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Sample records for psychologists conduct psychoeducational

  1. What Makes an Effective Psychoeducational Report? Perceptions of Teachers and Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Janet; Hawkins, Tara; Thornton, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    The psychoeducational report has many purposes and many readers. Given this, it is imperative that psychoeducational reports are well written, as well as acceptable to and understood by the readers. This study aimed to determine from the perspective of both teacher (report reader) and psychologist (report writer) the factors that make an effective…

  2. What Makes an Effective Psychoeducational Report? Perceptions of Teachers and Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Janet; Hawkins, Tara; Thornton, Jenna

    2015-01-01

    The psychoeducational report has many purposes and many readers. Given this, it is imperative that psychoeducational reports are well written, as well as acceptable to and understood by the readers. This study aimed to determine from the perspective of both teacher (report reader) and psychologist (report writer) the factors that make an effective…

  3. Psycho-Educational Assessment of Specific Learning Disabilities: Views and Practices of Australian Psychologists and Guidance Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyard, John D.; Gilmore, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the views and practices of 203 Australian psychologists and guidance counsellors with respect to psycho-educational assessment of students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs). Results from an online survey indicated that practitioners draw upon a wide range of theoretical perspectives when…

  4. Useful Terms in Psychoeducational Reports: A Survey of Students, Teachers, and Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafoth, Mary Ann; Richmond, Bert O.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the usefulness of terminology in psychoeducational reports with students, teachers, and psychology interns rating the usefulness of 25 terms frequently found in reports. Results showed significant differences in usefulness ratings, depending on major, category, and whether or not the rater had taken a special education course. (WAS)

  5. Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, focusing on introduction and applicability; preamble; general principles; and ethical standards (resolving ethical issues, competence, human relations, privacy and confidentiality, advertising and other public statements, record keeping and…

  6. When psychologists work with religious clients: applications of the general principles of ethical conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarhouse, M A; VanOrman, B T

    1999-12-01

    Psychologists become more effective and relevant when they appreciate that many clients hold religious values and commitments. Greater awareness of religion and religious values in the lives of clients may aid clinicians' efforts to provide more accurate assessments and effective treatment plans. The authors use the American Psychological Association's (1992) "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" as a framework to examine many of the ethical issues relevant when psychologists work with religious clients. This article also provides suggestions for ways in which clinicians may obtain the skills needed to offer competent assessments and interventions with religiously committed clients.

  7. 2010 Amendments to the 2002 "Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The following amendments to the 2002 "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" (the Ethics Code; American Psychological Association, 2002) were adopted by the APA Council of Representatives at its February 2010 meeting. The changes involve the last two sentences of the final paragraph of the Introduction and Applicability section and Ethical Standards 1.02 and 1.03. The amendments became effective June 1, 2010. A history of these amendments to the Ethics Code is provided in the "Report of the Ethics Committee, 2009" in this issue of the American Psychologist (American Psychological Association, Ethics Committee, 2010). Following are a clean version of the revisions and a version indicating changes from the 2002 language (inserted text is underlined; deleted text is crossed out).

  8. A Global Perspective on Psycho-Educational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Islam, Shaheen; Su, Hui; Younesian, Sharifeh

    2015-01-01

    For psychologists in less developed countries, psycho-educational assessment is often challenging due to a lack of specialist training and a scarcity of appropriate, psychometrically robust instruments. This article focuses on school psychology and psycho-educational assessment in three countries: Bangladesh, China and Iran. Despite differences in…

  9. A Global Perspective on Psycho-Educational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Islam, Shaheen; Su, Hui; Younesian, Sharifeh

    2015-01-01

    For psychologists in less developed countries, psycho-educational assessment is often challenging due to a lack of specialist training and a scarcity of appropriate, psychometrically robust instruments. This article focuses on school psychology and psycho-educational assessment in three countries: Bangladesh, China and Iran. Despite differences in…

  10. Psychoeducation for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Merinder, Lars Bertil; Belgamwar, Madhvi R

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia can be a severe and chronic illness characterised by lack of insight and poor compliance with treatment. Psychoeducational approaches have been developed to increase patients’ knowledge of, and insight into, their illness and its treatment. It is supposed that this increased knowledge and insight will enable people with schizophrenia to cope in a more effective way with their illness, thereby improving prognosis. Objectives To assess the effects of psychoeducational interventions compared with standard levels of knowledge provision. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2010). We updated this search November 2012 and added 27 new trials to the awaiting assessment section. Selection criteria All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducation for schizophrenia and/or related serious mental illnesses involving individuals or groups. We excluded quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors extracted data independently from included papers. We contacted authors of trials for additional and missing data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of homogeneous dichotomous data. We used a fixed-effects model for heterogeneous dichotomous data. Where possible we also calculated the numbers needed to treat (NNT), as well as weighted means for continuous data. Main results This review includes a total of 5142 participants (mostly inpatients) from 44 trials conducted between 1988 and 2009 (median study duration ~ 12 weeks, risk of bias - moderate). We found that incidences of non-compliance were lower in the psychoeducation group in the short term (n = 1400, RR 0.52 CI 0.40 to 0.67, NNT 11 CI 9 to 16). This finding holds for the medium and long term. Relapse appeared to be lower in psychoeducation group (n = 1214, RR 0.70 CI 0.61 to 0.81, NNT 9 CI 7 to 14) and this also applied to readmission (n = 206, RR 0.71 CI 0.56 to 0

  11. Interações entre crianças hospitalizadas e uma psicóloga, durante atendimento psicopedagógico em enfermaria de pediatria Interactions between hospitalized children and psychologist during psycho-educational attendance at a pediatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephânia Cottorello Vitorino

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar a interação entre crianças hospitalizadas e uma psicóloga em contexto de atendimento psicopedagógico. Foram realizadas 22 observações do atendimento promovido por uma psicóloga com crianças internadas em enfermaria de pediatria, no período de sete meses. Participaram do estudo 102 crianças com idade mediana na fase escolar. As verbalizações foram gravadas e tanto os comportamentos motores, quanto as atividades realizadas foram registradas. Os resultados revelaram que a psicóloga iniciava mais contatos interativos do que as crianças e atuava predominantemente estimulando a interação entre elas. Os temas sobre as atividades psicopedagógicas ocorreram em maior porcentagem em relação aos demais conteúdos verbais. Verificou-se que a psicóloga envolvia a criança nas atividades realizadas, informando, orientando ou fazendo comentários. As verbalizações sobre hospitalização apresentaram baixa ocorrência. As crianças, apesar de enfermas e hospitalizadas, participaram ativamente e interagiram em situações lúdico-pedagógicas. Os achados mostram a relevância desse tipo de atividades para promoção do desenvolvimento da criança no contexto hospitalar.The aim of the present study was to analyze the interactions between hospitalized children and a psychologist at psycho-educational attendance. Twenty two observations were done about the attendance promoted by a psychologist with children at pediatric ward, during a period of seven months. One hundred and two children participated in this study. The verbalizations were recorded; motor behavior and performed activities were registered. The results showed that the psychologist began more interactions than children and promoted stimulation for interactions between them. The verbalizations about psycho-educational activities were more frequent than other ones. The psychologist involved the child in the activities, instructing, giving

  12. [Psychoeducation in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata Ospina, Juan Pablo; Rangel Martínez-Villalba, Andrés Mauricio; García Valencia, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia includes the use of psychotropic drugs, psychotherapy, and psychosocial interventions that include psychoeducation. This strategy has been defined as the delivery of information about the disorder and its treatment in a systematic and structured way. To review the literature on the efficacy of psychoeducation in schizophrenia. A search in PubMed, SciELO, EMBASE and PsycINFO was made with the terms "psychoeducation", "schizophrenia" and "psychosocial intervention". Articles in Spanish and English language were reviewed. Psychoeducation can be applied to patients, family or both, and individually or in groups. The number of sessions can vary. There have been many studies that seek to determine the efficacy of psychoeducation in the clinical course, family dynamics and stigma, with results that favor its implementation, but so far it has not been possible to determine exactly how best to apply psychoeducation, mainly because of the great variability of designs. The studies on psychoeducation have shown efficacy. However, this might be an overestimation, as there is a high risk of bias. Consequently, there is not enough evidence. At least for now, it is reasonable to complement pharmacotherapy with psycoeducation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing the effects of combined numerical and visuo- spatial psychoeducational trainings conducted by curricular teachers and external trainers. Preliminary evidence across kindergarteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, M.; Mascia, M. L.; Fastame, M. C.; Napoleone, V.; Porru, A. M.; Siddu, F.; Lucangeli, D.; Penna, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of two pencil-and-paper trainings empowering numerical and visuo-spatial abilities in Italian five-year-old kindergarteners. Specifically, the trainings were respectively carried out by the curricular teacher or by an external trainer. The former received a specific training in order to use the psychoeducational programmes with her pupils, whereas the latter received a specific education about the role of numerical and visuo-spatial abilities for school achievement and she was also trained to use psychoeducational trainings in kindergarten schools. At pre-test and post-test nonverbal functions and numeracy knowledge were assessed through a battery of standardized tests. The results show that both the numerical psychoeducational programme and the visuo-spatial one are useful tools to enhance mathematical achievements in kindergarteners. However, when the trainings were proposed by the external trainer, the efficacy of the psychoeducational programmes was more significant. These outcomes seem to be related both to the expertise and the novelty effect of the external trainer on the classroom.

  14. Forensic psychologist

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    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of different issues that a forensic psychologists encounter at work. Forensic assessment might be needed in civil law cases, administrative procedures and in criminal law cases. The paper focuses on referrals in criminal law cases regarding matters such as assessing competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility and violence risk assessment. Finally, the role of expert testimony on eyewitness memory, which is not used in practice in Slovenia yet, is presented.

  15. New psychologist at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain, started work at CERN on 1 November. The psychologist’s office, formerly part of the Social Affairs Service in Human Resources, has now moved to the Medical Service (office 57-1-024). It is open every Tuesday and Thursday.   The new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain. Working in an organisation like CERN has numerous advantages. However, as in any professional setting, the work can sometimes bring stress, anxiety, overwork and so on. For this reason, a few years ago CERN brought in a psychologist for the staff. “As a psychologist, my role isn’t just to deal with known problems, but also to make assessments and, if possible, prevent difficult situations arising. Sometimes people realise that something is wrong, but they can’t say why. In such cases, I may be able to use a discussion to assess the nature of the problem and determine if further sessions are needed. If that is the case, I can either conduct the session...

  16. Psychologists in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto M. Alonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ince the beginning of Psychology as an university career, 55853 graduate student have obtained their degree as a psychologist. These professionals studied in 34 universities (7 federal and 27 private universities. 46777 psychologists in activity have been detected up to date. Graduate psychologists who are not in activity are 9076. University psychology students are 56387. In 2005, 12268 have started these studies in the field. Taking into account the amount of graduate psychologists related to national population it yields 154 psychologists every 100.000 citizens or in other way 649 inhabitants per psychologist

  17. Find a Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ages Served refers to a particular populations a psychologist has the most experience treating. Registrants have ranked ... 64 yrs.) Older adults (65 yrs. or older) ? Psychologists have education, training, and expertise in specific areas ...

  18. Psychologists in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Modesto M. Alonso

    2015-01-01

    ince the beginning of Psychology as an university career, 55853 graduate student have obtained their degree as a psychologist. These professionals studied in 34 universities (7 federal and 27 private universities). 46777 psychologists in activity have been detected up to date. Graduate psychologists who are not in activity are 9076. University psychology students are 56387. In 2005, 12268 have started these studies in the field. Taking into account the amount of graduate psychologists related...

  19. The Legalization of the School Psychologists' World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirp, David L.; Kirp, Lauren M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the increasing tendency of legal rules to shape school psychologist's conduct. The article suggests that "the legalization of the school psychologist's world" may afford an opportunity to reshape, in more "nonformal" and collegial ways, relationships with other school professions, students, and parents. (Author)

  20. Selected Leading American Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2015-01-01

    There are selected psychologists who have contributed much toward studying problems in teaching and learning. They have suggested plans from research, carefully conducted, which enable educational practices to be set on more secure and justifiable grounds. The writer will briefly write about ten leaders, although there are salient others.

  1. Psychologist Retention Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RETENTION(PSYCHOLOGY), *JOB SATISFACTION, *ALL VOLUNTEER, MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), DEMOGRAPHY, ATTRITION, SURVEYS, QUESTIONNAIRES, PERCEPTION (PSYCHOLOGY), PSYCHOLOGISTS .

  2. Clinical Efficacy of Psychoeducational Interventions with Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limiñana-Gras, Rosa M.; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Cuéllar-Flores, Isabel; Sánchez-López, M. Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the efficacy of psychoeducational interventions geared to reducing psychological distress for caregivers in a sample of 90 family caregivers of elderly dependent (78 women and 12 men). We conducted an analysis of the statistical and clinical significance of the changes observed in psychological health…

  3. Danish psychologists as psychotherapists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Nielsen, Jan; Orlinsky, David

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists are by far the biggest group of professional psychotherapists in Denmark, and this article presents data from two samples of psychologist psychotherapists collected at an interval of 15 years. The subjects in both samples responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core...

  4. The efficacy of psychoeducation on recurrent depression: A randomised trial with a two-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Foldager, Leslie; Makki, Ahmad;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of psychoeducation is well documented in the treatment of relapse prevention of schizophrenia, and recently also in bipolar disorder; however, for recurrent depression only few controlled studies focusing on the efficacy of psychoeducation have been conducted. Aims: This ...

  5. Psychoeducation to facilitate return to work in individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Yde, Bjarne Frostholm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sickness absence due to poor mental health is a common problem in many Western countries. To facilitate return to work, it may be important to identify individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder and subsequently to offer appropriate treatment. Psychoeducation...... of having a mental disorder. The psychoeducation was a supplement to the various standard offers provided by the job centres.Methods/design: The study is a randomised controlled trial, in which individuals on sick leave either receive psychoeducation and standard case management or standard case management...... by psychiatric nurses, a psychologist, a social worker, a physiotherapist and a person who had previously been on sick leave due to mental health problems. The sessions focused on stress and work life, and the purpose was to provide individuals on sick leave the skills to understand and improve their mental...

  6. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löhr HD

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hildegard D Löhr1,2, Jan H Rosenvinge1,3, Rolf Wynn2,41Division of General Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 4Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course.Keywords: cognitive therapy, information technology, occupational rehabilitation, psychoeducation, self-help, social anxiety

  7. Group psychoeducation for parents of adolescents with eating disorders: the Aachen program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Kristian; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Vloet, Timo; Hagenah, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Family-based treatment in adolescents and individual psychoeducation in adults are accepted components in a multimodal treatment of eating disorders. However, only few studies have been conducted on the use of parent-based psychoeducation. This paper presents the structure and content, as well as a preliminary evaluation, of a group psychoeducation program for parents of adolescent patients with eating disorders. The program is limited to five 90-minute sessions and aimed at increasing the parents' understanding of the disorder and promoting high transparency with regard to our treatment principles. The vast majority of parents rated the group psychoeducation as helpful in coping with their child's disorder and would recommend others to take part in the program.

  8. Psychoeducation for bipolar disorder: A discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynere; Crowe, Marie; Scott, Anne; Lacey, Cameron

    2017-03-16

    Psychoeducation has become a common intervention within mental health settings. It aims to increase people's ability to manage a life with a long-term illness. For people with bipolar disorder, psychoeducation is one of a range of psychosocial interventions now considered part of contemporary mental health practice. It has taken on a 'common sense' status that results in little critique of psychoeducation practices. Using a published manual on psychoeducation and bipolar disorder as its data, Foucauldian discourse analysis was used in the present study for a critical perspective on psychoeducation in order to explore the taken-for-granted assumptions on which it is based. It identifies that the text produces three key subject positions for people with bipolar disorder. To practice self-management, a person must: (i) accept and recognize the authority of psychiatry to know them; (ii) come to see that they can moderate themselves; and (iii) see themselves as able to undertake a reflexive process of self-examination and change. These findings highlight the circular and discursive quality to the construct of insight that is central to how psychoeducation is practiced. Using Foucault's construct of pastoral power, it also draws attention to the asymmetrical nature of power relations between the clinician and the person with bipolar disorder. An effect of the use of medical discourse in psychoeducation is to limit its ability to work with ambivalence and contradiction. A critical approach to psychotherapy and education offers an alternate paradigm on which to basis psychoeducation practices.

  9. Behavioral Econometrics for Psychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    We make the case that psychologists should make wider use of structural econometric methods. These methods involve the development of maximum likelihood estimates of models, where the likelihood function is tailored to the structural model. In recent years these models have been developed...

  10. Bilingual School Psychologists' Assessment Practices with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored bilingual school psychologists' assessment practices with students identified as English language learners (ELL). One thousand bilingual National Association of School Psychologist members were recruited nationwide, and 276 participated. Among those conducting language proficiency assessments of ELLs, many (58%) use…

  11. Effectiveness of Group Psycho-education on Well-being and Depression Among Breast Cancer Survivors of Melaka, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ram, Shanker; Narayanasamy, Rajagopal; Barua, Ankur

    2013-01-01

    .... A cluster non-randomized trial was conducted at a Cancer Society in Melaka, Malaysia to assess the effectiveness of psycho-education on well-being status and depression among breast cancer patients...

  12. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists

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    Ajai R. Singh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists share an inevitable, if rather uneasy, relationship. So very much like a modern marriage. Can't do without it, can't get out of it. Both sides contemplate divorce often. Think of separation by mutual consent. Even keep threatening as they rave and rant. Have secret, and not so secret, flings on the side. But, like the proverbial homing bird, or the conservative Indian arranged marriage, have no option but to stick it out with each other. Psychiatrists are otherwise good people. But that does not make them immune to handling clinical psychologists with the condescending tolerance and patronizing acceptance that teachers, for example, have towards rambling students. Or the rich have towards the poor. This does not take long to get converted into exasperation and smirky asides in the less charitable amongst the psychiatrists. Not that clinical psychologists are very helpful in motivating the psychiatrists to change for the better. For they, like most people in their position, over react and get aggressive when confronted with this attitude. And understandably so. However, it is time both realized their attitudes were not helpful either for mutual interaction, or growth of the Mental Health Movement at large. We can understand why psychiatrists behave the way they do. They are exposed to this same condescending-patronising attitude from their own peers in the medical profession. Their medical colleagues have yet to develop a feeling of healthy respect for psychiatry. Psychiatrists, no doubt, feel this is unjustified, but their peers are still in a position to deny them the respect and acceptance they seek. What they get from their medical colleagues, they unwittingly pass on to their clinical psychologist colleagues. But understanding why it occurs does not absolve them of their responsibility to behave more rationally, rather than emotionally, with the latter. [No abstract available.

  13. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  14. Incest and Parental Contact: A Psychologist's Personal Case and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A psychologist's husband molested their young daughter. Consulting psychologists purported that research indicated it would be developmentally advantageous for their daughter to continue a relationship with the father following the marital separation. The consulting psychologists did not reference the literature, prompting the mother to conduct a…

  15. [Role of psychoeducation in therapy of women with paranoid schizophrenia on the background of abdominal obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2013-03-01

    Sufficient information of patients and their relatives about essence of disease, principles of medicamental therapy, is one of major factors influencing on adherence of patients to therapy. Application of psychoeducation programs allows to activate a patient in partnership with a doctor, that assists the increase of compliance. Research aim - to improve quality of remission and readaptation of patients with paranoid schizophrenia by realization of the psychoeducation programs. 45 women in age of 18-60 being on treatment in the Kharkiv regional clinical psychiatric hospital №3, with a diagnosis paranoid schizophrenia were examined. Psychoeducation lessons were conducted in closed groups for 7-8 persons, 2 times per a week, by duration every lesson for 45 minutes. The psychoeducation module consisted of informative block and forming of practical skills. Realization of psychoeducation lesson in this contingent showed the efficiency. Communicative activity became better for all patients as well as their adherence to therapy, that gave possibility promptly expose and warn development of side effects, improve quality and level of social adaptation of patients life.

  16. Evaluation of the psychoeducation given to the elderly at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambağ, Hatice; Öz, Fatma

    2013-12-01

    The research was carried out as a pre-test, post-test patterned intervention with one group in order to evaluate the psychoeducation given to older people at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction. The research was done with 21 female and 21 male older people staying at the state-owned Seyran Bağlari Nursing Home/Elderly Caring Rehabilitation Center and the Ümitköy Nursing Home. In the psychoeducation program, each session was conducted for a duration of 60-90 min in the nursing homes' education classrooms. After the psychoeducation program, the life satisfaction index, the health promotion lifestyle profile total, and the subscale (nutrition, health responsibility, self realization, stress management, interpersonal support, and exercise) mean scores, significantly increased statistically. It is suggested that the nursing homes' health workers, and especially nurses who work full-time, should promote such psychoeducation.

  17. Identifying School Psychologists' Intercultural Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyana, Olivia E.; Edwards, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are encouraged to analyze their intercultural sensitivity because they may be subject to personal attitudes and beliefs that pejoratively influence their work with students and clients who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). However, gaps remain in the literature regarding whether school psychologists are prepared…

  18. Keep Your Brain Fit! A Psychoeducational Training Program for Healthy Cognitive Aging: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Jennifer; van Heugten, Caroline; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A psychoeducational face-to-face training program (Keep Your Brain Fit!) was developed to support the working population in coping with age-related cognitive changes and taking proactive preventive measures to maintain cognitive health. A feasibility study was conducted to test the training program presented in a workshop format. Participants…

  19. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Psychoeducational Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Ness, Carin M.; Dannison, Linda; Smith, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Presents results of study exploring use of psychoeducational group sessions on topics such as parenting skills, personal well-being, relationships, managing finances, and legal issues, specifically developed for custodial grandparents. Grandparents consistently met objectives of the content areas, with increased mastery as sessions progressed.…

  20. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Psychoeducational Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Ness, Carin M.; Dannison, Linda; Smith, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Presents results of study exploring use of psychoeducational group sessions on topics such as parenting skills, personal well-being, relationships, managing finances, and legal issues, specifically developed for custodial grandparents. Grandparents consistently met objectives of the content areas, with increased mastery as sessions progressed.…

  1. Caregiver psychoeducation for schizophrenia: is gender important?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Females care for individuals with chronic illness more commonly than males and have different attitudes to illness. Additionally, they experience greater burden and reduced quality of life, when compared to their male counterparts. Since knowledge has been shown to be related to burden, we sought to determine whether there were gender differences in knowledge acquisition during a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme (CPP).

  2. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Franca; Wicherts, Jelte M; Veldkamp, Coosje L S; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants' estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes.

  3. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants’ estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes. PMID:28296929

  4. George Kelly: cognitive psychologist, humanistic psychologist, or something else entirely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, John G

    2008-11-01

    George Kelly was regarded by some of his contemporaries as a cognitive psychologist and by others as a humanistic psychologist. Kelly himself resisted being rubricized. He did, however, name several people who had been influential in his life and work, one of whom was J.F. Herbart. A comparison of Herbart and Kelly reveals several similarities. Both shared a belief that psychology was fundamentally a mathematical discipline. Both eliminated distinctions usually taken for granted in psychology, such as emotion versus cognition. Reconstructing Kelly's relation to Herbart allows one to see more clearly why Kelly was such a unique figure in 20th century psychology.

  5. The role of the psychologist with disorders of consciousness in inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Sarah; Beaulieu, Cynthia; Sandbach, Karen; Colaiezzi, Angela; Balkan, Staci

    2017-08-01

    The psychologist in an inpatient pediatric neurorehabilitation setting provides a vital role in the assessment, treatment, and management of pediatric patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC). Competencies are drawn from several specialty areas of professional psychology, including rehabilitation psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, and pediatric psychology. This specialized knowledge forms the basis for tailoring assessment and treatment plans specific to the individual brain injury profile, with the goals of enhancing diagnosis, prognosis, and care transition decision. To describe the role of the psychologist in the differential diagnosis and treatment of pediatric patients with severe brain injury and DoC during inpatient rehabilitation. Research Method/Design: Three pediatric cases admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with suspected DoC illustrate the psychologist's role in diagnostics, case conceptualization, assessment design, and data collection based on patient-specific brain injury profiles. Customized data collection informs diagnostic decisions and treatment planning, with the goal of improved of care and resource utilization. The psychologist also provides ongoing psychoeducation, psychotherapy, and supportive interventions to the patient's family and caregivers to facilitate family adjustment to disability and promote long-term adaptation and adjustment. This case series illustrates the role of the psychologist in the use of individual brain injury profiles to coordinate assessment, diagnosis, and care for children with severe brain injury. Implications include the need for focused research to demonstrate the value-added role of the psychologist on the interdisciplinary team working in the neurorehabilitation of this complex patient population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. 10 CFR 712.33 - Designated Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated Psychologist. 712.33 Section 712.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.33 Designated Psychologist. (a) The Designated Psychologist reports to the SOMD and determines the psychological fitness of an individual...

  7. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-09-25

    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946-1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  8. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern John H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946–1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  9. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies...... will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one...... conducted within this area indicate that family psychoeducation as a supplement to traditional treatment can effectively reduce the risk of relapse in patients with major depression as well as being beneficial for the relatives involved. However, the evidence is currently limited. This study...

  10. Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... styles, and employee morale. They also work with management on matters such as policy planning, ... Hospitals; state, local, and private 6 Individual and family ...

  11. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Maricourt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (% use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  12. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maricourt, P.; Hergueta, Th.; Galinowski, A.; Salamon, R.; Diallo, A.; Vaugeois, C.; Lépine, J. P.; Olié, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction. PMID:27956923

  13. Development and Evaluation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Delivered by Psychologists and Non-Psychologists in an NHS Community Adult Mental Health Service: a Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Bell, Lorraine; Bolderston, Helen; Clarke, Sue

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is effective for depression and may be useful for complex transdiagnostic clients. To conduct a preliminary evaluation of whether ACT is feasible and effective when delivered by psychologists and non-psychologists for complex clients in a National Health Service (NHS) community mental health service for adults. Staff were trained in ACT and conducted one-to-one therapy with clients. Measures on general mental health, depression, fusion and values were given pre-therapy, post-therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Standardized measures showed significant improvements post-therapy for global mental health, depression, cognitive fusion and values post-treatment. These were partially maintained at follow-up and remained after an intent-to-treat analysis. There were no differences in outcomes between psychologists and non-psychologists. ACT may be delivered effectively with limited training for complex cases in secondary care, though further research is needed.

  14. Psychoeducation to facilitate return to work in individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Yde, Bjarne Frostholm; Labriola, Merete; Nohr, Ellen A; Jensen, Chris

    2014-12-17

    Sickness absence due to poor mental health is a common problem in many Western countries. To facilitate return to work, it may be important to identify individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder and subsequently to offer appropriate treatment. Psychoeducation alone has not previously been used as a return to work intervention, but may be a promising tool to facilitate return to work. Therefore, the aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychoeducation designed specifically to facilitate return to work for individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder. The psychoeducation was a supplement to the various standard offers provided by the job centres. The study is a randomised controlled trial, in which individuals on sick leave either receive psychoeducation and standard case management or standard case management alone. Participants were individuals with mental health symptoms, who had been on sick leave from part-time or full-time work or unemployment for about 4-8 weeks. The psychoeducational intervention was group-based and the course consisted of 2 hour sessions once a week for 6 weeks. The course was given by psychiatric nurses, a psychologist, a social worker, a physiotherapist and a person who had previously been on sick leave due to mental health problems. The sessions focused on stress and work life, and the purpose was to provide individuals on sick leave the skills to understand and improve their mental functioning.The primary outcome is the duration of sickness absence measured by register data. Secondary outcomes include psychological symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and locus of control. These outcomes are measured by questionnaires at the start of the intervention and at 3 and 6 months follow-up. On the basis of this trial, the effect of psychoeducation for individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder will be studied. The results will contribute to the

  15. Child Psychologist:Jean Piaget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大任

    2006-01-01

    Jean Piaget(1896-1980),a professor of psychology at theUniversity of Geneva from 1929 to 1954,was a French Swissdevelopmental psychologist who is most well known for organizingcognitive development into a series of stages,including Sensorimotor,Pheoperational,Concrete Operational,and Formal Operational.Piaget’s theory supposes that people develop schemas(conceptualmodels)by either assimilating or accommodating new information.These concepts can be explained as fitting information in to existingschemas,and altering existing schemas in order to accommodate newinformation,respectively.

  16. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    OpenAIRE

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investigation from the perspective of the reflexive capacities of the psychologist as one among other human beings and/or members of a specific culture. Most obvious was the emergence – in the late nineteent...

  17. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. Methods: This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients...... in substance use were associated with randomization to Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling. The findings support the usefulness of providing psycho-education to outpatients with antisocial personality disorder. Trial registration: ISRCTN registry, ISRCTN67266318, 17/7/2012...

  18. [Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Isabelle; Cludy, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration. The collaboration between nurses and psychologists is relatively recent within healthcare institutes. Gaining maximum value from such a collaboration requires solid knowledge of the roles and the limits of each profession as well as a real desire to work together, for the benefit of the greater well-being of the patient and, indirectly, of the teams.

  19. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investi

  20. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investi

  1. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under

  2. A New Role for the Psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Mel

    1976-01-01

    The educational psychologist and the school staff of an ESN(M) (educationally sub-normal) special school in Great Britain could relate more meaningfully if the assessments of the students by both teachers and psychologists were related to a curriculum based on sequencing of skills. (IM)

  3. Psychologists and child psychological maltreatment severity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, Ignacia; De Paúl, Joaquín; Indias, Silvia; Ullate, María

    2013-01-01

    Psychological maltreatment (PM) is probably the most difficult child maltreatment form to detect and evaluate. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of an instrument developed to improve accuracy in the assessment of PM severity in Child Protection Services (CPS). Case vignettes representing different severity levels of PM situations were used. 146 CPS psychologists participated in the study. A first group was made up of 115 psychologists who had been trained in the use of the instrument for 4 hours. The second group was made up of 31 psychologists who had been using the instrument for more than 12 months at the time of the study. Psychologists from the first group rated the severity of the vignettes in two ways: applying their own daily work criteria and applying the instrument after the training. Accurate ratings clearly improved when psychologists used the instrument criteria. However, only psychologists who had used the instrument for more than 12 months at the time of the study obtained more than 80% of accurate ratings. Results support the importance for CPS psychologists to use psychological maltreatment severity assessment instruments and show the conditions under which they could be effective.

  4. Application of Focal Conflict Theory to Psychoeducational Groups: Implications for Process, Content, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Group psychoeducation is a common group type used for a range of purposes. The literature presents balancing content and process as a challenge for psychoeducational group leaders. While the significance of group psychoeducation is supported, practitioners are given little direction for addressing process in these groups. Focal Conflict Theory…

  5. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. Methods: This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients...... were randomly allocated to treatment as usual (TAU, n = 80) or TAU plus a psycho-educative program, Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling (ILC, n = 96) delivered by site clinicians (n = 39). Using follow-up interviews 3 and 9 months after randomization, we examined changes in drug and alcohol use (Addiction......%) of participants randomized to psycho-education attended at least one counselling session, and 21 (23%) attended all six sessions. The Median number of sessions was 2. All patients reduced drug and alcohol problems at 9 months with small within-group effect sizes. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated significant...

  6. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in the study. The results show some problematic issues such as: record keeping, exceptions of confidentiality, access to personal data, the content of informed consent, incompetence, copying of literature and diagnostic instruments – even not standardised ones, psychology students as subjects in psychological research, and lack of information on ethical aspects of students' practical work. Psychologists and students reported inadequate knowledge of professional ethics and suggested various kinds of ethical education. Institutions mostly enable psychologists to work within the Code of ethics. There are, however, conflicts regarding access to data and professional autonomy. Psychologists report conflicts between law and ethics, incorrect reports in media and lack of control over professional ethics. In the case of ethical violation psychologists do less than they should. They emphasise the problem of incompetence. The frequency and seriousness of certain violation were estimated. Ways of verifying knowledge, stimulating ethical conduct and taking different measures in the case of violations were suggested. The state of affairs in different working environments of psychologists was also described. Results show that psychologist who have worked in the field for a shorter period answer more frequently contrary to the Code of Ethics. Students' knowledge of ethics is mostly very satisfactory. The study emphasises the ethical aspects of psychological practice in Slovenia. It

  7. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA's Ethics Code or current research.

