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Sample records for psychologist abraham maslow

  1. Abraham Maslow: On the Potential of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podeschi, Ronald L.; Podeschi, Phyllis J.

    1973-01-01

    Authors presented some principal perspectives by the psychologist, Abraham Maslow, who died in 1970, and who was writing about the potential of women long before it became popular to do so. (Author/RK)

  2. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  3. A Dialogue with Abraham Maslow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, Mildred

    1979-01-01

    This question-and-answer session was conducted at the New School for Social Research in the spring of 1962. Maslow comments on creativity, peak experiences, drug use, self-actualization, religion, and his psychology of Being. (SJL)

  4. Perspektif Psikologi Humanistik Abraham Maslow dalam Meninjau Motif Pelaku Pembunuhan

    OpenAIRE

    Nurwatie, Azrina; Fauzia, Rahmi; Akbar, Sukma Noor

    2014-01-01

    Fokus penelitian ini diarahkan pada motif pelaku pembunuhan dengan meninjaunya melalui perspektif psikologi humanistik Abraham Maslow. Subyek dalam penelitian ini berjumlah dua orang narapidana yang berada di Lapas Kelas IIA Anak Martapura dengan kasus pembunuhan. Metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode penelitian kualitatif. Teknik pengumpulan data melalui wawancara, observasi, dokumentasi,dan pemeriksaan psikologis (tes grafis). Berdasarkan hasil analisis data da...

  5. Mathematical Formalization Of Theories Of Motivation Proposed By Abraham Maslow And Frederick Herzberg

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Kotliarov

    2008-01-01

    the present article gives an outline of a mathematical model of theories of motivation proposed by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. This model is built on a basis of special non-continuous functions.

  6. MASLOW: The First Step in Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-06

    Being. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1999. Maslow , Abraham H. "/Maslow’s hierarchy of needs." wikipedia. Nov 12, 2007. http://en.wikipedia.org...the psychologist Abraham Maslow in 1943, may provide a more intuitive means of addressing the needs of the population in the near term and create a...the Link Between Education, Poverty and Terrorism Among Palestinians. Paper, Princeton University, 2006. Maslow , Abraham H. Toward a Psychology of

  7. Aktualisasi Teori Hierarki Kebutuhan Abraham H. Maslow Bagi Peningkatan Kinerja Individu Dalam Organisasi

    OpenAIRE

    Lianto, Lianto

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the theory of Abraham H. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs would be the starting point and the foundation for the idea of finding motivation to increase the performance of individuals within the organization. Today, there are various criticisms about the validity of Maslow's theory. However, as a basic concept for the introduction of individual personality and various structural factors that encourage people to do something, this theory can still resonates loudly. The term "actuali...

  8. The Personal Meaning of Social Values in the Work of Abraham Maslow

    OpenAIRE

    John H. Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) was, with Carl Rogers, the co-founder of what came to be known as the Third Force school of psychology. Considered a neo-Freudian in the post-psychoanalytical school, Maslow became a leader in the development of new modalities of treatment using psychotherapeutic techniques developed in his practice over many years and ultimately became a celebrated scholar and teaching using his concept of the hierarchy of needs and self-actualization. Where Maslow has too often an...

  9. Technology Staff-Development and Support Programs: Applying Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Pownell, David

    1998-01-01

    Presents Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs (physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, self-actualization) as a model for developing technology training and support for teachers, identifies basic technology-related needs that must be met before higher levels of technology integration can be achieved, and offers seven implications to help…

  10. Student Affairs as Perceived Through Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Steven

    The needs of human behavior are explored and correlated to the various departments within Student Affairs in an effort to show how Student Affairs can satisfy those needs. Maslow's Hierarchy of needs is briefly explained and related to the following Student Affairs departments: Financial Aid, Student Management, Career Development and Placement,…

  11. Manifestasi Kebutuhan Bertingkat Tokoh Aya Kito Dalam Novel One Liter of Tears Melalui Pendekatan Psikologi Humanistik Abraham Maslow

    OpenAIRE

    RACHMAWATI, DEVI SHINTA

    2013-01-01

    Novel is one of literary fiction exciting and in demand by today's society. Novel One Liter of Tears can be analyzed through a variety of approaches one through the psychological approach, in this case the approach of humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow. This study answers the formulation of the problem, namely, how the needs of multilevel manifestation Aya character in the novel One Litre of Tears through the approach of humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow. Analyzed from the humanist...

  12. Motivation Engineering to Employee by Employees Abraham Maslow Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Joko Suyono; Sri Wiwoho Mudjanarko

    2017-01-01

    Among many existing motivational theories, perhaps Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theories are widely known. This theory passes a message to us that once a person passes a certain level of need, he is no longer motivated by the level of motivation below. This provides an understanding that a manager or leader or motivator in the organization should know what is needed by subordinates. The need of a daily production worker with staff of managerial staff is different. To provide motivation that ca...

  13. A Brief Analysis of Abraham Maslow's Original Writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nedra H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes Abraham Maslow's original writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health." The review of literature in this article reveals that Maslow's hierarchy of needs have had profound effects in the area of psychology. In addition, the authors present information regarding self-actualized people, theorists of…

  14. Motivation Engineering to Employee by Employees Abraham Maslow Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Suyono

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Among many existing motivational theories, perhaps Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theories are widely known. This theory passes a message to us that once a person passes a certain level of need, he is no longer motivated by the level of motivation below. This provides an understanding that a manager or leader or motivator in the organization should know what is needed by subordinates. The need of a daily production worker with staff of managerial staff is different. To provide motivation that can improve performance to both, a motivator must provide different treatment according to their needs.

  15. The Personal Meaning of Social Values in the Work of Abraham Maslow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Morgan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Maslow (1908-1970 was, with Carl Rogers, the co-founder of what came to be known as the Third Force school of psychology. Considered a neo-Freudian in the post-psychoanalytical school, Maslow became a leader in the development of new modalities of treatment using psychotherapeutic techniques developed in his practice over many years and ultimately became a celebrated scholar and teaching using his concept of the hierarchy of needs and self-actualization. Where Maslow has too often and undeservedly been overlooked is in his exploration of the meaning and nature of values in the arena of public education. This essay is an attempt to correct this common oversight.

  16. Baring the soul: Paul Bindrim, Abraham Maslow and 'nude psychotherapy'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Nude psychotherapy is one of the most flamboyant therapeutic techniques ever developed in American psychology. Largely forgotten today, the therapy was an academic and popular sensation upon its introduction in 1967. Developed by psychologist Paul Bindrim, the therapy promised to guide clients to their authentic selves through the systematic removal of clothing. This paper explores the intellectual, cultural and ethical context of nude therapy and its significance as a form of unchurched spirituality. Although nude therapy has an indisputable tabloid character, it is also rooted in a long-standing academic search for authenticity and ultimate meaning through science. Bindrim's career demonstrates the historically long-standing interweaving of spirituality and science within American psychology while simultaneously highlighting the field's extraordinary capacity for adaptive reinvention.

  17. Maslow and Values Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Rodney

    1978-01-01

    Identifies major value bases which have been used to teach values in the classroom and outlines a values education program which stresses teaching about values without indoctrination. Based upon the hierarchy of human needs developed by psychologist Abraham Maslow, the program is based upon universal values, basic human needs, and recognition of…

  18. The Plateau Experience: Maslow's Unfinished Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Buckler, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) was a leading psychologist whose hierarchy of needs has resonated throughout various disciplines. The pinnacle of Maslow's hierarchy was self-actualisation, characterised by the peak experience. However there are a series of definitional, theoretical and methodological issues related to the hierarchy and self-actualisation. Maslow specifically refuted his own theory, instead suggesting that research should be directed towards self-transcendence as characterised by t...

  19. There Are No New Lessons Learned, Just Old Lessons Relearned: A Case Study of Operation Iraqi Freedom Through the Eyes of Maslow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    Abraham Maslow , a renowned American psychologist, prioritized human needs into four categories and his theory suggests that humans are motivated by...addressed through examination of other COIN and reconstruction operations. Endnotes 1 Abraham H. Maslow , Motivation and Personality, 3rd ed. (New...a basic understanding of Islam and provided a great contextual background for research. Maslow , Abraham H. Motivation and Personality, 3rd ed. New

  20. Self-actualization of The Main Character Hujan Novel by Tere Liye A Review of Psychology Abraham Maslow

    OpenAIRE

    Lestari, Chintya Bayu; Attas, Siti Gomo

    2018-01-01

    AbstrackThis research aims to self-actualization of depictions of the main characters of the Novel Hujan work of Tere Liye and structure of which is contained in the novel. This research is qualitative research using the method of content analysis. The approach used ini this study is the structural approach and psychology Abraham Maslow. In this study, there are four ways of engineering data collection performed by the researchers, namely: (a) read and understand the contents of the novel’s s...

  1. Achievement of Abraham Maslow's Needs Hierarchy Theory among Teachers: Implications for Human Resource Management in the Secondary School System in Rivers State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiele, E.E.; Abraham, Nath. M.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the achievement of Abraham Maslow's need hierarchy theory among secondary school teachers in Rivers State. A 25-item questionnaire was designed, validated and administered on a sample of 500 teachers drawn from 245 secondary schools in Rivers State. The result revealed that secondary school teachers indicated insignificant…

  2. Adult Learning Degree and Career Pathways: Allusions to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Marthann

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the allusion possibilities for distance education career pathways and the well-known hierarchy of needs--a theory first introduced by American psychologist Abraham Maslow. A grounding concept learned by all Psychology 101 students in high school or college, Maslow's theory can provide a similar base for understanding,…

  3. INTERNALISASI NILAI-NILAI PENDIDIKAN PERSPEKTIF ABRAHAM MASLOW (1908-1970 (Analisis Filosofis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASBUR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Value for Maslow is the value of existence (being values, which includes among others: truth, goodness, beauty, full of energy, unique, perfection, fullness, justice, order, simplicity, rich nature, the full nature of the game and the nature of self- sufficient. These values will behave as needs and fulfillment will bear the psychological health and leads to the possibility of a peak experience. Moreover, according to Maslow value focus is on the role of human beings, human nature, and moral values. At the first show that the award of the inner potential and the human role in determining his choices. In the second explains that human nature lies in the nature that fosters inner porensi independence and responsibility on humanitarian grounds. The latter showed that moral values are values that are very important for people to develop themselves. The implication of all it is the first, the realization of development opportunities and the role of human psychological behavior-based humanistic and religious. Second, the realization of psychological behavior improvement opportunities based on the transcendental spiritual and scientific aspects. Third, the realization of development opportunities of building science concerned with the aspect of morality. Because for him, the peak experience is becoming more of yourself, realizing his ability to perfect, closer to the core of its existence, and more fully as a human being and experience the peak is at the core of religion.

  4. If Maslow Taught Writing: A Way to Look at Motivation in the Composition Classroom. Writing Teachers at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ada; Boone, Beth

    Intended for use by teachers at both the college and the secondary school level, this booklet describes a method of getting students to write using the motivation theories developed by the psychologist Abraham Maslow. The first chapter of the booklet reviews Maslow's basic principles as they apply to the teaching of writing, but includes a…

  5. Maslow, Needs, and War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    for individual‟s remains equally true for groups and nations.ŗ Abraham H. Maslow did groundbreaking work on a hierarchy of needs; he identified five...Penguin Press, 1991), 48. 3 Ibid, 49. 4 Abraham H. Maslow , Motivation and Personality, Second Edition. (New York: Harper and Row, 1970), 35-58. 5... Maslow , Needs, and War by Lieutenant Colonel John P. Baker United States Air Force United States Army War College

  6. Maslow's Theories and Educating the Disadvantaged Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jerry

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes Abraham Maslow's concepts of the organization of the personality with implications for educating the disadvantaged adult learner. Special attention is given to personality syndromes and the effect they have on the expression of behavior. (JOW)

  7. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  8. The Use of Maslow's Model in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbs, Hugh

    1978-01-01

    Explains how Abraham Maslow's theory of the hierarchy of human needs can explain the success of medieval society which lasted 300 years. Based on sequential fulfillment of physical needs, security, affiliation, esteem, and self-fulfillment, the model can also illustrate how modern governments satisfy citizens' needs. (AV)

  9. Toward a Reconstruction of Organizational Theory: Androcentric Bias in A. H. Maslow's Theory of Human Motivation and Self-Actualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Irene Nowell; Shakeshaft, Charol

    An exploration in the context of feminist science of one theoretical basis of educational administration--Abraham Maslow's theory of human motivation and self-actualization--finds an androcentric bias in Maslow's methodology, philosophical underpinnings, and theory formulation. Maslow's hypothetico-deductive methodology was based on a…

  10. Maslow's Theory of Human Motivation and its Deep Roots in Individualism : Interrogating Maslow's Applicability in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mawere, Munyaradzi; Mubaya, Tapuwa R.; van Reisen, Mirjam; Stam, van Gertjan; Mawere, Munyaradzi; Nhemachena, Artwell

    Since the postulation of Abraham Maslow's theory of human motivation, the theory has been celebrated as the determining factor to account for and explain human wants and needs. While the theory has its genealogy from an individualistic society, the United States of America, where it was crafted and

  11. Construction and Validation of a Scale to Measure Maslow's Concept of Self-Actualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth Melvin; Randolph, Daniel Lee

    1978-01-01

    Designed to measure self-actualization as defined by Abraham Maslow, the Jones Self Actualizing Scale, as assessed in this study, possesses content validity, reliability, and a number of other positive characteristics. (JC)

  12. Quality of Life Theory III. Maslow Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Soren Ventegodt; Joav Merrick; Niels Jorgen Andersen

    2003-01-01

    In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth.When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have i...

  13. Herzberg's Theory of Motivation and Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. ERIC/AE Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, Joseph E.

    Among the behavioral theories embraced by American business are those of Frederick Herzberg and Abraham Maslow. Herzberg proposed a theory about job factors that motivate employees, and Maslow developed a theory about the rank and satisfaction of human needs and how people pursue those needs. This digest briefly outlines both theories and then…

  14. Maslow and Miller: An Exploration of Gender and Affiliation in the Journey to Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Doris Rhea; Kovacs-Long, Judith

    2005-01-01

    This article shows that although neither Abraham Maslow nor Jean Baker Miller reference each other in their writings, they are following different paths to the same conclusion: competence proceeds from connection. Miller and Maslow both describe a developmental model that applies equally to women and men. The conclusion of the authors of this…

  15. Mathematical formalization of theories of motivation proposed by Maslow and Herzberg

    OpenAIRE

    Kotliarov,Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Maslow's theory is by far the most known theory of motivation, and the most common in the business and management practice. Herzberg's theory fits the observations and explains some aspects of human motivation left unexplained by Maslow. However, these theories have never been formalized on a strictly mathematical basis. The present article gives an outline of a mathematical model of theories of motivation proposed by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. This model is built on a basis of sp...

  16. A Validation Study of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Rex J.

    A study was conducted to expand the body of research that tests the validity of Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory in a work context where it often serves as a guide for the supervisor's relationships with his subordinates. Data was gathered by questionnaire which tested for a hierarchy of needs among instructors at four community colleges…

  17. A Program Based on Maslow's Hierarchy Helps Students in Trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Mary Ruth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes the program at Alabama's Huntsville Alternative School, where severe behavioral problems are dealt with by promoting positive self-concepts in students through acceptance, trust, warmth, concern, firmness, consistency, humor, and the meeting of human needs as identified by Abraham Maslow. (Author/PGD)

  18. Maslow's Need Hierarchy and the Adjustment of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Seymour

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the need hierarchy theory of Abraham Maslow is used to describe stages in the adjustment process of new immigrants. This notion is developed and applied to interpreting some longitudinal data on the changing needs of immigrants to Israel during the first two years after their arrival. (Author/GC)

  19. Bouncing Back: Erikson, Maslow and Recovery from Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnofsky, Stan

    Counseling for recovery from divorce may be significantly enhanced if a general model of emotional health/deficiency can be applied. This article introduces an amalgam of Erik Erikson's developmental stages and Abraham Maslow's motivational hierarchy as a means of understanding the rigors of marital dissolution. The paradigm promotes client…

  20. Maslow's Theory of Human Motivation and its Deep Roots in Individualism: Interrogating Maslow's Applicability in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mawere, Munyaradzi; Mubaya, Tapuwa R.; van Reisen, Mirjam; Stam, van, Gertjan; Mawere, Munyaradzi; Nhemachena, Artwell

    2016-01-01

    Since the postulation of Abraham Maslow's theory of human motivation, the theory has been celebrated as the determining factor to account for and explain human wants and needs. While the theory has its genealogy from an individualistic society, the United States of America, where it was crafted and propelled to take a stand as a universal theory determining human wants and needs across the world, little has been done to critically examine its seemingly perceived universality and applicability...

  1. Freud, Maslow og Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyhus, Allan; Glarøe, Ditte; SteenBrand, Kim; Møller, Maria; Drumm, Kristian; Hørbo, Mie

    2004-01-01

    Hvorledes er det muligt at motivere medarbejdere ud fra et Freud/Maslow perspektiv? Teoretisk projekt uden inddragelse af empiri. Hvorledes er det muligt at motivere medarbejdere ud fra et Freud/Maslow perspektiv? Teoretisk projekt uden inddragelse af empiri.

  2. Using Maslow's Needs Model to Assess Individuals' Attitudes Toward Money

    OpenAIRE

    Oleson, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    Few things occupy as central a place in our lives as money. Although the study of money has a long history in the behavioral sciences, others have only recently begun examining this important topic. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between basic human need levels and money attitudes in a university-age cohort utilizing a theory of hierarchical needs. Needs theory, introduced by Abraham Maslow, suggests that as we interact with the environment we accumulate specific ne...

  3. Mathematical formalization of theories of motivation proposed by Maslow and Herzberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kotliarov

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Maslow's theory is by far the most known theory of motivation, and the most common in the business and management practice. Herzberg's theory fits the observations and explains some aspects of human motivation left unexplained by Maslow. However, these theories have never been formalized on a strictly mathematical basis. The present article gives an outline of a mathematical model of theories of motivation proposed by Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg. This model is built on a basis of special non-continuous functions. This description may be a good basis for HR software and may be useful for business and management.

  4. Quality of life theory III. Maslow revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav; Andersen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-10-13

    In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth. When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow's concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  5. The Relevance of Abraham Maslow's Work to Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Ann

    1976-01-01

    Health educators should be aware of people as growth aspiring, with a basic nature of goodness, and that individuals need to experience those qualities within themselves which produce health and a zest for living. (JD)

  6. Implementasi Teori Hirarki Kebutuhan Abraham Maslow terhadap Peningkatan Kinerja Pustakawan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandar Iskandar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One should concern in how to keep an organization keeps balanced is depending on its human resources. Humanbeings can make an organization effectively works, and might design all operational works, till to produce value things, to control its quality measurments, to promote, in which above all is to achiece the organization goals. Having such a quality person within an organization might lead to success. The current study investigates Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory and McClelland’s human motivation theroy that being used in many organization around the globe, including library. The study is a library research in which it will discover the impact of the theories within library as an information institution that worked human resources to establish.

  7. Maslow's Concept of Peak Experience Education: Impossible Myth or Possible Mission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgenbusch, Nancy

    Abraham Maslow, in delineating the hierarchy of human needs and affirming the transcendent nature of man, drew some educational implications of the humanistic psychologies. He stated, "We speak then of a self, a kind of intrinsic nature which is very subtle, which is not conscious, which has to be sought for, and which has to be uncovered and…

  8. If Maslow Created a Composition Course: A New Look at Motivation in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Beth; Hill, Ada S.

    The needs hierarchy developed by Abraham Maslow lends itself to the composition classroom. The hierarchy depicts five distinct need levels through which an individual travels: basic, safety/security, belonging/peer acceptance, ego/esteem, and self-actualization. From teacher observations and students' comments, need levels can be assessed and…

  9. Quality of Life Theory III. Maslow Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth.When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow�s concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  10. Education: An Exchange of Ideas among Three Humanistic Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ellen R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents fantasized version of discussion among Carl Rogers, Victor Frankl, and Abraham Maslow led by Delbert Obertueffer. All statements in dialog are either direct quotes from their writings or phrases that express their basic philosophy. The hope is that by reviewing the writings of these great leaders, aspects to be applied to education today…

  11. Frankenstein Meets Maslow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, Deborah; Courey, Tamra

    2003-01-01

    Describes the exchange that takes place between an English and a Nursing professor when a student writes a paper about Shelley's Frankenstein that incorporates Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the analysis. Discusses the collaborative conversations that took place as a result of this essay and the new pedagogical ideas this discussion generated.…

  12. Abraham at Qumran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren

    2005-01-01

    The Dead Sea Scrolls, including the Book of Jubilees copiously attested at Qumran, depict Abraham as a Jew living by the Mosaic rules long before they were first given. This is an early example of coopting the patriarch in order to guarantee the primacy of one's own religious tradition - a phenom......The Dead Sea Scrolls, including the Book of Jubilees copiously attested at Qumran, depict Abraham as a Jew living by the Mosaic rules long before they were first given. This is an early example of coopting the patriarch in order to guarantee the primacy of one's own religious tradition...

  13. [The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2006-01-01

    This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team.

  14. Abraham Kuyper as kerkregkundige

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Smit

    1989-05-01

    Full Text Available As partyman was Kuyper onbetwis Abraham die Geweldige. As kerk­regkundige was hy die man vir sintese, die man wat teenstellende filosofiee en teologiese strominge met sy verstommende intellektuele vermoe kon absorbeer en dit dan tot ’n nuwe weg kon verwerk. Hierin lê Kuyper se oorspronklikheid: dat hy deur sintese uit teenstrydige gedagterigtings ’n nuwe weg na die ou Gereformeerde kerkreg kon aantoon en dat hy na die eise van sy tyd op die ou leer kon voortbou.

  15. Mentorship: Maslow and me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadez, A M; Lund, C A

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs Nursing Service developed a leadership training program that utilizes a preceptor for a trainee. The relationship these two establish determines the level of development the trainee can achieve. The working relationship between preceptor and trainee in this setting surpassed the task-oriented aspects of the preceptorship program and can better be described as that achieved through mentorship. The cadre of competencies are comparable to Maslow's (1970) hierarchy of needs and are viewed as interacting and cyclical. The goal of the training program is to develop a leader that is capable of self-actualization in an advanced leadership role. The authors' personal experiences are used to demonstrate how the principles of mentorship are applied in the training setting.

  16. Measuring Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2013-08-01

    Two scales have been proposed to measure Maslow's hierarchy of needs in college students, one by Lester (1990) and one by Strong and Fiebert (1987). In a sample of 51 college students, scores on the corresponding scales for the five needs did not correlate significantly and positively, except for the measures of physiological needs. Furthermore, there was limited support for Maslow's hypothesis that need deprivation would predict psychopathology (specifically, mania and depression).

  17. A equipe de enfermagem e Maslow: (in)satisfações no trabalho El equipo de enfermería y Maslow: (in)satisfacciones en el trabajo The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena Fagundes Ladeia Vitória Regis; Isaura Setenta Porto

    2006-01-01

    Este texto busca compreender as insatisfações da equipe de Enfermagem no trabalho. Propomos a associação com a teoria das necessidades humanas de Abraham Maslow como um meio de sistematizar e entender as situações recorrentes ao dia-a-dia e prática da Enfermagem. As necessidades estruturam-se hierarquicamente em fisiológicas, segurança, social, auto-estima e auto-realização indicando o grau de satisfação (da enfermidade à plenitude) de um indivíduo ou grupo. A vantagem desta abordagem consist...

  18. A equipe de enfermagem e Maslow: (insatisfações no trabalho El equipo de enfermería y Maslow: (insatisfacciones en el trabajo The nursing team and Maslow: (dissatisfaction in the work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Fagundes Ladeia Vitória Regis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Este texto busca compreender as insatisfações da equipe de Enfermagem no trabalho. Propomos a associação com a teoria das necessidades humanas de Abraham Maslow como um meio de sistematizar e entender as situações recorrentes ao dia-a-dia e prática da Enfermagem. As necessidades estruturam-se hierarquicamente em fisiológicas, segurança, social, auto-estima e auto-realização indicando o grau de satisfação (da enfermidade à plenitude de um indivíduo ou grupo. A vantagem desta abordagem consiste em podermos utilizar da solidez, profundidade e riqueza da teoria de Maslow em situações concretas e particulares da equipe de Enfermagem.Este texto busca comprender el equipo de enfermería y sus (insatisfacciones laborales. Proponemos la asociación con la teoría de las necesidades humanas de Abrahan Maslow como medio de sistematizar y entender las situaciones recurrentes del día-a-día y la práctica de la enfermería. Las necesidades se estructuran jerárquicamente en fisiológicas, seguridad, social, auto-estima y auto-realización indicando el grado de satisfacción (de la enfermedad a la plenitud de un individuo o grupo. La ventaja de este abordaje cosiste en podernos utilizar de la solidez, profundidad y riqueza de la teoría de Maslow en situaciones concretas y particulares del equipo de Enfermería.This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dissatisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the

  19. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs and characterization of the self-actualizing personality, suggesting that since few people meet his self-actualization criteria, an educational system designed to produce such personalities may fail, with teachers attending only to the hierarchy's lower stages (self-esteem and self-actualization) which dilutes…

  20. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Manifested by the Main Character in the Forrest Gump the Movie

    OpenAIRE

    FIEDHAWATIE, SHINTYA DWI

    2013-01-01

    A film is one of literary works. American film has long been popular with recreating American history. Forrest Gump movie is chosen to be analyzed in this thesis because it shows the reality and the western historical themes. To support the analysis of the main character, some theories of the Hierarchy of Needs by Abraham Maslows are utilized to get better understanding about the main character. Since the object of the study is a movie, the researcher also use the movie studies. The formu...

  1. A equipe de enfermagem e Maslow: (in)satisfações no trabalho

    OpenAIRE

    Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2006-01-01

    Este texto busca compreender as insatisfações da equipe de Enfermagem no trabalho. Propomos a associação com a teoria das necessidades humanas de Abraham Maslow como um meio de sistematizar e entender as situações recorrentes ao dia-a-dia e prática da Enfermagem. As necessidades estruturam-se hierarquicamente em fisiológicas, segurança, social, auto-estima e auto-realização indicando o grau de satisfação (da enfermidade à plenitude) de um indivíduo ou grupo. A vantagem desta abordagem consist...

  2. Ethnic Differences and Motivation Based on Maslow?s Theory on Iranian Employees

    OpenAIRE

    MOUSAVI, Seyed Hadi; DARGAHI, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the levels of Maslow?s hierarchy of needs theory had been fulfilled and to compare the Maslow?s hierarchy of needs among Iranian different ethnic groups at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). Methods: This research was a descriptive-analytical study which conducted among administrative employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences; Tehran, Iran. The structured questionnaire consisted of 20 questions and demographic details. Each qu...

  3. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Psychological Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Hvezda, Judith; Sullivan, Shannon; Plourde, Roger

    1983-07-01

    A questionnaire was developed to measure the level of satisfaction in people of the five basic needs described by Maslow: physiological, safety, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization. For 166 undergraduates the level of basic needs satisfaction was related, as predicted by Maslow, to scores on measures of neuroticism and belief in an internal locus of control.

  4. Forensic psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of different issues that a forensic psychologists encounter at work. Forensic assessment might be needed in civil law cases, administrative procedures and in criminal law cases. The paper focuses on referrals in criminal law cases regarding matters such as assessing competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility and violence risk assessment. Finally, the role of expert testimony on eyewitness memory, which is not used in practice in Slovenia yet, is presented.

  5. Maslow's hierarchy of needs: a framework for achieving human potential in hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalenski, Robert J; Raspa, Richard

    2006-10-01

    Although the widespread implementation of hospice in the United States has led to tremendous advances in the care of the dying, there has been no widely accepted psychological theory to drive needs assessment and intervention design for the patient and family. The humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow, especially his theory of motivation and the hierarchy of needs, has been widely applied in business and social science, but only sparsely discussed in the palliative care literature. In this article we review Maslow's original hierarchy, adapt it to hospice and palliative care, apply the adaptation to a case example, and then discuss its implications for patient care, education, and research. The five levels of the hierarchy of needs as adapted to palliative care are: (1) distressing symptoms, such as pain or dyspnea; (2) fears for physical safety, of dying or abandonment; (3) affection, love and acceptance in the face of devastating illness; (4) esteem, respect, and appreciation for the person; (5) selfactualization and transcendence. Maslow's modified hierarchy of palliative care needs could be utilized to provide a comprehensive approach for the assessment of patients' needs and the design of interventions to achieve goals that start with comfort and potentially extend to the experience of transcendence.

  6. ABRAHAM IN GALATIANS AND IN GENESIS1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Genesis 12-25, attention is paid to the promise of land and on Abraham as a blessing to ... It is a truism to claim that Abraham serves as an important figure in both the ..... them rest (Jos 21:43), became the ground for hope for the people who.

  7. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  8. [Salzburg 1908. Karl Abraham caught between Freud and Jung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoonheten, Anna Bentinck

    2010-01-01

    The first psychoanalytic congress in Salzburg has often been described as a great success with one blemish: a conflict between Jung and Abraham, mainly caused by the rivalry in Abraham's behaviour. A new study of the material, and taking Abraham's perspective, provides a different view. Abraham, still a beginner in psychoanalysis, got in the way of Freud and Jung who at that time had a deep theoretical disagreement. In the end they both blamed Abraham.

  9. Jonestown in the Shadow of Maslow's Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Edgar M.; Wigglesworth, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the light of the Jonestown tragedy. Maintains that members of the People's Temple felt frustrated in attaining the lower levels in the world of reality, and so moved outside the pyramid in search of the top, self-actualization. In the process, their primary needs were met. Journal availability: see SO 507…

  10. A Suggested Modification to Maslow's Need Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, David L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Since its development, Maslow's need hierarchy has been criticized and applauded. This investigation was undertaken to explore a modification of the upper levels of the need hierarchy based upon the application of power, competition, and achievement to self, as well as the concept of "other directed." (Author)

  11. The Assessment of Motivation within Maslow's Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1982-01-01

    Reports progress in the development of the Needsort, a research tool, for the assessment of the three developmentally earliest, within Maslow's framework, conative needs (physiological, safety, belongingness). Discusses item analyses, item selection methods, reliability studies, and validation studies across a broad range of populations. (Author)

  12. Estimation of abraham solvation equation coefficients for hydrogen bond formation from abraham solvation parameters for solute activity and basicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abraham solvation equations find widespread use in environmental chemistry and pharmaco-chemistry. The coefficients in these equations, which are solvent (system) descriptors, are usually determined by fitting experimental data. To simplify the determination of these coefficients in Abraham

  13. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air−n-hexadecane and n-octanol−water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  14. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air-n-hexadecane and n-octanol-water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was

  15. A Study of Recognition of the Lesser Achievements of Low Ranking Enlisted Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    Abraham Maslow are physiological, safety, belongingness and love, self - esteem and self -actualization.2 Considering them In order, the first two...LITERATURE BEHAVIORAL CONSIDERATIONS Self -Esteepu Abraham Maslow lists man’s basic needs as being: physiological, safety, belonglngness and love... Esteem needs are felt to be of central importance by psychoanalysts and clinical psychologists. In the words of Maslow , «. . .satisfaction of the self

  16. Reexamination of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2017-09-01

    Here the Abraham-Minkowski controversy on the correct definition of the light momentum in a macroscopic medium is revisited with the purpose to highlight that an effective medium formalism necessarily restricts the available information on the internal state of a system, and that this is ultimately the reason why the dilemma has no universal solution. Despite these difficulties, it is demonstrated that in the limit of no material absorption and under steady-state conditions, the time-averaged light (kinetic) momentum may be unambiguously determined by the Abraham result, both for bodies at rest and for circulatory flows of matter. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of quantum optics of moving media, and we examine in detail the fundamental role of the Minkowski momentum in such a context.

  17. IPB: Predicting an Unpredictable Enemy Why We do it? Why the S2 can’t do it? What the Staff Should

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    On Intelligence; Richard Heuer, a social psychologist that works for the CIA from his work The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis; and Abraham Maslow ...CIA from his work The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis; and Abraham Maslow , the renowned psychologist from his work A Theory of Human Motivation...individual staff members, conflicts arise as the result of growth needs. Two needs, self esteem and self actualization provide the highest drive to

  18. Two Tests of Maslow's Theory of Need Fulfillment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Ellen L.

    1984-01-01

    Conducted a two-part test of Maslow's theory of human motivation and explored the relationships between need deficiencies and (1) need importance and (2) life satisfaction in female college graduates (N=474). Results support Maslow's model regarding need deficiencies and their relationship to life satisfaction. (LLL)

  19. Maslow and Field Experiences in Competency-Based Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Allen R.

    Student teaching is examined in relation to Maslow's theory of human motivation that proposes an inherent human tendency toward self-actualization. It is pointed out that the majority of student teachers operate in fear as they enter their final phase of teacher training, and according to Maslow, they are operating at the safety level, concerned…

  20. What do Psychologists do?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 9. What do Psychologists do? - Two Examples from Research in Cognitive Psychology. Kamala V Mukunda. General Article Volume 3 Issue 9 September 1998 pp 35-44 ...

  1. Danish psychologists as psychotherapists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Nielsen, Jan; Orlinsky, David

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists are by far the biggest group of professional psychotherapists in Denmark, and this article presents data from two samples of psychologist psychotherapists collected at an interval of 15 years. The subjects in both samples responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core ...... and further analysis suggests a possible future scenario with Cognitive dominance. Personal and demographical characteristics are presented, including data on current life satisfaction and current life stress. Finally, ideas for future exploration and analysis are given....

