and Al3+ values.

  11. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  12. 2010 Amendments to the 2002 "Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The following amendments to the 2002 "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" (the Ethics Code; American Psychological Association, 2002) were adopted by the APA Council of Representatives at its February 2010 meeting. The changes involve the last two sentences of the final paragraph of the Introduction and Applicability section and Ethical Standards 1.02 and 1.03. The amendments became effective June 1, 2010. A history of these amendments to the Ethics Code is provided in the "Report of the Ethics Committee, 2009" in this issue of the American Psychologist (American Psychological Association, Ethics Committee, 2010). Following are a clean version of the revisions and a version indicating changes from the 2002 language (inserted text is underlined; deleted text is crossed out).

  13. Productivity of Educational Psychologists in Educational Psychology Journals, 1991-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith; Locke; Boisse; Gallagher; Krengel; Kuczek; McFarland; Rapoo; Wertheim

    1998-04-01

    The scholarly productivity of educational psychologists, indexed in terms of the number of papers published in professional journals in the field was the focus of this investigation. Five journals considered to be among the "core journals" in the field and, thus, those in which educational psychologists are likely to publish their scholarship were examined for the years 1991-1996. Both institutions (i.e., universities) and individuals were identified. The top-rated institution, in terms of educational psychology productivity, was the University of Maryland and the most prolific individual contributor to the journals was Herbert Marsh. The findings partially replicate several previous productivity studies in psychology and educational psychology. The most productive scholars in the field include both seasoned, established leaders in the discipline, as well as younger individuals who are making their mark. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. The prescribing clinical health psychologist: a hybrid skill set in the new era of integrated healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kevin M

    2012-12-01

    The prescribing clinical health psychologist brings together in one individual a combination of skills to create a hybrid profession that can add value to any healthcare organization. This article addresses the high demand for mental health services and the inequitable distribution of mental health practitioners across the nation. The close link between physical and mental health and evidence that individuals in psychological distress often enter the mental health system via primary care medical clinics is offered as background to a discussion of the author's work as a commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service assigned to the Chaparral Medical Center of La Clinica de Familia, Inc. near the U.S.-Mexico border. The prescribing clinical health psychologist in primary care medical settings is described as a valuable asset to the future of professional psychology.

  15. From philosopher to psychologist: the early career of Edwin Ray Guthrie, Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David O

    2005-08-01

    Edwin R. Guthrie rose to prominence as a psychologist in the 1930s. His theoretical outlook was behavioristic. This approach came from his conviction that an objective method could be applied to a scientific treatment of mind. Prior to becoming a psychologist, he was a philosopher of mathematics. Guthrie was initiated into psychology by Stevenson Smith, from whom he learned a psychology of adjustment informed by comparative research, Columbia functionalism, and clinical psychology. Guthrie's first step into psychology was in collaboration with Smith on Chapters in General Psychology (S. Smith & E.R. Guthrie, 1921). To synthesize their own unique position on learning from the contemporary theory and research, they used the principle of association. This articles focuses on Guthrie's origin and his development into a learning theorist.

  16. The trend toward more attractive and informative titles: American Psychologist 1946-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, Cynthia

    2012-04-01

    Titles of journal articles serve to attract attention and inform potential readers. All titles from 65 volumes of American Psychologist (1946-2010, N = 12,313 titles) were studied in terms of their emotionality, style, and contents. Several trends noted for titles in different kinds of journals from psychology and other disciplines were present in American Psychologist (increasing title length, increasing use of punctuation marks, increasing employment of words with pleasant and arousing connotations, variations in the frequency of different content words). Longer titles allow authors to specify more information, and emotionally upbeat titles are more likely to attract reader attention. In an unexpected quadratic trend, titles became more abstract and the number of titles increased until about 1985, after which the trend was reversed and titles became more concrete as their numbers decreased. Predictors of this trend include societal variables and the journal's editorial policies.

  17. The relationships between adult attachment, theoretical orientation, and therapist-reported alliance quality among licensed psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Sari; Shorey, Hal S

    2016-01-01

    Attachment anxiety has been depicted as an undesirable therapist characteristic based on findings that preoccupied therapists, relative to those with other attachment styles, report more ruptures in the therapeutic alliance. What has not been considered, however, is the extent to which attachment dynamics are related to theoretical orientations and how attachment styles and theoretical orientations combine to predict therapists' perceptions of the quality of their alliances. The present surveyed 290 licensed psychologists nationally. Results revealed that even within a sample of primarily secure psychologists, higher 15 levels of attachment anxiety correlated positively with the endorsement of psychodynamic orientations, and negatively with the endorsement of cognitive-behavioral orientations and self-reported alliance quality. Endorsement of cognitive-behavioral orientations, in turn, correlated positively with therapist-reported alliance quality. The results are discussed in terms of the extent to which attachment dimensions should be considered in therapists' understandings of their therapeutic alliances.

  18. Managing Difficult Patients: Roles of Psychologists in the Age of Interdisciplinary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiner, William N; Petrik, Megan L

    2017-03-01

    Various problems can occur during encounters between health providers and patients. In some instances, clinicians attribute these problems to patients being "difficult." However, clinicians' perception of difficulties in the clinical encounter are also influenced by: clinicians' own attitudes, thoughts, and behavior; the specific setting in which patient and clinician interact; and properties of the healthcare organization in which they are embedded. This article explores how psychologists in medical settings can serve as a resource that: improves patient care for difficult patients; supports provider wellness; provides relevant education to clinical providers; and reduces the stress that difficult patients place on the healthcare system. The definition, scope, and impact of difficult patients in healthcare settings are reviewed, including an examination of patient, clinician, and systems factors that contribute to the etiology of difficult clinical encounters. Strategies are discussed that may prevent or limit the adverse impact of difficult patients in healthcare, with special emphasis on the roles of psychologists in interprofessional healthcare teams.

  19. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Factors Related to Compensation of Pediatric Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Cheryl L; Hilliard, Marisa E; Williams, Andre; Armstrong, F Daniel; Christidis, Peggy; Kichler, Jessica; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Stamm, Karen E; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-05-01

    To summarize compensation results from the 2015 Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey and identify factors related to compensation of pediatric psychologists. All full members of SPP ( n  = 1,314) received the online Workforce Survey; 404 (32%) were returned with usable data. The survey assessed salary, benefits, and other income sources. The relationship between demographic and employment-related factors and overall compensation was explored.   Academic rank, level of administrative responsibility, and cost of living index of employment location were associated with compensation. Compensation did not vary by gender; however, women were disproportionately represented at the assistant and associate professor level. Compensation of pediatric psychologists is related to multiple factors. Longitudinal administration of the Workforce Survey is needed to determine changes in compensation and career advancement for this profession over time. Strategies to increase the response rate of future Workforce Surveys are discussed.

  20. Primitive entertainment prank calls in the work of counseling psychologist on Children helpline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Geronimus

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges faced by counseling psychologist when working at the Children's Helpline in cases of prank calls. The category of prank calls include such calls, when the caller asks the psychologist to discuss the imaginary situation, or do not formulate a query at all. On the basis of empirical data, we revealed the main varieties of such calls: call jokes, fantasy calls, intrusive calls, insulting calls, prank calls, calls of a sexual nature, dating calls. We explore the possible motivations of children and adolescents, entertaining by phone calls: experimentation with new social roles, expression of negative emotions, cognitive motivation, etc. We show the principles and strategies of counselors of Children's helpline working with this type of calls: they are based on cultural-historical psychology ideas and V. Satir communicative styles model.

  1. [Intermittent urinary catheterization and collaboration between the stoma nurse and psychologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrille, Brigitte; Perrusson, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent urinary catheters can be prescribed in cases of urogenital disorders. The child and the family undergo a long process to adapt and learn a new way of life requiring regular stoma care. The stoma nurse specialist and psychologist work together to ensure the follow-up and therapeutic education of the children and their families as well as the coordination of the different partners involved in helping the child gain their autonomy.

  2. CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF THE MANIFESTATION OF EMPATHY OF PSYCHOLOGISTS AND PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Borisovna Khlebodarova

    2015-01-01

    Profession of psychologist requires from the individual special abilities: to understand the emotional state of the client, to be sincere in the relationship with the client, to reflect and convey the feelings experienced at the moment. It is impossible to achieve efficiency in the professional activities without practical mastering of such psychic reality as empathy. The approaches to the problems of empathy abound with dozens of definitions, models of empathic process, stages, levels, and m...