  8. The efficacy of psychoeducation on recurrent depression: A randomised trial with a two-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Foldager, Leslie; Makki, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of psychoeducation is well documented in the treatment of relapse prevention of schizophrenia, and recently also in bipolar disorder; however, for recurrent depression only few controlled studies focusing on the efficacy of psychoeducation have been conducted. Aims...... and in BDI was found; however, it was uniform for case and control patients. Drop-out/non-compliance was significantly more frequent among patients randomized to the control group. Furthermore, during follow-up the case group got a significant stronger attachment to the Labour market than the control group....... Conclusions: The primary hypothesis could not be confirmed. Secondary outcome measurements concerning drop-out/non-compliance and attachment to the Labour market were significantly in favour of cases....

  9. Psychoeducational Treatment of Children with Autism and Reactive Attachment Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Kaynak, F. Nimet; Kinali, Gulsevim; Besikci, Humeyra; Issever, Halim

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of short-term psychoeducational treatment in children with autism and reactive attachment disorder (RAD). Ten boys with autism aged 24-66 months and 11 children with RAD (nine boys and two girls) aged 30-70 months were included in the study. The Ankara Developmental Screening Inventory…

  10. The Psychoeducational Characteristics of Children with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovet, Joanne F.

    1993-01-01

    This study compared psychoeducational characteristics of 67 children (ages 6-16) with Turner syndrome and 27 nonaffected controls. Subjects exhibited selective impairments in visuospatial and memory areas; significant underachievement in arithmetic; poor social competence; and increased behavior problems, particularly in the area of hyperactivity.…

  11. Enhancing Marital Intimacy Through Psychoeducation: The PAIRS Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durana, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    Explores intimacy enhancement through a psychoeducational method, the Practical Application of Intimate Relationship Skills (PAIRS) Program. Participants were more distressed and less intimate than general population. Clients' perceptions of intimacy and what maintains intimacy were measured. Findings suggest a multifaceted view of intimacy.…

  12. Elderly Individuals with Diabetes: Adding Cognitive Training to Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna Paulo, Debora Lee; Sanches Yassuda, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The present research examined the effects of a cognitive training program combined with psychoeducational intervention for diabetic elderly patients. Specifically, it aimed at assessing the effects of an eight-session cognitive training and educational program in diabetic elderly individuals and investigating changes in their awareness about…

  13. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  14. The psychoeducational aspects of the psychiatric rehabilitation aproach

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William; Cohen, Mikal

    1991-01-01

    Psychiatric Rehabilitation is an approach which utilizes the principles of physical rehabilitation with psychotherapeutic techniques. It incorporates both psychoeducational techniques (skill development) and environmental modification (resource development). It includes a complex variety of didactic, modeling, experimental, follow-up activities in the context of a strong interpersonal relationship that permits a systematic intervention to be delivered in a flexible, hi...

  15. A Model Psychoeducational Group for Survivors of Organizational Downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Pamela F.; Smith, John E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a one-day psychoeducational group for survivors of a recent organizational downsizing. Principal goal of the group is to prevent "Layoff Survivor Syndrome" through instruction and group exercises designed to normalize common responses and increase awareness of positive coping strategies. Provides descriptions of group…

  16. The Process of the Psychoeducational Appraisal of the Multihandicapped Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Beth

    Covered in the paper on the psychoeducational assessment of the multihandicapped child are the importance of the learning accomplished in the sensory motor period and the effects of evaluation media and sequence on child performance. Described are the six stages of sensory motor development measured by a Piagetian-based instrument developed by J.…

  17. The Psychoeducational Philosophy: Programming Implications for Students with Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Albert H.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes factors relevant to the psychoeducational model of intervention with behavior disordered students, including values, biological predispositions, psychological development, and continuity of experience. The therapeutic potential of the teacher and the curriculum in helping students generate personal resources for coping is…

  18. The Psychoeducational Assessment of Ebonics Speakers: Issues and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul-McNicol, Sharon-ann; Reid, Grace; Wisdom, Cecilia

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the limitations of traditional standardized psychoeducational assessments for Ebonics speakers and describes alternative measures that may yield more accurate results for these students. Also highlights the implications of traditional and nontraditional assessment approaches for test developers, evaluators, educators, and students.…

  19. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stress: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-ana

  20. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stres: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.; Christensen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-ana

  1. Training the industrial and organisational psychologist as counsellor: Are we doing enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial and organisational (I-O psychologists are responsible for workplacecounselling. Workplace counselling requires specific skills and training for the I-O psychologist.Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to explore the role of training the I-Opsychologist as workplace counsellor.Motivation for the study: Studies show that the I-O psychologist does not feel adequatelyprepared for their role as workplace counsellor. It is important to explore which skills andtraining are needed to equip the I-O psychologist as counsellor.Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research design with convenience andsnowball sampling was used to identify I-O psychologists (n = 22 from different businesssectors in Gauteng and North-West. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gatherdata and content analysis was utilised to extract themes and sub-themes from the results.Main findings: The findings showed that the participants know about the process of counselling, but they did not feel adequately prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. From the findings, recommendations for the training of future I-O psychologists are made.Practical implications: This study adds to the knowledge about ensuring that the I-Opsychologist is equipped during their training for the workplace to address the counselling needs of employees in the workplace in South Africa.Contribution/value-add: This study contributes towards ensuring that the I-O psychologistis sufficiently prepared for their role as workplace counsellor by making knowledge available regarding the skills required by I-O psychologists to be applied in practice.Keywords: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologist; Counsellor; Skills and competencies; Qualitative research; Training

  2. The National Association of School Psychologists' Self-Assessment Tool for School Psychologists: Factor Structure and Relationship to the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Rossen, Eric; Charvat, Jeff; Meyer, Lauren; Tanner, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (2010a), often referred to as the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model, describes the comprehensive range of professional skills and competencies available from school psychologists across 10 domains. The…

  3. A psycho-educational intervention for depressed women: a qualitative analysis of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Ma Asunción; Navarro, Claudia; Acevedo, Maricarmen; Berenzon, Shoshana; Mondragón, Liliana; Rubí, Norma Angélica

    2004-12-01

    Yalom (1995) has stated that psycho-educational interventions could be made more effective by incorporating a focus on the interpersonal process. A qualitative analysis is proposed to investigate the degree of fidelity with which a psycho-educational intervention for women with depressive symptoms was delivered and to identify Yalom's significant therapeutic mechanisms operating in group therapy. The intervention consisted of six 2 two-hour weekly sessions organized around educational material. Eight groups were conducted with 5-19 participants each. A qualitative analysis was undertaken based on Kvale's (1996) technique of 'categorization of meanings' for the transcribed registers of audiotaped recordings. The analysis led to the definition of five major group process categories: establishment of rules, educational exchange, experiential exchange, reflexive work designed to achieve cognitive and behavioural change, and limitations on the exchange process. It showed that the facilitators largely adhered to the goals of the intervention, its strategies and model, and that the main limitations concerned facilitators' and participants'speaking for over-long periods of time and facilitators' failure to cover all the material due to lack of time. The subsequent analysis identified four of Yalom's categories: installation of hope, didactic instruction, catharsis, and universality. In support of Yalom's assertion, we concluded that this exercise was useful in that it highlighted important therapeutic factors that could be more purposefully manipulated in the future.

  4. Person-centredness in direct care workers caring for residents with dementia: Effects of a psycho-educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana; Nolan, Mike; Sousa, Liliana; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of a psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' person-centredness during morning care to residents with dementia. A controlled pretest-posttest study was conducted in four aged-care facilities with 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02). Two experimental facilities received a psycho-educational intervention comprising person-centred care competences and stress management skills; control facilities received an education-only intervention, without stress support. In total, 112 video-recorded morning care sessions were coded using the Global Behaviour Scale. Both groups reported significantly higher scores on eight of 11 items of the Global Behaviour Scale and on the Global Behaviour Scale total score at posttest (F=10.59; p=0.02). Global Behaviour Scale total score improvements were higher for the experimental group, with values close to significance (F=3.90; p=0.054). The findings suggest that a psycho-educational intervention may increase care workers' person-centredness. Further research is needed to explore the long-term sustainability and extent of its benefits on workers and residents.

  5. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  6. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using 2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%. In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9, vs. 88.86 (7.5. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness.

  7. Psycho-education's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc Mersin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emergency medical students are first persons that encountered and make medical aids to patients or traumatized people. It is stated that having adequate facilities about the communication of each health workers to deal with emergency patient and wounded persons is as important as immediate treatment. This research was conducted as quasi-experimental in order to determine the education of emotion recognition and expression's impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of emergency medical technical students. Methods: The research was made with 7 students in first year of education in emergency department at a university in Turkey in 2013-2014 academic years. Total 12-session education of emotion recognition and expression was given to student within research for 2 hours in a week during 12 weeks. Information Form including socio-demographic characteristics, Communication Skills Inventory (CSI, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS were applied to students before and after psycho-education. Results: It was determined that CSI mean scores of students within research were high before and after psycho-education but there is no statistically difference between them. It was determined that also there is no significantly difference between students' RSES and STAS mean scores before and after psycho-education. Conclusion: It was determined in the research that education of emotion recognition and expression has no impact on communication skills, self-esteem and anger expression status of students and students' communication skills levels were high before and after psycho-education. It has been concluded that especially empathy from communication skills is the mode of existence and therefore cannot be taught. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(6.000: 489-495

  8. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  9. Psychoeducation in Quebec: An Overview of the Subject’s Adaptive and Therapeutic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bluteau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is the last in a series of three articles on Quebec psychoeducation. While the first article introduced the historical and theoretical foundations of psychoeducation as a university discipline in Quebec, the second presented the Psychoeducative Intervention Method. This final article broaches the concept of psycho-social adaptation, with reference to the subject’s adaptive process as a result of having learned skills within the context of a shared psychoeducational experience. This third article also further examines the Utilizing of experiences for therapeutic purposes, a fundamental professional process in the field of psychoeducation. The aim herein is to consolidate the many concepts presented in the previous articles and facilitate the reader’s understanding of how they all come together and are activated by the psychoeducator in a treatment context by means of a highly-specialized therapeutic activity.

  10. Psychoeducation Interventions in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Reis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies in expressed emotions allowed establishing a pattern in educational and psychoeducative interventions within the families of schizophrenic patients. In this paper, the author synthesises his research developed in expressed emotions of the chronic patient's relatives. The author refers the importance of the relative's cognitive variables about mental representation of the patient and his disease. These variables are studied through the attributions made about the patient's personality and causes of disease. Other cognitive variables are analysed, relying to the conceptualisation in family psycho educative intervention, such as, transactional games, family conflicts and parental relationship style. The evaluation of the relatives and families is considered as being part of the process of family psycho-educative intervention.

  11. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  12. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  13. Training Ethical Psychologists: An Acculturation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael C.; Handelsman, Mitchell M.; Knapp, Samuel

    This paper posits the thesis that socialization into the profession of psychology is a process of acculturation. Students enter training with their own value traditions but are required to learn new ones when they become psychologists. The assumptions of the framework are that this "professional acculturation" (a) takes place over time, (b)…

  14. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  15. The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist The aim of this presentation is to illuminate and discuss some connections between the therapeutic profession and development of music pedagogic theory. A topic that initially emerged as a result of a sub-study in my PhD -project about professiona...

  16. [Evaluation of our psycho-educative program by participating caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, J C; Van den Berge, D; de Wouters d'Oplinter, N; Bosman, N; Fery, P

    2010-09-01

    Facing difficulties due to dementia syndromes, systemic care is necessary. Amongst therapies assessed specifically to caregivers, psychoeducative steps seem to be the strongest effective one on neuropsychiatrics symptoms. Psychoeducations tend to teach the caregivers to modify their interactions with patients via a better understanding of illnesses and patients. Our training "Pour mieux vivre avec la maladie d'Alzheimer", applied in groups of eight to twelve persons, consists in twelve sessions of two hours each. To assure the biggest possible availability, we recently incorporated the concomitant coverage of patients into artistic workshops. These sessions of art-therapy realized in parallel to our psychoeducative program will thus be estimated according to the same rigorous methodology. The critical evaluations realized by participants at the end of our program reflect the outcome of our main objective (to teach to modify interactions with the patients) while contributing to the improvement of social contacts and to the learning of calling to existing helps. These preliminary results strongly argue for the pursuit and even extension of this kind of caregiver's management.

  17. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Bester

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement , and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual’s set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one’s occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5% responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy

  18. Psycho-educational support for relatives of people with a recent diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia: an evaluation of a 'Course for Carers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alisoun; Guss, Reinhard; Russ, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Currently there are 820,000 people with dementia in the UK, a figure projected to reach 1.7 million by 2050. Policy and practice emphasis on early intervention in dementia and support of family carers foreground a need to explore service efficacy for relatives of those with a recent diagnosis. Existing evidence suggests that psycho-educational interventions can significantly enhance carer well being especially when well targeted and group based. A rolling programme of seven psycho-educational Courses for 'new carers' in one area of England was the subject of a systematic evaluation incorporating a quantitative rating scale and qualitative data. Findings suggest that the Courses achieved a number of intersecting aims: they provided psychological support; offered advice; enhanced coping skills; boosted confidence; increased knowledge; and prepared the carer for the future. That the Courses were designed and delivered by specialist staff - primarily psychologists, offered a social dimension, were time limited and free are noteworthy features. The evaluation suggests that as a model the Course has considerable short and longer term preventive potential; also that it could be replicated elsewhere in the country and achieve similar outcomes. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. An Analysis of a Novel, Short-Term Therapeutic Psychoeducational Program for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Neurological Illness and Their Parents; Feasibility and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Bonglim; Lee, Young-Mock; Kim, Heung Dong; Eom, Soyong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this intervention was to develop a therapeutic psycho-educational program that improves quality of life in children and adolescents who are experiencing chronic neurological illness, including epilepsy, and their parents, and to analyze the intervention's feasibility and efficacy and participants' satisfaction. Participants were eight children (n = 8) and adolescents and their parents; participating children were experiencing chronic neurological illness with psychological comorbidity; children with intellectual impairment were excluded (IQ parents' session content targeted family dynamic and emotional intervention, coping skills, childcare and education, and finishing up, respectively. Clinical psychologists administered psychological assessments (viz., Child Behavior Checklist, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Parenting Stress Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Children's Depression Inventory, and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale) at pre- and post-intervention, and administered satisfaction surveys following the intervention. Participants' opinions about the program's necessity, contents, and process, and participants' overall program satisfaction were analyzed. Parents and children reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. Externalizing behavioral problems, anxiety/depression, and emotional functioning from quality of life showed improvement after the intervention. Although not statistically significant, total child stress trended downward from pre- to post-intervention. A four-session structured therapeutic psycho-educational program for children and adolescents with chronic neurological illness and their parents was successfully implemented, showing good compliance and high satisfaction and efficacy.

  20. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    It emerged that mothers experienced parenting their children with ADHD as stressful, ... The findings pointed to the need for an effective .... Psycho-education and parent training have been ..... the parents, followed by a battery of cognitive,.

  1. Sex Bias in Clinical Judgment among School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, H. Thompson; Frederickson, Anne K.

    1991-01-01

    Used analogue case study format to examine sex bias in clinical judgment among school psychologists. Varied sex of adolescent and problem type in 2 X 2 design. School psychologists read case study and rated perceived disturbance and importance of intervention. Psychologists rated it more important to intervene when subject was male; no differences…

  2. School Psychologists' Role Concerning Children with Chronic Illnesses in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Camille; Machek, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the role of school psychologists in working with children with chronic illnesses in the schools. A total of 300 practicing school psychologists in public schools, drawn from the National Association of School Psychologists membership directory, completed a standard mail survey. The survey solicited information on (a) graduate…

  3. 38 CFR 1.514a - Disclosure to private psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... psychologists. 1.514a Section 1.514a Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Disclosure to private psychologists. When a beneficiary elects to obtain therapy or analysis as a private patient from a private psychologist, such information in the medical record as may be pertinent may...

  4. School Psychologist Diagnostic Decision-Making: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Robinson, Eric; Holt, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the diagnostic decision-making of school psychologists as a function of a student's disability and academic performance with three research questions using a randomly-selected sample of school psychologists from the state of Texas. Results from the first research question indicated that school psychologists significantly…

  5. Cognitive Assessment Practices: A Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Dixon, Shauna G.

    2014-01-01

    The present article describes an exploratory study regarding the preferred cognitive assessment practices of current school psychologists. Three hundred and twenty-three school psychologists participated in the survey. The results suggest that the majority of school psychologists endorsed that they base their assessment practices on an underlying…

  6. National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  7. 42 CFR 410.71 - Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist services and services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist services. 410.71 Section 410.71 Public Health CENTERS FOR... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.71 Clinical psychologist...

  8. Qualitative analysis of experiences of members of a psychoeducational assertiveness group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrakouli, Effi; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2007-04-01

    This study describes qualitatively a psychoeducational assertiveness intervention for 20 women's perceptions of positive and negative experiences, undertaken to identify whether therapeutic mechanisms operating in group therapy as described by Yalom might be inferred. There were 14 90-min. weekly sessions organized around educational material. Two groups were conducted with 10 university women each (M= 20.9 yr., SD= 1.9). Qualitative analysis of the 20 interviews identified five of Yalom's therapeutic mechanisms, namely, self-understanding, universality, acceptance, catharsis, and self-disclosure. The positive experiences were group cohesiveness, self-understanding, self-disclosure, positive views about the self and learning, and cognitive benefits. Self-disclosing at the early stages of group development was the most frequently reported negative experience or difficulty in the group. Although participants stated they improved interpersonal communication skills, analysis suggested the cultural context was an important mediator of assertive behavior.

  9. Improving Accident Statistics and Expanding the Role of Traffic Psychologists in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus A J M de Wit

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the mandatory assessment of psychological fitness to drive of prospective drivers, Brazil has a relatively large amount of traffic psychologists. Since, in general, assessment only happens upon first licensing, the task of these psychologists is fairly limited (as is the scope of the assessment itself. Intention and method: this study aims to perform a critical analysis of possibilities to expand the role of psychologists working in the traffic system in Brazil. A systematic review study of databases and international documents was conducted and a scope of activity of psychologists in this area was built. First result statistical data is scattered over many agencies. First conclusion in order to better identify specific tendencies and risk groups in Brazil, statistical data related to accident involvement needs to be better, perhaps centrally, coordinated and consolidated. Second result international research related to three subgroups of drivers that constitute a significantly increased safety risk can inform future directions for traffic psychology in Brazil. Psychological processes that may underlie these risk increases are discussed. Second conclusion two subgroups (young drivers and aggressive drivers could benefit from more than assessment, they could benefit from specific psychological interventions. The third subgroup (elderly drivers is expected to increase significantly in the future, which asks for clearer policies, with a significant input form psychologists and psychological research.

  10. History's mysteries demystified: becoming a psychologist-historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Blount, Kelli; Rutherford, Alexandra; Baker, David; Johnson, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, psychologist-historian Robert Watson argued that the study of history was of particular salience to psychology. In this article we explore the relationship between psychology and history and argue that the psychologist-historian plays a vital role in the discipline of psychology. We provide a brief overview of the emergence of the history of psychology as a professional subdiscipline, describe who psychologist-historians are, explain why they are needed, and detail how to join their ranks. We argue that increasing historical sophistication among psychologists will have beneficial effects on research and teaching, and we invite all psychologists to participate in the making of psychology's history.

  11. The 2002 Revision of the American Psychological Association's Ethics Code: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Rosemary; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Jacob, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The Ethical Principles for Psychologists and Code of Conduct has been recently revised. The organization of the code changed, and the language was made more specific. A number of points relevant to school psychology are explicitly stated in the code. A clear advantage of including these items in the code is the assistance to school psychologists…

  12. Nonromantic/Nonsexual Relationships with Former Clients: Implications for Psychologists' Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon K.

    The ethical principles and code of conduct of the American Psychological Association are clear: psychologists are to avoid sexual relationships with former clients. But guidelines offer scant guidance on nonromantic and nonsexual relationships with former clients; the ethical risks of such relationships are explored in this paper. The information…

  13. Assessing the Cognitive Functioning of Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Practices and Perceptions of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costner, Ashley Nicole

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are faced with the task of conducting evaluations of students in order to determine special education eligibility. This often equates to administering a cognitive assessment measure to obtain information about skills or abilities. Although this may be a straightforward task when working with children of average or higher…

  14. Chronic headache: the role of the psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    The role of the psychologist in chronic headache needs to be tailored to the patient's presentation. For some patients, psychological issues need to be directly addressed (eg, psychiatric comorbidity, difficulties coping with headache, significant problems with sleep and/or stress, medication overuse, and history of abuse). Other situations (eg, patients' beliefs about their readiness to change ability to actively manage headaches, medication adherence, and managing triggers) involve behavioral/psychological principles even when there is no direct contact with a psychologist. This article reviews the literature on the importance of psychological issues in headache management and provides suggestions for how to address behavioral and cognitive factors and their potential for improved headache care.

  15. Pavlov as a psychologist. A reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1987-01-01

    American psychologists are informed on Pavlov's work on conditional reflexes but not on the full development of his theory of higher nervous activity. This article shows that Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity dealt with concepts that concerned contemporary psychologists. Pavlov used the conditioning of the salivary reflex for methodological purposes. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity encompassed overt behavior, neural processes, and the conscious experience. The strong Darwinian element of Pavlov's theory, with its stress on the higher organisms' adaptation, is described. With regard to learning, Pavlov, at the end of his scholarly career, proposed that although all learning involves the formation of associations, the organism's adaptation to the environment is established through conditioning, but the accumulation of knowledge is established by trial and error.

  16. The activity model of legal psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Bogdanovich,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose an activity model of legal psychologist work. As a basis for the construction of the system of legal psychologist activity, we use trajectory of teenager living in the legal field. As the main activities within their respective specializations, we highlighted prevention, maintenance and rehabilitation. We define the main activities necessary for the development within the FGOSIII specialization 050407 “Pedagogy and Psychology of deviant behavior”: general and pathopsychologic diagnostics, development activity and psychological education, psycho-correction, psychological counseling. Accordingly, we define the types of psychological practices. We highlight the motivational and integrative practice (teaching introductory and trainee. We propose a system of training modules, ensuring the formation of the necessary competencies. The modules feature is their focus on practice (the association of training courses with the main types of psychological practice.

  17. Research contributions of counseling psychologists to neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S J; Ryan, J J; Sumerall, S W

    1998-10-01

    Research productivity of counseling psychologists with credentials in clinical neuropsychology were examined. Eighteen were ABPP/ABCN Diplomates. Division 40 Fellows, or both. They published an average of 3.06 (SD= 4.82; range = 0 to 20) neuropsychologically relevant, first-authored articles over the past 5 years. When counseling psychologists were compared to a random sample of ABPP/ABCN diplomates with doctoral degrees in other areas of psychology, no reliable differences emerged between the groups in age, research productivity, or number of years between graduation and receipt of the ABPP/ABCN diploma. Research contributions of neuropsychologists with degrees in counseling psychology are comparable to those of ABPP/ABCN diplomates who were trained in other areas of psychology (e.g., clinical, developmental, and physiological).

  18. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-01-01

    Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple case...

  19. Self-care strategies for nurses: A psycho-educational intervention for stress reduction and the prevention of burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravits, Kate; McAllister-Black, Randi; Grant, Marcia; Kirk, Christina

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and evaluate a psycho-educational program that assists nurses to develop stress management plans. Discussion of nursing-specific risk factors, practice with relaxation techniques, and exploration via art are used as interventions. Quantitative and qualitative measures of stress and burnout are conducted pre- and postcourse using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Draw-a-Person-in-the-Rain Art Assessment, and wellness plans. Descriptive statistics are used, and preliminary analysis indicates that the course is useful in impacting levels of emotional exhaustion. There are opportunities for evolving the program so that more enduring change in self-care is generated.

  20. A Psychoeducational School-Based Group Intervention for Socially Anxious Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Damer, Diana E.; Mellou, Angeliki; Mitropoulou, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a psychoeducational group for social anxiety aimed at elementary children. An 8-week psychoeducational program based on empirically validated risk factors was designed. Interventions included cognitive restructuring, anxiety management techniques, and social skills training. Pre-and posttest data from 3 groups…

  1. Stress Prevention and Mindfulness: A Psychoeducational and Support Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; Murphy, Susan L.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A stress prevention and mindfulness (SPAM) group is described, which is a 6-week psychoeducational and support group for teachers. The group incorporated psychoeducation about stress and utilized elements of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The group was implemented in a public charter school in the Southwest. Preliminary evaluation…

  2. Accessing Early Behavioral Intervention for Autism: The Development and Testing of a Psychoeducational Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, Michele Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of psychoeducation within a stepped care model as applied to the problem of autism treatment. The current study developed and pilot tested a psychoeducational website for parents who recently had a child diagnosed with autism. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design was used to evaluate the…

  3. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  4. A Bystander Bullying Psychoeducation Program with Middle School Students: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana; Sears, Dara; Lundquist, Amanda; Hausheer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief, stand-alone bystander bullying psychoeducation program for middle school students. The purpose of the program was to train students to take action as peer advocates. Pre- and post-tests indicated that after completing the 90-minute psychoeducation program, students reported an increase in their…

  5. The role of psychologists in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahass, Saeed H

    2005-05-01

    Advances in the biomedical and the behavioral sciences have paved the way for the integration of medical practice towards the biopsychosocial approach. Therefore, dealing with health and illness overtakes looking for the presence or absence of the disease and infirmity (the biomedical paradigm) to the biopsychosocial paradigm in which health means a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Psychology as a behavioral health discipline is the key to the biopsychosocial practice, and plays a major role in understanding the concept of health and illness. The clinical role of psychologists as health providers is diverse with the varying areas of care giving (primary, secondary and tertiary care) and a variety of subspecialties. Overall, psychologists assess, diagnose, and treat the psychological problems and the behavioral dysfunctions resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. In addition, they play a major role in the promotion of healthy behavior, preventing diseases and improving patients' quality of life. They perform their clinical roles according to rigorous ethical principles and code of conduct. This article describes and discusses the significant role of clinical health psychology in the provision of health care, following a biopsychosocial perspective of health and illness. Professional and educational issues have also been discussed.

  6. Qualitative process evaluation of a psycho-educational intervention targeted at people diagnosed with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Al-HadiHasan, Abd; Callaghan, Patrick; Lymn, Joanne S

    2017-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a serious form of mental illness that often requires long term care. Empirical findings indicate that combining a psycho-educational intervention (PEI) with neuroleptic medication to treat schizophrenia is effective. However, there is little information on the therapeutic mechanism of PEIs. Methods A qualitative process evaluation was conducted with a purposive sample of people diagnosed with schizophrenia (PDwS, n?=?8) and their Primary Caregivers (PCs, n?=?9) who...

  7. ["EduKation demenz®". Psychoeducative training program for relatives of people with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Sabine; Reiter-Jäschke, A; Hofner, B

    2016-04-01

    During the course of dementia there is frequently a decline in the quality of interpersonal relationships between the patient and the family caregivers. This is mainly caused by a very critical attitude of the family caregiver to the patient and by the limited ability of the family caregiver to empathically communicate with the patient. This relational disorder significantly contributes to the perceived burden of the family caregiver. This study was carried out to investigate whether the ability of family caregivers to empathically communicate can be strengthened, their emotional attitude towards the patient can be improved and their perceived burden and symptoms of depression can be reduced through a special communication-oriented psychoeducational intervention. Within the framework of a controlled study for confounding factors 121 family caregivers participated in a 10-week group intervention "EduKation demenz®," whereas the 93 family caregivers of the control group received detailed self-help literature. The before and after surveys were conducted using a standardized questionnaire. Compared to the control group the intervention group displayed a statistically significant difference in all target parameters: more empathic communication with the patient (confounder-controlled difference of change in the intervention group versus control group  0.69, p = 0.023), a less critical attitude towards the patient (confounder-controlled difference of change in the intervention group versus control group 2.11, p = 0.027), reduction in the perceived burden from disrupted communication (confounder-controlled difference of change in the intervention group versus control group  1.76, p = 0.038) and decreased symptoms of depression for caregivers with ≥ 33 points in the general depression scale (ADS-K, p = 0.028). Family caregivers of people with dementia clearly did not benefit from direct information transfer through the extensive offer of self

  8. Psychoeducative groups help control type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Cervantes Cuesta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of a psychoeducational group intervention in diabetes using glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, the body mass index (BMI and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF compared with conventional educational measures provided individually. Methods: A quasi-experimental study (pre/post-intervention with a non-equivalent control group was conducted, including 72 type 2 individuals with diabetes (mean data: age 63.08 years, HbA1C 6.98%, BMI 30.48 kg/m². The beneficial effect of psychoeducational group therapy in the study group (PGT was compared with conventional diabetes education in the control group (CG. Results: The PGT had a higher mean HbA1c reduction (-0.51 ± 1.7 vs. -0.06 ± 0.53%, p 0.003, met the objectives of optimal control of HbA1c to a higher degree (80% vs. 48%, p 0.005 and greater mean weight reduction (-1.93 ± 3.57 vs. 0.52 ± 1.73 kg, p 0002 than the CG.A significant improvement in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was achieved in PGT (all p < 0.05. Conclusions: PGT patients achieved a significant improvement in HbA1C, BMI and CVRF, and outperformed the conventional diabetes education group in achieving the optimal diabetes control objectives. Structural changes in the assistance programs should be considered to introduce these more efficient therapies for diabetes education in primary care.

  9. The importance of psychoeducation in systemic family therapy alcoholic treatment

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    Dragišić-Labaš Slađana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the paper was to analyze the impact of psychoeducation in alcoholism therapy treatment on initial motivation and comprehension, change in attitudes to alcoholism, and beginning of creating a new value system. The sample consisted of 166 respondents (83 married couples that had been involved in one-year systemic group family therapy alcoholic treatment (with the man being alcoholic. A questionnaire on knowledge about alcoholism was used. The respondents were tested three times - at the beginning of the treatment, after 6 months, and after one year. The results showed that the level of education had increased through three phases of the treatment, that motivation changed from initial to substantial, that the comprehension had also changed, turning family system into a more functional model of living. Statistically significant difference in level of education between phase 1 and phase 3 of the family therapy was confirmed. In conclusion, the authors argue for the importance of psychoeducation as a method in treating alcoholism.

  10. Effectiveness of Group Psycho-education on Well-being and Depression Among Breast Cancer Survivors of Melaka, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Shanker; Narayanasamy, Rajagopal; Barua, Ankur

    2013-01-01

    The psychological stress after diagnosis of breast cancer is often severe. Most of the women with breast cancer and their families suffer from emotional, social, financial and psychological disturbances. A cluster non-randomized trial was conducted at a Cancer Society in Melaka, Malaysia to assess the effectiveness of psycho-education on well-being status and depression among breast cancer patients. The study period was for one month (11(th) June 2011 and 16(th) July 2011). Participants in this study were 34 adult women suffering from non-metastatic breast cancer and on appropriate allopathic medication. The WHO-five Well-being Index (1998 version) was used as the screening instrument for the assessment of well-being and depression. The data collected were tabulated and analyzed by using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.0. Wilcoxon Signed-rank Test was applied for comparison between pre-test and post-test scores. A P value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. This study revealed that majority of the participants was in the state of adequate well-being after the psycho-education 33 (97.1%). The proportion of depressed individuals had also reduced from 8 (23.5%) to 1 (2.9%) after the psychological intervention. The post-test results significantly improved after the intervention for the items related to "I have felt calm and relaxed", "I woke up feeling fresh and rested" and "my daily life has been filled with things that interest me" along with the "overall impression" in the WHO-5 Well-being Index. Group psycho-education played a significant role in improving the well-being status and reducing depression of breast cancer survivors.

  11. Psychologists experience of cognitive behaviour therapy in a developing country: a qualitative study from Pakistan

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    Ayub Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological therapies especially Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT are used widely in the West to help patients with psychiatric problems. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has an established evidence base for the treatment of different emotional disorders. In spite of these developments in the developed world, patients in most developing countries hardly benefit from non pharmacological interventions. Although a significant number of psychologists are trained in Pakistan each year, psychological interventions play only a minor role in treatment plans in Pakistan. We conducted interviews with psychologists in Pakistan, to explore their experiences and their views on "providing CBT in Pakistan". These interviews were conducted as part of a project whose focus was to try to develop culturally-sensitive CBT in Pakistan. Methods In depth semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 psychologists working in psychiatry departments in Lahore, Pakistan. Results All the psychologists reported that psychotherapies, including CBT, need adjustments for use in Pakistan, although they were not able to elicit on these in details. Four major themes were discovered, hurdles in therapy, therapy related issues, involvement of the family and modification in therapy. The biggest hurdles in therapy were described to be service and resource issues. Conclusions For CBT to be acceptable, accessible and effective in Non Western cultures numerous adjustments need to be made, taking into consideration; factors related to service structure and delivery, patient's knowledge and beliefs about health and the therapy itself. Interviews with the psychologists in these countries can give us insights which can guide development of therapy and manuals to support its delivery.