  2. Maslow's Implied Matrix: A Clarification of the Need Hierarchy Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Edward

    1978-01-01

    Maslow's need hierarchy theory is restated by means of a matrix arrangement of the constructs within the theory. After consideration of the consequences of this restatement, some significant research is discussed and directions for future research suggested. (Author)

  3. Breaking the Toxic Leadership Paradigm in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    psychologist Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Maslow categorized human needs into a five-level pyramid with physiological needs forming the base...followed by safety needs, love and belonging needs, esteem needs, and finally, self actualization. Maslow theorized that people could only realize and

  4. Behavioral Econometrics for Psychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    We make the case that psychologists should make wider use of structural econometric methods. These methods involve the development of maximum likelihood estimates of models, where the likelihood function is tailored to the structural model. In recent years these models have been developed...

  5. New psychologist at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain, started work at CERN on 1 November. The psychologist’s office, formerly part of the Social Affairs Service in Human Resources, has now moved to the Medical Service (office 57-1-024). It is open every Tuesday and Thursday.   The new psychologist, Sigrid Malandain. Working in an organisation like CERN has numerous advantages. However, as in any professional setting, the work can sometimes bring stress, anxiety, overwork and so on. For this reason, a few years ago CERN brought in a psychologist for the staff. “As a psychologist, my role isn’t just to deal with known problems, but also to make assessments and, if possible, prevent difficult situations arising. Sometimes people realise that something is wrong, but they can’t say why. In such cases, I may be able to use a discussion to assess the nature of the problem and determine if further sessions are needed. If that is the case, I can either conduct the session...

  6. A Factor Analysis of Need-Fulfillment Items Designed to Measure Maslow Need Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L. K.; Roach, Darrell

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to factor analyze a set of items frequently used to measure Maslow need categories to obtain further information on their structure in relation to the Maslow system. (Author)

  7. Abraham Lincoln and the global economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormats, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Abraham Lincoln would have well understood the challenges facing many modern emerging nations. In Lincoln's America, as in many developing nations today, sweeping economic change threatened older industries, traditional ways of living, and social and national cohesion by exposing economies and societies to new and powerful competitive forces. Yet even in the midst of the brutal and expensive American Civil war--and in part because of it--Lincoln and the Republican Congress enacted bold legislation that helped create a huge national market, a strong and unified economy governed by national institutions, and a rising middle class of businessmen and property owners. Figuring out how to maximize the benefits of globalization while minimizing its disruptions is a formidable challenge for policy makers. How do you expand opportunities for the talented and the lucky while making sure the rest of society doesn't fall behind? It may be helpful to look at the principles that informed the policies that Lincoln and the Republican Congress instituted after they came to power in 1861: Facilitate the upward mobility of low- and middle-income groups to give them a significant stake in the country. Emphasize the good of the national economy over regional interests. Affirm the need for sound government institutions to temper the dynamics of the free enterprise system. Tailor policies to the national situation. Realize that a period of turmoil may present a unique opportunity for reform. These principles drove the reforms that helped Americans cope with and benefit from rapid technological advances and the fast integration of the American economy in the nineteenth century. They may be instructive to today's policy makers who are struggling to help their own citizens integrate into the fast-changing global economy of the twenty-first century.

  8. Counterinsurgency and Strategic Public Health: Shifting Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    government’s 3 effectiveness and, thus, its control. Another insight into this dynamic can be seen through the eyes of Abraham Maslow , a prominent...humanistic psychologist. Maslow defines a hierarchy of needs which builds a person toward self-actualization. He postulates the most basic of human...because if a person were deprived of all needs, the physiological ones would come first in the person’s search for satisfaction.”(emphasis added) Maslow

  9. DOD/NGO Relations and Stability, Security, Transition and Reconstruction Operations in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    through the eyes of Abraham Maslow , a prominent humanistic psychologist. Maslow defined a hierarchy of needs which builds a person toward self...ones would come first in the person’s search for satisfaction.”(emphasis added) Maslow further postulates that once physiological needs are met, a...intimidation as their only means to remain in power. Understanding this hierarchy of needs is the key to developing stable, effective government within an

  10. Maslow and Motherboards: Taking a Hierarchical View of Technology Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Presents a planning model for educational uses of technology that is based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Topics include established infrastructure; effective administration; extensive resources; enhanced teaching, including creating distance learning opportunities; empowered students, including evaluation methods and information literacy skills;…

  11. Bullying by Exclusion: Gifted Students and "Maslow's Paradox"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder-Davis, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this column the author explores the middle school nexus of asynchronicity, Maslow's hierarchy of needs and bullying as they apply to gifted students in secondary schools, with an emphasis on the middle school student. The premise is typically referred to as "achievement vs. affiliation," (Ford, 2004; Neihart, 2006, 2008) and concerns the…

  12. A Program Based on Maslow's Hierarchy Helps Students in Trouble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Mary Ruth; Saunders, Ron; Watkins, J. Foster

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the development of an "alternative school" in an urban school system for students having trouble in the regular secondary setting. The program was based upon "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" and is described in detail. The initial assessment of the program produced very positive results.

  13. A Second Look at Maslow's Hierarchy of Basic Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles M.

    Implications of Maslow's Need Hierarchy are considered in this paper, along with possible qualifications to the suggested structure and potential effects of superimposing relative deprivation theory onto the hierarchy as an approach to adult education. The interfacing of needs and alternative structurings is discussed in terms of two theories: (1)…

  14. Maslow Revisited: Constructing a Road Map of Human Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Dennis; Yballe, Leodones

    2007-01-01

    Given the scope and intent of Maslow's work, the current textbook treatment is wanting. Therefore, an inductive exercise has been created and is offered here to build "the road map of human nature." This age-old, philosophic focus on our true nature has been a way to successfully engage and inspire both our students and our pedagogy. In the spirit…

  15. Essays in general relativity a Festschrift for Abraham Taub

    CERN Document Server

    Tipler, Frank J

    1981-01-01

    Essays in General Relativity: A Festschrift for Abraham Taub is collection of essays to honor Professor Abraham H. Taub on the occasion of his retirement from the mathematics faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. Relativistic hydrodynamics has always been a subject dear to Taub's heart. In fact, many basic results on special relativistic fluid flows are due to him, and he has been a major contributor to the study of fluid flows near shocks. The book contains 16 chapters and begins with a discussion of a geometrical approach to general relativity. This is followed by separate cha

  16. The Blessing of Abraham: Seeking an Interpretive Link between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of biblical exegesis with the sub-method of lexical and syntactic analysis, it was found out that the blessing is that of sonship through Jesus Christ by virtue of the gift of the Holy Spirit and not material or financial blessing. Keywords: The Blessing of Abraham; Prosperity Preachers; Genesis 12; Galatians 3; Paul's theology ...

  17. "Convivencia," Abrahamic Religions and Study Abroad in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Mitchell A.; Holt, Sally

    2018-01-01

    As a point of departure for understanding the complexities of Spanish national and individual identities, it is incumbent that a student begin by investigating Spanish iterations of the three Abrahamic religions. This presupposition of religion's centrality in the pursuit of better informed understandings of the Spanish nation, people, history and…

  18. “Mine”. The Rhetoric of Abraham Kuyper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, Arie L.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Even the critics of Dutch Reformed theologian, politician, and publicist Abraham Kuyper (1837–1920) acknowledge his great power of oratory. This essay examines the nature of Kuyper’s rhetoric in a mythopoetic perspective that sees its inspiration in a romantic understanding of artistic

  19. Militant Religiopolitical Rhetoric: How Abraham Kuyper Mobilized His Constituency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, Arie; Van den Hemel, Ernst; Szafraniec, Asja

    2016-01-01

    Even the critics of Dutch Reformed theologian, politician, and publicist Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920) acknowledge his great power of oratory. This essay examines the nature of Kuyper's rhetoric in a mythopoetic perspective that sees its inspiration in a romantic understanding of artistic inspiration

  20. Identifying School Psychologists' Intercultural Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyana, Olivia E.; Edwards, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are encouraged to analyze their intercultural sensitivity because they may be subject to personal attitudes and beliefs that pejoratively influence their work with students and clients who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). However, gaps remain in the literature regarding whether school psychologists are prepared…

  1. Maslow and the motivation hierarchy: measuring satisfaction of the needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Robert J; Gao, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    For each of the 5 needs in Maslow's motivational hierarchy (physiological, safety-security, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization), operational definitions were developed from Maslow's theory of motivation. New measures were created based on the operational definitions (1) to assess the satisfaction of each need, (2) to assess their expected correlations (a) with each of the other needs and (b) with four social and personality measures (i.e., family support, traditional values, anxiety/worry, and life satisfaction), and (3) to test the ability of the satisfaction level of each need to statistically predict the satisfaction level of the next higher-level need. Psychometric tests of the scales conducted on questionnaire results from 386 adult respondents from the general population lent strong support for the validity and reliability of all 5 needs measures. Significant positive correlations among the scales were also found; that is, the more each lower-level need was satisfied, the more the next higher-level need was satisfied. Additionally, as predicted, family support, traditional values, and life satisfaction had significant positive correlations with the satisfaction of all 5 needs, and the anxiety/worry facet of neuroticism had significant negative correlations with the satisfaction of all the needs. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the satisfaction of each higher-level need was statistically predicted by the satisfaction of the need immediately below it in the hierarchy, as expected from Maslow's theory.

  2. KATA-KATA KANSEI PADA PRODUK BERBASIS BUDAYA UNTUK PEMENUHAN KEBUTUHAN MASLOW

    OpenAIRE

    Heddy Shri Ahimsa-Putra, Ratih Setyaningrum, I.G. Bagus Budi Dharma, dan

    2015-01-01

    Cultural aspect is not a priority within a product design and development process in Indonesia. On the other hand,cross culture products have success in the global market. That product is included in each Maslow level. Culturalaspect in product design is applied with a semantics, such as kansei words. The purpose of the research is to identifyculture products and kansei words based on Maslow needs. The research stage begins with mapping cultureproducts based on Maslow needs and determining ka...

  3. Public Health History Corner Abraham Flexner:the iconoclast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bucci

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Flexner, in 1910, led an attack on the inadequacy of the medical schools in the United States. In opposition to the traditional clinical type training he proposed a new laboratory centred model, with a strong emphasis on basic sciences. These university lab experiments were one of the main driving forces in the development of medical sciences in the USA. The work of a pedagogue caused a real medical revolution, the outcomes of which were important but not all positive.

  4. Public Health History Corner Abraham Flexner:the iconoclast

    OpenAIRE

    Bucci, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Abraham Flexner, in 1910, led an attack on the inadequacy of the medical schools in the United States. In opposition to the traditional clinical type training he proposed a new laboratory centred model, with a strong emphasis on basic sciences. These university lab experiments were one of the main driving forces in the development of medical sciences in the USA. The work of a pedagogue caused a real medical revolution, the outcomes of which were important but not all positive.

  5. Assessing Coverage of Maslow's Theory in Educational Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wininger, Steven R.; Norman, Antony D.

    2010-01-01

    Although Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory (HNT) is one of the most prevalent theories in psychology, the authors argued that it is also one of the most misinterpreted or misrepresented, particularly in educational psychology textbooks. Therefore, after carefully reading Maslow's writings on HNT they conducted a content analysis of 18 educational…

  6. The Implications of A. H. Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs" Theory for Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Earle Theodore

    The Maslow Hierarchy of Needs was reviewed and implications were sought for adult education theory, program planning and operation, promotional activities, and program evaluation. Maslow's work suggested self-actualization as an ultimate goal, meaning that adult education programs should be structured to foster both the acquisition of facts,…

  7. KATA-KATA KANSEI PADA PRODUK BERBASIS BUDAYA UNTUK PEMENUHAN KEBUTUHAN MASLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Setyaningrum, I.G. Bagus Budi Dharma, dan Heddy Shri Ahimsa-Putra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cultural aspect is not a priority within a product design and development process in Indonesia. On the other hand,cross culture products have success in the global market. That product is included in each Maslow level. Culturalaspect in product design is applied with a semantics, such as kansei words. The purpose of the research is to identifyculture products and kansei words based on Maslow needs. The research stage begins with mapping cultureproducts based on Maslow needs and determining kansei words. The result of this research is a classification ofkansei words. It is used to guide product development. Product development based on Maslow needs is one strategyto attract consumers. Therefore, product development and diversification product had met the needs of Maslow

  8. George Kelly: cognitive psychologist, humanistic psychologist, or something else entirely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, John G

    2008-11-01

    George Kelly was regarded by some of his contemporaries as a cognitive psychologist and by others as a humanistic psychologist. Kelly himself resisted being rubricized. He did, however, name several people who had been influential in his life and work, one of whom was J.F. Herbart. A comparison of Herbart and Kelly reveals several similarities. Both shared a belief that psychology was fundamentally a mathematical discipline. Both eliminated distinctions usually taken for granted in psychology, such as emotion versus cognition. Reconstructing Kelly's relation to Herbart allows one to see more clearly why Kelly was such a unique figure in 20th century psychology.

  9. An empirical test of Maslow's theory of need hierarchy using hologeistic comparison by statistical sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Sharts, J

    1986-10-01

    Maslow's hierarchy of basic human needs provides a major theoretical framework in nursing science. The purpose of this study was to empirically test Maslow's need theory, specifically at the levels of physiological and security needs, using a hologeistic comparative method. Thirty cultures taken from the 60 cultural units in the Health Relations Area Files (HRAF) Probability Sample were found to have data available for examining hypotheses about thermoregulatory (physiological) and protective (security) behaviors practiced prior to sleep onset. The findings demonstrate there is initial worldwide empirical evidence to support Maslow's need hierarchy.

  10. Recognition of names of eminent psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C P

    1976-10-01

    Faculty members, graduate students, undergraduate majors, and introductory psychology students checked those names they recognized in the list of 228 deceased psychologists, rated for eminence, provided by Annin, Boring, and Watson. Mean percentage recognition was less than 50% for the 128 American psychologists, and less than 25% for the 100 foreign psychologists, by the faculty subjects. The other three groups of subjects gave even lower recognition scores. Recognition was probably also influenced by recency; median year of death of the American psychologists was 1955, of the foreign psychologists, 1943. High recognition (defined as recognition by 80% or more of the faculty group) was achieved by only 34 psychologists, almost all of them American. These highly recognized psychologists also had high eminence ratings, but there was an equal number of psychologists with high eminence ratings that were poorly recognized.

  11. Radiation forces and the Abraham-Minkowski problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Iver

    2018-04-01

    Recent years have witnessed a number of beautiful experiments in radiation optics. Our purpose with this paper is to highlight some developments of radiation pressure physics in general, and thereafter to focus on the importance of the mentioned experiments in regard to the classic Abraham-Minkowski problem. That means, what is the “correct” expression for electromagnetic momentum density in continuous matter. In our opinion, one often sees that authors over-interpret the importance of their experimental findings with respect to the momentum problem. Most of these experiments are actually unable to discriminate between these energy-momentum tensors at all, since they can be easily described in terms of force expressions that are common for Abraham and Minkowski. Moreover, we emphasize the inherent ambiguity in applying the formal conservation principles to the radiation field in a dielectric, the reason being that the electromagnetic field in matter is only a subsystem which has to be supplemented by the mechanical subsystem to be closed. Finally, we make some suggestions regarding the connection between macroscopic electrodynamics and the Casimir effect, suggesting that there is a limit for the magnitudes of the cutoff parameters in QFT related to surface tension in ordinary hydromechanics.

  12. An Analysis of the Factors Affecting the Career Orientation/Turnover Behavior of Female Naval Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    motivation is the "need hierarchy." Developed by psychologist Abraham Maslow (1970). According to Maslow the source of human motivation is the fulfillment of...that there are five major, levels of needs in an ascending hierarchy: physiological, safety, social, self - esteem and self actualization. Once a need is...can induce a self -propagating cycle for extended periods of time. This is because the gaps formed in the military hierarchy by attrition force fewer

  13. Personality Dynamics in a Military Training Command and Its Relationship to Maslow's Motivation Hierarch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Jerome T.; Schuh, Allen J.

    1971-01-01

    Questionnaire data pertaining to perceived need deficiencies were analyzed to test the concept of a hierarchy of need levels (Maslow's theory). Significant experimental control" differences were not found until deprivation was experienced by the experimental group. (Author)

  14. Abraham Lincoln’s Attitudes on Slavery and Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Nagler

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The life of Abraham Lincoln coincided with dramatic societal transformations that shaped the future of the United States. In the center of these developments stood the question whether that nation could continue to grow with the system of slavery or not. Inherently linked to that issue—that almost dissolved the nation—was the problem of racism and the future of race relations after emancipation. To examine Lincoln’s attitudes on slavery and race opens a window for us to look at his own struggles concerning these issues, but at the same time at the political and cultural contentions at large of a nation that he helped to save as President during the American Civil War. His legacy as the "Great Emancipator,” liberating over four millions slaves, has generated a controversial debate on Lincoln’s position towards race and racism.

  15. [The psychologists in Argentina. Quantitative data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, M M

    1994-03-01

    A partial report from a study dealing with Psychology's current status in Argentina is presented. Pursuant to this preliminary study 36,128 psychologists have taken their degree at both State and private universities in Argentina--between 1956, when the first Department of Psychology was created, and 1992. So, over a 32.5-million population (as per the 1991 census), there is a psychologist every 897 inhabitants, or 111 psychologists every 100,000 inhabitants. According to psychologists' geographical distribution, the highest density is to be found in the capital city of Buenos Aires (one psychologist every 246 inhabitants) while the lowest density is to be found in the Province of Chaco (one psychologist every 17,465 inhabitants). During year 1993, a total of 26,726 students have been studying Psychology at the different Argentine universities: Of these, 6,858 have taken their Psychology degree during this academic year. A great majority of psychologists work in the clinical field, being Psychoanalysis their prominent theoretical orientation. Ladies psychologists supposedly account for 85% of the overall number of psychologists. Psychological Associations have 24,878 active psychologists recorded, of which a great majority work in the clinical field.

  16. Relentless Verity: Education for Being-Becoming-Belonging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, James Robbins

    The dynamic relationship of the concepts of being, becoming, and belonging is and must be the heart and central goal of adult education. The concept can be understood most readily by examination of the writings of humanist psychologists such as Carl Rogers, Fritz Perls, Gordon Allport, and Abraham Maslow. Some characteristics or dimensions of an…

  17. Proceedings of the 1975 Dallas-SPRE Institute. A Progressive Approach to Park and Recreation Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Donald C., Ed.

    This report is divided into three parts. The first part is the opening address. It argues for the importance of constructive leisure as a human need. The essay suggests that recreation educators need to learn from such humanistic psychologists as Abraham Maslow, who have studied what man needs to achieve self-actualization. The second part of the…

  18. Maslow Portfolio Selection for Individuals with Low Financial Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxin Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we extend Maslow’s need hierarchy theory and the two-level optimization approach by developing the framework of the Maslow portfolio selection model (MPSM by solving the two optimization problems to meet the need of individuals with low financial sustainability who prefer to satisfy their lower-level (safety need first, and, thereafter, look for higher-level (self-actualization need to maximize the optimal return. We illustrate our proposed model with real American stock data from the S&P index and conduct the out-of-sample analysis to compare the performance of our proposed Variance-CVaR (conditional value-at-risk MPSM with both traditional mean-variance and mean-CVaR models. Our empirical analysis shows that our proposed Variance-CVaR MPSM is not only sustainable, but also obtains the best out-of-sample performance in the sense that the optimal portfolios obtained by using our proposed Variance-CVaR MPSM obtain the highest cumulative returns in the out-of-sample period among the models used in our paper. We note that our proposed model is not only suitable to individuals with low financial sustainability, but also suitable to institutions or investors with high financial sustainability.

  19. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under investigation from the perspective of the reflexive capacities of the psychologist as one among other human beings and/or members of a specific culture. Most obvious was the emergence – in the late nineteent...

  20. School Psychologists' Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, Travis G.

    2004-01-01

    School Psychologistsâ Job Satisfaction: Ten Years Later (ABSTRACT) This study was designed to replicate nationwide surveys completed in 1982 and 1992. The purpose was to examine and describe the levels of job satisfaction and the relationship between the variables in a national sample of school psychologists belonging to the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The sample for this study consisted of respondents who reported being full-time school practitioners. ...

  1. Why Abraham cannot speak?: Kierkegaard, Derrida and forthcoming Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Llevadot

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling praises Abraham as a symbol of the «suspension of the ethical». For this reason, Buber and Levinas condemnd this work and it has been recently linked to fundamentalism and terrorism. The aim of this article is to show that «the suspension of the ethical» implied in Abraham’s silence is not related to religious fanaticism but, on the contrary, it is related to a new ethics, to an «ethics belong ethics», or a «hiper-ethics» that Kierkegaard and Derrida try to think about. To this end, firstly, I will analyse the concept of the «ethical» as it is criticized by Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling; secondly, I will explain the role of silence in the new ethics; and finally, I will try to show the analogy between Kierkegaard’s concept of believing and Derrida’s concept of justice in Force of Law

  2. The psychologist's dilemma ESHHS Paper Utrecht 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hezewijk, René; Stam, Henderikus

    2010-01-01

    The Psychologists Dilemma Game René van Hezewijk and Henderikus Stam Among the recurrent cleavages that define 20th century psychology is the deep division between psychologies that distance the psychologist from the phenomenon under investigation from those that engage the question under

  3. The School Psychologist as a Chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Otto

    1971-01-01

    This paper reviews very briefly some of the comprehensive views of the functions of the school psychologists, presents some suggestions which have been made in recent years for the training of school psychological personnel, and discusses the complex interrelationships between the psychologist and all those people and variables which make up his…

  4. An Examination of Common Worship and Ceremonies among the Abrahamic Faiths: Implication for Religious Tolerance in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omomia, O. Austin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abrahamic faiths refer to the three most popular religions that traced their origin to Abraham. These religions are Judaism (the earliest of the three, Christianity and Islam (Islam is commonly adjudged as the most recent.This paper examined the common worship, customs and other religious ceremonies prevalent among the Abrahamic faiths. It also identified the common areas of agreement between the Abrahamic faiths with regards to the common religious related customs. It is on this strength that the paper argued that the Abrahamic faiths should emphasize on areas of unity rather than widen the gulf of disagreement. The paper employed the historical and sociological methods of investigation. It is recommended that the Abrahamic faiths should explore areas of unity in order to strengthen the cord of tolerance and peace in the world in general and Nigeria in particular.

  5. Confirmation of Maslow's Hypothesis of Synergy: Developing an Acceptance of Selfishness at the Workplace Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Jiro; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Fujii, Yasuhito

    2016-04-30

    This study aimed to develop a new Acceptance of Selfishness at the Workplace Scale (ASWS) and to confirm Maslow's hypothesis of synergy: if both a sense of contribution and acceptance of selfishness at the workplace are high, workers are psychologically healthy. In a cross-sectional study with employees of three Japanese companies, 656 workers answered a self-administered questionnaire on paper completely (response rate = 66.8%). Each questionnaire was submitted to us in a sealed envelope and analyzed. The ASWS indicated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86). Significant (p Maslow's hypothesis of synergy was confirmed.

  6. Perceived happiness of college students measured by Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, T F; Pettijohn, T F

    1996-12-01

    Broad categories have been suggested for the events which contribute to happiness. In 1943 Maslow might have argued that people are happy when they meet or continue to meet their basic needs in his hierarchy of needs. A survey was given to 150 college students to assess which of Maslow's levels of need is perceived to be most important to happiness. Falling or staying in love was chosen significantly more often than the other choices by undergraduates of both genders. These results suggest that love is considered to be an extremely important contributor to the feeling of happiness among college students.

  7. Maslow and Bandura : Classroom Implications of two Western Psychological Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    本稿では、Abraham Maslowの「欲求の階層理論」及びAlbert Banduraの「社会的学習理論」を中心に、これらが日本の英語教育にどのように利用でき、また実際に役に立つのかを検討する。もともと両理論は特定の学究分野を目指して立てられたものではないが、前者は学習のモーティベーションの面で、後者はモデルをターゲットに、真似て、繰り返すという学習の効果という面で、語学学習に充分応用できるものだと思われる。そこでそれを証明するために、筆者の受け持ちのクラスでアンケートを行い、学生の学習心理を調べ、上記の理論に照らし合わせて検討した。結果は国籍を問わず、また英語教育という環境においても応用できるものであり、きわめて有効であることが判明した。...

  8. Ponderomotive forces in electrodynamics of moving media: The Minkowski and Abraham approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    In the general setting of the problem, the explicit compact formulae are derived for the ponderomotive forces in the macroscopic electrodynamics of moving media in the Minkowski and Abraham approaches. Taking account of the Minkowski constitutive relations and making use of a special representation for the Abraham energy-momentum tensor enable one to obtain a compact expression for the Abraham force in the case of arbitrary dependence of the medium velocity on spatial coordinates and the time and for nonstationary external electromagnetic field. We term the difference between the ponderomotive forces in the Abraham and Minkowski approaches as the Abraham force not only under consideration of media at rest but also in the case of moving media. The Lorentz force is found which is exerted by external electromagnetic field on the conduction current in a medium, the covariant Ohm law, and the constitutive Minkowski relations being taken into account. The physical argumentation is traced for the definition of the 4-vector of the ponderomotive force as the 4-divergence of the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetic field in a medium.

  9. Ethnic Differences and Motivation Based on Maslow's Theory on Iranian Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Dargahi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory had been fulfilled and to compare the Maslow's hierarchy of needs among Iranian different ethnic groups at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This research was a descriptive-analytical study which conducted among administrative employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences; Tehran, Iran. The structured questionnaire consisted of 20 questions and demographic details. Each question had 4 parts to measure Maslow's hierarchy of needs. The questionnaire was distributed randomly among 133 employees to fill-up the demographic details and the other questions. Data was collected and analyzed by SPSS software, and One Way ANOVA, T-test, Spearman and Mann Whitney statistical methods. TUMS ethnic groups of the employees placed most importance on Basic, Self-esteem and Self-actualization. In addition, we found that Persians, Mazandaranians, and Turks ethnic groups, scored the most mean for Maslow's hierarchical needs compared to the other ethnic groups. Basic needs and safety needs is available amongst the different ethnic groups in Iran. As though, self-actualization needs are ultimate human goal, Iranian employees' ethnic groups pay emphasis on these needs. We believe that new structures and work practices such as prevailing cultural values and beliefs of the society or the organizations must be explored if Iranian-based organizations want to remain responsive to the needs of the workplace.

  10. A Challenge to the Conventional Wisdom of Herzberg and Maslow Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellott, Fred K.; Tutor, F. Dexter

    This document assessment of the basic theories of A. Maslow and F. Herzberg and the populations from which their theories were derived. Herzberg used personal interviews to gather data with which to conduct his studies and to test his theories regarding motivation and job satisfaction. Herzberg identified five factors associated with job…

  11. Nain's Hierarchy of Needs: An Alternative to Maslow's & ERG's Hierarchy of Needs

    OpenAIRE

    nain, bhavya

    2013-01-01

    This article gives reasons as to why Maslow's & ERG Theory of Needs is inaccurate. It also gives reasons why the same is inaccurate in an organizational perspective. The author also gives a alternative model of needs, namely the Nain Model, which is particularly applicable in an organizational perspective. This article has been written for those interested in Organizational Behaviour.

  12. Maslow--Move Aside! A Heuristical Motivation Model for Leaders in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroth, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is often used as an example of motivational theory in both practitioner and scholarly journals, yet considerable motivational research is being conducted that is not widely known, nor applied in practical settings. This paper summarizes several of those lines of inquiry and suggests applications for career and technical…

  13. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Navajo Students' Struggle for Self Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kay

    1996-01-01

    Maslow's theory of a hierarchy of needs is used to analyze Navajo youths' struggles for identity, fulfillment, and self-esteem. Answers to the challenges of substance abuse, violence, and gang membership are offered based upon George Bearden's eight-step plan, which stresses the importance of understanding human needs to perceive and transform…

  14. Maslow's Need Hierarchy Related to Educational Attitudes and Self-Concepts of Elementary Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noad, Brian

    1979-01-01

    The Work Motivation Inventory, Minnesota Teacher Attitude Inventory, and Adjective Self Description Instrument were administered to 128 University of Houston student teachers. Results indicated that educational attitudes and self-concept, operating jointly, significantly contributed to the variance in Maslow's scales of basic, safety, and…

  15. Maslow Hierarchy of Needs and OBRA 1987: Toward Need Satisfaction by Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    To improve well-being of nursing home residents and ensure compliance with the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, programs aimed at improving quality of life must strive to satisfy higher level needs of the elderly as identified in Maslow's hierarchy. (SK)

  16. Clinical psychologists' experiences of NHS organisational change

    OpenAIRE

    Colley, Rich; Eccles, Fiona; Hutton, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Organisational-change experiences of eight clinical psychologists working in the NHS were captured. Three themes revealed the challenges they experienced and how their knowledge and skills have helped them understand, cope with, and respond to change.

  17. Culture and Identity: Critical Considerations for Successful State-building Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    and Political Science, 2008), 3-4. http://www.crisisstates.com/download/wp/wpSeries2/wp25.2.pdf (accessed on February 14, 2010). 36 Abraham Maslow ...Hierarchy of Needs,” quoted in C. George Boeree, “ Abraham Maslow 1908-1970,” Personality Theories, http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/maslow.html...Press, 2007. Maslow , Abraham . “Hierarchy of Needs,” quoted in C. George Boeree, “ Abraham Maslow 1908- 1970,” Personality Theories, http

  18. Electromagnetic Momentum in Magnetic Media and the Abraham-Minkowski Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Lopez-Marino, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the consequences of a force density, [image omitted], studied by some authors, for the device designed by Lai (1980 "Am. J. Phys. 48" 658) to analyse which definition of electromagnetic momentum density, either Minkowski's or Abraham's, is consistent with mechanical torques that arise from the change in time of a magnetic field, which…

  19. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation between Historical and Fantasy Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Kim, Angie L.; Schwalen, Courtney E.; Harris, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children…

  20. A hitherto unknown edition of the Spanish Psalter by Abraham Usque (Ferrara 1554

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni, Aron di Leone

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele in Roma owns a Psalter in Spanish published in 1554 by Abraham Usque. It is the matter of a hitherto unknown second edition of the Psalterium printed in Ferrara in 1553. From the «Prologo» we learn that Abraham Usque was not only a simple printer but also the editor and one of the translators of this book. He also stated to have worked at the translation of the Biblia en lengua Española (Ferrara 1553 together with eminent scholars.

    En la Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele de Roma se conserva un Salterio en español publicado en 1554 por Abraham Usque. Se trata de una segunda edición hasta ahora desconocida de su Psalterium impreso en Ferrara en 1553. Por su «Prologo» sabemos que Abraham Usque no actuó sólo como un mero impresor sino que también participó en la edición y fue uno de los traductores del libro. En dicho «Prologo» afirma asimismo que, junto con otros eminentes eruditos, había trabajado en la traducción de la Biblia en lengua Española (Ferrara 1553.

  1. Paul Abraham: A Forgotten Scholar of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Paul Abraham, one of the Berlin Academy's most experienced researchers, was deported to Auschwitz in 1943. The fate of this Jewish scholar reveals much about the inner life of the Academy, and its treatment of Jewish staff, during the World War II. This paper describes his life, against a backdrop of war, revolution, and dictatorship, and in the…

  2. Relativistic analysis of the dielectric Einstein box: Abraham, Minkowski and total energy-momentum tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Tomas; Rubilar, Guillermo F.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The definition of the momentum of light inside matter is studied. → Fully relativistic analysis of the dielectric 'Einstein box' thought experiment. → Minkowski, Abraham and the total energy-momentum tensors are derived in detail. → Some assumptions hidden in the usual Einstein box argument are identified. → The Abraham momentum is not uniquely selected as the momentum of light in this case. - Abstract: We analyse the 'Einstein box' thought experiment and the definition of the momentum of light inside matter. We stress the importance of the total energy-momentum tensor of the closed system (electromagnetic field plus material medium) and derive in detail the relativistic expressions for the Abraham and Minkowski momenta, together with the corresponding balance equations for an isotropic and homogeneous medium. We identify some assumptions hidden in the Einstein box argument, which make it weaker than it is usually recognized. In particular, we show that the Abraham momentum is not uniquely selected as the momentum of light in this case.

  3. Energy secretary Spencer Abraham announces department of energy 20-year science facility plan

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "In a speech at the National Press Club today, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham outlined the Department of Energy's Office of Science 20-year science facility plan, a roadmap for future scientific facilities to support the department's basic science and research missions. The plan prioritizes new, major scientific facilities and upgrades to current facilities" (1 page).

  4. Towards an Abrahamic Ecumenism? The Search for the Universality of the Divine Mystery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, C.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution explores the notion of an Abrahamic ecumenism as proposed by Hans Küng and others in search for a way in which Islam, Judaism and Christianity can live peacefully together. It is argued, however, that to pursue a viable political pluralism, it is more promising for Christian

  5. Socio-historical impulse in literature: a study of Peter Abrahams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Abrahams is one of those who believe that with fiction, certain abnormalities in a society can be remedied thus Mine Boy albeitseen by some as a journalistic history of the South African society, like other works of art, is pure fiction, whose inspiration comes by what happens around the author. Our interest in this paper ...

