WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychological clinical care

  1. Psychological care demand in clinical practice: treatment and results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Labrador, Francisco Javier; Estupiñá, Francisco José; García Vera, María Paz

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of describing the usual clinical context as opposed to the academic or research context, the characteristics of patients and psychological treatments applied in a sample of 856 patients...

  2. [Clinical Psychology in Primary Care: A Descriptive Study of One Year of Operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Reales, S; Tornero-Gómez, M J; Martín-Oviedo, P; Redondo-Jiménez, M; del-Arco-Jódar, R

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to present the first year of operation of a Clinical Psychology service in a Primary Care setting. A descriptive study was performed by analysing the requests and the care intervention of the Psychology Service, in collaboration with 36 general practitioners (33% of the staff), belonging to 6 health centres. Within the one year period, 171 outpatients from 15 years and older were referred with mild psychological disorders (> 61 in the global assessment functioning scale, APA, 2002). A total of 111 outpatients received psychological care. The main diagnoses were adaptation disorder, affective disorder, and anxiety. More than half (54.82%) of them achieved a full recovery. After a year follow up, a drop of 25.19% was observed in medicines use. The Primary Care Psychology team is a halfway unit between Primary Care practitioners and specialised units in order to deal with mild mental symptomatology which otherwise could be undertreated. It represents an important support for practitioners. Secondly, the early intervention can prevent mental problems becoming chronic, as shown by the drop in medication use. In spite of the not very high agreement between the practitioner's diagnoses and those made by the Psychology unit, it has set up an important means of communication and with direct and immediate interdisciplinary action. This should eventually lead to savings in economic resources and human suffering. Copyright © 2014. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. [Clinical psychology in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdy, E

    1998-11-08

    What is health- and clinical psychology? How do they fit into the healthcare system as disciplines and branches of professional practice? This overviews presents the theoretical sources of the profession, its components and interdisciplinary relations. Outlined are the criteria of being a profession, within the framework of the developmental history of clinical psychology in Hungary and abroad. Also discussed are specific aspects of practical care, both within and beyond healthcare as primary prevention (mental hygiene). In addition, we deal with the current problems of clinical psychology, international and specifically Hungarian, as well as its potential for development. Our main message is that the answer to present day challenges is activity based upon on integrated care model. This uses the framework of primary care and is capable of bringing about the reconciliation and integration of biological and psycho-social interventions. A crucial aspect of this is the role of team-work and, above all, that of the clinical psychologist.

  4. A clinical psychologist in GP-Land: an evaluation of brief psychological interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dath, Sunil; Dong, Christine Yang; Stewart, Malcolm W; Sables, Eileen

    2014-03-28

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes and other impacts of brief therapy provided in a primary care setting by a clinical psychologist who was mainly employed in secondary mental health. The outcomes of 23 primary care patients referred to a clinical psychologist were evaluated using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the World Health Organisation Quality of Life (WHOQoL) scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A mixture of quantitative and qualitative data from patients and staff were analysed to identify other impacts of the intervention. Large improvements in BDI, GHQ, and WHOQOL scores were found, with strong changes consistent with the targets of the intervention. Patients reported primary-based clinical psychology input was more convenient and many engaged who had resisted referral to secondary mental health services. Other benefits to the service, including improved primary-secondary service integration, improved primary management of mental health difficulties, and improved liaison with mental health specialists, were reported by primary health staff. Brief psychological interventions by a visiting clinical psychologist in a general practice setting had substantial benefits for the patients and for the practice. This project indicates the value of integrated psychological input consistent with recent moves to better primary-secondary integration in mental health care.

  5. Evaluation of integrated psychological services in a university-based primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadock, Elizabeth; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Aggarwal, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Primary care is increasingly moving toward integration of psychological services; however few studies have been conducted to test the efficacy of such an integrated approach. This paper presents a program evaluation of psychological services provided by doctoral trainees in clinical and counseling psychology within a primary care clinic at an urban academic medical center. It includes: (1) a description of the program, including types of patients served, their presenting problems, and treatments administered and; (2) evidence of the impact of behavioral health services on primary care patients' emotional adjustment and progress on behavioral goals. Intake and follow-up measures of depression, anxiety, smoking, insomnia, chronic pain, and weight loss were collected on 452 adult patients (mean age = 52; 59 % African-American; 35 % uninsured) who were provided brief interventions (mean visits = 2.2) over a 16-month period. Although conclusions are limited by the lack of a control or comparison group, preliminary findings indicate that the integrated behavioral health services provided were effective. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  6. Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men: an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jane RW; Hammarberg, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men. The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research. A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagn...

  7. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  8. Training oncology and palliative care clinical nurse specialists in psychological skills: evaluation of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jane E; Aitken, Susan; Watson, Nina; McVey, Joanne; Helbert, Jan; Wraith, Anita; Taylor, Vanessa; Catesby, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    National guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend training Clinical Nurse Specialists in psychological skills to improve the assessment and intervention with psychological problems experienced by people with a cancer diagnosis (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2004). This pilot study evaluated a three-day training program combined with supervision sessions from Clinical Psychologists that focused on developing skills in psychological assessment and intervention for common problems experienced by people with cancer. Questionnaires were developed to measure participants' levels of confidence in 15 competencies of psychological skills. Participants completed these prior to the program and on completion of the program. Summative evaluation was undertaken and results were compared. In addition, a focus group interview provided qualitative data of participants' experiences of the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Following the program, participants rated their confidence in psychological assessment and skills associated with providing psychological support as having increased in all areas. This included improved knowledge of psychological theories, skills in assessment and intervention and accessing and using supervision appropriately. The largest increase was in providing psycho-education to support the coping strategies of patients and carers. Thematic analysis of interview data identified two main themes including learning experiences and program enhancements. The significance of the clinical supervision sessions as key learning opportunities, achieved through the development of a community of practice, emerged. Although this pilot study has limitations, the results suggest that a combined teaching and supervision program is effective in improving Clinical Nurse Specialists' confidence level in specific psychological skills. Participants' experiences highlighted suggestions for refinement and development of the program

  9. Stepped care targeting psychological distress in head and neck and lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebber Anne-Marie H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress is common in cancer survivors. Although there is some evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial care in distressed cancer patients, referral rate is low. Lack of adequate screening instruments in oncology settings and insufficient availability of traditional models of psychosocial care are the main barriers. A stepped care approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of psychosocial care. The aim of the study described herein is to evaluate efficacy of a stepped care strategy targeting psychological distress in cancer survivors. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomized clinical trial with 2 treatment arms: a stepped care intervention programme versus care as usual. Patients treated for head and neck cancer (HNC or lung cancer (LC are screened for distress using OncoQuest, a computerized touchscreen system. After stratification for tumour (HNC vs. LC and stage (stage I/II vs. III/IV, 176 distressed patients are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group will follow a stepped care model with 4 evidence based steps: 1. Watchful waiting, 2. Guided self-help via Internet or a booklet, 3. Problem Solving Treatment administered by a specialized nurse, and 4. Specialized psychological intervention or antidepressant medication. In the control group, patients receive care as usual which most often is a single interview or referral to specialized intervention. Primary outcome is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcome measures are a clinical level of depression or anxiety (CIDI, quality of life (EQ-5D, EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-HN35, QLQ-LC13, patient satisfaction with care (EORTC QLQ-PATSAT, and costs (health care utilization and work loss (TIC-P and PRODISQ modules. Outcomes are evaluated before and after intervention and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after intervention. Discussion Stepped care is a system of delivering and

  10. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  11. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  12. Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men: an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane RW; Hammarberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men. The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research. A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagnosis, assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and unsuccessful treatment among men with fertility difficulties. The studies are diverse in conceptualisation, design, setting and data collection, but the findings were reasonably consistent. These studies indicated that fertile and infertile childless men of reproductive age have desires to experience parenthood that are similar to those of their female counterparts; in addition, diagnosis and initiation of treatment are associated with elevated infertility-specific anxiety, and unsuccessful treatment can lead to a state of lasting sadness. However, rates of clinically significant mental health problems among this patient population are no higher than in the general population. Infertile men who are socially isolated, have an avoidant coping style and appraise stressful events as overwhelming, are more vulnerable to severe anxiety than men without these characteristics. Men prefer oral to written treatment information and prefer to receive emotional support from infertility clinicians rather than from mental health professionals, self-help support groups or friends. Nevertheless, structured, facilitated psycho-educational groups that are didactic but permit informal sharing of experiences might be beneficial. There are gaps in knowledge about factors governing seeking, persisting with and deciding to cease treatment; experiences of invasive procedures; parenting after assisted conception; adoption and infertility

  13. Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men: an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane R W; Hammarberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men. The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research. A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagnosis, assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and unsuccessful treatment among men with fertility difficulties. The studies are diverse in conceptualisation, design, setting and data collection, but the findings were reasonably consistent. These studies indicated that fertile and infertile childless men of reproductive age have desires to experience parenthood that are similar to those of their female counterparts; in addition, diagnosis and initiation of treatment are associated with elevated infertility-specific anxiety, and unsuccessful treatment can lead to a state of lasting sadness. However, rates of clinically significant mental health problems among this patient population are no higher than in the general population. Infertile men who are socially isolated, have an avoidant coping style and appraise stressful events as overwhelming, are more vulnerable to severe anxiety than men without these characteristics. Men prefer oral to written treatment information and prefer to receive emotional support from infertility clinicians rather than from mental health professionals, self-help support groups or friends. Nevertheless, structured, facilitated psycho-educational groups that are didactic but permit informal sharing of experiences might be beneficial. There are gaps in knowledge about factors governing seeking, persisting with and deciding to cease treatment; experiences of invasive procedures; parenting after assisted conception; adoption and infertility

  14. Psychological needs, service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health clinic for young refugees: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Daniel; Sclare, Irene

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed psychological needs, patterns of service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health service for young refugees and asylum seekers in London. Comparisons were made between two groups with different levels of postulated mental health need: unaccompanied minors (UAMs; n = 49) and children accompanied to the UK by one or more primary caregivers (n = 29). Significant differences were observed in referral pathways, with UAMs more likely to be referred by social services and less likely to be referred from medical agencies. UAMs also attended fewer sessions during treatment, and missed a greater proportion of scheduled appointments. Contrary to prediction, group comparisons revealed similar levels of post-migration stress and overall psychological morbidity. However, UAMs experienced significantly more traumatic events prior to resettlement, and were more likely to exhibit symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than their accompanied peers. Despite their elevated risk of PTSD, UAMs were less likely than accompanied children to have received trauma-focused interventions. UAMs were also significantly less likely to have been treated using cognitive therapy, anxiety management and parent/carer training, as well as receiving fewer types of practical assistance with basic social needs. The clinical and service implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Reestablishing Clinical Psychology's Subjective Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Peter Hume

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. The Task Force is to be commended for their report valuing evidence from "clinical expertise" on a par with "research data" (p. 272) in guiding psychological practices. The current author…

  16. Clinical psychology, sexuality and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, J.; Zitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical psychology has an early ignominious past with regard to sexuality and gender. Burns and Zitz provide a history of the perspectives taken on sexuality, gender and their variants through the lens of clinical psychology, moving from an individualist, positivistic perspective to more current positions such as intersectionality and post-modern understandings of distress. Alongside this changing perspective the development of the profession and its therapeutic practices will be charted. Bu...

  17. LEARNING THEORY AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY,

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY , *ADJUSTMENT( PSYCHOLOGY ), LEARNING, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, PERSONALITY, ANXIETY, ATTITUDES( PSYCHOLOGY ), NEUROSES, MENTAL DISORDERS...PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), VERBAL BEHAVIOR, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY , DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE), THERAPY.

  18. Family therapy and clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The results of a survey of 111 clinical psychologists in the Republic of Ireland along with some comparable data from US and UK surveys were used to address a series of questions about the link between family therapy and clinical psychology. Family therapy was not a clearly identifiable sub-specialty within clinical psychology in Ireland. Family therapy theoretical models were used by more than a quarter of the Irish sample to conceptualize their work but by less than a tenth of US and UK res...

  19. Clinically speaking, psychological abuse matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Começanha, Rita; Basto-Pereira, Miguel; Maia, Ângela

    2017-02-01

    The adverse effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on mental health are well-established, except in the cases of psychological abuse and men's victimization. This research study examines the prevalence and the independent contribution of psychological IPV on mental health for both genders. The initial sample comprises 661 college students from a Portuguese public university, who completed an e-survey. Statistical analysis focused on a subsample (n=364), 23% of which were men, after removing cases of physical and/or sexual abuse. A total of 75% of men and 72% of women reported lifetime psychological victimization and no differences were found for sociodemographic factors, including gender. However, women reported significantly more instigations of psychological abusive acts (OR =5.41, 95% CI=1.88-15.55). Multivariate linear regression models revealed that post-traumatic stress symptoms-PTSS (β=.51; p<.001), depression (β=.34; p<.001) and anxiety (β=.22; p<.001)-were predicted by psychological IPV. The strongest relationship was established between psychological IPV and PTSS, and the final model accounts for 28.6% of the variance (F(6357)=23.86, p<.001). This article provides an empirical basis to recognize the unique and serious impact of psychological IPV on mental health, and recommends screening psychological IPV as part of the clinical routine, developing a gender-inclusive approach, and implementing evidence-based protocols tailored to the needs of these victims. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stepped psychological care after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, Ian I

    2016-09-01

    Emotional difficulties are common after stroke and have an impact on rehabilitation outcome. It is a challenge to manage these problems effectively, particularly in times of resource stringency. One proposal for how to do this has arisen out of an approach to general mental health management: a system of 'stepped care'. Such a system directs intervention by considering level of need, thereby making the most efficient use of available resources. It is the purpose of this article to articulate a stepped psychological care approach for emotional problems after stroke. Narrative review and elaboration of the model proposed by the Department of Health in England for the management of emotional problems after stroke. A stepped care model for the management of emotional problems after stroke is presented in detail, including descriptions of specific interventions and guidance to inform the level of management. The stepped psychological care proposal for emotional problems after stroke requires evaluation but is potentially of use within comparable healthcare systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Emotional problems are common after stroke and effect rehabilitation outcomes. A stepped care approach to these problems offers the ability to cater to all according to need. Greater specification of the services at each step can be outlined. While recommended, such an approach requires evaluation to prove its efficacy.