  12. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  13. [How to involve patients with schizophrenia in their treatment using psychoeducation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized not only by symptoms, but also by a reduced insight that contributes to functional outcomes through a bad acceptation of the disease and a low involvement in treatment and care. Functional outcomes of schizophrenia are conditioned by the acceptance of the troubles, by the involvement in psychopharmacological treatment and in psychosocial care and by the expressed emotion level of the family. Psychoeducation improves adherence to treatment. Psychoeducation lowers relapse rate. All the patients suffering from schizophrenia and their families should benefit from psychoeducation.

  14. ["Schizophrenia versus cannabis", a novel psychoeducational workshop designed with patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouillet, Christelle; Simon, Morgane; Kular, Sonia

    A therapeutic workshop involving patients with schizophrenia and consumers of cannabis was created within the Lavallois adult psychiatry department. The collaboration between two nurses and a psychologist enabled new working tools to be designed and implemented with a pilot group of four patients, informed and aware of their condition, and admitting their use of cannabis. This article provides an initial assessment of this rewarding scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of a psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana; Marques, Alda; Sousa, Liliana; Nolan, Mike; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a person-centered care-based psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers' communicative behaviors with people with dementia living in aged-care facilities. An experimental study with a pretest-posttest control-group design was conducted in four aged-care facilities. Two experimental facilities received an 8-week psycho-educational intervention aiming to develop workers' knowledge about dementia, person-centered care competences, and tools for stress management. Control facilities received education only, with no support to deal with stress. In total, 332 morning care sessions, involving 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02 years), were video-recorded before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The frequency and duration of a list of verbal and nonverbal communicative behaviors were analyzed. Within the experimental group there was a positive change from pre- to posttest on the frequency of all workers' communicative behaviors. Significant treatment effects in favor of the experimental group were obtained for the frequency of inform (p educational intervention can positively affect direct care workers' communicative behaviors with residents with dementia. Further research is required to determine the extent of the benefits of this approach.

  16. The Role of a School Psychologist in Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Rieger, Brian

    2009-01-01

    School psychologists historically have received little training on topics such as mild traumatic brain injury or concussion, yet they could play a significant role in assessment, consultation, and intervention with students who have sustained a concussion. The purpose of this article is to educate school psychologists with regard to definition,…

  17. Preparing School Psychologists to Testify at Due Process Hearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Carol A.

    Guidelines are presented for school psychologists in order to make their testimony at special education due process hearings as effective as possible. Recommendations are offered to prepare the school psychologist to: (1) accept the role of expert witness; (2) organize and review case materials; (3) state relevant rules, procedures, and criteria;…

  18. The Preparation of Educational Psychologists in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong

    2014-01-01

    Modeled after the British system, school psychologists in Hong Kong are called educational psychologists. Hong Kong is the first location in Asia to have a recognized specialty vocation in educational psychology and a program for their professional preparation. The first program in Hong Kong, established by the University of Hong Kong in 1981…

  19. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  20. The Preparation of Educational Psychologists in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong

    2014-01-01

    Modeled after the British system, school psychologists in Hong Kong are called educational psychologists. Hong Kong is the first location in Asia to have a recognized specialty vocation in educational psychology and a program for their professional preparation. The first program in Hong Kong, established by the University of Hong Kong in 1981…

  1. School Psychologists Working with Children Affected by Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezen, Kristin A.; Gurl, Aaron; Ping, Jenn

    2010-01-01

    School psychologists encounter children regularly who have been affected by abuse and neglect. Maltreatment adversely affects the mental health status and academic achievement of youth, thereby making the topic an area of concern for school psychologists. More recently, child protection laws have been expanded to include mandatory child abuse…

  2. Training for Tragedy: Critical Challenges for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNisco, Alison

    2013-01-01

    School psychologists are often the first professionals to reach students with mental illness, and part of their role is to help identify threats that can lead to events such as the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., which left 20 children and six adults dead, including school psychologist Mary Sherlach, who was one of the…

  3. Practice Guidelines regarding Psychologists' Involvement in Pharmacological Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The guidelines presented in this document are intended to provide a resource to psychologists interested in the issue of what represents optimal practice in relation to pharmacotherapy. They are not intended to apply to those psychologists who choose not to become directly or indirectly involved in medication management regardless of their level…

  4. Preparation of School/Educational Psychologists in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negovan, Valeria; Dinca, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the academic and professional training of educational/school psychologists in Romania. Their training mirrors the country's history, legal provisions, social qualities, and current professional status of psychologists and their specialization. Efforts to increase the quality of training for educational/school psychologists…

  5. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  6. A School Psychologist's Self-Study Guide to Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesyk, Jack J.

    2005-01-01

    School psychologists may find the field of sport psychology beneficial to them in extending their skills and effectiveness. As trained psychologists, they are likely to already have some of the knowledge and skills necessary for working in the area of sport psychology. However, without additional training, this may not be sufficient for ethical…

  7. Elementary School Psychologists and Response to Intervention (RTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne; Marrs, Heath; Bogue, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) in elementary schools may have important implications for school psychologists. Therefore, it is important to better understand how elementary school psychologists perceive RTI and what barriers to successful RTI implementation they identify. Although previous research has investigated the…

  8. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  9. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  10. What School Psychologists Can Do for Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Bruce M.; Bramer, Dawn H. H.; French, Lisa R.; Assouline, Susan L. G.

    2006-01-01

    The term "twice exceptional" is used to describe gifted students who also have specific academic, behavioral, and social-emotional difficulties. This is a population of gifted students for whom the expertise and experience of school psychologists may be particularly relevant. This article discusses the ways in which school psychologists can help…

  11. Slovenian psychologists about the use of psychological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Boben

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The Committee for Psychological Tests of the Slovenian Psychological Association (SPA is participating actively in the work of the Task Force for Tests and Testing of the European Federation of Professional Psychological Associations (EFPPA. This task force developed the questionnaire on tests and testing for psychologists, members of the national associations in the European states, which are members of EFPPA. 321 psychologists answered the questionnaire in Slovenia. We have collected the opinions of psychologists about various topics regarding the use of psychological tests: knowledge and competence, legal standards and control, missuse and abuse of tests and testing, testing procedures and their limitations, significance of tests and testing etc. In addition, psychologists named three psychological tests they use most frequently. The respondents also provided useful commentaries on test use. In our study, Slovenian results are also compared with answers of psychologists in Great Britain, Spain, Croatia and Germany.

  12. Effects of Psychoeducation on Mental Health in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bashiri, Zahra; Aghajani, Mohammad; Masoudi Alavi, Negin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with coronary heart disease are at high risk for mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Psychoeducation is a well-known intervention for psychiatric patients, but its use has been limited in other health conditions, such as coronary heart disease. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on mental health in coronary heart disease patients. Patients and Methods This randomized clinical trial included 70 patients with c...

  13. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis

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    Cuijpers Pim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in September 2008. Additional materials were obtained from reference lists. Papers describing passive psychoeducational interventions for depression, anxiety and psychological distress were included if the research design was a randomized controlled trial and incorporated an attention placebo, no intervention or waitlist comparison group. Results In total, 9010 abstracts were identified. Of these, five papers which described four research studies targeting passive psychoeducation for depression and psychological distress met the inclusion criteria. The pooled standardized-effect size (four studies, four comparisons for reduced symptoms of depression and psychological distress at post-intervention was d = 0.20 (95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.40; Z = 2.04; P = 0.04; the number needed to treat: 9. Heterogeneity was not significant among the studies (I2 = 32.77, Q:4.46; P = 0.22. Conclusions Although it is commonly believed that psychoeducation interventions are ineffective, this meta-analysis revealed that brief passive psychoeducational interventions for depression and psychological distress can reduce symptoms. Brief passive psychoeducation interventions are easy to implement, can be applied immediately and are not expensive. They may offer a first-step intervention for those experiencing psychological distress or depression and might serve as an initial intervention in primary care or community models. The findings suggest that the quality of psychoeducation may be

  14. The dilemma of the academic industrial psychologist

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    C. Orpen

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available The university industrial psychologist is often faced with a conflict between his roles as an 'academic scientist' and as a 'professional technician'. It is argued that this problem of 'dual allegiance' can be resolved to a large extent if the industrial psychologist: (i reminds himself (and his students that industrial psychology is not a special discipline on its own, but is an integral part of psychology-in-general, (ii does not view his subject as just a mirror of professional practice, (iii has regard for his subject as a scientific discipline, and not just as a useful tool for management, and (iv convinces practitioners of the value of the subject in a variety of areas, ranging from testing to consumer behaviour.OpsommingDie bedryfsielkundige aan die universiteit kom dikwels te staan voor 'n konflik tussen sy rol as "akademiese wetenskaplike" en "professionele tegnikus". Dit word beweer dat hierdie probleem van "tweeledige verbondenheid" tot ‘n groot mate opgelos kan word as die bedryfsielkundige (en sy studente: (a dit in gedagte hou dat bedryfsielkunde nie wesentlik 'n onafhanklike dissipline is nie, maar 'n integrale deel van sielkunde-in-diealgemeen vorm, (b nie sy vak as slegs 'n weerspieëling van die professionele praktyk beskou nie, (c agting vir sy vak as 'n wetenskaplike dissipline het en nie net as 'n gerieflike werktuig vir bestuur beskou word nie, en (d die praktyk kan oortuig van die waarde van die vak in 'n verskeidenheid gebiede, wat strek van toetsing tot verbruikersgedrag.

  15. An Analysis of a Novel, Short-Term Therapeutic Psychoeducational Program for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Neurological Illness and Their Parents; Feasibility and Efficacy

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    Bonglim Joo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this intervention was to develop a therapeutic psycho-educational program that improves quality of life in children and adolescents who are experiencing chronic neurological illness, including epilepsy, and their parents, and to analyze the intervention's feasibility and efficacy and participants' satisfaction. Participants were eight children (n = 8 and adolescents and their parents; participating children were experiencing chronic neurological illness with psychological comorbidity; children with intellectual impairment were excluded (IQ < 80. The program was carried out weekly for four sessions. In each of the 4 weeks, children's session content addressed self, emotion, coping skills, and finishing up, respectively; and parents' session content targeted family dynamic and emotional intervention, coping skills, childcare and education, and finishing up, respectively. Clinical psychologists administered psychological assessments (viz., Child Behavior Checklist, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Parenting Stress Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Children's Depression Inventory, and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale at pre- and post-intervention, and administered satisfaction surveys following the intervention. Participants' opinions about the program's necessity, contents, and process, and participants' overall program satisfaction were analyzed. Parents and children reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. Externalizing behavioral problems, anxiety/depression, and emotional functioning from quality of life showed improvement after the intervention. Although not statistically significant, total child stress trended downward from pre- to post-intervention. A four-session structured therapeutic psycho-educational program for children and adolescents with chronic neurological illness and their parents was successfully implemented, showing good compliance and high satisfaction and efficacy.

  16. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  17. Effect of Psychoeducation on Relapses in Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsah Acar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is a systematic review of psychoeducation interventions which aims at preventing relapses in patients with bipolar disorder. This study has been condcuted in order to determine the effects of these interventions. In the present study national and international databases were screened to identify psycho-education initiatives and a total of seven articles that met the criteria for inclusion and exclusion were evaluated. All of the seven studies reviewed, focused on the effects of psy-choeducation on frequency of relapse and hospitalization, time spent as a patient, serum lithium levels and social functioning. The findings of the studies revealed that psychoeducation reduces the frequency of relapse and hospitalization and time spent as a patient. Besides, psychoeducation contributed to the protective levels of serum lithium levels and has a positive impact on the social functioning of bipolar patients. In conclusion, psycho-education programs have positive results on preventing relapse for patients with bipolar disorder. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 310-329

  18. How Can Educational Psychologists Support the Reintegration of Children with an Acquired Brain Injury upon Their Return to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Heather; Howe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of reintegration into school for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and considers the role of the educational psychologist (EP) in supporting these children. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals in two specialist settings: a specialist rehabilitation centre and a children's hospital with…

  19. Investigating School Psychologists' Perceptions of Treatment Integrity in School-Based Interventions for Children with Academic and Behavior Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Wendy S.; Laux, John M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors conducted a survey of nationally certified school psychologists (NCSPs) in Ohio via the Internet. They collected information regarding the beliefs of the NCSPs about the importance of measuring treatment integrity in school-based interventions for children with academic and behavior concerns. The authors collected the…

  20. How Can Educational Psychologists Support the Reintegration of Children with an Acquired Brain Injury upon Their Return to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Heather; Howe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of reintegration into school for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and considers the role of the educational psychologist (EP) in supporting these children. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals in two specialist settings: a specialist rehabilitation centre and a children's hospital with…

  1. [Psychoeducational intervention in high ability: intellectual functioning and extracurricular enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Riba, Sylvia

    2014-02-24

    The 'new paradigm' defines the high intellectual ability as a potential that should crystallize progressively throughout development. Its main feature is a high intellectual initial multidimensional potential, which is transformed so that, being a person with high intellectual ability is the result of a developmental process from a neurobiological substrate and the incidence of variables (psychosocial and education) which determines its manifestation more or less stable and optimal to excellence. It is interesting to know the effectiveness of psychoeducational intervention of the extracurricular enrichment programs and their effects on the expression of differential functioning and the optimization of the management of cognitive resources that lead to excellence. An extracurricular enrichment program is described and evaluated through: 1) the stability of the intellectual measures; 2) the satisfaction level of participants and families. Participants are 58 high ability students on the enrichment program and 25 parents. Intellectual profiles are obtained on T1-T2 and calculated their stability by regression analysis, the CSA and CSA-P questionnaires were applied in order to know the participants and families' satisfaction measure. Results show the basic stability of intellectual profiles with five cases of instability among the 58 profiles obtained, and a high satisfaction with the results obtained in the domain of cognitive and personal management among the participants.

  2. Evolving Expectations for Personality Traits in Counselling Psychologist in Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakare Aveez Oluwatoyin

    2016-01-01

    ... of a counsellor's personality characteristics has been linked to effective outcome. In view of these, this paper examines evolvement of expectations for personality traits among the counselling psychologist-in training...

  3. Sources Informing Undergraduate College Student Perceptions of Psychologists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonald, Dana N; Wantz, Richard A; Firmin, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    ... psychologists from other HSPs.We surveyed 259 students enrolled in a general psychology class at a selective private comprehensive university in the Midwest in order to determine the sources that inform their perceptions...

  4. [Therapeutic benefit of a registered psychoeducation program on treatment adherence, objective and subjective quality of life: French pilot study for schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvanaud, F; Kebir, O; Vlasie, M; Doste, V; Amado, I; Krebs, M-O

    2017-05-01

    In schizophrenic disorders, supportive psychosocial therapies have been used as adjuncts to pharmacotherapy to help alleviate residual symptoms and to improve social functioning and quality of life. Among these therapies, psychoeducational therapies showed a significant efficacy on improving drug adherence and on reducing relapses. However, according to the French Health Agency, fewer than 10% of psychiatric structures in France offer registered psychoeducation programs. Caregiver apprehension of patients' depressive reactions to the awareness of the disease could underlie the underuse of psychoeducation therapies. Indeed, the psychoeducation programs' impact on objective and subjective quality of life is discussed among the literature. In this context, we conducted a retrospective, monocentric, open-labelled and non-controlled pilot study to measure the impact of a registered psychoeducation program on objective and subjective quality of life of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Secondary objectives included measures of the effects on drug observance and awareness of the disease. We included stabilized patients over the age of eighteen suffering from schizophrenia. Referent psychiatrics were asked to inform the patient of the diagnosis and to prescribe psychoeducation therapy. From 2011 to 2014, we offered three ambulatory programs, each program including fifteen two-hour group sessions. The groups were opened for three to six patients and managed by two caregivers. Themes discussed during the sessions included: schizophrenic disease, treatments, relationships to family, diet, social issues, toxics, relaxation. Objective and subjective quality of life were evaluated one month before and one month after the program using respectively the global assessment functioning (GAF) and the subjective quality of life (SQoL) scales. The Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the French IQ8 scale evaluated respectively drug adherence and awareness of the disease. All

  5. 20 CFR 30.402 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 30.402 Section 30.402 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist may serve as a physician within the scope of his or her practice as defined by state law. Therefore, a clinical psychologist...

  6. 20 CFR 10.312 - What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of clinical psychologists? 10.312 Section 10.312 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... § 10.312 What are the special rules for the services of clinical psychologists? A clinical psychologist.... Therefore, a clinical psychologist may not serve as a physician for conditions that include a...

  7. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or...) Of a type that the clinical psychologist or clinical social worker who furnishes the services...

  8. Reducing depression level of diabetes mellitus patient by psychoeducation by means of poster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachidah Yuniartika

    2016-08-01

    Results: This study showed that depression level for respondents in intervention group before intervention was in mild category, with the average value of 7.80, then after received psychoeducation therapy, the average value declined 3.60 points to 4.20 (no depression and P value 0.000. In control group, the depression level was in mild category, with the average value of 8.15, these value decreased by 0.2 points to 7.98 (still in mild depression after post test with P value 0.464. The depression level of Diabetes Mellitus patient who received psychoeducation declined significantly compared to the patient in control group. Conclusions: Psychoeducation intervention had significant effect on reducing depression level for Diabetes Mellitus patient. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3348-3353

  9. A 'family affair'? The impact of family psychoeducational interventions on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Giacco, Domenico; De Rosa, Corrado; Malangone, Claudio; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is reported to be the most common mental disorder, and one of the leading causes of disability-adjusted life years. It causes high levels of family burden and of expressed emotions. Research interest in family functioning in mental disorders has recently shifted from schizophrenia to unipolar and bipolar affective disorders. However, studies on family burden and on the effect of family psychoeducational interventions on major depression are still very few in number and lack a rigorous methodology, clear outcome measures and adequate follow-ups. Despite this, the few available studies on the efficacy of psychoeducational family intervention in unipolar major depression have had promising results. A comprehensive management of unipolar major depression should include psychoeducational family intervention.

  10. The effect of psycho-educational strategies on marital conflict among dual-career couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghamari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of psycho--educational strategies on decreasing the components of marital conflict among dual-career couples. The method of research was experimental design. 11 couples were selected using random sampling and then were assigned into the groups of experimental and control. The experimental group participated in psycho-educational sessions. Data were collected using Barati and Sanai’s marital conflict questionnaire and analyzed using repeated measure test. Results showed that psycho-educational strategies are effective in decreasing all components of marital conflict among dual-career couples (p<0/01 except for two components of seeking child support and separating financial events.

  11. Effectiveness of a comprehensive psychoeducational intervention with pregnant and parenting adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Deborah V; Looney, Stephen W

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of a comprehensive psychoeducational intervention on depression, self-esteem, and parenting attitudes/beliefs of at-risk pregnant and parenting adolescents. Adolescents (N = 41) attending either a residential treatment facility (RTF) or a rural alternative school (RAS) participated in a psychoeducational parenting group using Bavolek's Nurturing Program during Phase I. Phase II included health promotion issues, infant massage, and CPR. Using the Parenting Semantic Differential and the AAPI-2, there was significant improvement in parenting attitudes and beliefs. No significant change was found in self-esteem. A comprehensive psychoeducational parenting group can be effective in changing parenting attitudes and beliefs, which suggests an ultimate improvement in health promotion and disease prevention in adolescent women and their children.

  12. Reducing maladaptive weight management practices: developing a psychoeducational intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Karina M; LeBow, Michael D

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has addressed the issues of behavior change and eating disorder prevention among adolescents and young women. The current study was designed to evaluate: (a) whether an 8-week psychoeducational intervention can reduce maladaptive weight-management practices in women (University females, N=24) with sub-clinical levels of eating pathology; and (b) whether its implementation reduces the risk of developing more severe eating pathology across time. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (EX) group or a self-monitoring control (SMC) group. Statistically significant changes on measures of eating pathology, including the Eating Attitudes Test-26 [Garner, D. M., Olmsted, M. P., Bohr, Y., & Garfinkel, P. (1982). The Eating Attitudes Test: psychometric features and clinical correlates. Psychological Medicine, 12, 871-878]; Forbidden Food Survey [Ruggerio, L., Williamson, D. A., Davis, C. J., Schlundt, D. G., & Carey, M. P. (1988). Forbidden Food Survey: Measure of bulimic's anticipated emotional reactions to specific foods. Addictive Behaviors, 13, 267-274]; and Bulimia Test-Revised [Thelen, M. H., Farmer, J., Wonderlich, S., & Smith, M. (1991). A revision of the bulimia test: The BULIT-R. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 3(1), 119-124] were observed, as were changes in body image, as measured by the Body Shape Questionnaire [Cooper, P. J., Taylor, M. J., Cooper, Z., & Fairburn, C. G. (1987). The development and validation of the body shape questionnaire. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 6(4), 485-494]. Additional significant between-group differences in eating behavior, as measured by daily meal records, were also seen. Participants in the EX group evidenced improvements in scores which were significantly different from those observed in the SMC group. Unfortunately, attrition limited the utility of follow up data.

  13. The effect of single-session psychoeducational music therapy on verbalizations and perceptions in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare group-based psychoeducational music therapy to psychoeducation in measures of satisfaction with life, knowledge of illness, treatment perceptions, and response frequency and type in acute psychiatric inpatients during a randomized and controlled clinical trial. Participants (N=105) took part in a scripted single session controlled by a treatment manual and facilitated by a Board-Certified Music Therapist. No significant differences were found between groups in measures of helpfulness, enjoyment, satisfaction with life, or psychoeducational knowledge. However, although not significant, the music therapy group tended to have slightly higher mean scores in all aforementioned variables, suggesting music therapy can be as effective as psychoeducation in these measures. There were no significant differences between groups for the number of therapist questions and validations as measured by a trained behavioral observer, although during the music therapy condition the therapist was able to ask a mean of almost 11 additional questions than during the psychoeducational control condition. Although not significant, there were almost 20 more participant mean verbalizations per session during the music therapy conditions. Additionally, many of these verbalizations were categorized as self and cognitive insight statements, indicating participants in the music therapy condition were talking more about themselves and their unique situations. Congruent with this finding, during the music therapy condition, the ratios of participant self statements to therapist questions and participant cognitive insights to therapist questions were higher than in the control condition. There was a significant correlation between participant total verbal participation and perception of helpfulness, enjoyment, and comfort for the control condition. This correlation was not significant for the experimental condition, indicating that the music therapy group did

  14. Contemporary roles of the pediatric psychologist in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichler, Jessica C; Harris, Michael A; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Important stakeholders, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), recognize the need for psychologists to be an integral part of diabetes care. This review paper aims to provide a comprehensive examination of pediatric psychologists' roles in working with children and adolescents with diabetes, including during distinct phases of treatment (e.g., diagnosis, outpatient diabetes clinic visits, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient psychology visits) and with different modalities of psychological interventions (e.g., screening, individual, family, and group therapy). In addition, the role of the psychologist in diabetes care within various settings (e.g., private practice, academic medical centers, and community organizations) will be explored. Finally, this paper will outline other roles in which psychologists contribute to diabetes-specific efforts (e.g., translational research, program development in transition to adult care, advocacy for health care reform initiatives, health care billing/reimbursement, and alternative methods to psychosocial care delivery) as well as future directions for working with children and adolescents with diabetes. Pediatric psychologists have multiple professional roles in a wide variety of settings; however, there is more that can be done in the future to fully utilize pediatric psychologists in diabetes care for children and adolescents, such as embedding psychologists into integrated clinic visits where families receive comprehensive medical and psychological services to support overall health and well-being. Therefore, there is a need for increased advocacy to obtain even more pediatric psychology engagement in diabetes care to provide new clinical services and develop more translational research.

  15. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  16. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Biegańska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Preliminary patients’ opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients’ lives.

  17. Psychoeducation program on strategies for coping with stress in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegańska, Joanna; Pihut, M

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives.

  18. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  19. A randomized, controlled, pilot study of dialectical behavior therapy skills in a psychoeducational group for individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Sheri; Jeffrey, Janet; Katz, Mark R

    2013-03-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques have been shown to effectively treat borderline personality disorder, a condition also marked by prominent affective disturbances. The utility of DBT techniques in treating BD has been largely unexplored. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study of a DBT-based psychoeducational group (BDG) in treating euthymic, depressed, or hypomanic Bipolar I or II patients. In this experiment, 26 adults with bipolar I or II were randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups and completed the Beck depression inventory II, mindfulness-based self-efficacy scale, and affective control scale at baseline and 12 weeks. The BDG intervention consisted of 12 weekly 90-min sessions which taught DBT skills, mindfulness techniques, and general BD psychoeducation. Using RM-ANOVA, subjects in BDG demonstrated a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms, and significant improvement in several MSES subscales indicating greater mindful awareness, and less fear toward and more control of emotional states (ACS). These findings were supported with a larger sample of patients who completed the BDG. Furthermore, group attendees had reduced emergency room visits and mental health related admissions in the six months following BDG. The small sample size in RCT affects power to detect between group differences. How well improvements after the12-week BDG were maintained is unknown. There is preliminary evidence that DBT skills reduce depressive symptoms, improve affective control, and improve mindfulness self-efficacy in BD. Its application warrants further evaluation in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The work of a clinical psychologist in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M

    1978-11-01

    The data presented suggest that general practitioners would be likely to refer a large number of patients with diverse problems to clinical psychologists working in health centres. Compared with a centrally organized clinical psychology service, the work of the primary care psychologist is likely to offer the following advantages:1. Access to psychological help for patients with a need for such help, but who could not attend a central clinic owing to problems associated with travel, work, physical disability, or even a presenting problem such as agoraphobia.2. Greater continuity of care of patients.3. Increased communication between the psychologist and members of the primary care teams.4. Possibility of the psychologist seeing the patient earlier, before the problems have become entrenched.5. Less need for referral to other agencies.6. Reduced stigma for the patient.7. Development of new therapeutic approaches relevant to problems presenting in primary care.8. More flexible and more relevant therapy due to seeing the patients in their home setting.9. Greater therapeutic involvement of the patient's family.10. Reduced costs and inconvenience for the patient's family.11. Reduced administrative and ambulance service costs.While these points do not overcome the need for a formal evaluation of the work of psychologists in primary care, they do suggest that there are advantages in this type of service over the services which are currently available and that a full evaluation would be worth undertaking.

  1. Psychologists abandon the Nuremberg ethic: concerns for detainee interrogations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kenneth S; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of 9-11, the American Psychological Association, one of the largest U.S. health professions, changed its ethics code so that it now runs counter to the Nuremberg Ethic. This historic post-9-11 change allows psychologists to set aside their ethical responsibilities whenever they are in irreconcilable conflict with military orders, governmental regulations, national and local laws, and other forms of governing legal authority. This article discusses the history, wording, rationale, and implications of the ethical standard that U.S. psychologists adopted 7 years ago, particularly in light of concerns over health care professionals' involvement in detainee interrogations and the controversy over psychologists' prominent involvement in settings like the Guantánamo Bay Detainment Camp and the Abu Ghraib prison. It discusses possible approaches to the complex dilemmas arising when ethical responsibilities conflict with laws, regulations, or other governing legal authority.

  2. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Practices in Psychoeducational Reports for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Past researchers suggested there are a number of shortcomings in the psychoeducational evaluation process and practices used with English language learners (ELLs). In the present exploratory study, the authors descriptively examined the assessment practices used in the special education eligibility determination process for ELLs as documented in…

  3. A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Psychoeducational Group for Chinese People with Chronic Illnesses: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Ip, Priscilla S. Y.; Lee, Kim Man

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) psychoeducational group for Chinese people with chronic illness in Hong Kong. It adopted a single group design, and 52 participants joined the group. A questionnaire with three outcome measures, measuring general mental health, quality of life…

  4. Internet psychoeducation for bipolar affective disorder: basis for preparation and first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Jelenova, Daniela; Ociskova, Marie; Sedlackova, Zuzana

    2014-06-01

    There is growing evidence that patients with bipolar affective disorder (BAD), who use medication, respond well to further psychotherapeutic interventions. Internet-based psychoeducation is typically centered on the interaction between a client and therapist via the Internet. Multiple methods were required to investigate existing psychoeducational and psychotherapeutic strategies used on patients suffering from BAD. Systematic reviews and original reports of all trials of psychoeducation in BAD patients were retrieved. Patients with BAD, who were hospitalized in a psychiatric department or attended a day hospital program, were exposed to the first version of the program during the treatment, and then questioned about understandability, comprehensibility, and usefulness of each lecture. Twelve modules of the Internet E-Program for BAD were developed and the intervention was a pilot tested with twelve patients. Internet psychoeducation program for BAD is an intervention designed for universal implementation that addresses heightened learning needs of patients suffering from BAD. It is designed to promote confidence and reduce the number of episodes of the disorder by providing skills in monitoring warning signs, planning daily activities and practicing communication skills.

  5. Anger and Depression Management: Psychoeducational Skill Training Interventions for Women Caregivers of a Relative with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry; Steffen, Ann; Sorocco, Kristen; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the short-term impact of two theoretically based psychoeducational small group interventions with distressed caregivers, and it also examines the role of specific moderator and mediator variables on caregiver outcomes. Design and Methods: Female participants (N = 169) aged 50 and older who were caring for a…

  6. Development and Implementation of a Psychoeducational Group for Ghanaian Adolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyi, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents development and informal assessment of a 10-week psychoeducational program designed for 8 adolescent group members experiencing parental divorce in a rural community in Ghana. Group design, cultural considerations, program implementation, and impacts are described. The literature review pertaining to group work as an…

  7. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  8. The Psychoeducational Characteristics of School-Aged Students in Colorado with Educationally Significant Hearing Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1996-01-01

    This study of 461 Colorado students (ages 7-18) with deafness or partial hearing investigated the students' psychoeducational development by age and hearing loss, including syntactic comprehension and production, reading comprehension, social maturity, speech intelligibility, and math calculation skills. Traditional standardized measures of…

  9. Anger and Depression Management: Psychoeducational Skill Training Interventions for Women Caregivers of a Relative with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry; Steffen, Ann; Sorocco, Kristen; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the short-term impact of two theoretically based psychoeducational small group interventions with distressed caregivers, and it also examines the role of specific moderator and mediator variables on caregiver outcomes. Design and Methods: Female participants (N = 169) aged 50 and older who were caring for a…

  10. Brief Psychoeducational Group Treatment with Re-Traumatized Refugees and Asylum Seekers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a psychoeducational group treatment with students with a history of refugee trauma, war, and human rights abuses who were further traumatized by the 9/11 attacks in New York City. The rationale for group intervention and specific techniques utilized to promote emotional and behavioral stabilization and…

  11. Survival after a psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma: a replication study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Boesen, Sidsel H; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The results of a randomized, intervention study done in 1993 of psychoeducation for patients with early-stage malignant melanoma showed a beneficial effect on recurrence and survival 6 years after the intervention. In the present study, we replicated the study with 258 Danish patients with malign...