  6. The National Association of School Psychologists' Self-Assessment Tool for School Psychologists: Factor Structure and Relationship to the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Rossen, Eric; Charvat, Jeff; Meyer, Lauren; Tanner, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (2010a), often referred to as the National Association of School Psychologists' Practice Model, describes the comprehensive range of professional skills and competencies available from school psychologists across 10 domains. The…

  7. Adapting Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a Framework for Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew J; Ricotta, Daniel N; Freed, Jason; Smith, C Christopher; Huang, Grace C

    2018-04-30

    Burnout in graduate medical education is pervasive and has a deleterious impact on career satisfaction, personal well-being, and patient outcomes. Interventions in residency programs have often addressed isolated contributors to burnout; however, a more comprehensive framework for conceptualizing wellness is needed. In this article the authors propose Maslow's hierarchy of human needs (physiologic, safety, love/belonging, esteem, and self-actualization) as a potential framework for addressing wellness initiatives. There are numerous contributors to burnout among physician-trainees, and programs to combat burnout must be equally multifaceted. A holistic approach, considering both the trainees personal and professional needs, is recommended. Maslow's Needs can be adapted to create such a framework in graduate medical education. The authors review current evidence to support this model. This work surveys current interventions to mitigate burnout and organizes them into a scaffold that can be used by residency programs interested in a complete framework to supporting wellness.

  8. A Cognitive-Systemic Reconstruction of Maslow's Theory of Self-Actualization

    OpenAIRE

    Heylighen, Francis

    1992-01-01

    Maslow's need hierarchy and model of the self-actualizing personality are reviewed and criticized. The definition of self-actualization is found to be confusing, and the gratification of all needs is concluded to be insufficient to explain self-actualization. Therefore the theory is reconstructed on the basis of a second-order, cognitive-systemic framework. A hierarchy of basic needs is derived from the urgency of perturbations which an autonomous system must compensate in order to maintain i...

  9. Understanding and motivating health care employees: integrating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, training and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Suzanne G; Dundis, Stephen P

    2003-09-01

    This paper applies Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model to the challenges of understanding and motivating employees in a rapidly changing health care industry. The perspective that Maslow's Model brings is an essential element that should be considered as the health care arena is faced with reorganization, re-engineering, mergers, acquisitions, increases in learning demands, and the escalating role of technology in training. This paper offers a new perspective related to how Maslow's Model, as used in business/organizational settings, can be directly related to current workforce concerns: the need for security and freedom from stress, social belongingness, self-esteem, self-actualization, altered work/social environments, and new opportunities for learning and self-definition. Changes in health care will continue at an accelerated pace and with these changes will come the need for more and more training. The use of technology in training has heightened access, faster distribution, innovation and increased collaboration. However, with this technology come attendant challenges including keeping up with the technology, the increased pace of training, depersonalization, and fear of the unknown. The Maslow model provides a means for understanding these challenges in terms of universal individual needs. How does one motivate employees in the face of increased demands, particularly when they are being asked to meet these demands with fewer resources? The answer is, in large part, to make the employee feel secure, needed, and appreciated. This is not at all easy, but if leaders take into consideration the needs of the individual, the new technology that provides challenges and opportunities for meeting those needs, and provides the training to meet both sets of needs, enhanced employee motivation and commitment is possible.

  10. Child Maltreatment and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment remains a relevant issue for school psychologists. This special issue was designed to provide school psychology practitioners, researchers, and other school personnel with current, empirically sound information about child maltreatment. This introduction provides context for the articles in this volume, including definitions of…

  11. Voices from the Field: School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Emily W.; Schanding, Thomas; Elmore, Gail

    2015-01-01

    As school psychologists, educators and parents most often approach us with questions relating to a concern. We have the privilege of serving students in their natural learning environment where skills and behaviors can be observed and analyzed, where interventions can be created and tested, and, hopefully, where a positive change can be made…

  12. The Preparation of School Psychologists in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzichristou, Chryse; Polychroni, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the preparation of school psychologists in Greece. It discusses the social and cultural contexts that have influenced the evolution of the discipline of psychology, the beginning of training programs in school psychology, and the current status of school psychological services. The structure of the Graduate Program of School…

  13. Georgetown University Research Psychologist Shares Terrorism Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2013-01-01

    Georgetown University research psychologist Dr. Anne Speckhard has spent the last decade interviewing more than four hundred terrorists, terrorist supporters, family members, close associates and even terrorist's hostages in Western Europe and the Middle East. Speckhard shared her insights with students at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security in July.

  14. Views of Chinese Psychologists toward Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gonggu; Saklofske, Donald H.; Oakland, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of intelligence and methods to assess it constitute important contributions to psychology and have had a profound impact on school psychology practice. While the perspectives and practices of North American and European psychologists toward the construct and assessment of intelligence generally are well known, the views held by…

  15. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  16. Psychotropic Medications: An Update for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Nancy; Kulick, Deborah; Phelps, LeAdelle

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of medications used frequently in the treatment of pediatric depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. The need for a collaborative relationship between the prescribing physician, school personnel, and the family is outlined. School psychologists can play crucial roles by providing the physician with information…

  17. Seizure Disorders: A Review for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Henry T.; Barrett, Rowland P.

    1995-01-01

    Recognizing possible seizure disorders, medication side-effects, behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures, and their treatments are important skills for school psychologists because they affect 500,000 United States school-aged children attending regular education. A knowledgeable school professional serves a critical role in integrating…

  18. 10 CFR 712.33 - Designated Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SOMD. (b) The Designated Psychologist must: (1) Hold a doctoral degree from a clinical psychology... license to practice clinical psychology in the state where HRP medical assessments occur; (4) Have met the... practice by any institution; (4) Being named a defendant in any criminal proceeding (felony or misdemeanor...

  19. Psychologists' diagnostic processes during a diagnostic interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, Marleen; Beerthuis, Vos R.J.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Witteman, C.L.M.; Witteman, Cilia L.M.; Swinkels, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    In mental health care, psychologists assess clients’ complaints, analyze underlying problems, and identify causes for these problems, to make treatment decisions. We present a study on psychologists’ diagnostic processes, in which a mixed-method approach was employed. We aimed to identify a common

  20. Interdepartmental Programs to Produce Bachelor's Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.; Kanda, Christine N.

    This paper disputes the notion that an advanced degree is required for all work in the field of psychology and suggests that those with a bachelor's degree in the field are employed in many areas where they use their training, but are not called psychologists. Another effect has been that industry and government offer few jobs to psychology…

  1. Selection for professional training as educational psychologists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I co-ordinate the MEd Psych programme of the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Stellenbosch. After the completion of this training programme as well as an internship of twelve months, candidates are qualified to register as educational psychologists at the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

  2. The Orden de oraciones de mes arreo (Ferrara 1555 and a Bakasah composed by Abraham Usque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzfeld, Siegfried

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The British Library owns the only known copy of a prayer-book composed in 1555 by Abraham Usque: the Libro de Oraciones de mes arreo. Usque was well aware of the difficulties, encountered by many former Marranos still unfamiliar with Jewish liturgy, to follow the sometime long and complicated synagogue service. Abraham tried to provide a simplified version of the Siddur and abridged some part of it. In the Prologue he claimed to have presented the prayers in a plain and straight way (arreo: without the necessity of having to leaf through the book to find the continuation of the service. Abraham inserted in his Siddur a new prayer by which he asked the Lord to put an end to the sufferings of Israel, to raise up a scion of David and to restore His people to its ancient glory and dignity. The Author wanted to provide a reassuring answer to the anxieties and hopes of his generation. Likewise the Jews who left Spain in 1492, also the Portuguese Marranos who reached Ferrara towards the middle of the XVIcentury, continued to cherish the deeply rooted cultural values of their erstwhile homeland and considered their departure from Iberian Peninsula as a most catastrophic event. Abraham Usque asked the Lord to be content with the punishments already inflicted to His people and to grant His pardon to the sons of Israel who had completely abandoned every idolatrie practice.La British Library conserva la única copia conocida de un libro de oraciones compuesto en 1555 por Abraham Usque: el Libro de Oraciones de mes arreo. Usque era consciente de las dificultades que tenían muchos de los antiguos marranos, aún no familiarizados con la liturgia judía, en seguir el a veces largo y complicado servicio de la sinagoga. Abraham trató de proporcionar una versión simplificada del sidur, y lo abrevió en parte. En el Prólogo afirmó que había presentado las oraciones de un modo llano y directo (arreo, sin que hubiera necesidad de hojear el libro en busca de la

  3. Abraham dans l'iconographie des trois religions monothéistes

    OpenAIRE

    Fellous, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Cet article a été publié en 2004. Depuis, de nouvelles recherches dans ce domaine m'ont conduite à en corriger certains éléments.; Abraham ou Abram est le premier patriarche du peuple d'Israël et nul autre que lui ne portera ce nom dans le récit biblique. Sa vie ne constitue pas un récit narratif continu mais une série d'épisodes souvent dramatiques qui inspirèrent largement l'iconographie biblique antique et médiévale. C'est le sacrifice d'Abraham, expression suprême de son amour pour Dieu q...

  4. Cognitive Assessment Practices: A Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Dixon, Shauna G.

    2014-01-01

    The present article describes an exploratory study regarding the preferred cognitive assessment practices of current school psychologists. Three hundred and twenty-three school psychologists participated in the survey. The results suggest that the majority of school psychologists endorsed that they base their assessment practices on an underlying…

  5. School Psychologist Diagnostic Decision-Making: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Robinson, Eric; Holt, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the diagnostic decision-making of school psychologists as a function of a student's disability and academic performance with three research questions using a randomly-selected sample of school psychologists from the state of Texas. Results from the first research question indicated that school psychologists significantly…

  6. School Psychologists' Role Concerning Children with Chronic Illnesses in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Camille; Machek, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the role of school psychologists in working with children with chronic illnesses in the schools. A total of 300 practicing school psychologists in public schools, drawn from the National Association of School Psychologists membership directory, completed a standard mail survey. The survey solicited information on (a) graduate…

  7. National Association of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  8. Health at the dawn of development: the thought of Abraham Horwitz

    OpenAIRE

    Pires-Alves, Fernando A.; Maio, Marcos Chor

    2015-01-01

    The article explores the ideas of Pan American Health Organization director Abraham Horwitz on the relations between health and development at the time the Alliance for Progress was established, in 1961. Taking development discourse as a public philosophy of international cooperation, the discussion centers on how Horwitz worked to mediate between health and development. Horwitz endeavored to establish arguments that highlighted the importance of social policy, especially in health; he also s...

  9. Electromagnetic momentum in magnetic media and the Abraham-Minkowski controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J L [Departamento de Fisica, Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Apartado Postal 21-463, Mexico DF, 04000 (Mexico); Campos, I [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 21-463, Mexico DF, 04000 (Mexico); Lopez-Marino, M A, E-mail: jlj@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: iecampos@prodigy.net.mx, E-mail: malm@itesm.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Central de Veracruz, Av. E. Garza Sada 1, Apartado Postal 314, Cordoba, Veracruz, 94500 (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    We explore the consequences of a force density, - (1)/c ({partial_derivative}M)/{partial_derivative}t x E, studied by some authors, for the device designed by Lai (1980 Am. J. Phys. 48 658) to analyse which definition of electromagnetic momentum density, either Minkowski's or Abraham's, is consistent with mechanical torques that arise from the change in time of a magnetic field, which produces an induced electric field that acts on free and polarization charges. It is found that Minkowski's definition is consistent with the mechanical torques associated with free charges, while Abraham's is consistent with mechanical torques associated with both free and polarization charges. We show that with this new force density Lai's work (1980 Am. J. Phys. 48 658) can be extended to include magnetic media. The results are consistent with Abraham's definition of electromagnetic momentum density, extending in this way its usefulness to magnetic media.

  10. The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats

    practice. In contrast, the results indicate that the force contained in music-theoretical concepts appears to have an impact on how music situations are interpreted. These diversities were expressed as three different types of music-therapists; the Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist, which......The Musician, the Researcher and the Psychologist The aim of this presentation is to illuminate and discuss some connections between the therapeutic profession and development of music pedagogic theory. A topic that initially emerged as a result of a sub-study in my PhD -project about professional...... practitioners music-pedagogical Powers of Definition. The purpose of this sub-study was to generate data about which concepts music-therapists use in their meta-reflections on musical situations in special-pedagogic related practices. The link between the sub-study’s results and the research question was based...

  11. History's mysteries demystified: becoming a psychologist-historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Blount, Kelli; Rutherford, Alexandra; Baker, David; Johnson, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, psychologist-historian Robert Watson argued that the study of history was of particular salience to psychology. In this article we explore the relationship between psychology and history and argue that the psychologist-historian plays a vital role in the discipline of psychology. We provide a brief overview of the emergence of the history of psychology as a professional subdiscipline, describe who psychologist-historians are, explain why they are needed, and detail how to join their ranks. We argue that increasing historical sophistication among psychologists will have beneficial effects on research and teaching, and we invite all psychologists to participate in the making of psychology's history.

  12. Professional Competency Profile of San Marcos psychologist

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana Manrique, Oswaldo; García A., Lupe; Sarria J., César; Morocho S., José; Herrera H., Edgar; Salazar C., Marina; Yanac R., Elisa; Sotelo L., Lidia; Sotelo L., Noemi

    2014-01-01

    Taking as reference the project Tuning, research inquires about the recognition of skills generic psychologist from his identification done by students for a fifth year of the period of intership or pre-professional practice and graduates, presenting the outcome of the five powers elected overwhelmingly, establishing their differentiation and relevance. Tomando como referencia el proyecto Tuning, la investigación indaga acerca del reconocimiento de las competencias genéricas del psicólogo ...

  13. Understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour: can Maslow's pyramid help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lenthe, Frank J; Jansen, Tessa; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M

    2015-04-14

    Socio-economic groups differ in their material, living, working and social circumstances, which may result in different priorities about their daily-life needs, including the priority to make healthy food choices. Following Maslow's hierarchy of human needs, we hypothesised that socio-economic inequalities in healthy food choices can be explained by differences in the levels of need fulfilment. Postal survey data collected in 2011 (67·2 % response) from 2903 participants aged 20-75 years in the Dutch GLOBE (Gezondheid en Levens Omstandigheden Bevolking Eindhoven en omstreken) study were analysed. Maslow's hierarchy of human needs (measured with the Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory) was added to age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models that linked education and net household income levels to healthy food choices (measured by a FFQ). Most participants (38·6 %) were in the self-actualisation layer of the pyramid. This proportion was highest among the highest education group (47·6 %). Being in a higher level of the hierarchy was associated with a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as more healthy than unhealthy bread, snack and dairy consumption. Educational inequalities in fruit and vegetable intake (B= -1·79, 95 % CI -2·31, -1·28 in the lowest education group) were most reduced after the hierarchy of needs score was included (B= -1·57, 95 % CI - ·09, -1·05). Inequalities in other healthy food choices hardly changed after the hierarchy of needs score was included. People who are satisfied with higher-level needs make healthier food choices. Studies aimed at understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour need to take differences in the priority given to daily-life needs by different socio-economic groups into account, but Maslow's pyramid offers little help.

  14. Prescribing Privileges for Psychologists: A Public Service or Hazard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E. Lakhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The privilege to prescribe pharmacotherapeutics has been granted in limited areas to psychologists. The psychologist's role in society may be approaching a great evolution that can dramatically impact the state of mental healthcare and the discipline of psychiatry. Opponents argue drug company funding and cheaper non-PhD psychological professionals fuel the movement for prescription rights for PhD level psychologists. However, proponents claim that this right would equip psychologists with greater psychotherapeutic modalities and the capability of having richer doctor-patient relationships to diagnose and treat underserved populations. Nonetheless, the paucity of prescribing psychologist studies cannot allow the biopsychosocial community to make firm opinions, let alone a decision on this debate. This article reviews the history of clinical psychology and highlights the potential divergence into collaborative clinical and health psychologists and autonomous prescribing psychologists.

  15. Recoilless fractions calculated with the nearest-neighbour interaction model by Kagan and Maslow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerink, G. J.; Pleiter, F.

    1986-08-01

    The recoilless fraction is calculated for a number of Mössbauer atoms that are natural constituents of HfC, TaC, NdSb, FeO, NiO, EuO, EuS, EuSe, EuTe, SnTe, PbTe and CsF. The calculations are based on a model developed by Kagan and Maslow for binary compounds with rocksalt structure. With the exception of SnTe and, to a lesser extent, PbTe, the results are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data and values derived from other models.

  16. A Study of Non-Economic Motivational Practice for Non-Professional Key Civilian Employees of Naval Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Current Individual Motivation Theories In 1954 psychologist Abraham Maslow oresented a theory based on the hierarch of needs in his book entitled... Esteem or Fpo Needs: (power; prestige; status; and self -confidence). In a fairly well-adjusted person these needs emerqe when the preceding needs are...fulfilled to the required dpqree. The majority of our society desire a stable, firmly based, usually high evaluation of themselves, for self - esteem or

  17. Leading Edge. Volume 7, Number 3. Systems Safety Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    foods were not always safe to eat given the sanitary conditions of the day. In 1943, the psychologist Abraham Maslow proposed a five-level... hierarchy of basic human needs, and safety was number two on this list. System safety is a specialized and formalized extension of our in- herent drive for...factors, hazards, mishaps, and ef- fects. The following is an example of each element within the hierarchy : An exposed sharp edge in a relay cabi- net

  18. 人間性心理学における「宗教」の位置づけ : A・マズローを中心に

    OpenAIRE

    今野, 啓介

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the treatment of religion by humanistic psychologists, especially Abraham Maslow (1908-1970), the founding father of that branch of psychology. Humanistic psychology is known as “the third force” in psychology in the mid-twentieth century, after psycho-analysis and behaviorism. This branch of psychology is distinguished from the other two by its focus on healthy-minded humans and their latent talents. Humanistic psychology also discusses religion more vigorously than b...

  19. Exploring the Future of Security in the Caribbean: a Regional Security Partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-14

    by these organizations and their members. 25 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Psychologist Abraham Maslow posited that safety [read security] is one...addressing the security needs of the Caribbean Basin and the United States? Of necessity , there are several secondary questions which must be...development of models/ theories of security. These theories of security abound, and have evolved as the international arena has changed. Realists, idealists and

  20. The Applicability of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model to Saudi Organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Fallatah, Rodwan Hashim Mohammed; Saudi Arabia Ministry of Higher Education

    2015-01-01

    One of the most influential and often quoted content theories of human motivation is Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Maslow’s theory is based on an assumption that all humans are motivated by a hierarchy of needs that are fundamental and universal. While many studies have attested to the wide relevance and applicability of this model, some other legitimate studies have argued that the theory is limited in terms of its universal applicability because of its Anglo-Saxon monoculture orienta...

  1. Ten Statisticians and Their Impacts for Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel B

    2009-11-01

    Although psychologists frequently use statistical procedures, they are often unaware of the statisticians most associated with these procedures. Learning more about the people will aid understanding of the techniques. In this article, I present a list of 10 prominent statisticians: David Cox, Bradley Efron, Ronald Fisher, Leo Goodman, John Nelder, Jerzy Neyman, Karl Pearson, Donald Rubin, Robert Tibshirani, and John Tukey. I then discuss their key contributions and impact for psychology, as well as some aspects of their nonacademic lives. © 2009 Association for Psychological Science.

  2. THE CONCEPTIONS OF MODESTY AND MODEST DRESS IN THE SCRIPTURES OF ABRAHAMIC RELIGIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Zohreh. Sadatmoosavi; Wan Zailan Kamaruddin Wan Ali; Mohammad Ali Shokouhi

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the issue of modesty norms and women's wearing modest dress were widely discussed in academic and media discourse. Basically, modesty does not belong to any specific culture but today it has become the subject of intense scrutiny in the Islamic context. However, all scriptures of Abrahamic religions; the Qur‘an, Old and New Testaments have emphasized on the observing modesty as a moral and social virtue for both men and women and recommended modest dress for women d...

  3. La sátira en los Cuentos chinos de Abraham Valdelomar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Silva-Santisteban Ubilluz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Valdelomar nació en Ica en 1888 y falleció trágicamente en Ayacucho en 1919, luego de una corta pero deslumbrante carrera literaria en la que acometió todos los géneros literarios. En Valdelomar se ha privilegiado al admirable cuentista que fue con detrimento del poeta, el ensayista y el dramaturgo en una obra vasta y desigual en que se destacan dos tonos nítidamente diferenciados: uno exotista y artificial y otro en que se respira y palpa el ambiente de su aldea natal.

  4. Health at the dawn of development: the thought of Abraham Horwitz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A. Pires-Alves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the ideas of Pan American Health Organization director Abraham Horwitz on the relations between health and development at the time the Alliance for Progress was established, in 1961. Taking development discourse as a public philosophy of international cooperation, the discussion centers on how Horwitz worked to mediate between health and development. Horwitz endeavored to establish arguments that highlighted the importance of social policy, especially in health; he also strove to reach different audiences and drew connections between elements like health, illness, and labor productivity, without ignoring the humanistic considerations so dear to the public health tradition

  5. Health at the dawn of development: the thought of Abraham Horwitz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Alves, Fernando A; Maio, Marcos Chor

    2015-01-01

    The article explores the ideas of Pan American Health Organization director Abraham Horwitz on the relations between health and development at the time the Alliance for Progress was established, in 1961. Taking development discourse as a public philosophy of international cooperation, the discussion centers on how Horwitz worked to mediate between health and development. Horwitz endeavored to establish arguments that highlighted the importance of social policy, especially in health; he also strove to reach different audiences and drew connections between elements like health, illness, and labor productivity, without ignoring the humanistic considerations so dear to the public health tradition.

  6. A Comparison of Able-Bodied and Disabled College Students on Erikson's Ego Stages and Maslow's Needs Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsman, Kay Harris; Hershenson, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Compared physically disabled and able-bodied college students on Erickson's epigenetic stages of life-span development, and Maslow's motivational needs hierarchy of personality development. The groups were more similar than dissimilar in ego development and needs level. College students with disabilities may be a select population because of their…

  7. The role of a psychologist in management: discipline, practice and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the marketing sector, Consumers Psychologist has over the years maximize organizational profit by providing strategies for products and services branding, pricing, packaging, sales promotion and advertising.

  8. The ethical ideologies of psychologists and physicians: a preliminary comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Malloy, David C; Sharpe, Donald; Fuchs-Lacelle, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    The ethical ideologies of psychologists (who provide health services) and physicians were compared using the Ethics Position Questionnaire. The findings reveal that psychologists tend to be less relativistic than physicians. Further, we explored the degree to which physicians and psychologists report being influenced by a variety of factors (e.g., family views) in their ethical decision making. Psychologists were more influenced by their code of ethics and less influenced by family views, religious background, and peer attitudes than were physicians. We argue that these differences reflect the varied professional cultures in which practitioners are trained and socialized.

  9. La obra astrológica de Abraham Ibn Ezra en dos códices castellanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainz de la Maza, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we offer a study and a commentary of Abraham Ibn Ezra’s astrological works that have been preserved in two old Spanish manuscripts translated from Hebrew in a late medieval converso environment.

    En el presente artículo ofrecemos un estudio y comentario de las obras astrológicas de Abraham Ibn Ezra que han sido preservadas en dos manuscritos en castellano traducidos del hebreo en un entorno converso a finales de la Baja Edad Media.

  10. Maslow's needs hierarchy as a framework for evaluating hospitality houses' resources and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mary Katherine Waibel; Blugis, Ann

    2011-08-01

    As hospitality houses welcome greater numbers of families and families requiring longer stays, they do so in the absence of a widely accepted theory to guide their understanding of guests' needs and evaluations of how well they meet those needs. We propose A. Maslow's (1970) Hierarchy of Needs as a conceptual framework for understanding what makes a hospitality house a home for families of pediatric patients and for guiding the activities of hospitality houses' boards of directors, staff, volunteers, and donors. This article presents findings from a theory-driven evaluation of one hospitality house's ability to meet guests' needs, describes the house's best practice standards for addressing guests' needs, and suggests areas for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Kyoto protocol - a victim of supply security? or: if Maslow were in energy politics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Christoph W. E-mail: christoph.frei@weforum.org

    2004-07-01

    History suggests that energy policy priorities can be stratified, similar to the way Maslow structured his famous pyramid of human needs. The essay below claims that access to energy, supply security, energy costs, environmental issues and social acceptance are not subject to trade-off, but to a hierarchy that underlies the importance of satisfying lower-order needs before addressing the higher-order needs. The essay demonstrates the hierarchy with an 'energy policy needs pyramid' based on historical evidence. The pyramid is used to analyze the viability of current items of the energy policy agenda. Conclusions indicate that the Kyoto protocol might be a victim of supply insecurity, that OPEC is good for the environment and that environmentalists should make the fight against energy poverty their first priority in order to achieve their overall goals.

  12. The concept of Maslow's pyramid for cardiovascular health and its impact on "change cycle".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2014-01-01

    Since the leading cause of morbidity and mortality is cardiovascular diseases, every individual should think regularly about possessing and maintaining cardiovascular health. In reality, this self-processing is delayed until the occurrence of complications related to cardiovascular inefficiency manifested as chest pain and/or dyspnea. However, people should be trained to think about their cardiovascular health issues as a vital need from early childhood. This goal is achievable by understanding it as a "true human derive" and its consecutive "behaviors". Most people are unaware of their real needs, and even if they know all of their cardiovascular needs, this knowledge is not projected in their behaviors. In the present paper, I try to outline the Herzberg two-factor hypothesis and Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

  13. The Kyoto protocol - a victim of supply security? or: if Maslow were in energy politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, Christoph W.

    2004-01-01

    History suggests that energy policy priorities can be stratified, similar to the way Maslow structured his famous pyramid of human needs. The essay below claims that access to energy, supply security, energy costs, environmental issues and social acceptance are not subject to trade-off, but to a hierarchy that underlies the importance of satisfying lower-order needs before addressing the higher-order needs. The essay demonstrates the hierarchy with an 'energy policy needs pyramid' based on historical evidence. The pyramid is used to analyze the viability of current items of the energy policy agenda. Conclusions indicate that the Kyoto protocol might be a victim of supply insecurity, that OPEC is good for the environment and that environmentalists should make the fight against energy poverty their first priority in order to achieve their overall goals

  14. A critical review of the application of Maslow's motivation theory in industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Barling

    1977-11-01

    Die toepassing van Maslow se motiveringsteorie binne die bedryfsituasie word hersien. Hoewel dit dikwels toegepas word, is die bruikbaarheid en die toepasbaarheid daarvan in sulke situasies nog nie met sekerheid bevestig nie. 'n Onderskeid word getref tussen die studies wat die toepasbaarheid en die wat die bruikbaarheid daarvan, vir die industriële situasie, bepaal. Die noodsaaklikheid van verdere navorsing, in besonder om vas te stel of daar 'n verband bestaan tussen die selfvervullingsbehoefte en produktiwiteit, (bv. die bruikbaarheid van die teorie vir die organisasie word besonder beklemtoon. Ten slotte word gesuggereer dat die teorie, in terme van die kriteria van voorspelling en kontrole van gedrag in organisasies, tekort skiet as 'n arbeidsmotiveringsteorie.

  15. The concept of Maslow's pyramid for cardiovascular health and its impact on “change cycle”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2014-01-01

    Since the leading cause of morbidity and mortality is cardiovascular diseases, every individual should think regularly about possessing and maintaining cardiovascular health. In reality, this self-processing is delayed until the occurrence of complications related to cardiovascular inefficiency manifested as chest pain and/or dyspnea. However, people should be trained to think about their cardiovascular health issues as a vital need from early childhood. This goal is achievable by understanding it as a "true human derive" and its consecutive "behaviors". Most people are unaware of their real needs, and even if they know all of their cardiovascular needs, this knowledge is not projected in their behaviors. In the present paper, I try to outline the Herzberg two-factor hypothesis and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. PMID:24963317

  16. Mathematics teachers' support and retention: using Maslow's hierarchy to understand teachers' needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Molly H.; Royster, David

    2016-10-01

    As part of a larger study, four mathematics teachers from diverse backgrounds and teaching situations report their ideas on teacher stress, mathematics teacher retention, and their feelings about the needs of mathematics teachers, as well as other information crucial to retaining quality teachers. The responses from the participants were used to develop a hierarchy of teachers' needs that resembles Maslow's hierarchy, which can be used to better support teachers in various stages of their careers. The interviews revealed both non content-specific and content-specific needs within the hierarchy. The responses show that teachers found different schools foster different stress levels and that as teachers they used a number of resources for reducing stress. Other mathematics-specific ideas are also discussed such as the amount of content and pedagogy courses required for certification.

  17. Identification of the needs of haemodialysis patients using the concept of Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumi, Magda

    2012-03-01

    Along with basic survival and other clinical outcomes, patients' quality of life is an important indicator to reflect the needs of these patients. Human needs are classified in Maslow's hierarchy, where the most essential basic physiological need provides the base, and self actualisation is at the top of pyramid. The aim of this study is to identify the patients' needs who are on maintenance haemodialysis using concept of Maslow's hierarchy. The descriptive study was conducted in the dialysis unit of Suez Canal University Hospitals. The study included 50 patients attending the dialysis unit. The findings showed that the patients' highest need was for self-esteem (92.0%), whereas the lowest was for love and belonging (38.0%). Statistically significant relationships were revealed between the identified love and belonging needs and patients' age and the duration of dialysis (p = 0.008). The total needs score was lower with the longer duration of dialysis (59.6 ± 7.3), compared to those with a duration less than 24 months (65.7 ± 8.1), p = 0.02. Based on the main study findings it is concluded that haemodialysis patients' highest need was for self-esteem, and the lowest was for love and belonging. These needs increased with longer duration of dialysis. Nurses need to be aware of these findings in order to be able to supply the necessary support to help the patient regain his/her self-concept. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  18. Editorial policies of the American Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norman B

    2006-01-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the American Psychologist (AP). Since the publication of its first issue in January 1946, AP has served as the flagship journal for the American Psychological Association (APA) and has played an important and unique role for the field of psychology. Because of the quality of the articles published in AP, the journal has evolved into one of the most influential and widely cited publications in psychology. The purpose of this editorial is to outline a revised set of policies for the journal that builds on and expands those developed by previous editors (see, e.g., Fowler, 1993; Goodstein, 1987; Kiesler, 1976; Pallack, 1981). Before outlining these policies, I would like to explore the relative status and influence of AP within the universe of psychological and social science journals. 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of School/Educational Psychologists in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negovan, Valeria; Dinca, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the academic and professional training of educational/school psychologists in Romania. Their training mirrors the country's history, legal provisions, social qualities, and current professional status of psychologists and their specialization. Efforts to increase the quality of training for educational/school psychologists…

  20. Elementary School Psychologists and Response to Intervention (RTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne; Marrs, Heath; Bogue, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) in elementary schools may have important implications for school psychologists. Therefore, it is important to better understand how elementary school psychologists perceive RTI and what barriers to successful RTI implementation they identify. Although previous research has investigated the…

  1. Employment Protection of School Psychologists: A Cautionary Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses legal issues arising from a district's decision not to renew the employment contract of a 61-year-old school psychologist after 9 years of service. The case focuses on the issues of age discrimination and whistleblowing, although it raises other questions of current relevance to school psychologists, such as the…

  2. Performance Evaluation and Accountability for School Psychologists: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2013-01-01

    The call for school psychologists to demonstrate accountability in the evaluation of services at the individual, group, and system levels comes at a time when school districts nationally are pursuing personnel evaluation models that link teachers' instructional practices to student achievement. School psychologists have an opportunity to take a…

  3. Training for Tragedy: Critical Challenges for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNisco, Alison

    2013-01-01

    School psychologists are often the first professionals to reach students with mental illness, and part of their role is to help identify threats that can lead to events such as the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., which left 20 children and six adults dead, including school psychologist Mary Sherlach, who was one of the…

  4. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  5. Unfamiliar Feminisms: Revisiting the National Council of Women Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ann; Johnston, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Second-generation women psychologists lived and worked between the two waves of organized feminist protest in the United States. This period is usually described as a time when feminist activity was suppressed or put on hold, and women psychologists from this period are often depicted as being collectively nonfeminist in orientation. In…

  6. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in supporting their children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. ... an effective inclusive school environment that forefront the role of educational psychologists in sharing knowledge and working collaboratively across the education system in South Africa.

  7. Online Video Gaming: What Should Educational Psychologists Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Based on a significant increase in correspondence to the author from parents, teachers and psychologists concerning "addiction" to online video games like "World of Warcraft", this paper provides a brief overview of the main issues surrounding excessive video game playing among adolescents. As an aid to educational psychologists, and based on two…

  8. School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School psychologists' views on challenges in facilitating school development through intersectoral collaboration. ... In the Western Cape, the context of this study, school psychologists are assigned to circuit teams, where they are expected to work collaboratively with other professionals to provide support to schools.

  9. Projective Test Use among School Psychologists: A Survey and Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Morrison, Rhonda; Brown, Melissa; Matthews, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of projective techniques by school psychologists has been a point of interest and debate, with a number of survey studies documenting usage. The purpose of this study is to update the status of projective use among school psychologists, with a specific focus on their use in the social emotional assessment of children in schools. In…

  10. Educational Psychologists: The Early Search for an Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary society's expectations of educational psychology, and of a role for educational psychologists within these expectations, were major themes of, and subtexts to, many of the papers delivered at recent annual courses of the Association of Educational Psychologists (AEP). The distinctive contribution of educational psychology and a…

  11. The Role of a School Psychologist in Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Rieger, Brian

    2009-01-01

    School psychologists historically have received little training on topics such as mild traumatic brain injury or concussion, yet they could play a significant role in assessment, consultation, and intervention with students who have sustained a concussion. The purpose of this article is to educate school psychologists with regard to definition,…

  12. The Research of the Personality Qualities of Future Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V. I.; Salamatov, A. A.; Potapova, M. V.; Yakovleva, N. O.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors substantiate the existence of the personality qualities of future educational psychologists (PQFEP) that are, in fact, a sum of knowledge, skills, abilities, socially required qualities of personality allowing the psychologist to solve problems in all the fields of professional activities. A model of PQFEP predicts the…

  13. Demographics and Professional Practices of School Psychologists: A Comparison of NASP Members and Non-NASP School Psychologists by Telephone Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael F.; Truscott, Stephen D.; Volker, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    A national telephone survey was conducted to examine potential differences between National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) members and non-NASP member school psychologists. Identified schools were contacted by telephone and the researchers asked to speak with the school psychologist. A sample of 124 practicing school psychologists was…

  14. Psychologists in Academic Administration: A Call to Action and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaling, Karen B; Linton, John C

    2017-06-01

    Academic psychologists' backgrounds may prepare them for many aspects of academic administration such as: understanding and working with people; prioritizing others' needs and institutional needs; and managing projects and budgets, e.g., for research grants or training programs. Contemporary academic health centers also may provide opportunities for psychologists to serve in academic health administration. This article encourages psychologists to consider preparing for and seeking administrative and higher-level leadership roles. Six psychologists serving diverse administrative roles-from vice chairs in medical school departments to presidents of universities with academic health centers-reflected on: their paths to administration; their preparation for administrative roles; and the commonalities and differences between the work and skills sets of psychologist health service providers and the work and skill sets required for higher level administrative and leadership roles.