  1. Prevalence of psychological distress and associated factors in tuberculosis patients in public primary care clinics in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological distress has been rarely investigated among tuberculosis patients in low-resource settings despite the fact that mental ill health has far-reaching consequences for the health outcome of tuberculosis (TB) patients. In this study, we assessed the prevalence and predictors of psychological distress as a proxy for common mental disorders among tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa, where over 60 % of the TB patients are co-infected with HIV. Methods We interviewed 4900 tuberculosis public primary care patients within one month of initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment for the presence of psychological distress using the Kessler-10 item scale (K-10), and identified predictors of distress using multiple logistic regressions. The Kessler scale contains items associated with anxiety and depression. Data on socio-demographic variables, health status, alcohol and tobacco use and adherence to anti-TB drugs and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were collected using a structured questionnaire. Results Using a cut off score of ≥28 and ≥16 on the K-10, 32.9 % and 81 % of tuberculosis patients had symptoms of distress, respectively. In multivariable analysis older age (OR = 1.52; 95 % CI = 1.24-1.85), lower formal education (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.91), poverty (OR = 1.90; 95 % CI = 1.57-2.31) and not married, separated, divorced or widowed (OR = 0.74; 95 % CI = 0.62-0.87) were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥28), and older age (OR = 1.30; 95 % CI = 1.00-1.69), lower formal education (OR = 0.55; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.71), poverty (OR = 2.02; 95 % CI = 1.50-2.70) and being HIV positive (OR = 1.44; 95 % CI = 1.19-1.74) were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥16). In the final model mental illness co-morbidity (hazardous or harmful alcohol use) and non-adherence to anti-TB medication and/or antiretroviral therapy were not associated with

  2. The Educational Psychology of Clinical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jessica H; Rutledge, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Clinical training is paramount to the educational experience of learners, and the purpose of this training can be categorized into the following 4 categories of learning taxonomies: socialization, clinical reasoning, medical management of patient care and attitudinal change. This article investigates the educational psychology that provides the foundation of the categories of learning that take place in the clinical environment. Understanding this is critically important to create an opportunity for learners to activate their knowledge repertoire at the precise time of appropriate application. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-management and psychological-sexological interventions in patients with endometriosis: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buggio L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laura Buggio,1,2 Giussy Barbara,3 Federica Facchin,4 Maria Pina Frattaruolo,1,2 Giorgio Aimi,2 Nicola Berlanda2 1Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2Departmental Operating Unit of Surgical Gynecology and Endometriosis, Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Service for Sexual and Domestic Violence (SVSeD, Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 4Faculty of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milan, Italy Abstract: Endometriosis has a multifactorial etiology. The onset and progression of the disease are believed to be related to different pathogenic mechanisms. Among them, the environment and lifestyle may play significant roles. Diet, dietary supplements, physical exercise, osteopathy, massage, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and Chinese herbal medicine may represent a complementary and feasible approach in the treatment of symptoms related to the disease. In this narrative review, we aimed to examine the most updated evidence on these alternative approaches implicated in the self-management of the disease. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that endometriosis may negatively impact mental health and quality of life, suggesting that affected women may have an increased risk of developing psychological suffering as well as sexual problems due to the presence of pain. In light of these findings, we discuss the importance of integrating psychological interventions (including psychotherapy and sexual therapy in endometriosis treatment. Keywords: sexual therapy, diet, physical activity, alternative medicine, psychotherapy 

  4. Computer applications in clinical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Oana Zamoşteanu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The computer-assisted analysis is not currently a novelty, but a necessity in all areas of psychology. A number of studies that examine the limits of the computer assisted and analyzed interpretations, also its advantages. A series of studies aim to assess how the computer assisting programs are able to establish a diagnosis referring to the presence of certain mental disorders. We will present the results of one computer application in clinical psychology regarding the assessment of Theory of Mind capacity by animation.

  5. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-01-01

    The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  6. Health psychology in primary care: recent research and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielke S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Thielke1, Alexander Thompson2, Richard Stuart31Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Puget Sound VA Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Over the last decade, research about health psychology in primary care has reiterated its contributions to mental and physical health promotion, and its role in addressing gaps in mental health service delivery. Recent meta-analyses have generated mixed results about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health psychology interventions. There have been few studies of health psychology interventions in real-world treatment settings. Several key challenges exist: determining the degree of penetration of health psychology into primary care settings; clarifying the specific roles of health psychologists in integrated care; resolving reimbursement issues; and adapting to the increased prescription of psychotropic medications. Identifying and exploring these issues can help health psychologists and primary care providers to develop the most effective ways of applying psychological principles in primary care settings. In a changing health care landscape, health psychologists must continue to articulate the theories and techniques of health psychology and integrated care, to put their beliefs into practice, and to measure the outcomes of their work.Keywords: health psychology, primary care, integrated care, collaborative care, referral, colocation

  7. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  8. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology is concerned with the psychological, social, behavioural, medical, paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. The journal publishes contributions of research, clinical, counselling and theoretical interest. Contributions ...

  9. The Importance of Calibration in Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Petersen, Isaac T; Mentch, Lucas K; Youngstrom, Eric A

    2018-02-01

    Accuracy has several elements, not all of which have received equal attention in the field of clinical psychology. Calibration, the degree to which a probabilistic estimate of an event reflects the true underlying probability of the event, has largely been neglected in the field of clinical psychology in favor of other components of accuracy such as discrimination (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve). Although it is frequently overlooked, calibration is a critical component of accuracy with particular relevance for prognostic models and risk-assessment tools. With advances in personalized medicine and the increasing use of probabilistic (0% to 100%) estimates and predictions in mental health research, the need for careful attention to calibration has become increasingly important.

  10. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns of psychological symptoms between trajectories. This naturalistic study focused on 241 cancer patients receiving psychological care at psycho-oncology institutions. Data were collected before the initiation of psychological care, and 3 and 9 months thereafter. Latent class growth analysis was applied to identify personal control trajectories. Three personal control trajectories were identified: enduring improvement (41%), temporary improvement (50%), and deterioration (9%). Education and baseline physical symptoms distinguished these trajectories. In the whole group, improvements in personal control were associated with improvements in psychological symptoms. Patients at distinct trajectories reported different levels of psychological symptoms, but did not differ in their courses of psychological symptoms. Patients in the enduring and temporary control improvement groups experienced significant psychological symptoms reductions over time, whereas patients in the control deterioration group maintained high psychological symptoms. Improvements in personal control seem to depend on initial control level: those who start with the highest control levels show subsequent improvements, whereas those with the lowest control levels show subsequent deterioration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Using psychological theory to understand the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in Primary Care: a comparison across two European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrisos, Susan; Eccles, Martin P; Francis, Jill J; Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Johnston, Marie; Grol, Richard; Kaner, Eileen F S; Steen, Ian N

    2009-08-05

    Long term management of patients with Type 2 diabetes is well established within Primary Care. However, despite extensive efforts to implement high quality care both service provision and patient health outcomes remain sub-optimal. Several recent studies suggest that psychological theories about individuals' behaviour can provide a valuable framework for understanding generalisable factors underlying health professionals' clinical behaviour. In the context of the team management of chronic disease such as diabetes, however, the application of such models is less well established. The aim of this study was to identify motivational factors underlying health professional teams' clinical management of diabetes using a psychological model of human behaviour. A predictive questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) investigated health professionals' (HPs') cognitions (e.g., beliefs, attitudes and intentions) about the provision of two aspects of care for patients with diabetes: prescribing statins and inspecting feet.General practitioners and practice nurses in England and the Netherlands completed parallel questionnaires, cross-validated for equivalence in English and Dutch. Behavioural data were practice-level patient-reported rates of foot examination and use of statin medication. Relationships between the cognitive antecedents of behaviour proposed by the TPB and healthcare teams' clinical behaviour were explored using multiple regression. In both countries, attitude and subjective norm were important predictors of health professionals' intention to inspect feet (Attitude: beta = .40; Subjective Norm: beta = .28; Adjusted R2 = .34, p < 0.01), and their intention to prescribe statins (Attitude: beta = .44; Adjusted R2 = .40, p < 0.01). Individuals' self-reported intention did not predict practice-level performance of either clinical behaviour. Using the TPB, we identified modifiable factors underlying health professionals' intentions to perform two

  12. Applying sport psychology to improve clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Helen R; Rumbold, James L; Sandars, John

    2017-12-01

    Preparedness for practice has become an international theme within Medical Education: for healthcare systems to maintain their highest clinical standards, junior doctors must "hit the ground running" on beginning work. Despite demonstrating logical, structured assessment and management plans during their undergraduate examinations, many newly qualified doctors report difficulty in translating this theoretical knowledge into the real clinical environment. "Preparedness" must constitute more than the knowledge and skills acquired during medical school. Complexities of the clinical environment overwhelm some junior doctors, who acknowledge that they lack strategies to manage their anxieties, under-confidence and low self-efficacy. If uncontrolled, such negative emotions and behaviors may impede the delivery of time-critical treatment for acutely unwell patients and compound junior doctors' self-doubt, thus impacting future patient encounters. Medical Education often seeks inspiration from other industries for potential solutions to challenges. To address "preparedness for practice," this AMEE Guide highlights sport psychology: elite sportspeople train both physically and psychologically for their discipline. The latter promotes management of negative emotions, distractions and under-confidence, thus optimizing performance despite immense pressures of career-defining moments. Similar techniques might allow junior doctors to optimize patient care, especially within stressful situations. This AMEE Guide introduces the novel conceptual model, PERFORM, which targets the challenges faced by junior doctors on graduation. The model applies pre-performance routines from sport psychology with the self-regulatory processes of metacognition to the clinical context. This model could potentially equip junior doctors, and other healthcare professionals facing similar challenges, with strategies to optimize clinical care under the most difficult circumstances.

  13. Using psychological theory to understand the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in Primary Care: a comparison across two European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Marie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long term management of patients with Type 2 diabetes is well established within Primary Care. However, despite extensive efforts to implement high quality care both service provision and patient health outcomes remain sub-optimal. Several recent studies suggest that psychological theories about individuals' behaviour can provide a valuable framework for understanding generalisable factors underlying health professionals' clinical behaviour. In the context of the team management of chronic disease such as diabetes, however, the application of such models is less well established. The aim of this study was to identify motivational factors underlying health professional teams' clinical management of diabetes using a psychological model of human behaviour. Methods A predictive questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB investigated health professionals' (HPs' cognitions (e.g., beliefs, attitudes and intentions about the provision of two aspects of care for patients with diabetes: prescribing statins and inspecting feet. General practitioners and practice nurses in England and the Netherlands completed parallel questionnaires, cross-validated for equivalence in English and Dutch. Behavioural data were practice-level patient-reported rates of foot examination and use of statin medication. Relationships between the cognitive antecedents of behaviour proposed by the TPB and healthcare teams' clinical behaviour were explored using multiple regression. Results In both countries, attitude and subjective norm were important predictors of health professionals' intention to inspect feet (Attitude: beta = .40; Subjective Norm: beta = .28; Adjusted R2 = .34, p 2 = .40, p Conclusion Using the TPB, we identified modifiable factors underlying health professionals' intentions to perform two clinical behaviours, providing a rationale for the development of targeted interventions. However, we did not observe a relationship

  14. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  15. Effect of a Primary Care-Based Psychological Intervention on Symptoms of Common Mental Disorders in Zimbabwe: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, Dixon; Weiss, Helen A; Verhey, Ruth; Simms, Victoria; Munjoma, Ronald; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Chingono, Alfred; Munetsi, Epiphania; Bere, Tarisai; Manda, Ethel; Abas, Melanie; Araya, Ricardo

    2016-12-27

    Depression and anxiety are common mental disorders globally but are rarely recognized or treated in low-income settings. Task-shifting of mental health care to lay health workers (LHWs) might decrease the treatment gap. To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted psychological intervention for common mental disorders delivered by LHWs in primary care. Cluster randomized clinical trial with 6 months' follow-up conducted from September 1, 2014, to May 25, 2015, in Harare, Zimbabwe. Twenty-four clinics were randomized 1:1 to the intervention or enhanced usual care (control). Participants were clinic attenders 18 years or older who screened positive for common mental disorders on the locally validated Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ-14). The Friendship Bench intervention comprised 6 sessions of individual problem-solving therapy delivered by trained, supervised LHWs plus an optional 6-session peer support program. The control group received standard care plus information, education, and support on common mental disorders. Primary outcome was common mental disorder measured at 6 months as a continuous variable via the SSQ-14 score, with a range of 0 (best) to 14 and a cutpoint of 9. The secondary outcome was depression symptoms measured as a binary variable via the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, with a range of 0 (best) to 27 and a cutpoint of 11. Outcomes were analyzed by modified intention-to-treat. Among 573 randomized patients (286 in the intervention group and 287 in the control group), 495 (86.4%) were women, median age was 33 years (interquartile range, 27-41 years), 238 (41.7%) were human immunodeficiency virus positive, and 521 (90.9%) completed follow-up at 6 months. Intervention group participants had fewer symptoms than control group participants on the SSQ-14 (3.81; 95% CI, 3.28 to 4.34 vs 8.90; 95% CI, 8.33 to 9.47; adjusted mean difference, -4.86; 95% CI, -5.63 to -4.10; P mental disorders in Zimbabwe, LHW-administered, primary care

  16. Using psychological theory to understand the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in Primary Care: a comparison across two European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrisos, S.; Eccles, M.P.; Francis, J.J.; Bosch, M.C.; Dijkstra, R.F.; Johnston, M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Kaner, E.F.; Steen, I.N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long term management of patients with Type 2 diabetes is well established within Primary Care. However, despite extensive efforts to implement high quality care both service provision and patient health outcomes remain sub-optimal. Several recent studies suggest that psychological

  17. Barriers to health-care and psychological distress among mothers living with HIV in Quebec (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Martin; Fernet, Mylène; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Lebouché, Bertrand; Rodrigue, Carl; Lapointe, Normand; Otis, Joanne; Samson, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Health-care providers play a major role in providing good quality care and in preventing psychological distress among mothers living with HIV (MLHIV). The objectives of this study are to explore the impact of health-care services and satisfaction with care providers on psychological distress in MLHIV. One hundred MLHIV were recruited from community and clinical settings in the province of Quebec (Canada). Prevalence estimation of clinical psychological distress and univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to predict clinical psychological distress. Forty-five percent of the participants reported clinical psychological distress. In the multivariable regression, the following variables were significantly associated with psychological distress while controlling for sociodemographic variables: resilience, quality of communication with the care providers, resources, and HIV disclosure concerns. The multivariate results support the key role of personal, structural, and medical resources in understanding psychological distress among MLHIV. Interventions that can support the psychological health of MLHIV are discussed.