  3. Organizational-professional conflict of I/O psychologists, job satisfaction and work engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Branko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available organizational-professional conflict occurs among employees in situations when organizational expectations and demands are opposed to the professional principles and standards. The results of studies have shown that this conflict negatively affects employees' attitude towards the job and affective-motivational state of fulfilment with work role. The purpose of this research was to examine exposure to organizational-professional conflict among I/O psychologists in Serbia, to find out whether there is a correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict, job satisfaction and work engagement, and to determine the main factors of exposure to organizational-professional conflict. Our sample consisted of 96 I/O psychologists. Results have shown that there was significant high negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and job satisfaction, as well as significant moderate negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and work engagement. The highest correlations were with social dimensions of job satisfaction. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was lower among I/O psychologists with longer work experience and those at higher positions in organizational hierarchy. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was higher among I/O psychologists who were working in privately owned companies and among those who were fixed-term employees. There was no significant correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and the size of the organization or business field. Our study showed that organizational-professional conflict should be considered as an important theoretical and research topic, as well as a relevant professional and career issue.

  4. Practicing what we preach: Investigating the role of social support in sport psychologists well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eMcCormack

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Well-being and mental health of psychologists and their clients can be strongly linked to the psychologists’ experience of work. We know from general theories of occupational health psychology that certain work factors will have a greater impact on well-being than others. Work engagement is positively related with occupational health, while burnout and workaholic tendencies relate negatively. An individual’s resources can buffer against these negative effects. Specifically, the environmental resource of social support can impede the impact and instance of workaholism and has a positive influence on burnout. Social support is often encouraged by sport psychologists in protecting an athlete’s well-being. Drawing on theory and research from work and organisational, health and social psychology we explore the lived experiences of burnout and work engagement among applied sport psychologists, investigating their perceptions of how these experiences impact their well-being. Thirty participants from five countries were asked, using semi-structured interviews, to recall specific incidents when feelings of work engagement and burnout occurred. We examined the influence of social support and its impact on these incidents. Thematic analysis revealed that burnout is frequently experienced despite high levels of work engagement. Sources of social support differ between groups of high burnout versus low burnout, as does reference to the dimensions of work engagement. Avenues for future research including investigating the role of mindfulness and therapeutic lifestyle changes for practitioners are outlined.

  5. [New meanings for the psychologist practice in the Family Health Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Diogo Faria Corrêa; Olivo, Vânia Maria Fighera

    2009-10-01

    This paper aims to analyze some of the definitions associated with the psychologist's practice at the Family Health Program (FHP). To do so, it was developed a qualitative research using the content analysis method to work with the data collected from a semi-structured interview with 07 volunteer psychologists, from July to August of 2006, who work in specifics FHP in Santa Maria, central region of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. Some themes were selected and classified into two major categories: (1) identification/practice and education model of the psychologist; (2) new directions for the psychology practice in the FHP. According to the interviews, there is still the predominance of the clinical model in the psychology practice, with the support of the academic model of education, which results in some difficulties and adaptations. It is proposed, therefore, to discuss new directions for the psychology practice in primary health care as well as to indicate some suggestions for a possible change in the predominant model of health attention and in psychology practice.

  6. Role of a health psychologist in the management of functional esophageal complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, M E; Kinsinger, S; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E; Keefer, L

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal complaints are common among patients in a gastrointestinal clinic. Outside of typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms that are treated with medication, the symptom presentations of esophageal patients, particularly those with functional conditions, are often difficult to treat and account for high health-care utilization. This manuscript describes the role of a health psychologist in the treatment of esophageal disorders using behavioral medicine interventions. Observations over the course of a 1-year period indicate that the sample presents with a relatively low level of psychological distress but reports negative effects of their symptoms on health-related quality of life. Five case examples of commonly treated disorders (globus, non-cardiac chest pain, functional dysphagia, rumination syndrome, supragastric belching) are described to highlight how behavioral treatment can improve patients' symptoms, decrease health-care utilization, and improve overall quality of life in a timely and relatively simple manner. Successful treatment outcomes are associated with a collaborative working alliance between patient, health psychologist, and gastroenterologist. Results indicate the benefit of referring appropriate esophageal patients to a health psychologist with specialization in gastroenterology.

  7. The role of the obstetrician and the psychologist in postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ferraz de Sampaio Neto

    2013-03-01

    The depressive conditions that affect women in the postpartum period are very relevant, either due to its high prevalence or to the impairment in the woman's quality of life, her fetus' and other components of her family. The multidisciplinary approach of these patients can significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and therapeutic treatment; avoiding that mild frames develop into serious situations as puerperal psychosis. The harmonic performance of the team formed by the obstetrician, pediatrician, psychiatrist, nurse and psychologist will be fundamental to reduce the impact of situations of postpartum depression (PPD. It is up to the obstetrician to suspect those women who have risk factors for developing PPD, according to their personal and familiar history. The obstetrician, pediatrician, or other partners of the health care team will be observing the patient's puerperal period whereas investigating suspicious situations of PPD, by using objective diagnosis methods. The psychologists are responsible for defining the final diagnosis and psychotherapy and they are an important part in the preparation of pregnant women during prenatal care for patients at risk of PPD. Precocious diagnosis will provide referral for combined services with the psychologist, treating and elucidating the patient about the PPD's condition.

  8. Online counseling: An exploratory survey of Italian psychologists' attitudes towards new ways of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolletta, Sabrina; Mocellin, Damiano

    2017-01-09

    Online counseling may be defined as an interaction between users and mental health professionals that takes place through computer mediated communication technology. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of Italian psychologists towards different aspects of online counseling provided via email, chat, forums, and videoconference. An online questionnaire was administered to a sample of 289 licensed psychologists in the Veneto Region (Italy) in order to collect opinions, preferences, and intentions to use online modalities, along with prior knowledge and practice experiences. Only 18.3% of the respondents had previous experience with online counseling. Overall, the majority of psychologists (62.6%) were favorable towards online counseling, but they also had several reservations about the provision of online diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Results showed a consistent lack of clarity regarding ethical and penal issues concerning online modalities. More efforts must be directed to deepening the application of new technologies in the field of psychology in order to enable an ethical and professional practice of online counseling in Italy.

  9. Person-first and identity-first language: Developing psychologists' cultural competence using disability language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dana S; Andrews, Erin E

    2015-04-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) advocates the use of person-first language (e.g., people with disabilities) to refer to individuals with disabilities in daily discourse and to reduce bias in psychological writing. Disability culture advocates and disability studies scholars have challenged the rationale for and implications of exclusive person-first language use, promoting use of identity-first language (e.g., disabled people). We argue that psychologists should adopt identity-first language alongside person-first constructions to address the concerns of disability groups while promoting human dignity and maintaining scientific and professional rigor. We review the evolution of disability language and then discuss the major models used to characterize disability and people with disabilities. The rationale for person-first language and the emergence of identity-first language, respectively, are linked to particular models. We then discuss some language challenges posed by identity-first language and the current intent of person-first language, suggesting that psychologists make judicious use of the former when it is possible to do so. We conclude by offering five observations of ways that use of both person-first and identity-first language could enhance psychologists' cultural competence regarding disability issues in personal and scientific communications. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. [Observation in day care centers for children and infants: reflection on the team role of the psychologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauvais, P

    1995-01-01

    This work tempts to emphasize the relation between the quality of the reception of the young child and the shared observation work done by the team. It also tries to define the psychologist's contribution.

  11. The psychologist who is not a psychologist: a deconstructive reading of Wolfgang Giegerich's idea of psychology proper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlan, Stanton

    2016-04-01

    This paper represents an archetypal and deconstructive reading of the work of Wolfgang Giegerich. In an attempt to extend and philosophically develop Jung's late-life view of the objective psyche, Giegerich, via Hegel, defines psychology proper as fundamentally separate from the everyday person and the 'human, all-too-human' aspects of the soul. It is argued that, in so doing, Giegerich removes the human person from being the primary focus of his psychology and creates instead a hierarchy of ideas and values privileging syntax over semantics, the logical over the empirical, and thinking over imagination. This bypasses the emotionality of the everyday person/patient and also renders psychology proper unable to address the day-to-day practice of the analyst. Giegerich attempts to rectify this problem by re-incorporating what he had previously rejected, making his theory more complex than is apparent in his binary oppositions. In the end, however, it remains a question to what extent Giegerich is successful in avoiding a binary scission (Saban 2015) or a tendency to regularly de-emphasize the human aspect of the soul (Hoedl 2015) in his need to continue to heroically push off from the ego seeking total freedom from neurosis and from our humanity. © 2016, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  12. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs SR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan R Childs,1,* Emma M Casely,2,* Bianca M Kuehler,1 Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte L Halmshaw,1 Sarah E Thomas,1 Ian D Goodall,1 Carsten Bantel1,3 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Anaesthetic Department, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize

  13. Derogation of student female athletes who consult a sport psychologist: an alternative perspective on the negative halo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J E; Bull, S J

    2001-03-01

    This study attempts to further research female student athletes' perceptions of the sport psychologist and other sport and mental health professionals. 90 British student athletes from 17 different sports completed a two-part questionnaire to examine the potential derogation effect as a result of consulting one of three identified professionals and to explore the perceived definition and role of the sport psychologist. A fictitious selection report of a female field hockey player was presented to subjects with coach, sport psychologist and psychotherapist as the three professionals. It was hypothesised that subjects' recommendations regarding selection would differ depending on the consultant used. No differences were found which suggests the absence of a negative halo effect and that derogation would not occur within this sample group. Definitions and perceived role of the sport psychologist varied with the subjective tone of the responses from participants being mainly positive (74%). These results indicate that this female student athlete sample has a moderated, even a positive, perception of the sport psychologist. A general acceptance of the sport psychologist falls in line with the suggestions of Murstein and Fontaine (1993) concerning a reported increase in acceptance of mental health professionals.