  15. Abraham Reef Stable Isotope Data (delta 13C, delta 18O, delta 14C) for 1635-1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Abraham Reef, 22ó 06'S, 153ó 00'E, Porites australiensus, Radiocarbon (delta 14C) and Stable Isotope (del 18O and del 13C) results from bi-annual samples from...

  16. Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meladze, Pikria; Brown, Jac

    2015-10-01

    This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonegativity was predicted by the main Abrahamic faiths (i.e. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and internalized shame. Qualitative analysis showed that gay men who adhere to a monotheistic religious faith follow a different path to reconciling their religion and homosexuality compared to gay men who adhere to Philosophical/New Age religions or to gay men who have no religious faith. The implications of these findings as well as directions for future research studies were discussed.

  17. Tra storia e mito. Politiche e usi politici di Abraham Lincoln

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sioli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Barack Obama's election brought to the forefront one of the key figures of the nineteenth century, Abraham Lincoln, considered to be a founder of the nation by the new American President. Like Lincoln, Obama put the accent on unity and national goodwill. Like Lincoln, Obama nourished the roots that connected to the common man. The deep desire for change in American politics that Obama espouses also occurred during Lincoln's presidency.

    This essay dwells on Lincoln's words that are impressive in many respects, especially in the way they are able to communicate the passion of political involvement, as well as are impressive the images which represent the Great Emancipator in the different period of American history. Words and images reinterpreted Lincoln's myth in a contemporary mood, showing the how Lincoln became a continuously changing icon, down to the current presidency of Barack Obama.


  18. Tra storia e mito. Politiche e usi politici di Abraham Lincoln

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sioli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Barack Obama's election brought to the forefront one of the key figures of the nineteenth century, Abraham Lincoln, considered to be a founder of the nation by the new American President. Like Lincoln, Obama put the accent on unity and national goodwill. Like Lincoln, Obama nourished the roots that connected to the common man. The deep desire for change in American politics that Obama espouses also occurred during Lincoln's presidency. This essay dwells on Lincoln's words that are impressive in many respects, especially in the way they are able to communicate the passion of political involvement, as well as are impressive the images which represent the Great Emancipator in the different period of American history. Words and images reinterpreted Lincoln's myth in a contemporary mood, showing the how Lincoln became a continuously changing icon, down to the current presidency of Barack Obama.

  19. An iconographic study of the engraving of the Consecration, the Flemish artist Abraham van Diepenbeeck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Isaac Calvo Portela

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study a engraving from the workshop of flemish artist, Abraham van Diepenbeeck, who opened the engraver Mattheus Borrekens and published Martinus van den Enden the Elder, between the late 1640s and early 1650s. In the Courtland Institute of London is preserved a previus sketch of this engraving, which allows us to approach the analysis of the creative process of the engraving. In this engraving are expressed many of the doctrines that the Council of Trent established on the Eucharist is expressed, and at the same time, it tries to deal the position of Jansenism on the Sacramento and also it opposes to the idea of frequent Communion, idea that was defended among others the Jesuits.

  20. 'Luim en jokkernij': satire over Abraham Kuyper in Uilenspiegel (1875-1883

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederiek ten Broeke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uilenspiegel (1870-1916 was a successful and long-lasting satirical journal during the last decades of the 19th century - a period that saw an increasing popularity of the satirical genre as a whole. Founded in a liberal environment, Uilenspiegel concentrated its wit on conservative and non-secular politics. This article focuses on Uilenspiegel's satirical coverage of the activities of Abraham Kuyper, the leader of the Dutch Anti Revolutionary Party, and of the founding of a protestant university. Uilenspiegel's critical views of Kuyper's aim to incorporate his religious ideas in politics and science not only produce a telling image of the way he was perceived in liberal circles, but also of the way the liberals contrasted themselves to their political opponents.

  1. Four Bad Habits of Modern Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, James; Barrett, Paul; Cota, Lisa; Felix, Crystal; Taylor, Zachery; Garner, Samantha; Medellin, Eliwid; Vest, Adam

    2017-08-14

    Four data sets from studies included in the Reproducibility Project were re-analyzed to demonstrate a number of flawed research practices (i.e., "bad habits") of modern psychology. Three of the four studies were successfully replicated, but re-analysis showed that in one study most of the participants responded in a manner inconsistent with the researchers' theoretical model. In the second study, the replicated effect was shown to be an experimental confound, and in the third study the replicated statistical effect was shown to be entirely trivial. The fourth study was an unsuccessful replication, yet re-analysis of the data showed that questioning the common assumptions of modern psychological measurement can lead to novel techniques of data analysis and potentially interesting findings missed by traditional methods of analysis. Considered together, these new analyses show that while it is true replication is a key feature of science, causal inference, modeling, and measurement are equally important and perhaps more fundamental to obtaining truly scientific knowledge of the natural world. It would therefore be prudent for psychologists to confront the limitations and flaws in their current analytical methods and research practices.

  2. South African Hindu psychologists' perceptions of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, Priyanka; Laher, Sumaya

    2014-04-01

    Conceptualisations of mental illness are not universally applicable, as culture shapes the expression, perceptions and treatment preferences thereof. By focusing on the perceptions of Hindu psychologists regarding mental illness, this study aimed to provide a deeper understanding of the impact that religious beliefs have on such conceptualisations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six Hindu psychologists around the Johannesburg area, South Africa. Responses were analysed using thematic content analysis. From the findings, it was evident that religion plays a critical role in the understanding and treatment of mental illness. Hindu beliefs around psychological disturbances were salient. Additionally, it was found that a tension existed between psychologists' awareness of the influential function of religion, particularly amongst collectivistic communities such as the Hindu community, and their occupational understandings and practices, which are deeply rooted in Western thought. Furthermore, it was suggested that the fear of stigma prevented Hindu clients from reaping the benefits of seeking help from culturally competent psychologists.

  3. Workplace Responses and Psychologists' Needs Following Client Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Melissa; Simmonds, Janette

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to explore the role of workplace responses in psychologists' adaptation to client suicides. Participants were 178 psychologists who completed an online self-report questionnaire which included both open and closed questions yielding qualitative and quantitative data. Fifty-six (31.5%) participants reported one or more client suicides. Mixed results were found in terms of perceived support from the workplace following a client suicide. Psychologists reported a need for more open communication in the workplace, peer supports, space to grieve, as well as opportunities to engage in a learning process. The findings have important implications for research and for understanding the role of the workplace postvention. It also raises the need for external support to be accessible for psychologists working in private practice.

  4. The Transmission mechanisms of the position and Functions of Prophets in Abrahamic Religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Vasfi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prophethood, possesses a profound significance in the Abrahamic religions. Prophets act as mediums, through whom the message of God is received and delivered to people, and thus fulfill two kinds of epistemological and Responsible functions: one related to the prophetic “gnosis” of the divine message and the other to the missionary “responsibility” of enacting it. But do the position and functions of the prophets come to an end with his death? For the Abrahamic religions, the answer is ‘No’. In these religions, we are faced with a phenomenon that can be called the “Transmission of the position and functions of prophets”. This article attempts to explain this phenomenon in the context of the holy texts of these three religions and in the terms of the three mechanisms of Blessedness, Heredity and Successorship. Although, the separation between this mechanisms in analysis, necessarily, they are not separate in instances. The first mechanism of such Transmission, by which the prophet transmits on his position and functions to his Children's, is Blessedness. Blessedness is a special covenant between God and Abraham, and is reported twice in the Old covenant. By this mechanism, God blesses to Abraham and promises to bless his Children's, to make them as many as the dust of the earth, and to make them victorious in the face of their enemies. Thus, the mechanism of blessedness becomes institutionalized in Abraham’s family and household, and passes on from one generation to the next. In the New covenant, Jesus and Virgin Mary are called “the Blessed Ones”, Jesus is described as the Source of Blessedness for everyone, and all the true Christian believers are considered as the heirs to Abraham’s Blessedness. In the noble Quran, not only the covenant of God’s Blessedness with Abraham and Isaac is mentioned, but also Jesus is referred to as “the Blessed One” (“Mubarak”. However, it can be said that mechanism of Blessedness

  5. The Transmission mechanisms of the position and Functions of Prophets in Abrahamic Religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roohollah Shafiee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Prophethood, possesses a profound significance in the Abrahamic religions. Prophets act as mediums, through whom the message of God is received and delivered to people, and thus fulfill two kinds of epistemological and Responsible functions: one related to the prophetic “gnosis” of the divine message and the other to the missionary “responsibility” of enacting it. But do the position and functions of the prophets come to an end with his death? For the Abrahamic religions, the answer is ‘No’. In these religions, we are faced with a phenomenon that can be called the “Transmission of the position and functions of prophets”. This article attempts to explain this phenomenon in the context of the holy texts of these three religions and in the terms of the three mechanisms of Blessedness, Heredity and Successorship. Although, the separation between this mechanisms in analysis, necessarily, they are not separate in instances. The first mechanism of such Transmission, by which the prophet transmits on his position and functions to his Children's, is Blessedness. Blessedness is a special covenant between God and Abraham, and is reported twice in the Old covenant. By this mechanism, God blesses to Abraham and promises to bless his Children's, to make them as many as the dust of the earth, and to make them victorious in the face of their enemies. Thus, the mechanism of blessedness becomes institutionalized in Abraham’s family and household, and passes on from one generation to the next. In the New covenant, Jesus and Virgin Mary are called “the Blessed Ones”, Jesus is described as the Source of Blessedness for everyone, and all the true Christian believers are considered as the heirs to Abraham’s Blessedness. In the noble Quran, not only the covenant of God’s Blessedness with Abraham and Isaac is mentioned, but also Jesus is referred to as “the Blessed One” (“Mubarak”. However, it can be said that mechanism of Blessedness

  6. The Transmission mechanisms of the position and Functions of Prophets in Abrahamic Religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Vasfi

    Full Text Available Prophethood, possesses a profound significance in the Abrahamic religions. Prophets act as mediums, through whom the message of God is received and delivered to people, and thus fulfill two kinds of epistemological and Responsible functions: one related to the prophetic “gnosis” of the divine message and the other to the missionary “responsibility” of enacting it. But do the position and functions of the prophets come to an end with his death? For the Abrahamic religions, the answer is ‘No’. In these religions, we are faced with a phenomenon that can be called the “Transmission of the position and functions of prophets”. This article attempts to explain this phenomenon in the context of the holy texts of these three religions and in the terms of the three mechanisms of Blessedness, Heredity and Successorship. Although, the separation between this mechanisms in analysis, necessarily, they are not separate in instances. The first mechanism of such Transmission, by which the prophet transmits on his position and functions to his Children's, is Blessedness. Blessedness is a special covenant between God and Abraham, and is reported twice in the Old covenant. By this mechanism, God blesses to Abraham and promises to bless his Children's, to make them as many as the dust of the earth, and to make them victorious in the face of their enemies. Thus, the mechanism of blessedness becomes institutionalized in Abraham’s family and household, and passes on from one generation to the next. In the New covenant, Jesus and Virgin Mary are called “the Blessed Ones”, Jesus is described as the Source of Blessedness for everyone, and all the true Christian believers are considered as the heirs to Abraham’s Blessedness. In the noble Quran, not only the covenant of God’s Blessedness with Abraham and Isaac is mentioned, but also Jesus is referred to as “the Blessed One” (“Mubarak”. However, it can be said that mechanism of Blessedness

  7. Prospective teachers' perceptions of the school psychologist's role

    OpenAIRE

    Poulou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Acknowledging the importance of teachers’ implicit theories for the determination of school psychologist’s role, this study aims to elicit prospective teachers’ personal theories for the role of school psychologist. By using metaphoric pictures, 59 pre-service teachers described their perceptions of the school psychologist’s role in relation to other members of the school community, the expectations of both teachers and the school psychologist in relation to the role of the ...

  8. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN in the Persian Gulf from 1995-07-28 to 1995-07-29 (NCEI Accession 9500112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession were collected in Persian Gulf (Gulf of Iran) from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN on July 28-29, 1995. The real time data of water temperature at...

  9. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN in the Persian Gulf from 1995-06-18 to 1995-06-30 (NCEI Accession 9500107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession were collected in Persian Gulf (Gulf of Iran) from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN between June 18, 1995 and June 30, 1995. The real time data of...

  10. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN from 1995-05-19 to 1995-06-03 (NCEI Accession 9500094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession were collected from USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN between May 19, 1995 and June 3, 1995. The real time data of water temperature at varying depth...

  11. A psychologist's view of validating aviation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Earl S.; Wagner, Dan

    1994-01-01

    All systems, no matter what they are designed to do, have shortcomings that may make them less productive than was hoped during the initial development. Such shortcomings can arise at any stage of development: from conception to the end of the implementation life cycle. While systems failure and errors of a lesser magnitude can occur as a function of mechanical or software breakdown, the majority of such problems, in aviation are usually laid on the shoulders of the human operator and, to a lesser extent, on human factors. The operator bears the responsibility and blame even though, from a human factors perspective, error may have been designed into the system. Human factors is not a new concept in aviation. The name may be new, but the issues related to operators in the loop date back to the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and certainly to the aviation build-up for World War I. During this first global confrontation, military services from all sides discovered rather quickly that poor selection and training led to drastically increased personnel losses. While hardware design became an issue later, the early efforts were primarily focused on increased care in pilot selection and on their training. This actually involved early labor-intensive simulation, using such devices as sticks and chairs mounted on rope networks which could be manually moved in response to control input. The use of selection criteria and improved training led to more viable person-machine systems. More pilots survived training and their first ten missions in the air, a rule of thumb arrived at by experience which predicted ultimate survival better than any other. This rule was to hold through World War II. At that time, personnel selection and training became very sophisticated based on previous standards. Also, many psychologists were drafted into Army Air Corps programs which were geared towards refining the human factor. However, despite the talent involved in these programs

  12. Abraham Trembley's strategy of generosity and the scope of celebrity in the mid-eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Marc J

    2004-12-01

    Historians of science have long believed that Abraham Trembley's celebrity and impact were attributable chiefly to the incredible regenerative phenomena demonstrated by the polyp, which he discovered in 1744, and to the new experimental method he devised to investigate them. This essay shows that experimental method alone cannot account for Trembley's success and influence; nor are the marvels of the polyp sufficient to explain its scientific and cultural impact. Experimental method was but one element in a new conception of the laboratory that called for both experimental and para-experimental skills whose public availability depended on a new style of communication. The strategy of generosity that led Trembley to dispatch polyps everywhere enabled experimental naturalist laboratories to spread throughout Europe, and the free circulation of living objects for scientific research led practitioners to establish an experimental field distinct from mechanical physics. Scholars reacted to the marvels of the polyp by strengthening the boundaries between the public and academic spheres and, in consequence, opened a space for new standards in both scientific work and the production of celebrity.

  13. Abraham Joshua Heschel and Nostra Aetate: Shaping the Catholic Reconsideration of Judaism during Vatican II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Furnal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Nostra Aetate is only comprised of five short paragraphs, this document represents a turning point, not just for Catholic-Jewish relations, but also sketches the fundamental aims of embodying the Christian faith in a pluralistic age. There is a complex but important narrative that needs to be revisited so that we do not forget the ways in which Catholic learning has developed, and how this development has often been prompted by non-Catholics. In this article, I will re-examine some crucial details in the back-story of the formulation of Nostra Aetate and offer some observations about the potential consequences of omitting these details. My argument is that some recent events and scholarship suffer from a form of amnesia about the role that Jewish people have played in the development of Catholic learning—a form of amnesia that manifests in explicit proselytizing tendencies. In particular, I want to highlight the role that Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel played during the Second Vatican Council as an instructive example for Catholic-Jewish dialogue today.

  14. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: children's differentiation between historical and fantasy characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H; Kim, Angie L; Schwalen, Courtney E; Harris, Paul L

    2009-11-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children (5-, 6-, and 7-year-olds) understand the status of familiar figures, correctly judging historical figures to be real and fictional figures to be pretend. However, when presented with information about novel figures embedded in either a realistic narrative or a narrative with obvious fantasy elements, only older children used the narrative to make an appropriate assessment of the status of the protagonist. In Experiment 2, 3-, and 4-year-olds were prompted to judge whether the story events were really possible or not. Those who did so accurately were able to deploy that judgment to correctly assess the status of the protagonist.

  15. Dandismo y rebeldía en el Perú: el caso de Abraham Valdelomar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Bernabé

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Valdelomar fue un “hombre nómade, versátil, inquieto como su tiempo” apunta Mariátegui en sus Siete ensayos de interpretación de la realidad peruana. Nuestro interés reside, precisamente, en considerar ese nomadismo como una modalidad constituyente en la construcción de su imagen. Narrador, ensayista, periodista, poeta, caudillo político, apóstol del nacionalismo, novio fiel, homosexual, opiómano, hijo amantísimo, decadente, primitivo, Valdelomar es también el que inaugura la profesión de escritor en el Perú. Fue el primero que logró vivir de lo que escribía y de las conferencias que dictaba. Su nomadismo, esto es, las sucesivas transfiguraciones de su persona resistiendo a los esquemas establecidos, es la clave que nos permite leer en su obra los conflictos que desatan las tensiones entre artificio y autenticidad, entre presentación y representación, entre simulación y verdad. En este marco estudiamos con especial atención sus cuentos criollistas, sus crónicas periodísticas, su epistolario y los discursos y conferencias ofrecidos en ocasión de sus viajes patrióticos al interior del Perú.

  16. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-09-25

    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946-1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  17. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern John H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946–1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter.

  18. Psychologists abandon the Nuremberg ethic: concerns for detainee interrogations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kenneth S; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of 9-11, the American Psychological Association, one of the largest U.S. health professions, changed its ethics code so that it now runs counter to the Nuremberg Ethic. This historic post-9-11 change allows psychologists to set aside their ethical responsibilities whenever they are in irreconcilable conflict with military orders, governmental regulations, national and local laws, and other forms of governing legal authority. This article discusses the history, wording, rationale, and implications of the ethical standard that U.S. psychologists adopted 7 years ago, particularly in light of concerns over health care professionals' involvement in detainee interrogations and the controversy over psychologists' prominent involvement in settings like the Guantánamo Bay Detainment Camp and the Abu Ghraib prison. It discusses possible approaches to the complex dilemmas arising when ethical responsibilities conflict with laws, regulations, or other governing legal authority.

  19. Exploring Influence and Autoethnography: A Dialogue Between Two Counselling Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C. Kracen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article utilises a dialogical approach to explore the potential of autoethnography as a research method for counselling psychology while using the method to reflect on what it means to have influence as a researcher. We use a collaborative autoethnographical approach to explore the themes of influence, curiosity, rich insight and sincerity. We attempt to bring honesty and transparency to our collaborative dialogue about our previous work on vicarious trauma (VT and secondary traumatic stress (STS, as well as how our themes are revealed in the different paths we have taken as counselling psychologists since our earlier collaboration. We consider what it means to influence, to be influential, and to be influenced. Through our dialogue, we try to speak with authenticity about our experiences as colleagues, counselling psychologists, scientist practitioners, and human beings. We discuss both the potential contribution of autoethnographical approaches and the challenges of using these methods, for counselling psychologists.

  20. Training Psychologists for Rural Practice: Exploring Opportunities and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Lin, Ching-Ching Claire; Morrissey, Joseph P; Ellis, Alan R; Fraher, Erin; Richman, Erica L; Thomas, Kathleen C; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2018-04-17

    To examine trends in the psychologist workforce and training opportunities, including factors that may influence the decision of clinical psychologists to practice in rural settings. We use a mixed-methods approach to examine the psychologist workforce nationally and in North Carolina (NC), including (1) an analysis of the location of programs awarding doctoral degrees; (2) an analysis of the practice, demographic, and educational characteristics of the psychologist workforce; and (3) interviews with directors of doctoral programs in clinical psychology to understand where current graduates are getting jobs and why they may or may not be choosing to practice in rural communities. Fewer than 1% of programs and institutions awarding doctoral degrees in psychology in the United States are located in rural areas. In NC, approximately 80% of practicing psychologists have out-of-state degrees and about 80% of recent NC graduates are not currently licensed in the state. This juxtaposition undermines the utility of adding more in-state degree programs. While expansion of training programs within rural areas could help alleviate the shortages of mental health providers, adding new degree-granting programs alone will not necessarily increase supply. We discuss complementary recruitment and retention strategies, including greater incentives for rural training and practice as well as training in emerging technologies that don't require providers to be physically located in underserved areas, such as telemedicine. Increasing the supply of psychologists practicing in rural areas will require a thoughtful, multipronged approach to training this critical part of the behavioral health workforce. © 2018 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Commentary: Pediatric Epilepsy: A Good Fit for Pediatric Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani; Smith, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    While there are an abundance of pediatric neuropsychologists working with youth with epilepsy (YWE), other subspecialty psychologists have played minimal roles in clinical and research endeavors in pediatric epilepsy. Thus, the purpose of this commentary was to describe (a) the needs of YWE due to the intermittent nature of seizures and difficulties with disease management, (b) increased risk for psychosocial comorbidities, (c) limited access to care, and (d) provide recommendations for how pediatric psychologists can become involved in the clinical care and research activities for YWE. PMID:21148174

  2. Abraham Willink: impulsor de la descentralización de la entomología argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía E. CLAPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una síntesis de las principales actividades desarrolladas por Abraham Willink (1920-1998 en su relación con la ciencia argentina, en especial con la Entomología. Se brinda información sobre su vida personal y su trayectoria en el ámbito universitario, refiriéndose especialmente al desarrollo de los estudios de posgrado y a la formación de recursos humanos en la Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo de la Universidad Nacional de Tucumán. Se destaca su trayectoria en el área de la sistemática y la biogeografía de himenópteros superiores, así como su importante aporte en la conformación y mantenimiento de la colección de insectos del Instituto Miguel Lillo. Se pone énfasis en su gran interés por la descentralización de la ciencia y en especial de la Entomología, en la Argentina. Se ofrece información sobre sus logros científicos, así como el reconocimiento que recibió de discípulos y colegas de distintas partes del mundo. Finalmente se destacan sus cualidades personales, que reflejan la calidez humana que lo caracterizó, como maestro de varias generaciones de biólogos, no solo entomólogos. PALABRAS CLAVE. Entomología.

  3. More than Welgelegen (well-situated: Abraham van der Hart and the Hope family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Heijenbrok

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Pavilion Welgelegen in Haarlem was built in 1785-1792 as the country house of the fabulously rich Amsterdam citizen Henry Hope (1735-1811, partner of the internationally renowned commercial bank Hope & Co. Since 1930 the Pavilion has been the seat of the provincial authorities of North Holland. So far, it was assumed that the consul of the Kingdom of Sardinia in the Dutch Republic, Michel (de Triquetti (1748-1821, had designed Welgelegen, whose plans were said to have been executed by Jean-Baptiste Dubois (1762-1851, an architect from Dendermonde. However, it has now been ascertained that the designer was Abraham van der Hart (1747-1820, town architect of Amsterdam at that time. This is the result of new research in the records, confirmed by the conclusions of a study of Henry Hope's network of relations in connection with known buildings of Van der Hart. Research of Pavilion Welgelegen itself showed that the L-shaped building originally consisted of two rather autonomous parts: a residential wing on the Dreef and a picture gallery on Haarlemmerhout. It also appeared that the residential wing is in fact the refurbished country house that Hope had bought in 1769. This functional distinction was also evident from the very expensive interior, for instance, the soft furnishings: chintz for the residential wing and silk for the gallery. The soft furnishings were the work of the French decorator Louis le Houx, who had probably settled in Haarlem especially for this assignment. Because of the imperfect connection between the wings it may be assumed that initially the design of the picture gallery on Haarlemmerhout was not intended for Welgelegen, but for the country estate Groenendaal in Heemstede, the property of John Hope, Henry's cousin. Just as Henry, John was a partner of Hope & Co, but he was a collector in the first place; around 1780 his collection of paintings was the most important of Amsterdam. Everything indicates that John had plans for

  4. A pilot study for the analysis of dream reports using Maslow's need categories: an extension to the emotional selection hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Richard

    2010-10-01

    The emotional selection hypothesis describes a cyclical process that uses dreams to modify and test select mental schemas. An extension is proposed that further characterizes these schemas as facilitators of human need satisfaction. A pilot study was conducted in which this hypothesis was tested by assigning 100 dream reports (10 randomly selected from 10 dream logs at an online web site) to one or more categories within Maslow's hierarchy of needs. A "match" was declared when at least two of three judges agreed both for category and for whether the identified need was satisfied or thwarted in the dream narrative. The interjudge reliability of the judged needs was good (92% of the reports contained at least one match). The number of needs judged as thwarted did not differ significantly from the number judged as satisfied (48 vs. 52%, respectively). The six "higher" needs (belongingness, esteem, cognitive, aesthetic, self-actualization, and transcendence) were scored significantly more frequently (81%) than were the two lowest or "basic" needs (physiological and safety, 19%). Basic needs were also more likely to be judged as thwarted, while higher needs were more likely to be judged as satisfied. These findings are discussed in the context of Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a framework for investigating theories of dream function, including the emotional selection hypothesis and other contemporary dream theories.

  5. From Epicurus to Maslow: Happiness Then and Now and the Place of the Human Being in Social Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Gutenschwager

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protagoras said, "The human being is the measure of all things". This implies, among other things, that language, science and religion are human inventions, as are economics, money, efficiency, race, conflict, etc. As symbol-using animals, we have created these concepts to serve our purposes. But as our societies have increased in size and our concepts have become more abstract, there is a danger that we will forget our authorship and reify these symbols. This inhibits change in the way we name things, so we are always in danger of misunderstanding the reality we are describing. We seem to be at such a stage now as we employ 18th and 19th century theories to describe and, more importantly, create 21st century reality. One such idea has to do with human needs. Influenced by the abstract (economic concepts we use, we have lost our sense of what we truly need. Epicurus and Maslow may help to review and reassess those concepts. Epicurus, by suggesting that our material needs are quite simple but that emotional and spiritual need satisfaction requires a small scale loving community, free from fear, and Maslow, by suggesting that our emotional development is age-related, which, besides therapy, may help in suggesting revisions in socioeconomic theory that would ensure the social conditions that would allow this development to take place successfully.

  6. The association of sociodemographic factors and needs of hemodialysis patients according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chiung-Yu; Huang, Chiu-Ya; Huang, Mei-Lun; Chen, Chyong-Mei; Tang, Fu-In

    2018-05-18

    To explore the association between the sociodemographic factors and the needs of patients undergoing hemodialysis in Taiwan. Concomitant discomfort, including physical and mental aspects, affects the patients' quality of life and their willingness to undergo hemodialysis. Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a well-known tool to assess different levels of human needs. We conducted a small-scale cross-sectional observational study using a structured needs assessment questionnaire on 159 patients from the Taipei Veterans General Hospital hemodialysis unit. The overall mean scores of physical, mental, spiritual, other needs, and needs in relation to medical staff care were 4.0±0.8, 3.2±0.8, 2.7±1.0, 3.1±0.9, and 4.1±0.7, respectively. The results showed that the patients' highest need was in relation to medical staff care, followed by physical needs. Further analysis showed that patients who are still employed during the treatment process have higher mental, spiritual, and other needs. Patient who are financially supported by their family have higher physical needs. Patients taken cared of by paid caregivers have lower spiritual needs and other needs. This is also the same with patients who are religious as opposed to those who are non-religious. Patients who have attained tertiary education have higher other needs compared to patients who have only achieved up to primary or secondary education. The study is the first in Taiwan to identify and quantify the needs of patients undergoing hemodialysis. When the needs of the patients are identified in relation to their sociodemographic factors, the medical staff can give the appropriate treatment in order to meet the needs and improve the patients' well-being. Healthcare providers should not only focus on the patients' physiological needs, but should determine and address their other needs in various aspects in order to improve the quality and efficacy of the dialysis care process. This article is protected by copyright

  7. Latino Immigration: Preparing School Psychologists to Meet Students' Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Joslin, Jacqueline J.; Carrillo, Gerardo L.; Guzman, Veronica; Vega, Desireé; Plotts, Cynthia A.; Lasser, Jon

    2016-01-01

    As the population of immigrant Latino students continues to rise, school psychologists serving Latino children and families must develop the knowledge and skills necessary to provide high-quality psychological services to culturally and linguistically diverse students from immigrant families. Following a review of the relevant literature on the…

  8. Ethics in School Psychologists Report Writing: Acknowledging Aporia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    Research in school psychologist report writing has argued for reports that connect to the client's context; have clear links between the referral questions and the answers to these questions; have integrated interpretations; address client strengths and problem areas; have specific, concrete and feasible recommendations; and are adapted to the…

  9. Are Student Communications with School Psychologists Legally Privileged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ross; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2017-01-01

    As a trusted link between district personnel, students, and their families, school psychologists often have questions about whether their communications are privileged like those of other professionals. In some jurisdictions, state statutes and common, or case, law recognize privileged communications for certain specified paired roles, including…

  10. SLD Identification: A Survey of Methods Used by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D., Jr.; Simon, Joan B.; Nunnley, Lenora

    2016-01-01

    IDEA 2004 opened the door for states, and in some cases districts, to choose among three different methods for identifying children with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs). This study provides an in-depth look at SLD identification practices in a state that allows school psychologists to use any of the three methods. Eighty-four school…

  11. Child Maltreatment Identification and Reporting Behavior of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Victoria L.; Zibulsky, Jamie; Viezel, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    A majority of substantiated maltreatment reports are made by educators and thus, teacher knowledge of child maltreatment reporting mandates and reporting behavior has been a focus of research. The knowledge and behavior of school psychologists, however, has not received similar attention. This study investigated the child maltreatment reporting…

  12. Formative Assessment and the Classroom Teacher: Recommendations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stacy A. S.; Stenglein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In order for school psychologists to effectively work with teachers, it is important to understand not only the context in which they work, but to understand how educators consider and subsequently use data. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine how formative assessments are conceptualized in teacher training and pedagogical…

  13. Mistaken Evaluation: The School Psychologist or the Case Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2012-01-01

    Given their pivotal position, school psychologists have understandable concerns about the possibility of becoming the target of the relatively frequent legal proceedings under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Indeed, the threat of litigation can contribute to a flight from the profession (Lange, 2011). Yet, an informal…

  14. Team Crisis: School Psychologists and Nurses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Maughan, Erin D.; Tuck, Christine; Patrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Schools are often the geographic and sociological center of a community. Given modern community emergencies and challenges, schools should make the most of this role and best allocate their resources to maximize the positive impact they have during difficult times. This article uses the vantage point of school psychologists and school nurses from…

  15. School Psychologists' Experiences with Teacher-to-Student Mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Sharon R. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, transcendental, phenomenological study was to describe school psychologists' experiences with teacher-to-student mistreatment in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational setting. There are few United States studies presented in the literature on the topic of teacher-to-student mistreatment and its…

  16. Training, Degrees, and Credentials in the Hiring of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'donnell, Patrick S.; Dunlap, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    A national sample of 246 Directors of Pupil Personnel Services and Directors of Special Education were surveyed to assess the importance they place on training, degrees, and credentials in the hiring of school psychologists. High, but varying, levels of importance were found for the content knowledge and skill areas in the National Association of…

  17. School Psychologists' Family-School Partnering Experiences with Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Fernandez, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify the beliefs, perceptions, and actions of school psychologists toward family-school partnering (FSP) with Latino families in the public school system. Existing research in this area is extremely limited; therefore, the present study has significant implications for pre- and in-service…

  18. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  19. Children and Natural Disasters: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda; Oehler-Stinnett, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide children are impacted by natural disasters, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, landslides and sandstorms, winter and severe storms, heat waves, volcanoes and tsunamis. School psychologists should understand natural disaster effects, such as economic loss, relocation and health concerns and mental health…

  20. Ethics of Teaching: Beliefs and Behaviors of Psychologists as Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Barbara G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    To study the behaviors and ethical beliefs of psychologists functioning as educators, survey data were collected from 482 American Psychological Association members working primarily in higher education. Participants rated each of 63 behaviors as to how often they practiced them and how ethical they considered them to be. (CJS)

  1. Teaching Leadership: Most Any Psychologist Can Do It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a growing interest in college courses on leadership in a variety of academic disciplines. The study of leadership has a long history, much of it based on psychology. As a result, psychologists are well informed and quite capable of teaching leadership courses. In this article, I discuss core theories of leadership,…

  2. Increasing Medicaid Revenue Generation for Services by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybza, Megan M.; Stokes, Trevor F.; Hayman, Marilee; Schatzberg, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    We examined a performance improvement package with components of feedback, goal setting, and prompting to generate additional revenue by improving the consistency of Medicaid billing submitted by 74 school psychologists serving 102 schools. A multiple baseline design across three service areas of a county school system demonstrated the…

  3. Educational Psychologists' Report-Writing: Acts of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major tasks of educational psychologists is the writing of reports. Often, all involvement, assessment and intervention culminate in the production of a report. This paper explores critically the tensions involved in writing reports which are closed down in their conformity to requirements of different bodies, while looking for…

  4. Do First and Later Borns Agree with Psychologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Diane

    Research has found firstborns to be more ambitious, rule-oriented, authority-oriented, helpful, and responsible, and less oriented toward peers, their own needs, social activities, and group cooperation than are laterborns. To explore whether those occupying different birth order positions perceive themselves as psychologists have described them,…

  5. Job Satisfaction of School Psychologists in a Primarily Rural State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solly, David C.; Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    1986-01-01

    Job satisfaction of school psychologists practicing in West Virginia was studied using a modified version of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Job satisfaction increased as (1) salary increased, and (2) the supervisor's level of training reached the level of the practitioner and the area of training more closely approached that of a school…

  6. The Educational Journey of a Latina Feminist Community Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This narrative describes how my educational journey led me to become a Latina feminist community psychologist. My experiences as a Central American woman living in the United States has made me deeply committed to feminist community values and the importance of social justice. Throughout the journey, I connect how immigration status, culture, and…

  7. Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, focusing on introduction and applicability; preamble; general principles; and ethical standards (resolving ethical issues, competence, human relations, privacy and confidentiality, advertising and other public statements, record keeping and…

  8. Global Migration: The Need for Culturally Competent School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Plotts, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Never before have more children lived away from their home countries. Given the unique social, emotional, and academic needs of children who have migrated, school psychologists must be well prepared to meet these growing demands. Consequently, school psychology training programs must invest in the preparation of culturally competent future school…

  9. Post Advanced Technology Implementation Effects on School Psychologist Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Rana Dirice

    2017-01-01

    The technology acceptance model (TAM) has been widely used to assess technology adoption in business, education, and health care. The New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) launched a web-based Individualized Educational Program (IEP) system for school psychologists to use in conducting evaluations and reviews. This quantitative study…

  10. Leadership Theory for School Psychologists: Leading for Systems Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.; Preast, June L.; Kilpatrick, Kayla D.; Taylor, Crystal N.; Young, Helen; Aguilar, Lisa; Allen, Amanda; Copeland, Christa; Haider, Aqdas; Henry, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are often seen as leaders in schools. They lead data teams, problem-solving teams, multidisciplinary evaluation teams, and crisis response teams. They are also perceived as leaders regarding intervention, multitiered systems of support, behavior support, collaboration, consultation, special education, assessment, and…

  11. Differential Perception of Counselling Psychologists' Duties to Oyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive survey study investigated the differences that exist in the perception of the relevance of counselling psychologists' duties to broadcasting corporation. The participants consisted of one hundred and two (54 males and 48 females) purposively selected staff of Oyo State Broadcasting Corporation.