  18. From ethics of care to psychology of care: reconnecting ethics of care to contemporary moral psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govrin, Aner

    2014-01-01

    Moral psychology once regarded ethics of care as a promising theory. However, there is evidence to suggest that nowadays moral psychology completely ignores ethics of care’s various insights. Moreover, ethics of care’s core concepts – compassion, dependence, and the importance of early relations to moral development– are no longer considered to be relevant to the development of new theories in the field. In this paper, I will firstly discuss some of the reasons which, over recent years, have contributed to the marginalization of the role of ethics of care in moral psychology. Next, I will show that ethics of care’s most promising idea centered on the care given to an infant and the importance of that care to the development of moral thinking. In this context, I will be describing the implications of John Bowlby’s attachment theories, infant research, findings in moral psychology and neuroscience. I will argue that ethics of care needs to be radically re-thought and replaced by a psychology of care, an attachment approach to moral judgment, which would establish the centrality of the caregiver’s role in moral development. The philosophical implications of this approach to the understanding of the “rationalists” and “intuitionists” debate about the true nature of moral judgment is also discussed. PMID:25368588

  19. From ethics of care to psychology of care - Reconnecting ethics of care to contemporary moral psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aner eGovrin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Moral psychology once regarded ethics of care as a promising theory. However, there is evidence to suggest that nowadays moral psychology completely ignores ethics of care’s various insights. Moreover, ethics of care’s core concepts – compassion, dependence, and the importance of early relations to moral development– are no longer considered to be relevant to the development of new theories in the field. In this paper, I will firstly discuss some of the reasons which, over recent years, have contributed to the marginalization of the role of ethics of care in moral psychology. Next, I will show that ethics of care’s most promising idea centered on the care given to an infant and the importance of that care to the development of moral thinking. In this context, I will be describing the implications of John Bowlby’s attachment theories, infant research, findings in moral psychology and neuroscience. I will argue that ethics of care needs to be radically re-thought and replaced by a psychology of care, an attachment approach to moral judgment, which would establish the centrality of the caregiver’s role in moral development. The philosophical implications of this approach to the understanding of the 'rationalists’’ and ‘intuitionists’’ debate about the true nature of moral judgment is also discussed.

  20. International challenges in patient-centred care in fertility clinics offering assisted reproductive technology: providers' gaps and attitudes towards addressing the patients' psychological needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Murray

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychosocial care provided to patients undergoing fertility treatment has focused on a small proportion of patients with major psychosocial problems, leaving the remaining patients impacted by psychosocial stressors without follow-up. Factors that could influence the ability or willingness of physicians treating infertility to assess and address patients’ psychosocial needs have not been investigated. This study aimed to identify the practice gaps and educational needs of physicians treating and managing patients with infertility, with the aim of informing future educational interventions. Methods. A cross-sectional, exploratory, mixed-methods study incorporating semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews and a quantitative online survey was designed and deployed to actively practising physicians treating infertile couples from 15 countries across the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East Region. Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data was used to increase trustworthiness of findings. Results. Forty-five participants completed a qualitative interview and 271 participants completed the quantitative online survey (response rates were 4 and 9%, respectively. A majority (74% of respondents reported needing improvement in their psychological assessment skill, which was considered essential to the provision of optimal care by less than half (41% of respondents. A need for improvement in their skill to assess patients’ parenting skills was reported in 72% of respondents, and this skill was considered as essential by 32% of participants. Similarly, 72% reported needing improvement in their ability to identify the needs of patients for psychological and emotional support, and this ability was considered essential by 45%. Statistical differences were observed between countries (p<0.05. Conclusion. Addressing the gaps highlighted in this study, through educational or performance improvement activities, could

  1. Psychological implications of admission to critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Natalie

    Admission to critical care can have far-reaching psychological effects because of the distinct environment. Critical care services are being re-shaped to address long-term sequelae, including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The long-term consequences of critical illness not only cost the individual, but also have implications for society, such as diminished areas of health-related quality-of-life in sleep, reduced ability to return to work and enjoy recreational activities (Audit Commission, 1999; Hayes et al, 2000). The debate around the phenomenon of intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome is discussed with reference to current thinking. After critical care, patients may experience amnesia, continued hallucinations or flashbacks, anxiety, depression, and dreams and nightmares. Nursing care for patients while in the critical care environment can have a positive effect on psychological well-being. Facilitating communication, explaining care and rationalizing interventions, ensuring patients are oriented as to time and place, reassuring patients about transfer, providing patients,where possible, with information about critical care before admission and considering anxiolytic use, are all practices that have a beneficial effect on patient care. Follow-up services can help patients come to terms with their experiences of critical illness and provide the opportunity for them to access further intervention if desired. Working towards providing optimal psychological care will have a positive effect on patients' psychological recovery and may also help physical recuperation after critical care.

  2. From ethics of care to psychology of care - Reconnecting ethics of care to contemporary moral psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Aner eGovrin

    2014-01-01

    Moral psychology once regarded ethics of care as a promising theory. However, there is evidence to suggest that nowadays moral psychology completely ignores ethics of care’s various insights. Moreover, ethics of care’s core concepts – compassion, dependence, and the importance of early relations to moral development– are no longer considered to be relevant to the development of new theories in the field. In this paper, I will firstly discuss some of the reasons which, over recent years, have ...

  3. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  4. Self-management and psychological-sexological interventions in patients with endometriosis: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    OpenAIRE

    Buggio, Laura; Barbara, Giussy; Facchin, Federica; Frattaruolo, Maria Pina; Aimi, Giorgio; Berlanda, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Laura Buggio,1,2 Giussy Barbara,3 Federica Facchin,4 Maria Pina Frattaruolo,1,2 Giorgio Aimi,2 Nicola Berlanda2 1Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2Departmental Operating Unit of Surgical Gynecology and Endometriosis, Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Service for Sexual and Domestic Violence (SVSeD), Fon...

  5. Clinical Psychology Training: Accreditation and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Robert W

    2017-05-08

    Beginning with efforts in the late 1940s to ensure that clinical psychologists were adequately trained to meet the mental health needs of the veterans of World War II, the accreditation of clinical psychologists has largely been the province of the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association. However, in 2008 the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System began accrediting doctoral programs that adhere to the clinical science training model. This review discusses the goals of accreditation and the history of the accreditation of graduate programs in clinical psychology, and provides an overview of the evaluation procedures used by these two systems. Accreditation is viewed against the backdrop of the slow rate of progress in reducing the burden of mental illness and the changes in clinical psychology training that might help improve this situation. The review concludes with a set of five recommendations for improving accreditation.

  6. Specialization in psychology and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J; Graves, Chanda C; Smith, Chaundrissa Oyeshiku

    2012-03-01

    This article begins by contextualizing specialization and board certification of psychologists, with attention paid to relevant definitions and expectations of other health care professionals. A brief history of specialization and board certification in professional psychology is offered. The benefits of board certification through the American Board of Professional Psychology are highlighted. Consideration is then given to the primary reasons for psychologists working in academic health sciences centers to specialize in the current health care climate and to obtain board certification as a mark of such specialization.

  7. The Patterns of Graded Psychological Nursing Care for Patients after Cardiothoracic Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jingbo; Wang, Xiaochun

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the interventional efficacy and clinical significance of graded psychological nursing care for patients who have undergone cardiothoracic surgery by providing graded psychological nursing care for these patients according to the results of their psychological evaluation. In this interventional study, 110 patients who had undergone cardiothoracic surgery between 2014 and 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China, were enrolled. We divided them into two groups of 55 patients each, namely, a control group and a treatment group. For patients in the control group, we applied regular psychological nursing care; those in the treatment group were further divided into three different psychological grades after being assessed using Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); patients at each grade were treated by graded psychological nursing care in addition to regular psychological nursing care. Significant decreases, with statistically significant differences (Ppsychological nursing care according to their varying psychological conditions, showed better improvement in their post-surgery emotional state and sleep quality than those in the control group, thus indicating the great significance of graded psychological nursing care in clinical practices. Applying graded psychological nursing care in post-operation cardiothoracic patients improved nursing care efficiency and alleviated patients' negative feelings. Therefore, this type of nursing care should be further promoted and utilized in clinical practice for effective rehabilitation of patients.

  8. A values-driven and evidence-based health care psychology for diverse sex development

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, L-M; Simmonds, M

    2014-01-01

    The integration of psychology into multidisciplinary care for people affected by 'disorders of sex development' is acknowledged in most recent care standard documents. However, psychological evidence that can inform service development is currently insubstantial for specific reasons, some of which are outlined in this article. We argue for psychological activities and their prioritisation to be equally driven by the professional values embedded in clinical psychology and to seek user input in...

  9. Child sexual abuse: clinical and psychological perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Etty Indriati, Etty Indriati

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical and psychological effects of children who suffer sexual abuse. Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a forced sexual behavior toward a child, either from the opposite or same sex. The types of child sexual abuse include exhibitionism, vouyerism, kissing, fondling, fellatio and cunnilingus, sexual intercourse, and pornography. The psychological effects of child sexual abuse often last a long time, in the form of anger, anxiety, nightmares, insecure, confused, scared, sa...

  10. Revisioning Clinical Psychology: Integrating Cultural Psychology into Clinical Research and Practice with Portuguese Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    James, Susan; Harris, Sara; Foster, Gary; Clarke, Juanne; Gadermann, Anne; Morrison, Marie; Bezanson, Birdie Jane

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a model for conducting psychotherapy with people of diverse cultural backgrounds. The theoretical foundation for the model is based on clinical and cultural psychology. Cultural psychology integrates psychology and anthropology in order to provide a complex understanding of both culture and the individual within his or her cultural context. The model proposed in this article is also based on our clinical experience and mixed method research with the Portuguese communi...

  11. Health care reform: preparing the psychology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2012-03-01

    This article is based on the opening presentation by the author to the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers' 5th National Conference, "Preparing Psychologists for a Rapidly Changing Healthcare Environment" held in March, 2011. Reviewing the patient protection and affordable care act (ACA), that presentation was designed to set the stage for several days of symposia and discussions anticipating upcoming changes to the healthcare system. This article reviews the ACA; general trends that have impacted healthcare reform; the implications of the Act for psychology's workforce including the growing focus on interprofessional education, training, and practice, challenges to address in order to prepare for psychology's future; and recommendations for advocating for psychology's future as a healthcare profession.

  12. What predicts performance during clinical psychology training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, Katrina; Bradley, Caroline E; Potts, Henry W W; Woolf, Katherine; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2014-06-01

    While the question of who is likely to be selected for clinical psychology training has been studied, evidence on performance during training is scant. This study explored data from seven consecutive intakes of the UK's largest clinical psychology training course, aiming to identify what factors predict better or poorer outcomes. Longitudinal cross-sectional study using prospective and retrospective data. Characteristics at application were analysed in relation to a range of in-course assessments for 274 trainee clinical psychologists who had completed or were in the final stage of their training. Trainees were diverse in age, pre-training experience, and academic performance at A-level (advanced level certificate required for university admission), but not in gender or ethnicity. Failure rates across the three performance domains (academic, clinical, research) were very low, suggesting that selection was successful in screening out less suitable candidates. Key predictors of good performance on the course were better A-levels and better degree class. Non-white students performed less well on two outcomes. Type and extent of pre-training clinical experience on outcomes had varied effects on outcome. Research supervisor ratings emerged as global indicators and predicted nearly all outcomes, but may have been biased as they were retrospective. Referee ratings predicted only one of the seven outcomes examined, and interview ratings predicted none of the outcomes. Predicting who will do well or poorly in clinical psychology training is complex. Interview and referee ratings may well be successful in screening out unsuitable candidates, but appear to be a poor guide to performance on the course. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the British Psychological Society.