  12. Making Sense of Inconsistencies in Psycho-Educational Assessment: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Miller, Robyn; Ward, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented of an 8-year-old boy who was referred for psycho-educational assessment because of difficulties with writing. The article provides an example of the way in which a case unfolds as further assessment data become available, and describes a number of challenging aspects of the assessment process. In this case, dilemmas arose…

  13. Effectiveness of psychoeducation intervention on subjective well being and self compassion of individuals with mental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul Duran

    2016-01-01

    Results: We identified significant increase in parents' subjective well-being and self compassion levels after eight session of psychoeducation (p<0.05. Conclusions: As a result, we believe there is very few intervention practices directed to parents of children with mental disabilities and that these practices should be enhanced. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(1.000: 181-188

  14. Effects of Culturally Relevant Psychoeducation for Korean American Families of Persons with Chronic Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Kyung

    2004-01-01

    This study is to identify culturally relevant treatment methods and to assess the effects of family psychoeducational intervention for Korean Americans who had a family member with mental illness. 48 Korean Americans with children with mental illness were randomly assigned to either an experimental group program that provided culturally sensitive…

  15. Psychoeducational interventions targeting core symptoms to achieve remission and prevent relapses and recurrence in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2008-01-01

    Depressive disorders have a high prevalence and incidence, and are associated with a huge burden of disease and economic costs. Most respond satisfactorily to drug therapy and/or psychological intervention, in particular to psychoeducation. By far the best-studied example of this approach is the Cop

  16. Responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-Third Edition for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chiang, Fu-Mei; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Fu, Chung-Pei; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We investigated the responsiveness in terms of three types of scores (i.e., raw scores, developmental ages, and percentile ranks) of the subtests and composites of the PEP-3 and three…

  17. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  18. A Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Psychoeducational Group Manual for Problem Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Abigail; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on problem gambling in adults and includes a detailed mindfulness-based psychoeducational group manual for problem gambling, complete with an extensive group counselling consent form, assessment and screening protocols, 10 user-friendly lesson plans, templates for a…

  19. Psychoeducational treatment and prevention of depression: The coping with depression course thirty years later

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Munoz, R.F.; Clarke, G.N.; Lewinsohn, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The “Coping with Depression” course (CWD) is by the far the best studied psychoeducational intervention for the treatment and prevention of depression, and is used in routine practice in several countries. The CWD is a highly structured cognitive-behavioral intervention, which has been adap

  20. Psychoeducational interventions targeting core symptoms to achieve remission and prevent relapses and recurrence in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2008-01-01

    Depressive disorders have a high prevalence and incidence, and are associated with a huge burden of disease and economic costs. Most respond satisfactorily to drug therapy and/or psychological intervention, in particular to psychoeducation. By far the best-studied example of this approach is the Cop

  1. SPARC Groups: A Model for Incorporating Spiritual Psychoeducation into Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas, Christopher; Van Horn, Stacy M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of spirituality as a resource for clients within the counseling field is growing; however, the primary focus has been on individual therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide counseling practitioners, administrators, and researchers with an approach for incorporating spiritual psychoeducation into group work. The proposed model can…

  2. Improving Empathy and Communication Skills of Visually Impaired Early Adolescents through a Psycho-Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an interpersonal communication skills psycho-education program to improve empathy and communication skills of visually impaired adolescents. Participants of the study were sixteen early adolescents schooling in an elementary school for visually impaired youth in Diyarbakir. The…

  3. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part I. Patient Information and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Beale, Ivan L.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic review of published research on psychoeducational interventions for children with cancer. The current lack of an organizational model for this literature makes it difficult to form a coherent picture of the scattered literature and draw nomothetic conclusions. A model is described that is based on functional concepts from…

  4. Brief Psychoeducational Group Treatment with Re-Traumatized Refugees and Asylum Seekers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a psychoeducational group treatment with students with a history of refugee trauma, war, and human rights abuses who were further traumatized by the 9/11 attacks in New York City. The rationale for group intervention and specific techniques utilized to promote emotional and behavioral stabilization and…

  5. Responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-Third Edition for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chiang, Fu-Mei; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Fu, Chung-Pei; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We investigated the responsiveness in terms of three types of scores (i.e., raw scores, developmental ages, and percentile ranks) of the subtests and composites of the PEP-3 and three…

  6. Psycho-Educational Factors in the Prediction of Academic Buoyancy in Second Life®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Cheril C.

    2013-01-01

    Academic resilience has been widely researched in traditional and online educational settings, but it has not been sufficiently studied in three-dimensional (3D) virtual learning environments (VLEs). This inferential research used multiple regression to quantitatively investigate the extent to which psycho-educational factors including academic…

  7. Effects of a psychoeducation intervention on fear and anxiety about surgery: randomized trial in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmansouri, Nazilla; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Salehi Omran, Abbas; Karimi, Abbas Ali; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Arjmandi, Akram; Nikfam, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a brief psychoeducation group intervention on fear and anxiety in patients undergoing the coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Sixty consecutive patients undergoing CABG for the first time were recruited for a clinical trial and randomized into two groups. The control group received routine care. The study group received a brief psychoeducation group intervention combined with routine care. The psychoeducation session consisted of a discussion of fear and anxiety in a psychotherapeutic atmosphere and relaxation techniques. Fear was scored with the Bypass Grafting Fear Scale (BGFS) and anxiety was scored with the Spielberger State Inventory (STAI) Questionnaire. The BGFS and the STAI were given to the patients the day after hospital admission and a day before the operation to measure fear and anxiety. Fear scores decreased in the psychoeducation group. Of the 29 patients treated with psychoeducation, the mean (SD) fear score decreased from 4.6 (1.7) at baseline to 2.8 (1.2) before the operation (p  .05). The mean difference in fear score before the operation was significantly lower in the psychoeducation group than the routine care group (mean difference -1.3; 95% CI, -2.1, -.2; p anxiety scores before the operation between the psychoeducation and routine care groups. In patients undergoing CABG, adding psychoeducation to routine care had a significant positive effect on fear but not on anxiety scores. A larger study of psychoeducation in these patients is warranted to assess the efficacy of this intervention in greater detail.

  8. Misconceptions of the p-value among Chilean and Italian Academic Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Iotti, Bryan; Bonilla-Campos, Amparo; Longobardi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Common misconceptions of p-values are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals' decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italian, 30 Chilean) questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with previous research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p-values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed. PMID:27602007

  9. Clinical Reasoning in School Psychology: From Assessment to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jac J. W.; Syeda, Maisha M.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists typically conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessments, provide prevention and intervention services, and consult and collaborate with allied professionals (e.g., teachers, physicians, psychiatrists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and nurses) and parents toward better understanding and…

  10. Clinical Reasoning in School Psychology: From Assessment to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jac J. W.; Syeda, Maisha M.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists typically conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessments, provide prevention and intervention services, and consult and collaborate with allied professionals (e.g., teachers, physicians, psychiatrists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and nurses) and parents toward better understanding and…

  11. Stereotype Threat and Test Performance: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alexander H.; Lovett, Benjamin J.

    2007-01-01

    Ethical guidelines require school psychologists to ensure that their assessment practices are nondiscriminatory, but typical discussions on this topic neglect the possible discriminatory effects of cultural stereotypes on assessment results. Recent research on "stereotype threat" shows that students' knowledge of stereotype-based negative…

  12. Ethically Challenging Situations Reported by School Psychologists: Implications for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailor, A. Nichole; Jacob, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Practitioner-members of the National Association of School Psychologists (N = 208) completed questionnaires regarding their ethics training, preparedness, the types of ethical transgressions and dilemmas encountered in the previous year, and the strategies used to solve problems. Respondents who received multilevel training in ethics (ethics…

  13. Changing Conceptualization of the Role of Educational Psychologists in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Phey Ling; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra; Burgetova, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a young discipline in Singapore. Hence, perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of an educational psychologist (EP) are still constantly being negotiated and redefined. This qualitative study examined how role negotiations and redefinitions could be actively facilitated through an experiential and intensive two-day Basic…

  14. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  15. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  16. Do First and Later Borns Agree with Psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Diane

    Research has found firstborns to be more ambitious, rule-oriented, authority-oriented, helpful, and responsible, and less oriented toward peers, their own needs, social activities, and group cooperation than are laterborns. To explore whether those occupying different birth order positions perceive themselves as psychologists have described them,…

  17. School Psychologists' Experiences with Teacher-to-Student Mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Sharon R. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, transcendental, phenomenological study was to describe school psychologists' experiences with teacher-to-student mistreatment in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational setting. There are few United States studies presented in the literature on the topic of teacher-to-student mistreatment and its…

  18. Training, Degrees, and Credentials in the Hiring of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'donnell, Patrick S.; Dunlap, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    A national sample of 246 Directors of Pupil Personnel Services and Directors of Special Education were surveyed to assess the importance they place on training, degrees, and credentials in the hiring of school psychologists. High, but varying, levels of importance were found for the content knowledge and skill areas in the National Association of…

  19. School Psychologists' Family-School Partnering Experiences with Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Fernandez, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify the beliefs, perceptions, and actions of school psychologists toward family-school partnering (FSP) with Latino families in the public school system. Existing research in this area is extremely limited; therefore, the present study has significant implications for pre- and in-service…

  20. Global Migration: The Need for Culturally Competent School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Plotts, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Never before have more children lived away from their home countries. Given the unique social, emotional, and academic needs of children who have migrated, school psychologists must be well prepared to meet these growing demands. Consequently, school psychology training programs must invest in the preparation of culturally competent future school…

  1. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  2. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  3. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  4. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  5. Educational Psychologists' Constructions of Sexuality and the Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    Despite an underlying inclusion agenda, sexuality equality remains a low priority in education. Review of literature suggests the marginalization of sexual minority young people (SMYP) in schools. This study explores educational psychologists' (EPs') constructions of sexuality and the implications for practice. Discursive psychology was used to…

  6. Primary Care Psychologists in the Netherlands: 30 Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, J.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary care psychologist (PCP) in the Netherlands has 30 years of experience. The PCP is a generalist who, in close cooperation with the family physician and other providers of primary health care, has a mindset and manner of working that is largely determined by the context in which the PCP

  7. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  8. Gesell: The First School Psychologist. Part II. Practice and Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    This article describes what is known of Arnold L. Gesell's position in Connecticut between 1914-1919, including conditions of employment and responsibilities. While some questions remain unanswered regarding Gesell's acquisition of the title "school psychologist," it is concluded that he was the first U.S. practitioner to hold that title.…

  9. Children and Natural Disasters: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda; Oehler-Stinnett, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide children are impacted by natural disasters, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, landslides and sandstorms, winter and severe storms, heat waves, volcanoes and tsunamis. School psychologists should understand natural disaster effects, such as economic loss, relocation and health concerns and mental health…

  10. Human Resource Planning: Challenges for Industrial/Organizational Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Susan E.; Schuler, Randall S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes activities that industrial/organizational psychologists engage in as they seek to improve the competitiveness of organizations through effective human resource planning. Presents a model for describing human resource short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term planning. (JS)

  11. Primary Care Psychologists in the Netherlands: 30 Years of Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, J.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary care psychologist (PCP) in the Netherlands has 30 years of experience. The PCP is a generalist who, in close cooperation with the family physician and other providers of primary health care, has a mindset and manner of working that is largely determined by the context in which the PCP wo

  12. What Counseling Psychologists Can Do to Help Returning Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Steven J.; Antonides, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the needs of service members and their families who have fought or are fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and who have sustained psychological and/or physical injuries and how counseling psychologists can help. The focus is twofold: (a) to help the reader better understand those who have served and how what…

  13. Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: School Psychologists' Practices and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Allen, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    From its inception as a disability category in the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, serving students under the special education category Emotional Disturbance (ED) has been a challenging task for school psychologists. In particular, the vague and ambiguous federal definition has created an environment in which inconsistent assessment…

  14. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Stakeholder Engagement in Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) continues to be implemented in schools, it is important to consider how this initiative is perceived by the educational professionals involved in the implementation and effectiveness of the process. This study utilized a survey intended to investigate the perceptions of school psychologists regarding their…

  15. The Role of School Psychologists in Child Protection and Safeguarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Bond, Caroline; Tyldesley, Kath; Farrell, Peter; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Child protection and safeguarding are important aspects of work for all professionals working with children. The current article outlines the international context of school psychologists' work in relation to child protection and safeguarding and describes the United Kingdom context in more detail. Given the relatively recent broadening of the UK…

  16. A Comparison of Two Measures of School Psychologists' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael B.; Hardison, Ashley; Bolen, Larry M.; Walcott, Christy M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the concurrent and construct validity of the Job Satisfaction Scales (JSS) and a modified version of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) using a sample of practicing school psychologists. Strong internal consistency was determined within each of the job satisfaction instruments. Correlations…

  17. Letters to a Young Psychologist: An Invitation to Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Tania

    2012-01-01

    In this response to the major contribution, "Voices of Early Career Psychologists in the Society of Counseling Psychology," the past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP) expresses appreciation, describes aspects of her early career experience in light of the survey findings in the major contribution, offers reflections…

  18. Educational Psychologists' Report-Writing: Acts of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major tasks of educational psychologists is the writing of reports. Often, all involvement, assessment and intervention culminate in the production of a report. This paper explores critically the tensions involved in writing reports which are closed down in their conformity to requirements of different bodies, while looking for…

  19. Classroom Behaviour Management: Educational Psychologists' Views on Effective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of children and young people in schools is a perennial concern to educators and the wider public alike. It also represents a significant focus for the work of educational psychologists (EPs). Research evidence has identified a number of strategies that teachers, students and school inspectors believe contribute to effective classroom…

  20. Albert Sidney Beckham: The First African American School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Albert Sidney Beckham was the first African American to hold the title school psychologist. This article examines the life and professional career of Beckham in the context of his contributions to the field of school psychology. It explores his graduate education, the founding of Howard University's Psychological Laboratory and his research and…

  1. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  2. Effect of psycho-educational interventions on quality of life in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Wen; Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Lin, Pai-Hui

    2016-09-30

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) were developed for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. However, ICD recipients' mortality is significantly predicted by their quality of life (QOL). The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of psycho-educational interventions on QOL in patients with ICDs. We systematically searched PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL through April 2015 and references of relevant articles. Studies were reviewed if they met following criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial, (2) participants were adults with an ICD, and (3) data were sufficient to evaluate the effect of psychological or educational interventions on QOL measured by the SF-36 or SF-12. Studies were independently selected and their data were extracted by two reviewers. Study quality was evaluated using a modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager Software Package (RevMan 5). Study heterogeneity was assessed by Q statistics and I (2) statistic. Depending on heterogeneity, data were pooled across trials using fixed-effect or random-effect modeling. Seven randomized controlled trials fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and included 1017 participants. The psycho-educational interventions improved physical component summary (PCS) scores in the intervention groups more than in control groups (mean difference 2.08, 95 % CI 0.86 to 3.29, p educational interventions improved the physical component, but not the mental component of QOL in patients with ICDs.

  3. Effects of a Psychoeducational Intervention for Direct Care Workers Caring for People With Dementia: Results From a 6-Month Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana; Nolan, Mike; Sousa, Liliana; Marques, Alda; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of a psychoeducational intervention, designed to improve direct care workers' stress, burnout and job satisfaction, and person-centered communicative behavior in people with dementia. A pretest-posttest control group design was conducted in 4 aged-care facilities. Two experimental facilities received a psychoeducational intervention, and 2 control facilities received an education only. Data were gathered from 53 care workers at baseline, immediately, and 6 months after the intervention, through self-administrated instruments and video-recorded morning care sessions. The experimental group showed a significant decrease in care workers' burnout and a significant improvement in several communicative behaviors (e.g., involvement). Stress levels deteriorated at 6 months, and no intervention effects were found for job satisfaction. The findings highlight the importance of providing care workers with both technical competences and tools for stress management, as this might be associated with a reduction in their levels of exhaustion and improved communicative behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Family-Based Psychoeducation Programs for Prevention of Depression in Adolescents with Depressed Parents: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Basogul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the effects of family-based psychoeducation programs to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents and investigates participant, intervention, provider, and research designs. Family-based psychoeducation programs described by articles in several national and international databases were reviewed. Five studies were identified using this approach and are included in this review. The adolescents who participated in Family-Based Psychoeducation programs reported a significant decrease in symptoms of depression, internalizing and externalizing symptoms and increase in secondary control coping. Moreover, it was noted that there was an increase in positive parental skills and a moderate effect for episodes of depression of the parents who participated in the programs. Studies evaluating effects of family-based psychoeducation programs have indicated positive results to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 265-279

  5. Schizophrenia: a five-year follow-up of patient outcome following psycho-education for caregivers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that psycho-education courses for caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia improve the short-term outcome of the condition. However, most of the outcome studies are limited to two-year follow-up.

  6. Psychoeducation training on stress management strategies as an addition to the therapy of temporomandibular joint dysfunction – preliminary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marta Biegańska

    2016-05-01

    Preliminary results suggest that the developed psychoeducation programme improves emotional status of patients receiving prosthetic treatment for temporomandibular disorders. Development of an algorithm for these patients needs further research and testing.

  7. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  8. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  9. Job Satisfaction, Burnout, and Perceived Effectiveness of "In-House" versus Traditional School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Briley E.; Steadman, Tara

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined whether school psychologists who serve a single school ("In-House" group) differed from school psychologists who serve several schools concurrently ("Traditional" group) in the three areas of job satisfaction, burnout, and effectiveness as perceived by the school psychologist. A total of 63 school psychology…

  10. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  11. 20 CFR 404.1617 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 404.1617 Section 404.1617 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see §...

  12. 42 CFR 414.62 - Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.62 Fee schedule for clinical psychologist services. The fee schedule for clinical psychologist services is set at 100 percent of the amount determined for...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1017 - Reasonable efforts to obtain review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. 416.1017 Section 416.1017 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... review by a qualified psychiatrist or psychologist. (a) The State agency must determine if additional qualified psychiatrists and psychologists are needed to make the necessary reviews (see §...

  14. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  15. 20 CFR 220.58 - Objections to the designated physician or psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... psychologist. 220.58 Section 220.58 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE... designated physician or psychologist. A claimant or his or her representative may object to his or her being examined by a designated physician or psychologist. If there is a good reason for the objection, the...

  16. A Comparison of Special Education Teacher and Psychologist Scoring of the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glen G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Ten special education teachers and two school psychologists scored the Bender-Gestalt protocals of elementary school children using the Koppitz scoring system. The reported correlations between teachers and school psychologists compared favorably to correlations between school psychologists as well as to interrater reliabilities reported in the…

  17. Perceptions of Leadership Practices of School Psychologists: Views of Multiple Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine; Kilanowski, Lisa; Privitera, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership ability is necessary in the work of school psychologists, yet formal investigation of leadership processes engaged in by school psychologists has not occurred in the field. Likewise, perceptions of the leadership ability of school psychologists by other key school professionals, such as administrators and teachers, remain undocumented.…

  18. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  19. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  20. [A proposal for reforming psychologists' training in France and in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, J-P

    2009-02-01

    necessary in career course. This reform aiming at excellence, which is socially and humanly highly necessary, must obviously also be accompanied by an indispensable and important revision of the criteria in the selection and competence of those who will dispense this renewed training (the current criteria used to recruit psychology teachers have been widely contested and deemed to be, justly so, the main cause of shortcomings of the initial training of psychologists and of their professional segmentation). An aggregative or postdoctoral route should thus be created to recruit future psychology teachers in the higher education (public and private). This recruitment should take into account candidates' theoretical knowledge, but also their knowledge of the profession and their qualities in its exercise. Thus the following criteria are essential when recruiting psychology teachers: validation of the reformed doctorate in psychology (and possibly validation of trainings complementing this doctorate); practice in the field of the psychologist's job (during at least 10 years full-time, followed by the possibility of becoming practitioner-teacher-researcher in psychology, in the sector of experiments and acquired competences, if the candidate is selected at aggregation); ability to teach and capacity to train the future psychologists for the professional acts they will be susceptible to conduct; capacity to conceive, initiate, carry out, direct and communicate useful research. Recruiting all psychology teachers in the stock of professional psychologists who are experienced, talented, skilled and who perform in all the application fields of the discipline as practitioner-teacher-researcher, is vital to implement these essential improvements in psychologists' training, exercise and research. It is therefore a priority for the future of French and European psychologists to set up as fast as possible a reformed doctorate and an aggregation (or, with regard to the aggregation, an

  1. Effects of VA Facility Dog on Hospitalized Veterans Seen by a Palliative Care Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Levy, Cari; Holman, Elizabeth; Kolassa, John E

    2016-01-01

    The United States is home to 23 million veterans. In many instances, veterans with serious illness who seek healthcare at the VA receive care from a palliative care service. Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) is gaining attention as a therapeutic stress reducing modality; however, its effects have not been well studied in veterans receiving palliative care in an acute care setting. A crossover repeated-measures study was conducted to examine the effects of an animal-assisted intervention (AAI) in the form of a therapy dog on stress indicators in 25 veterans on the palliative care service at the VA Eastern Colorado Healthcare System in Denver, CO. Veterans had a visit from a therapy dog and the dog's handler, a clinical psychologist (experimental condition) and an unstructured visit with the clinical psychologist alone (control condition). Blood pressure, heart rate, and the salivary biomarkers cortisol, alpha-amylase, and immunoglobulin A were collected before, after, and 30-minutes after both the experimental and control conditions. Significant decreases in cortisol were found when the before time period was compared to the 30-minutes after time period for both the experimental ( p = 0.007) and control condition ( p = 0.036). A significant decrease in HR was also found when the before time period was compared to the 30-minutes after time period for both the experimental ( p = 0.0046) and control ( p = 0.0119) condition. Results of this study supported that a VA facility dog paired with a palliative care psychologist had a measurable impact on salivary cortisol levels and HR in veterans.

  2. Effectiveness of a psychoeducation program on the quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Razavi, Narges Sadat; Aghajani, Mohammad; Bashiri, Zahra

    2017-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate effectiveness of a psychoeducation program (PEP) on the quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD affects patients' quality of life. PEPs may be useful to help patients reach maximum functional health. A pretest-posttest controlled clinical trial was conducted on a study population of 70 CHD patients, who were selected through convenience sampling and randomly allocated to either the intervention or the control group. The MacNew Quality of Life Questionnaire in heart disease was completed by participants twice: first as a pretest, and then in a follow-up posttest. After the intervention, the quality of life (QOL) score was 157.97±25.51 in the intervention group and 105.03±8.38 in the control group, making for a significant difference (pPEPs helped CHD patients improve their quality of life through reducing tension, relieving their negative emotions, and improving their social relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [IDEM-depression: Characteristics and evaluation of an open group that combines psychoeducation and cognitive-behavior therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, L; Garcia-Krafes, E; Garcia, S; Berthomier, C; Morali, A; Metzger, J-Y; Weibel, S; Javelot, H; Bertschy, G

    2016-10-28

    Depression is a highly prevalent mental illness that is associated with high rates of morbidity and functional impairment. At the psychiatric unit of the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France, we have developed an open group that combines psychoeducation and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), the information, discovery, exchange and mobilization for depression group (IDEM-depression). IDEM-depression is composed of 17 thematic, structured, and independent sessions, which address different aspects of depression (i.e., rumination, pharmacological treatments). Because of its flexible format, patients with varying degrees of depression severity (from remission up to severe depressive symptoms) and whose depression might be bipolar or unipolar, are able to participate in the group. Thus, the group is well suited to a large number of patients with major depression. In the present study we aimed at describing the IDEM-depression group and presenting results regarding patients' overall satisfaction, assessed via two self-report questionnaires (the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, the CSQ-8, and the IDEM ad hoc questionnaire), as well as its effect on mood following each session assessed via a visual analog scale (VAS) ranging from 0 up to 100. Sixty-five patients participated in 50 sessions of the IDEM-depression group in two hospitals in Alsace. 61% of the patients had bipolar disorder, and 41% of them were inpatients. Sessions took place on a weekly basis, lasted 2hours and were proposed by a CBT-trained clinical psychologist. Patients were asked to fill-out the VAS at the beginning and at the end of each session. Moreover, they were asked to fill-out the CSQ-8 and the IDEM ad hoc questionnaire when they left the group. Other than one session ("yoga and mindfulness"), all the sessions (16 out of 17) were structured on a Powerpoint(©) presentation. During the first hour information was given regarding the topic (i.e., rumination), and a shared CBT

  4. [New promising caregiver's psychoeducation training program: a Belgian experience in dementing disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berge, D; Bosman, N; Fery, P; Bier, J-C

    2010-01-01

    Facing difficulties due to dementia syndromes, systemic care is necessary. But nevertheless, caregivers are generally lacking in medical welfare. Therapies assessed specifically to caregivers are missing. Amongst these, psychoeducative steps seem to be the strongest effective's one on neuropsychiatrics symptoms. Psychoeducations tend to learn to caregivers to modify their interactions with patients via a better understanding of illnesses and patients. Our training "Pour mieux vivre avec la maladie d'Alzheimer ", done in groups of eight to twelve persons, is constituted of twelve sessions of two hours each. Complete formation includes behavioural and cognitive aspects of the disease and proposes some multidimensional approach which content at least pedagogical, psychological and cognitivo behavioural aspects. We illustrate here with the use of two peculiar cases that our program can reach its objectives. These preliminary results strongly argue for the pursuit and even extension of this kind of caregiver's management.

  5. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højskov, Ida Elisabeth; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V

    2016-01-01

    , no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. AIMS: The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment...... and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. RESULTS: The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions......BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However...

  6. Core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette E. Maritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to explore and describe core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches. The total number of participants in this qualitative research was 30. A purposive and snowball sampling strategy was used. Triangulation was achieved through focus groups, in-depth individual interviews and naïve sketches. Data were analysed through an open inductive approach and descriptive analysis. The results describe core competencies of a business team coach as situated within an Outcomes Based Education framework and relate to the knowledge to be discovered, skills to be mastered and the attitudes to be formed during a managerial psycho-educational training programme.

  7. A psychoeducational codependency support group for older adults who reside in the community: friends supporting friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIinnis-Perry, Gloria J; Good, Jim M

    2006-08-01

    Older adults with loved ones who are dependent on alcohol or drugs often experience the adverse effects of a codependent relationship. Many experience anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and suicidal thoughts. A pilot psychoeducational codependency support group was developed to promote well-being and reduce the adverse effects of codependency among older persons. The study participants were a voluntary convenience sample of 22 older adults (ages 65 and older) residing in the community. A pretest and posttest were administered. Six 90-minute group sessions based on a curriculum developed by the authors were held during a 2-month period. Yalom's Therapeutic Factors were used to evaluate the group process. Results indicated that older adults benefit from a psychoeducational support group format and that codependency issues can be reduced.

  8. EL PSICÓLOGO EDUCATIVO EN LA ACTUALIDAD: UN FACILITADOR DEL DESARROLLO HUMANO INTEGRAL - THE EDUCATIVE PSYCHOLOGIST NOWADAYS: A FACILITATOR OF THE INTEGRATED HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINDA ESCORCIA JULIO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available From a human development concept that trend by improving the quality of life of people from human-scale approach, we consider the role of educational psychologist in the world today, providing further main function of individual potential and collective members of the education community to achieve the ultimate goal of development is the welfare of people. Thus the psychologist conducts its promotion, prevention and intervention from a holistic perspective of education that involves and above basic psychological processes that stimulate individual growth and social development in an educational organization.

  9. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

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    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  10. Utilisation of psychiatrists and psychologists in private practice among non-Western labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries and ethnic Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Kreiner, Svend

    2015-01-01

    and psychologists in labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries (RGC), and ethnic Danes could be fully explained by mental health status. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide survey in 2007 with 3,573 individuals aged 18-66 comprising ethnic Danes, labour immigrants (Pakistan and Turkey......), and immigrants from RGC (Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, and Somalia). Survey data was linked to healthcare utilisation registries. Using Poisson regression, contacts with private practising psychiatrists and psychologists were estimated. Analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic factors and mental health status. RESULTS......: Overall, 2.2 % among ethnic Danes, 1.4 % among labour immigrants and 6.5 % among immigrants from RGC consulted a psychiatrist or psychologist. In adjusted analyses, for psychiatrists, compared with ethnic Danes, labour-immigrant women (multiplicative effect = 1.78), and immigrant women from RGC...

  11. Why isn’t everyone an Evolutionary Psychologist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBurke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with Evolutionary Psychology, and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success.

  12. Why isn't everyone an evolutionary psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Despite a widespread acceptance that the brain that underpins human psychology is the result of biological evolution, very few psychologists in any way incorporate an evolutionary perspective in their research or practice. There have been many attempts to convince mainstream psychology of the importance of such a perspective, mostly from those who identify with "Evolutionary Psychology," and there has certainly been progress in that direction, but the core of psychology remains essentially unevolutionary. Here I explore a number of potential reasons for mainstream psychology continuing to ignore or resist an evolutionary approach, and suggest some ways in which those of us interested in seeing an increase in the proportion of psychologists adopting an evolutionary perspective might need to modify our tactics to increase our chances of success.

  13. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care

  14. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be

  15. Impact of psychoeducation intervention module on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suravi Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD in India face a host of challenges, while seeking care which ranges from unavailability of information to difficulty in availing services. Aims: To develop a psycho-education intervention module for parents of children with ASD and to study its impact on parent stress and knowledge. Settings and Design: Child Guidance Clinic Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Interventional study. Methodology: Parents of children diagnosed with ASD as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria, recruited through consecutive sampling. Total number of 18 participants participated in the two phase study. Phase I included preparation of a parent training module through a four stage process and Phase II was evaluation of impact of the final version of the module on parental stress and knowledge. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test using SPSS version 17.0. Results: There was an improvement in all the domains of parenting stress and knowledge. Social stress score and total stress score showed significant improvement. Conclusions: Parent psycho-education intervention module on ASD decreases parenting stress, and improves knowledge about ASD. Psycho-education intervention module is a feasible and acceptable way of parent empowerment.

  16. Efficacy of a psychoeducational group with caregivers of patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Luiza Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of intervention strategies aimed at dementia caregivers objectives the information and the creation of coping strategies to deal with the difficulties caused by dementia. OBJECTIVES: To assess the correlation between the participation in a psychoeducational group and the decrease of burden, and depressive and anxious symptoms of caregivers of people with dementia. METHODS: Caregivers (n = 18 assessed in a longitudinal study at baseline and after six months of participation in a psychoeducational group. There were used the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR, Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire (PFAQ, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD, Quality of Life Scale in Alzheimer' Disease (QoL-AD, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. RESULTS: In the baseline, there was correlation between the burden and the caregivers' depressive symptoms (p = 0.048. The analysis of the differences between the baseline and the second moment has shown a decrease in caregivers' depressive symptoms in moment 2 (p = 0.011. There were no significant differences in the other variables. DISCUSSION: Psychoeducational groups can be considered efficient interventions on the decrease of the depression of caregivers of people with dementia.

  17. Divorce: Using Psychologists' Skills for Transformation and Conflict Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    The litigious divorce process often leaves children with parents who are at "war" and have little ability to coparent effectively. This article discusses some of the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes designed to lessen conflict both before and after divorce. It also addresses the important work of psychologists serving in the roles of child therapists and reunification clinicians doing the difficult work of helping to heal fractured child-parent relationships. Ethical challenges are addressed and future directions for applied research are suggested.

  18. Innovative psycho-educational program to prevent common postpartum mental disorders in primiparous women: a before and after controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Heather J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universal interventions to prevent postnatal mental disorders in women have had limited success, perhaps because they were insufficiently theorised, not gender-informed and overlooked relevant risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether an innovative brief psycho-educational program for mothers, fathers and first newborns, which addressed salient learning needs about infant behaviour management and adjustment tasks in the intimate partner relationship, prevented postpartum mental health problems in primiparous women. Methods A before and after controlled study was conducted in primary care in seven local government areas in Victoria, Australia. English-speaking couples with one-week old infants were invited consecutively to participate by the maternal and child health nurse at the universal first home visit. Two groups were recruited and followed sequentially: both completed telephone interviews at four weeks and six months postpartum and received standard health care. Intervention group participants were also invited to attend a half-day program with up to five couples and one month old infants, facilitated by trained, supervised nurses. The main outcome was any Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI diagnosis of Depression or Anxiety or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Anxiety, or Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood in the first six months postpartum. Factors associated with the outcome were established by logistic regression controlling for potential confounders and analysis was by intention to treat. Results In total 399/646 (62% women were recruited; 210 received only standard care and 189 were also offered the intervention; 364 (91% were retained at follow up six months postpartum. In women without a psychiatric history (232/364; 64%, 36/125 (29% were diagnosed with Depression or Anxiety or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Anxiety, or Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood in the control group

  19. Positive psychology and the training of psychologists: Students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharina Guse

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The development of positive psychology interventions have burgeoned internationally and are relevant to the professional training of psychologistsResearch purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the personal and professional impact of including positive psychology in the professional training of clinical and counselling psychologists.Motivation for the study: It is not known how students previously educated in a pathogenic paradigm experience the exposure to positive psychology, and resultant paradigm shift, as part of their professional training.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design was implemented. Data consisted of written documents submitted by the participants and was analyzed by means of thematic analysis.Main findings: Integrating positive psychology in the professional training curriculum was valuable and enriching on both a professional and personal level. The participants reported an experience of positive emotions and increased sense of self-understanding and psychological well-being. Professionally they experienced a sense of increased self-efficacy.Practical/managerial implications: Positive psychology should be considered as part of the basic training of psychologists since it may enhance the development of trainee psychologists’ professional self, enhance aspects of psychological well-being as well as prevent stress and burnout.Contribution/value-add: This is the first South African study to explore the impact of including positive psychology principles and interventions in professional training.