  14. Optimal control of laser plasma instabilities using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses) for ICF and IFE

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive method of controlling parametric instabilities in laser produced plasmas is proposed. It involves fast temporal modulation of a laser pulse on the fastest instability's amplification time scale, adapting to changing and unknown plasma conditions. These pulses are comprised of on and off sequences having at least one or two orders of magnitude contrast between them. Such laser illumination profiles are called STUD pulses for Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay. The STUD pulse program includes scrambling the speckle patterns spatially in between the laser spikes. The off times allow damping of driven waves. The scrambling of the hot spots allows tens of damping times to elapse before hot spot locations experience recurring high intensity spikes. Damping in the meantime will have healed the scars of past growth. Another unique feature of STUD pulses on crossing beams is that their temporal profiles can be interlaced or staggered, and their interactions thus controlled with an on-off switch and ...

  15. Optimal control of laser plasma instabilities using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses) for ICF and IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    An adaptive method of controlling parametric instabilities in laser produced plasmas is proposed. It involves fast temporal modulation of a laser pulse on the fastest instability's amplification time scale, adapting to changing and unknown plasma conditions. These pulses are comprised of on and off sequences having at least one or two orders of magnitude contrast between them. Such laser illumination profiles are called STUD pulses for Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay. The STUD pulse program includes scrambling the speckle patterns spatially in between the laser spikes. The off times allow damping of driven waves. The scrambling of the hot spots allows tens of damping times to elapse before hot spot locations experience recurring high intensity spikes. Damping in the meantime will have healed the scars of past growth. Another unique feature of STUD pulses on crossing beams is that their temporal profiles can be interlaced or staggered, and their interactions thus controlled with an on-off switch and a dimmer.

  16. Simulations of drastically reduced SBS with laser pulses composed of a Spike Train of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses)

    CERN Document Server

    Hüller, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    By comparing the impact of established laser smoothing techniques like Random Phase Plates (RPP) and Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion (SSD) to the concept of "Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay" (STUD pulses) on the amplification of parametric instabilities in laser-produced plasmas, we show with the help of numerical simulations, that STUD pulses can drastically reduce instability growth by orders of magnitude. The simulation results, obtained with the code {\\sc Harmony} in a nonuniformly flowing mm-size plasma for the Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) instability, show that the efficiency of the STUD pulse technique is due to the fact that successive re-amplification in space and time of parametrically excited plasma waves inside laser hot spots is minimized. An overall mean fluctuation level of ion acoustic waves at low amplitude is established because of the frequent change of the speckle pattern in successive spikes. This level stays orders of magnitude below the levels of ion acoustic waves e...

  17. Local and generalized height-diameter models with random parameters for mixed, uneven-aged forests in Northwestern Durango, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacramento Corral-Rivas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We used mixed models with random components to develop height-diameter (h-d functions for mixed, uneven-aged stands in northwestern Durango (Mexico, considering the breast height diameter (d and stand variables as predictors. Methods The data were obtained from 44 permanent plots used to monitor stand growth under forest management in the study area. Results The generalized Bertalanffy-Richards model performed better than the other generalized models in predicting the total height of the species under study. For the genera Pinus and Quercus, the models were successfully calibrated by measuring the height of a subsample of three randomly selected trees close to the mean d, whereas for species of the genera Cupressus, Arbutus and Alnus, three trees were also selected, but they are specifically the maximum, minimum and mean d trees. Conclusions The presented equations represent a new tool for the evaluation and management of natural forest in the region.

  18. Modelling merchantable volumes for uneven aged maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton stands established by natural regeneration in the central Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alegria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Uneven aged maritime pine stands established by natural regeneration have a great expression in Portugal. These stands being overstocked, as opposed to those established from plantations, provide straight and cylindrical tree boles and logs with less knots that makes them very suitable for certain industrial purposes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to fit a set of equations to predict total volume and merchantable volumes to any merchantable limit for uneven aged maritime pine stands established by natural regeneration in the central inland region of Portugal. Data were collected in 30 circular sampling plots of 500 m2 of area, on 1426 trees and 314 sample trees for volume assessment, corresponding to 2353 diameter/height mea-surements. A total height equation, a total volume equation, a volume ratio equation to any top height limit and a taper equation, over bark, were fitted. To select among the best models, several statistics were computed during model fitting and the independent validation procedure to evaluate model fitting, collinearity and prediction performances. A ranking index was used to support the final decision. The models selected were then fitted again using robust regression and weighted regression techniques, because studentized residuals distribution normality and homogeneity assumptions were not observed. This research showed that the models selected for these stands were not the same as those selected in previous studies for the species in this region, suggesting that these results may be due to the influence of stand density conditions on diameter and total height growth, and consequently, on stem form and volume. This set of equations will also be included as components in a single tree growth and yield model developed for these stands.

  19. Erythrocyte aggregation may promote uneven spatial distribution of NO/O2 in the downstream vessel of arteriolar bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yan Cheng; Namgung, Bumseok; Leo, Hwa Liang; Kim, Sangho

    2016-07-26

    This study examined the effect of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2) distributions in the downstream vessels of arteriolar bifurcations. Particular attention was paid to the inherent formation of asymmetric cell-free layer (CFL) widths in the downstream vessels and its consequential impact on the NO/O2 bioavailability after the bifurcations. A microscopic image-based two-dimensional transient model was used to predict the NO/O2 distribution by utilizing the in vivo CFL width data obtained under non-, normal- and hyper-aggregating conditions at the pseudoshear rate of 15.6±2.0s(-1). In vivo experimental result showed that the asymmetry of CFL widths was enhanced by the elevation in RBC aggregation level. The model demonstrated that NO bioavailability was regulated by the dynamic fluctuation of the local CFL widths, which is corollary to its modulation of wall shear stress. Accordingly, the uneven distribution of NO/O2 was prominent at opposite sides of the arterioles up to six vessel-diameter (6D) away from the bifurcating point, and this was further enhanced by increasing the levels of RBC aggregation. Our findings suggested that RBC aggregation potentially augments both the formation of asymmetric CFL widths and its influence on the uneven distribution of NO/O2 in the downstream flow of an arteriolar bifurcation. The extended heterogeneity of NO/O2 downstream (2D-6D) also implied its potential propagation throughout the entire arteriolar microvasculature.

  20. Uneven health outcomes and political resistance under residual neoliberalism in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick; Dor, George

    2003-01-01

    Africa has suffered two decades of policy implementation associated with the "neoliberal" macroeconomic as well as micro-development paradigm, and the health status of this continent has deteriorated markedly. Notwithstanding the discrediting of such policies since the late 1990s, they continue to be applied in Africa, especially by the World Bank and IMF, through Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers and the Highly Indebted Poor Countries debt relief initiative. Evidence can be found in the inadequate fiscal allocations to the health sector; the inadequate conceptualization of health in relation to other sectors; insufficient consultation with civil society; ongoing implementation of cost-recovery and user-fee provisions; a failed strategy to access pharmaceutical products, by respecting unnecessary Trade in Intellectual Property Rights provisos; and, most importantly, glaring insufficiencies in reducing Africa's foreign debt. One reflection of the balance of forces between Washington financial agencies and African societies is the adoption of the New Partnership for Africa's Development at the urging of the South African and Nigerian governments. While the WHO has helped to research, publicize, and criticize the problems associated with durable neoliberalism in African health care, it also continues to make serious mistakes as it remains locked within the paradigm. A human rights perspective being developed by the African Social Forum is, in contrast, consistent with broader international trends in the opposition to corporate globalization.