  13. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) have been created to further develop these strengths in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care contexts. The review identified that most of this research involves measuring character strengths and their association with health outcomes in patients with a range of different conditions, similar to the position in positive psychology research on non-clinical populations. More recently, PPIs are beginning to be applied to clinical populations with physical health problems and this research, although relatively scarce, is reviewed here for cancer, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. In common with PPIs being evaluated in the general population, high quality studies are scarce. Applying PPIs to patients with serious health conditions presents significant challenges to health psychologists. They must ensure that patients are dealt with appropriately and ethically, given that exaggerated claims for PPIs are made on the internet quite frequently. This is discussed along with the need for more high quality research. PMID:27618122

  14. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann

    2016-09-07

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) have been created to further develop these strengths in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care contexts. The review identified that most of this research involves measuring character strengths and their association with health outcomes in patients with a range of different conditions, similar to the position in positive psychology research on non-clinical populations. More recently, PPIs are beginning to be applied to clinical populations with physical health problems and this research, although relatively scarce, is reviewed here for cancer, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. In common with PPIs being evaluated in the general population, high quality studies are scarce. Applying PPIs to patients with serious health conditions presents significant challenges to health psychologists. They must ensure that patients are dealt with appropriately and ethically, given that exaggerated claims for PPIs are made on the internet quite frequently. This is discussed along with the need for more high quality research.

  15. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... centres for participants with previous admission records. Drug therapy, psychotherapy and occupational therapy were the management strategies used and a recommendation for the inclusion of peer counselling as a management strategy. (Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: 2001 7 (1&2): 17-34) ...

  16. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-05-01

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Parent perspectives of clinical psychology access when experiencing distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Sam; Smith, Ian; Turl, Emma; Arnold, Emma; Msetfi, Rachel M

    2012-04-01

    Around 20 to 30% of parents experience mental health difficulties within their child's first year, but only a small proportion go on to access specialist services. This is despite growing evidence around the positive benefits of psychosocial interventions for both parents and children. Previous research highlights facilitators and barriers to generic healthcare services for mothers with postnatal depression. The current study adopted a qualitative methodology to explore parents' own perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to clinical psychology specifically. Seven women took part in the study, most of whom had no previous involvement with specialist mental health services. A thematic analysis of interview data suggested six key themes in relation to the research question: 'The importance of connecting', 'Pressing the danger button', 'I'm not mad', 'More round care', 'Psychological distress as barrier' and 'Making space, making sense'. These are presented alongside a consideration of the clinical implications for community-based practitioners, including clinical psychologists.

  18. Psychological and medical care of gender nonconforming youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Stanley R; Ehrensaft, Diane; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    Gender nonconforming (GN) children and adolescents, collectively referred to as GN youth, may seek care to understand their internal gender identities, socially transition to their affirmed genders, and/or physically transition to their affirmed genders. Because general pediatricians are often the first point of contact with the health care system for GN youth, familiarity with the psychological and medical approaches to providing care for this population is crucial. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of existing clinical practice guidelines for GN youth. Such guidelines emphasize a multidisciplinary approach with collaboration of medical, mental health, and social services/advocacy providers. Appropriate training needs to be provided to promote comprehensive, culturally competent care to GN youth, a population that has traditionally been underserved and at risk for negative psychosocial outcomes. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Perceptions of a clinical psychology support group for spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Pete; King, Lorraine; Royle, Jane

    A service evaluation was performed exploring nurses' perceptions of a clinical psychology facilitated peer support group in a spinal injury rehabilitation setting. To determine whether staff found the meetings useful while, more broadly, to highlight the need to support and supervise nursing staff in psychological care appropriately. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the 30 members of staff who worked on the ward. Seventeen questionnaires were returned (57%). Data was analysed using thematic analysis. The meetings were viewed as a place to discuss issues, and a safe protected space to share stresses. Staff felt the meetings aided team cohesion and helped them share ideas and draw up clinical strategies. Meetings aided stress management and confidence building. Staff considered the meetings to increase their psychological awareness and understanding. Staff involved in the acute care and rehabilitation of spinal injured patients are consistently exposed to highly demanding and stressful clinical environments. Support meetings where staff can discuss patient and ward issues are invaluable. Other clinical nursing areas would benefit from similar support systems.

  20. Embodied Conversational Agents in Clinical Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provoost, Simon; Lau, Ho Ming; Ruwaard, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Embodied conversational agents (ECAs) are computer-generated characters that simulate key properties of human face-to-face conversation, such as verbal and nonverbal behavior. In Internet-based eHealth interventions, ECAs may be used for the delivery of automated human support factors....... OBJECTIVE: We aim to provide an overview of the technological and clinical possibilities, as well as the evidence base for ECA applications in clinical psychology, to inform health professionals about the activity in this field of research. METHODS: Given the large variety of applied methodologies, types...... applications in the treatment of mood, anxiety, psychotic, autism spectrum, and substance use disorders were conducted in databases in the fields of psychology and computer science, as well as in interdisciplinary databases. Studies were included if they conveyed primary research findings on an ECA application...

  1. Ethical standards in clinical psychology: maintaining integrity, record keeping and confidentiality

    OpenAIRE

    Routledge, Chelsey H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical psychologists aim to promote psychological wellbeing and reduce psychological distress in people with mental or physical health illness (National Health Service [NHS], 2014). A requirement of all clinical psychologists is to be familiar with and adhere to the ethical codes that govern their profession: the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) standards of conduct, performance and ethics (HCPC, 2012a) and the British Psychological Society’s (BPS) code of ethics and conduct (BPS,...

  2. Psychology at Chinese universities and in Chinese society: with special reference to clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Guoan; Perrez, Meinrad; Han, Xiulan

    2011-01-01

    The following contribution gives a short introduction to Chinese psychology, history, psychological research and teaching institutions and student selection for universities. After a brief overview of the theoretical traditions and contemporary trends in general and experimental psychology it focuses in more detail on the recent developments in clinical and medical psychology. Research domains, academic training in clinical psychology and its applications in modern China are discussed with sp...

  3. Understanding Egorrhea from Cultural-Clinical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eSasaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on his observations in Japanese clinical settings, Fujinawa (1972 conceptualized egorrhea syndrome, which includes symptoms such as olfactory reference syndrome, fear of eye-to-eye confrontation, delusions of sleep talking, delusions of soliloquy, and thought broadcasting. The key feature of this syndrome is self-leakage, a perceived sense that one’s personal internal information, such as feelings and thoughts, are leaking out. To reach a more comprehensive understanding of egorrhea, this paper aims to present general overview and reconsider the phenomenon of self-leakage using cultural-clinical psychology as a framework. First, the symptoms of egorrhea are reviewed in relation to other related psychopathologies such as social anxiety disorder (SAD and taijin kyofusho (TKS, as well as schizophrenia. Second, a series of empirical studies conducted using Japanese non-clinical samples are summarized. The results of these studies form the basis for subsequent discussions, which incorporates the cultural-clinical psychology perspective proposed by Ryder, Ban, Chentsova-Dutton (2011. This paper ends with a general discussion regarding implications for research and clinical practice.

  4. Understanding egorrhea from cultural-clinical psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Wada, Kaori; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Based on his observations in Japanese clinical settings, Fujinawa (1972) conceptualized egorrhea syndrome, which includes symptoms such as erythrophobia, fear of eye-to-eye confrontation, olfactory reference syndrome, delusions of soliloquy, delusions of sleep talking, and thought broadcasting. The key feature of this syndrome is self-leakage, a perceived sense that one's personal internal information, such as feelings and thoughts, are leaking out. To reach a more comprehensive understanding of egorrhea, this paper aims to present general overview and reconsider the phenomenon of self-leakage using cultural-clinical psychology as a framework. First, the symptoms of egorrhea are reviewed in relation to other related psychopathologies such as social anxiety disorder (SAD) and taijin kyofusho (TKS), as well as schizophrenia. Second, a series of empirical studies conducted using Japanese non-clinical samples are summarized. The results of these studies form the basis for subsequent discussions, which incorporates the cultural-clinical psychology perspective proposed by Ryder et al. (2011). This paper ends with a general discussion regarding implications for research and clinical practice. PMID:24348445

  5. Exploring associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compen, F R; Adang, E M M; Bisseling, E M; Van der Lee, M L; Speckens, A E M

    2017-12-04

    The mental burden of cancer might elicit additional health care utilization. However, it is unclear how psychiatric disorder and psychological distress relate to health care utilization. Therefore, this study explores associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization. It was hypothesized that presence of psychiatric disorder and psychological distress was associated with increased health care utilization and costs. The current study consisted of secondary analyses of baseline data of a larger randomized controlled trial. Two hundred forty-five mixed-cancer patients with at least mild symptoms of psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-T ≥ 11) were mainly recruited via online media, participating centers and patient associations. Patients were assessed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) for depressive, anxiety, and/or adjustment disorder. Psychological distress was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Retrospective self-reported health care utilization in the past 3 months was collected. Associations between predictors and health care utilization in terms of incidence rate ratios (IRR) and costs per category (mental, primary, somatic, and complementary) were assessed by negative binomial, logistic, and gamma regression. Eighty-nine (36.3%) patients suffered from psychiatric disorder, which was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.63) and costs (OR = 3.11). We observed a nonsignificant trend of somatic health care utilization in patients with psychiatric disorder. Psychological distress was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.09) and costs (OR = 1.09). Psychological distress was also associated with complementary health care utilization (IRR = 1.03). Psychiatric disorder and psychological distress were associated with mental health care use and costs. Psychological distress was associated

  6. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: Editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology is concerned with the psychological, social, behavioural, medical, paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. The journal publishes contributions of research, clinical, counselling and theoretical ...

  7. What predicts performance during clinical psychology training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, Katrina; Bradley, Caroline E; Potts, Henry W W; Woolf, Katherine; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While the question of who is likely to be selected for clinical psychology training has been studied, evidence on performance during training is scant. This study explored data from seven consecutive intakes of the UK's largest clinical psychology training course, aiming to identify what factors predict better or poorer outcomes. Design Longitudinal cross-sectional study using prospective and retrospective data. Method Characteristics at application were analysed in relation to a range of in-course assessments for 274 trainee clinical psychologists who had completed or were in the final stage of their training. Results Trainees were diverse in age, pre-training experience, and academic performance at A-level (advanced level certificate required for university admission), but not in gender or ethnicity. Failure rates across the three performance domains (academic, clinical, research) were very low, suggesting that selection was successful in screening out less suitable candidates. Key predictors of good performance on the course were better A-levels and better degree class. Non-white students performed less well on two outcomes. Type and extent of pre-training clinical experience on outcomes had varied effects on outcome. Research supervisor ratings emerged as global indicators and predicted nearly all outcomes, but may have been biased as they were retrospective. Referee ratings predicted only one of the seven outcomes examined, and interview ratings predicted none of the outcomes. Conclusions Predicting who will do well or poorly in clinical psychology training is complex. Interview and referee ratings may well be successful in screening out unsuitable candidates, but appear to be a poor guide to performance on the course. Practitioner points While referee and selection interview ratings did not predict performance during training, they may be useful in screening out unsuitable candidates at the application stage High school final academic performance

  8. Determinants of psychology service utilization in a palliative care outpatient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuero, Casey; Allen, Rebecca Sue; Kvale, Elizabeth; Azuero, Andres; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Research has demonstrated that treating cancer patients' psychological and physical health leads to improved overall health. This may be especially true for palliative care patients facing serious illness. This study examines the proportion and determinants of psychology service utilization in an outpatient palliative care population. Data from an existing clinical database in an outpatient palliative clinic utilizing a collaborative care model to deliver psychology services were explored. This study was framed by Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use, which incorporates three main components: predisposing, enabling, and need factors to model health service utilization. The sample (N = 149) was majority middle aged, female, and White with a primary diagnosis of cancer. Cross-tabulations were conducted to determine how many patients who met screening criteria for depression or anxiety sought psychology services. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess for predisposing, enabling, and need factor determinants of psychology service utilization. Among patients who met criteria for moderate depression or anxiety, 50% did not access readily available psychology services. Enabling factors were the strongest determinant of psychology utilization. Factors associated with need for psychology services (i.e., emotional distress and psychological symptom burden) did not reach significance in determining psychology service use. This study extends current knowledge about psychology utilization to palliative care outpatients receiving care within a collaborative care model. Directions for future research include further investigation of care models that optimize enabling strategies to enhance access to these services, and examination of patient-reported barriers to receiving this care. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Macaskill, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) created to develop these strengths further in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care...

  10. Clinical supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda: an initial qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer; Kasujja, Rosco; Oakes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Burn out in clinical psychologists working in low income countries has been reported. Clinical supervisory structures do not yet exist in Uganda. A way to decrease levels of burn out and increase quality of care for people with mental illness is through clinical supervision. The aim of this study was to explore the initial experiences of supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda to ascertain whether or not clinical supervision is culturally appropriate, and what aspects of supervision had been helpful and unhelpful. A qualitative design with thematic analysis was utilized. A focus group was held with 12 second year clinical psychology students to ask their experiences of receiving supervision. Data analysis created five themes. Firstly, the negative emotions that resulted from the training processed were discussed, and how supervision helped and did not help the students to manage these. Secondly, the students voiced that supervision helped them to learn through observational experiences, co-therapist roles and parallel processes within the supervisory relationship. Thirdly, supervision had taught the clinical psychology students their role as a clinical psychology student, how to act within the Ugandan mental health system and skills to conduct therapy. Fourthly, suggestions for the future of supervision were given, with the students requesting for it to start earlier in the training, for supervisors who can meet with the students on a regular basis to be selected and for the training the students receive at university to match the skills required on their placements, with a request for more practical techniques rather than theory. The final theme related to left over miscellaneous data, such as the students agreeing with each other. The students stated that supervision was helpful overall, implying that clinical supervision is culturally appropriate for clinical psychology students in Uganda. Suggestions for future supervision were given. In order to

  11. Current status of psychology and clinical psychology in India - an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virudhagirinathan, Baboo Sankar; Karunanidhi, Subbiah

    2014-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of the social and cultural context for the emergence and development of psychology in India and also more specifically of the development of clinical psychology. It details the range of universities offering psychology programmes and the various bodies involved in supporting the development of the psychology. The paper also describes the development of clinical psychology in India and the variety of roles undertaken by clinical psychologists. Finally, it raises a number of issues facing the development of Indian psychology into the future.