  20. Earthquakes and Children: The Role of Psychologists with Families and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Ramos, Michelle C.; Guran, Elyse L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 Sichuan Province earthquake and 2005 Pakistan earthquake are examples of natural disasters that took an unimaginable toll on children. In such disaster management contexts, family members as well as health care and school personnel are the first-line responders and are natural sources of continued social support as children recover. Although psychologists have increasingly sophisticated understandings of post-disaster reactions and strategies for helping children and adolescents cope with trauma, models for responding to mass catastrophes are limited, particularly in geographically remote communities and in regions where mental health services are stigmatizing. With children's well-being subsequent to earthquakes inextricably linked to family and community, psychologists can make important contributions in three spheres: (a) coordinating and activating collaborations within children's existing social contexts to develop post-earthquake interventions; (b) designing prevention and preparedness programs focused on the emotional needs of children in earthquake-prone communities; and (c) conducting research on interventions and recovery with particular attention to developmental stage, socio-cultural-economic contexts, and the similarities versus differences across various types of disasters. PMID:20428504

  1. Types of Rural Extensionists' Expectations of Psychology and Their Implications on Psychologists' Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Psychology has great potential for contributing to rural development, particularly through supporting rural extension (RE). In this paper, the types of expectations extensionists have of psychology are identified, as well as possible ways of integrating psychosocial knowledge into the RE context. Rural extensionists from 12 Latin American countries were surveyed (n = 654). Of them, 89.4 % considered psychology could contribute to rural extension and commented on how this would be possible. Expectations were categorised and the nine mentioned by more than 20 % of them were utilized to conduct a two-steps cluster analysis. Three types of extensionists' expectations were identified: one wherein working with extensionists was highlighted; another characterised by a focus on working with farmers; and a third featuring a traditional, diffusionist extension approach, which views farmers as objects of psychologists' interventions. With the first type, psychologists should not neglect working with farmers and with the second, with extensionists. With the third type, reflecting on the expectations themselves and their underlying assumptions seems essential.

  2. Designing websites for persons with cognitive deficits: Design and usability of a psychoeducational intervention for persons with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Armando J; Sinkule, Jennifer; Haas, Gretchen L; Spring, Michael B; Litschge, Christine M; Newhill, Christina E; Ganguli, Rohan; Anderson, Carol M

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the design elements that influence the ability of persons with severe mental illness (SMI) and cognitive deficits to use a website, and to use this knowledge to design a web-based telehealth application to deliver a psychoeducation program to persons with schizophrenia and their families. Usability testing was conducted with 98 persons with SMI. First, individual website design elements were tested. Based on these results, theoretical website design models were used to create several alternative websites. These designs were tested for their ability to facilitate use by persons with SMI. The final website design is presented. The results indicate that commonly prescribed design models and guidelines produce websites that are poorly suited and confusing to persons with SMI. Our findings suggest an alternative model that should be considered when designing websites and other telehealth interventions for this population. Implications for future studies addressing the characteristics of accessible designs for persons with SMI and cognitive deficits are discussed.

  3. What Is a Bilingual School Psychologist? A National Survey of the Credentialing Bodies of School Psychologists: Implications for the Assessment of Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the credentialing practices for bilingual school psychologists in the United States. Credentialing agencies of school psychologists, mostly State Departments of Education, across the 50 states and the District of Columbia were contacted via telephone by trained graduate student research assistants. Only two of the…

  4. Professional Competences of Young Psychologists: The Dimensions of Self-Rated Competence Domains and Their Variation in the Early Years of the Psychologist's Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuittinen, Matti; Meriläinen, Matti; Räty, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The study set out to explore an array of key competencies required by psychologists, along with a method for assessing them. The respondents (n?=?353) were a representative sample of young Finnish psychologists with professional experience of between 1 and 6 years. They were requested to rate 52 statements of competence. A set of explorative…

  5. Is psychoeducation for parents and teachers of children and adolescents with ADHD efficacious? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, A; Colom, F; Ferrin, M

    2011-04-01

    To identify evidence from comparative studies on the effects of psychoeducation programs on clinical outcomes in children and adolescents with ADHD. Articles published between January 1980 and July 2010 were searched through electronic databases and hand search. A qualitative systematic review of comparative studies of psychoeducation in ADHD was performed. Psychoeducation was considered if studies use a specific therapeutic program focusing on the didactically communication of information and provide patients and families with coping skills. Seven studies were identified (four randomized-controlled trials, three uncontrolled pre-post treatment designs). Studies differed on whether psychoeducation approaches were applied to parents of ADHD children (three studies), to ADHD children/adolescents and their families (three studies) or to their teachers (one study). Positive outcomes measured as improvement on a number of different variables, including patient's behavior, parent and child satisfaction, child's knowledge of ADHD, children's opinion of the use of medication and adherence to medical recommendations were found. Although available evidence is limited and some findings may be difficult to be interpreted, the positive role of psychoeducation and other educational interventions in children and adolescents with ADHD in regard to several outcome measures is supported by most of the literature referenced in this review. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of a Group Psychoeducation Program on Self-Stigma, Empowerment and Perceived Discrimination of Persons with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Sesar, Marijan Alfonso; Mužinić, Lana

    2017-03-01

    Self-stigma adversely affects recovery from schizophrenia. Analyses of self stigma reduction programs discovered that few studies have investigated the impact of education about the illness on self-stigma reduction. The objective of this study was to determine whether psychoeducation based on the principles of recovery and empowerment using therapeutic group factors assists in reduction of self-stigma, increased empowerment and reduced perception of discrimination in patients with schizophrenia. 40 patients participated in psychoeducation group program and were compared with a control group of 40 patients placed on the waiting list for the same program. A Solomon four group design was used to control the influence of the pretest. Rating scales were used to measure internalized stigma, empowerment and perception of discrimination. Two-way analysis of variance was used to determine the main effects and interaction between the treatment and pretest. Simple analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to additionally test effect of treatment onself-stigma, empowerment and perceived discrimination. The participants in the psychoeducation group had lower scores on internalized stigma (F(1,76)=8.18; pempowerment. Psychoeducation did not influence perception of discrimination. Group psychoeducation decreased the level of self stigma. This intervention can assist in recovery from schizophrenia.

  7. Discussing end-of-life care issues with terminally ill patients and their relatives: comparisons among physicians, nurses and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasevoli, Mario; Giantin, Valter; Voci, Alberto; Valentini, Elisabetta; Zurlo, Anna; Maggi, Stefania; Siviero, Paola; Orrù, Graziella; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Pegoraro, Renzo; Manzato, Enzo

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the end-of-life topics most frequently discussed by Italian physicians, nurses and psychologists with terminally ill patients and their relatives. Findings were compared with the levels of communication reported by physicians in other countries involved in the EURELD research project, in Europe and elsewhere. An ad hoc questionnaire was prepared to measure levels of communication and administered to 716 professionals (181 physicians, 454 nurses and 81 psychologists) employed in geriatric hospital wards, hospices and nursing homes, or registered with professional associations in the Veneto and Trentino Alto-Adige regions of north-east Italy. Statistical analyses (frequency analysis, multivariate logistic regression) were conducted on data from questionnaires returned by standard mail or email. Communication levels vary for the various end-of-life issues which physicians, nurses and psychologists are required to discuss and the individuals with whom they deal. Italian physicians are more communicative with relatives than with patients, whereas psychologists tend to discuss these problems more with patients than with members of their families. Nurses behave in much the same way with both patients and relatives. By comparison with their colleagues elsewhere in Europe, Italian physicians reveal more evident differences in their willingness to discuss end-of-life issues, depending on whether they are communicating with patients or relatives. Having received bio-ethical training helps physicians communicate with their patients. Communicating is a fundamental part of providing care for terminally ill patients and support for their families. The patient care process involves several kinds of professionals, who are all increasingly called upon to be prepared to discuss the end of a patient's life, and to develop a therapeutic relationship which includes communicating without evading any of the aspects (and problems) relating to this

  8. A Model Psychoeducation Group for Shy College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Virginia; Thomas, M. Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    Considers the planning, organizing, and conducting of a proposed model for shy college students. Offers several recommendations for educators and counselors on early identification of shy students, the design of educational environments to enhance development, and further research to answer questions about efficacy of treatment modes. (Author/JDM)

  9. Perspectives of an Iranian psychologist practicing in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsalimi, Hamid

    2010-06-01

    My experience as a male psychologist who was born and raised in Iran has had a tremendous impact on my professional practice in the United States. After providing a brief history of Iran to put this article in context, I explore 5 elements of that impact: Description of my diversity status, key practice issues raised for me as an Iranian therapist, my background and its impact on case formulation, key clinical issues raised for my clients given my diversity status, and effective strategies for addressing my diversity status and its impact on the treatment.

  10. The role of the psychologist in social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderman, Peter

    2014-06-01

    On 1 September 1967, the Nobel Prize-winning civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech entitled 'The role of the behavioral scientist in the civil rights movement' to the American Psychological Association (APA, 1999; King, 1968). With eloquence and passion, Martin Luther King championed the civil rights struggle and spoke to the interests of his audience. He stressed how behavioural scientists could and should support the civil rights movement. King's eloquent and passionate speech is still relevant today - explaining how psychologists and other mental health professionals could help address today's pressing social issues.

  11. Current assessment practice, personality measurement, and rorschach usage by psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musewicz, John; Marczyk, Geoffrey; Knauss, Linda; York, David

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we investigated current personality assessment practice and attitudes toward Rorschach (Exner, 2003) usage by 215 psychologists. We administered an Internet survey to members of the Society for Personality Assessment (SPA) and the American Psychological Association. Results were similar to those of past surveys, but the importance of using tests with strong psychometric properties was greater in this study. The majority of respondents reported using the Rorschach and supporting efforts to standardize and psychometrically validate the test. However, SPA members agreed more strongly than non-SPA members that the Rorschach is an effective test. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  12. [Collaborative relationship between psychiatrists and psychologists: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the empirical literature concerning the collaborative relationship between psychiatrists and psychologists. Despite the scarcity of published studies about this topic, three main areas of interest could be identified: 1. Literature regarding combined treatments (psychotherapy plus medication); 2. The development of therapeutic programs for specific conditions within a biopsychosocial framework; 3. The discussion about the team role in the approach of difficult cases. In general terms, it could be stated that collaborative treatments are a valid and effective option in mental health settings.

  13. Where do counselling psychologists based in the UK disseminate their research? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Terry; Ruth, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Research is frequently cited as core to counselling psychology. Yet we know little about where counselling psychologists publish their own findings. The present study aims to answer the following two research questions: (1) Where do UK-based counselling psychologists disseminate their research? (2) To what extent do counselling psychologists disseminate their research in British Psychological Society outlets? Method: A systematic review examining research by UK-based counselling psycholo...

  14. Meditation with yoga, group therapy with hypnosis, and psychoeducation for long-term depressed mood: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lisa D; Waelde, Lynn C; Hastings, T Andrew; Chen, Xin-Hua; Symons, Barbara; Marshall, Jonathan; Kaufman, Adam; Nagy, Thomas F; Blasey, Christine M; Seibert, Elizabeth O; Spiegel, David

    2008-07-01

    This randomized pilot study investigated the effects of meditation with yoga (and psychoeducation) versus group therapy with hypnosis (and psychoeducation) versus psychoeducation alone on diagnostic status and symptom levels among 46 individuals with long-term depressive disorders. Results indicate that significantly more meditation group participants experienced a remission than did controls at 9-month follow-up. Eight hypnosis group participants also experienced a remission, but the difference from controls was not statistically significant. Three control participants, but no meditation or hypnosis participants, developed a new depressive episode during the study, though this difference did not reach statistical significance in any case. Although all groups reported some reduction in symptom levels, they did not differ significantly in that outcome. Overall, these results suggest that these two interventions show promise for treating low- to moderate-level depression.

  15. Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Labriola, Merete

    2015-01-01

    disorder. METHODS: Between 2012 and 2014, 430 participants on sick leave were randomly allocated to either an intervention or control group. The psychoeducation consisted of 2-h sessions once a week for 6 weeks. The sessions focused on stress and work life and was based on problem-solving techniques......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on return to work as an adjunct to standard case management in individuals on sick leave at risk of having a mental disorder. The participants could have different diagnoses but were all at risk of having a mental...... and coping strategies. The main outcome, the relative risk (RR) of a full return to work based on register data from the job centres, was determined during the first 3 and 6 months after participation in the psychoeducation programme. At baseline and at 3 and 6 months after the intervention, the participants...

  16. Psycho-education, education and family’s therapy of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galatou C.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of family in mental illness has changed dramatically compared to the early 20th century. The family considered neither as a victim nor as a perpetrator, but as an emotional and behavioral system and an important factor for the entire healing process. Furthermore only coordinated global action that includes being a supportive social network around the patient’s family, can promise a real improvement.Purpose: of this paper is to highlight the active involvement of the family throughout the course of the disease, mainly because of long-term interaction of patient and care members.Material and Methods: a search of relevant sources in both Greek and foreign language literature with keywords: mental illness, patient, family psycho-education, treatment. Conclusions: these three measures have different conceptual bases: the psycho-education stems from the theories expressed emotion and family education based on theories about stress, response and adaptation. Education and family therapy aims at being of all members, while psycho-education designed to deal effectively with the patient and, thereby maintaining the balance. The training helps family members to be more “effective” in interventions for mental patients-member. It is more effective the support in groups, because it promotes the exchange of views and mutual aid.Psycho-education tends to be clinical in nature and provided by health professionals, and the treatment of various approaches. Families’ education in the community provided by other families and is of short duration. The intervention and family therapy focuses on identifying the problems and the meaning of illness and recovery strategies, which in turn will help improve the operation of domestic and smoothing of negative emotions and conflict. Improving these aspects represents a reduction of negative relationships (critical comments, hostility and helps to reduce the intensity of depression. Working with

  17. Pilot study of a culturally adapted psychoeducation (CaPE) intervention for bipolar disorder in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Muhammad Ishrat; Chaudhry, Imran B; Rahman, Raza R; Hamirani, Munir M; Mehmood, Nasir; Haddad, Peter M; Hodsoll, John; Young, Allan H; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2017-12-01

    Despite the use of maintenance medication, recurrence rates in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) are high. To date, there are no clinical trials that have investigated the use of psychological interventions in bipolar disorder in Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted bipolar psychoeducation programme (CaPE) in Pakistan. Thirty-four euthymic bipolar I and II outpatients were randomized to either 12 weekly sessions of individual psychoeducation plus Treatment As Usual (Intervention) or Treatment As Usual (TAU) (Control). Outcomes were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), EuroQoL (EQ-5D), Bipolar Knowledge and Attitudes and Questionnaire (BKAQ), and a self-reported measure of medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items, MMAS-4). Effect sizes were derived from baseline adjusted standardized regression coefficients. Retention in the study was good, 80% of patients in the TAU follow-up assessment and 100% of patients in the CaPE group attended all 12 sessions. Patient satisfaction was higher in the CaPE group relative to control (ES = 1.41). Further, there were large effect sizes shown for CaPE versus TAU for medication adherence (MMAS-4: ES = 0.81), knowledge and attitudes towards bipolar (BKAQ: ES = 0.68), mania (YMRS: ES = 1.18), depression (BDI: ES = 1.17) and quality of life measures (EQ-5D: ES ⇒ 0.88). Culturally adapted psychoeducation intervention is acceptable and feasible, and can be effective in improving mood symptoms and knowledge and attitudes to BPAD when compared with TAU. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02210390.

  18. Predictors of early change in bulimia nervosa after a brief psychoeducational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Aranda, Fernando; Alvarez-Moya, Eva M; Martínez-Viana, Cristina; Sànchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Forcano, Laura; Peñas-Lledó, Eva

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to examine baseline predictors of treatment response in bulimic patients. 241 seeking-treatment females with bulimia nervosa completed an exhaustive assessment and were referred to a six-session psychoeducational group. Regression analyses of treatment response were performed. Childhood obesity, lower frequency of eating symptomatology, lower body mass index, older age, and lower family's and patient's concern about the disorder were predictors of poor abstinence. Suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, higher maximum BMI, higher novelty seeking and lower baseline purging frequency predicted dropouts. Predictors of early symptom changes and dropouts were similar to those identified in longer CBT interventions.

  19. Training Educational Psychologists: A Model of Working with Diagnostic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubina A.S.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a model of working with a diagnostic case in educational psychological practice and analyses its compliance with the requirements of the professional standard for educational psychologists as well as with the theoretical bases of psychological assessment as a form of professional activity of a psychologist. The paper reviews the possibilities for making the requirements of the professional standard more specific by means of relating its components to the stages of the diagnostic process. As it is shown, a number of aspects in the diagnostic activity are deficient and require to be specially developed during professional and advanced training. The paper analyses the necessity of designing the content of psychodiagnostic disciplines so that they involve working with diagnostic hypotheses. It also outlines the tasks of mastering psychodiagnostic disciplines which, if solved successfully, would prevent students from making typical diagnostic mistakes. Finally, the paper discusses the difficulties with the development of the gnostic component of diagnostic activity in graduate students with bachelor degrees in a non-psychology field.

  20. Interprofessional education: preparing psychologists for success in integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubic, Barbara; Mance, Janette; Turgesen, Jeri N; Lamanna, Jennifer D

    2012-03-01

    Rapidly occurring changes in the healthcare arena mean time is of the essence for psychology to formalize a strategic plan for training in primary care settings. The current article articulates factors affecting models of integrated care in Academic Health Centers (AHCs) and describes ways to identify and utilize resources at AHCs to develop interprofessional educational and clinical integrated care opportunities. The paper asserts that interprofessional educational experiences between psychology and other healthcare providers are vital to insure professionals value one another's disciplines in health care reform endeavors, most notably the patient-centered initiatives. The paper highlights ways to create shared values and common goals between primary care providers and psychologists, which are needed for trainee internalization of integrated care precepts. A developmental perspective to training from pre-doctoral, internship and postdoctoral levels for psychologists in integrated care is described. Lastly, a call to action is given for the field to develop more opportunities for psychology trainees to receive education and training within practica, internships and postdoctoral fellowships in primary care settings to address the reality that most patients seek their mental health treatment in primary care settings.

  1. Psychologists in preoperative programmes for children undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Costa, Sebastiano; Gugliandolo, Maria Cristina; Larcan, Rosalba

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to verify whether psychologists and game activities could reduce preoperative anxiety and promote compliance in paediatric patients. More specifically, we sought to evaluate whether it would be better to propose contextualized games or just distracting activities. A total of 104 children undergoing surgery were assigned to the following 4 conditions of treatment: (1) contextual games and psychological accompaniment, (2) only contextual games, (3) distracting activities, and (4) only psychological accompaniment. Observed children's anxiety was assessed using modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale and compliant behaviours with modified form of Induction Compliance Checklist. Children in the first condition (complete intervention - contextual games and psychological accompaniment) were less anxious and more cooperative in the preoperative period and during the induction of anaesthesia than in the other three conditions. In particular, contextual activities (second condition) were found to be more efficient than psychological accompaniment (fourth condition), whereas the worst condition was proposing only distracting activities (third condition). In order to help young hospitalized patients in paediatric surgery structures, it is necessary to propose games that can prepare them for what will happen as well as the support of a psychologist.

  2. Stabilizing group treatment for complex posttraumatic stress disorder related to child abuse based on psychoeducation and cognitive behavioural therapy: a multisite randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Veltman, Dick J; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Draijer, Nel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments for complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood abuse are scarce. This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of psycho-educational and cognitive behavioural stabilizing group treatment in terms of both PTSD and complex PTSD symptom severity. Seventy-one patients with complex PTSD and severe comorbidity (e.g., 74% axis II comorbidity) were randomly assigned to either a 20-week group treatment in addition to treatment as usual or to treatment as usual only. Primary outcome measures were the Davidson trauma scale (DTS) for PTSD and the structured interview for disorders of extreme stress (SIDES) for complex PTSD symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted in the intention-to-treat (ITT) and in the completer sample. Subjects were considered responders when scoring at 20 weeks at least 1 standard deviation below pretest findings. The 16% attrition was relatively low. After 20 weeks, the experimental condition (large effect sizes) and control condition (medium effect sizes) both showed significant decreases on the DTS and SIDES, but differences between the conditions were not significant. The secondary responder analysis (ITT) revealed significantly more responders on the DTS (45 vs. 21%), but not on the SIDES (61 vs. 42%). Adding psycho-educational and cognitive behavioural stabilizing group treatment for complex PTSD related to child abuse to treatment as usual showed an equivocal outcome. Patients in both conditions improved substantially during stabilizing treatment, and while significant superiority on change scores was absent, responder analysis suggested clinical meaningfulness of adding group treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Confronting the Ubiquity of Electronic Communication and Social Media: Ethical and Legal Considerations for Psychoeducational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Joseph A.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Most U.S. children and adults use computers and the Internet on a daily basis. The pervasiveness of electronic communication in a variety of contexts, including home and school, raises ethical and legal concerns for school psychologists and those in related fields of practice, because of the risks to privacy and confidentiality, boundaries,…

  4. Training School Psychologists to Conduct Evidence-Based Treatments for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Kevin D.; Arora, Prerna; Funk, Catherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective approach to the treatment of depressive disorders within schools, due to its demonstrated efficacy, as well as its availability in manualized treatment form. When implemented by therapists with inadequate training, the treatment is often stilted, less engaging for participants, and aimlessly guided…

  5. Psycho-educational program for high school females Intervención psico- educativa en féminas de la enseñanza secundaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luis Pino Pich

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: sex education provides knowledge, values and attitudes that both, men and women need to live with dignity and develop fully and happily. Objective: to determine the usefulness of applying a psycho-educational program on female sexuality in high school. Methods: a quasi-experimental study conducted between September 2007 and June 2008, based on a sample composed of 180 ninth grade females living in Cumanayagua’s urban area. Variables analyzed: adolescents’ knowledge on sex-related risks, sexually transmitted infections and contraceptives. They were all analyzed before and after applying the psycho-educational program. Results: after applying the psycho-educational program, knowledge standard on the right time to begin with sexual intercourses (18% to 71%, the risk of pregnancy at first sexual intercourse (37% to 75% and the consequences of pregnancy and abortion in adolescence (from 57% to 71% increased. Regarding STI’s, there were also improvements (from 27% to 75%, and as to the ideal contraceptive the features raised from 0% to 92%. Conclusions: The psycho-educational program proved to be effective in students and raised the knowledge standard on these fundamental aspects of sex education.Introducción: la educación sexual proporciona conocimientos, valores y actitudes necesarias para que las personas de uno y otro sexo puedan vivir con dignidad y desarrollarse de forma plena y feliz.
    Objetivo: determinar la utilidad de la aplicación de un programa psico- educativo sobre sexualidad a féminas de la enseñanza secundaria.
    Métodos:
    estudio cuasi-experimental realizado entre septiembre de 2007 y junio de 2008, referido a una muestra integrada por 180 féminas pertenecientes al noveno grado del área urbana de Cumanayagua. Se analizaron las variables: conocimientos de las

  6. Empowerment implementation: enhancing fidelity and adaptation in a psycho-educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daele, Tom; van Audenhove, Chantal; Hermans, Dirk; van den Bergh, Omer; van den Broucke, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Implementation is an emerging research topic in the field of health promotion. Most of the implementation research adheres to one of two paradigms: implementing interventions with maximum fidelity or designing interventions that are responsive to the needs of a local community. While fidelity and adaptation are often considered as contradictory, they are both essential elements of preventive interventions. An innovative program design strategy is therefore to develop hybrid programs that 'build in' adaptation to enhance program fit, while also maximizing the implementation fidelity. The present article presents guidelines for this hybrid approach to program implementation and illustrates them with a concrete psycho-educational group intervention. The approach, which is referred to as 'empowerment implementation' on the analogy of empowerment evaluation, builds on theory of implementation fidelity and community-based participatory research. To demonstrate the use of these guidelines, a psycho-educational course aimed at stress reduction and the prevention of depression and anxiety was implemented according to these guidelines. The main focus lies on how an intervention can benefit from adaptations guided by local expertise, while maintaining the core program components and still respecting the implementation fidelity.

  7. A psychoeducational approach to methadone maintenance treatment: a survey of client reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, M J; Campbell, B K

    1991-01-01

    STAR, a methadone clinic in Portland, Oregon employs a psychoeducational approach in an attempt to provide coherent, comprehensive treatment in meeting diverse client needs. Two hundred and thirty-eight STAR clients completed a 133 item survey as part of an evaluative review of the efficacy of the psychoeducational model. Clients were asked about their perceived treatment needs and expectations, drug use, criminality, mental and physical health, social and economic stability, and their sense of self-worth and life satisfaction. Respondents reported that receiving methadone was the most useful and best liked aspect of treatment, followed by individual counseling, and education and skill classes. Clients indicated low rates of criminal behavior and drug use, but acknowledged high rates of psychological symptoms including depression, anxiety, and irritability, and rated as very important the need to reduce drug use and to improve health, to achieve a sense of life satisfaction, to enhance feelings about self and relationships, especially those with their children. A majority of the respondents had less than adequate income, and a substantial minority had less than a high school education. Longer time in treatment at STAR was associated with reduced heroin and cocaine use and improvements in social, economic and legal realms. The discussion focuses on implications for methadone treatment in general and possible modifications of the STAR program.

  8. Clinical Psychologists' Judgments of the Scientific Merit and Clinical-Relevance of Psychotherapy Outcome Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lawrence H.

    1979-01-01

    Result of this study indicated psychologists' judgments of scientific merit were influenced by patient assignment and follow-up but not by therapists' experience. Judgments of clinical relevance were influenced by patient population, the findings' applicability, and nature of therapy. Psychologists were more critical of methodology of studies…

  9. Effects of Social Psychological Phenomena on School Psychologists' Ethical Decision-Making: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Lasser, Jon; Reardon, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary, exploratory study examines the impact of select social psychological phenomena on school-based ethical decision-making of school psychologists. Responses to vignettes and hypothetical statements reflecting several social psychological phenomena were collected from 106 practicing school psychologists. Participants were asked to…

  10. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  11. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  12. Sexual Health Education: Social and Scientific Perspectives and How School Psychologists Can Be Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Ashley A.; Perfect, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' (NASP) official stand on sexual education is that it should be taught in schools to help young people make healthy decisions regarding sex throughout their lives. Accordingly, school psychologists have a responsibility to use their expertise to facilitate these programs. Without a comprehensive…

  13. School Psychologists' Ethical Strain and Rumination: Individual Profiles and Their Associations with Weekly Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtala, Mari; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated school psychologists' experiences of ethical strain (the frequency of ethical dilemmas at work and the stress caused by these dilemmas) and dilemma-related rumination outside working hours. Individual latent profiles were estimated at the study baseline based on these three dimensions. The psychologists' weekly well-being (vigor,…

  14. National Study of School Psychologists' Use of Evidence-Based Assessment in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rachel; Ruble, Lisa; Esler, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to better understand predictors of evidence-based assessment practices for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Nationwide, 402 school psychologists were surveyed for their knowledge of and training and experience with ASD on assessment practices, including reported areas of training needs. The majority of school psychologists reported…

  15. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  16. Psychologist suicide: Incidence, impact, and suggestions for prevention, intervention, and postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Phillip M; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Bongar, Bruce; Bridgeman, Diane; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Hillbrand, Marc; Yufit, Robert I

    2011-06-01

    Psychologist practitioners are not immune to some mental health problems, including suicidality, for which they provide services. In the aftermath of two recent psychologist suicides, the American Psychological Association's Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance (ACCA) initiated the formation of a conjoint ad hoc committee consisting of members from ACCA, the American Psychological Association (APA) Practice Directorate, and the Section on Clinical Emergencies and Crises (Section VII of APA's Division 12) to investigate the incidence of psychologist suicide and its impact on colleagues, students or interns, patients or clients, and the profession. The committee reviewed the extant empirical literature on suicide rates for psychologists, evaluated unpublished data on psychologist suicide provided by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), interviewed colleague survivors, reviewed published case reports of the impact of therapist suicides, and linked their findings to the literature on professional distress, impairment, and self-care. The committee concluded that there is evidence suggestive of an elevated risk of suicide for psychologists in past decades. It further concluded that there is a need for further research to confirm if there is a heightened risk of suicide for psychologists in the present day, and to determine factors that might contribute to such risk. Accounts from colleague-survivors suggest that the impact of a psychologist's suicide can affect many people including family, colleagues, students, and patients or clients. This article offers suggestions for possible preventive approaches, for intervention with potentially at-risk colleagues, and for postvention efforts in the wake of a colleague suicide.

  17. [What role can the psychologist have in patient education in nephrology? An out-center example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, Laëtitia; Untas, Aurélie; Aguirrezabal, Maïder; Larroumet, Nicole; Rascle, Nicole; Chauveau, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the experience of a psychologist in the development of a multidisciplinary and collective Therapeutic Patient Education program for dialysis patients in out-center (self-dialysis). The role of the psychologist is situated at different levels: construction of the program, animation and co-animation of interventions and evaluation of the program.

  18. [The role of the psychologist with a death in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The psychologist within a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit intervenes in accordance with the condition of the patient and those at whom their services are aimed. The psychological practice in this particular context comprises certain specificities. As the child nears the end of life the psychologist must find his place within the unit and adapt his care to the needs expressed.

  19. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  20. School Psychologists' Ethical Strain and Rumination: Individual Profiles and Their Associations with Weekly Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtala, Mari; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated school psychologists' experiences of ethical strain (the frequency of ethical dilemmas at work and the stress caused by these dilemmas) and dilemma-related rumination outside working hours. Individual latent profiles were estimated at the study baseline based on these three dimensions. The psychologists' weekly well-being (vigor,…

  1. Perceptions of Spanish/English Bilingual School Psychologists Regarding Competency in Assessment and Future Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    With the changing demographics of the school population, the need for bilingually competent school psychologists has become increasingly important. The current study examined the influence of training and regional factors on Spanish-speaking, bilingual school psychologists' self-perceptions of competence regarding assessment of non-native…

  2. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  3. School Psychologists' Knowledge and Use of Evidence-Based, Social-Emotional Learning Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKevitt, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of a national survey pertaining to school psychologists' knowledge and use of evidence-based, social-emotional learning (SEL) interventions. For the study, 331 school psychologists responded to a survey that listed (a) techniques for identifying SEL interventions, (b) 16 SEL programs that have been identified by…

  4. The Interrelationship between the Society of Indian Psychologists and Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jacqueline S.; Carter, Paula M.; LaFromboise, Teresa D.; BigFoot, Dolores Subia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the Society of Indian Psychologists (SIP) has grown from a small network of indigenous psychologists and students to a well-established network among the ethnic minority psychology organizations. SIP embraces both Western psychology and indigenous values of cooperation, group harmony, respect, generosity, careful…

  5. Considerations for School Psychologists Working with Arab American Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N.

    2011-01-01

    There are an estimated three million Arab Americans in the United States, with 25% of the population under the age of 18. Given this significant population, it is likely that some school psychologists come across children from Arab backgrounds during their career. Many school psychologists, however, may not be aware of the unique cultural…

  6. Thai and Korean Students' Perceptions about the Roles and Functions of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangdhanakanond, Kamonwan; Lee, Dong Hun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare Thai and Korean college students on their perceptions of the roles and functions of school psychologists. One hundred and ninety-three Thai college students and 238 Korean counterparts participated in this study. Students rated the importance of various roles/functions of a school psychologist and…

  7. School Psychologists' Perceived Competence and Training Needs for Student Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow-Sanchez, Jason; Call, Megan E.; Adolphson, S. Lillian; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: School psychologists are some of the most likely personnel to deliver mental health services, including substance abuse, in school settings, but there is limited research on the perceived competence of school psychologists to address student substance abuse concerns. The 3 aims of this study were to determine how school psychologists…

  8. Assessment of Teacher and School Psychologist Knowledge of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L.; Fulton, Katherine M.; Schepman, Steve B.; Verdi, Genevieve R.; Wilson, Kimberly G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher and school psychologists' knowledge of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). One hundred thirty-two kindergarten through 12th-grade general education teachers, special education teachers, and school psychologists responded to a 24-item questionnaire concerning treatment and possible…

  9. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  10. Facilitators and Barriers to the Provision of Therapeutic Interventions by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Muscutt, Janet; Wasilewski, David

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern internationally about the prevalence of mental health problems among school-aged children and their access to specialist services. School psychologists (SPs) may be one group of professionals well-positioned to support the well-being of children and young people, due to their position as applied psychologists working…

  11. An Examination of Factors Associated with School Psychologists' Provision of Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFago, Jennifer Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors that predict provision of counseling services by Ohio-based school psychologists. In order to address the research questions, a survey instrument was created and a sample of school psychologists working in Ohio completed a questionnaire regarding their counseling practices. The data were…

  12. Clinical and psychoeducational profile of children with specific learning disability and co-occurring attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karande Sunil

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Almost 10% of school-going children have specific learning disability (SpLD in the form of dyslexia, dysgraphia and/ or dyscalculia. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD occurs as a comorbidity in about 20% of these children. Aims: To document the clinical profile and academic history of children with SpLD and co-occurring ADHD. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in our clinic. Materials and Methods: From August to November 2004, 50 consecutively diagnosed children (34 boys, 16 girls were included in the study. SpLD was diagnosed on the basis of psychoeducational testing. Diagnosis of ADHD was made by DSM-IV-revised criteria. Detailed clinical and academic history and physical and neurological examination findings were noted. Statistical Analysis : Chi-square test or unpaired student′s t-test was applied wherever applicable. Results: The mean age of children was 11.4 years (±SD 2.5, range 7-17.1. Fifteen (30% children had a significant perinatal history, 12 (24% had delayed walking, 11 (22% had delayed talking, 5 (10% had microcephaly, 27 (54% displayed soft neurological signs and 10 (20% had primary nocturnal enuresis. There were no differentiating features between the two gender groups. Their academic problems were difficulties in writing (96%, inattentiveness (96%, difficulties in mathematics (74%, hyperactivity (68% and difficulties in reading (60%. All children had poor school performance, 15 (30% had already experienced class retention and 20 (40% had developed aggressive or withdrawn behavior. Conclusion: Children with SpLD and co-occurring ADHD need to be identified at an early age to prevent poor school performance and behavioral problems.