  12. School Psychologists' Perceptions of Stakeholder Engagement in Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) continues to be implemented in schools, it is important to consider how this initiative is perceived by the educational professionals involved in the implementation and effectiveness of the process. This study utilized a survey intended to investigate the perceptions of school psychologists regarding their…

  13. Change the System! School Psychologist as Organizational Consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Janis Clark; Bernstein, Rhoda

    Organizational development (OD) within school systems is productive work for the school psychologist. Basic to all OD is the principle of maximizing a system's resources. Following organizational change in the business world, schools can profit greatly from system changes which address today's "people problems." Outside consultants often provide…

  14. Psychologists' right to prescribe – should prescribing privileges be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current changes in legislation regarding prescription rights increase the possibility of non-medical practitioners being authorised to presctibe medication. There has been ongoing debate about granting psychologists in South Africa a limited right to prescribe (RTP) psychotropic medication. The main reasons advanced for ...

  15. Mothers' reflections on the role of the educational psychologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    assurance and emotional support from educational psychologists. Having ... the identification, referral, and treatment of ADHD (Decaires-Wagner & Picton, 2009). Hence ... tions like anxiety and depression can exacerbate ... the mother to use positive parenting practices to .... and information that could contribute to the study.

  16. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  17. Un documento inédito de 1494 sobre Abraham Seneor y rabí Meir Melamed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María López Álvarez

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the study and the transcription of a document belonging to the Sephardic Museum in Toledo, acquired by the Association of the Friends of the Museum, which describes the proceedings carried out in 1494 by the tax collector don Gonzalo Blaço, a native of Seville and resident in Jerez de la Frontera, on the properties owned by don Abraham Seneor, his son Salomón and his son-in-law rabbi Meir Melamed in Jerez de la Frontera and Carmona.

  18. Has Technology Become a Need? A Qualitative Study Exploring Three Generational Cohorts' Perception of Technology in Regards to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunmore, Denisia

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of America, there are four different generations living, working and learning together in a society that is more technologically advanced than ever before. However, could it be that technology has become a need? The primary purpose of this qualitative case study was to utilize Maslow's hierarchy of needs as the…

  19. Motivation Theories of Maslow, Herzberg, McGregor & McClelland. A Literature Review of Selected Theories Dealing with Job Satisfaction and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Ronald L.

    Job satisfaction, motivation, and reward systems are included in one area of organizational theory. The strongest influence in this area is motivation because it overlaps into both of the other two components. A review of the classical literature on motivation reveals four major theory areas: (1) Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs; (2) Herzberg's…

  20. Advocating for School Psychologists in Response to the APA's Proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Anastasia Kalamaros

    2009-01-01

    On March 6, 2009, the APA Model Licensure Act Task Force released its second draft of the policy document known as the proposed "Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists". This policy document serves as guidance to state legislatures for how they should set up their psychology licensing laws. The general expectations promoted in the model…

  1. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  2. Perceptions of Leadership Practices of School Psychologists: Views of Multiple Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine; Kilanowski, Lisa; Privitera, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership ability is necessary in the work of school psychologists, yet formal investigation of leadership processes engaged in by school psychologists has not occurred in the field. Likewise, perceptions of the leadership ability of school psychologists by other key school professionals, such as administrators and teachers, remain undocumented.…

  3. Perceptions of School Psychologists Regarding Barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Heath; Little, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    As Response to Intervention (RTI) models continue to be implemented, an important research question is how school psychologists are experiencing the transition to RTI practice. In order to better understand the experiences of school psychologists, interviews with seven practicing school psychologists regarding their perceptions of barriers and…

  4. Assessment and Intervention Practices for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A National Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borick, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined school psychologists' assessment and intervention practices regarding ADHD. Five hundred school psychologists who practiced in a school setting and were regular members of the National Association of School Psychologists were randomly selected to complete and return a questionnaire titled Assessment and Intervention Practices…

  5. National Association of School Psychologists Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  6. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  7. The Multiplier Effect: A Strategy for the Continuing Education of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Walter; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-two school psychologists participated in a year long institute designed to test the use of a multiplier effect in the continuing professional development of school psychologists in Michigan. Results indicated that 550 school psychologists attended two in-service meetings with generally favorable reactions. (Author)

  8. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or clinical social worker professional services to be payable under this subpart, the services must be— (1...

  9. Developing Friendship and Intimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Abraham H.

    1991-01-01

    Presents previously unpublished paper written by Abraham Maslow in April 1968 in which Maslow speculates on the issue that society had become pathologically individualistic and needed to develop better means of facilitating close relationships among people. (Author/ABL)

  10. The Nature of Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Abraham H.

    1991-01-01

    Presents previously unpublished paper written by Abraham Maslow in November 1964. Maslow discusses the concept of happiness, suggesting that happiness is a lot more complicated than its standard, hedonistic definition as merely the absence of pain. (Author/ABL)

  11. The Abraham Story in Comparison to the Mystical and Hermeneutic Persian Texts up to the Tenth Century, a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Aghahosseini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abraham was one of the ol Al Azm prophets whose name is repeatedly addressed in the Holy Quran. He is a clean-soul Muslim which bowed to nothing except the unique God. A prophet who was trapped and every time found himself proud of Divine test closer to his idol. He achieved the (Khollat title from his God and crowned the divine Khalil (Nesa,125 and his ethic is glorified with the "Hanif " attribute in some places in the Quran(Nesa,125-Al, Umran,95- Nahl, 123.   His life story has come within the merciful Quran in details. Interpreted texts are of most important religious sources of Muslims that according to merciful Quran studid this Divine prophet. on the other side, the mystics that consistently have introduced Quran characters as the best role models too, have particular view on the character of Abraham. Since these texts have special importance in Persian literature, their attention to the story of this Divine Prophet gets attention to.   Commentators and mystics view of this story, although similar in some short hints, are different in the majority of the materials. In this paper, it is attempted to investigate one of the most important stories of the merciful Quran in one of the most important mystic and religious(literature sources.

  12. Windows of Opportunity: East Timor and Australian Strategic Decision Making (1975-1999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    global power. Abraham Maslow argues that when you have the world’s largest hammer, every problem looks like a nail. 33 The US had the world’s...Terror,” 156. 32 Tanter, Bitter Flowers, Sweet Flowers, 156. 33 Abraham H. Maslow , The Psychology of Science: A Reconnaissance (Maurice Bassett, 2004...Some Critical Comments.” Australian Journal of International Affairs 54, no. 2 (2000). Maslow , Abraham H. The Psychology of Science: A

  13. Architectural Patterns for Self-Organizing Systems-of-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    show that they are necessary for self-organization to occur. Common Purpose Abraham Maslow proposed a theory on human motivation based on a hierarchy...http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/abouthiwel.html (accessed October 28, 2010). 21. Maslow , Abraham . 1943. A theory of human motivation. In Psychological...in-the-wall Education Ltd. http://www.hole- in-the-wall.com/abouthiwel.html (accessed October 28, 2010). 22. Maslow , Abraham . 1943. A theory of human

  14. Enhancing Resilience through Post-Deployment Decompression: A Softer Approach to Sharpening the Warrior Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    hierarchy of needs set forth by Abraham Maslow in 1943, the basic human need for love, affection, and belongingness is superseded in importance only by...February 10, 2012. 80 Abraham H. Maslow , “A Theory of Human Motivation,” Psychological Review 50, (1943): 370-396. Maslow’s paper was originally published...Warrior. Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2010. Maslow , Abraham H. “A Theory of Human Motivation.” Psychological Review 50, (1943): 370- 396, http

  15. Using Maslow's pyramid and the national database of nursing quality indicators(R) to attain a healthier work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff-Paris, Lisa; Terhaar, Mary

    2010-12-07

    The strongest predictor of nurse job dissatisfaction and intent to leave is that of stress in the practice environment. Good communication, control over practice, decision making at the bedside, teamwork, and nurse empowerment have been found to increase nurse satisfaction and decrease turnover. In this article we share our experience of developing a rapid-design process to change the approach to performance improvement so as to increase engagement, empowerment, effectiveness, and the quality of the professional practice environment. Meal and non-meal breaks were identified as the target area for improvement. Qualitative and quantitative data support the success of this project. We begin this article with a review of literature related to work environment and retention and a presentation of the frameworks used to improve the work environment, specifically Maslow's theory of the Hierarchy of Inborn Needs and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Survey. We then describe our performance improvement project and share our conclusion and recommendations.

  16. Maslow and mental health recovery: a comparative study of homeless programs for adults with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, Benjamin F; Derejko, Katie-Sue; Couture, Julie; Padgett, Deborah K

    2015-03-01

    This mixed-methods study uses Maslow's hierarchy as a theoretical lens to investigate the experiences of 63 newly enrolled clients of housing first and traditional programs for adults with serious mental illness who have experienced homelessness. Quantitative findings suggests that identifying self-actualization goals is associated with not having one's basic needs met rather than from the fulfillment of basic needs. Qualitative findings suggest a more complex relationship between basic needs, goal setting, and the meaning of self-actualization. Transforming mental health care into a recovery-oriented system will require further consideration of person-centered care planning as well as the impact of limited resources especially for those living in poverty.

  17. A District Approach to Countering Afghanistan’s Insurgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    actualization. Abraham Maslow , A Theory of Human Motivation, 1943, http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/ Maslow /motivation.htm (accessed October 29, 2009...Lyon Press, 2002. Maslow , Abraham . A Theory of Human Motivation, 1943. http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/ Maslow /motivation.htm (accessed October 29...established village and district political hierarchies may effectively deny insurgents sanctuary, critical resources, and serve to isolate and separate the

  18. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    OpenAIRE

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-01-01

    Abstract After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very agg...

  19. Classification of social stereotypes by Japanese Social Psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Ai; Takahashi, Naoya; Matsui, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The present study asks social psychologists (N=82) to evaluate six stereotypes in order to both examine the characteristics of stereotypes held by Japanese people and to classify them. The results are as follows. (1) Typicality and discrimination-amusement were identified as perspectives for evaluating stereotypes. (2) The six stereotypes examined in this study were classified into three different groups based on correspondence analysis. (a) Stereotypes about older people and business women i...

  20. The Lincoln Legal Papers Curriculum: Understanding Illinois Social History through Documents from the Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln, 1836-1861.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Lawrence W., Ed.; Drake, Frederick D., Ed.

    This curriculum considers the social history of Illinois during the years of 1836-1861 by studying Abraham Lincoln's legal papers from his time as a lawyer. Nearly 100,000 documents have been discovered in the archives of local, county, state, federal courts, libraries, and other repositories. The documents include detailed information about the…

  1. It Is My Desire to Be Free: Annie Davis's Letter to Abraham Lincoln and Winslow Homer's Painting "A Visit from the Old Mistress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Michael; Eder, Elizabeth K.

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. President, It is my Desire to be free," wrote Annie Davis to Abraham Lincoln, 20 months after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation affected only those parts of the country that were in rebellion against the United States on the date it was issued, January 1, 1863. The slaveholding border states of…

  2. Examination of hydrogen-bonding interactions between dissolved solutes and alkylbenzene solvents based on Abraham model correlations derived from measured enthalpies of solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T. [Chemical Institute, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Acree, William E., E-mail: acree@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Brumfield, Michela [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Abraham, Michael H. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution measured for 48 solutes dissolved in mesitylene. • Enthalpies of solution measured for 81 solutes dissolved in p-xylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in mesitylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in p-xylene. • Hydrogen-bonding enthalpies reported for interactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with hydrogen-bond acidic solutes. - Abstract: Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of 48 organic solutes in mesitylene and 81 organic solutes in p-xylene were measured using isothermal solution calorimeter. Enthalpies of solvation for 92 organic vapors and gaseous solutes in mesitylene and for 130 gaseous compounds in p-xylene were determined from the experimental and literature data. Abraham model correlations are determined from the experimental enthalpy of solvation data. The derived correlations describe the experimental gas-to-mesitylene and gas-to-p-xylene solvation enthalpies to within average standard deviations of 1.87 kJ mol{sup −1} and 2.08 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Enthalpies of X-H⋯π (X-O, N, and C) hydrogen bond formation of proton donor solutes (alcohols, amines, chlorinated hydrocarbons etc.) with mesitylene and p-xylene were calculated based on the Abraham solvation equation. Obtained values are in good agreement with the results determined using conventional methods.

  3. What Is a Bilingual School Psychologist? A National Survey of the Credentialing Bodies of School Psychologists: Implications for the Assessment of Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the credentialing practices for bilingual school psychologists in the United States. Credentialing agencies of school psychologists, mostly State Departments of Education, across the 50 states and the District of Columbia were contacted via telephone by trained graduate student research assistants. Only two of the…

  4. Paul Buhle et Dave Wagner. A Very Dangerous Citizen : Abraham Lincoln Polonsky and the Hollywood Left.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Portis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Lincoln Polonsky (1910-1999 — cinéaste, romancier, militant marxiste — fut l’un de ces intellectuels états-uniens qui, à force de refuser de faire des concessions vis-à-vis des autorités, resta dans l’ombre malgré son talent. Scénariste et réalisateur de cinéma original et créatif pendant les années 40 et 50, sa carrière fut entravée par la répression de cette période. Qualifié publiquement de « very dangerous citizen » par un membre du House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC, ...

  5. Using Maslow's hierarchy to highlight power imbalances between visiting health professional student volunteers and the host community: An applied qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Akporuno, Orezioghene; Owens, Katrina M; Lickers, Brittany; Marlinga, Jazmin; Lin, Henry C; Loh, Lawrence C

    2017-01-01

    Health professional students from high-income countries increasingly participate in short-term experiences in global health (STEGH) conducted abroad. One common criticism of STEGH is the inherent power differential that exists between visiting learners and the local community. To highlight this power differential, this paper explores perceived benefits as described by volunteer and community respondents and applies Maslow's hierarchy of needs to commonly identified themes in each respondent group. A semistructured survey was used to collect qualitative responses from both volunteers and community members located in a Dominican Republic community, that is, a hotspot for traditionally conducted STEGH. Thematic analysis identified themes of perceived benefits from both respondent groups; each group's common themes were then classified and compared within Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Each respondent group identified resource provision as a perceived benefit of STEGH, but volunteer respondents primarily focused on the provision of highly-skilled, complex resources while community respondents focused on basic necessities (food, water, etc.) Volunteer respondents were also the only group to also mention spiritual/religious/life experiences, personal skills development, and relationships as perceived benefits. Applying Maslow's hierarchy thus demonstrates a difference in needs: community respondents focused on benefits that address deficiency needs at the bottom of the hierarchy while volunteers focused on benefits addressing self-transcendence/actualization needs at the top of the hierarchy. The perceived difference in needs met by STEGH between volunteers and the host community within Maslow's hierarchy may drive an inherent power differential. Refocusing STEGH on the relationship level of the hierarchy (i.e., focusing on partnerships) might help mitigate this imbalance and empower host communities.

  6. Beyond Maslow's culture-bound linear theory: a preliminary statement of the double-Y model of basic human needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuo-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Maslow's theory of basic human needs is criticized with respect to two of its major aspects, unidimensional linearity and cross-cultural validity. To replace Maslow's linear theory, a revised Y model is proposed on the base of Y. Yu's original Y model. Arranged on the stem of the Y are Maslow's physiological needs (excluding sexual needs) and safety needs. Satisfaction of these needs is indispensable to genetic survival. On the left arm of the Y are interpersonal and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and the self-actualization need. The thoughts and behaviors required for the fulfillment of these needs lead to genetic expression. Lastly, on the right arm of the Y are sexual needs, childbearing needs, and parenting needs. The thoughts and behaviors entailed in the satisfaction of these needs result in genetic transmission. I contend that needs for genetic survival and transmission are universal and that needs for genetic expression are culture-bound. Two major varieties of culture-specific expression needs are distinguished for each of the three levels of needs on the left arm of the Y model. Collectivistic needs for interpersonal affiliation and belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization prevail in collectivist cultures like those found in East Asian countries. Individualistic needs are dominant in individualist cultures like those in North America and certain European nations. I construct two separate Y models, one for people in collectivist cultures and the other for those in individualist ones. In the first (the Yc model), the three levels of expression needs on the left arm are collectivistic in nature, whereas in the second (the Yi model), the three levels of needs on the left arm are individualistic in nature. Various forms of the double-Y model are formulated by conceptually combining the Yc and Yi models at the cross-cultural, crossgroup, and intra-individual levels. Research directions for testing the various aspects of the double-Y model are

  7. Divorce: Using Psychologists' Skills for Transformation and Conflict Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    The litigious divorce process often leaves children with parents who are at "war" and have little ability to coparent effectively. This article discusses some of the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes designed to lessen conflict both before and after divorce. It also addresses the important work of psychologists serving in the roles of child therapists and reunification clinicians doing the difficult work of helping to heal fractured child-parent relationships. Ethical challenges are addressed and future directions for applied research are suggested. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  9. Where do counselling psychologists based in the UK disseminate their research? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Terry; Ruth, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Research is frequently cited as core to counselling psychology. Yet we know little about where counselling psychologists publish their own findings. The present study aims to answer the following two research questions: (1) Where do UK-based counselling psychologists disseminate their research? (2) To what extent do counselling psychologists disseminate their research in British Psychological Society outlets? Method: A systematic review examining research by UK-based counselling psycholo...

  10. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Tina Zupan; Valentin Bucik

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in ...

  11. Positive psychology and the training of psychologists: Students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharina Guse

    2010-12-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the personal and professional impact of including positive psychology in the professional training of clinical and counselling psychologists. Motivation for the study: It is not known how students previously educated in a pathogenic paradigm experience the exposure to positive psychology, and resultant paradigm shift, as part of their professional training. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design was implemented. Data consisted of written documents submitted by the participants and was analyzed by means of thematic analysis. Main findings: Integrating positive psychology in the professional training curriculum was valuable and enriching on both a professional and personal level. The participants reported an experience of positive emotions and increased sense of self-understanding and psychological well-being. Professionally they experienced a sense of increased self-efficacy. Practical/managerial implications: Positive psychology should be considered as part of the basic training of psychologists since it may enhance the development of trainee psychologists’ professional self, enhance aspects of psychological well-being as well as prevent stress and burnout. Contribution/value-add: This is the first South African study to explore the impact of including positive psychology principles and interventions in professional training.

  12. The role of psychologists in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahass, Saeed H

    2005-05-01

    Advances in the biomedical and the behavioral sciences have paved the way for the integration of medical practice towards the biopsychosocial approach. Therefore, dealing with health and illness overtakes looking for the presence or absence of the disease and infirmity (the biomedical paradigm) to the biopsychosocial paradigm in which health means a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Psychology as a behavioral health discipline is the key to the biopsychosocial practice, and plays a major role in understanding the concept of health and illness. The clinical role of psychologists as health providers is diverse with the varying areas of care giving (primary, secondary and tertiary care) and a variety of subspecialties. Overall, psychologists assess, diagnose, and treat the psychological problems and the behavioral dysfunctions resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. In addition, they play a major role in the promotion of healthy behavior, preventing diseases and improving patients' quality of life. They perform their clinical roles according to rigorous ethical principles and code of conduct. This article describes and discusses the significant role of clinical health psychology in the provision of health care, following a biopsychosocial perspective of health and illness. Professional and educational issues have also been discussed.

  13. Positive emotion word use and longevity in famous deceased psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Sarah D; Cohen, Sheldon

    2012-05-01

    This study examined whether specific types of positive and negative emotional words used in the autobiographies of well-known deceased psychologists were associated with longevity. For each of the 88 psychologists, the percent of emotional words used in writing was calculated and categorized by valence (positive or negative) and arousal (activated [e.g., lively, anxious] or not activated [e.g., calm, drowsy]) based on existing emotion scales and models of emotion categorization. After controlling for sex, year of publication, health (based on disclosed illness in autobiography), native language, and year of birth, the use of more activated positive emotional words (e.g., lively, vigorous, attentive, humorous) was associated with increased longevity. Negative terms (e.g., angry, afraid, drowsy, sluggish) and unactivated positive terms (e.g., peaceful, calm) were not related to longevity. The association of activated positive emotions with longevity was also independent of words indicative of social integration, optimism, and the other affect/activation categories. Results indicate that in writing, not every type of emotion correlates with longevity and that there may be value to considering different categories beyond emotional valence in health relevant outcomes.

  14. Islam and the Arabs in the work of a Maronite scholar in the service of the Catholic church (Abraham Ecchellensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyberger, Bernard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As an expert in Arabic documents in the “Republic of Letters”, Abraham Ecchellensis devoted himself in his work to an attempt at synthesis that was characteristic of his time: he tried to reconcile contemporary scholars’ expectations of specialised knowledge both with his Catholic and controversialist commitments and with his status, in his role as a Maronite, as a spokesman for Arabic and even Muslim culture. Ecchellensis provided the public with translations of Arabic Muslim philosophical and scientific texts which he deemed to have drawn on universal “wisdom”. However, a disinterested curiosity concerning Islam could not be publicly advertised and had to be cloaked in the form of anti-Protestant controversy or Catholic apology. In the work of Ecchellensis this stance was accompanied by an expurgation of all Islamic terminology from the Arabic language and by a recourse to the Christian Arabic literature writen during the first centuries of the Hijra.

    [fr] Expert en documents arabes dans la « République des Lettres », Abraham Ecchellensis se livre dans son oeuvre à un essai de synthèse caractéristique de son temps : il tente de concillier l’attente de connaissances des savants de son temps avec son engagement catholique et controversiste, et avec son identification, en tant que maronite, comme porte-parole de la culture arabe, y compris musulmane. Il fournit au public des traductions de textes philosophiques et scientifiques arabes musulmans qui lui paraissent participer d’une « sagesse » universelle. Mais une curiosité désintéressée pour l’islam ne peut s’afficher : elle doit prendre les formes de la controverse anti-protestante ou de l’apologie catholique. Chez Ecchellensis cette posture s’accompagne d’une expurgation de toute terminologie islamique dans la langue arabe, et d’un recours à la littérature arabe chrétienne élaboré aux premiers siècles de l’Hégire.

  15. Revisiting the crisis in Freud's libido theory and Abraham's concept of the oral-sadistic phase as a way out of it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    The now available unabridged correspondence between Freud and Abraham leads to a re-evaluation of the significance of Abraham's work. The author proposes the thesis that clinical observations by Karl Abraham of the ambivalence of object relations and the destructive-sadistic aspects of orality have an important influence on the advancement of psychoanalytical theory. The phantasy problem of the Wolf Man and the question of the pathogenic relevance of early actual, or merely imagined traumata led Freud to doubt the validity of his theory. He attempted repeatedly to solve this problem using libido theory, but failed because of his problematic conception of oral erotics. The pathogenic effect of presymbolic traumatizations cannot be demonstrated scientifically because of the still underdeveloped brain in the early stage of the child's development. Consequently, the important empirical evidence of a scientific neurosis theory could not be provided. A revision of the theory of the instincts thus became necessary. With Abraham's clinical contributions and other pathologic evidence, Freud was, with some reservation, forced to modify his idea of oral erotics by ascribing to it a status of a merely constructed and fictive phase of oral organization. A solution was eventually facilitated via recognition of non-erotic aggression and destruction, thereby opening libido theory to fundamental revisions. Driven by the desire to develop a scientific theory, Freud initially had, in his first theory of the instincts, assumed a strongly causal-deterministic view on Psychic Function. His third revision of theory of the instincts, Beyond the Pleasure Principle including the death instinct hypothesis, considered the hermeneutic aspect of psychoanalytic theory, which had previously existed only implicitly in his theory. Further development of the death instinct hypothesis by Melanie Klein and her successors abandoned quantitative-economic and causal-deterministic principles, and instead

  16. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  17. Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Andres Bedoya, C.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    A central part of providing evidence-based practice is appropriate cultural competence to facilitate psychological assessment and intervention with diverse clients. At a minimum, cultural competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people involves adequate scientific and supervised practical training, with increasing depth and complexity across training levels. In order to further this goal, we offer 28 recommendations of minimum standards moving toward ideal training for LGBT-specific cultural competence. We review and synthesize the relevant literature to achieve and assess competence across the various levels of training (doctoral, internship, post-doctoral, and beyond) in order to guide the field towards best practices. These recommendations are aligned with educational and practice guidelines set forth by the field and informed by other allied professions in order to provide a roadmap for programs, faculty, and trainees in improving the training of psychologists to work with LGBT individuals. PMID:26279609

  18. Effects of Social Psychological Phenomena on School Psychologists' Ethical Decision-Making: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Lasser, Jon; Reardon, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary, exploratory study examines the impact of select social psychological phenomena on school-based ethical decision-making of school psychologists. Responses to vignettes and hypothetical statements reflecting several social psychological phenomena were collected from 106 practicing school psychologists. Participants were asked to…

  19. Achieving and Maintaining Change in Urban Schools: The Role of The School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Bradley; Serbonich, Nadine

    2018-01-01

    School psychologists in Baltimore (MD) City Public Schools are engaged in efforts to expand their professional roles from a traditional to a more comprehensive model. In Baltimore, school psychologists had been in the traditional role as a special education-specific gatekeeper and service provider. Starting in 2013, a group of school…

  20. School Psychology 2010--Part 2: School Psychologists' Professional Practices and Implications for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Every 5 years, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) conducts a national study of the field. Surveys are sent to randomly selected regular members of NASP to gather information on school psychologists' demographic characteristics, context for professional practices, and professional practices. The latest iteration of the national…

  1. School Psychologists' Views on Challenges in Facilitating School Development through Intersectoral Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolla, Nadeen; Lazarus, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    The role of school psychologists has been debated and contested nationally and internationally for many decades, with an emphasis on the need for a paradigm shift in professional roles. Psychologists may be employed in the private sector, in nongovernmental organisations, in higher education institutions, and by the state. Those employed by the…

  2. National Study of School Psychologists' Use of Evidence-Based Assessment in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rachel; Ruble, Lisa; Esler, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to better understand predictors of evidence-based assessment practices for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Nationwide, 402 school psychologists were surveyed for their knowledge of and training and experience with ASD on assessment practices, including reported areas of training needs. The majority of school psychologists reported…

  3. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  4. Considerations for School Psychologists Working with Arab American Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N.

    2011-01-01

    There are an estimated three million Arab Americans in the United States, with 25% of the population under the age of 18. Given this significant population, it is likely that some school psychologists come across children from Arab backgrounds during their career. Many school psychologists, however, may not be aware of the unique cultural…

  5. Professional Development Issues for School Psychologists: "What's Hot, What's Not in the United States"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnek, Andrew C.; Klein, Gabrielle; Bracken, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    This study queried practicing school psychologists in the United States about the extent to which advances in the field have improved their individual service provision and fostered a desire for additional professional development. The researchers surveyed 1,000 members of the largest professional organization for school psychologists in the…

  6. The Association of Black Psychologists: An Organization Dedicated to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasi, Ezemenari M.; Speight, Suzette L.; Rowe, Daryl M.; Clark, Le Ondra; Turner-Essel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi) was founded on September 2, 1968, in San Francisco, California, in response to the American Psychological Association's failure to address the mental health needs of the Black community. This revolutionary idea was borne out of the efforts of Black early career psychologists and student activists from…

  7. Culturally Diverse Beliefs Concerning Dying, Death, and Bereavement: A School Psychologist's Intervention Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    School psychologists need to employ a multicultural perspective in the areas of death, dying, and bereavement. To develop multicultural sensitivity and competency requires setting aside one's personal beliefs in an attempt to adopt another's perspective. Consequently, school psychologists first need to explore their own attitudes about death and…

  8. Job Satisfaction among Practicing School Psychologists: The Impact of SLD Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has documented high levels of job satisfaction among school psychologists. Given that school psychologists spend much of their time in special education decision making and identifying students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs), it is important to understand how assessment practices relate to job satisfaction. This study surveyed…

  9. Delivering School-Based Mental Health Services by School Psychologists: Education, Training, and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Morris, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Consistent with the priority goals of the 2002 Future of School Psychology Conference, the National Association of School Psychologists' "Blueprint for Training and Practice III" advocates for school psychologists becoming "leading mental health experts in schools." In this regard, the present article reviews the prevalence and incidence of…

  10. Facilitators and Barriers to the Provision of Therapeutic Interventions by School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Muscutt, Janet; Wasilewski, David

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern internationally about the prevalence of mental health problems among school-aged children and their access to specialist services. School psychologists (SPs) may be one group of professionals well-positioned to support the well-being of children and young people, due to their position as applied psychologists working…

  11. Impact of Sociocultural Background and Assessment Data Upon School Psychologists' Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, E. Scott; Cummings, Jack A.