  12. Clinical Psychology and Research: epistemological notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Coppola

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a reflection on the relationship between clinical psychology and research, highlighting the constant epistemological crossing the two practices, empirical and professional. The paper warns against the pitfalls of reductionism that, in both cases, may impact the effectiveness of therapeutic results. In fact, both in clinical practice and is in psychological research, the mere application of techniques contradicts the specificity of the object of study (the mind which, rather, requires the constant attention to a complexity of variables and contextual elements essential for the understanding the psychic. Qualitative research has been a prolific space for dialogue and joint trials between research and clinical practice that has rehabilitated scientific dignity of affective and subjective for a long time confined to the ephemeral world of poetry and literature. It must therefore be a further extension of the convergence not only of qualitative and quantitative methods but also of training modules for researchers and practitioners are able to stimulate, in daily practice, confidence in the utility of scientific monitoring and detection of inter-subjective variables in research devices.

  13. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Miranda, Jeanne M.; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G.; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  14. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E; Hughes, Jennifer L; Miranda, Jeanne M; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models.

  15. Clinical psychology and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pagnini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a fatal and progressive disease, characterized by progressive muscles weakness, with consequent loss of physical capacities. Psychologists can play an important role in ALS care, by providing clinical activities in every step of the disease, including support and counseling activities directed to patients, their caregivers and to physicians.

  16. The use of photography in clinical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Belgiojoso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article present and investigate different aspects of the use of photography in clinical psychology in order to provide psychotherapists with information about the tools and their reference theory for a better orientation among the different techniques and assess their integration into their clinical work.The article describes the main techniques that include the use of photographs in psycphoto genogram and photolange, with a specific focus on Judy Weiser’s PhotoTherapy Techniques. We then present data from an exploratory qualitative research on the use of Photo Therapy Techniques by the authors (psychotherapists of different orientations with their patients. The focus is on understanding when, with whom and why a therapist proposes a specific technique, how he uses the photographs, wich difficulty he can meet and how to manage it.hotherapy (such as collage, the

  17. Reprinting of the Future of Clinical Psychology. The Past Future of Clinical Psychology: A Reflection on Woodworth (1937).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Robert S.; Sechrest, Lee

    1992-01-01

    Presents article on future of clinical psychology reprinted from first volume of "Journal of Consulting Psychology" published in 1937. Accompanying commentary looks at predictions made in original article that did not materialize. Notes that progress in field of clinical psychology has been uneven, with professional claims made by clinical…

  18. The institution of the institutional practice of psychology: health care reform and psychology's future workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2011-11-01

    Implications for the future of professional psychology are discussed and related to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, patient-centered health care homes and accountable care organizations, and the growing importance of interprofessional competencies in health care. The need for increased information about the psychology workforce is related to the history of the institutional practice of psychology and how that data must be used to plan for the supply of psychologists required to meet the service demands of the changing health care system. Several challenges to the field of psychology are offered, along with steps that must be taken by the profession to prepare for increased institutionally based health care services in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Training in clinical child psychology: doing it right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M C; Sobel, A B

    1999-12-01

    Discusses (a) what roles the specialty of clinical child psychology fulfills and how societal and professional changes have enhanced the need for the specialty, (b) how the field defines itself, (c) how models of training are conceptualized for the specialty, and (d) how some training programs implement specialty training with broad, interdisciplinary components. Clinical child psychology is a professional field of research and practice that, when adequate training is provided, properly deserves a places as a specialty. The dangers of overspecialization and narrowness are more likely present in traditional clinical (adult) psychology than in clinical child psychology, especially when the clinical child training is done in a broadly comprehensive and integrated manner.

  20. Clinical, psychological and maternal characteristics in early functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilincaslan, Huseyin; Abali, Osman; Demirkaya, Sevcan Karakoc; Bilici, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the clinical features of functional constipation (FC) at preschool age, as well as emotional and behavioral characteristics of the children, psychological symptom level and parental attitudes of the mothers, and compared these with that of non-referred typically developing controls with normal intestinal habits. Participants included 65 children with FC (mean age, 43.6 ± 15.4 months; range, 25-72 months), 59 healthy controls (mean age, 46.9 ± 14.5 months; range, 25-72 months) and the mothers of the children. The Childhood Behavior Checklist, Symptom Checklist 90 and Parental Attitude Research Instrument were filled in by the mothers. Participants with FC had higher problem scores than the comparison children in a variety of emotional and behavioral parameters. Approximately half exhibited internalizing and one-third had externalizing problems in the clinical range. The mothers of the patient group had higher levels of psychological distress, overprotective parenting and strict discipline. On multiple logistic regression analysis child psychopathology, maternal education level and maternal distress were independently associated with FC. Behavior problems are common in children with FC from an early age. Low level of education and high psychological distress of the mothers seem to be important risk factors for constipation and should be assessed carefully in the management of these cases. © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. [Psychological support for cancer care professionals: contemporary theory and practice within the Czech Healthcare System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlák, M; Suchý, A

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals, especially those working in cancer care, represent a subgroup of helping professions that requires special psychological care. Recent findings clearly show that a lack of regular psychological care for oncologists and oncology nurses leads to higher rate of psychiatric and physical illness, poorer quality of life, higher employee fluctuation rates and lower quality of provided medical care. In spite of this, the special psychological care for cancer care professionals is still lacking and theoretical and practical level of their undergraduate and postgraduate education in psychology does not satisfy the demands of clinical practice. Regular group meetings seem to be an effective way of psychological care. They provide an opportunity for the participants to view own problems from a distance and to seek new options. It allows them to gain new insights from the discussed situations and to get support or feedback from colleagues. Regular group meetings also represent a key component of self-care and it is an important preventive factor of exhaustion that has been shown to cause medical or personal misconducts. In this context, the aim of the present paper is to describe the basic theoretical background for regular group meetings of oncologists and oncology nurses and to refer about the current practice within the Czech health care system.

  2. The Longitudinal Association between Psychological Factors and Health Care Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens-Oliver; Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-03-15

    Little attention has been given to psychological factors as correlates of health care use, which could be an important key to manage it. We analyzed the association of psychological factors with health care use. Primary data were obtained from three follow-ups (2002, 2008, and 2011) of a large population-based study with participants aged 40+. Using a longitudinal observational study, we analyzed the psychological factors of negative and positive affect (affective well-being), life satisfaction (cognitive well-being), self-efficacy, loneliness, self-esteem, optimism, and flexible goal adjustment using fixed-effects regressions. The participants provided data on health care use (visits to general practitioners [GPs] and specialists as well as hospitalization) and psychological factors via self-administered questionnaires and personal interviews (7,116 observations). The sample was drawn using national probability sampling. Controlling for self-rated health, chronic diseases and sociodemographics, increases in affective well-being, and optimism decreased health care use of GPs, specialists, and hospital treatment. Increases in cognitive well-being decreased health care use of GPs and specialists. Increases in self-efficacy decreased hospitalization. The study underlines the influence of psychological factors on health care use. Thus, whenever possible, future studies of health care use should include psychological factors, and efforts to reduce health care use might focus on such factors. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. [Psychology of nursing personnel in home care nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler, R

    1995-04-01

    In a random survey questions were put to 100 employees of home care centers (51 qualified nursing staff, 28 assistants and/or trainees, 21 young people doing community service as an alternative to military service). (1) The job motivation is primarily of a private nature: social commitment, achievement motivation, being responsible for solving diverse human problems are at the centre of job orientation. (2) Huge disappointments (neglect of patients, stress, arrangement of working hours, bureaucracy, lack of self-responsibility) are in 62% of the cases the reasons for changing from a clinic to the home care centre. (3) The psychological results of home care nursing are only positive in 62% of the cases; 26% have thought of giving notice, 37% would not choose their job again. (4) The training qualification for home care nursing is only adequate for 60% of those questioned; deficiencies are experienced with regard to consulting competence, gerontopsychiatry, specific knowledge about illnesses, legal questions. Essential further training is neglected. Also initial instruction in the home care service is to a great extent unsatisfactory. (5) For economic reasons it is frequently necessary to limit daily care to basic nursing; the patients' communicative needs have to ignored. One's occupational self-importance dwindles away; the job increasingly becomes an everyday stress factor. (6) The high risk of infection in the case of home-care patients is considered to be above-average (bedsores, infection risks with regard to changing bandages/catheters, anuspraeter aids, incontinence, fungal diseases, food risks: not keeping to diets, food not suitable for the elderly, lack of appropriate storage for leftovers. (7) Nursing staff, as well as patients, regard soap, cleansing lotion, shampoo, tooth brushes and toothpaste as the main items for personal hygiene, for the prevention and treatment of bedsores. Beyond that, compared with nursing staff, patients have a greater need for

  4. Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

  5. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  6. Setting up a clinical psychology service for commercial sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Clare; Petrak, Jenny

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide what we believe to be the first report of the establishment of a clinical psychology service to provide accessible psychological assessment, intervention and crisis support, integrated within an existing East London sexual health clinical and outreach service for commercial sex workers (CSWs). Data are presented on referral patterns, demographics, presenting issues to clinical psychology, interventions and outcomes for the first year of the service. Women presented with a range of psychosocial needs. Psychological interventions included direct therapy, signposting to other services and consultation with staff. We concluded that this flexible model of service provision improves access to mental health services within the context of a specialist sexual health and outreach service for CSWs. The provision of a named, female clinical psychologist who provides both the clinical sessions and attends outreach has been an important factor in developing trust and familiarity, leading to better uptake of the clinical psychology service.

  7. Clinical and scientific progress related to the interface between cardiology and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdman, R A M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    in need of repair, combined with the understanding that the heart and mind interact to affect health. The present selective review addresses the broad range of contributions of 35 years of psychology to clinical cardiology and cardiovascular research with a focus on research, teaching, psychological...... screening and patient care. The review ends with lessons to be learned and challenges for the future with respect to improving the care and management of patients with heart disease in order to enhance secondary prevention and the role of behavioural and psychological factors in this endeavour....

  8. The Healthy Aging Brain Care (HABC) Monitor: validation of the Patient Self-Report Version of the clinical tool designed to measure and monitor cognitive, functional, and psychological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Patrick O; Alder, Catherine A; Khan, Babar A; Stump, Timothy; Boustani, Malaz A

    2014-01-01

    Primary care providers need an inexpensive, simple, user-friendly, easily standardized, sensitive to change, and widely available multidomain instrument to measure the cognitive, functional, and psychological symptoms of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions. We previously validated the Caregiver Report Version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor (HABC Monitor) for measuring and monitoring the severity of symptoms through caregiver reports. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Patient Self-Report Version of the HABC Monitor (Self-Report HABC Monitor). Cross-sectional study. Primary care clinics affiliated with a safety net urban health care system in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. A total of 291 subjects aged ≥65 years with a mean age of 72.7 (standard deviation 6.2) years, 76% female, and 56% African Americans. Psychometric validity and reliability of the Self-Report HABC Monitor. Among 291 patients analyzed, the Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrated excellent fit for the confirmatory factor analysis model (root mean square error of approximation =0.030, comparative fit index =0.974, weighted root mean square residual =0.837) and good internal consistency (0.78-0.92). Adequate convergent-divergent validity (differences between the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status test-based cognitive function impairment versus nonimpairment groups) was demonstrated only when patients were removed from analysis if they had both cognitive function test impairment and suspiciously perfect self-report HABC Monitor cognitive floor scores of 0. The Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrates good reliability and validity as a clinically practical multidimensional tool for measuring symptoms. The tool can be used along with its caregiver version to provide useful feedback (via monitoring of symptoms) for modifying care plans. Determining the validity of HABC Monitor scores from patients who self-report a perfect cognitive score of

  9. Clinical psychology in general practice: a controlled trial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earll, Louise; Kincey, John

    1982-01-01

    A controlled trial study is described in which 50 consecutive potential referrals for psychological treatment from one general practice were randomly allocated either to behavioural treatment or no-treatment conditions. Treatment-group patients received treatment from a clinical psychologist working within the practice; the control-group patients continued to be managed by their general practitioner. The patients' use of NHS resources was assessed during the treatment period (or its equivalent for the control group) and at a follow-up comparison point, when the patients' subjective ratings of their progress were also obtained. Between referral and the end of treatment the treated group received significantly less psychotropic medication than the control group. This difference was not, however, maintained at the longer-term follow-up. No differences in general practice consultation rates, in the subjective ratings of psychological distress, in control orientation or life satisfaction were found between the two groups, but the level of patient satisfaction was high. Implications for the design of future studies and for psychological health care delivery systems are discussed. PMID:7086742

  10. A new challenge: Model of positive health and clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence; Milosev, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to present a new model and approach in Health and Clinical practice – Applied Positive Psychology. Through discussion about the roots of Positive Psychology and interest in what is good about humans and their lives and in optimal human functioning we will try to introduce a new model of Positive Health and Clinical Psychology. From Aristotle’s treatises on eudemonia, through Aquinas’ writings about virtue during the Renaissance, to the inquires of modern psycholo...