  13. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  14. Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Andres Bedoya, C.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    A central part of providing evidence-based practice is appropriate cultural competence to facilitate psychological assessment and intervention with diverse clients. At a minimum, cultural competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people involves adequate scientific and supervised practical training, with increasing depth and complexity across training levels. In order to further this goal, we offer 28 recommendations of minimum standards moving toward ideal training for LGBT-specific cultural competence. We review and synthesize the relevant literature to achieve and assess competence across the various levels of training (doctoral, internship, post-doctoral, and beyond) in order to guide the field towards best practices. These recommendations are aligned with educational and practice guidelines set forth by the field and informed by other allied professions in order to provide a roadmap for programs, faculty, and trainees in improving the training of psychologists to work with LGBT individuals. PMID:26279609

  15. Functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Justin M; McKay, Kevin M; Vogel, Mark E; Masters, Kevin S

    2012-03-01

    Psychologists are presented with unprecedented opportunities to integrate their work in primary care settings. Although some roles of psychologists in primary care overlap with those in traditional psychology practice settings, a number are distinct reflecting the uniqueness of the primary care culture. In this paper, we first describe the integrated primary care setting, with a focus on those settings that have components of patient centered medical home. We then describe functional roles and foundational characteristics of psychologists in integrated primary care. The description of functional roles emphasizes the diversity of roles performed. The foundational characteristics identified are those that we consider the 'primary care ethic,' or core characteristics of psychologists that serve as the basis for the various functional roles in integrated primary care. The 'primary care ethic' includes attitudes, values, knowledge, and abilities that are essential to the psychologist being a valued, effective, and productive primary care team member.

  16. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  17. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  18. Testing Self-Efficacy as a Pathway that Supports Self-Care among Family Caregivers in a Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Brintnall-Peterson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a psychoeducational intervention supports family-centered care by influencing health risk and self-care behaviors of caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (N = 325). Moreover, this study investigated the extent to which changes in self-efficacy explained changes in health risk and self-care…

  19. Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

  20. Differential Effects of Emotion-Focused Therapy and Psychoeducation in Facilitating Forgiveness and Letting Go of Emotional Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie J.; Warwar, Serine H.; Malcolm, Wanda M.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) involving gestalt empty-chair dialogue in the treatment of individuals who were emotionally injured by a significant other with therapy in a psychoeducation group designed to deal with these injuries. In addition, this study examined aspects of the emotional process of…

  1. Creating a Safe Space: A Case Study of Complex Trauma and a Call for Proactive Comprehensive Psychoeducational Assessments and Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwaring, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates for proactive, dynamic and comprehensive psycho-educational assessments for children and young people who have a history of complex trauma, because of its known effects on development and learning. A case study is shared of a young woman with a history of complex trauma because of exposure to parental neglect, multiple…

  2. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  3. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  4. Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

  5. Defining emotion in psychology: what a historical examination of the use of introspection by early psychologists reveals about a current problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Anna Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Research conducted on emotion by psychologists has produced numerous understandings of the concept and there is currently no consensus as to how it should be defined (Russell, 2012). Despite some general agreement among some theorists as to certain aspects, such as physiological response, eliciting events, and related facial expressions, it is a persistent issue and discussions as to how a solution may be found have recurred at various points throughout the history of psycholog...

  6. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational program for improving quality of life of fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesano Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most fibromyalgia patients are seen in primary care (PC. However, the effectiveness of the treatments prescribed by general practitioners is usually minimal. The main objective of the present research is to assess the efficacy of structured psycho-educational intervention, combined with relaxation, developed to improve the quality of life of patients suffering fibromyalgia (FM. The second objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of this multimodal intervention. Method/Design Design. Randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up involving two groups, one of which is the intervention group that includes patients receiving a psychoeducational program and the other the control group consisting of patients treated for FM in the usual way. Setting. Three urban PC centers in the province of Barcelona (Spain. Sample. The total sample comprises 218 patients (over 18 years of age suffering FM, selected from a database (Rheumatology service-Viladecans Hospital of patients with this illness. Only those patients introduced in the database between the years 2005 and 2007 were included in the selection. Selected patients will be asked for written informed consent to participate in the study. Intervention. Multi-component program including information about the illness, counselling about physical exercise and training in autogenic relaxation. The intervention consists of nine 2-hour sessions delivered during a two-month period. The pharmacological treatment prescribed by the physician was maintained in both groups. Main variables. Sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life, use and cost of healthcare and social services. Measures. Quality of life is to be measured with the FIQ and the EuroQol-5D, and the use of healthcare services with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI. These variables will be measured before the beginning of the program (baseline and 1, 2, 6 and 12 months later. Discussion

  7. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yueren Zhao,1–3 Taro Kishi,1 Nakao Iwata,1 Manabu Ikeda3,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital Fujita Kokoro Care Center, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan Abstract: A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set, an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy. Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8% were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4% relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total

  8. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2452 Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a clinical psychologist's...

  9. 20 CFR 220.59 - Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... physician, psychologist or institution-hearings officer hearing level. 220.59 Section 220.59 Employees... Consultative Examinations § 220.59 Requesting examination by a specific physician, psychologist or institution... examination by a particular physician, psychologist or institution. Some examples include the following:...

  10. Qualitative process evaluation of a psycho-educational intervention targeted at people diagnosed with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-HadiHasan, Abd; Callaghan, Patrick; Lymn, Joanne S

    2017-02-13

    Schizophrenia is a serious form of mental illness that often requires long term care. Empirical findings indicate that combining a psycho-educational intervention (PEI) with neuroleptic medication to treat schizophrenia is effective. However, there is little information on the therapeutic mechanism of PEIs. A qualitative process evaluation was conducted with a purposive sample of people diagnosed with schizophrenia (PDwS, n = 8) and their Primary Caregivers (PCs, n = 9) who had received PEI as a part of an exploratory randomized controlled trial. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore potential processes underpinning any observed effect. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and identify prominent patterns in the data. Interviews were conducted between April 2013 and August 2013. Three themes emerged from the qualitative interviews, 'Awareness of schizophrenia', 'Positive impact on health and wellbeing', 'empowerment and enhanced confidence', which described the variety of experiences with the intervention, although most reported that the intervention was acceptable and valued. This study identified that individual understanding varied between PDwS and PCs and led to differences in the ways that they used knowledge gained from the PEI in everyday situations. These data support the importance of improving understanding of schizophrenia by PDwS and their PCs to enable them to benefit more fully from medication. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78084871 . Retrospectively registered 28 December 2015.

  11. Psychologists' views of inter-disciplinary psychosocial communication within the cancer care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Butow, P; Davis, E; Turner, J; Mason, C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about how psychologists working in cancer care centres communicate clinical information to other members of the multidisciplinary team or what information is communicated. This study surveyed Australian cancer care psychologists regarding their communication practices and their views on barriers to and facilitators of effective inter-disciplinary communication. Psychologists were invited to complete an online survey containing purpose-designed items that addressed study aims. Forty-four psychologists completed the survey. Psychologists' most common method of recording initial consultations was in patient medical records, with 69 % of respondents recording notes in either most of the time or all of the time. Twenty-two percent of psychologists said they did not regularly feedback the results of an initial assessment to a referrer and more than 40 % used verbal and e-mail communication to do so. This study provides data that will assist in the development of guidelines for inter-professional communication between psychologists and other members of the cancer care team.

  12. Caregiver Burden and Psychoeducational Interventions in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Beinart

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring for a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD is associated with poor quality of life and deteriorating health for the caregiver. Methods: This comprehensive review was performed to investigate the current literature on caregiver burden, factors affecting caregiver burden and the effectiveness of different types of intervention. Results: Successful psychoeducational interventions for caregivers have included provision of information about AD, care planning, advice about patient management and the importance of self-care, skills training to aid patient management, stress management training, and problem-solving and decision-making guidance. Conclusion: Interventions that are individually tailored to the caregiver are particularly effective at reducing caregiver burden and should be further investigated. The use of effective pharmacological treatment for the improvement and/or stabilisation of AD symptoms in the patient is also likely to improve caregiver burden.

  13. Impact of Psychoeducational Content Delivered Online to a Positive Psychology Aware Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeck, Carly; Schueller, Stephen M; Parks, Acacia C

    Happiness-increasing interventions demonstrate significant variation in outcomes, suggesting that the people who use them might be as important as the interventions themselves to determine efficacy. In light of this, instructive interventions might not be necessary to increase happiness given a population with knowledge of happiness-increasing strategies. We recruited 270 participants with knowledge of positive psychology to receive six weeks of online psychoeducation. We explored participants' use of the website, reported use of happiness strategies, and changes in well-being. Those who spent more time on the website reported smaller changes in well-being than those who spent less time on the website. Conversely, those who reported employing more happiness strategies reported greater increases in well-being than those who used fewer strategies. This shows that for those already familiar with positive psychology, information, rather than instruction, might increase well-being. This has implications for studies evaluating the efficacy of happiness-increasing interventions more broadly.

  14. Effectiveness of one-time psychoeducational programming for students with high levels of eating concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Kathleen S; Sell, Darcie M; Yates, Lindsay A; Mueller, Nichole

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of on-campus programming for National Eating Disorder Awareness Week at increasing knowledge of available treatment options and help-seeking intentions for participants with low and high levels of eating concerns. Program attendees were approached as they entered the space reserved for programming and were asked to participate in the study. One hundred thirty-six college students completed the study questionnaire both immediately before attending programming (pre-test) and immediately after attending programming (post-test). Results indicate that after programming both populations reported significantly greater knowledge of on-campus resources and help-seeking intentions for themselves. Only low eating concern participants reported significantly increased help-seeking intentions for a friend. Psychoeducational programming for eating disorders can be effective at increasing access to treatment and encouraging help seeking behaviors for students.

  15. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose.Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists.Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education.Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  16. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  17. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yueren; Kishi, Taro; Iwata, Nakao; Ikeda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set), an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy). Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8%) were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4%) relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total scores (P = 0.0031), BPRS positive (P = 0.0451), BRPS negative (P < 0.0001), and general subscale scores (P = 0.0031), and GAF (P < 0.0001) from baseline to 6 months. In conclusion, the lower relapse rate observed in patients treated with COMPASS plus risperidone LAI than in patients treated with risperidone LAI alone suggests that COMPASS may have benefits in the treatment of schizophrenia, indicating a need for randomized, controlled trials in larger numbers of patients. PMID:24194642

  18. Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration.

  19. Implementing the Five-A Model of Technical Refinement: Key Roles of the Sport Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Howie J; Collins, Dave

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the significant contribution provided by sport psychologists within applied coaching environments. However, this rarely considers their skills/knowledge being applied when refining athletes' already learned and well-established motor skills. Therefore, this article focuses on how a sport psychologist might assist a coach and athlete to implement long-term permanent and pressure proof refinements. It highlights key contributions at each stage of the Five-A model-designed to deliver these important outcomes-providing both psychomotor and psychosocial input to the support delivery. By employing these recommendations, sport psychologists can make multiple positive contributions to completion of this challenging task.

  20. Jung as psychologist of religion and Jung as philosopher of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Is it possible to be both a psychologist and a philosopher? Is it possible for a psychologist, or more generally a social scientist, to use social scientific findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, is it possible for a social scientist to use social scientific findings to determine the existence of God? Did Jung profess to be only a psychologist or also a philosopher? If he professed to be both, did he enlist his psychological findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, did he enlist his psychological findings to determine the existence of God?

  1. Jehovah's Witness parents' refusal of blood transfusions: Ethical considerations for psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Psychologists in medical settings may be confronted with Jehovah's Witness parents refusing blood transfusions for their children as an ethical dilemma. The purpose of this discussion is to help psychologists provide informed, ethical consultations and support by investigating the values of the Jehovah's Witness community and the origin of the blood transfusion taboo, how medical and legal professionals have approached this dilemma, exploring relevant ethical principles and standards for psychologists, and suggestions for how to move toward a better understanding of harm with Jehovah's Witness families.

  2. Psycho-education with problem solving (PEPS) therapy for adults with personality disorder: A pragmatic multi-site community-based randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Duggan Conor; Adams Clive E; Williams Hywel; Moran Paul; McCrone Paul; Reilly Joseph G; Crawford Mike J; McMurran Mary; Delport Juan; Whitham Diane; Day Florence

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Impairment in social functioning is a key component of personality disorder. Therefore psycho-education and problem solving (PEPS) therapy may benefit people with this disorder. Psycho-education aims to educate, build rapport, and motivate people for problem solving therapy. Problem solving therapy aims to help clients solve interpersonal problems positively and rationally, thereby improving social functioning and reducing distress. PEPS therapy has been evaluated with com...

  3. Cognitive behavior therapy-based psychoeducational groups for adults with ADHD and their significant others (PEGASUS): an open clinical feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvikoski, T.; Waaler, E.; Lindström, T; Bölte, S.; Jokinen, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a new psychoeducative intervention program (PEGASUS) for adults with ADHD and their significant others in a psychiatric outpatient context. At three outpatient psychiatric clinics, adults with ADHD and their significant others took part in PEGASUS, a psychoeducational program based on theories from cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, and cross-disciplinary evidence regarding ADHD. In total, 108 adul...

  4. Cost-effectiveness of family psychoeducation to prevent relapse in major depression: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimodera Shinji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family psychoeducation is a relatively simple and straightforward intervention whose prophylactic effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is well-established for schizophrenia. We have recently demonstrated its effectiveness for unipolar depression, but its cost-effectiveness has never been examined. We hereby report a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial in order to assess its cost-effectiveness for preventing relapse/recurrence in depression. Methods Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with major depression and undergoing its maintenance treatment, and their primary family members were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU only or to TAU plus family psychoeducation, which consisted of four 2-hour multiple-family sessions consisting of didactic lectures about depression (30 minutes and group discussion and problem solving (60–90 minutes. The economic analyses were undertaken from the perspective of the National Health Insurance (NHI, assuming the most reasonable price of US$50 per psychoeducation session per patient. The main outcome measures included relapse-free days and direct costs to the NHI. Results The intervention group enjoyed 272 (SD: 7.1 relapse-free days, while the control group spent 214 (SD: 90.8 relapse-free days (Cox proportional hazard ratio = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.04 to 0.75, p = 0.002. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggested that the family psychoeducation has 90% or more chances of being cost-effective if the decision-maker is prepared to pay US$20 for one additional relapse-free day. This cost-effectiveness finding was robust when the price for family psychoeducation ranged between 50% to 150% of the baseline scenario in sensitivity analyses. If a relapse-free day is considered to be worth $30 or more, all the pricing scenarios have a close to 100% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion Family psychoeducation is effective in the relapse prevention of

  5. Que Podemos Hacer?: Roles for School Psychologists with Mexican and Latino Migrant Children and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning-Stout, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Literature review provides social and cultural information needed by school psychologists serving Latino and Mexican migrant farmworking children and families, examples of school-based programs, and implications for public policy and practice. (Author/JDM)

  6. Creating a Space for Clinical Psychologists in Healthcare System in Ghana: Is it Necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethel Akpene Atefoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the clinical psychologists in the health sector cannot be underestimated. It is now recognized that psychological issues play a crucial role in almost every health care condition, and that addressing these issues will increase well-being and quality of life. One important role is the prevention of diseases, through behavior medicine (Ogden, 2000; whereby people can be helped to behave in healthier ways, given that many illnesses or disabilities could be prevented. However, there is a misconception among Ghanaians that clinical psychologists are only meant for the mental hospitals which is due to ignorance about what exactly the field is about. This paper argues that Clinical psychologists can do more in providing healthcare services to Ghanaians beyond mental health services and also makes recommendations concerning the training and placement of Clinical psychologists in Ghana.

  7. Continuing Education in Micro-Computers for Academic and Practicing Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, James V.; Ware, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    A workshop designed to teach participants how to use microcomputers for practice management, psychological testing, word processing, peripheral interface, and data analysis was found to meet the interests and needs of both academic and practicing psychologists. (RM)

  8. [The role of the psychologist in the intensive care unit with patients and their relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, François

    2012-06-01

    The ICU stay is a potential source of psychological trauma for patients but also for their relatives. The presence of a psychologist can help overcome these difficulties. The nursingteam should be alerted to the identification of symptoms of distress.

  9. Practicing what we know: Multicultural counseling competence among clinical psychology trainees and experienced multicultural psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Radhika; Saules, Karen; Young, Amy; Grey, Melissa J; Gillem, Angela R; Nabors, Nina A; Byrd, Michelle R; Jefferson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural (MC) competence is considered a necessary skill for clinical and counseling psychologists; however, there is little to no research on the assessment of demonstrated multicultural counseling competence (DMCCC) of clinical psychology graduate students. In this study, we developed a MC assessment instrument to assess DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students compared with MC-experienced psychologists. In addition, we assessed for differences between the endorsement of MC-appropriate strategies and actual use of these strategies in clinical practice, both by MC-experienced psychologists and clinical psychology students. Results revealed significant differences between the DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students and MC-experienced psychologists. Significant differences also emerged between endorsement of strategies as multiculturally appropriate and likelihood of actual use of these strategies. Findings suggest that future training and competence models should incorporate participants' ability to not only identify multiculturally appropriate strategies but also use these strategies in therapy.

  10. A question of finding harmony: a grounded theory study of clinical psychologists' experience of addressing spiritual beliefs in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Jon P; Salter, Denis P

    2005-09-01

    In spite of the increasing emphasis upon spirituality in the psychological literature, research continues to highlight concerns that issues relating to spirituality are regularly overlooked within a therapeutic setting. The aim of the current study was to develop an account of the way in which clinical psychologists understand and address spirituality within therapy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight clinical psychologists. The transcripts were analysed using the qualitative methodology of grounded theory, which also informed the data collection process. Two core categories were developed and termed spirituality as an elusive concept and finding harmony with spiritual beliefs. The diversity of meaning surrounding spirituality and the relative lack of engagement was found to create difficulty for constructing spirituality coherently as a concept. When specifically considering methods for identifying and addressing spiritual beliefs, contrasting approaches were identified. This diversity in understanding and approach has implications for the process and outcome of therapy, which are discussed in detail. Recommendations are suggested for developing spirituality as a more coherent and accessible concept, both within professional dialogue and the therapeutic context.

  11. Modern Approaches to Professional Spoken English Interaction Teaching of Future Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Zinovyeva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the modern approaches to English professional spoken interaction teaching of future psychologists. The points of view of methodologists on the concept of professional spoken interaction were analysed. The main stages of professional spoken interaction teaching process in the context of foreign languages for specific purposes are defined. The most effective teaching model of foreign languages for specific purposes which is used for future psychologists is described.

  12. Teachers or Psychologists: Who Should Facilitate Depression Prevention Programs in Schools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie S. Wahl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study evaluates a depression prevention program for adolescents led by psychologists vs. teachers in comparison to a control. The universal school-based prevention program has shown its efficacy in several studies when implemented by psychologists. The current study compares the effects of the program as implemented by teachers versus that implemented by psychologists under real-life conditions. A total of 646 vocational track 8th grade students from Germany participated either in a universal prevention program, led by teachers (n = 207 or psychologists (n = 213, or a teaching-as-usual control condition (n = 226. The design includes baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up (at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. The cognitive-behavioral program includes 10 sessions held in a regular school setting in same-gender groups and is based on the social information-processing model of social competence. Positive intervention effects were found on the change in girls’ depressive symptoms up to 12 months after program delivery when the program was implemented by psychologists. No such effects were found on boys or when program was delivered by teachers. The prevention program can successfully be implemented for girls by psychologists. Further research is needed for explanations of these effects.

  13. Psychologists' Perspectives on Therapy Termination and the Use of Therapy Engagement/Retention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2016-08-25

    Practicing psychologists (n = 269) were surveyed regarding their perspectives on client reasons for termination at different points in therapy and their use of strategies to engage and retain clients in therapy. Psychologists estimated that one-third of their caseload unilaterally terminated (M = 13% before the third therapy session; M = 20% after the third session). They viewed lack of readiness for change/insufficient motivation as the most important barrier to early treatment engagement, and symptom improvement as the most important reason for clients' unilateral decisions to end therapy after the third session. Most psychologists reported occasional use of the majority of engagement and retention strategies. Although some strategies were used by most psychologists (e.g., building the early working alliance), fewer than 25% of psychologists reported the frequent use of time-limited treatment, appointment reminders or case management procedures. As the implementation of these strategies in clinical practice has the potential to greatly influence client retention rates, future research should examine psychologists' perspectives on and barriers to using these strategies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. EFFECTS OF A GROUP PSYCHOEDUCATION PROGRAM ON SELF-STIGMA, EMPOWERMENT AND PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION OF PERSONS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Štrkalj Ivezić, Slađana; Alfonso Sesar, Marijan; Mužinić, Lana

    2017-01-01

    Background: Self-stigma adversely affects recovery from schizophrenia. Analyses of self stigma reduction programs discovered that few studies have investigated the impact of education about the illness on self-stigma reduction. The objective of this study was to determine whether psychoeducation based on the principles of recovery and empowerment using therapeutic group factors assists in reduction of self-stigma, increased empowerment and reduced perception of discrimination in pati...

  15. Anger parameters in parolees undergoing psychoeducation: Temporal stability, social desirability bias, and comparison with non-offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Kiageri, Vasiliki; Guharajan, Deepan; Day, Andrew

    2017-09-08

    Anger is commonly measured as if it were a single, simple construct. This may be particularly unhelpful if the main purpose of a measure is to determine change and responsiveness to interventions. Our primary aim was to assess five anger parameters in parolees - frequency, duration, intensity, latency, and threshold - and to test for effects of psychoeducation and social desirability bias on parolees' scores. Average anger scores for the offender sample were compared with those in a non-offender sample. The offender sample was drawn from male parolees in San Antonio. Age-matched volunteers recruited at public libraries were engaged for baseline comparisons. The Anger Parameters Scale and the Marlow-Crowne Scale were used to assess anger and social desirability, respectively. Parole officers delivered a psychoeducation course to parolees over 12 weeks, and anger and social desirability measures were taken before and afterwards. At baseline, parolees were angry more often, stayed angry longer, and reached higher levels of anger than the non-offenders, confirming their eligibility for the programme. Mean anger scores were not significantly different after psychoeducation than before it. Parolees' reported anger was significantly and negatively correlated with social desirability scores. Only three of the five anger parameters were prominent among these offenders: frequency, duration, and intensity of their outbursts. Psychoeducation did not produce improvement, possibly because it was instructional rather than therapeutic, but also because group means may mask useful individual differences. Concurrent assessment of social desirability is likely to assist in interpretation of anger measures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effects of Brief Psychoeducational Program on Stigma in Malaysian Pre-clinical Medical Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Aaron; Tan, Kit-Aun; Knaak, Stephanie; Chew, Boon How; Ghazali, Sazlina Shariff

    2016-12-01

    If presented with serious mental illness (SMI), individuals' low help-seeking behaviors and poor adherence to treatment are associated with negative stereotypes and attitudes of healthcare providers. In this study, we examined the effects of a brief psychoeducational program on reducing stigma in pre-clinical medical students. One hundred and two pre-clinical medical students (20-23 years old) were randomly assigned to face-to-face contact + educational lecture (n = 51) condition or video-based contact + educational lecture (n = 51) condition. Measures of pre-clinical medical students' mental illness-related stigma using the Opening Minds Stigma Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC) were administered at pre-, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up. A 2 (condition: face-to-face contact + educational lecture, video-based contact + educational lecture) by 3 (time: pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up) mixed model MANOVA was conducted on the Attitudes, Disclosure and Help-Seeking, and Social Distance OMS-HC subscales. Participants' scores on all subscales changed significantly across time, regardless of conditions. To determine how participants' scores changed significantly over time on each subscale, Bonferroni follow-up comparisons were performed to access pairwise differences for the main effect of time. Specifically, pairwise comparisons produced a significant reduction in Social Distance subscale between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between pre-treatment and 1-month follow-up, and a significant increase between post-treatment and 1-month follow-up, regardless of conditions. With respect to the Attitudes and Disclosure and Help-Seeking subscales, pairwise comparisons produced a significant reduction in scores between pre-treatment and post-treatment and a significant increase between post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Our findings provide additional evidence that educational lecture on mental illness, coupled

  17. The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidian Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC, in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n = 50 and mood disorders (n = 50 were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

  18. Systematic review of the information and communication technology features of web- and mobile-based psychoeducational interventions for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Danyang; Lustria, Mia Liza A; Hendrickse, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    To examine the information and communication technology (ICT) features of psychoeducational interventions for depression delivered via the Internet or via mobile technology. Web- and mobile-based psychoeducational intervention studies published from 2004 to 2014 were selected and reviewed by two independent coders. A total of 55 unique studies satisfied the selection criteria. The review revealed a diverse range of ICTs used to support the psychoeducational programs. Most interventions used websites as their main mode of delivery and reported greater use of communication tools compared to effective approaches like tailoring or interactive technologies games, videos, and self-monitoring tools. Many of the studies relied on medium levels of clinician involvement and only a few were entirely self-guided. Programs that reported higher levels of clinician involvement also reported using more communication tools, and reported greater compliance to treatment. Future experimental studies may help unpack the effects of technology features and reveal new ways to automate aspects of clinician input. There is a need to further examine ways ICTs can be optimized to reduce the burden on clinicians whilst enhancing the delivery of proven effective therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AS A WAY OF CORRECTING MOTIVATIONAL COMPONENTS IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of motivational and targeted psychoeducational programs designed for patients with paranoid schizophrenia with abdominal obesity. We observed 34 women aged 18-42 with continuous-flow type paranoid schizophrenia. All patients had a concomitant abdominal obesity, which developed secondarily after long-term administration of second generation antipsychotic medications (at least 1 year). Based on clinical-psychopathological and psychometric methods of assessment and on the analysis of Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire we have developed modules for psychoeducational programs. Based on the results of the treatment we conclude that the application of psychoeducational programs is an effective component of complex treatment of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Abdominal obesity should be regarded as an important and the main side effect of long-term therapy with atypical antipsychotic medications. It has a marked negative effect on subjective assessment of patients and decreases the level of their mental and social adaptation. This factor should be the basis for the formation of re-socialization and compliance-oriented actions.

  20. Effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions for family carers of people with psychosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Gillard, Steve; Spain, Debbie; Cornelius, Victoria; Chen, Tao; Henderson, Claire

    2017-08-01

    Psychoeducational interventions for family carers of people with psychosis are effective for improving compliance and preventing relapse. Whether carers benefit from these interventions has been little explored. This systematic review investigated the effectiveness of psychoeducation for improving carers' outcomes, and potential treatment moderators. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in English or Chinese in eight databases. Carers' outcomes included wellbeing, quality of life, global morbidities, burden, and expressed emotion. Thirty-two RCTs were included, examining 2858 carers. Intervention duration ranged from 4 to 52weeks, and contact times ranged from 6 to 42hours. At post intervention, findings were equivocal for carers' wellbeing (SMD 0.103, 95% CI -0.186 to 0.392). Conversely, psychoeducation was superior in reducing carers' global morbidities (SMD -0.230, 95% CI -0.386 to -0.075), perceived burden (SMD -0.434, 95% CI -0.567 to -0.31), negative caregiving experiences (SMD -0.210, 95% CI -0.396 to -0.025) and expressed emotion (SMD -0.161, 95% CI -0.367 to -0.045). The lack of available data precluded meta-analysis of outcomes beyond short-term follow-up. Meta-regression revealed no significant associations between intervention modality, duration, or contact time and outcomes. Further research should focus on improving carers' outcomes in the longer-term and identifying factors to optimise intervention design. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological or psychological? Effects of eating disorder psychoeducation on self-blame and recovery expectations among symptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Nicholas R; Lee, Aaron A; Deacon, Brett J

    2015-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed increasing popularity and promotion of biological influences (e.g., genetics) in eating disorder (ED) development. Although research suggests biological models of EDs reduce blame-oriented stigma in the general public, their effect on symptomatic individuals' attitudes toward themselves, treatment, and their prognosis has not been studied. Additionally, little is known about how other credible forms of conceptualizing ED development (e.g., cognitive-behavioral) affect individuals with disordered eating. Accordingly, the present study assessed the effects of three different forms of psychoeducation about ED development (biology-only, malleability of biology, cognitive-behavioral) among a sample high in ED symptoms. Participants (N = 216) viewed an audiovisual presentation describing ED development from one of the three perspectives before completing measures of self-blame for symptoms, prognostic expectations, self-efficacy in recovering, and attitudes toward a description of cognitive-behavioral therapy. There were no significant differences between conditions in self-blame. Relative to biology-only, the psychoeducational messages emphasizing malleable biology and cognitive-behavioral factors produced more prognostic optimism and self-efficacy in recovering. Perceived credibility of cognitive-behavioral therapy and expectations for its efficacy were highest in the cognitive-behavioral psychoeducation condition. Implications for efforts to educate the public and treatment-seeking individuals about the nature of EDs are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Group psychoeducation for forensic and dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Aho-Mustonen

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The effectiveness of patient psychoeducation has only rarely been studied among forensic populations. This paper examines the outcomes of an eight-time psychoeducational group comprised of schizophrenic patients in a forensic hospital setting in Finland. Methods: The intervention group contained forensic or dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia. Treatment outcomes were compared between the intervention group (n = 7 and a matched treatment-as-usual control group (n = 8. The group provided information about schizophrenia and its treatment and cognitive-behavioural elements were used to enhance patients' learning and coping. The results were obtained from a knowledge of schizophrenia, awareness of mental disorder, attitudes toward psychiatric treatment and medication, and depression. Results: The results of this pilot study suggest that even severely ill patients were able to gain improved knowledge about their illness, and psychoeducation also had positive impact on their awareness of the illness. The results showed no significant changes in attitudes toward psychiatric treatment or medication, or depressive symptoms. No significant changes in any measures were found in the control group. Conclusions: Despite our positive results further research with larger samples is needed to discover the effectiveness of patient education as a component of the comprehensive treatment of forensic patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Group psychoeducation for forensic and dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Aho-Mustonen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The effectiveness of patient psychoeducation has only rarely been studied among forensic populations. This paper examines the outcomes of an eight-time psychoeducational group comprised of schizophrenic patients in a forensic hospital setting in Finland. Methods: The intervention group contained forensic or dangerous non-forensic long-term patients with schizophrenia. Treatment outcomes were compared between the intervention group (n = 7 and a matched treatment-as-usual control group (n = 8. The group provided information about schizophrenia and its treatment and cognitive-behavioural elements were used to enhance patients' learning and coping. The results were obtained from a knowledge of schizophrenia, awareness of mental disorder, attitudes toward psychiatric treatment and medication, and depression. Results: The results of this pilot study suggest that even severely ill patients were able to gain improved knowledge about their illness, and psychoeducation also had positive impact on their awareness of the illness. The results showed no significant changes in attitudes toward psychiatric treatment or medication, or depressive symptoms. No significant changes in any measures were found in the control group. Conclusions: Despite our positive results further research with larger samples is needed to discover the effectiveness of patient education as a component of the comprehensive treatment of forensic patients with schizophrenia.