  1. Effects of VA Facility Dog on Hospitalized Veterans Seen by a Palliative Care Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Levy, Cari; Holman, Elizabeth; Kolassa, John E

    2016-01-01

    The United States is home to 23 million veterans. In many instances, veterans with serious illness who seek healthcare at the VA receive care from a palliative care service. Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) is gaining attention as a therapeutic stress reducing modality; however, its effects have not been well studied in veterans receiving palliative care in an acute care setting. A crossover repeated-measures study was conducted to examine the effects of an animal-assisted intervention (AAI) in the form of a therapy dog on stress indicators in 25 veterans on the palliative care service at the VA Eastern Colorado Healthcare System in Denver, CO. Veterans had a visit from a therapy dog and the dog's handler, a clinical psychologist (experimental condition) and an unstructured visit with the clinical psychologist alone (control condition). Blood pressure, heart rate, and the salivary biomarkers cortisol, alpha-amylase, and immunoglobulin A were collected before, after, and 30-minutes after both the experimental and control conditions. Significant decreases in cortisol were found when the before time period was compared to the 30-minutes after time period for both the experimental ( p = 0.007) and control condition ( p = 0.036). A significant decrease in HR was also found when the before time period was compared to the 30-minutes after time period for both the experimental ( p = 0.0046) and control ( p = 0.0119) condition. Results of this study supported that a VA facility dog paired with a palliative care psychologist had a measurable impact on salivary cortisol levels and HR in veterans.

  2. Van Gogh and lithium. Creativity and bipolar disorder: perspective of a psychologist/writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orum, M

    1999-12-01

    Margo Orum is the author of Fairytales in reality: My victory over manic depression. Manic depression first appeared in her life 14 years ago, when she was 31. In the first 5 years she had seven episodes (four manias and three depressions). She then embarked on a period of personal growth, including therapy with a psychologist: a period that she now sees as a turning point in helping her to better manage her illness. In the 9 years since then, she has had only two episodes. Both occurred when she was temporarily off lithium. Currently Margo is completing a PhD in psychology and is a casual teacher at Macquarie University.

  3. Psychology and U.S. psychologists in torture and war in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Gerald; Zielinski, Alessandra

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of U.S. psychologists and their influence on torture in Cuba, Afghanistan and Iraq provides previously unrevealed evidence of U.S. torture and military tactical policy, and points to probable military goals the U.S. Administration has denied. What is revealed is that current torture has been designed and used, not so much for interrogation as the Administration and the media insist, but for control by terror. Further, Iraqi civilian deaths may be deliberate and for the same purpose. That is, discovery of involvement of the U.S. psychological professions is a clue to torture, and perhaps killing, as policy, not accident.

  4. Misconceptions of the p-value among Chilean and Italian Academic Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Iotti, Bryan; Bonilla-Campos, Amparo; Longobardi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Common misconceptions of p-values are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals' decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italian, 30 Chilean) questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with previous research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p-values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed. PMID:27602007

  5. Forming skills of self-presentation as professional essential qualities of future teachers-psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kazanceva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article makes an attempt to consider the role and importance of professional self-presentation as an important quality of the future teachers-psychologists. The author notes the lack of study of the process of creation of «professional image» as professionally important skills in the system of pedagogical communication. Active and purposeful possess the skill of a professional self-presentation is considered by the author as the extensive skills in the framework of the professional activity.

  6. Transformation of even-aged European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) to uneven-aged management under changing growth conditions caused by climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Erik; Meilby, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from even-aged to uneven-aged forest management is currently taking place throughout Europe. Climate change is, however, expected to change growth conditions—possibly quite radically. Using a deterministic approach, it was the objective of this study to investigate the influence of...

  7. Concurrent validity of accelerations measured using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael H; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W; Smeathers, James E; Kerr, Graham K

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments.

  8. Power and uneven globalization: Coalitions and energy trade dependence in the newly independent states of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Corina Herron

    2000-10-01

    governments or an oscillation of power failed to implement either policy consistently, resulting in continued energy dependence on Russia. Lithuania, Moldova, and Ukraine, the "hybrids," sought to limit their energy dependence on Russia, but could not meet their energy needs at world-market prices. They remained dependent on Russian energy, while struggling toward energy trade diversification.

  9. The program structure does not reliably recover the correct population structure when sampling is uneven: subsampling and new estimators alleviate the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puechmaille, Sebastien J

    2016-05-01

    Inferences of population structure and more precisely the identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals are essential to the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. Such population structure inferences are routinely investigated via the program structure implementing a Bayesian algorithm to identify groups of individuals at Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. While the method is performing relatively well under various population models with even sampling between subpopulations, the robustness of the method to uneven sample size between subpopulations and/or hierarchical levels of population structure has not yet been tested despite being commonly encountered in empirical data sets. In this study, I used simulated and empirical microsatellite data sets to investigate the impact of uneven sample size between subpopulations and/or hierarchical levels of population structure on the detected population structure. The results demonstrated that uneven sampling often leads to wrong inferences on hierarchical structure and downward-biased estimates of the true number of subpopulations. Distinct subpopulations with reduced sampling tended to be merged together, while at the same time, individuals from extensively sampled subpopulations were generally split, despite belonging to the same panmictic population. Four new supervised methods to detect the number of clusters were developed and tested as part of this study and were found to outperform the existing methods using both evenly and unevenly sampled data sets. Additionally, a subsampling strategy aiming to reduce sampling unevenness between subpopulations is presented and tested. These results altogether demonstrate that when sampling evenness is accounted for, the detection of the correct population structure is greatly improved.

  10. Concurrent Validity of Accelerations Measured Using a Tri-Axial Inertial Measurement Unit while Walking on Firm, Compliant and Uneven Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael H.; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Kavanagh, Justin K.; Morrison, Steven; Hodges, Paul W.; Smeathers, James E.; Kerr, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i) subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending); and ii) use of orientation information (quaternions) from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12) using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s−2). Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: −0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s−2), whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: −0.16 to −0.02 vs. −0.07 to 0.07 m.s−2). The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments. PMID:24866262

  11. Concurrent validity of accelerations measured using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Cole

    Full Text Available Although accelerometers are extensively used for assessing gait, limited research has evaluated the concurrent validity of these devices on less predictable walking surfaces or the comparability of different methods used for gravitational acceleration compensation. This study evaluated the concurrent validity of trunk accelerations derived from a tri-axial inertial measurement unit while walking on firm, compliant and uneven surfaces and contrasted two methods used to remove gravitational accelerations; i subtraction of the best linear fit from the data (detrending; and ii use of orientation information (quaternions from the inertial measurement unit. Twelve older and twelve younger adults walked at their preferred speed along firm, compliant and uneven walkways. Accelerations were evaluated for the thoracic spine (T12 using a tri-axial inertial measurement unit and an eleven-camera Vicon system. The findings demonstrated excellent agreement between accelerations derived from the inertial measurement unit and motion analysis system, including while walking on uneven surfaces that better approximate a real-world setting (all differences <0.16 m.s(-2. Detrending produced slightly better agreement between the inertial measurement unit and Vicon system on firm surfaces (delta range: -0.05 to 0.06 vs. 0.00 to 0.14 m.s(-2, whereas the quaternion method performed better when walking on compliant and uneven walkways (delta range: -0.16 to -0.02 vs. -0.07 to 0.07 m.s(-2. The technique used to compensate for gravitational accelerations requires consideration in future research, particularly when walking on compliant and uneven surfaces. These findings demonstrate trunk accelerations can be accurately measured using a wireless inertial measurement unit and are appropriate for research that evaluates healthy populations in complex environments.

  12. Three studies on ponderosa pine management on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation: stocking control in uneven-aged stands, forest products from fire-damage trees, and fuels reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    John V. Arena

    2005-01-01

    Over 60,000 acres of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. and C. Lawson) forest on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation (WSIR) in Oregon are managed using an uneven-age system. Three on-going studies on WSIR address current issues in the management of pine forests: determining levels of growing stock for uneven-age management, fire effects on wood...