  11. The VEPSY updated project: virtual reality in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, G; Alcañiz, M; Anolli, L; Bacchetta, M; Baños, R; Beltrame, F; Botella, C; Galimberti, C; Gamberini, L; Gaggioli, A; Molinari, E; Mantovani, G; Nugues, P; Optale, G; Orsi, G; Perpina, C; Troiañi, R

    2001-08-01

    Many of us grew up with the naive assumption that couches are the best used therapeutic tools in psychotherapy. But tools for psychotherapy are evolving in a much more complex environment than a designer's chaise lounge. In particular, virtual reality (VR) devices have the potential for appearing soon in many consulting rooms. The use of VR in medicine is not a novelty. Applications of virtual environments for health care have been developed in the following areas: surgical procedures (remote surgery or telepresence, augmented or enhanced surgery, and planning and simulation of procedures before surgery); preventive medicine and patient education; medical education and training; visualization of massive medical databases; and architectural design for health care facilities. However, there is a growing recognition that VR can play an important role in clinical psychology, too. To exploit and understand this potential is the main goal of the Telemedicine and Portable Virtual Environment in Clinical Psychology--VEPSY Updated--a European Community-funded research project (IST-2000-25323, http://www.vepsy.com). The project will provide innovative tools-telemedicine and portable-for the treatment of patients, clinical trials to verify their viability, and action plans for dissemination of its results to an extended audience-potential users and influential groups. The project will also develop different personal computer (PC)-based virtual reality modules to be used in clinical assessment and treatment. In particular, the developed modules will address the following pathologies: anxiety disorders; male impotence and premature ejaculation; and obesity, bulimia, and binge-eating disorders.

  12. Construal level, rumination, and psychological distress in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfin, John M; Watkins, Edward R

    2012-06-01

    Patients with a life-limiting illness, such as cancer, and their carers experience elevated psychological distress. However, the psychological mechanisms underpinning distress in palliative care have been little studied. Recent theories predict that individuals who experience increased uncertainty in the context of ongoing difficulties, such as palliative patients and their carers, will (a) think more abstractly; (b) ruminate more; and (c) be more distressed. Palliative patients (n = 36, 90% with cancer), their carers (n = 29), and age-matched controls (n = 30) completed standardized questionnaires to assess anxiety, depression, and rumination, and open-ended interviews to identify their concerns and idiosyncratic levels of rumination. Concerns were analyzed linguistically for level of abstraction. As predicted, (i) palliative patients and carers reported significantly more uncertainty, rumination, and abstract thinking than controls; (ii) uncertainty, abstractness, and rumination were associated with psychological distress. Abstraction and rumination are psychological mechanism potentially involved in increased psychological distress in palliative care. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Revisioning Clinical Psychology: Integrating Cultural Psychology into Clinical Research and Practice with Portuguese Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Susan; Harris, Sara; Foster, Gary; Clarke, Juanne; Gadermann, Anne; Morrison, Marie; Bezanson, Birdie Jane

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a model for conducting psychotherapy with people of diverse cultural backgrounds. The theoretical foundation for the model is based on clinical and cultural psychology. Cultural psychology integrates psychology and anthropology in order to provide a complex understanding of both culture and the individual within his or her cultural context. The model proposed in this article is also based on our clinical experience and mixed-method research with the Portuguese community. The model demonstrates its value with ethnic minority clients by situating the clients within the context of their multi-layered social reality. The individual, familial, socio-cultural, and religio-moral domains are explored in two research projects, revealing the interrelation of these levels/contexts. The article is structured according to these domains. Study 1 is a quantitative study that validates the Agonias Questionnaire in Ontario. The results of this study are used to illustrate the individual domain of our proposed model. Study 2 is an ethnography conducted in the Azorean Islands, and the results of this study are integrated to illustrate the other three levels of the model, namely family, socio-cultural, and the religio-moral levels. PMID:23720642

  14. Moving Toward Improved Teamwork in Cancer Care: The Role of Psychological Safety in Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anshu K; Fennell, Mary L; Chagpar, Anees B; Connolly, Hannah K; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication is a requirement in the teamwork necessary for improved coordination to deliver patient-centered, value-based cancer care. Communication is particularly important when care providers are geographically distributed or work across organizations. We review organizational and teams research on communication to highlight psychological safety as a key determinant of high-quality communication within teams. We first present the concept of psychological safety, findings about its communication effects for teamwork, and factors that affect it. We focus on five factors applicable to cancer care delivery: familiarity, clinical hierarchy-related status differences, geographic dispersion, boundary spanning, and leader behavior. To illustrate how these factors facilitate or hinder psychologically safe communication and teamwork in cancer care, we review the case of a patient as she experiences the treatment-planning process for early-stage breast cancer in a community setting. Our analysis is summarized in a key principle: Teamwork in cancer care requires high-quality communication, which depends on psychological safety for all team members, clinicians and patients alike. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of psychological safety in clinical care and suggestions for future research.

  15. Improving quality of diabetes care by integrating psychological and social care for poorly controlled diabetes: 3 Dimensions of Care for Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Anne M; Gayle, Carol; Morgan-Jones, Ruth; Archer, Nicola; Laura-Lee; Ismail, Khalida; Werner, Anne

    Many people with persistent suboptimal diabetes control also have psychiatric morbidity and social problems which interfere with their ability to self-manage their diabetes. Current models of care in the UK do not integrate these different dimensions of care or address inequalities between physical and mental health. 3DFD (3 Dimensions of Care For Diabetes) integrated medical, psychological, and social care in diabetes for patients with persistent suboptimal glycemic control (HbA1c > 75 mmol/mol) despite guideline-based routine diabetes care, to improve glycemic control, reduce psychological distress, and improve social functioning. The service delivered interventions including brief psychological therapies, mental health assessments, psychotropic medications, and social support, enhanced by patient-led case conferences aiming to optimize diabetes care. 3DFD measured changes in HbA1c, psychological functioning, quality of life, rates of unscheduled care, and levels of engagement with routine diabetes care at baseline and at 12 months. At 12-month follow-up, 3DFD patients achieved significant reductions in HbA1c of 15 mmol/mol, International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (1.4% Diabetes Control and Complications Trial) and improvements in depression scores and patient satisfaction. This model of care demonstrates that integrated care can improve diabetes outcomes in people with psychological and social comorbidities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Psychological issues in diabetes care | Ogunsemi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes is a chronic condition requiring prolonged medical supervision and informed self-care. Clinicians have traditionally focused on the medical aspects of diabetes care. A psychosocial approach is necessary to overcome potential barriers to self-care so that effective self-management is successful. In order to do so, ...

  17. Occurrence, recognition, and outcome of psychological disorders in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemens, B.G.; Ormel, J.; Simon, G.E.

    Objective: The authors' goal was to cross-validate the earlier finding of the Groningen Primary Care Study that recognition of psychological disorders was associated with better patient outcomes. Method: The 12-item General Health Questionnaire was used to screen 1,271 consecutive primary care

  18. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Group psychotherapy in Obstetric fistula care. African Journal of Reproductive Health March 2014; 18(1): 156. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A. Complementary Recipe for the Accompanying Mental Ill Health. Morbidities? Oladosu A Ojengbede. 1. , Yvonne Baba. 2.

  19. Identifying psychological distress in elderly seeking health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Prafulla; Sadanand, Shilpa; Bharath, Srikala; Girish, N; Philip, Mariamma; Varghese, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Psychological distress in the elderly with various illness conditions often goes unrecognized. Since psychological distress is treatable, it is important to recognize it at the earliest to enhance recovery. This is an interim analysis of screening data of the elderly seeking health care in a hospital in India, with a focus on the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), a screening instrument for psychological distress and a rationale for a higher cutoff score in help seeking elderly. A retrospective analysis of screening data of psychological distress using GHQ-12 in the elderly seeking care for neuropsychiatric conditions was carried out. Traditionally, ≥2 is considered positive for distress by GHQ-12. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to define new cutoff points for psychological distress. At ≥2, 2443 (50%) of the elderly screened were recognized to be psychologically distressed. Using an ROC and optimum sensitivity and specificity measures, a cutoff score of ≥4 was observed to detect 30% of the elderly who had diagnosable mental health disorders. Female sex, illiteracy, and multiple co-morbidities were the factors that were associated with higher cutoff scores on GHQ-12 proposed here and psychiatric morbidity thereof. There is greater psychological distress among the elderly seeking health care. Hence, it is important to screen them and identify those at higher risk. Using a higher cutoff score with a standardized instrument like GHQ-12 indicated that it was statistically valid to identify those elderly with higher distress in a busy out-patient setting.

  20. Children's psychological and behavioral responses following pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization: the caring intensively study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, Janet E; Dougherty, Geoffrey; Chambers, Christine; Stremler, Robyn; Childerhose, Janet E; Stack, Dale M; Harrison, Denise; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Dryden-Palmer, Karen; Zhang, Xun; Hutchison, Jamie

    2014-10-26

    Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) hospitalization places children at increased risk of persistent psychological and behavioral difficulties following discharge. Despite tremendous advances in medical technology and treatment regimes, approximately 25% of children demonstrate negative psychological and behavioral outcomes within the first year post-discharge. It is imperative that a broader array of risk factors and outcome indicators be explored in examining long-term psychological morbidity to identify areas for future health promotion and clinical intervention. This study aims to examine psychological and behavioral responses in children aged 3 to 12 years over a three year period following PICU hospitalization, and compare them to children who have undergone ear, nose and/or throat (ENT) day surgery. This mixed-methods prospective cohort study will enrol 220 children aged 3 to 12 years during PICU hospitalization (study group, n = 110) and ENT day surgery hospitalization (comparison group, n = 110). Participants will be recruited from 3 Canadian pediatric hospitals, and followed for 3 years with data collection points at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and 3 years post-discharge. Psychological and behavioral characteristics of the child, and parent anxiety and parenting stress, will be assessed prior to hospital discharge, and again at each of the 5 subsequent time points, using standardized measures. Psychological and behavioral response scores for both groups will be compared at each follow-up time point. Multivariate regression analysis will be used to adjust for demographic and clinical variables at baseline. To explore baseline factors predictive of poor psychological and behavioral scores at 3 years among PICU patients, correlation analysis and multivariate linear regression will be used. A subgroup of 40 parents of study group children will be interviewed at years 1 and 3 post-discharge to explore their perceptions of the impact of PICU

  1. Psychological woundedness and its evaluation in applications for clinical psychology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Gavin; Partington, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating clinical psychology programme selectors' perceptions of psychological 'woundedness' in the autobiographical narratives of applicants for clinical psychology training. Woundedness was here defined in terms of the ongoing or residual psychological impact of adverse experiences and psychic conflicts. Ten selectors were presented with a sample of applicants' written autobiographical narratives, differentiated by the conspicuous presence or absence of psychological woundedness. The selectors, who were not informed of the specific aims of the study, ranked applicant protocols and were interviewed individually about their impressions of the protocols and the criteria that they used to rank them. Most selectors were positively biased toward 'wounded' narratives and suspicious of those in which woundedness was manifestly absent. Although generally disposed to favour wounded applicants, how woundedness was presented, rather than the mere presence of it, was a discriminating feature in selectors' appraisal of wounded narratives. Selectors were concerned that unresolved woundedness may compromise applicants' professional boundaries, impair self-reflective capacity and lead to damaging countertransference enactments. The relative extent to which applicant woundedness appeared to be resolved was significant in selectors' assessment of applicants' clinical training potential. A distinction is thus proposed between obstructive and facilitative woundedness in clinical psychology applicants. A sample of clinical psychology programme selectors identified psychological woundedness as a significant feature in applicant autobiographies. Selectors favoured applicant autobiographies showing evidence of woundedness. The distinction between obstructive and facilitative woundedness is important in how the selector sample evaluated woundedness. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ortiz PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accountable Care Organization (ACO is one of the new models of health care delivery in the United States. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods: A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs in 9 states. Two dependent variables—participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs—were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. Results: A total of 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2% of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. Rural Health Clinics in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds ratio = 0.22, P = .059. Nonprofit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B = 1.271, P = .054. There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B = 0.402, P = .010. Conclusion: At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs.

  3. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AFTER THE PGS (GENERAL HEALTHCARE PSYCHOLOGY IN SPAIN: A REASONED PROPOSAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César González-Blanch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From now on, for the independent practice of psychology in the field of health in Spain, the psychologist must complete the newly created Master’s degree in General Healthcare Psychology. However, this mandatory university course is not required for access to the specialised healthcare training that provides the title of “clinical psychologist” (the PIR, an internship in Clinical Psychology. In this paper we argue in favour of changing the access to the specialised training program in clinical psychology so as to ensure that the knowledge and skills specifically related to healthcare offered by the university are included in the curricula of future clinical psychologists. Finally, the risks to the entire profession of impoverishing the university studies of clinical psychologists are discussed.

  4. Introduction to the special issue on international clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierc, Susan Frauenglass; Routh, Donald K

    2003-06-01

    We briefly describe the content of the six research articles selected by peer review for this, the first special issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology devoted to international clinical psychology. Two of the articles address general scientific issues-illusory mental health and a theory of anorexia nervosa-not considered specific to any particular cultural setting. One article examines social anxiety in three different Western societies. One considers the development of clinical psychology in a specific country, Spain. The final two articles consider two clinical problems-sexual dysfunction and Type-I diabetes-within two different contexts in India, one Hindu, the other Moslem. The introduction concludes with some general comments on the history and present status of clinical psychology as an international field. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol.

  5. [Co-therapy in intercultural clinical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocreau, Jean-Bernard; Martins-Borges, Lucienne

    2013-01-01

    Numerous clinicians practicing systemic psychotherapy have recognized the relevance of co-therapy, an intervention model involving at least two clinicians. Intercultural psychology and ethnopsychiatry have been inspired by the principles of co-therapy and have adapted it to the intercultural context. Our objective is to illustrate how co-therapy works in intercultural psychology, as it has been developed by the Specialized Psychological Services for Immigrants and for Refugees (SAPSIR). This intervention model facilitates the working through processes of mourning and of identity, important issues with migrant individuals. Finally, this practice cannot be reduced to the mere application of techniques including some cultural elements; it implies a special way of being in relationship with others, with oneself and with one's knowledge.