    1985-01-01

    Psychologists (N=56) participated in an adapted version of Algozzine and Ysseldyke's (1981) diagnostic simulation to investigate the effects of sociocultural background (rural vs. suburban) and assessment data (normal vs. learning disabled) on educational decisions. Findings suggest school psychologists utilize multiple sources of information but…

  12. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  13. School Psychologists' Ethical Strain and Rumination: Individual Profiles and Their Associations with Weekly Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtala, Mari; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated school psychologists' experiences of ethical strain (the frequency of ethical dilemmas at work and the stress caused by these dilemmas) and dilemma-related rumination outside working hours. Individual latent profiles were estimated at the study baseline based on these three dimensions. The psychologists' weekly well-being (vigor,…

  14. The Relationship among Stress, Burnout, and Locus of Control of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Shana J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how stress, burnout, and locus of control are related for school psychologists providing direct services in the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. This knowledge is essential in providing the needed experience and outlook of working as a school psychologist. The current study provided school…

  15. Sexual Health Education: Social and Scientific Perspectives and How School Psychologists Can Be Involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Ashley A.; Perfect, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists' (NASP) official stand on sexual education is that it should be taught in schools to help young people make healthy decisions regarding sex throughout their lives. Accordingly, school psychologists have a responsibility to use their expertise to facilitate these programs. Without a comprehensive…

  16. Principles of managed intellectual activity in training psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Zakharova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the possibility of using the principles of gradual development of intellectual activity in the training experts of developmental psychology. The issue of the managed development of professional work components is being raised. A possible way of working is discussed analysing the features of child actual development aimed at discovering the reasons for the learning difficulties, which served as an excuse for the parents to seek psychological assistance. The method of analysis becomes an important competence of a consulting psychologist against the background of a high variety of forms of mental development. Development of readymade algorithms for solving a problem situation, covering all their diversity seems next to impossible. In this regard, there is a need to prepare students for an independent analysis of a specific life situation. It is the ability to this kind of analysis that ensures the expert’s preparedness to develop recommendations that contribute to harmonizing the child’s development. Elaboration of this competence implies the integration of knowledge and skills acquired in various training courses. This possibility is provided by shaping the student’s orientation in the learned action taking into account its level structure. Semantically speaking, orientation allows one to recover the logic of the child’s examination and child development according to the goal set. The orientation is based on the mechanisms and conditions of mental development. The choice of adequate diagnostic tools becomes an independent task of the analysis that requires understanding of the available techniques and diagnostic tools. Summing up, the operational level of orientation provides competent use of the means chosen during diagnostic examination. Taking into account the orientation level of the developed activity makes it possible to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the process of training into psychologist expert

  17. Producing Military Commanders: A Systemic Exploration of the Development Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    all decisions and learning is important for developing officers. Motivation and Personality by Abraham Maslow gives readers a relevant explanation...Center of Military History, 1992. Lawson, Bryan. How Designers Think: The Design Process Demystified. Burlington: Elsevier Linacre House, 2007. Maslow ... Abraham H. Motivation and Personality. New York: Harper & Row, 1954. Paul, Richard and Linda Elder. Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of

  18. Planning Combat Outposts to Maximize Population Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Abraham Maslow defined incremental layers of needs that require fulfillment and that can explain people’s motivations in life [12]. The needs at a lower...Hildebrant I ,e Certified by: The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. Technical Supervisor Stephen C. Graves Professor, Abraham J. Siegel...22 Figure 2-4: Maslow Hierarchy of Needs ................................................................................. 27 Figure 3-1

  19. It is not Just a Press Conference: The Consequences of Crisis Communication While the World Watches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Abraham H. Maslow , Motivation and Personality (New York, NY: Harper and Row, 1970). 26 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 27 III. RESEARCH DESIGN...http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenmakovsky/2013/10/03/1159/. Maslow , Abraham H. Motivation and Personality. New York, NY: Harper and Row, 1970. Miles

  20. Myth, Metaphor, and Imagination: Framing Homeland Security as Art and Archetype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Culture to Identify the Post 9/11 Homeland Security Zeitgeist” (Master’s thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, 2008). 4 Abraham H. Maslow , The Farther...Archetypes in a Public Mental Hospital.” Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California, 1987. Maslow , Abraham H. 1971. The Farther Reaches

  1. ANÁLISE DA MOTIVAÇÃO DE PESSOAS: um estudo baseado em princípios da Hierarquia de Necessidades de Maslow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander Luiz Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A motivação é um tema complexo, abordado por diversos pesquisadores que elaboraram teorias visando explicar o fenômeno motivacional e sua influência sobre o comportamento humano. Entre as teorias de motivação, uma importante teoria é a Hierarquia de Necessidades de Maslow que relaciona a motivação das pessoas a um conjunto de necessidades. Sendo assim, o presente estudo teve por objetivo analisar o grau de satisfação e a questão motivacional de pessoas para as necessidades fisiológicas, de segurança, sociais, de estima e autorrealização. O estudo foi realizado em uma empresa do setor mecânico, localizada na região Centro Ocidental do Paraná. Para a realização do estudo, foi aplicado um questionário a 40 pessoas, de diferentes características, como idade, gênero, escolaridade e renda familiar. Com base nos resultados, constatou-se que, de maneira geral, os entrevistados estão satisfeitos pelo atendimento às necessidades fisiológicas, como alimentação, moradia, vestuário e descanso, porém, outras necessidades, dispostas em outros níveis da pirâmide de Maslow, não foram completamente atendidas e, portanto, resultam em insatisfação pela ausência de estímulos motivacionais.   Motivation is a complex subject, addressed by different researchers who elaborate theories aiming explain the motivational phenomenon and its influence on human behavior. Among the theories of motivation, an important theory is Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs that relates people's motivation needs set. In this way, the present study aimed to analyze the degree of satisfaction and motivational question of people for the physiological, safety, social, esteem and self-fulfillment needs. The study was accomplished in a company of the mechanical sector, located in the Western Center region of Paraná. For the study, a questionnaire was applied to 40 people, with different characteristics, such as age, gender, schooling and family income. Based on

  2. Exploring the role of the industrial-organisational psychologist as counsellor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologists are often confronted with counselling interventions in the workplace and thus it is vital that they are effectively prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. Research purpose: The aim of this study was to review the role of I-O psychologists as counsellors and to ascertain whether these practitioners are effectively prepared for this purpose. Motivation for the study: I-O psychologists are mainly concerned with the deep-rooted problems individuals experience in the workplace, and they therefore need appropriate counselling skills. However, it is not clear whether graduates in this discipline receive adequate training for this role. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design with convenience and snowball sampling of 22 participants was utilised. Participants were practising I-O psychologists across Gauteng and North West (South Africa. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Main findings: Participants were familiar with the meaning of counselling and confirmed that they are faced with a range of counselling situations requiring a unique set of skills and competencies. Based on these findings, participants made recommendations for the future training of I-O psychologists and recommended that counselling be included in the scope of practice of I-O psychologists. Practical/managerial implications: The role of the I-O psychologist requires training in short-term therapeutic techniques and counselling in tertiary education. Contribution/value-add: The study clarifies the role of the I-O psychologist as a counsellor that will ensure that I-O psychologists can be trained more effectively for this role.

  3. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in the study. The results show some problematic issues such as: record keeping, exceptions of confidentiality, access to personal data, the content of informed consent, incompetence, copying of literature and diagnostic instruments – even not standardised ones, psychology students as subjects in psychological research, and lack of information on ethical aspects of students' practical work. Psychologists and students reported inadequate knowledge of professional ethics and suggested various kinds of ethical education. Institutions mostly enable psychologists to work within the Code of ethics. There are, however, conflicts regarding access to data and professional autonomy. Psychologists report conflicts between law and ethics, incorrect reports in media and lack of control over professional ethics. In the case of ethical violation psychologists do less than they should. They emphasise the problem of incompetence. The frequency and seriousness of certain violation were estimated. Ways of verifying knowledge, stimulating ethical conduct and taking different measures in the case of violations were suggested. The state of affairs in different working environments of psychologists was also described. Results show that psychologist who have worked in the field for a shorter period answer more frequently contrary to the Code of Ethics. Students' knowledge of ethics is mostly very satisfactory. The study emphasises the ethical aspects of psychological practice in Slovenia. It

  4. Experience of Approbation and Target Reference Points of Introduction of the Professional Standard "Pedagogue-Psychologist (Educational psychologist" in Sverdlovsk Region

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    Vasyagina N.N.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The experience of application of the professional standard "Pedagogue-psychologist (educational psychologist" in the Sverdlovsk region is described. A regional model for the application of the professional standard developed on the basis of the principles of unity of centralization and decentralization, interdepartmental and network interaction developed by the authors is presented. The main forms and methods of work on the application of a professional standard in the region are disclosed; the results of the Sverdlovsk region internship site are described, including mechanisms for identifying personnel shortages and development of personalized trajectories of the professional development of psychology teachers in the region. The following are highlighted as priority areas: the development of regional normative legal acts regulating the professional activity of pedagogue-psychologists, the application of the professional standard of the pedagogue-psychologist in the formation of the personnel policy in the field of education, and the modernization of the system of vocational training and additional vocational education of psychologists.

  5. When psychologists work with religious clients: applications of the general principles of ethical conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarhouse, M A; VanOrman, B T

    1999-12-01

    Psychologists become more effective and relevant when they appreciate that many clients hold religious values and commitments. Greater awareness of religion and religious values in the lives of clients may aid clinicians' efforts to provide more accurate assessments and effective treatment plans. The authors use the American Psychological Association's (1992) "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" as a framework to examine many of the ethical issues relevant when psychologists work with religious clients. This article also provides suggestions for ways in which clinicians may obtain the skills needed to offer competent assessments and interventions with religiously committed clients.

  6. An Investigation of ‘Acceptance of Self, Others and Nature’ in Ghazaliat Hafez from Maslow’s Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aa Bagheri Khalili

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Religious thinkers and scholars, based on their peculiar dispositions, have considered the wise, strong, weak, insightful etc person as the model of Perfect Man. In the twentieth century, Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis and Humanism have made it possible to pay more objective attention to human character. Psychoanalysis sees man as a product of his instinct, and Behaviorism of his environment. While disapproving the two theories, Maslow (1908-1970 considers man to be essentially good and in constant search of Self-actualization. He sees behavior as arising from needs which he classifies into five categories: 1 physiological needs 2 safety and security 3 love and belonging 4 self-esteem 5 Self-actualization. Maslow cites several attributes of Self-actualized people and the present paper addresses two of them in Ghazaliat Hafez: 1 better perception of reality 2 acceptance of Self, others and nature. From Hafez’s viewpoint, the world is the most enigmatic phenomenon to be understood. Despite being aware of the world instability, he never reads it as he desires but interprets it differently. His Self acceptance includes: 1 poetic skill 2 taking responsibility of one’s actions 3 hopefulness. His knowledge that frailties can be compensated is the core of his acceptance of Self, others and nature.

  7. Optical momentum and angular momentum in complex media: from the Abraham-Minkowski debate to unusual properties of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Bliokh, Konstantin; Y Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    We examine the momentum and angular momentum (AM) properties of monochromatic optical fields in dispersive and inhomogeneous isotropic media, using the Abraham- and Minkowski-type approaches, as well as the kinetic (Poynting-like) and canonical (with separate spin and orbital degrees of freedom) pictures. While the kinetic Abraham-Poynting momentum describes the energy flux and the group velocity of the wave, the Minkowski-type quantities, with proper dispersion corrections, describe the actual momentum and AM carried by the wave. The kinetic Minkowski-type momentum and AM densities agree with phenomenological results derived by Philbin. Using the canonical spin-orbital decomposition, previously used for free-space fields, we find the corresponding canonical momentum, spin and orbital AM of light in a dispersive inhomogeneous medium. These acquire a very natural form analogous to the Brillouin energy density and are valid for arbitrary structured fields. The general theory is applied to a non-trivial example of a surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wave at a metal-vacuum interface. We show that the integral momentum of the SPP per particle corresponds to the SPP wave vector, and hence exceeds the momentum of a photon in the vacuum. We also provide the first accurate calculation of the transverse spin and orbital AM of the SPP. While the intrinsic orbital AM vanishes, the transverse spin can change its sign depending on the SPP frequency. Importantly, we present both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, thereby proving the validity of the general phenomenological results. The microscopic theory also predicts a transverse magnetization in the metal (i.e. a magnetic moment for the SPP) as well as the corresponding direct magnetization current, which provides the difference between the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  8. Psychosocial care and the role of clinical psychologists in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sheng-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chun; Lin, I-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the works of clinical psychologists in palliative care in Taiwan. Clinical psychologists who were working or had experience in palliative care were recruited. A 2-stage qualitative method study was conducted, including semistructured interviews and a focus group. The following 4 main themes were identified: (1) the essential nature of the psychologists' care were caring and company; (2) the dynamic process included psychological assessment, intervention, and evaluation based on psychological knowledge; (3) they needed to modify their care using an integrative framework, by setting practical goals and using techniques with flexibility; and (4) they faced external and internal challenges in this field. Clinical psychologists have beneficial contributions but have to modify psychosocial care based on the patients' needs and clinical situations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Assessing competencies of trainee sport psychologists: An examination of the 'Structured Case Presentation' assessment method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutter, R.I.; Pijpers, J.R.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is virtually no literature on how to assess competencies of applied sport psychologists. We assessed casework of applied sport psychology students and compared written case report assessment (WCRA) with structured case presentation assessment (SCPA) on reliability and acceptability

  10. Psychologists and detainee interrogations: key decisions, opportunities lost, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    After the 9-11 terrorist attacks, U.S. psychologists faced hard choices about what roles, if any, were appropriate for psychologists in the detainee interrogations conducted in settings such as the Bagram Airbase, the Abu Ghraib Prison, and the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camps. The American Psychological Association (APA) sparked intense controversy with its policies and public statements. This article reviews APA decisions, documents, and public statements in this area, in the context of major criticisms and responses to those criticisms. The review focuses on key issues: how the APA created and reported policies in the areas of ethics and national security; transparency; psychologists' professional identities; psychologists' qualifications; ethical-legal conflicts; policies opposing torture; interpretations of avoiding harm; and effective interrogations. It suggests lessons learned, missed opportunities, and questions in need of a fresh approach. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

  11. Testing a model of research intention among U.K. clinical psychologists: a logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Gemma; Holttum, Sue; Hayward, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Previous research highlights barriers to clinical psychologists conducting research, but has rarely examined U.K. clinical psychologists. The study investigated U.K. clinical psychologists' self-reported research output and tested part of a theoretical model of factors influencing their intention to conduct research. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,300 U.K. clinical psychologists. Three hundred and seventy-four questionnaires were returned (29% response-rate). This study replicated in a U.K. sample the finding that the modal number of publications was zero, highlighted in a number of U.K. and U.S. studies. Research intention was bimodally distributed, and logistic regression classified 78% of cases successfully. Outcome expectations, perceived behavioral control and normative beliefs mediated between research training environment and intention. Further research should explore how research is negotiated in clinical roles, and this issue should be incorporated into prequalification training. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Abraham Plotkin, un syndicaliste américain observateur à Berlin, 1932‑33, du mouvement syndical allemand et de sa chute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Collomp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Plotkin était membre du syndicat de la confection pour Dames, International Ladies Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU, dont il était un militant permanent (organizer sur la Côte Ouest des Etats Unis. Se trouvant cependant au chômage, comme des millions d’Américains affectés par la grande dépression économique, à l’automne 1932 il décida de partir pour l’Allemagne et d’y passer quelques mois. Ses motivations étaient politiques et syndicales. Plotkin était attiré par la forte tradition soc...

  13. Training the industrial and organisational psychologist as counsellor: Are we doing enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanri Barkhuizen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Industrial and organisational (I-O psychologists are responsible for workplacecounselling. Workplace counselling requires specific skills and training for the I-O psychologist. Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to explore the role of training the I-Opsychologist as workplace counsellor. Motivation for the study: Studies show that the I-O psychologist does not feel adequatelyprepared for their role as workplace counsellor. It is important to explore which skills andtraining are needed to equip the I-O psychologist as counsellor. Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research design with convenience andsnowball sampling was used to identify I-O psychologists (n = 22 from different businesssectors in Gauteng and North-West. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gatherdata and content analysis was utilised to extract themes and sub-themes from the results. Main findings: The findings showed that the participants know about the process of counselling, but they did not feel adequately prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. From the findings, recommendations for the training of future I-O psychologists are made. Practical implications: This study adds to the knowledge about ensuring that the I-Opsychologist is equipped during their training for the workplace to address the counselling needs of employees in the workplace in South Africa. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes towards ensuring that the I-O psychologistis sufficiently prepared for their role as workplace counsellor by making knowledge available regarding the skills required by I-O psychologists to be applied in practice. Keywords: Industrial-organisational (I-O psychologist; Counsellor; Skills and competencies; Qualitative research; Training

  14. A Thematic Inquiry into the Burnout Experience of Australian Solo-Practicing Clinical Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Trent E; Crowther, Andrew; Drummond, Sally

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Burnout is conceptualized as a syndrome that consists of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment. Despite the increased frequency and severity of burnout in the Western world, there is limited published research regarding the experiences of clinical psychologists who have had burnout. The present study examines clinical psychologists' different experiences of burnout in Australia. Design and Methods: In the year 2015, six privately practicing and solo-employed clinical psychologists provided rich qualitative data by participating in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was the method used to analyze clinical psychologists' natural accounts of their burnout experiences. Using NVivo, emerging themes were identified through coding 'first order constructs' and then axial code 'second order constructs.' Findings: Clinical psychologists indicated that their roles are demanding and a diverse range of symptoms, including the enduring effects of burnout, mental stress, fatigue, decreased personal accomplishment, negative affect, depersonalization, reduced productivity and motivation, and insomnia. They identified precursors of burnout, including excessive workload and hours of work, life stresses, mismanaged workload, and transference. Clinical psychologists suggested that protective factors of burnout include knowledge and years worked in direct care, and trusting and long-term relationships. They indicated that the barriers to overcoming burnout include the fallacy that their clients' expectations and needs are more important than their own, the financial cost of working in private practice, contemporary knowledge and inadequate education regarding self-care, and time constraints. Discussion and Conclusion: The findings presented in this study provide psychologists and other health professionals with an insight about the burnout experience and inform professionals of the mental shortcomings of working as a solo

  15. Teachers or Psychologists: Who Should Facilitate Depression Prevention Programs in Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Melanie S.; Adelson, Jill L.; Patak, Margarete A.; Pössel, Patrick; Hautzinger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates a depression prevention program for adolescents led by psychologists vs. teachers in comparison to a control. The universal school-based prevention program has shown its efficacy in several studies when implemented by psychologists. The current study compares the effects of the program as implemented by teachers versus that implemented by psychologists under real-life conditions. A total of 646 vocational track 8th grade students from Germany participated either in a universal prevention program, led by teachers (n = 207) or psychologists (n = 213), or a teaching-as-usual control condition (n = 226). The design includes baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up (at 6 and 12 months post-intervention). The cognitive-behavioral program includes 10 sessions held in a regular school setting in same-gender groups and is based on the social information-processing model of social competence. Positive intervention effects were found on the change in girls’ depressive symptoms up to 12 months after program delivery when the program was implemented by psychologists. No such effects were found on boys or when program was delivered by teachers. The prevention program can successfully be implemented for girls by psychologists. Further research is needed for explanations of these effects. PMID:24837667

  16. Training for Leadership Roles in Academic Medicine: Opportunities for Psychologists in the AAMC LEAD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPaglia, Donna; Thompson, Britta; Hafler, Janet; Chauvin, Sheila

    2017-06-01

    Psychologists' roles within academic medicine have expanded well beyond research and scholarship. They are active as providers of patient care, medical education, and clinical supervision. Although the number of psychologists in academic health centers continues to grow, they represent a small portion of total medical school faculties. However, with the movement toward collaborative care models, emphasis on interprofessional teams, and increased emphasis on psychological science topics in medical curricula, psychologists are well-positioned to make further contributions. Another path through which psychologists can further increase their contributions and value within academic health centers is to aspire to leadership roles. This article describes the first author's reflections on her experiences in a two-year, cohort-based, educational leadership development certificate program in academic medicine. The cohort was comprised largely of physicians and basic scientists, and a small number of non-physician participants of which the first author was the only clinical psychologist. The insights gained from this experience provide recommendations for psychologists interested in leadership opportunities in academic medicine.

  17. To treat or not to treat: should psychologists treat tobacco use disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Linda P

    2014-08-01

    The author presented this Presidential Address for Divison 18, Psychologists in Public Service, at the 2012 American Psychological Association Convention in Orlando, Florida. The address challenges public service psychologists to reduce the tobacco disease burden through their roles as researchers, leaders, educators, and practitioners and explains why treating tobacco use disorder is important and relevant for psychologists. The address discusses the prevalence and the resulting mortality and morbidity rates of tobacco use disorder, which call for effective evidence-based interventions that can be integrated by psychologists into other ongoing treatments. Treatment of the underserved populations, including those with serious mental illness and/or substance use disorders, presents many barriers. In addition, education and training for tobacco use disorder in undergraduate and graduate clinical psychology programs present further barriers for psychology trainees. However, progress is being made because of the numerous resources and psychology leaders who are advocates for tobacco use disorder treatment and research. Challenges for the future include increasing awareness of the importance of treatment for tobacco use disorder, finding innovative ways to increase access to comprehensive evidence-based treatment, and acknowledging that psychologists can make a difference in reducing the tobacco use disorder disease burden. Psychologists have an ethical and professional responsibility to treat tobacco use disorder.

  18. Teachers or Psychologists: Who Should Facilitate Depression Prevention Programs in Schools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie S. Wahl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study evaluates a depression prevention program for adolescents led by psychologists vs. teachers in comparison to a control. The universal school-based prevention program has shown its efficacy in several studies when implemented by psychologists. The current study compares the effects of the program as implemented by teachers versus that implemented by psychologists under real-life conditions. A total of 646 vocational track 8th grade students from Germany participated either in a universal prevention program, led by teachers (n = 207 or psychologists (n = 213, or a teaching-as-usual control condition (n = 226. The design includes baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up (at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. The cognitive-behavioral program includes 10 sessions held in a regular school setting in same-gender groups and is based on the social information-processing model of social competence. Positive intervention effects were found on the change in girls’ depressive symptoms up to 12 months after program delivery when the program was implemented by psychologists. No such effects were found on boys or when program was delivered by teachers. The prevention program can successfully be implemented for girls by psychologists. Further research is needed for explanations of these effects.

  19. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Bester

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement , and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual’s set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one’s occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5% responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy

  20. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, C L; Mouton, T

    2006-08-01

    In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual's set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one's occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect that it is likely that their dominant career anchor would be service orientation. If this is the case, psychologists with service as their dominant career anchor are supposed to have greater job satisfaction and job involvement compared to those with different career anchors. However, according to literature, this assumption is not necessarily correct. The primary goals of the current study were to determine whether in fact service is the dominant career anchor of psychologists in the Free State and whether there are significant differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement between psychologists with and without service as their dominant career anchor. A third goal was to determine whether psychologists with different dominant career anchors differ significantly from one another regarding job satisfaction and job involvement. Questionnaires measuring career orientations, job satisfaction and job involvement were sent to 165 of the 171 registered psychologists in the Free State region. Only 75 psychologists (45,5%) responded which exceeded the traditional return rate of 20 to 30%. Due to the small sample of respondents, a nonparametric statistical test, namely the Mann Whitney U test was conducted to determine possible differences. An analysis of the data showed that 21 respondents had entrepreneurship as their dominant career orientation while 12 fell in the technical/functional, 12 in the challenging, 9 in the service and 8 in the autonomy categories of dominant

  1. Albert Abraham Michelson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    his knowledge of physics gave him an unfair advantage. ... temporarily lost his job at Case, although he was reinstated after a year at a lower salary. Mor .... He could not have paid a better tribute to his lifelong passion to measure what the poet ...

  2. Albert Abraham Michelson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some experiments change the face of a subject, and some experiments do that many times over. Albert Michelson built his interferometer in order to determine the effect of Earth's rotation on the speed of light. The null result supported the crucial assumption in Einstein's special theory of relativity and was the final nail in the ...

  3. Politics and Israeli psychologists: is it time to take a stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Nissim

    2007-01-01

    In Israel, it is quite rare for psychologists to relate to political and social issues. This remarkable tendency of psychologists to avoid dealing with such matters seems to supersede the common indifference or obtuseness of other groups in the Israeli public and similar groups in particular (e.g., physicians or social workers). Within this context, this paper focuses on the qualities and forms of reaction of the psychotherapeutic community in Israel to the national conflict that has been present intermittently since the late 1980s - namely, the two Intifadas. More specifically, as opposed to the current situation (the second Al-Aksa Intifada), in the course of the first Intifada (1987-1996), the voice of Israeli psychologists was clearly heard. Until now, this is the only exception to the rule of neutrality and passivity, in which psychologists in Israel became politically active. Specific elements of involvement of the therapeutic community is presented and discussed. Also, an attempt is made to suggest possible reasons to the very puzzling questions: Why then? Or what factors allowed for this change in position to occur? And more importantly, why did the protest of the psychologists in Israel vanish and their clear voices turn into silence?

  4. Observations for Practitioners: Counterinsurgency as a Complex Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    enduring security with justice.‖ This in turn implies a stronger 11 Abraham H. Maslow , A Theory...clear from a wide range of literature and experience that Maslow 11 basically got it right. In the Hierarchy of Human Needs, ―the safety needs‖ are...of Human Motivation, Psychological Review 50(4) (1943):370-96. http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/ Maslow /motivation.htm, accessed 04 JAN 09. 12 Maslow

  5. Older Driver Safety: A Survey of Psychologists' Attitudes, Knowledge, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Janet; Tuokko, Holly

    2016-09-01

    Using an online survey, we examined the knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to older driver safety concerns of clinical psychologists from across Canada who self-identified as working with at least some drivers over 60 years of age. Eighty-four psychologists completed the survey, and many were aware of the issues relevant to older driver safety, although only about half reported that assessing fitness to drive was an important issue in their practice. The majority (75%) reported that they would benefit from education concerning evaluation of fitness to drive. The primary recommendation emerging from this investigation is to increase efforts to inform and educate psychologists about driving-related assessment and regulatory issues in general, and specifically with respect to older adults. As the population ages, it is of growing importance for all health care providers to understand the influence of mental health conditions-including cognitive impairment and dementia-on driving skills.

  6. The changing duties of organizational psychologists in Slovenia in the past and in the present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Boštjančič

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As with other areas, the growth of occupational and organizational psychology is based on scientific research, variety of situational factors and trends, and needs that arise in the organizational environment. The aim of the study was to describe the tasks carried out by psychologists in organizations in the past (55 years long history of the field in Slovenia, and to compare these with the tasks that are currently performed. The results were compared with similar studies that had been conducted in Slovenia. The results reveal that the work carried out by psychologists in organizations is currently more diverse, but also more focused on specific forms of work, particularly those related to psychological assessment, counseling, and motivation. Their duties are now more likely to be conducted in an international environment and involve working directly with employees and leaders. Participants also gave recommendations to psychologists who work or want to work in the field of organizational psychology.

  7. A Thematic Inquiry into the Burnout Experience of Australian Solo-Practicing Clinical Psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trent E. Hammond

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is conceptualized as a syndrome that consists of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment. Despite the increased frequency and severity of burnout in the Western world, there is limited published research regarding the experiences of clinical psychologists who have had burnout. The present study examines clinical psychologists’ different experiences of burnout in Australia.Design and Methods: In the year 2015, six privately practicing and solo-employed clinical psychologists provided rich qualitative data by participating in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was the method used to analyze clinical psychologists’ natural accounts of their burnout experiences. Using NVivo, emerging themes were identified through coding ‘first order constructs’ and then axial code ‘second order constructs.’Findings: Clinical psychologists indicated that their roles are demanding and a diverse range of symptoms, including the enduring effects of burnout, mental stress, fatigue, decreased personal accomplishment, negative affect, depersonalization, reduced productivity and motivation, and insomnia. They identified precursors of burnout, including excessive workload and hours of work, life stresses, mismanaged workload, and transference. Clinical psychologists suggested that protective factors of burnout include knowledge and years worked in direct care, and trusting and long-term relationships. They indicated that the barriers to overcoming burnout include the fallacy that their clients’ expectations and needs are more important than their own, the financial cost of working in private practice, contemporary knowledge and inadequate education regarding self-care, and time constraints.Discussion and Conclusion: The findings presented in this study provide psychologists and other health professionals with an insight about the burnout experience and inform professionals of the mental

  8. A Thematic Inquiry into the Burnout Experience of Australian Solo-Practicing Clinical Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Trent E.; Crowther, Andrew; Drummond, Sally

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Burnout is conceptualized as a syndrome that consists of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment. Despite the increased frequency and severity of burnout in the Western world, there is limited published research regarding the experiences of clinical psychologists who have had burnout. The present study examines clinical psychologists’ different experiences of burnout in Australia. Design and Methods: In the year 2015, six privately practicing and solo-employed clinical psychologists provided rich qualitative data by participating in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was the method used to analyze clinical psychologists’ natural accounts of their burnout experiences. Using NVivo, emerging themes were identified through coding ‘first order constructs’ and then axial code ‘second order constructs.’ Findings: Clinical psychologists indicated that their roles are demanding and a diverse range of symptoms, including the enduring effects of burnout, mental stress, fatigue, decreased personal accomplishment, negative affect, depersonalization, reduced productivity and motivation, and insomnia. They identified precursors of burnout, including excessive workload and hours of work, life stresses, mismanaged workload, and transference. Clinical psychologists suggested that protective factors of burnout include knowledge and years worked in direct care, and trusting and long-term relationships. They indicated that the barriers to overcoming burnout include the fallacy that their clients’ expectations and needs are more important than their own, the financial cost of working in private practice, contemporary knowledge and inadequate education regarding self-care, and time constraints. Discussion and Conclusion: The findings presented in this study provide psychologists and other health professionals with an insight about the burnout experience and inform professionals of the mental shortcomings of

  9. Psychologists involved in cancer palliative care in Japan: A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kasumi; Iwamitsu, Yumi; Matsubara, Mei; Oba, Akira; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify, using a nationwide survey, what is perceived as necessary knowledge and skills for psychologists involved in cancer palliative care in Japan, the expectations of medical staff members, and the degree to which these expectations are met. We conducted a questionnaire survey of psychologists involved in cancer palliative care. A total of 419 psychologists from 403 facilities were asked to fill out the questionnaire and return it anonymously. Some 401 psychologists (89 males, 310 females, and 2 unspecified; mean age, 37.2 ± 9.5 years) responded about necessary knowledge and skills for psychologists working in cancer palliative care, the necessity for training, expectations at their current workplace, and the degree to which expectations are met. More than 90% of participants responded that many kinds of knowledge and skills related to the field of cancer palliative care are necessary. Over 80% of participants indicated a necessity for training related to these knowledge and skills. Although more than 50% (range, 50.1-85.8%) of participants responded that such services as "cooperation with medical staff within a hospital," "handling patients for whom psychological support would be beneficial," and "assessment of patients' mental state" were expected at their workplace, fewer than 60% (31.4-56.9%) responded that they actually performed these roles. Our results show that many psychologists in cancer palliative care feel unable to respond to the expectations at their current workplace and that they require more adequate knowledge and skills related to cancer palliative care to work effectively. No other nationwide surveys have generated this type of information in Japan, so we believe that the results of our study are uniquely important.

  10. Balancing life and work by unbending gender: Early American women psychologists' struggles and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Elizabeth; Johnson, Ann

    2017-07-01

    Women's participation in the work force shifted markedly throughout the twentieth century, from a low of 21 percent in 1900 to 59 percent in 1998. The influx of women into market work, particularly married women with children, put pressure on the ideology of domesticity: an ideal male worker in the outside market married to a woman taking care of children and home (Williams, 2000). Here, we examine some moments in the early-to-mid-twentieth century when female psychologists contested established norms of life-work balance premised on domesticity. In the 1920s, Ethel Puffer Howes, one of the first generation of American women psychologists studied by Scarborough and Furumoto (1987), challenged the waste of women's higher education represented by the denial of their interests outside of the confines of domesticity with pioneering applied research on communitarian solutions to life-work balance. Prominent second-generation psychologists, such as Leta Hollingworth, Lillian Gilbreth, and Florence Goodenough, sounded notes of dissent in a variety of forums in the interwar period. At mid-century, the exclusion of women psychologists from war work galvanized more organized efforts to address their status and life-work balance. Examination of the ensuing uneasy collaboration between psychologist and library scholar Alice Bryan and the influential male gatekeeper E. G. Boring documents gendered disparities in life-work balance and illuminates how the entrenched ideology of domesticity was sustained. We conclude with Jane Loevinger's mid-century challenge to domesticity and mother-blaming through her questioning of Boring's persistent focus on the need for job concentration in professional psychologists and development of a novel research focus on mothering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Modeling as Didactic Method in the Scientific-Professional Training of the Psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Ramiro Gross Tur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The modeling method has often been developed or recognized in various processes related to training of psychologists studies. It has educational value as its application favors the appropriation of skills and capacity necessary for the performance on the student. However, the method has limitations because it does not exhaust the content praxiological psychology in the teaching-learning process. Therefore, the modeling required to be valued its limitations and potentials in order to plan actions necessary to improve or complement other methods, which serve to improve the process of scientific and professional training of psychologists, with emphasis on the labor dimension.

  12. The (even) bolder model. The clinical psychologist as metaphysician-scientist-practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W

    1989-12-01

    Is the clinical psychologist best characterized as a scientist-practitioner? Or does the practice of science and psychotherapy involve metaphysics to such an extent that the clinical psychologist ought to be considered a metaphysician-scientist-practitioner? To answer these questions, the roles, if any, of metaphysics in science and psychotherapy are examined. This article investigates this question by examining the views of the logical positivists, Karl Popper and Imre Lakatos, and concludes that the practice of science and psychotherapy involves metaphysics in (a) problem choice, (b) research and therapy design, (c) observation statements, (d) resolving the Duhemian problem, and (e) modifying hypotheses to encompass anomalous results.

  13. A forgotten argument by Gordon uniquely selects Abraham's tensor as the energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field in homogeneous, isotropic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoci, S.; Mihich, L.

    1997-01-01

    Given the present status of the problem of the electromagnetic energy tensor in matter, there is perhaps use in recalling a forgotten argument given in 1923 by W. Gordon. Let us consider a material medium which is homogeneous and isotropic when observed in its rest frame. For such a medium, Gordon's argument allows to reduce the above-mentioned problem to an analogous one, defined in a general relativistic vacuum. For the latter problem the form of the Lagrangian is known already, hence the determination of the energy tensor is a straightforward matter. One just performs the Hamiltonian derivative of the Lagrangian chosen in this way with respect to the true metric g ik . Abraham's tensor is thus selected as the electromagnetic energy tensor for a medium which is homogeneous and isotropic in its rest frame

  14. Homenaje a la memoria de los Maestros Doctores Abraham Aparicio Cruz (1849-1914 y Pablo García Medina (1858- 1935

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medicina Academia de

    1951-07-01

    reunió en sesión extraordinaria la Academia Nacional de Medicina para descubrir en el salón de sesiones los retratos de los académicos Abraham Aparicio Cruz y Pablo García Medina. El acto que revistió gran solemnidad fue presidido por el profesor emérito José Vicente Huertas. Concurrió el ex-Presidente de la República Dr. Alfonso López, también el señor Ministro de Higiene. Estuvieron presentes la mayoría de los Académicos, profesores universitarios, numerosos miembros de la Academia de Historia y un nutrido y selecto público de damas y caballeros.