  4. Militarism, human welfare, and the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Craig

    1992-01-01

    A case study is presented of the American Psychological Association (APA), as a health care organization that promotes human welfare. APA includes policies on human welfare in its Ethical Principles of Psychologists and even lists the advancement of psychology "as a means of promoting human welfare" on its letterhead. Nevertheless, APA has other policies and activities based on military and weapons work that appear to conflict with its promotion of human welfare. Although military work in and of itself may not necessarily be problematic, work that contributes to people purposely being harmed or killed should be squared with the association's ethical guidelines. The results presented here show that this may not be the case: There currently appears to be little justification in the Ethical Principles for work intended to harm people. APA's active lobbying, research, and development for the military are documented here, in relation to an analysis of the Ethical Principles. APA's uncritical support for Operation Desert Storm is examined specifically, with regard to weapons technology and therapeutic treatment of U.S. soldiers on the battlefield. This one-sided support for victims of the war is not in keeping with a Hippocratic health care ethic to treat patients needing care, and to do so with neutrality and impartiality. Similarities to a historical example of nationalistic mental health ethics are discussed, with a review of the development of the German Institute for Psychological Research and Psychotherapy and of the German Society for Psychology in the Nazi wartime effort and the Holocaust. The results here show similar deficiencies in APA's ethical standards, not the least of which is that the code applies to individual members but not to APA policies, committees, or activities. This article concludes with suggested criteria for the Ethical Principles that would at least (a) recognize the ambiguities in systematically developing and using weapons to hurt people

  5. Psycho-education with problem solving (PEPS therapy for adults with personality disorder: A pragmatic multi-site community-based randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Conor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in social functioning is a key component of personality disorder. Therefore psycho-education and problem solving (PEPS therapy may benefit people with this disorder. Psycho-education aims to educate, build rapport, and motivate people for problem solving therapy. Problem solving therapy aims to help clients solve interpersonal problems positively and rationally, thereby improving social functioning and reducing distress. PEPS therapy has been evaluated with community adults with personality disorder in an exploratory trial. At the end of treatment, compared to a wait-list control group, those treated with PEPS therapy showed better social functioning, as measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ. A definitive evaluation is now being conducted to determine whether PEPS therapy is a clinically and cost-effective treatment for people with personality disorder Methods This is a pragmatic, two-arm, multi-centre, parallel, randomised controlled clinical trial. The target population is community-dwelling adults with one or more personality disorder, as identified by the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE. Inclusion criteria are: Living in the community (including residential or supported care settings; presence of one or more personality disorder; aged 18 or over; proficiency in spoken English; capacity to provide informed consent. Exclusion criteria are: Primary diagnosis of a functional psychosis; insufficient degree of literacy, comprehension or attention to be able to engage in trial therapy and assessments; currently engaged in a specific programme of psychological treatment for personality disorder or likely to start such treatment during the trial period; currently enrolled in any other trial. Suitable participants are randomly allocated to PEPS therapy plus treatment as usual (TAU or TAU only. We aim to recruit 340 men and women. The primary outcome is social functioning as measured

  6. Psycho-education with problem solving (PEPS) therapy for adults with personality disorder: a pragmatic multi-site community-based randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurran, Mary; Crawford, Mike J; Reilly, Joseph G; McCrone, Paul; Moran, Paul; Williams, Hywel; Adams, Clive E; Duggan, Conor; Delport, Juan; Whitham, Diane; Day, Florence

    2011-08-24

    Impairment in social functioning is a key component of personality disorder. Therefore psycho-education and problem solving (PEPS) therapy may benefit people with this disorder. Psycho-education aims to educate, build rapport, and motivate people for problem solving therapy. Problem solving therapy aims to help clients solve interpersonal problems positively and rationally, thereby improving social functioning and reducing distress. PEPS therapy has been evaluated with community adults with personality disorder in an exploratory trial. At the end of treatment, compared to a wait-list control group, those treated with PEPS therapy showed better social functioning, as measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ). A definitive evaluation is now being conducted to determine whether PEPS therapy is a clinically and cost-effective treatment for people with personality disorder This is a pragmatic, two-arm, multi-centre, parallel, randomised controlled clinical trial. The target population is community-dwelling adults with one or more personality disorder, as identified by the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE). Inclusion criteria are: Living in the community (including residential or supported care settings); presence of one or more personality disorder; aged 18 or over; proficiency in spoken English; capacity to provide informed consent. Exclusion criteria are: Primary diagnosis of a functional psychosis; insufficient degree of literacy, comprehension or attention to be able to engage in trial therapy and assessments; currently engaged in a specific programme of psychological treatment for personality disorder or likely to start such treatment during the trial period; currently enrolled in any other trial. Suitable participants are randomly allocated to PEPS therapy plus treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU only. We aim to recruit 340 men and women. The primary outcome is social functioning as measured by the SFQ. A reduction (i.e., an

  7. The In-House Psychologist: Do We Speak the Same Language? Short Report of a Qualitative Practice Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Birgitte; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2013-01-02

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is gaining importance. Although general practices (GP's) have a comprehensive experience in collaboration with psychologists, research on this topic is scarce. In house referrals to a psychologist are assumed to lower the thresholds for patients and GP's. In this study it was investigated whether the GP's reasons to refer in were accordance with the treatment strategy of the residing psychologist. The study is performed in a retrospective, observational cross section design. The studied population were the residing psychologist and GP's. Both were asked to complete a questionnaire. Outcome measures where the referral reasons of the GP's and the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A total sample of 92 patients of 6 GP's was studied. Over 60% of the patients were referred for counseling but only in 25% of the cases this proposal was carried out by the psychologist. Overall, the referral reasons of the GP's were not in accordance with the treatment strategy of the psychologist. A close collaboration and communication between general practitioners and psychologists is both difficult and indispensable. This practice research demonstrated that the referral motives of the GP's usually do not correspond to the treatment policy of the psychologist. This observation is partly explained by a lack of understanding of the GP in the treatment strategies of the psychologists. Another part of the explanation is that there is a pre-selection of the GPs referrals rather influenced by patient characteristics than by pathology.

  8. Effectiveness of a focused, brief psychoeducation program for parents of ADHD children: improvement of medication adherence and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai GN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guan-nan Bai,1 Yu-feng Wang,2,3 Li Yang,2,3 Wen-yi Niu1 1Department of Social Medicine and Health Education, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Peking University Sixth Hospital/Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation program for parents of children with ADHD in enhancing adherence to pharmacological treatment and improving clinical symptoms. Methods: We developed a psychoeducation program based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB. Eighty-nine children with ADHD were cluster randomly assigned for their families to receive 3 months of well-structured psychoeducation (intervention group, n=44 or only general clinical counseling (control group, n=45. Parents in the intervention group were given an expert lecture (with slides and a parent manual, attended two expert-guided parent group sessions, and were invited to join a professional-guided online community. Measurement of parents’ knowledge about ADHD, components of the TPB model, and child ADHD symptoms were taken before and after intervention. Medication adherence was assessed thoroughly at the end of the first and third months. Satisfaction with the psychoeducation program was assessed only in the intervention group. Two-independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square test were employed to compare differences between groups. Results: Compared to the control group, medication adherence in the intervention group was significantly higher after 1 and 3 months (97.7% intervention vs 75.6% control, P=0.002, and 86.4% intervention vs 53.3% control, P=0.001, respectively. Accordingly, the ADHD rating scale scores were lower in the intervention group than the control group after

  9. "Melanoma: Questions and Answers." Development and evaluation of a psycho-educational resource for people with a history of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Nadine A; Mireskandari, Shab; Butow, Phyllis N; Dieng, Mbathio; Cust, Anne E; Meiser, Bettina; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Menzies, Scott; Mann, Graham J

    2016-12-01

    People with melanoma often report pervasive fears about cancer recurrence, unmet information needs, and difficulties accessing psychological care. Interventions addressing the supportive care needs of people with melanoma are rare, and needs are often overlooked. The study evaluated a newly developed, evidence-based, psycho-educational resource for people with melanoma. The evaluation study comprised three groups: adults at high risk of new primary disease due to multiple previous melanomas or one melanoma and dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS), adults at moderate risk due to one previous melanoma and no DNS, and health professionals involved in melanoma care. Participants evaluated a 68-page psycho-educational booklet, Melanoma: Questions and Answers, developed by a multidisciplinary team in accordance with published evidence, clinical guidelines, and intervention development frameworks. The booklet comprised seven modules featuring information on melanoma diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and ongoing clinical management; risk factors and the role of genetic counseling services for melanoma; psycho-education on emotional, behavioral, and cognitive responses to melanoma, including psycho-education on fear of cancer recurrence; description of healthy coping responses; a suite of tailored tools to support skin self-examination, doctor-patient communication, and identification of the signs and symptoms of anxiety and depression; a list of community-based services and resources; and tools to support melanoma-related record keeping and monitoring. Resource acceptability, relevance, quality, dissemination preferences, emotional responses, unmet information needs, and demographic characteristics were assessed. Nineteen melanoma survivors (response rate 50 %) and 10 health professionals (response rate 83 %) evaluated the resource. Responses were overwhelmingly positive; the booklet was thoroughly read and highly rated in terms of quality and quantity of information, utility

  10. At-risk adolescents as experts in a new requirements elicitation procedure for the development of a smart phone psychoeducational trauma-informed care application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Schug, Seran; Zhu, Jichen; Smith, T J; Senathirajah, Yalini; Bloom, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents from urban, socioeconomically disadvantaged communities of color encounter high rates of adverse childhood experiences. To address the resulting multidimensional problems, we developed an innovative approach, Experiential Participatory and Interactive Knowledge Elicitation (EPIKE), using remote experiential needs elicitation methods to generate design and content requirements for a mobile health (mHealth) psychoeducational intervention. At a community-based organization in a northeastern city, the research team developed EPIKE by incorporating elicitation of input on the graphics and conducting remotely recorded experiential meetings and iterative reviews of the design to produce an mHealth smartphone story application (app) prototype for the participants to critique. The 22 participants were 13- to 17-year-olds, predominantly African American and female, from underresourced communities. The four goals of the design process were attained: 1) story development from participant input; 2) needs-elicitation that reflected the patient-centered care approach; 3) interactive story game creation that accommodates the participants' emotional and cognitive developmental needs; 4) development of a game that adolescents can relate to and that which matches their comfort levels of emotional intensity. The EPIKE approach can be used successfully to identify the needs of adolescents across the digital divide to inform the design and development of mHealth apps.

  11. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention group program in the reduction of the burden experienced by caregivers of patients with dementia: the EDUCA-II randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Carrasco, Manuel; Domínguez-Panchón, Ana Isabel; González-Fraile, Eduardo; Muñoz-Hermoso, Paula; Ballesteros, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter, prospective, evaluator-blinded, 2-arm parallel randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a group psychoeducational intervention (PIP) with that of standard care in dementia caregivers. The primary outcome was the burden experience evaluated by the Zarit Burden Interview. Secondary outcomes were psychological distress evaluated with the scaled General Health Questionnaire-28 items, and quality of life evaluated with the Short-Form Health Survey 12. Effectiveness endpoint was at 4 months since inception. Statistical analyses used complete case and intention-to-treat analysis (ITT). The trial recruited 238 caregivers from 22 research sites (115 randomized to PIP, 123 randomized to standard care). No differences were found in the Zarit Burden Interview scores (complete case analysis: mean difference=-1.02, 95% confidence interval=-4.41 to 2.37; ITT analysis: MD=-0.55, 95% confidence interval=-3.64 to 2.55), the Short-Form Health Survey 12 domain scores (all P>0.05), and total General Health Questionnaire-28 items scores and some of its subscales (all P>0.05) except the anxiety and insomnia subscale for the ITT analysis (P=0.03). In summary, PIP in modality of group intervention was not better than standard care to reduce caregiver burden and overall psychological distress or to improve quality-of-life domains. EDUCA-II trial registry: ISRCTN14411440.

  12. The family physician and the psychologist in the office together: a response to fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Luigi; Pirrotta, Enzo; Ingravalle, Veronica; Fayella, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that motives for consulting the family physician, though expressed as physical symptoms, often derive from problems needing a holistic, psychosocial approach. Progressive differentiation between medicine and psychology makes co-operation through referral to the psychologist by the physician quite problematic, in terms of both which patients are referred and the modalities of referral. Acceptance of psychological referral may, in any case, be difficult, due to the social stigma that still surrounds mental distress.The authors report a possible solution in an experiment implemented by the postgraduate Health Psychology School of the Rome University 'Sapienza', entailing joint, direct co-operation between a family physician and a psychologist through the psychologist's presence in the doctor's office during consultations. This allowed direct access to a psychologist in the absence of any filter and without the need for a formal request on the patient's part and a biopsychosocial approach to distress. In a small number of cases, more formal consultation with the psychologist was proposed. Cases were always discussed between the two professionals. To date, the experiment has involved nine psychologists and seven physicians over a period of nine years. It appears to be entirely feasible, though requiring a period of adaptation between the two professionals. Patients have welcomed the presence of the psychologist and, as expected, take a broader approach in reporting their distress.An illustrative case is presented, in which finding the meaning of a symptom avoided unnecessary and costly investigations, and facilitated the patient in taking a new direction in his life.

  13. Piloting a psycho-education program for parents of pediatric cancer patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Azizah; Blunden, Sarah; Mohamad, Norsarwany; Mohd Hussin, Zabidi Azhar; Jamil Osman, Zubaidah

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate a psycho-educational program (PeP) for parents of children with cancer (PoCwC) in Malaysia. Seventy-nine parents were invited to be either in an intervention (n=41) or a control group (n=38). Baseline assessment took place upon agreement of participation. Short-term effects were measured four weeks after the intervention. Control parents received standard care. Intervention parents received, in addition to standard care, 4 x 50 min sessions of information on childhood cancer and coping strategies. Repeated measures of ANOVAs revealed increased knowledge about cancer (p=0.01) in the intervention parents compared with standard care. Intervention parents reported reduced anxiety and increased activities with children after the program; however, differences were not significant. This PeP, the first of its kind in Malaysia, has significantly increased levels of knowledge among parents of seriously ill children which may point towards the potential for these services to increase coping in Malaysian PoCwC.

  14. Tapping onto the potential of Smartphone applications for psycho-education and early intervention in Addictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvyn WB Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E-health, and in particular smartphone based technology, is increasingly becoming commonplace in healthcare. Whilst psychiatry has tapped onto these innovations for conditions such as affective disorders as well as schizophrenia and psychosis, the usage of these technologies in addiction is limited. Addiction psychiatry could harness the potential of smartphone technologies. Given the increasing incidences of substance related problems globally, and along with the normalization of the general public’s perspectives towards substances, and also in consideration of unwillingness for at-risk individuals in seeking help, the authors hope to illustrate how these issues could potentially be solved using E-Health and technological innovations. The objectives of the current perspective article are to illustrate how recent advances in smartphone-based technologies could help in terms of psycho-education, as well as in helping individuals who are at-risk users in seeking help earlier. The authors aim to illustrate how the above are possible, building on existing theory driven framework that has been extensively reviewed in previous literature. Limitations with regards to the implementation of such technologies will also be discussed.

  15. Tapping onto the Potential of Smartphone Applications for Psycho-Education and Early Intervention in Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M

    2016-01-01

    E-health, and in particular smartphone-based technology, is increasingly becoming commonplace in healthcare. While psychiatry has tapped onto these innovations for conditions, such as affective disorders, and schizophrenia and psychosis, the usage of these technologies in addiction is limited. Addiction psychiatry could harness the potential of smartphone technologies. Given the increasing incidences of substance-related problems globally, and along with the normalization of the general public's perspectives toward substances, and also in consideration of unwillingness for at-risk individuals in seeking help, the authors hope to illustrate how these issues could potentially be solved using E-health and technological innovations. The objectives of the current perspective article are to illustrate how recent advances in smartphone-based technologies could help in terms of psycho-education, as well as in helping individuals who are at-risk users in seeking help earlier. The authors aim to illustrate how the above are possible, building on existing theory-driven framework that has been extensively reviewed in the previous literature. Limitations with regard to the implementation of such technologies will also be discussed.

  16. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  17. Preliminary Validation of the Scale of Attitudes from Psychologists and psychology students (IAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Guerra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of training psychologists involves addressing both technical skills and generic or attitudinal competencies. However, there are not instruments for assessing attitudinal skills in psychologists and psychology students. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the process of construction and preliminary validation of an instrument of attitudinal competencies in psychologists and psychology students (IAPE. 152 students and graduates of psychology were considered in the different phases of the study. Participants answered the IAPE and another two instruments to assess convergent and divergent validity. Results showed that the final instrument consist of 17 items has one-factor structure with adequate internal consistency. Furthermore, they showed the validity (convergent, divergent and discriminant of the instrument. Finally, it is discussed the usefulness of this instrument in the national context. At the same time it is been said that this is a preliminary study, being necessary futher researchs to conclude about IAPE validity.

  18. Behavioral Treatment for Headaches in Children: A Practical Guide for the Child Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benore, Ethan; Monnin, Kara

    2016-03-29

    Headache is a highly prevalent condition and is the leading cause for school absences. Despite the rich literature supporting behavioral treatments for headache, many child psychologists mistakenly perceive that they lack appropriate training to treat children with headache. Likewise, many physicians feel underprepared to refer the child for behavioral treatments. This article serves as a primer, providing tools for the general child psychologist or mental health provider by answering frequently asked questions. First, we provide a concise background on pathophysiology and medical care for headache. We then detail aspects of behavioral interventions for headache, including a case example. We included a limited list of up-to-date references most relevant to the child psychologist who does not treat headache on a regular basis to support further reading. By reviewing this primer, local mental health professionals can provide children with headache access to high-quality, evidence-based clinical care closer to home.

  19. [The role of the psychologist in hospitals and maternity wards in the state of Sergipe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lyvia de Jesus; Vieira, Maria Jésia

    2012-05-01

    This article seeks to reflect on the professional activity of the psychologist in the hospital context by examining the role of psychologists working in hospitals and maternity wards in the State of Sergipe. It seeks to identify the specific role of these professionals in hospitals and maternity wards, as well as their motivating forces and the difficulties encountered. This work is part of a broader project that sought to study not only the activity per se, but also training aspects of these professionals. The sample was analyzed using a qualitative and quantitative approach for thematic analysis. Results revealed that the characterization of the role of psychologists has a focus on psychotherapeutic work with patients before and after surgery, as well as the caregivers and family members of critically ill patients in the following units: ICU, ICC, oncology, dialysis and surgical wards, offering support, especially at the pre- and post-surgery phase.

  20. The psychologist and the bombardier: the Army Air Forces' aircrew classification program in WWII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Marcia E

    2014-03-01

    During World War II, psychologists in the Army Air Forces were given an unprecedented opportunity to showcase their discipline by developing examinations to test the aptitude of aviation cadets as pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. These psychologists enjoyed success in classifying pilots and navigators, but became quickly frustrated by their results for bombardiers. The trouble lay not in their choice of tests but in their performance measures for bombardiering, a difficulty that came to be known as 'the problem of the criterion.' This episode in the history of military mental testing exemplifies the challenges faced by psychologists at the moment they were poised to gain the support of the armed services, and highlights how these new hazards shaped postwar military psychology.

  1. Combating elder and dependent adult mistreatment: the role of the clinical psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiglesworth, Aileen; Kemp, Bryan; Mosqueda, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Among the many different professionals who work to address elder and dependent adult mistreatment, the clinical psychologist performs a function that is not well documented. The experiences of a clinical psychologist attached to a medical response team and an elder abuse forensic center provide insight into this complex and multifaceted role. Case examples from an elder abuse forensic center illustrate the breadth of referral questions that a clinical psychologist addresses. This information may be of use to those who would argue that these services be made widely available to elder abuse professionals such as social workers, public guardians, and those in the criminal justice system. The case studies also may be useful for training purposes.

  2. Psychology in the community: a community psychologist looks at 30 years in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John R

    2008-01-01

    I review my 30 years in the community mental health field, emphasizing the personal and historical context that shaped this career. I especially highlight the origins of the values that guided significant career decisions, including family, neighborhood, religious and educational influences. The core guiding value was the belief that public service is both a privilege and an obligation, and that righting social injustice through such service is a noble calling. I trace the evolution of my thoughts and actions reflecting this value, from an early desire to "help children," through preparation to become a child psychologist, and ultimately to practice in a public community mental health setting and a career dedicated first to primary prevention and then to broader safety net services for those in need. I highlight a corresponding intellectual evolution as well, a progressive change in identity from "clinical psychologist in the community" to community psychologist.

  3. [Physician and medical psychologist: complementary approaches in providing psychological care to cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkova, V A; Pesterëva, E V

    2014-01-01

    In providing psychological care to an oncological patient a physician and a medical psychologist come from a variety of professional positions that require different approaches and methods. It is proposed a three-phase model of the dynamics of the psychological state of the person in the situation of cancer reflecting the process of psychological adaptation of a particular patient. Focusing on this model, the authors conclude that psychological care to cancer patient, performed by a doctor and a medical psychologist, are different kinds of psychological care that does not replace but complement each other.

  4. Competence Approach to the Training of Organizational Psychologists in the Context of Reforms in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogodina A.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a model of professional competences of organizational psycholo- gists developed by the authors and provides outcomes of a study carried out to verify the model. The study aimed to explore content and structural features of notions about professional competences of the organizational psychologist in high- and mid-level executives of various fields (manufacture; trading and services; education. The paper presents results of the correlation analysis of such representations in different groups of executives and argues that it is important to take into account prospective employers’ expectations and preferences regarding organizational psychologists in the training of the latter.

  5. The (even) bolder model. The clinical psychologist as metaphysician-scientist-practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W

    1989-12-01

    Is the clinical psychologist best characterized as a scientist-practitioner? Or does the practice of science and psychotherapy involve metaphysics to such an extent that the clinical psychologist ought to be considered a metaphysician-scientist-practitioner? To answer these questions, the roles, if any, of metaphysics in science and psychotherapy are examined. This article investigates this question by examining the views of the logical positivists, Karl Popper and Imre Lakatos, and concludes that the practice of science and psychotherapy involves metaphysics in (a) problem choice, (b) research and therapy design, (c) observation statements, (d) resolving the Duhemian problem, and (e) modifying hypotheses to encompass anomalous results.

  6. Telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for Hong Kong Chinese dementia caregivers: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Kwok,1,2 Bel Wong,2 Isaac Ip,2 Kenny Chui,2 Daniel Young,2 Florence Ho2 1Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region; 2Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region Purpose: Many family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD are unable to participate in community center-based caregiver support services because of logistical constraints. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers of PWD in alleviating caregiver burden and enhancing caregiving self-efficacy. Subjects and methods: In a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, 38 family caregivers of PWD were randomly allocated into an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received psychoeducation from a registered social worker over the phone for 12 sessions. Caregivers in the control group were given a DVD containing educational information about dementia caregiving. Outcomes of the intervention were measured by the Chinese versions of the Zarit Burden Interview and the Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-efficacy. Mann–Whitney U tests were used to compare the differences between the intervention and control groups. Results: The level of burden of caregivers in the intervention group reduced significantly compared with caregivers in the control group. Caregivers in the intervention group also reported significantly more gain in self-efficacy in obtaining respite than the control group. Conclusion: A structured telephone intervention can benefit dementia caregivers in terms of self-efficacy and caregiving burden. The limitations of the research and recommendations for intervention are discussed. Keywords: telephone intervention, psychoeducation, dementia caregivers

  7. Predictors and moderators in the randomized trial of multifamily psychoeducational psychotherapy for childhood mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Heather A; Algorta, Guillermo Perez; Mendenhall, Amy N; Fields, Benjamin W; Fristad, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated predictors and moderators of mood symptoms in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP) for childhood mood disorders. Based on predictors and moderators in RCTs of psychosocial interventions for adolescent mood disorders, we hypothesized that children's greater functional impairment would predict worse outcome, whereas children's stress/trauma history and parental expressed emotion and psychopathology would moderate outcome. Exploratory analyses examined other demographic, functioning, and diagnostic variables. Logistic regression and linear mixed effects modeling were used in this secondary analysis of the MF-PEP RCT of 165 children, ages 8 to 12, with mood disorders, a majority of whom were male (73%) and White, non-Hispanic (90%). Treatment nonresponse was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of global functioning (i.e., less impairment; Cohen's d = 0.51) and lower levels of stress/trauma history (d = 0.56) in children and Cluster B personality disorder symptoms in parents (d = 0.49). Regarding moderators, children with moderately impaired functioning who received MF-PEP had significantly decreased mood symptoms (t = 2.10, d = 0.33) compared with waitlist control. MF-PEP had the strongest effect on severely impaired children (t = 3.03, d = 0.47). Comprehensive assessment of demographic, youth, parent, and familial variables should precede intervention. Treatment of mood disorders in high-functioning youth without stress/trauma histories and with parents with elevated Cluster B symptoms may require extra therapeutic effort, whereas severely impaired children may benefit most from MF-PEP.

  8. Evaluation of a psychoeducation programme for parents of children and adolescents with ADHD: immediate and long-term effects using a blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrin, Maite; Moreno-Granados, J M; Salcedo-Marin, M D; Ruiz-Veguilla, M; Perez-Ayala, V; Taylor, E

    2014-08-01

    Recent guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have claimed the possible benefits of psychoeducational techniques in the comprehensive management of ADHD. To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation programme for parents of children and adolescents with ADHD in a clinical setting using a blind randomized trial. 81 children/adolescents with ADHD were randomly assigned for their families to receive either a well-structured psychoeducation programme (intervention group, n = 44), or a parent counselling and support intervention (control group, n = 37). Measures of child ADHD symptoms, psychopathology, quality of life and family stress were taken before and after intervention and after a year follow-up. Parents and evaluators were unaware of the condition received. Compared to the support control group, the psychoeducation group showed ADHD Index and cognitive/inattention levels significantly reduced after the intervention ended (Mann-Whitney U = 3.34; p = 0.001; Mann-Whitney U = 3.47; p = 0.001). An improvement in the pro-social domain was also observed after 1 year follow-up (Mann-Whitney U = -2.37; p = 0.018), and clinical global impression found a statistically significant effect for severity over the time. Differences were initially found for the impact of the disorder in the family in different domains, including emotional and social functioning; these differences were no longer significant after alpha correction. No significant differences in quality of life or family stress were found in comparison with the control group. This psychoeducation programme is a valuable treatment for parents/carers of children/adolescents with ADHD, which needs to be considered when evaluating different non-pharmacological treatment options. Psychoeducation and other kind of non-pharmacological approaches need to be regarded not as a substitute, but as a complementary treatment to medications; these approaches might help other

  9. Effectiveness of the first French psychoeducational program on unipolar depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, Déborah; Courtet, Philippe; Sénèque, Maude; Genty, Catherine; Picot, Marie-Christine; Schwan, Raymund; Olié, Emilie

    2015-11-17

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent and was associated with greater morbidity, mortality (including suicide), and healthcare costs. By 2030, MDD will become the leading cause of disability in high-income countries. Notably, among patients with a previous experience of a major depressive episode, it was indeed estimated that up to 85 % of those patients will suffer from relapse. Two main factors were associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse: poor medication adherence and low self-efficacy in disease management. Interestingly, these issues could become the targets of psychoeducational programs for chronic diseases. Indded psychoeducational program for depression are recommended in international guidelines, but have not yet been proposed in France. We propose to evaluate the first French psychoeducational program for depression "ENVIE" in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. The group intervention will include 9 weekly sessions. Its aim is to educate patients on the latest knowledge on depression and effective treatments through didactic and interactive sessions. Patients will experiment the latest innovating psychological skills (from acceptance and commitment therapy) to cope with depressive symptoms and maintain motivation in behavioral activation. In total, 332 unipolar non-chronic (depression, without psychotic features, will be randomly allocated to the add-on ENVIE program (N = 166) or to a waiting list (N = 166). The follow-up will last 15 months and include 5 assessment visits. The primary endpoint will be the remission rate of the index episode at 15 months post-inclusion, defined by a Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score ≤ 12 over an 8-week period, and without relapse during follow-up. We will also assess the response rate and relapse at 15 months post-inclusion, hospitalization rate and adherence to treatment during the follow-up period, quality of life and global functioning upon

  10. Current and Future School Psychologists' Preparedness to Work with LGBT Students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Goldstein, Thalia R.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess current and future school psychologists' attitudes toward and preparedness to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Two-hundred seventy-nine school psychologists (n = 162, 58%) and school psychology graduate students (n = 117, 42%) were included in the study.…

  11. The Psychologist as an Interlocutor in Autism Spectrum Disorder Assessment: Insights from a Study of Spontaneous Prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Daniel; Lee, Chi-Chun; Black, Matthew P.; Williams, Marian E.; Lee, Sungbok; Levitt, Pat; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between prosodic speech cues and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) severity, hypothesizing a mutually interactive relationship between the speech characteristics of the psychologist and the child. The authors objectively quantified acoustic-prosodic cues of the psychologist and of the…

  12. Assessment in the Digital Age: An Overview of Online Tools and Considerations for School Psychologists and School Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellins, Laura

    2015-01-01

    With recent developments in technology, online tests and digital tools offer school psychologists and school counsellors alternate modes of assessment. These new technologies have the potential to increase accessibility to tests (through greater portability), allow school psychologists and school counsellors to service more students (through…

  13. Methods of Identification of Students with Learning Disabilities in Reading: Perceptions of Administrators in Illinois and Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists' training provides a variety of skills from which its practitioners may draw, including consultation, intervention, counseling, staff development, and assessment. Despite these broad skills, school psychologists' primary roles involve assessment and assessment-related tasks, generally as related to eligibility determination…

  14. The School Psychologist and Sport: A Natural Interface to Promote Optimal Functioning Between, Student-Athlete, Family and School Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Marshall L.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a background and logical explanation for school psychologists to feel justified in the pursuit of providing sport psychology services. This perspective is useful for the school psychologist or other school administrative personnel who may question or be questioned about the value or need for the provision of sport psychology…

  15. Methods of Identification of Students with Learning Disabilities in Reading: Perceptions of Administrators in Illinois and Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists' training provides a variety of skills from which its practitioners may draw, including consultation, intervention, counseling, staff development, and assessment. Despite these broad skills, school psychologists' primary roles involve assessment and assessment-related tasks, generally as related to eligibility determination…

  16. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  17. New paradigms on the school psychologist's practice / Novos paradigmas na prática do psicólogo escolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edla Grisard Caldeira de Andrada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on the paradigmatic implications involved on the practice of the school psychologist, which has been modified towards a relational practice, based on the presupposition of the historical social constitution of the human being. However, when this professional works in an educational institution faces several difficulties, such as: lack of comprehension from the other professional of the school board about the role of the psychologist at school; maintenance of a excluding and individualist practice (the problem is in the mind of the student or in his family, characterizing a linear and Cartesian thought. However, confronting practices, the school psychologist may create situations in order to think together with school board on better and fair existing conditions. Based on the presuppositions of the cultural-historical psychologist as well as the systemic theory, new forms of creation of these situations are presented and the results point to a new practice of the school psychologist.

  18. "God save us from psychologists as expert witnesses": the battle for forensic psychology in early twentieth-century Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2015-11-01

    This article is focused on the jurisdictional battle between psychiatrists and psychologists over psychological expertise in legal contexts that took place during the first decades of the 20th century. Using, as an example, the debate between the psychologist William Stern, the psychiatrist Albert Moll, and the jurist Albert Hellwig, which occurred at the International Congress for Sexual Research held in Berlin in 1926, it aims to demonstrate the manner in which psychiatrists' responses to psychologists' attempts to gain admittance to Germany's courtrooms were shaped not only by epistemological and methodological objections, but also by changes to expert witnessing that had already encroached on psychiatrists' professional territory. Building upon recent work examining the relationship between psychologists and jurists prior to the First World War, this article also seeks to examine the role of judges and lawyers in the contest over forensic psychology in the mid-1920s, arguing that they ultimately became referees in the increasingly public disputes between psychiatrists and psychologists.

  19. Educating Somali Immigrant and Refugee Students: A Review of Cultural-Historical Issues and Related Psychoeducational Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walick, Christopher M.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Somali immigrants and refugees have entered the United States with increasing frequency due to civil war-induced violence and instability in their native country. The resultant increase of Somali students is of particular relevance to educators and school psychologists because Somali youth possess unique cultural backgrounds. In addition, refugee…

  20. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conduct disorder is often linked to attention-deficit disorder . Conduct disorder also can be an early sign of ... child or teen has a history of conduct disorder behaviors. A physical examination and blood tests can help ...