  6. Clinical Community Psychology: Reflections on the Decades Following Swampscott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Jenkins, Richard

    2016-12-01

    The Swampscott report was foundational, but in some ways reflected divisions within community psychology that have continued into the present. Community psychologists trained in the 1970s and, especially, the 1980s confronted a period where the original focus of community mental health began to have less influence in the mental health field due to a variety of public policies, and the growth of third party payments as a significant source of health care funding. Programs that engaged communities and provided a base for prevention interventions were greatly curtailed because of changes in federal legislation and limited opportunities for state and local funding, although prevention interventions found growing interest from research funders. Clinical and community psychologists who trained in this period increasingly looked to a variety of areas outside of mental health. Consequently, the field of community psychology has become more applied and less academic, with increased attention to advocacy, theory, and global perspectives. The sweep of these changes and their implications for the future of the field are discussed here. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Exploring the Intersection of Comparative and Clinical Psychology: An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Marston, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This article serves as the introduction to the special issues of the International Journal of Comparative Psychology on the intersection of comparative and clinical psychology.  These two fields have a shared history going back to the beginnings of each.  Prominent names throughout psychology have work that crosses over between these two fields.  Freud referenced Darwin’s work throughout his work and Skinner’s research was almost exclusively comparative psychology research.  For much of the f...

  8. Understanding persons with psychological distress in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsdotter, Tina; Marklund, Bertil; Kylén, Sven; Taft, Charles; Ekman, Inger

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge and a deeper understanding of experiences of persons living with psychological distress who seek help in primary care. Psychological distress is a state of emotional suffering associated with stressors and demands that are difficult to cope with in daily life. The lack of effective care for and difficulty in identifying psychological distress is frustrating for patients and health professionals alike. The aim was therefore to gain more knowledge about the experience of living with psychological distress. Twelve persons (nine women and three men) aged 23-51 years were interviewed. Analyses were based on a phenomenological hermeneutic method and indicated that psychological distress may be seen as an imbalance (incongruence) between the self and the ideal self, which slowly breaks down a person's self-esteem. This imbalance was described in three dimensions: Struggling to cope with everyday life, Feeling inferior to others and Losing one's grip on life. It seems to be associated with a gradual depletion of existential capacities and lead to dissatisfaction, suffering, poor self-esteem and lack of control. As psychological distress may be a forerunner to mental, physical and emotional exhaustion, there is a need to initiate preventive or early interventions to avoid mental, physical and emotional chaos in such patients. Patients' with psychological distress need to be involved in a person-centred salutogenic dialogue with health professionals to become aware of and strengthen their own capacities to regain health and well-being. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Clinical psychology at doctorate level:Hopes, expectations and reality

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, J.

    2008-01-01

    With a recent reduction in training places on the clinical psychology doctorate training programme, achieving a place has become increasingly difficult. Here, I reflect on the expectations we have of ourselves, and of the course, when these hopes are realised.

  10. Sex and sexuality teaching in UK clinical psychology courses

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, E; Butler, C A; Marriott, C

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of clinical psychology training courses that measured levels of training in sex and sexuality. Findings suggest there is inconsistent provision in terms of quantity and breadth of coverage.

  11. Social networking, identity and professionalism in clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Karen; Fawns, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the issues faced by clinical psychology trainees when integrating their 'personal' 'student' and 'professional' images. This is in the context of the increasing use of social networking sites for both personal and educational processes.

  12. Current opinion in clinical sport psychology: from athletic performance to psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zella E; Bonagura, Kehana

    2017-08-01

    Clinical sport psychology (CSP) is a contemporary, empirically informed model that employs a scope, style, and mode of practice built upon cutting-edge findings from both clinical and sport sciences, and that follows the sound methodological traditions of clinical psychology [1 •• ]. Conceptualizing athletic performance and well-being through the context of empirical research in both athletic and nonathletic domains of functioning, CSP practice can involve the enhancement of athletic performance, and also the personal development and psychological well-being of performers. CSP intervention options expand (if desired) to include those currently considered to be outside of the purview of traditional sport psychology and within the domains of clinical/counseling psychology. Importantly, CSP does not imply that its practitioners must choose a population. CSPers can, if appropriate, assess and intervene with psychological disorders, performance dysfunction, and performance improvement, and/or can make appropriate referrals. Despite whether one personally addresses the variety of interpersonal, non-diagnosable, and clinical issues potentially presented, they must support a comprehensive, client-specific approach and engage in interventions based on sound evidence. Expanding practice boundaries, and with it one's roles and responsibilities, also results in expanded job opportunities. This scope highlights the clinical sport psychologist as the human behavior expert in the athletic milieu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Complexity of Primary Care Psychology: Theoretical Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, E H; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    How does primary care psychology deal with organized complexity? Has it escaped Newtonian science? Has it, as Weaver (1991) suggests, found a way to 'manage problems with many interrelated factors that cannot be dealt by statistical techniques'? Computer simulations and mathematical models in psychology are ongoing positive developments in the study of complex systems. However, the theoretical development of complex systems in psychology lags behind these advances. In this article we use complexity science to develop a theory on experienced complexity in the daily practice of primary care psychologists. We briefly answer the ontological question of what we see (from the perspective of primary care psychology) as reality, the epistemological question of what we can know, the methodological question of how to act, and the ethical question of what is good care. Following our empirical study, we conclude that complexity science can describe the experienced complexity of the psychologist and offer room for personalized client-centered care. Complexity science is slowly filling the gap between the dominant reductionist theory and complex daily practice.

  14. Sedation and its psychological effects following intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxall, Clare; Tyas, Moira; Garside, Joanne

    Significant psychological impacts, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have been associated with patients under sedation in intensive care units (ICUs). However, it remains unknown if and how sedation is related to post-ICU psychological outcomes. This literature review explores the relationships between sedation, the depth of sedation and psychological disorders. A review of existing literature was undertaken systematically with key terms and included peer-reviewed primary research and randomised controlled trials (RCTs). To ensure subject relevance pre-2006, non-English and paediatric-based research was excluded. Findings highlighted that reduced sedation levels did not significantly reduce the outcome of PTSD, yet reduced ICU length of stay and length of mechanical ventilation (MV) were both associated with lighter sedation. Further research is recommended into more specific factual and delusional memories post ICU in relation to the level of sedation and to psychological distress.

  15. Users' psychological characterization of the Birigui Mental Health Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Fajardo, Renato Salviato [UNESP; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina; Botasim, Eliene Ferreira; Barboza, Glaucia de Souza

    2014-01-01

    To improve mental health services, the World Health Organization proposes an epidemiological approach" based on the constant screening of existing research, and aimed at continuous improvement of psychological treatment rather than strict application of prescribed techniques. This study provides an epidemiological survey conducted at the psychology ward of the municipal Ambulatório de Saúde Mental in Birigui, São Paulo, Brazil. Data from 180 patients in psychotherapeutic care were collected, ...

  16. A survey of psychological support provision for people with inflammatory arthritis in secondary care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dures, Emma; Almeida, Celia; Caesley, Judy; Peterson, Alice; Ambler, Nicholas; Morris, Marianne; Pollock, Jon; Hewlett, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    The consequences of inflammatory arthritis can include depression, anxiety and low mood, reducing patients' quality of life and increasing pressure on the healthcare system. Treatment guidelines recommend psychological support, but data are lacking on the provision available. A postal survey concerning psychological support provision was sent to rheumatology units in 143 acute trusts across England. Nurses from 73 rheumatology units (51%) responded. Overall, 73% rated their unit's psychological support provision as 'inadequate' and only 4% rated it as 'good'. Few units believed that psychological support did not fall within their remit (12%), yet only 8% had a psychologist in the team. Most units (68%) did not routinely screen patients to identify psychological difficulties. Referral to other service providers was reported in 42% of units, with 3% very satisfied with this provision. Within units, services containing elements of psychological support ranged from occupational therapy (81%) to psychology/counselling (14%). Psychological approaches used by team members ranged from shared decision making (77%) to cognitive-behavioural approaches (26%). The current barriers to providing psychological support were lack of clinical time and available training (86% and 74%, respectively), and delivery costs (74%). Future facilitators included management support (74%) and availability of skills training (74%). Rheumatology units viewed psychological support provision as part of their remit but rated their overall provision as inadequate, despite some team members using psychological skills. To improve provision, clinicians' training needs must be addressed and organizational support generated, and further research needs to define adequate psychological support provision from the patient perspective. © 2014 The Authors. Musculoskeletal Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Symptom burden, palliative care need and predictors of physical and psychological discomfort in two UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Tony; Ingleton, Christine; Gardiner, Clare; Parker, Chris; Gott, Merryn; Noble, Bill

    2013-02-26

    The requirement to meet the palliative needs of acute hospital populations has grown in recent years. With increasing numbers of frail older people needing hospital care as a result of both malignant and non-malignant conditions, emphasis is being placed upon understanding the physical, psychological and social burdens experienced by patients. This study explores the extent of burden in two large UK hospitals, focusing upon those patients who meet palliative care criteria. Furthermore, the paper explores the use of palliative services and identifies the most significant clinical diagnostic and demographic factors which determine physical and psychological burden. Two hospital surveys were undertaken to identify burden using the Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral to Care (SPARC). The Gold Standards Framework (GSF) is used to identify those patients meeting palliative care criteria. Participants were identified as being in-patients during a two-week data collection phase for each site. Data was gathered using face-to-face interviews or self-completion by patients or a proxy. Descriptive analyses highlight prevalence and use of palliative care provision. Binary logistic regression assesses clinical diagnostic predictor variables of physical and psychological burden. The sample consisted of 514 patients and elevated physical, psychological and social burden is identified amongst those meeting palliative care criteria (n = 185). Tiredness (34.6%), pain (31.1%), weakness (28.8%) and psychological discomfort (low mood 19.9%; anxiety 16.1%) are noted as being prevalent. A small number of these participants accessed Specialist Palliative Care (8.2%). Dementia was identified as a predictor of physical (OR 3.94; p psychological burden (OR 2.88; p psychological burden (OR 2.00; p care requirements. Moreover, the paper also indicates that a large proportion of such patients are not in receipt of palliative approaches to their care. Furthermore, the paper

  18. The Complexity of Primary Care Psychology: Theoretical Foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.H.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    How does primary care psychology deal with organized complexity? Has it escaped Newtonian science? Has it, as Weaver (1991) suggests, found a way to 'manage problems with many interrelated factors that cannot be dealt by statistical techniques'? Computer simulations and mathematical models in

  19. Psychological support of a cancer patient based on nursing care process records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, J; Gaworska-Krzemińska, A; Piotrkowska, R

    2007-01-01

    The care of a cancer patient undergoes considerable changes. Patients' most important need is a demand of support in dealing with somatic, psychological, emotional and social complaints. The purpose of this research is to analyse the realization of the psychological support of a cancer patient based on nursing care process records. The research analysis is based on 150 nursing care case histories of cancer children and adults treated in the Independent Public Clinical Hospital No 1 of the Academic Clinical Centre at the Medical University of Gdańsk in such wards as: Paediatric Haematology, Paediatric Chemotherapy, Adults' Haematology, Oncology and Radiotherapy, Thoracic Surgery. Evaluation chart of nursing care histories and statistical methods were tools in this research. The nursing case history evaluation chart created for this very research is successfully used by members of nursing records team in all of 61 wards. The results indicate that in all analysed wards the most problematic factor for nurses was taking the patients' (children's) habits and free time planning into account while establishing the plan of action. In numerous cases a stated nursing care diagnosis was not connected with the realization of psychological support. Providing patients with the feeling of safety and contact with family was positively assessed. In the care process nurses should pay more attention to the evaluation of patients and their families' need of social support.

  20. Medical Students' Death Anxiety: Severity and Association With Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Pia; Quince, Thelma; Benson, John; Wood, Diana; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Death anxiety (DA) is related to awareness of the reality of dying and death and can be negatively related to a person's psychological health. Physicians' DA also may influence their care for patients approaching death. Doctors face death in a professional context for the first time at medical school, but knowledge about DA among medical students is limited. This study examined medical students' DA in relation to: 1) its severity, gender differences, and trajectory during medical education and 2) its associations with students' attitudes toward palliative care and their psychological health. Four cohorts of core science and four cohorts of clinical students at the University of Cambridge Medical School took part in a questionnaire survey with longitudinal follow-up. Students who provided data on the revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale were included in the analysis (n = 790). Medical students' DA was moderate, with no gender differences and remained very stable over time. High DA was associated with higher depression and anxiety levels and greater concerns about the personal impact of providing palliative care. The associations between high DA and lower psychological health and negative attitudes toward palliative care are concerning. It is important to address DA during medical education to enhance student's psychological health and the quality of their future palliative care provision. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Foundational questions in the beginning of clinical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Glauco

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes an initial survey on the origins of American clinical psychology between the nineteenth and twentieth century, against a backdrop of historiographical interpretation that hypothesizes a "plurality of matrices" of clinical psychology, linked to different theoretical perspectives and different socio-cultural contexts. Particular attention is focused upon the main foundational issues of the discipline, drawing from some of the writings of Lightner Witmer, to whom we owe the founding of the first "clinical psychology" for subjects in childhood characterized by "retardation or physical defects interfering with school progress"; and of a lesser-known scholar, John E.W. Wallin. Both authors, indeed, worry themselves anxious to define clinical psychology, differentiating it from other medical and psychological branches; to establish which is the field of competence of the clinical psychologist; and to outline their training and specify the aims and contents of their intervention. Attention is then addressed to the relationship psychologists-psychiatrists at the time of its emergence, making specific reference to a document of the New York Psychiatrical Society--which represents one of the first attempts to exclude clinical psychologists from the field of mental health--and reporting also on the response to this position signed by Shepherd Franz. After an allusion to the Italian situation from the 1950s to today, the article concludes by emphasizing that at least some of the basic questions that clinical psychology had to deal with at its birth are still present, though filtered through the intense debate that has taken place over the years, and consequently supporting the importance of a historical component in the training of contemporary clinical psychologists.