  15. Methods of Identification of Students with Learning Disabilities in Reading: Perceptions of Administrators in Illinois and Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists' training provides a variety of skills from which its practitioners may draw, including consultation, intervention, counseling, staff development, and assessment. Despite these broad skills, school psychologists' primary roles involve assessment and assessment-related tasks, generally as related to eligibility determination…

  16. Assessment in the Digital Age: An Overview of Online Tools and Considerations for School Psychologists and School Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellins, Laura

    2015-01-01

    With recent developments in technology, online tests and digital tools offer school psychologists and school counsellors alternate modes of assessment. These new technologies have the potential to increase accessibility to tests (through greater portability), allow school psychologists and school counsellors to service more students (through…

  17. Training the Next Generation of School Psychologists to Deliver Evidence Based Mental Health Practices: Current Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Elisa S.; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are uniquely positioned to support the delivery of evidence-based mental health practices (EBMHPs) to address the overwhelming mental health needs of children and youth. Graduate training programs can promote EBMHPs in schools by ensuring school psychologists enter the workplace prepared to deliver and support high-quality,…

  18. Autism: Assessment and Intervention Practices of School Psychologists and the Implications for Training in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jenny Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are being diagnosed at alarmingly high rates and school psychologists are charged with evaluating, identifying, and providing interventions for students with ASD in the United States' public school systems. A national survey probed Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSP) to determine their level of…

  19. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  20. Current and Future School Psychologists' Preparedness to Work with LGBT Students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Goldstein, Thalia R.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess current and future school psychologists' attitudes toward and preparedness to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Two-hundred seventy-nine school psychologists (n = 162, 58%) and school psychology graduate students (n = 117, 42%) were included in the study.…

  1. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a clinical psychologist's or clinical social worker's services are reimbursable under this subpart if the service or supply is— (1) Of a...

  2. Abraham Flexner y el Flexnerismo. Fundamento Imperecedero de la Educación Médica Moderna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Felix Patiño Restrepo

    1998-12-01

    servicios de salud introducen cambios profundos en el ejercicio de la medicina y crean nuevos problemas como la ruptura de la relación médico-paciente, el deterioro de la imagen pública del médico, el surgimiento del paciente como cliente, usuario o consumidor y las complejas implicaciones de la medicina tecnológica (Hafferty & Franks 1994. De la medicina hipocrática hemos pasado a una medicina organizada y gerenciada, a una práctica médica de tipo corporativo, en la cual el imperativo hipocrático ha sido reemplazado por un mandato burocrático, y se perciben serias amenazas contra la preservación de la medicina como profesión y como ciencia (Patiño 1998.

    Al tiempo que la educación médica es un sistema pedagógico, la facultad de medicina es una comunidad moral y, como lo afirmó Abraham Flexner a comienzos del siglo, siendo una división universitaria es también una corporación de servicio público. Estoy convencido de que la misión de la educación médica moderna, ahora más que nunca, se define y se aclara con base en los preceptos establecidos por Flexner.

    Flexner murió en 1959, a la edad de 92 años, habiendo completado una admirable hoja de vida como educador y promotor de la excelencia académica (Bonner 1998...

  3. Analysis of the basic professional standards involving the work of psychologists in difficult and legally significant situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich N. V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the analysis of professional standards in terms of the scope of work of the psychologist with clients in difficult life and legal situations. The criteria of analysis chosen: reflected in professional activities, the choice of grounds for the selection of professional activities that focus on a specific Department, selection of a particular direction of activity of the psychologist (prevention, support, rehabilitation. It is shown that all five of the analyzed standards imply such a situation, but only three of them ("educational psychologist", "Psychologist in the social sphere", "Specialist in rehabilitative work in the social sphere" describe the activities of the psychologist, and the remaining ("Expert of bodies of guardianship and guardianship concerning minors" and "Specialist in working with families" are more organizational in nature. The conclusion about compliance of the training programs developed by the Department of legal psychology and law and education, the requirements of professional standards, proposed improvements in these programs.

  4. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA's Ethics Code or current research.

  5. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA’s Ethics Code or current research. PMID:25342876

  6. Delivering and Receiving Bad News: What School Psychologists Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Megan; Rogers, Margaret R.; O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Perry, Kimberly Hill

    2010-01-01

    Delivering bad news to students, teachers, and parents is not an uncommon occurrence for school psychologists. Skillfully communicating bad news requires sensitivity, thoughtful wording, and an awareness of the potential effect on the recipients. Despite the importance of this skill, school psychology has devoted little attention to what is…

  7. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  8. Acceptability of Functional Behavioral Assessment Procedures to Special Educators and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert E.; Bundock, Kaitlin; Kladis, Kristin; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2015-01-01

    This survey study assessed the acceptability of a variety of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures (i.e., functional assessment interviews, rating scales/questionnaires, systematic direct observations, functional analysis manipulations) to a national sample of 123 special educators and a state sample of 140 school psychologists.…

  9. Assessing the Cognitive Functioning of Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Practices and Perceptions of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costner, Ashley Nicole

    2016-01-01

    School psychologists are faced with the task of conducting evaluations of students in order to determine special education eligibility. This often equates to administering a cognitive assessment measure to obtain information about skills or abilities. Although this may be a straightforward task when working with children of average or higher…

  10. The Provision of Counseling Services among School Psychologists: An Exploration of Training, Current Practices, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Fernald, Lori N.

    2013-01-01

    Although school psychologists have been called on in recent literature to assume a leadership role in a collective and comprehensive effort to address students' mental health needs, many practitioners find that their professional roles continue to be narrowly focused on special education-related activities, such as individualized assessment…

  11. School Psychologists' Knowledge and Self-Efficacy in Working with Students with TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glang, Ann E.; McCart, Melissa; Moore, Christabelle L.; Davies, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 145,000 U.S. children experience lasting effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that manifest in social, behavioural, physical, and cognitive challenges in the school setting. School psychologists have an essential role in identifying students who need support and in determining eligibility under the Individuals with Disabilities…

  12. Motor Deficits Following Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew S.; Moore, Brittney; Rice, Valerie; Decker, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), sometimes referred to as concussion, is one of the most common acquired neurological problems of childhood. When children return to school following mTBI, school psychologists should be actively involved in the determination of neurocognitive and functional deficits for the purpose of designing strength-based…

  13. Medication-Related Practice Roles: An Ethical and Legal Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Given the prevalence of school-age children and adolescents who are prescribed with and are taking psychotropic medications, a critical issue that school psychologists may likely encounter in contemporary practice is providing both quality and continuity of care to these students in the context of relevant legal and ethical parameters. With a…

  14. Why Do School Psychologists Cling to Ineffective Practices? Let's Do What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerHeyden, Amanda M.

    2018-01-01

    This article considers the cost of poor decision making in school psychology, especially with regard to determining eligibility for special education under the category of specific learning disability. One common costly decision made by school psychologists is failing to use evidence-based assessment and intervention procedures that are likely to…

  15. Single-Case Design and Evaluation in R: An Introduction and Tutorial for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    For the appraisal of single-case intervention data, school psychologists have been encouraged to focus most, if not all, of their interpretive weight on the visual inspection of graphed data. However, existing software programs provide practitioners with limited features for systematic visual inspection. R (R Development Core Team, 2014) is a…

  16. Supervision and Mentoring for Early Career School Psychologists: Availability, Access, Structure, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlene E.; Newman, Daniel S.; Guiney, Meaghan C.; Valley-Gray, Sarah; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors thank Jeffrey Charvat, Director of Research, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), for his guidance regarding survey development and administration, and Wendy Finn, former Director of Membership and Marketing, NASP, for her assistance with sampling and data collection. The authors thank Concetta Panuccio for her…

  17. The Significance of the Interculturally Competent School Psychologist for Achieving Equitable Education Outcomes for Migrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This article examines procedures and processes that result in the over-referral of migrant students to separate special education programmes and, as a consequence, their exclusion from general education. The particular focus is on the role of the school psychologist in this process. The empirical study is a comparison of Swiss teachers' and school…

  18. School Psychologists' Willingness to Implement RtI: The Role of Philosophical and Practical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chung-Hau; Denner, Peter R.; Bocanegra, Joel O.; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    After the change in IDEIA, different models of response to intervention (RtI) have been practiced widely in American school systems. School psychologists are in an important position to facilitate RtI practice and provide professional development in order to help their school systems successfully undergo this transformation. However, there is a…

  19. Supporting Socio-Emotional Competence and Psychological Well-Being of School Psychologists through Mindfulness Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahari, Uma

    2017-01-01

    The development of effective emotional regulation is critical to the success of educational professionals in a variety of settings. These skills are particularly important for school psychologists who must learn to interact successfully with diverse students, teachers, and parents on a daily basis. Research now suggests that mindfulness practice…

  20. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Afifi, Amanda F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, school psychologists have increasingly recognized the importance of using valid and reliable methods to assess culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students for special education eligibility. However, little is known about their assessment practices or preparation in this area. To address these questions, a Web-based survey…

  1. The Changing Role of School Psychologists in School-Wide Models of Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Dena F.

    2012-01-01

    The reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004) allows states the use of a process based on a child's response to scientific, research-based intervention as a means to assist in the determination of a specific learning disability (SLD). As a result, the traditional role of the school psychologist as a test…

  2. Gesell: The First School Psychologist Part I. The Road to Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Arnold Gesell's (1880-1960) qualifications, career, experiences, and the events which led to his official appointment as the first school psychologist in the United States are discussed. Gesell was influenced by Hall's thinking, and his graduate studies were a combination of experimental, developmental, and clinical psychology. (JAZ)

  3. Defining the Undefinable: Operationalization of Methods to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities among Practicing School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and consistent identification of students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs) is crucial; however, state and district guidelines regarding identification methods lack operationalization and are inconsistent throughout the United States. In the current study, the authors surveyed 471 school psychologists about "school" SLD…

  4. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Childhood Internalizing Disorders: Perceived Knowledge, Role Preferences and Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.; Jome, Larae M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of a national sample of school psychologists in the United States regarding their knowledge, preferred roles and training needs in the assessment of nine prominent childhood internalizing disorders. Knowledge about all disorders was rated by respondents as being at least fairly important. In particular,…

  5. Survey of School Psychologists' Attitudes, Feelings, and Exposure to Gay and Lesbian Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-sook; Thul, Candrice A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Norris, James L.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists' attitudes and feelings toward gay and lesbian parents were surveyed in relation to their training and exposure, and professional services offered to gay and lesbian parents and their children. The relationship between attitudes, feelings, training, exposure, and demographic characteristics was explored as well. A stratified…

  6. Should social psychologists create a disciplinary affirmative action program for political conservatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweder, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Freely staying on the move between alternative points of view is the best antidote to dogmatism. Robert Merton's ideals for an epistemic community are sufficient to correct pseudo-empirical studies designed to confirm beliefs that liberals (or conservatives) think deserve to be true. Institutionalizing the self-proclaimed political identities of social psychologists may make things worse.

  7. The Role of the School Psychologist in the Examination of Complex Language Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Hans

    1988-01-01

    School psychologists must utilize an interdisciplinary approach to understand and analyze language disturbances, by examining the student's motor coordination, sensorium, perception, cognition, emotionality, and sociability. Implications for the practice of school psychology are offered in the areas of dyslalia, dysgrammatia, retardation of…

  8. The School Psychologist as a Facilitator of Parent Involvement in Decisions Concerning Their Children. An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapides, Joseph

    Factors influencing decision making are reviewed, and strategies which a school psychologist can use to increase parent involvement in decisions about their handicapped children are delineated. It is explained that four types of interventions are effective in promoting parental involvement: decision counseling, the balance sheet schema to help…

  9. Use of Hypnosis by Psychologists in a Pediatric Setting: Establishing and Maintaining Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Donald J.; Hoffmann, Claudia

    The use of hypnosis in a pediatric setting has the potential for yielding effective results. Obstacles to its use are inappropriate training of psychologists in pediatric psychology, resistance to hypnosis from the pediatricians and mental health professionals, fragmented communication, and constant demand for space and time. Success of hypnosis…

  10. An Innovative Model of Integrated Behavioral Health: School Psychologists in Pediatric Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Carolyn D.; Hinojosa, Sara; Armstrong, Kathleen; Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an innovative example of integrated care in which doctoral level school psychology interns and residents worked alongside pediatric residents and pediatricians in the primary care settings to jointly provide services to patients. School psychologists specializing in pediatric health are uniquely trained to recognize and…

  11. School Safety and Crisis Planning Considerations for School Psychologists. Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly-Wilson, Christina; Reeves, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, people across the country are asking if schools in their communities are safe. School psychologists not only play a pivotal role in answering that question, but they can also provide leadership in helping to ensure a safe school climate. A critical component to answering…

  12. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  13. Supervision and Satisfaction among School Psychologists: An Empirical Study of Professionals in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielking, Monica; Moore, Susan; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the supervision arrangements and job satisfaction among school psychologists in Victoria, Australia. Participation in professional supervision was explored in relation to the type of employment and job satisfaction. The results revealed that the frequency of participation in supervision activities was less than optimal, with…

  14. The Role of School Counsellors and Psychologists in Supporting Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Damien W.; Bartholomaeus, Clare

    2015-01-01

    As growing numbers of transgender people--including students, parents, and educators--become visible within schools, so comes with this the requirement that schools ensure their full inclusion. This article suggests that school counsellors and psychologists have an important role to play in supporting transgender people within schools. As an…

  15. Promoting School Psychologist Participation in Transition Services Using the TPIE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talapatra, Devadrita; Roach, Andrew T.; Varjas, Kris; Houchins, David E.; Crimmins, Daniel B.

    2018-01-01

    Transition services can be used to forge family, school, and community partnerships and foster a successful shift to adult life for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). School psychologists can play a valuable additive role in supporting the transition process due to their graduate training in interpersonal skills; consultation services;…

  16. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  17. A Survey of School Psychologists' Practices for Identifying Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Barry, Christine T.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed school psychologists regarding identification of mentally retarded students. The Wechsler scales were the most frequently used tests for deriving intelligence quotient scores, which together with adaptive behavior scale scores were rated as most influential in identification-placement decisions. The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales were…

  18. Assessment Practices of School Psychologists When Identifying Children for SED Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnieks, Maija; Wessel, Joan

    This study investigated the procedures used by psychologists in a large midwestern urban area for the initial diagnosis and placement of elementary children with severe emotional disturbance (SED) in educational programs in light of the widespread criticism of the use of projective tests due to the questionable reliability of the tests and…

  19. How Vocational Psychologists Can Make a Difference in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Shannon, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In general, vocational psychologists have not been engaged in applied research that demonstrates how career interventions can improve educational problems that matter to relevant decision-makers and stakeholders. This article describes how vocational psychology can make a difference in K-12 education by embracing an interdisciplinary…

  20. Training MA Psychologists for Work in Rural Settings: Issues and Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter A.

    Despite the assumptions some have naively made about various stresses and the quality of life associated with rural settings, most who have studied people residing in rural areas would acknowledge the strong need for mental health services. However psychologists, like most other health care professionals prefer the amenities of more metropolitan…

  1. School Psychologists Working with Native American Youth: Training, Competence, and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Butler-Byrd, Nola; Cook-Morales, Valerie; Dauphinais, Paul; Charley, Elvina; Bonner, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing emphases on multicultural competence, Native American youth remain tremendously underserved by schools: low achievement, high dropout rates, and over-identification for special education persist. The authors analyzed responses of 403 school psychologists to a national survey regarding their competence gained in training, in current…

  2. A Comparison of Satisfaction Ratings of School Psychologists in RTI versus Non-RTI School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade-White, Priscilla A.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' satisfaction with school psychological services has been studied for more than 30 years. Few to no studies, however, are available that provide data about the perceptions of school psychologists regarding their perceived value within different service delivery models, particularly those involving Response to Intervention (RTI) models.…

  3. Black Students' Recollections of Pathways to Resilience: Lessons for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on narrative data from a multiple case study, I recount the life stories of two resilient Black South African university students to theorize about the processes that encouraged these students, familiar with penury and parental illiteracy, to resile. I aimed to uncover lessons for school psychologists about resilience, and their role in…

  4. Development of Students-Psychologists Personality Adapting to the Future Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L A Dmitrieva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the studies of the structure of practical psychologist's professionally important qualities (PIQ of junior and graduate students. It is shown that, during the students' adaptation to their profession the hierarchy, the linking system of PIQ and their interpretation by students change.

  5. School Psychologists: Leaders for Change Building a Secure Future for Children. CASS Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Carol

    This digest examines the role of school psychologists in improving educational opportunities for children and adolescents. A variety of issues that affect children and their ability to learn are discussed: widening social class differences and increases in the number of children living in poverty; changing value systems; family disintegration;…

  6. Realists or Pragmatists? "Reliable Evidence" and the Role of the Educational Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of interviews with seven educational psychologists, focused on issues of epistemological and ontological positioning, are reported. The interviews were conducted within a qualitative, biographical research paradigm which examines the ways in which a person's meaning-making is impacted upon by all aspects of their life experience. Thematic…

  7. Professional Development Needs and Training Interests: A Survey of Early Career School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Brown, Jacqueline; Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Early career psychologists (ECPs) are considered a distinct professional group that faces unique career challenges. Despite recent organizational efforts to increase engagement of these individuals, little is known about the professional development needs and training interests of ECPs, particularly within psychology's subfields. As such, this…

  8. A Look at the Single Parent Family: Implications for the School Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Christine W.; Brassard, Marla R.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the effects on parents and children of living in a single parent family, and suggests ways in which school psychologists can aid schools and single parent families. Presents school-based interventions for children and parents. Suggests changes in administrative policies to meet the needs of single parent families. (Author)

  9. Nonromantic/Nonsexual Relationships with Former Clients: Implications for Psychologists' Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon K.

    The ethical principles and code of conduct of the American Psychological Association are clear: psychologists are to avoid sexual relationships with former clients. But guidelines offer scant guidance on nonromantic and nonsexual relationships with former clients; the ethical risks of such relationships are explored in this paper. The information…

  10. The 2002 Revision of the American Psychological Association's Ethics Code: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Rosemary; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Jacob, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The Ethical Principles for Psychologists and Code of Conduct has been recently revised. The organization of the code changed, and the language was made more specific. A number of points relevant to school psychology are explicitly stated in the code. A clear advantage of including these items in the code is the assistance to school psychologists…

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury: The Efficacy of a Half-Day Training for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Ray, Ashlyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rates of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are increasing, yet educators continue to be inadequately trained in assessing and serving students with TBIs. This study examined the efficacy of a half-day TBI training program for school psychologists designed to improve their knowledge and skills. Results of quantitative and qualitative…

  12. Female and Male Psychologists in Academic Administration: Resource Control and Perceived Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined male and female psychologists in academic administrative positions with regard to their perceptions of their own power and their actual power within the administrative hierarchies in which they work. In the past, researchers have compared women and men in academic administrative positions with regard to parity of numbers,…

  13. References to Human Rights in Codes of Ethics for Psychologists: Critical Issues and Recommendations. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Жанель Готье

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available There are codes of ethics in psychology that explicitly refer to human rights. There are also psychologists interested in the protection and promotion of human rights who are calling for the explicit inclusion of references to human rights in all psychology ethics codes. Yet, references to human rights in ethics documents have rarely been the focus of attention in psychological ethics. This article represents the first part of a two-part article series focusing on critical issues associated with the inclusion of references to human rights in the ethical codes of psychologists, and recommendations about how psychological ethics and the human rights movement can work together in serving humanity. The first part of the article series examines issues pertaining to the interpretation of references to human rights in codes of ethics for psychologists, and the justifications for including these references in psychological ethics codes. The second part of the article series examines how the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists can be used to extend or supplement codes of ethics in psychology, how ethical principles and human rights differ and complement each other, and how psychological ethics and the human rights movement can work together in serving humanity and improving the welfare of both persons and peoples.

  14. Training School Psychologists to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities: A Content Analysis of Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Courtenay A.; Cottrell, Joseph M.; Newman, Daniel S.; Pierce, Benjamin G.; Anderson, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 2.4 million children receive special education services for specific learning disabilities (SLDs), and school psychologists are key contributors to the SLD eligibility decision-making process. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) enabled local education agencies to use response to intervention (RTI) instead of the…

  15. Experiences of Asian Psychologists and Counselors Trained in the USA: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Michael; Yon, Kyu Jin; Shimmi, Yukiko; Hirai, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    This study qualitatively explored the pre-departure to reentry experiences of Asian international psychologists and counselors trained in the USA. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 participants from four different Asian countries. Inductive analysis with Consensual Qualitative Research methods was used to analyze the interview…

  16. MF Scales: Instruments of Male Chauvinism or Responsible Tools of the Psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Lenore W.

    A study is made of the validity of the use of MF scales. It is pointed out that femininity is often a liability in the psychologist's office. Clients who have MF scores considered to be more appropriate for the opposite sex are threatened by them. If the clinician assumes the client has an abnormal score, the ensuing therapy usually will be…

  17. How Russian Teachers, Mothers and School Psychologists Perceive Internalising and Externalising Behaviours in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Elena; Moskovtseva, Ludmila; Naumenko, Oksana; Zilberberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perception of children's internalising and externalising behaviours by Russian teachers, mothers and school psychologists. The participants rated their agreement about the causes, seriousness and recommended interventions for the problem behaviour of a fictitious girl/boy described in two vignettes. Mixed ANOVAs indicated…

  18. Thinking Like a Psychologist Introductory Psychology Writing Assignments: Encouraging Critical Thinking and Resisting Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Diane Keyser; Whitmarsh, Lona

    2017-01-01

    Teaching the general psychology course provides instructors with the opportunity to invite students to explore the dynamics of behavior and mental processes through the lens of theory and research. Three innovative writing assignments were developed to teach students to think like a psychologist, operationalized as enhancing critical thinking,…

  19. A Competency-Based Approach to Hiring School Counselors, Psychologists and Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Dennis P.; Probst, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Hiring decisions offer an immense opportunity for school leaders to influence the trajectory of their organizations in the immediate and long-term. However, very few school administrators have appropriate training, if any at all, in how to select the best candidates. Effective hiring for school counselors, psychologists, and social workers…

  20. Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

  1. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conceptualising the professional identity of industrial or organisational psychologists within the South African context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, Llewellyn E.; Nel, Elzabe; Stander, Marius W.; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: Lack in congruence amongst industrial and organisational psychologists (IOPs) as to the conceptualisation of its profession poses a significant risk as to the relevance, longevity and professional identity of the profession within the South African context. Research purpose: This study

  3. Missing Voices: African American School Psychologists' Perspectives on Increasing Professional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L.; Truscott, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s, there has been a noticeable decrease in the percentage of African American educators. Although a sizeable literature is dedicated to understanding how to recruit African American teachers, fewer studies focus on recruiting and retaining African American school psychologists. Therefore, this exploratory qualitative study…

  4. Individual psychological therapy in an acute inpatient setting: Service user and psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine; Pistrang, Nancy; Huddy, Vyv; Williams, Claire

    2018-01-18

    The acute inpatient setting poses potential challenges to delivering one-to-one psychological therapy; however, there is little research on the experiences of both receiving and delivering therapies in this environment. This qualitative study aimed to explore service users' and psychologists' experiences of undertaking individual therapy in acute inpatient units. It focused on the relationship between service users and psychologists, what service users found helpful or unhelpful, and how psychologists attempted to overcome any challenges in delivering therapy. The study used a qualitative, interview-based design. Eight service users and the six psychologists they worked with were recruited from four acute inpatient wards. They participated in individual semi-structured interviews eliciting their perspectives on the therapy. Service users' and psychologists' transcripts were analysed together using Braun and Clarke's (2006, Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77) method of thematic analysis. The accounts highlighted the importance of forming a 'human' relationship - particularly within the context of the inpatient environment - as a basis for therapeutic work. Psychological therapy provided valued opportunities for meaning-making. To overcome the challenges of acute mental health crisis and environmental constraints, psychologists needed to work flexibly and creatively; the therapeutic work also extended to the wider context of the inpatient unit, in efforts to promote a shared understanding of service users' difficulties. Therapeutic relationships between service users and clinicians need to be promoted more broadly within acute inpatient care. Psychological formulation can help both service users and ward staff in understanding crisis and working collaboratively. Practice-based evidence is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of adapted psychological therapy models. Developing 'human' relationships at all levels of acute inpatient care continues to be an

  5. Psychologists experience of cognitive behaviour therapy in a developing country: a qualitative study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayub Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological therapies especially Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT are used widely in the West to help patients with psychiatric problems. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has an established evidence base for the treatment of different emotional disorders. In spite of these developments in the developed world, patients in most developing countries hardly benefit from non pharmacological interventions. Although a significant number of psychologists are trained in Pakistan each year, psychological interventions play only a minor role in treatment plans in Pakistan. We conducted interviews with psychologists in Pakistan, to explore their experiences and their views on "providing CBT in Pakistan". These interviews were conducted as part of a project whose focus was to try to develop culturally-sensitive CBT in Pakistan. Methods In depth semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 psychologists working in psychiatry departments in Lahore, Pakistan. Results All the psychologists reported that psychotherapies, including CBT, need adjustments for use in Pakistan, although they were not able to elicit on these in details. Four major themes were discovered, hurdles in therapy, therapy related issues, involvement of the family and modification in therapy. The biggest hurdles in therapy were described to be service and resource issues. Conclusions For CBT to be acceptable, accessible and effective in Non Western cultures numerous adjustments need to be made, taking into consideration; factors related to service structure and delivery, patient's knowledge and beliefs about health and the therapy itself. Interviews with the psychologists in these countries can give us insights which can guide development of therapy and manuals to support its delivery.

  6. Understanding the Process: An Ethnographic Case Study of School Psychologists' Experiences in the Referral of African Americans to Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Pamela Denise

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative method of research was chosen for this study. This ethnographic case study examined school psychologists' and the referral process for special education services. The participants included school psychologists in a specific county in the state of Maryland. School psychologists are considered crucial members of an Individualized…

  7. Care at home of the patient with advanced multiple sclerosis--part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitman, Nancy Clayton

    2010-05-01

    Clinicians caring for patients with advanced MS have choices of different options and approaches. Whatever path is chosen, interventions must incorporate the wishes and capabilities of the patient and be supported by the care team, usually led by the nurse. As the work of the great psychologist Abraham Maslow has shown, in his famous "hierarchy of needs," the basic levels of needs must be met before the highest self-actualization can be accomplished (Maslow, 1943). This is equally true in the nursing care of very ill patients, as authors Zalenski and Raspa write: "The five levels of the hierarchy of needs as adapted to palliative care are: (1) distressing symptoms, such as pain or dyspnea; (2) fears for physical safety, of dying or abandonment; (3) affection, love and acceptance in the face of devastating illness; (4) esteem, respect, and appreciation for the person; (5) self-actualization and transcendence. Maslow's modified hierarchy of palliative care needs could be utilized to provide a comprehensive approach for the assessment of patients' needs and the design of interventions to achieve goals that start with comfort and potentially extend to the experience of transcendence."(Zalenski & Raspa, 2006, p.1120).

  8. La creación del mundo supralunar según Abraham Ibn Ezra: un estudio comparativo de sus dos comentarios a Génesis 1,14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sela, Shlomo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at elucidating Abraham Ibn Ezra's (ca. 1089 - ca. 1167 opinion about the creation of the supra-lunar world. A major and striking feature of Ibn Ezra's approach is that he did not find it convenient to address this issue, intimately related to the nature of the celestial bodies, in his astronomical or astrological treatises, but rather in his biblical commentaries. Therefore, we propose to concentrate our efforts on the meticulous study of the two commentaries which Ibn Ezra wrote on Genesis 1,14. As this verse focuses on the account of the creation of the heavenly bodies, we have assumed that the elusive Ibn Ezra could not have avoided revealing his view, or, at least, that we should have left some significant hints from which we may uncover his genuine opinion about the creation of the supra-lunar world.

    El propósito de este artículo es averiguar la opinión de Abraham Ibn Ezra (ca. 1089 - ca. 1167 sobre lo relacionado con la creación del mundo supralunar. Una característica fundamental dei modus operandi de Ibn Ezra es que, si buscamos información acerca de su opinión sobre la creación del mundo, tanto sublunar como supralunar, no la hallaremos en sus tratados científicos astronómicos o astrológicos, sino precisamente en sus comentarios bíblicos. Por lo tanto, la metodología más adecuada consistirá en concentrar nuestros esfuerzos en el estudio meticuloso de sus dos comentarios a Génesis 1,14. Dado que este verso bíblico tiene como objetivo principal el relato y la descripción de la creación de las luminarias, pensamos que en ambos comentarios Ibn Ezra no pudo haber eludido dar su verdadera opinión -o al menos dejar alguna pista significativa- sobre la creación del mundo supralunar.

  9. Quality Improvement in Health Care: The Role of Psychologists and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Liza

    2018-02-21

    Quality Improvement (QI) is a health care interprofessional team activity wherein psychology as a field and individual psychologists in health care settings can and should adopt a more robust presence. The current article makes the argument for why psychology's participation in QI is good for health care, is good for our profession, and is the right thing to do for the patients and families we serve. It reviews the varied ways individual psychologists and our profession can integrate quality processes and improve health care through: (1) our approach to our daily work; (2) our roles on health care teams and involvement in organizational initiatives; (3) opportunities for teaching and scholarship; and (4) system redesign and advocacy within our health care organizations and health care environment.

  10. The relationships between adult attachment, theoretical orientation, and therapist-reported alliance quality among licensed psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Sari; Shorey, Hal S

    2016-01-01

    Attachment anxiety has been depicted as an undesirable therapist characteristic based on findings that preoccupied therapists, relative to those with other attachment styles, report more ruptures in the therapeutic alliance. What has not been considered, however, is the extent to which attachment dynamics are related to theoretical orientations and how attachment styles and theoretical orientations combine to predict therapists' perceptions of the quality of their alliances. The present surveyed 290 licensed psychologists nationally. Results revealed that even within a sample of primarily secure psychologists, higher 15 levels of attachment anxiety correlated positively with the endorsement of psychodynamic orientations, and negatively with the endorsement of cognitive-behavioral orientations and self-reported alliance quality. Endorsement of cognitive-behavioral orientations, in turn, correlated positively with therapist-reported alliance quality. The results are discussed in terms of the extent to which attachment dimensions should be considered in therapists' understandings of their therapeutic alliances.

  11. Scientific-professional training of psychologist: a historical and tendency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Gross-Tur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the teaching-learning process of psychology have changed significantly over time. Studying of their transformations allows us to understand the external manifestations of its changes, the essential dynamics that affect their movement and transformation, and development prospects in their future. Therefore, this article, framed from the pedagogical sciences, illustrates the results of the historical valuation of scientist-professional training process of psychologists in Cuba. This study was done by means of a review of different literatures and we used a criteria and indicators for interpretation. Three key stages in the history of the process of scientific-professional training of psychologists in Cuba were identified. Similarly, two historical trends that characterize the process in question were revealed.

  12. 2010 Amendments to the 2002 "Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The following amendments to the 2002 "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" (the Ethics Code; American Psychological Association, 2002) were adopted by the APA Council of Representatives at its February 2010 meeting. The changes involve the last two sentences of the final paragraph of the Introduction and Applicability section and Ethical Standards 1.02 and 1.03. The amendments became effective June 1, 2010. A history of these amendments to the Ethics Code is provided in the "Report of the Ethics Committee, 2009" in this issue of the American Psychologist (American Psychological Association, Ethics Committee, 2010). Following are a clean version of the revisions and a version indicating changes from the 2002 language (inserted text is underlined; deleted text is crossed out). 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Primitive entertainment prank calls in the work of counseling psychologist on Children helpline

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    I.A. Geronimus

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges faced by counseling psychologist when working at the Children's Helpline in cases of prank calls. The category of prank calls include such calls, when the caller asks the psychologist to discuss the imaginary situation, or do not formulate a query at all. On the basis of empirical data, we revealed the main varieties of such calls: call jokes, fantasy calls, intrusive calls, insulting calls, prank calls, calls of a sexual nature, dating calls. We explore the possible motivations of children and adolescents, entertaining by phone calls: experimentation with new social roles, expression of negative emotions, cognitive motivation, etc. We show the principles and strategies of counselors of Children's helpline working with this type of calls: they are based on cultural-historical psychology ideas and V. Satir communicative styles model.

  14. Psychologists conducting Psychotherapy in 2012: current practices and historical trends among Division 29 members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Rogan, Jessica D

    2013-12-01

    This study updates three similar investigations conducted in 1981, 1991, and 2001 on APA Division of Psychotherapy members in order to paint a contemporary portrait of psychologists conducting psychotherapy and to chronicle historical trends among Division 29 members. Four hundred twenty-eight psychologists (43% response) completed a questionnaire in 2012 regarding their demographic characteristics, professional activities, theoretical orientations, employment settings, and career experiences. The results point to an increasingly female and aging membership, which continues to be employed primarily in private practices and universities. Psychodynamic (27%), integrative (25%), and cognitive (17%) orientations continue to prevail. Professional activities have remained quite similar across the past 30 years with the exception of declines in projective testing and growth in neuropsychological and health testing. Training and career satisfactions remain high as well.

  15. Commentary on the Future of Community Psychology: Perspective of a Research Community Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Norweeta G

    2016-12-01

    Community psychology is commented upon from the perspective of a community psychologist who was trained in the Community Psychology Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Her background and training are reviewed. A brief survey of research on homelessness as a frame for community psychology research is presented. Concluding remarks are provided on the future of research in community psychology. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  16. Differences regarding job satisfaction and job involvement of psychologists with different dominant career anchors

    OpenAIRE

    CL Bester; T Mouton

    2006-01-01

    In order to contribute to higher levels of job satisfaction, job involvement , and productivity, a match or fit should be established between the dominant career anchor associated with a specific occupation and that of the employee. A career anchor is an individual’s set of self-perceived talents, abilities, motives, needs and values that form the nucleus of one’s occupational self-concept. Psychologists have always been part of the service orientated careers and therefore one would expect th...