  1. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  2. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Afifi, Amanda F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, school psychologists have increasingly recognized the importance of using valid and reliable methods to assess culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students for special education eligibility. However, little is known about their assessment practices or preparation in this area. To address these questions, a Web-based survey…

  3. Psychotropic Medication Consultation in Schools: An Ethical and Legal Dilemma for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Thaler, Cara L.; Hirsch, Amanda J.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing, consulting, and intervening with students being treated with psychotropic medications is an increasingly common activity for school psychologists. This article reviews some of the literature providing evidence for the greater need for training in school psychopharmacology. A legal and ethical case study is presented that highlights the…

  4. School Psychologists Ethical Decision Making: Implications from Selected Social Psychological Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Jon; Klose, Laurie McGarry

    2007-01-01

    School psychologists routinely engage in ethical decision making, and existing models have served as useful tools for systematically approaching ethical dilemmas. However, a few of these models have taken account of the rich and salient body of social psychology research. This article reviews social psychological phenomena that present clear…

  5. Children and Traumatic Events: Therapeutic Techniques for Psychologists Working in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Gutierrez, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    It is clear that exposure to traumatic events is not uncommon in childhood and adolescence, and psychologists working in schools should have some training in meeting the needs of this segment of the population. One intervention that has been empirically supported in the trauma field is Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT). This…

  6. Counseling Psychologists Who View Their Careers as a Calling: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Foley, Pamela F.; Raque-Bodgan, Trisha L.; Reid-Marks, Laura; Dik, Bryan J.; Castano, Megan C.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Interviews were completed with eight counseling psychologists who viewed their careers as a calling. Using the Consensual Qualitative Research guidelines, six domains emerged: definition, process of discerning, content of the calling, professional impact, personal impact, and maintenance. Generally, interviewees viewed the discernment of their…

  7. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  8. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  9. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Childhood Internalizing Disorders: Perceived Knowledge, Role Preferences and Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.; Jome, Larae M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of a national sample of school psychologists in the United States regarding their knowledge, preferred roles and training needs in the assessment of nine prominent childhood internalizing disorders. Knowledge about all disorders was rated by respondents as being at least fairly important. In particular,…

  10. A Competency-Based Approach to Hiring School Counselors, Psychologists and Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Dennis P.; Probst, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Hiring decisions offer an immense opportunity for school leaders to influence the trajectory of their organizations in the immediate and long-term. However, very few school administrators have appropriate training, if any at all, in how to select the best candidates. Effective hiring for school counselors, psychologists, and social workers…

  11. Psychologizing and the Anti-Psychologist: Dewey, Lacan, and Contemporary Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Art education throughout the 20th and into the 21st century has drawn on both psychology and psychoanalysis to support approaches to teaching and learning in the arts. This article examines the concept of "psychologizing" as it appears in the writing of psychologist/philosopher John Dewey (1859-1952) and psychiatrist/psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan…

  12. Single-Case Design and Evaluation in R: An Introduction and Tutorial for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    For the appraisal of single-case intervention data, school psychologists have been encouraged to focus most, if not all, of their interpretive weight on the visual inspection of graphed data. However, existing software programs provide practitioners with limited features for systematic visual inspection. R (R Development Core Team, 2014) is a…

  13. Social Justice and Multicultural Issues: Implications for the Practice and Training of Counselors and Counseling Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Hage, Sally M.; Kindaichi, Mai M.; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the historical and contemporary connection to social justice issues in the fields of counseling and counseling psychology via the multicultural counseling movement. In addition, the authors present ways in which social justice issues can be addressed in counselors' and counseling psychologists' work with clients from diverse…

  14. Single-Case Design and Evaluation in R: An Introduction and Tutorial for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    For the appraisal of single-case intervention data, school psychologists have been encouraged to focus most, if not all, of their interpretive weight on the visual inspection of graphed data. However, existing software programs provide practitioners with limited features for systematic visual inspection. R (R Development Core Team, 2014) is a…

  15. Diabetes Management in the School Setting: The Role of the School Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Alan M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The epidemiology and characteristics of diabetes mellitus in children are discussed. Empirical studies focusing on personality and family variables, stress, behavior management, problems related to newly diagnosed cases, and cognitive functioning are reviewed. The role of school psychologists is highlighted, and guidelines are offered for…

  16. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  17. THE ETHICAL ISSUES IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PSYCHOLOGIST AS THERAPIST AND THE PATIENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    The two main ethical issues in the relationship between the psychotherapist and patient have been mentioned to be: Sexual involvement between the Psychologist and patient, and the dilemma of confidentiality so called the double loyalty of the therapist. This article will professionally discuss the nature and implications of these two phenomena; and it will propose preventive measures and strategies to cope with.

  18. Medication-Related Practice Roles: An Ethical and Legal Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Given the prevalence of school-age children and adolescents who are prescribed with and are taking psychotropic medications, a critical issue that school psychologists may likely encounter in contemporary practice is providing both quality and continuity of care to these students in the context of relevant legal and ethical parameters. With a…

  19. Commentary on the Future of Community Psychology: Perspective of a Research Community Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Norweeta G

    2016-12-01

    Community psychology is commented upon from the perspective of a community psychologist who was trained in the Community Psychology Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Her background and training are reviewed. A brief survey of research on homelessness as a frame for community psychology research is presented. Concluding remarks are provided on the future of research in community psychology.

  20. Acceptability of Functional Behavioral Assessment Procedures to Special Educators and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert E.; Bundock, Kaitlin; Kladis, Kristin; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2015-01-01

    This survey study assessed the acceptability of a variety of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures (i.e., functional assessment interviews, rating scales/questionnaires, systematic direct observations, functional analysis manipulations) to a national sample of 123 special educators and a state sample of 140 school psychologists.…

  1. Practice Placement Experiences and Needs of Trainee Educational Psychologists in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Atkinson, Cathy; Bond, Caroline; Gibbs, Simon; Hill, Vivian; Howe, Julia; Morris, Sue

    2015-01-01

    As part of initial professional training, educational psychologists in England undertake substantial periods of practice placement, within which the role of supervision is instrumental to their professional learning and effectiveness. The research reported here provides up-to-date and comprehensive information on the experiences and needs of…

  2. [The role of the psychologist with children or adolescents with a bone tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The psychologist practising both in a paediatric orthopaedic surgery department and a paediatric oncology department provides continuity for children and teenagers suffering from a malignant bone tumour, as well as for their family. Psychological support aims to help these young patients face the somatic and psychological upheavals with which they will be confronted throughout their treatment.

  3. The Significance of the Interculturally Competent School Psychologist for Achieving Equitable Education Outcomes for Migrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This article examines procedures and processes that result in the over-referral of migrant students to separate special education programmes and, as a consequence, their exclusion from general education. The particular focus is on the role of the school psychologist in this process. The empirical study is a comparison of Swiss teachers' and school…

  4. How Russian Teachers, Mothers and School Psychologists Perceive Internalising and Externalising Behaviours in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Elena; Moskovtseva, Ludmila; Naumenko, Oksana; Zilberberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perception of children's internalising and externalising behaviours by Russian teachers, mothers and school psychologists. The participants rated their agreement about the causes, seriousness and recommended interventions for the problem behaviour of a fictitious girl/boy described in two vignettes. Mixed ANOVAs indicated…

  5. Physics Envy: Psychologists' Perceptions of Psychology and Agreement about Core Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Collisson, Brian; King, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of psychology and its consensus regarding core content. We hypothesized that psychology possesses little agreement regarding its core content areas and thus may "envy" more canonical sciences, such as physics. Using a global sample, we compared psychologists' and physicists' perceptions regarding…

  6. An Innovative Model of Integrated Behavioral Health: School Psychologists in Pediatric Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Carolyn D.; Hinojosa, Sara; Armstrong, Kathleen; Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an innovative example of integrated care in which doctoral level school psychology interns and residents worked alongside pediatric residents and pediatricians in the primary care settings to jointly provide services to patients. School psychologists specializing in pediatric health are uniquely trained to recognize and…

  7. Should social psychologists create a disciplinary affirmative action program for political conservatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweder, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Freely staying on the move between alternative points of view is the best antidote to dogmatism. Robert Merton's ideals for an epistemic community are sufficient to correct pseudo-empirical studies designed to confirm beliefs that liberals (or conservatives) think deserve to be true. Institutionalizing the self-proclaimed political identities of social psychologists may make things worse.

  8. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work with…

  9. A case report of embryo donation: ethical and clinical implications for psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marianne; Pawlak, Stacey

    2016-10-01

    Third-party reproduction is a growing field, and an increasing body of literature considers the ethics of embryo donation. Due to the psychosocial complexities that generally accompany the donation and/or use of donor embryos, psychologists can play a pivotal role in these specialised fertility cases. While laws in the USA are in place to regulate the medical procedures involved in embryo donation, only unenforceable guidelines exist for psychologists specialising in fertility cases. The presentation of this case study aims to: (1) clarify the ethical concerns that fertility psychologists should consider in similar situations by assessing whether American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines compete or complement one another within this case of embryo donation and (2) consider the interests, obligations and rights of all parties involved. Several principles, standards and guidelines that must be considered are described. Overall, the APA Ethics Code and the ASRM Guidelines appear to complement one another for most aspects of this case. Fertility psychologists should consider the clinical implications of the interests, rights and duties of all involved parties, including themselves.

  10. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Hypnosis by Psychologists in a Pediatric Setting: Establishing and Maintaining Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Donald J.; Hoffmann, Claudia

    The use of hypnosis in a pediatric setting has the potential for yielding effective results. Obstacles to its use are inappropriate training of psychologists in pediatric psychology, resistance to hypnosis from the pediatricians and mental health professionals, fragmented communication, and constant demand for space and time. Success of hypnosis…

  12. Providing Psychological Intervention Following Traumatic Events: Understanding and Managing Psychologists' Own Stress Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ben; Frederickson, Norah

    2008-01-01

    The role of the educational psychology service in crisis support is well established. This paper examines a key aspect of this role, the impact on psychologists themselves, and reviews literature on secondary stress, considering the term "stress" itself as part of the discussion. It examines recommendations for professional practice and self care…

  13. Evaluating Childhood Bipolar Disorder--A Survey of School Psychologists' Knowledge and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Linda A.; Mayo, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Using data gathered from the "Childhood Bipolar Disorder Survey," this study explored Pennsylvania school psychologists' knowledge and practices when evaluating children for Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Results indicate that only a small percentage of school referrals involved children or adolescents with BPD. Participating school…

  14. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  15. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  16. Crisis Response in the Public Schools: A Survey of School Psychologists' Experiences and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Austin D.; Peacock, Gretchen Gimpel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 228 school psychologists completed a survey regarding crisis intervention teams and plans. The majority of respondents indicated their schools had crisis plans (95.1%) and teams (83.6%). The most common team activities endorsed by participants involved providing direct assistance and services to students, staff, and the media. The…

  17. Survey of School Psychologists' Attitudes, Feelings, and Exposure to Gay and Lesbian Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-sook; Thul, Candrice A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Norris, James L.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists' attitudes and feelings toward gay and lesbian parents were surveyed in relation to their training and exposure, and professional services offered to gay and lesbian parents and their children. The relationship between attitudes, feelings, training, exposure, and demographic characteristics was explored as well. A stratified…

  18. Gesell: The First School Psychologist Part I. The Road to Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Arnold Gesell's (1880-1960) qualifications, career, experiences, and the events which led to his official appointment as the first school psychologist in the United States are discussed. Gesell was influenced by Hall's thinking, and his graduate studies were a combination of experimental, developmental, and clinical psychology. (JAZ)

  19. [Involvement of psychologists in the organ procurement procedure after 'controlled' cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernay, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    A protocol for the provision of psychological support for family members has been put in place by a hospital coordination team, in the framework of organ donation after the limitation or cessation of treatment. The support takes into account the needs of the families in terms of information, listening and follow-up. The unit psychologist plays an important role in this approach.

  20. Using Consultation to Support English Learners: The Experiences of Bilingual School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Through semi-structured interviews, this study explored 11 bilingual school psychologists' (BSPs) consultation experiences with teachers of English learners (EL) to determine referral concerns, recommendations made, challenges encountered, preparation experiences, and skills most needed. The most common referral issue concerned students' academic…

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury: The Efficacy of a Half-Day Training for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Ray, Ashlyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are increasing, yet educators continue to be inadequately trained in assessing and serving students with TBIs. This study examined the efficacy of a half-day TBI training program for school psychologists designed to improve their knowledge and skills. Results of quantitative and qualitative…

  2. Modeling Psychologists' Ethical Intention: Application of an Expanded Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz-Kaddari, Michall; Shifman, Annie; Koslowsky, Meni

    2016-06-01

    At the core of all therapeutic and medical practice lies ethics. By applying an expanded Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior formulation, the present investigation tested a model for explaining psychologists' intention to behave ethically. In the pretest, dual relationships and money conflicts were seen as the most prevalent dilemmas. A total of 395 clinical psychologists filled out questionnaires containing either a dual relationship dilemma describing a scenario where a psychologist was asked to treat a son of a colleague or a money-focused dilemma where he or she was asked to treat a patient unable to pay for the service. Results obtained from applying the expanded Ajzen's model to each dilemma, generally, supported the study hypotheses. In particular, attitudes were seen as the most important predictor in both dilemmas followed by a morality component, defined here as the commitment of the psychologist to the patient included here as an additional predictor in the model. The expanded model provided a better understanding of ethical intention. Practical implications were also discussed.

  3. The Likelihood of Use of Social Power Strategies by School Psychologists when Consulting with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristen E.; Erchul, William P.; Raven, Bertram H.

    2008-01-01

    The Interpersonal Power Inventory (IPI) has been applied previously to investigate school psychologists engaged in problem-solving consultation with teachers concerning students having various learning and adjustment problems. Relevant prior findings include (a) consultants and teachers both perceive soft power strategies as more effective than…

  4. Black Students' Recollections of Pathways to Resilience: Lessons for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on narrative data from a multiple case study, I recount the life stories of two resilient Black South African university students to theorize about the processes that encouraged these students, familiar with penury and parental illiteracy, to resile. I aimed to uncover lessons for school psychologists about resilience, and their role in…

  5. American Psychologist Task Force Report: Clarifying Mission, Coverage, Communication, and Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2002-01-01

    An American Psychological Association task force reviewed the role and function of "American Psychologist," (AP) focusing on its coverage domain and issues related to its editorial review process. This report examines AP editorial domain, AP editorial instructions, AP editorship, communications within the AP editorial process, use of ad…

  6. Introduction and Overview: Counseling Psychologists' Roles, Training, and Research Contributions to Large-Scale Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sue C.; Leach, Mark M.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    Counseling psychologists have responded to many disasters, including the Haiti earthquake, the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, and Hurricane Katrina. However, as a profession, their responses have been localized and nonsystematic. In this first of four articles in this contribution, "Counseling Psychology and Large-Scale Disasters,…

  7. A Discussion of the Developing Role of Educational Psychologists within Children's Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Kate; Woods, Kevin; Rooney, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the developing role of educational psychologists (EPs) within the local authority Children's Services, from the starting point that the EP role has, through numerous reviews, been clearly conceptualised. Detailing the philosophy and framework for the inception of Children's Services in England, the authors propose two…

  8. Intermarried Couples Negotiating Mixedness in Everyday Life in Denmark: Lessons for Psychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    be doing to help society meet the challenges and grasp the opportunities in education, at work, and in clinical practice. The increasingly international and globalized nature of modern societies means that psychologists in particular face new challenges and have new opportunities in all areas of practice...

  9. The Ever Evolving Identity of Counseling Psychologists: Musings of the Society of Counseling Psychology President

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding our identity as counseling psychologists has been an issue since the inception of our specialty in the 1940s and one that the authors of these two articles (Goodyear et al., 2008 [this issue]; Munley, Pate, & Duncan, 2008 [this issue]) tackle in new and different ways. In this response, this author (a) identifies additional reasons…

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury: The Efficacy of a Half-Day Training for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Ray, Ashlyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are increasing, yet educators continue to be inadequately trained in assessing and serving students with TBIs. This study examined the efficacy of a half-day TBI training program for school psychologists designed to improve their knowledge and skills. Results of quantitative and qualitative…

  11. Evaluating a primary care psychology service in Ireland: a survey of stakeholders and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark; Byrne, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Primary care psychology services (PCPS) represent an important resource in meeting the various health needs of our communities. This study evaluated the PCPS in a two-county area within the Republic of Ireland. The objectives were to (i) examine the viewpoints of the service for both psychologists and stakeholders (healthcare professionals only) and (ii) examine the enactment of the stepped care model of service provision. Separate surveys were sent to primary care psychologists (n = 8), general practitioners (GPs; n = 69) and other stakeholders in the two counties. GPs and stakeholders were required to rate the current PCPS. The GP survey specifically examined referrals to the PCPS and service configuration, while the stakeholder survey also requested suggestions for future service provision. Psychologists were required to provide information regarding their workload, time spent on certain tasks and productivity ideas. Referral numbers, waiting lists and waiting times were also obtained. All 8 psychologists, 23 GPs (33% response rate) and 37 stakeholders (unknown response rate) responded. GPs and stakeholders reported access to the PCPS as a primary concern, with waiting times of up to 80 weeks in some areas. Service provision to children and adults was uneven between counties. A stepped care model of service provision was not observed. Access can be improved by further implementation of a stepped care service, developing a high-throughput service for adults (based on a stepped care model), and employing a single waiting list for each county to ensure equal access.

  12. The Provision of Counseling Services among School Psychologists: An Exploration of Training, Current Practices, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Fernald, Lori N.

    2013-01-01

    Although school psychologists have been called on in recent literature to assume a leadership role in a collective and comprehensive effort to address students' mental health needs, many practitioners find that their professional roles continue to be narrowly focused on special education-related activities, such as individualized assessment…

  13. A Survey of School Psychologists' Preparation, Participation, and Perceptions Related to Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Long, Lori; Kucera, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Positive behavior interventions and supports are increasingly utilized in school systems throughout the nation, particularly the school-wide multi-tiered support framework. Given such trends, and the basis of these practices in psychological principles and research, it is important to identify how school psychologists are trained to contribute to…

  14. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Primary Care Partnerships: Implications for Building the Collaborative Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Jeffries-DeLoatche, Kendall L.; Walsh, Audra St. John; Bateman, Lisa P.; Nadeau, Josh; Powers, Derek J.; Cunningham, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need to increase communication and collaboration across the educational and medical systems on behalf of students with paediatric health issues. The purpose of the current study was to investigate school psychologists' perceptions of their communication and collaboration practices with paediatric professionals (e.g.…

  15. How Vocational Psychologists Can Make a Difference in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Shannon, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In general, vocational psychologists have not been engaged in applied research that demonstrates how career interventions can improve educational problems that matter to relevant decision-makers and stakeholders. This article describes how vocational psychology can make a difference in K-12 education by embracing an interdisciplinary…

  16. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  17. Conceptualising the professional identity of industrial or organisational psychologists within the South African context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, Llewellyn E.; Nel, Elzabe; Stander, Marius W.; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: Lack in congruence amongst industrial and organisational psychologists (IOPs) as to the conceptualisation of its profession poses a significant risk as to the relevance, longevity and professional identity of the profession within the South African context. Research purpose: This study

  18. The Role of the School Psychologist in the Examination of Complex Language Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Hans

    1988-01-01

    School psychologists must utilize an interdisciplinary approach to understand and analyze language disturbances, by examining the student's motor coordination, sensorium, perception, cognition, emotionality, and sociability. Implications for the practice of school psychology are offered in the areas of dyslalia, dysgrammatia, retardation of…

  19. Associations between psychologists' thinking styles and accuracy on a diagnostic classification task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, A.A.; Witteman, C.L.M.; Souren, P.M.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether individual differences between psychologists in thinking styles are associated with accuracy in diagnostic classification. We asked novice and experienced clinicians to classify two clinical cases of clients with two co-occurring psychological disorders. No sig

  20. The Role of School Counsellors and Psychologists in Supporting Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Damien W.; Bartholomaeus, Clare

    2015-01-01

    As growing numbers of transgender people--including students, parents, and educators--become visible within schools, so comes with this the requirement that schools ensure their full inclusion. This article suggests that school counsellors and psychologists have an important role to play in supporting transgender people within schools. As an…

  1. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  2. Physics Envy: Psychologists' Perceptions of Psychology and Agreement about Core Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Collisson, Brian; King, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of psychology and its consensus regarding core content. We hypothesized that psychology possesses little agreement regarding its core content areas and thus may "envy" more canonical sciences, such as physics. Using a global sample, we compared psychologists' and physicists' perceptions regarding…

  3. Use of Hypnosis by Psychologists in a Pediatric Setting: Establishing and Maintaining Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Donald J.; Hoffmann, Claudia

    The use of hypnosis in a pediatric setting has the potential for yielding effective results. Obstacles to its use are inappropriate training of psychologists in pediatric psychology, resistance to hypnosis from the pediatricians and mental health professionals, fragmented communication, and constant demand for space and time. Success of hypnosis…

  4. School Safety and Crisis Planning Considerations for School Psychologists. Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly-Wilson, Christina; Reeves, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, people across the country are asking if schools in their communities are safe. School psychologists not only play a pivotal role in answering that question, but they can also provide leadership in helping to ensure a safe school climate. A critical component to answering…

  5. Supervision and Mentoring for Early Career School Psychologists: Availability, Access, Structure, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlene E.; Newman, Daniel S.; Guiney, Meaghan C.; Valley-Gray, Sarah; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors thank Jeffrey Charvat, Director of Research, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), for his guidance regarding survey development and administration, and Wendy Finn, former Director of Membership and Marketing, NASP, for her assistance with sampling and data collection. The authors thank Concetta Panuccio for her…

  6. Taking charge of epilepsy: the development of a structured psychoeducational group intervention for adolescents with epilepsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Kara; Ackerson, Joseph; Bailey, Kirstin; Schmitt, Margaret M; Madan-Swain, Avi; Martin, Roy C

    2004-08-01

    Children and adolescents with epilepsy frequently experience poor psychosocial outcomes due to numerous factors such as perceived stigma, behavior problems, academic difficulties, and depression. Health psychology research has documented the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions aimed at improving psychosocial outcomes for individuals with a variety of health conditions. With increasing numbers of adolescents living with epilepsy, interest in improving the quality of life for this particular population has grown. There remains, however, a paucity of research concerning psychosocial interventions for adolescents with epilepsy. The present study outlines the development and initial implementation of a 6-week structured psychoeducational group intervention for adolescents with epilepsy and their parents. Preintervention, the QOLIE-AD-48, Childhood Depression Inventory, and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale were administered. Educational topics included medical aspects of epilepsy, healthy lifestyle behaviors, family and peer relationships, understanding self-image and self-esteem, and stress management techniques. Participants were introduced to a variety of cognitive-behavioral strategies, and were encouraged to share their own experiences with epilepsy. Feedback from adolescent and parent participants indicated that the intervention was relevant to their needs, helped them better understand their epilepsy, and allowed an opportunity for positive peer support. Also, postintervention outcome measurement indicated an overall positive trend for quality of life improvement in the adolescents.

  7. Effectiveness of a nursing psychoeducative intervention as a helping tool in children´s mourning work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Pérez González

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The children grief has many special characteristics determinated by the childhood features. Several studies consider that children may have anxiety reactions, fears, depression and disadaptated behaviour when a relative is fort.The objective of this study is to know the effectiveness of a psychoeducative intervention of a Primary Care nurse in preventing misadaptative behaviours related to grief in children.To achieve this objective, a randomized controlled trial with an experimental group and a control group has been designed. 198 children and teenagers will be included in it (there will be randomized assigned 98 on each group from 5 to16 years old, having been affected of a relating grief, belonging to the Primary Care Centers of the 9, 10 and 11 areas in Madrid Community. Children and teenagers included in the experimental group will take a psychoeducative intervention based on 7 individualized weekly sessions. Measures of the punctuations obtained on the Children Behaviour Test will be made when children will be included in the study and after 3, 6 and 12 months.

  8. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach. PMID:25506221

  9. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients' pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach.

  10. Anger self-management in chronic traumatic brain injury: protocol for a psycho-educational treatment with a structurally equivalent control and an evaluation of treatment enactment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R; Maiuro, Roland D; Vaccaro, Monica J

    2015-01-01

    Anger and irritability are important and persistent clinical problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Treatment options include medications, behavioral modification, and psychotherapies, but some are impractical and none have proven efficacy with this population. We describe a randomized multi-center clinical trial testing a novel, one-on-one, 8-session psychoeducational treatment program, Anger Self-Management Training (ASMT), designed specifically for people with TBI who have significant cognitive impairment. The trial is notable for its use of a structurally equivalent comparison treatment, called Personal Readjustment and Education (PRE), which was created for the study and is intended to maximize equipoise for both participants and treaters. Fidelity assessment is conducted in real time and used in therapist supervision sessions. The primary outcome is change in self-reported anger on validated measures from pre-treatment to 1 week after the final session. Secondary outcomes include participant anger as reported by a significant other; emotional distress in domains other than anger/irritability; behavioral functioning; and quality of life. An interim assessment after the 4th session will allow examination of the trajectory of any observed treatment effects, and a follow-up assessment 2 months after the end of intervention will allow examination of persistence of effects. A treatment enactment phase, in which participants are interviewed several months after the last therapy session, is designed to provide qualitative data on whether and to what extent the principles and techniques learned in treatment are still carried out in daily life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Psycho-Education (B-CBE Program for Managing Stress and Anxiety of Main Family Caregivers of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vico Chung Lim Chiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Having a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU is a stressful event, which may cause a high level of anxiety to the family members. This could threaten their wellbeing and ability to support the patients in, or after discharge from, the ICU. To investigate the outcomes of a brief cognitive-behavioral psycho-education program (B-CBE to manage stress and anxiety of the main family caregivers (MFCs, a pragmatic quasi-experimental study involving 45 participants (treatment group: 24; control group: 21 was conducted in an ICU. The Depression and Anxiety Stress Scale and the Critical Care Family Need Inventory were used to evaluate the primary outcomes on stress and anxiety, and satisfaction with family needs. The treatment group reported significantly better improvement in the information satisfaction score compared to the control group (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.09. Overall main effects were observed on the stress (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.20, anxiety (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.18, depression (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, support satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, and comfort satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.11 scores. The experience of this study suggest that MFCs are in great need of additional support like B-CBE to manage their stress and anxiety. Given the brevity of B-CBE, it is practical for critical care nurses to deliver and MFCs to take within the industrious context of an ICU. More studies are needed to investigate these types of brief psychological interventions.

  12. Contribution of Benson's Relaxation Technique and Brief Psycho-Educational Intervention on Quality of Life of Primary Caregivers of Iranian Children with Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Forough; Khanjari, Sedigheh; Inanlou, Mehrnoush

    Chronic diseases leave a significant effect on not only the afflicted children but also their parents. Chronic diseases in children may also influence their parents' or primary caregivers' quality of life (QoL). To determine the effectiveness of a Brief Psycho-educational Intervention (BPI) and Benson's Relaxation Technique (BRT) on the QoL of primary caregivers of children with chronic diseases. The present quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was conducted on 100 parents with children who had one chronic disease (50 in each of the control and intervention groups) and were admitted to two state-run pediatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran in 2014. The primary caregivers' QoL was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire before (T1) and four weeks after the intervention (T2). The training was done in four 60-70minute sessions over one week with a 4-week follow-up. Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to analyze the data. On average, large effect sizes (ES≥0.80) were observed after interventions in SF-36 subscales that measured the effect of emotional roles. Small (0.20-0.49) to moderate (0.50-0.79) ESs were found in subscales measuring physical functioning, physical-role, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning and mental health. General health scores remained relatively unchanged at T2. These results suggested that BPI and BRT were effective strategies to improve the QoL of primary caregivers. Furthermore, interventions with low cost, and good safety and outcome could improve the QoL of primary caregivers of children with chronic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention versus usual care for managing anxiety and dyspnoea in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, Dorthe Gaby; Overgaard, Dorthe; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    foundation in cognitive-behavioural therapy and psychoeducation. The primary outcome is patient-reported anxiety as assessed by the Hospital and Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This trial complies with the latest Declaration of Helsinki, and The Ethics Committee of the Capital...

  14. The effectiveness of a trauma-focused psycho-educational secondary prevention program for children exposed to interparental violence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, M.M.; Schipper, de J.C.; Lamers-Winkelman, F.; Schuengel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children who witness interparental violence are at a heightened risk for developing psychosocial, behavioral and cognitive problems, as well as posttraumatic stress symptoms. For these children the psycho-educational secondary prevention program 'En nu ik...!' ('It's my turn now!') has b

  15. Family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy versus psycho-education for chronic fatigue syndrome in 11- to 18-year-olds: a randomized controlled treatment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalder, T; Deary, V; Husain, K; Walwyn, R

    2010-08-01

    Only one previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) has examined the efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in children. The aim of this study was to compare family-focused CBT with psycho-education for CFS in adolescents. Sixty-three 11- to 18-year-olds (43 girls, 20 boys) with CFS were randomly assigned to either family-focused CBT or psycho-education delivered over 6 months. School attendance was the main outcome, which was assessed at the end of treatment and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. At the main outcome point (the 6-month follow-up) both groups had improved similarly. However, although those who received family-focused CBT were attending school for longer than those who received psycho-education, at discharge from treatment and at 3 months follow-up, they improved less quickly across the follow-up period. Adolescents with CFS get back to school more quickly after family-focused CBT. This is important as they are at a crucial stage of their development. However, the finding that psycho-education was as effective as family-focused CBT at 6 and 12 months follow-up has important implications for health service delivery.

  16. Assessments of intellectually gifted students with(out) characteristic(s) of ASD : An explorative evaluation among diagnosticians in various psycho-educational organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger-Veltmeijer, Agnes E.J.; Minnaert, Alexander E.M.G.; van den Bosch, Els J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Burger-Veltmeijer, Minnaert & Van den Bosch (2014) constructed a conceptual framework, called the Strengths and Weaknesses Heuristic (S&W Heuristic) which might provide systematicity and coherence in research as well as psycho-educational praxis, regarding assessments of Intellectually Gif

  17. Further Empirical Data on the Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R): Reliability and Validation with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Susanna; Micheli, Enrico; Villa, Laura; Pastore, Valentina; Crippa, Alessandro; Molteni, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The PEP-R (psychoeducational profile revised) is an instrument that has been used in many countries to assess abilities and formulate treatment programs for children with autism and related developmental disorders. To the end to provide further information on the PEP-R's psychometric properties, a large sample (N = 137) of children presenting…

  18. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  19. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy vs. psycho-education for patients with major depression who did not achieve remission following antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Alberto; Castagner, Vittoria; Andrisano, Costanza; Serretti, Alessandro; Mandelli, Laura; Porcelli, Stefano; Giommi, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) showed efficacy for currently depressed patients. However, most of the available studies suffer from important methodological shortcomings, including the lack of adequate control groups. The present study aims to compare MBCT with a psycho-educational control group designed to be structurally equivalent to the MBCT program but excluding the main putative "active ingredient" of MBCT (i.e., mindfulness meditation practice) for the treatment of patients with major depression (MD) who did not achieve remission following at least 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Out of 106 screened subjects, 43 were randomized to receive MBCT or psycho-education and were prospectively followed for 26 weeks. MD severity was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Measures of anxiety, mindfulness, and quality of life were also included. All assessments were performed at baseline, 4, 8, 17 and 26-weeks. Both HAM-D and BDI scores, as well as quality of life and mindfulness scores, showed higher improvements, which were particularly evident over the long-term period, in the MBCT group than in the psycho-education group. Although limited by a small sample size, the results of this study suggest the superiority of MBCT over psycho-education for non-remitted MD subjects.

  20. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational parenting group on child, parent, and family behavior: a pilot study in a family practice clinic with an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Law, David D; Johnson, Jennifer; Wells, M Gawain

    2010-09-01

    Although integrated care for adults in primary care has steadily increased over the last several decades, there remains a paucity of research regarding integrated care for children in primary care. To report results of a pilot study testing initial feasibility of a parenting psychoeducational group targeting child behavioral problems within a primary care clinic. The participants (n = 35) were parents representing an underserved population from an inner-city primary care clinic. Participants attended a 12-week psychoeducational parenting group and reported pre- and post-measures of family functioning, child misbehavior and dyadic functioning. Paired t-tests and effects sizes are reported. Participants reported statistically significant improvement in family functioning, child misbehavior, and couple functioning after participating in the parenting psychoeducational group. Results suggest initial feasibility of a parenting psychoeducational group within a primary care clinic with an underserved population. This intervention may be useful for other primary care clinics seeking to offer more integrative care options for children and their families.