  13. Newcomer Psychologists and Organizational Socialization: Can a Content Model Capture the Experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvild Sagberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to evaluate how well Taormina’s Multidomain, Continuous Process Model of Organizational Socialization (Taormina, 1997 applies to the data from qualitative interviews with newcomer psychologists, and to explore the interview content that does not correspond with the model. A total of 64 interviews with 22 recently graduated psychologists in Norway were subjected to deductive content analysis by use of the model. The interview content that did not fit with the model was then explored by inductive content analysis. Largely, the model covered the interview material. However, the model’s categories are wide, and perhaps they too easily embraced the data. Moreover, the model did not embrace issues concerning the work/non-work interface and the participants’ own health and well-being, and an extension of the model is therefore discussed. These issues may be relevant in other professional contexts as well, and not only to newly graduated employees. The findings suggest that organizational socialization researchers could benefit from expanding their view of newcomers’ situation. To practitioners in the field of HR, the model may provide a framework for developing introductory programmes. In addition, attention to the newcomers’ personal well-being and life situation in general is recommended.

  14. Earthquakes and Children: The Role of Psychologists with Families and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Ramos, Michelle C.; Guran, Elyse L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 Sichuan Province earthquake and 2005 Pakistan earthquake are examples of natural disasters that took an unimaginable toll on children. In such disaster management contexts, family members as well as health care and school personnel are the first-line responders and are natural sources of continued social support as children recover. Although psychologists have increasingly sophisticated understandings of post-disaster reactions and strategies for helping children and adolescents cope with trauma, models for responding to mass catastrophes are limited, particularly in geographically remote communities and in regions where mental health services are stigmatizing. With children's well-being subsequent to earthquakes inextricably linked to family and community, psychologists can make important contributions in three spheres: (a) coordinating and activating collaborations within children's existing social contexts to develop post-earthquake interventions; (b) designing prevention and preparedness programs focused on the emotional needs of children in earthquake-prone communities; and (c) conducting research on interventions and recovery with particular attention to developmental stage, socio-cultural-economic contexts, and the similarities versus differences across various types of disasters. PMID:20428504

  15. [Incorporation of a psychologist into a nephrology service: criteria and process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llana, H; Barbero, J; Olea, T; Jiménez, C; Del Peso, G; Miguel, J L; Sánchez, R; Celadilla, O; Trocoli, F; Argüello, M T; Selgas, R

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with a wide range of stressful situations causing important physical and psychological repercussions. It is not usual that psychology professionals are active members of the nephrology teams. In consequence, these alterations are not properly assisted. Our aim is to present the introduction process of a psychologist in a nephrology department and its preliminary results. We designed a clearly defined introduction process, starting with a therapeutic communication training program for all the staff. In the model we have priorized pre-emptive interventions in order to promote the adaptation process, far from simple psychological symptom control. It is assumed the binomial patient-family as the major objective for care, choosing an interdisciplinary approach. We worked more from a health psychology perspective than from a mental health perspective. Over the year 2008 the number of patients assisted by the psychologist were 571 (mean 48 patients/month). The total number of interventions was 1,022. Majority of cases (45.2%) were derived from the advanced chronic kidney disease program, mostly related to demands about emotional impact of renal replacement therapy commencement. Others were: suspect of depression episode, adherence, primary caregiver emotional overwhelming, bereavement, anxiety and support in decision making process. This experience is a stimulus for the integral approach of the renal patient.

  16. The psychologist as a poet: Kierkegaard and psychology in 19th-century Copenhagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pind, Jörgen L

    2016-11-01

    Psychology had an early start at the University of Copenhagen in the first half of the 19th century, where it was taught as the major part of a compulsory course required of all first-year students. Particularly important in the establishment of psychology at the university was Frederik Christian Sibbern, who was professor of philosophy from 1813 to 1870. Sibbern wrote numerous works on psychology throughout his career. In his first book on psychology, Sibbern expressed the view that the ideal psychologist should also be a poet. Søren Kierkegaard, Sibbern's student, was precisely such a poet-psychologist. Kierkegaard discussed psychology in many of his works, reflecting the gathering momentum of psychology in 19th-century Copenhagen, Denmark. The article brings out some aspects of Kierkegaard's poetic and literary-imaginative approach to psychology. In his opinion, psychology was primarily a playful subject and limited in the questions about human nature it could answer, especially when it came up against the "eternal" in man's nature. Kierkegaard had a positive view of psychology, which contrasts sharply with his negative views on the rise of statistics and the natural sciences. In the latter half of the 19th century, psychology turned positivistic at the University of Copenhagen. This left little room for Kierkegaard's kind of poetic psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Predicting counseling psychologists attitudes and clinical judgments with respect to older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Jody K; Munley, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine age, gender, training and experience in aging issues, fear of death, and multicultural competence in predicting counseling psychologists' global attitudes toward older adults and specific clinical judgments concerning a case vignette of an older client. A national sample of 364 practicing counseling psychologists participated in the study. Participants completed a demographic measure, Polizzi's refined version of the Aging Semantic Differential (Polizzi, 2003 ), a survey of professional bias based on a clinical vignette of a 70-year-old woman (James & Haley, 1995), the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale 3.0 (Lester, & Abdel-Khalek, 2003), the Multicultural Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale (MCKAS; Ponterotto, Gretchen, Utsey, Rieger, & Austin, 2002), and a Training and Experience Questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the extent to which the selected variables predicted more favorable attitudes toward older adults and less professional bias toward an older client beyond prediction by age and gender. Results revealed that older age and higher total scores on the MCKAS predicted less professional bias in clinical judgments. Gender was a significant predictor of global attitudes toward older adults. Findings suggest that multicultural knowledge, awareness, and skills are important in working with older adults.

  18. CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF THE MANIFESTATION OF EMPATHY OF PSYCHOLOGISTS AND PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Borisovna Khlebodarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Profession of psychologist requires from the individual special abilities: to understand the emotional state of the client, to be sincere in the relationship with the client, to reflect and convey the feelings experienced at the moment. It is impossible to achieve efficiency in the professional activities without practical mastering of such psychic reality as empathy. The approaches to the problems of empathy abound with dozens of definitions, models of empathic process, stages, levels, and mechanisms.The polysemantic character of the term «empathy» often causes researchers to use rather monosemantic, in their opinion, concepts such as «identification», «sympathy». Empathy (from GK. empatheia – empathy is a category of modern psychology, which means understanding of the emotional state of another person, involuntary experiencing similar feelings, sympathizing with him. The problem of studying empathy is always topical in psychology. The problem of research and development of empathy is especially important for the professional development of students-psychologists. To show empathy towards the person means to look at the situation from his point of view, to experience similar feelings, to understand and accept his current emotional state. To be in the state of empathy means to perceive the inner world of another person accurately, maintaining the emotional connotations, what enhances efficiency in professional psychological activity.

  19. Types of Rural Extensionists' Expectations of Psychology and Their Implications on Psychologists' Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Psychology has great potential for contributing to rural development, particularly through supporting rural extension (RE). In this paper, the types of expectations extensionists have of psychology are identified, as well as possible ways of integrating psychosocial knowledge into the RE context. Rural extensionists from 12 Latin American countries were surveyed (n = 654). Of them, 89.4 % considered psychology could contribute to rural extension and commented on how this would be possible. Expectations were categorised and the nine mentioned by more than 20 % of them were utilized to conduct a two-steps cluster analysis. Three types of extensionists' expectations were identified: one wherein working with extensionists was highlighted; another characterised by a focus on working with farmers; and a third featuring a traditional, diffusionist extension approach, which views farmers as objects of psychologists' interventions. With the first type, psychologists should not neglect working with farmers and with the second, with extensionists. With the third type, reflecting on the expectations themselves and their underlying assumptions seems essential.

  20. The role of the organisational psychologist in disasters and emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Guillén, César

    2011-04-01

    Interventions in extreme situations, such as natural or technological disasters, terrorist attacks or emergencies in general, take place in settings of great uncertainty and are always accompanied by extraordinary circumstances. For this reason, there are various processes related to implementing intervention protocols that must be carefully examined, including an evaluation of work scenarios, personnel selection, within-group relationships in work teams, decision-making processes, or certain peculiarities of burnout among emergency personnel. In the view of this author, an ad hoc review of the role of the organisational psychologist can highlight interesting analysis and performance possibilities that could make work in emergency and disasters contexts more effective. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of the organisational psychologist pre-and post-disaster. Furthermore, it supports the idea that professional profiles must be designed that take into account specific knowledge and skills, as well as certain aptitudes and values. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  1. Definitional ceremonies: narrative practices for psychologists to inform interdisciplinary teams' understanding of children's spirituality in pediatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Moxley-Haegert, Linda

    2015-03-01

    In pediatric settings, parents and children often seek spiritual and religious support from their healthcare provider, as they try to find meaning in their illness. Narrative practices, such as definitional ceremonies, can provide a unique framework for psychologists to explore children's spirituality and its role in the midst of illness. In addition, definitional ceremonies can be used as a means for psychologists to inform interdisciplinary teams' understanding of children's spirituality and its relevance in pediatric treatment settings. In this article, our objectives are to (a) provide a brief overview of the literature on children's spirituality, (b) review some of the literature on childhood cancer patients' spirituality, (c) highlight the importance of whole-person care for diverse pediatric patients, and (d) introduce definitional ceremonies as appropriate narrative practices that psychologists can use to both guide their therapy and inform interdisciplinary teams' understanding of children's spirituality.