  17. ROLE OF PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY IN SELF-REALIZATION OF PSYCHOLOGISTS-TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S I Kudinov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the problem of the role of professional identity in self-realization of psychologists- teachers. Within the frame of a system-defined approach the research identifies and describes the individual- typological features of the phenomena interesting to us. The works that focus on the study of self-realization are subjected to the analysis, as the result it is noted that in this field there are still gaps in the understanding of this issue. Thus, the study from the perspective of the influence of professional identity on the successful self-realization of the personality is recognized as relevant. In the framework of this study the following assumptions are put forward: there is a relationship between the professional identity and successful self- realization of the personality; the level of formation of professional identity has an impact on the success of personality self-realization; the professional identity not fully formed acts as a barrier for creativity, activity, internality and constructive self- realization; fully formed professional identity provides a high success rate of self-realization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the features of self- realization and professional identity of psychologists-teachers. For the study, we used “Multidimensional questionnaire of personality self-realization” (MQPS by S.I. Kudinov, for the study of professional identity the following methods were used: “Professional identity-marginalism” questionnaire by E.P. Ermolaeva and Methods of measuring professional identity (MMPI by L.B. Schneider. The results obtained were subjected to quantitative analysis. In the article the author relies on the data gathered as a result of a study conducted at the Institute of Education Development of the Republic of Bashkortostan (GAOU DPO IRO RB, city of Ufa. The sample consisted of 142 educational psychologists. As a result of the conducted research, the specific relationship

  18. Practice to Policy: Clinical psychologists' experiences of macro-level work

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, N.

    2017-01-01

    Many clinical psychologists are venturing beyond their traditional therapeutic roles to undertake macro-level work, engaging with social change, policy and public health. However, no research has systematically examined clinical psychologists’ roles in policy work and the implications for the profession. Part 1 of the thesis is a literature review of one area of macro-level policy aimed at improving the social determinants of mental health. It reviews nine intervention studies of housing impr...

  19. Making ethical choices: a comprehensive decision-making model for Canadian psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, T; Malloy, D C

    2000-05-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical augmentation of the seven-step decision-making model outlined in the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. We propose that teleological, deontological, and existential ethical perspectives should be taken into account in the decision-making process. We also consider the influence of individual, issue-specific, significant-other, situational, and external factors on ethical decision-making. This theoretical analysis demonstrates the richness and complexity of ethical decision-making.

  20. Organizational-professional conflict of I/O psychologists, job satisfaction and work engagement

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    Mladenović Branko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available organizational-professional conflict occurs among employees in situations when organizational expectations and demands are opposed to the professional principles and standards. The results of studies have shown that this conflict negatively affects employees' attitude towards the job and affective-motivational state of fulfilment with work role. The purpose of this research was to examine exposure to organizational-professional conflict among I/O psychologists in Serbia, to find out whether there is a correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict, job satisfaction and work engagement, and to determine the main factors of exposure to organizational-professional conflict. Our sample consisted of 96 I/O psychologists. Results have shown that there was significant high negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and job satisfaction, as well as significant moderate negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and work engagement. The highest correlations were with social dimensions of job satisfaction. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was lower among I/O psychologists with longer work experience and those at higher positions in organizational hierarchy. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was higher among I/O psychologists who were working in privately owned companies and among those who were fixed-term employees. There was no significant correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and the size of the organization or business field. Our study showed that organizational-professional conflict should be considered as an important theoretical and research topic, as well as a relevant professional and career issue.

  1. Organizational-professional conflict of I/O psychologists, job satisfaction and work engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Mladenović Branko; Petrović Ivana B.

    2015-01-01

    organizational-professional conflict occurs among employees in situations when organizational expectations and demands are opposed to the professional principles and standards. The results of studies have shown that this conflict negatively affects employees' attitude towards the job and affective-motivational state of fulfilment with work role. The purpose of this research was to examine exposure to organizational-professional conflict among I/O psychologists in Serbia, to find out whether t...

  2. Evaluating a primary care psychology service in Ireland: a survey of stakeholders and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark; Byrne, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Primary care psychology services (PCPS) represent an important resource in meeting the various health needs of our communities. This study evaluated the PCPS in a two-county area within the Republic of Ireland. The objectives were to (i) examine the viewpoints of the service for both psychologists and stakeholders (healthcare professionals only) and (ii) examine the enactment of the stepped care model of service provision. Separate surveys were sent to primary care psychologists (n = 8), general practitioners (GPs; n = 69) and other stakeholders in the two counties. GPs and stakeholders were required to rate the current PCPS. The GP survey specifically examined referrals to the PCPS and service configuration, while the stakeholder survey also requested suggestions for future service provision. Psychologists were required to provide information regarding their workload, time spent on certain tasks and productivity ideas. Referral numbers, waiting lists and waiting times were also obtained. All 8 psychologists, 23 GPs (33% response rate) and 37 stakeholders (unknown response rate) responded. GPs and stakeholders reported access to the PCPS as a primary concern, with waiting times of up to 80 weeks in some areas. Service provision to children and adults was uneven between counties. A stepped care model of service provision was not observed. Access can be improved by further implementation of a stepped care service, developing a high-throughput service for adults (based on a stepped care model), and employing a single waiting list for each county to ensure equal access. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Online counseling: An exploratory survey of Italian psychologists' attitudes towards new ways of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolletta, Sabrina; Mocellin, Damiano

    2017-01-09

    Online counseling may be defined as an interaction between users and mental health professionals that takes place through computer mediated communication technology. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of Italian psychologists towards different aspects of online counseling provided via email, chat, forums, and videoconference. An online questionnaire was administered to a sample of 289 licensed psychologists in the Veneto Region (Italy) in order to collect opinions, preferences, and intentions to use online modalities, along with prior knowledge and practice experiences. Only 18.3% of the respondents had previous experience with online counseling. Overall, the majority of psychologists (62.6%) were favorable towards online counseling, but they also had several reservations about the provision of online diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Results showed a consistent lack of clarity regarding ethical and penal issues concerning online modalities. More efforts must be directed to deepening the application of new technologies in the field of psychology in order to enable an ethical and professional practice of online counseling in Italy.

  4. Practicing what we preach: Investigating the role of social support in sport psychologists well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eMcCormack

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Well-being and mental health of psychologists and their clients can be strongly linked to the psychologists’ experience of work. We know from general theories of occupational health psychology that certain work factors will have a greater impact on well-being than others. Work engagement is positively related with occupational health, while burnout and workaholic tendencies relate negatively. An individual’s resources can buffer against these negative effects. Specifically, the environmental resource of social support can impede the impact and instance of workaholism and has a positive influence on burnout. Social support is often encouraged by sport psychologists in protecting an athlete’s well-being. Drawing on theory and research from work and organisational, health and social psychology we explore the lived experiences of burnout and work engagement among applied sport psychologists, investigating their perceptions of how these experiences impact their well-being. Thirty participants from five countries were asked, using semi-structured interviews, to recall specific incidents when feelings of work engagement and burnout occurred. We examined the influence of social support and its impact on these incidents. Thematic analysis revealed that burnout is frequently experienced despite high levels of work engagement. Sources of social support differ between groups of high burnout versus low burnout, as does reference to the dimensions of work engagement. Avenues for future research including investigating the role of mindfulness and therapeutic lifestyle changes for practitioners are outlined.

  5. Women, behavior, and evolution: understanding the debate between feminist evolutionists and evolutionary psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesen, Laurette T

    2007-03-01

    Often since the early 1990s, feminist evolutionists have criticized evolutionary psychologists, finding fault in their analyses of human male and female reproductive behavior. Feminist evolutionists have criticized various evolutionary psychologists for perpetuating gender stereotypes, using questionable methodology, and exhibiting a chill toward feminism. Though these criticisms have been raised many times, the conflict itself has not been fully analyzed. Therefore, I reconsider this conflict, both in its origins and its implications. I find that the approaches and perspectives of feminist evolutionists and evolutionary psychologists are distinctly different, leading many of the former to work in behavioral ecology, primatology, and evolutionary biology. Invitingly to feminist evolutionists, these three fields emphasize social behavior and the influences of environmental variables; in contrast, evolutionary psychology has come to rely on assumptions deemphasizing the pliability of psychological mechanisms and the flexibility of human behavior. In behavioral ecology, primatology, and evolutionary biology, feminist evolutionists have found old biases easy to correct and new hypotheses practical to test, offering new insights into male and female behavior, explaining the emergence and persistence of patriarchy, and potentially bringing closer a prime feminist goal, sexual equality.

  6. Mental health problems among clinical psychologists: Stigma and its impact on disclosure and help-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Stacie; Alcock, Kat; Scior, Katrina

    2018-03-24

    To assess the prevalence of personal experiences of mental health problems among clinical psychologists, external, perceived, and self-stigma among them, and stigma-related concerns relating to disclosure and help-seeking. Responses were collected from 678 UK-based clinical psychologists through an anonymous web survey consisting of the Social Distance Scale, Stig-9, Military Stigma Scale, Secrecy Scale, Attitudes towards Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale-Short Form, alongside personal experience and socio-demographic questions. Two-thirds of participants had experienced mental health problems themselves. Perceived mental health stigma was higher than external and self-stigma. Participants were more likely to have disclosed in their social than work circles. Concerns about negative consequences for self and career, and shame prevented some from disclosing and help-seeking. Personal experiences of mental health problems among clinical psychologists may be fairly common. Stigma, concerns about negative consequences of disclosure and shame as barriers to disclosure and help-seeking merit further consideration. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Person-first and identity-first language: Developing psychologists' cultural competence using disability language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dana S; Andrews, Erin E

    2015-04-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) advocates the use of person-first language (e.g., people with disabilities) to refer to individuals with disabilities in daily discourse and to reduce bias in psychological writing. Disability culture advocates and disability studies scholars have challenged the rationale for and implications of exclusive person-first language use, promoting use of identity-first language (e.g., disabled people). We argue that psychologists should adopt identity-first language alongside person-first constructions to address the concerns of disability groups while promoting human dignity and maintaining scientific and professional rigor. We review the evolution of disability language and then discuss the major models used to characterize disability and people with disabilities. The rationale for person-first language and the emergence of identity-first language, respectively, are linked to particular models. We then discuss some language challenges posed by identity-first language and the current intent of person-first language, suggesting that psychologists make judicious use of the former when it is possible to do so. We conclude by offering five observations of ways that use of both person-first and identity-first language could enhance psychologists' cultural competence regarding disability issues in personal and scientific communications. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The problem of developing of readiness of the future legal psychologists to effective coping

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    Busarova O.R.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the need to improve the readiness of the future legal psychologists to effective coping behavior in the light output at the present time in Russia professional standards governing the activities of professionals providing psychological assistance to minors, including those who are in legally relevant situations. The aim of the presented research - the identification of typical coping strategies for students of legal psychology in the educational practice and the analysis of the relationship of coping strategies with successful performance practices. Second-year students were diagnostic practice in various educational institutions, including schools and special schools for students with deviant behavior. Probationers acted as a psychologist, a holistic diagnostic problem solving - from the receipt of the request to make recommendations on the results of the survey. The method of content analysis was processed 41 report on the practice. Fixed mention of problematic situations that have caused negative emotions in the trainees, and mention of coping behavior. Revealed the typical difficulties of students and coping strategies when performing queries on psycho-diagnostics of children with behavioral problems. We found a significant positive correlation between the success of the implementation of practice tasks students with a variety mentioned in the report difficulties with the frequency of their appearance, as well as with a variety of coping strategies. The study offers methodological tools for the preparation of the future legal psychologists in diagnostic practice.

  9. The role of the obstetrician and the psychologist in postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ferraz de Sampaio Neto

    2013-03-01

    The depressive conditions that affect women in the postpartum period are very relevant, either due to its high prevalence or to the impairment in the woman's quality of life, her fetus' and other components of her family. The multidisciplinary approach of these patients can significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and therapeutic treatment; avoiding that mild frames develop into serious situations as puerperal psychosis. The harmonic performance of the team formed by the obstetrician, pediatrician, psychiatrist, nurse and psychologist will be fundamental to reduce the impact of situations of postpartum depression (PPD. It is up to the obstetrician to suspect those women who have risk factors for developing PPD, according to their personal and familiar history. The obstetrician, pediatrician, or other partners of the health care team will be observing the patient's puerperal period whereas investigating suspicious situations of PPD, by using objective diagnosis methods. The psychologists are responsible for defining the final diagnosis and psychotherapy and they are an important part in the preparation of pregnant women during prenatal care for patients at risk of PPD. Precocious diagnosis will provide referral for combined services with the psychologist, treating and elucidating the patient about the PPD's condition.

  10. The relationship between continuing education and perceived competence, professional support, and professional value among clinical psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Stacy; Drapeau, Martin; Destefano, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Continuing education is one of the means by which professionals maintain and increase their level of competence. However, the relationship between continuing education and the professional's sense of personal competence and other practice-related variables remains unclear. This study examined practicing psychologists' continuing education activities and how these relate to feelings of perceived competence, professional value, and professional support. Psychologists (n = 418) licensed to practice in Quebec were surveyed by pencil-and-paper mail-in survey concerning their continuing education activities, as well as their perceptions of their competence in practice, and their feelings of being professionally valued and professionally supported. Results indicated that feelings of competence in practice were related to professional reading, taking courses/workshops, years being licensed, and attending psychology conferences/conventions. Feelings of professional value were related to age and participating in psychology networking groups, and feelings of professional support were related to participating in case discussion groups, supervision groups, and psychology networking groups. The results showcase the complexity of professional development. Although relationships were found between continuing education activities and the 3 factors of interest, these relationships were moderate. Findings are discussed in the context of their value to individual psychologists, as well as to psychology licensing and regulatory boards, such as promoting participation in those activities related to feelings of competence and support. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  11. Synergistic Man: Outcome Model for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseve, Ronald J.

    1973-01-01

    Drawing on the insights of Ruth Benedict and Abraham Maslow in their search for an ethical gauge by which to rate personal-social health, this article proposes synergistic man'' as the desired outcome model for counselors. (Author)

  12. Abraham Flexner of Kentucky, his report, Medical Education in the United States and Canada, and the historical questions raised by the report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Edward C; Perman, Jay A; Wilson, Emery A

    2010-02-01

    One hundred years ago, the time was right and the need was critical for medical education reform. Medical education had become a commercial enterprise with proprietary schools of variable quality, lectures delivered in crowded classrooms, and often no laboratory instruction or patient contact. Progress in science, technology, and the quality of medical care, along with political will and philanthropic support, contributed to the circumstances under which Abraham Flexner produced his report. Flexner was dismayed by the quality of many of the medical schools he visited in preparing the report. Many of the recommendations in Medical Education in the United States and Canada are still relevant, especially those concerning the physician as a practitioner whose purpose is more societal and preventive than individual and curative. Flexner helped establish standards for prerequisite education, framed medical school admission criteria, aided in the design of a curriculum introduced by the basic and followed by the clinical sciences, stipulated the resources necessary for medical education, and emphasized medical school affiliation with both a university and a strong clinical system. He proposed integration of basic and clinical sciences leading to contextual learning, active rather than passive learning, and the importance of philanthropy. Flexner's report poses several questions for the historian: How were his views on African American medical education shaped by his post-Civil War upbringing in Louisville? Was the report original or derivative? Why did it have such a large impact? This article describes Flexner's early life and the report's methodology and considers several of the historical questions.

  13. ‘Thou retir’est to endless Rest’. Abraham Cowley’s ‘Wise’ and ‘Epicuræan’ Grassehopper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Romero Allué

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The lyric The Grassehopper by Abraham Cowley is a paradigmatic example of the reverent and almost animistic approach to the natural dimension that marks the first half of the seventeenth century: along with the vast process of democratization and the growing interest in science, a renewed enthusiasm for classic thinkers contributes to a mounting sensitivity towards the ‘brute creation’. Close to Pythagoras, Plato, Theophrastus, Ovid, Plutarch, Porphyry and, among his illustrious contemporaries, Gassendi, Galileo and Montaigne, Cowley indirectly challenges anthropocentrism and believes that the earth equally exists for humanity, animals and plants. Cowley devotes numerous poems and essays to plants and animals that do not belong to literary tradition and even theorizes and formulates an educative system that includes agriculture, gardening and zoology. In the lyric under analysis, he obliquely associates the eponymous grasshopper, an insect traditionally identified with the cicada in English culture, with the Muses, Apollo, Tithonus, Epicurus and with the figure of the poet: Cowley endows the “happy Insect” with both human and divine features and connects himself with it in order to retire, as his grassehopper does, “to endless Rest”, a metaphor for the paradisal and immortal dimension to which many seventeenth-century English thinkers aspire.

  14. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life

    OpenAIRE

    Haeny, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The p...

  15. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs SR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan R Childs,1,* Emma M Casely,2,* Bianca M Kuehler,1 Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte L Halmshaw,1 Sarah E Thomas,1 Ian D Goodall,1 Carsten Bantel1,3 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Anaesthetic Department, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize

  16. Sources of Career Dissatisfaction among Mid-Level Coast Guard Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    fulfillment than staff managers, with the largest line-staff differences occurring in the esteem and self -actualization need areas; (2) line and staff...of Industrial Psychology and Organizational Behavior, ed. Marvin Dunnette, Chicago: Rand McNally & Co., 1976. Maslow , Abraham H., Motivation and...Personality, New York: Harper and Row, Publishers, 1954. Maslow , Abraham H., "The Study of Man At His Best," Behavioral Science Concepts and

  17. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation: Proposal for Department of Defense Support to the Whole of Government Approach In Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    September 1, 2011). 5 Abraham Maslow , Motivation and Personality, Third Edition, Harper and Row Publishers, 1954, 91-236. 6 Joshua M. Epstein, “Why...Response Program." Joint Force Quarterly, no. 37 (2005): 46, http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/jfq_pubs/0937.pdf (accessed October 15, 2011). Maslow ... Abraham . Motivation and Personality. Third ed. New York, New York: Harper and Row, 1954. Mattis, James. US Central Command Commander’s Posture

  18. A Square Peg in a Round Hole: A Case Study of Center Gravity Application in Counter Insurgency Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Operations," Proceedings (December 2004): 32. 28 John Mackinlay, The Insurgent Archipelago (London: C. Hurst, 2009), 10. See also Abraham H. Maslow ...Motivation and Personality, (New York: Harper & Row, 1970), 97- 104. For a description of what Maslow considers his ―Heirarchy of Needs‖. 29...of attacks, see Anthony Cordesman and Abraham Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume II: The Iran-Iraq War (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1990), 506

  19. [A proposal for reforming psychologists' training in France and in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, J-P

    2009-02-01

    In France, as in the European Union, the number of psychologists continues to increase and constitutes by far the most important source of professionals in this field. The requests for services of psychologists in many various domains have also increased in an unprecedented way over a number of years. In spite of this development, which should continue to increase considerably, the initial training of psychologists remains uneven and disparate and often remote from, even unsuitable to, the legitimate expectations of users. It is therefore important to reform this training by extending, updating, homogenising and adapting it to current knowledge and needs, and by marking it by a single and specific degree: that of a doctorate. This new eight-year doctoral curriculum would be at the same time more complete and simpler than the European Diploma in Psychology model (EuroPsy), for instance. This latter is a very complicated and insufficient subject and would not completely resolve the great problems of psychologists' training and the competences they need to gain in order to access professional practise, research and teaching. This extension of the psychologists' training would make it possible to integrate new data concerning traditional fields of psychology and data concerning new fields of application of psychology and should obviously include the essential training for psychotherapies referred to the great theoretical and practical models, since their interest is clinically acknowledged (psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical therapies, cognitive and behavioural therapies, systemic therapies, therapies for individuals, couples, families, groups...). This polyreferred training would make it possible to go from a culture still too often axed on orientation and deficiencies of the therapist, to a culture of indication, opening and competence, focused on the patient's interest. Teaching of psychophysiology and neurosciences should be updated and harmonised by taking into

  20. Interpersonal circumplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, T

    1996-04-01

    The social and intellectual climate of the late 1940s and early 1950s in America helped nourish humanistic, person-centered views of human behavior. During that time, psychologists such as Gordon Allport, Abraham Maslow, David McClelland, Harry Murray, and Carl Rogers emphasized the positive growth potential in human character. The psychiatrist Harry Stack Sullivan proposed that personality can best be understood within the context of interpersonal transactions, and he provided a practical, street-smart understanding of psychiatric symptoms that was quite an advance over the traditional medical and psychoanalytic viewpoints. These ideas, along with the concept of dimensionalizing traits rather than categorizing them, inspired my colleagues and I to conduct our cooperative work on the interpersonal circumplex, which culminated in the publication of my monograph. Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality (Leary, 1957).

  1. Cuerpo, lectura y mujer en Separation/Séparation de Annie Abrahams, Underbelly de Christine Wilks y Vniverse de Stephanie Strickland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreto Doménech

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2015v11n2p128 Presentamos una lectura comparada de tres obras de literatura electrónica representativas de un proceso de autoría encarnada y en las que la corporalidad es un aspecto esencial, tanto temáticamente como en cuanto al proceso de lectura. Separation/Separation, de Annie Abrahams, és un poema electrónico que simula el diálogo entre el cuerpo y la máquina. Sin embargo, el proceso de lectura nos desvela significados ocultos relacionados con el género: la recuperación del cuerpo es una metáfora de la recuperación emocional a través de un discurso de empoderamiento. Vniverse de Stephanie Strickland es un poemario híbrido que compila una experiencia lectora y un proceso de crecimiento identitario. Con los versos que dedica a Simone Weil, que representa la escritura, el pensamiento y la acción desde la experiencia corporal, se construye un universo que cuestiona los mecanismos de poder a través del desbaratamiento del proceso lector y de la disolución de la figura mitificada de la mujer. En Underbelly, Christine Wilks sitúa en las entrañas de la tierra el relato etnológico e histórico de las mujeres mineras de la Inglaterra del siglo XIX y las interfiere con la voz de una artista actual que trabaja la piedra. Las mujeres de Underbelly  estan separadas por siglos pero atravesadas por un mismo proceso, el de la maternidad.

  2. How We Diminish Ourselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Abraham H.

    1991-01-01

    Presents previously unpublished paper written by Abraham Maslow, written in November 1966, in which Maslow confronts the issue why so few people are truly self-actualizing. Discusses the Jonah Complex, the willful evasion of personal capacity for growth and accomplishment in life. (Author/ABL)

  3. Training Humans for the Human Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Yerkes introduced the first intelligence tests in the United States. In 1954, Abraham Maslow published Motivation and Person- ality, describing the...20, pp. 158-177. 40. A. Maslow , Motivation and Personality, New York: Harper, 1954. 41. S. Milgram, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View

  4. The Implementation of the Bully Prevention Program: Bully Proofing Your School and Its Effect on Bullying and School Climate on Sixth Grade Suburban Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Barbara K.

    2010-01-01

    Almost 70 years after Abraham Harold Maslow suggested in his 1943 work, "A Theory of Human Emotion", a child's need to feel safe in order to thrive (Maslow, 1943), educational communities, still embracing his insight, find themselves continuing to grapple with how to keep children safe-from one another. The bulk of educational research focused on…

  5. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  6. State Water Resource Competition and the Resulting Consequences of Diminished Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    future! To illustrate the need for survival through his Self-Actualization Theory, Abraham Maslow proposes “that human motivation can be...belonging needs, and esteem needs, and culminate in self-actualization.”3 Maslow categorizes the value of water to human survival as a “demand.” The

  7. Peak Communication Experiences: Concept, Structure, and Sex Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ron; Dulaney, Earl

    A study was conducted to test a "peak communication experience" (PCE) scale developed from Abraham Maslow's theory of PCE's, a model of one's highest interpersonal communication moments in terms of perceived mutual understanding, happiness, and personal fulfillment. Nineteen items, extrapolated from Maslow's model but rendered more…

  8. Starting with the Soul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Sam M.; Kunzman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Intrator and Kunzman argue that professional development for teachers follows an orientation similar to Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs--and that this orientation needs to be reversed. Maslow posited that people must fulfill subsistence needs such as needs for food and safety before they can pursue higher needs like the need for…

  9. Experiential Exercises for Gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Abraham H.

    1991-01-01

    Presents previously unpublished paper written by Abraham Maslow in which Maslow discusses gratitude. Claims it is important to acquire the ability to "count one's blessings" and appreciate what is possessed without experiencing its loss. Offers suggestions on applying this principle. (ABL)

  10. The Self-Actualization of Polk Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Howard E.; Thompson, Paul V., Jr.

    This article investigates the concept of self-actualization introduced by Abraham Maslow (1954). A summary of Maslow's Needs Hierarchy, along with a description of the characteristics of the self-actualized person, is presented. An analysis of humanistic education reveals it has much to offer as a means of promoting the principles of…

  11. "God save us from psychologists as expert witnesses": the battle for forensic psychology in early twentieth-century Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffram, Heather

    2015-11-01

    This article is focused on the jurisdictional battle between psychiatrists and psychologists over psychological expertise in legal contexts that took place during the first decades of the 20th century. Using, as an example, the debate between the psychologist William Stern, the psychiatrist Albert Moll, and the jurist Albert Hellwig, which occurred at the International Congress for Sexual Research held in Berlin in 1926, it aims to demonstrate the manner in which psychiatrists' responses to psychologists' attempts to gain admittance to Germany's courtrooms were shaped not only by epistemological and methodological objections, but also by changes to expert witnessing that had already encroached on psychiatrists' professional territory. Building upon recent work examining the relationship between psychologists and jurists prior to the First World War, this article also seeks to examine the role of judges and lawyers in the contest over forensic psychology in the mid-1920s, arguing that they ultimately became referees in the increasingly public disputes between psychiatrists and psychologists. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Rated casemix of general practitioner referrals to practice counsellors and clinical psychologists: a retrospective survey of a year's caseload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J; Parham, A

    2001-06-01

    Although evidence-based guidelines are beginning to be produced as to which psychological therapies might be appropriate for which patients, little is known about how general medical practitioners (GPs) in practice distribute referrals between different psychological therapy services. In a retrospective survey, 19 practice counsellors and 10 clinical psychologists from the same geographical area rated a year's caseload of GP referrals using identical data collection methods. Rated casemix was found to be broadly similar, although practice counsellors rated relationship and bereavement problems as more common in their caseloads (totalling 986 patients), and clinical psychologists rated panic disorder, phobias, and obsessive-compulsive problems as more common in their caseloads (totalling 320 patients). Depression and anxiety reactions were the most common problems rated in both groups, but the clinical psychologist cases of depression were rated as more severe and complex. Where differences were found, they may have reflected the different ways that counsellors and clinical psychologists conceptualize cases rather than actual differences in casemix. The results are discussed in relation to evidence-based guideline recommendations about cases appropriate to be seen by practice counsellors and by clinical psychologists in primary and secondary care, and the need to adapt such guidance to local services and skills of practitioners.

  13. Managing a Solar Sensor Array Project: Analyzing Insolation & Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    good, for ourselves and our society. Abraham Maslow (1943) established a prominent theory of motivation with his needs hierarchy. According to...approach combines Maslow ?s needs hierarchy with prosocial behavior theory to encourage team members to motivate themselves and build self-confidence. The...affiliation, and recognition identified by Maslow . There is much satisfaction to be found in serving others and in creating a greater good. When workers are

  14. The Study of Teachers' and Parents' Needs for Psychological Consultation from School Psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina E.A.,

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at the investigation of teachers’ and parents’ needs in consultation with a school psychologist. Participants were 159 teachers and 292 parents from three cities in Russia. Two surveys were designed to measure teachers’ and parents’ desire to receive psychological consultation regarding behavioral, emotional, learning and interpersonal problems of students; teaching methods and relationships with colleagues (for teachers; and child-parent relationships. In addition, the participants were asked to indicate whether they received a consultation from a school psychologist in the past and their satisfaction from the consultation. The results indicated that, in general, both teachers and parents are satisfied with the consultation; however, fewer parents received such a consultation compared to teachers. Both teachers and parents are more willing to receive consultation regarding children’s behavioral and emotional problems and relationships with peers. Teachers are less motivated to receive consultation about teaching methods, students’ learning problems, and teachers’ relationships with colleagues. Parents were less interested to receive consultation about child-parent relationships. The results of this study are interpreted in terms of their alignment with standards, which regulate the school psychology profession and training.

  15. Facilitators and barriers to the provision of therapeutic interventions by school psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Muscutt, Janet; Wasilewski, David

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern internationally about the prevalence of mental health problems among school-aged children and their access to specialist services. School psychologists (SPs) may be one group of professionals well-positioned to support the well-being of children and young people, due to their position as applied psychologists working within educational settings and their capability to deliver therapeutic interventions. This research considers findings from a large scale, United Kingdom (UK)-wide survey of the views of SPs (N = 455) about facilitators and barriers to the provision of therapeutic interventions to children and young people. Principal Components Analyses of ranked questionnaire responses yielded three components: The role of the SP; training and practice; and support and psychology service context. Quantitative findings were then triangulated, using qualitative responses from the survey. Greater direction and clarification of the role of the SP as a provider of therapeutic interventions is recommended, particularly given the diverse roles undertaken by SPs and competing demands, particularly from assessment activities. PMID:26412911

  16. The role of the organisational psychologist in disasters and emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Guillén, César

    2011-04-01

    Interventions in extreme situations, such as natural or technological disasters, terrorist attacks or emergencies in general, take place in settings of great uncertainty and are always accompanied by extraordinary circumstances. For this reason, there are various processes related to implementing intervention protocols that must be carefully examined, including an evaluation of work scenarios, personnel selection, within-group relationships in work teams, decision-making processes, or certain peculiarities of burnout among emergency personnel. In the view of this author, an ad hoc review of the role of the organisational psychologist can highlight interesting analysis and performance possibilities that could make work in emergency and disasters contexts more effective. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of the organisational psychologist pre-and post-disaster. Furthermore, it supports the idea that professional profiles must be designed that take into account specific knowledge and skills, as well as certain aptitudes and values. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  17. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Factors Related to Compensation of Pediatric Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Cheryl L; Hilliard, Marisa E; Williams, Andre; Armstrong, F Daniel; Christidis, Peggy; Kichler, Jessica; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Stamm, Karen E; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-05-01

    To summarize compensation results from the 2015 Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey and identify factors related to compensation of pediatric psychologists. All full members of SPP ( n  = 1,314) received the online Workforce Survey; 404 (32%) were returned with usable data. The survey assessed salary, benefits, and other income sources. The relationship between demographic and employment-related factors and overall compensation was explored.   Academic rank, level of administrative responsibility, and cost of living index of employment location were associated with compensation. Compensation did not vary by gender; however, women were disproportionately represented at the assistant and associate professor level. Compensation of pediatric psychologists is related to multiple factors. Longitudinal administration of the Workforce Survey is needed to determine changes in compensation and career advancement for this profession over time. Strategies to increase the response rate of future Workforce Surveys are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Why Should We All Be Cultural Psychologists? Lessons from the Study of Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    I call the attention of psychologists to the pivotal role of cultural psychology in extending and enriching research programs. I argue that it is not enough to simply acknowledge the importance of culture, and urge psychologists to practice cultural psychology in their research. I deconstruct five assumptions about cultural psychology that seriously undermine its contribution to the building of a true psychological science, including that cultural psychology 1) is only about finding group differences; 2) does not care about group similarities; 3) only concerns group-level analysis; 4) is irrelevant to basic psychological processes; and 5) is only to confirm the generalizability of theories. I discuss how cultural psychology can provide unique insights into psychological processes and further equip researchers with additional tools to understand human behavior. Drawing lessons from the 20 years of cultural research that my colleagues and I have done on the development of social cognition, including autobiographical memory, future thinking, self, and emotion knowledge, I demonstrate that incorporating cultural psychology into a research program is not only necessary but also feasible. PMID:27694456

  19. 'Chipping in': clinical psychologists' descriptions of their use of formulation in multidisciplinary team working.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stella; Johnstone, Lucy; Musa, Meyrem

    2012-12-01

    To investigate clinical psychologists' accounts of their use of psychological case formulation in multidisciplinary teamwork. A qualitative study using inductive thematic analysis. Ten clinical psychologists working in community and inpatient adult mental health services who identified themselves as using formulation in their multidisciplinary team work participated in semi-structured interviews. Psychological hypotheses were described as shared mostly through informal means such as chipping in ideas during a team discussion rather than through explicit means such as staff training or case presentations that usually only took place once participants had spent time developing their role within the team. Service context and staff's prior experience were also factors in how explicitly formulation was discussed. Participants reported that they believed that this way of working, although often not formally recognized, was valuable and improved the quality of clinical services provided. More investigation into this under-researched but important area of clinical practice is needed, in order to share ideas and support good practice. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  20. STRUCTURAL AND STRATEGIC ASPECTS OF PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED SPEECH OF A PSYCHOLOGIST MEDIATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Levchyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents characteristic speech patterns of psychologist-mediator on the basis of five staged model of his professional speech behavior that involves the following five speech activities: introductory talks with the conflict parties; clarifying of the parties’ positions; finding the optimal solution to the problem; persuasion in the legality of a compromise; execution of the agreement between the parties. Each of these stages of the mediation process in terms of mental and speech activities of a specialist have been analyzed and subsequently the structure of mediator’s communication has been derived. The concept of a "strategy of verbal behavior" considering professional activity of a psychologist-mediator has been described in terms of its correlation with the type of negotiation behaviors of disputants. The basic types of opponents’ behavior in negotiations ‒ namely avoidance, concession, denial, aggression have been specified. The compliance of strategy of speech of mediator’s behavior to his chosen style of mediation has been discovered. The tactics and logic of mediator’s speech behavior according to the stages of mediation conversation have been determined. It has been found out that the mediator’s tactics implies application of specific professional speech skills to conduct a dialogue in accordance with the chosen strategy as well as emotional and verbal reaction of conflict sides in the process of communication.