  2. Identification and Management of Eating Disorders in Integrated Primary Care: Recommendations for Psychologists in Integrated Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Laura J; King, Paul R; Wray, Laura O

    2017-06-01

    Eating disorders are associated with deleterious health consequences, increased risk of mortality, and psychosocial impairment. Although individuals with eating disorders are likely to seek treatment in general medical settings such as primary care (PC), these conditions are often under-detected by PC providers. However, psychologists in integrated PC settings are likely to see patients with eating disorders because of the mental health comorbidities associated with these conditions. Further, due to their training in identifying risk factors associated with eating disorders (i.e., comorbid mental health and medical disorders) and opportunities for collaboration with PC providers, psychologists are well-positioned to improve the detection and management of eating disorders in PC. This paper provides a brief overview of eating disorders and practical guidance for psychologists working in integrated PC settings to facilitate the identification and management of these conditions.

  3. Degree-granting institutions and characteristics of psychologists with both diplomate and fellow status in counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S J; Gariglietti, K P; Merkley, K B; Reynolds, S C; Wettersten, K B

    1999-06-01

    Psychologists (44 men, 6 women) were identified as individuals who received both Fellow status from Division 17 of the APA and ABPP Diplomate status in Counseling Psychology. Years of postdoctoral experience acquired prior to gaining the credentials averaged 13.1 (SD = 6.1) for the Division 17 Fellow and 9.8 (SD = 4.7) for the ABPP Diplomate. 25 different degree-granting institutions provided training for the 50 whose careers exemplify the scientist-practitioner approach to their work. Columbia graduated 9 of these psychologists, whereas Ohio State and Minnesota graduated 5 each. In regard to degree specialty, 37 (74%) gained their degrees from counseling or counseling psychology programs, whereas 11 (22%) gained their degrees from other types of psychology programs. These psychologists tended to work in academic institutions and to publish an average of 57 journal articles per year.

  4. Spectral analysis of uneven time series of geological variables; Analisis espectral de series temporales de variables geologicas con muestreo irregular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo-Iguzquiza, E.; Rodriguez-Tovar, F. J.

    2013-06-01

    In geosciences the sampling of a time series tends to afford uneven results, sometimes because the sampling itself is random or because of hiatuses or even completely missing data or due to difficulties involved in the conversion of data from a spatial to a time scale when the sedimentation rate was not constant. Whatever the case, the best solution does not lie in interpolation but rather in resorting to a method that deals with the irregular data. We show here how the use of the smoothed Lomb-Scargle periodogram is both a practical and efficient choice. We describe the effects on the estimated power spectrum of the type of irregular sampling, the number of data, interpolation, and the presence of drift. We propose the permutation test as being an efficient way of calculating statistical confidence levels. By applying the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to a synthetic series with a known spectral content we are able to confirm the validity of this method in the face of the difficulties mentioned above. A case study with real data, including hiatuses, representing the thickness of the annual banding in a stalagmite, is chosen to demonstrate an application using the statistical and physical interpretation of spectral peaks. (Author)

  5. Effect of Ply Twist Factor on Hairiness and Unevenness of Two Plied Cotton Yarns Made of Different Spinning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamija, Sudershan; Chowdhury, Amal; Chattopadhyay, Rabisankar

    2016-06-01

    Hairiness and unevenness of cotton plied yarns made of singles spun on Murata Vortex Spinning (MVS) and other spinning systems viz. ring, compact and rotor in relation to ply twist factor have been evaluated. It has been observed that both the type of singles and ply twist has remarkable influence on these parameters. Plied yarn hairiness for ring and compact yarns is less than their respective single counterparts. However, for vortex and rotor yarns, it is found to be higher and decreases with ply twist to be at the same level or even less that of their parent single yarns at high ply twist factor. There is always an increase of short hairs (1, 2 mm) after plying as compared to their respective singles at low ply twist factors, the effect being more prominent for vortex and rotor yarns. The improvement in yarn evenness after plying has also been found to be higher for these yarns but insensitive to ply twist. Further, the percentage decrease in imperfections after plying is observed to be the highest for MVS yarns in majority of the cases.

  6. A method for the estimation of the significance of cross-correlations in unevenly sampled red-noise time series

    CERN Document Server

    Max-Moerbeck, W; Hovatta, T; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S

    2014-01-01

    We present a practical implementation of a Monte Carlo method to estimate the significance of cross-correlations in unevenly sampled time series of data, whose statistical properties are modeled with a simple power-law power spectral density. This implementation builds on published methods, we introduce a number of improvements in the normalization of the cross-correlation function estimate and a bootstrap method for estimating the significance of the cross-correlations. A closely related matter is the estimation of a model for the light curves, which is critical for the significance estimates. We present a graphical and quantitative demonstration that uses simulations to show how common it is to get high cross-correlations for unrelated light curves with steep power spectral densities. This demonstration highlights the dangers of interpreting them as signs of a physical connection. We show that by using interpolation and the Hanning sampling window function we are able to reduce the effects of red-noise leak...

  7. Optimal Control of Laser-Plasma Instabilities Using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay: STUD Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive methods of laser irradiation of plasmas are proposed consisting of deterministic, `on-off' amplitude modulations in time, and intermittently changing speckle-patterns. These laser pulses consist of a series of picosecond time-scale spikes in a spike train of uneven duration and delay (STUD pulses), in contrast to hydrodynamic-time-scale modulated, multi-nanosecond pulses for laser fusion. Properly designed STUD pulses minimize backscatter and tame any absorptive parametric instability for a given set of plasma conditions, by adjusting the modulation periods, duty cycles and spatial hot-spot-distribution scrambling-rates of the spikes. Traditional methods of beam conditioning are subsumed or surpassed by STUD pulses. In addition, STUD pulses allow an advance in the control of instabilities driven by spatially overlapped laser beams by allowing the spikes of crossing beams to be temporally staggered. When the intensity peaks of one fall within the nulls of its crossing beam, it allows an on-off switch ...

  8. Gap filling and noise reduction of unevenly sampled data by means of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lomb-Scargle periodogram is widely used for the estimation of the power spectral density of unevenly sampled data. A small extension of the algorithm of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram permits the estimation of the phases of the spectral components. The amplitude and phase information is sufficient for the construction of a complex Fourier spectrum. The inverse Fourier transform can be applied to this Fourier spectrum and provides an evenly sampled series (Scargle, 1989. We are testing the proposed reconstruction method by means of artificial time series and real observations of mesospheric ozone, having data gaps and noise. For data gap filling and noise reduction, it is necessary to modify the Fourier spectrum before the inverse Fourier transform is done. The modification can be easily performed by selection of the relevant spectral components which are above a given confidence limit or within a certain frequency range. Examples with time series of lower mesospheric ozone show that the reconstruction method can reproduce steep ozone gradients around sunrise and sunset and superposed planetary wave-like oscillations observed by a ground-based microwave radiometer at Payerne.

  9. Diffraction of Oblique Water Waves by Small Uneven Channel-bed in a Two-layer Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Smrutiranjan Mohapatra

    2014-01-01

    Obliquely incident water wave scattering by an uneven channel-bed in the form of a small bottom undulation in a two-layer fluid is investigated within the frame work of three-dimensional linear water wave theory. The upper fluid is assumed to be bounded above by a rigid lid, while the lower one is bounded below by a bottom surface having a small deformation and the channel is unbounded in the horizontal directions. Assuming irrotational motion, perturbation technique is employed to calculate the first-order corrections to the velocity potentials in the two fluids by using Fourier transform approximately, and also to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals involving the shape function representing the bottom deformation. Consideration of a patch of sinusoidal ripples shows that the reflection coefficient is an oscillatory function of the ratio of twice the component of the wave number along x-axis and the ripple wave number. When this ratio approaches one, the theory predicts a resonant interaction between the bed and interface, and the reflection coefficient becomes a multiple of the number of ripples. High reflection of incident wave energy occurs if this number is large.

  10. Development of stable walking robot for accident condition monitoring on uneven floors in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seog; Jang, You Hyun [Central Research Institute of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Even though the potential for an accident in nuclear power plants is very low, multiple emergency plans are necessary because the impact of such an accident to the public is enormous. One of these emergency plans involves a robotic system for investigating accidents under conditions of high radiation and contaminated air. To develop a robot suitable for operation in a nuclear power plant, we focused on eliminating the three major obstacles that challenge robots in such conditions: the disconnection of radio communication, falling on uneven floors, and loss of localization. To solve the radio problem, a Wi-Fi extender was used in radio shadow areas. To reinforce the walking, we developed two- and four-leg convertible walking, a floor adaptive foot, a roly-poly defensive falling design, and automatic standing recovery after falling methods were developed. To allow the robot to determine its location in the containment building, a bar code landmark reading method was chosen. When a severe accident occurs, this robot will be useful for accident condition monitoring. We also anticipate the robot can serve as a workman aid in a high radiation area during normal operations.

  11. Calculation on the pitch angle of rocker of a rocker lunar rover on uneven terrain and path planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zong-quan; HOU Xu-yan; GAO Hai-bo; HU Ming

    2008-01-01

    Forthe concertedmotion of rockerlunar rover,the pitch angle of rocker of a rocker lunar rover in uneven terrain must be calculated.According to the character of passive shape-shifting adaptive suspension of rocker lunar rover,the model of rocker lunar rover and the model of terrain were both simplified.The pitch angle of rocker was calculated using forward solving,reverse solving and the method of offsetting the curve of terrain respectively.Because of the banishment of the nonlinearity of equation sets of calculation by reverse solving,the calculation of the pitch angle based on reverse solving was programmed by means of MATLAB.Simulations were carried out by means of ADAMS.The result verified the validity of the calculation based on reverse solving.It provides the theoretical foundation for motion planning and path planning of rocker lunar rover.As applications of the calculation of pitch angle of rocker,the multi-attribute decision making of path based on the concerted motion planning and the predictive control on lunar rover based on the Markov prediction model were introduced.

  12. Diffraction of oblique water waves by small uneven channel-bed in a two-layer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Smrutiranjan

    2014-09-01

    Obliquely incident water wave scattering by an uneven channel-bed in the form of a small bottom undulation in a two-layer fluid is investigated within the frame work of three-dimensional linear water wave theory. The upper fluid is assumed to be bounded above by a rigid lid, while the lower one is bounded below by a bottom surface having a small deformation and the channel is unbounded in the horizontal directions. Assuming irrotational motion, perturbation technique is employed to calculate the first-order corrections to the velocity potentials in the two fluids by using Fourier transform approximately, and also to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of integrals involving the shape function representing the bottom deformation. Consideration of a patch of sinusoidal ripples shows that the reflection coefficient is an oscillatory function of the ratio of twice the component of the wave number along x-axis and the ripple wave number. When this ratio approaches one, the theory predicts a resonant interaction between the bed and interface, and the reflection coefficient becomes a multiple of the number of ripples. High reflection of incident wave energy occurs if this number is large.

  13. Simulations of drastically reduced SBS with laser pulses composed of a Spike Train of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüller Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available By comparing the impact of established laser smoothing techniques like Random Phase Plates (RPP and Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion (SSD to the concept of “Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay” (STUD pulses on the amplification of parametric instabilities in laser-produced plasmas, we show with the help of numerical simulations, that STUD pulses can drastically reduce instability growth by orders of magnitude. The simulation results, obtained with the code Harmony in a nonuniformly flowing mm-size plasma for the Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS instability, show that the efficiency of the STUD pulse technique is due to the fact that successive re-amplification in space and time of parametrically excited plasma waves inside laser hot spots is minimized. An overall mean fluctuation level of ion acoustic waves at low amplitude is established because of the frequent change of the speckle pattern in successive spikes. This level stays orders of magnitude below the levels of ion acoustic waves excited in hot spots of RPP and SSD laser beams.

  14. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2006-03-28

    In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I) production and trade of agricultural goods; (II) foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III) global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis), but adaptation to products targeted at different

  15. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Corinna

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I production and trade of agricultural goods; (II foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis, but adaptation to

  16. A conceptual framework to explore the roles and contributions of industrial psychologists in South Africa (part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Barnard

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at developing a conceptual framework against which the roles and contributions of industrial psychologists in South Africa could be explored. Three widely-used business frameworks – Balanced Score Card, South African Excellence Model and King II Report on Corporate Governance for South Africa – were theoretically integrated to produce a multi-dimensional framework to clarify roles and contributions in a discourse familiar to the business community. The framework was subsequently utilised in a follow-up study involving 23 registered industrial psychologists who were asked to clarify specific roles and contributions within each of the dimensions of the framework.

  17. Uneven Playing Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Potential U.S. imposed carbon tariffs raise concerns about a new form of trade protectionism During their high-profile visits to China, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Commerce Secretary Gary Locke tried to convince China that the United States was not turning the fight against climate change into a tool for protectionists by imposing carbon tariffs on

  18. Making the Road by Walking: Using Role-Play and Instructor Feedback to Teach Basic Counseling Skills to Singaporean Trainee Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Phey Ling; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra; Burgetova, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the experiential learning experiences of eight trainee educational psychologists (school psychologists in the United States) from Singapore who participated in three role-play sessions during a two-day Basic Counseling Skills Training Program. Data collected from transcriptions of video-recorded sessions, a focus group…

  19. The Use of Evidenced-Based Practices in the Provision of Social Skills Training for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder among School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Bertina H.; Chang, Mei; Austin, Jennifer E.; Hayes, Demarquis

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore school psychologists' use of evidence-based practices (EBP), specifically in the area of social skills training, for students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 220 school psychologists practicing in public school settings who provided social skills training to students with ASD. Participants were…

  20. What's It Like to Work with a Clinical Psychologist of a Specialist Learning Disabilities Service? Views from People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Clive; Evers, Catherine; Walden, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Clinical psychologists are well placed to work with people with learning disabilities given the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders in this population and the specialist training undertaken by psychologists. The evidence for psychological interventions in learning disabilities is scarce compared to the evidence for mainstream psychological…

  1. Liberating history: the context of the challenge of psychologists of color to American psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickren, Wade E

    2009-10-01

    The history of race and ethnicity in North America is long and complex. It has been fraught with racism and various forms of oppression--intellectual, social, and physical--and defies easy analysis. This article examines the history of race and ethnicity in the United States, and how it played out in the field of psychology. Although other articles in this issue examine the specific impact of racism and internal colonialism on racial and ethnic minorities, this article places these events within an international context, specifically the post-World War II era when oppressed peoples around the world sought liberation from colonial oppressors. The article suggests that the struggles and successes of racial and ethnic minority psychologists may provide the best opportunity for American psychology to connect with emerging indigenous psychologies in other parts of the world, which represent the future of psychology in a globalizing world.

  2. WILLIAM MCDOUGALL, AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST: A RECONSIDERATION OF NATURE-NURTURE DEBATES IN THE INTERWAR UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anne C

    2016-09-01

    The British-born psychologist William McDougall (1871-1938) spent more than half of his academic career in the United States, holding successive positions after 1920 at Harvard and Duke universities. Scholarly studies uniformly characterize McDougall's relationship with his New World colleagues as contentious: in the standard view, McDougall's theory of innate drives clashed with the Americans' experimentation into learned habits. This essay argues instead that rising American curiosity about inborn appetites-an interest rooted in earlier pragmatic philosophy and empirically investigated by interwar scientists-explains McDougall's migration to the United States and his growing success there. A review of McDougall's intellectual and professional ties, evolving outside public controversy, highlights persistent American attention to natural agency and complicates arguments voiced by contemporaries in favor of nurture.

  3. [Feeding disorders in infants and toddlers: advantages of a joint consultation with pediatrician and psychologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales, T; Olives, J-P

    2013-08-01

    Feeding disorders and food refusal can be found in 25% of infants, a minority of these disorders has an organic explanation. Failure to thrive and/or severe malnutrition is found in 3-5% of infants in the general population. The authors describe the various phases of the interdisciplinary therapeutic intervention by underlining the advantages and the objectives to integrate therapeutic approaches across professional boundaries. Caregiver-infant relationship disturbances are certainly the most important factor, but the induced psychosomatic conditions also have a multifactorial etiology. This article points out the specificities of the disorders of infant feeding behaviors and explains the advantages of a joint pediatrician-psychologist consultation compared to separate consultations in pediatrics and child psychiatry.

  4. The role of the psychologist in the preparation of young children for radiotherapy: short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokun, J; Klikovac, T; Vujic, D; Nikitovic, M

    2011-01-01

    Psychooncology is now recognized as an important part of the holistic approach to therapy of very young cancer patients. When the psychologist is included in a multidisciplinary team, his/her duty is to prepare the child for several procedures he/she is scheduled for. If the very young child has to be treated by radiotherapy, adequate preparation of the child before the start of radiotherapy may enable the child to undergo the whole procedure without sedation or repeated anesthesia. Such practice has started in Serbia in 2002, at the Department of Pediatric Oncology of the Institute for Radiology and Oncology of Serbia, Belgrade. In this article, we discuss the model we currently use, and we present how this approach has been successfully applied in a 5-year-old girl treated by radiotherapy.

  5. One mind or two? How psychiatrists and psychologists reconcile faith and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenfeld-Heintz, Ellen

    2008-09-01

    Utilizing qualitative interviews, this study showed how, to what extent, and why psychiatrists and psychologists of Judeo-Christian religious orientations or nonaffiliated believers in Michigan were willing or reluctant to integrate religious paradigms in their mental health practices. Most of the study participants were found to believe that medical-scientific and religious paradigms are equally important and may coexist or even be integrated in psychotherapeutic practice. However, actual attempts to integrate them usually reflected the practitioners' personal religious backgrounds and initiatives and/or were client driven. Yet these integration initiatives were found to face powerful institutional impediments such as politico-cultural norms of separation of religion from secular institutions and professional norms.

  6. Turning pedagogy into a science: teachers and psychologists in late imperial Russia (1897-1917).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byford, Andy

    2008-01-01

    The article explores the Russian teachers' tortuous campaign at the beginning of the twentieth century to rise above the status of "semiprofessionals" by rooting the legitimacy of their professional expertise, training institutions, and working practices in the authority of "science." This involved a radical reshaping of traditional pedagogy and its fusion with new, controversial approaches to child psychology. It also led to a proliferation of teacher-training courses and conferences devoted to "pedagogical psychology," "experimental pedagogy," and "pedology." The article analyzes how the teachers' professional aspirations interacted with the conflicting agendas of rival groups of psychologists, who were themselves engaged in bitter squabbles over the legitimate identity of psychology as a scientific discipline.

  7. Anxiety, supervision and a space for thinking: some narcissistic perils for clinical psychologists in learning psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollon, P

    1989-06-01

    The process of learning psychotherapy involves narcissistic dangers--there may be injuries to self-esteem and self-image, especially when working with certain kinds of disturbed and hostile patients. Some patients will unconsciously recreate, in the transference, representations of early damaging experiences with parents, but now reversed with the therapist as the victim. It is vital for the trainee to be helped to understand these powerful interactional pressures. There are aspects of the professional culture and ideals of clinical psychologists (and possibly of some psychiatrists and social workers as well) which may make them particularly vulnerable in work with the hostile patient. It is argued that the function of supervision is not to teach a technique directly, but to create a 'space for thinking'--a kind of thinking which is more akin to maternal reverie, as described by Bion, than problem solving.

  8. Can language acquisition be facilitated in cochlear implanted children? Comparison of cognitive and behavioral psychologists' viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshizadeh, Leila; Vameghi, Roshanak; Yadegari, Fariba; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Hashemi, Seyed Basir

    2016-11-08

    To study how language acquisition can be facilitated for cochlear implanted children based on cognitive and behavioral psychology viewpoints? To accomplish this objective, literature related to behaviorist and cognitive psychology prospects about language acquisition were studied and some relevant books as well as Medline, Cochrane Library, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge and Scopus databases were searched. Among 25 articles that were selected, only 11 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Based on the inclusion criteria, review articles, expert opinion studies, non-experimental and experimental studies that clearly focused on behavioral and cognitive factors affecting language acquisition in children were selected. Finally, the selected articles were appraised according to guidelines of appraisal of medical studies. Due to the importance of the cochlear implanted child's language performance, the comparison of behaviorist and cognitive psychology points of view in child language acquisition was done. Since each theoretical basis, has its own positive effects on language, and since the two are not in opposition to one another, it can be said that a set of behavioral and cognitive factors might facilitate the process of language acquisition in children. Behavioral psychologists believe that repetition, as well as immediate reinforcement of child's language behavior help him easily acquire the language during a language intervention program, while cognitive psychologists emphasize on the relationship between information processing, memory improvement through repetitively using words along with "associated" pictures and objects, motor development and language acquisition. It is recommended to use a combined approach based on both theoretical frameworks while planning a language intervention program.

  9. Influence of uneven rail irregularities on the dynamic response of the railway track using a three-dimensional model of the vehicle-track system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Zakeri, Jabbar Ali; Esmaeili, Morteza; Shadfar, Morad

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the vehicle-track interaction is developed to investigate the coupled behaviour of vehicle-track system, in the presence of uneven irregularities at left/right rails. The railway vehicle is simplified as a 3D multi-rigid-body model, and the track is treated as the two parallel beams on a layered discrete support system. Besides the car-body, the bogies and the wheel sets, the sleepers are assumed to have roll degree of freedom, in order to simulate the in-plane rotation of the components. The wheel-rail interface is treated using a nonlinear Hertzian contact model, coupling the mathematical equations of the vehicle-track systems. The dynamic interaction of the entire system is numerically studied in time domain, employing Newmark's integration method. The track irregularity spectra of both the left/right rails are taken into account, as the inputs of dynamic excitations. The dynamic responses of the track system induced by such irregularities are obtained, particularly in terms of the vertical (bounce) and roll displacements. The numerical model of the present research is validated using several benchmark models reported in the literature, for both the smooth and unsmooth track conditions. Four sample profiles of the measured rail irregularities are considered as the case studies of excitation sources, examining their influences on the dynamic behaviour of the coupled system. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that the motion of track system is significantly influenced by the presence of uneven irregularities in left/right rails. Dynamic response of the sleepers in the roll direction becomes more sensitive to the rail irregularities, as the unevenness severity of the parallel profiles (quantitative difference between left and right rail spectra) is increased. The severe geometric deformation of the track in the bounce-pitch-roll directions is mainly related to such profile unevenness (cross-level) in left/right rails.

  10. Psychologists' Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Candidates Influenced by Patients' Attachment Representations and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Acherman, Yair; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric surg

  11. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  12. How Can Educational Psychologists Support the Reintegration of Children with an Acquired Brain Injury upon Their Return to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Heather; Howe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of reintegration into school for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and considers the role of the educational psychologist (EP) in supporting these children. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals in two specialist settings: a specialist rehabilitation centre and a children's hospital with…

  13. Developing a Competency Framework for the Initial Training of Educational Psychologists Working with Young People Aged 16-25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Cathy; Dunsmuir, Sandra; Lang, Jane; Wright, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The Children and Families Act (2014) extends statutory protections for young people with special educational needs and disabilities until age 25. Consequently the core curriculum for trainee educational psychologists (TEPs) needs to be developed beyond the current focus of work with early years and school-age children. In order to define requisite…

  14. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work…

  15. Personnel selection between aptitude tests and character assessment. The changing expertise of military psychologists in Germany, 1914-1942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petri, S

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the changing methodological principles in the process of the institutionalization of German military psychology. The paper argues that during the development of selection procedures for officer cadets, military psychologists shaped their tests along the general lines of personnel

  16. The Role of the School Psychologist in the Inclusive Education of School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan K.; Johnson, Cynthia; Sukhodolsky, Dennis G.

    2005-01-01

    Two independent trends are impacting school psychologists with regard to their involvement in the education of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs): increasing prevalence estimates of ASDs and an emphasis on the inclusion of students with special needs in regular education classrooms. In light of these trends and growing awareness of the…

  17. Psychologists' Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Candidates Influenced by Patients' Attachment Representations and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Acherman, Yair; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric

  18. 20 CFR 220.61 - Informing the examining physician or psychologist of examination scheduling, report content and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... capacity. Pertinent points in the claimant's medical history, such as a description of chest pain, will... do basic work activities such as sitting, standing, lifting, carrying, handling objects, hearing... psychologist's opinion as to the claimant's ability to reason or make occupational, personal, or social...

  19. Assessment Practices of Educational Psychologists in Aotearoa/New Zealand: From Diagnostic to Dialogic Ways of Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Roseanna; Dharan, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists working in education in Aotearoa/New Zealand work in diverse educational environments making day-to-day decisions informed by evidence-based practice. As a relatively small professional group with a complex work programme, they contribute to the assessments and decision-making processes of children and young people across multiple…

  20. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Positive Therapeutic Change for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Client, Carer and Clinical Psychologist Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Sarah; Tickle, Anna; Dawson, David L.; Harris, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Studies have highlighted successful outcomes of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. However, processes underlying these outcomes are uncertain. Thematic analysis was used to explore the perceptions of three clinical psychologists, six clients and six carers of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change for…