  2. Adolescents and the Media: Medical and Psychological Impact. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C.

    Aimed at primary care physicians and nurses, educators, and parents, this book reviews media effects on adolescent behavior and psychology. The book notes that television is a powerful medium to which adolescents are uniquely susceptible and how studies have shown television's ability to shape social attitudes. Theories of how television affects…

  3. A Clinic Model: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elizabeth L; Bloom, Sarah L; Stollings, Joanna L; Camp, Mildred; Sevin, Carla M; Jackson, James C

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients surviving critical illness in the United States has increased with advancements in medicine. Post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family are terms developed by the Society of Critical Care Medicine in order to address the cognitive, psychological, and physical sequelae emerging in patients and their families after discharge from the intensive care unit. In the United Kingdom and Europe, intensive care unit follow-up clinics have been used to address the complications of post-intensive care syndrome for some time. However, the interprofessional clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among the first in the United States to address the wide variety of problems experienced by intensive care survivors and to provide patients and their families with care after discharge from the intensive care unit.

  4. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  5. Psychological distress and quality of life of palliative cancer patients and their caring relatives during home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Brähler, Elmar; Gansera, Lutz; Polze, Nina; Köhler, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    Palliative patients and their family caregivers were interviewed at the beginning of home care in personal interviews at home in regard to their psychological distress as well as their quality of life. Quality of life was collected with the palliative module EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL (patients) and the Short Form-8 Health Survey (caregivers). The psychological distress was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the extent of social support with the Oslo 3-items social support scale. Two multiple regression models were employed to examine factors associated with psychological distress. Data from 106 palliative patients (39.6 % female) and their family caregivers (67.9 % female) were included in the analysis. Every fourth patient had clinically relevant anxiety levels and half of the palliative patients had clinically symptomatic depression scores. The main symptoms of the patients were: fatigue, loss of appetite, pain, and shortness of breath. Patients' and caregivers' anxiety and depression scores were significantly correlated (anxiety r = 0.386, depression r = 0.416). Thirty-three percent of caregivers suffered from high anxiety and 28 % from depression. Spousal caregivers had higher psychological distress than other caregivers. Other relevant factors for higher distress were high financial burden and low social support. There was hardly any family member receiving professional psychological support. In palliative patients, depressive symptoms should not be judged as a normal attendant of the terminal illness situation. Instead, patients should be referred to appropriate support services for pharmacological or psychological treatment. Spousal caregivers and caregivers who are socially not well integrated are in particular need of support. Attention to the financial burden of family caregivers is also very important. Due to the existing correlation between the psychological situation of palliative patients and their caring relatives, couples must

  6. [Screening for bipolar disorder in primary care patients with psychological symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Escobar-Rabadán, Francisco; Téllez-Lapeira, Juan; Mínguez, José; Párraga, Ignacio; Suárez-Hernández, Tatiana; Piñero, María José; Guzón, Marta-Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of positive results in the screening of bipolar disorder (BD) among primary care patients presenting with psychological symptoms, and to analyze their characteristics. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Nineteen Primary Care clinics in different Spanish regions. A total of 360 consecutive primary care patients aged 18 to 70, presenting with psychological symptoms. Screening for BP was performed by means of the Mood Disorders Questionnaire. Data on quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained. Data on psychiatric comorbidity and data on the use of psychotropic medication were acquired by review of medical records. Of the patients screened, 11.9% were positive (95%CI: 8.8%-15.7%). Only two patients had a diagnosis of BP in their clinical records and, although more than half received treatment with antidepressants, only two received treatment with mood stabilizers. Positive screening is associated with work, social and family dysfunction, greater perceived stress and poor quality of life. BD screening in primary care patients with psychological problems leads to a striking proportion of positive results, indicating that there may be a significant prevalence of BP patients, most of them undiagnosed and untreated. Further research is needed to determine the role that Primary Care can or should assume in the screening, diagnosis and management of this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and psychological factors for criminal aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safuanov F.S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates approach to the study of crime of aggression, taking into account the analysis of the behavior principles of interaction of personal and situational factors; interaction of aggressive and antiaggressive personal factors. Three-dimensional typology of crime of aggression formed three axles: high – low aggressiveness; formation – aborted personal aggression inhibitors; neutral – a legally significant traumatic situation. This typology has been verified on the basis of empirical material, including 329 people (257 males and 72 women aged 18 to 70 years charged with violent crimes. All of the defendants (33 % mental health 67 % – with a variety of mental disorders not excluding sanity were examined in the production of a comprehensive forensic psychological and psychiatric examination. A cluster analysis of the subjects (Ward's method showed the validity of the choice of three bases of a typology of criminal aggression. The most powerful discriminator of types of aggression were personal inhibitors of aggression, less severe factors of high aggressiveness and characteristics of the situation. Identified correlations between various mental disorders and types of aggression.

  8. Effects of a Psychological Intervention in a Primary Health Care Center for Caregivers of Dependent Relatives: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Mora-Simon, Sara; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Perez-Penaranda, Anibal; Losada-Baltar, Andres; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in the context of Primary Health Care (PHC), the effect of a psychological intervention in mental health among caregivers (CGs) of dependent relatives. Design and Methods: Randomized multicenter, controlled clinical trial. The 125 CGs included in the trial were receiving health care in PHC. Inclusion criteria: Identifying…

  9. The First Experience of Clinical Practice on Psychology Students’ Imaginary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Regina Gallo-Belluzzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the academic development of the psychologist as a complex process which articulates the transmission of scientific knowledge and changes in imaginative activity, we psychoanalytically investigate the collective imaginary of Psychology students regarding the first clinical consultation. We conducted a group interview with 52 undergraduate students, using the Thematic Story-Drawing Procedure as a way to open a dialogical field. The material obtained, through the psychoanalytical method, resulted in the creation/gathering of four affective-emotional meaning fields: “I came, I saw and I conquered”, “I know that I (do not know”, “I survived and I will save” and “I am and I do”, from which we see an emotionally immature imaginary about the meeting with the patient, since students are more self-centered than concerned with the patient. The overall situation indicates the need for care regarding student academic development, in order to encourage a more mature approach toward the suffering of the other.

  10. Introduction to the special section on multicultural and community psychology: clinical psychology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama Hall, Gordon C

    2005-10-01

    Human behavior occurs in the contexts of culture and community. Yet, clinical psychology has traditionally focused on the individual, neglecting the individual's context. The purpose of this Special Section is to address the underlying conceptual issues in integrating multicultural and community psychology within a common framework. The integration of etic and emic approaches distinguishes the research programs in these articles from others that have solely focused on universal or culture-specific approaches. Issues facing ethnic minority populations are addressed, including identification of risk and protective factors, obstacles to mental health service use, and optimal treatment effectiveness. The integration of culture and community contexts into clinical psychology is necessary for it to remain relevant in an increasingly diverse 21st century. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. The FMLA and Psychological Support: Courts Care About "Care" (and Employers Should, Too).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Katherine Stallings

    2017-01-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") recognizes an employee's right to take leave to care for a qualifying family member. In light of the Act's remedial nature, the intended scope of the care provision is broad, but its definitional details are sparse. As a result of the attendant interpretive discretion afforded to courts, the Seventh Circuit announced its rejection of the requirement-- first articulated by the Ninth Circuit--that care provided during travel be related to continuing medical treatment. A facial analysis of the resulting circuit split fails to appreciate the fundamental difference between the Seventh and Ninth Circuits' considerations: the distinction between physical and psychological care. Whereas physical care is readily measurable, psychological care is less defined and, consequently, ripe to facilitate FMLA abuse. Efforts to combat this potential lead courts to impose judicially devised limitations on psychological care, but judicial discretion still infuses some uncertainty into proceedings. For employers, the best remedy lies in the FMLA's optional certification provision, which requires medical validation of an employee’s need for leave. In requiring certification, employers should distinguish between physical and psychological care, maximize the FMLA’s informational requirements, and implement complete and consistent request and approval procedures.

  12. Expertise in Clinical Psychology. The Effects of University Training and Practical Experience on Expertise in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Sabine; Spada, Hans; Caspar, Franz; Burri, Salome

    2013-01-01

    How do university training and subsequent practical experience affect expertise in clinical psychology? To answer this question we developed methods to assess psychological knowledge and the competence to diagnose, construct case conceptualizations, and plan psychotherapeutic treatment: a knowledge test and short case studies in a first study, and a complex, dynamically evolving case study in the second study. In our cross-sectional studies, psychology students, trainees in a certified postgraduate psychotherapist curriculum, and behavior therapists with more than 10 years of experience were tested (100 in total: 20 each of novice, intermediate, and advanced university students, postgraduate trainees, and therapists). Clinical knowledge and competence increased up to the level of trainees but unexpectedly decreased at the level of experienced therapists. We discuss the results against the background of expertise research and the training of clinical psychologists (in Germany). Important factors for the continuing professional development of psychotherapists are proposed. PMID:23543213

  13. Conducting research in clinical psychology practice: Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirsten V; Thew, Graham R

    2017-09-01

    The combination of clinical psychologists' therapeutic expertise and research training means that they are in an ideal position to be conducting high-quality research projects. However, despite these skills and the documented benefits of research to services and service users, research activity in practice remains low. This article aims to give an overview of the advantages of, and difficulties in conducting research in clinical practice. We reviewed the relevant literature on barriers to research and reflected on our clinical and research experiences in a range of contexts to offer practical recommendations. We considered factors involved in the planning, sourcing support, implementation, and dissemination phases of research, and outline suggestions to improve the feasibility of research projects in post-qualification roles. We suggest that research leadership is particularly important within clinical psychology to ensure the profession's continued visibility and influence within health settings. Clinical implications Emerging evidence suggests that clinical settings that foster research are associated with better patient outcomes. Suggestions to increase the feasibility of research projects in clinical settings are detailed. Limitations The present recommendations are drawn from the authors' practical experience and may need adaptation to individual practitioners' settings. This study does not attempt to assess the efficacy of the strategies suggested. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  14. The challenges and psychological impact of delivering nursing care within a war zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Alan; Lauder, William; McKenna, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Between 2001 and 2014, British military nurses served in Afghanistan caring for both service personnel and local nationals of all ages. However, there have been few research studies assessing the psychological impact of delivering nursing care in a war zone hospital. The purpose of the study was to explore the challenges and psychological stressors facing military nurses in undertaking their operational role. A constructivist grounded theory was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 British Armed Forces nurses at Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan, in June to July 2013. Military nurses faced prolonged periods of caring for seriously injured polytrauma casualties of all ages, and there were associated distressing psychological effects and prolonged periods of adjustment on returning home. Caring for children was a particular concern. The factors that caused stress, both on deployment and returning home, along with measures to address these issues such as time for rest and exercise, can change rapidly in response to the dynamic flux in clinical intensity common within the deployable environment. Clinical training, a good command structure, the requirement for rest, recuperation, exercise, and diet were important in reducing psychological stress within a war zone. No formal debriefing model was advocated for clinical staff who appear to want to discuss traumatic incidents as a group, and this may have contributed to stigma and nurses feeling isolated. On returning home, military nurses reported being disconnected from the civilian wards and departments. The study raised the question of who cares for the carers, as participants reported a perception that others felt that they should be able to cope without any emotional issues. It is envisioned that the results are transferable internationally to nurses from other armed forces and will raise awareness with civilian colleagues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between practice counselling and referral to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J; Parham, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although reduction in the use of secondary care mental health services is a suggested benefit of counselling in general practice, there has been little empirical investigation of this relationship. AIM: To investigate the relationship between the provision of counselling in general practice and the use of outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology services across a geographical area. METHOD: Information on referrals to outpatient psychiatry and clinical psychology from all general practices in the London Borough of Islington over one year (October 1993 to September 1994) was collected from the routine information systems of the main hospital departments serving this area. Referral rates per 1000 practice population were compared for practices with and without a practice-based counsellor. RESULTS: Fifteen (35%) of the 43 practices had a counsellor based in the practice. The median referral rate to clinical psychology was higher in practices with a counsellor (4.1 per 1000) than in practices without a counsellor (0.8 per 1000). There was no relationship between the provision of practice counselling and median referral rates to outpatient psychiatry (1.8 per 1000 with a counsellor, 1.7 per 1000 without a counsellor). CONCLUSION: Provision of practice counselling in the study was associated with higher referral rates to clinical psychology and no difference in referral rates to outpatient psychiatry. This is in contrast to the hypothesis that counselling reduces the use of secondary care mental health services. PMID:10024705

  16. Psychological morbidity among young adults attending primary care: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Louise; Hannigan, Ailish; O'Regan, Andrew; Khalil, Sherif; Meagher, David; Cullen, Walter

    2015-10-15

    Currently, Ireland has the fourth highest rate of youth suicide in the European Union with psychological morbidity ranging from 21% to 27% in young adults. Primary care is ideally situated to address mental health problems and provide direction and support to young adults. This study investigates the prevalence and management of young adults aged 18-25 presenting to their general practitioner with a psychological problem as part of a larger study on all adults. A random sample of 100 patients aged 18 and over with a consultation in the previous 2 years was selected from the practice management systems of 40 general practices in Ireland. Clinical records of active patients (excluding temporary visitors to the practice) were examined using a standardized reporting tool to extract information on demographics, prevalence, diagnoses and treatments for psychological problems. Of the 3845 active patients sampled aged 18 and over, 479 were in the target age group of 18-25. Of the 479 young adults identified (51% female, 60% fee paying), 57 (12%, 95% CI: 9-15%) had a documented psychological problem within the previous 2 years. Those with psychological problems were more likely to be frequent attenders and eligible for free medical care. Depression (23%) and stress and anxiety (23%) were most commonly identified. The estimated prevalence rate is considerably lower than previous studies which may indicate reluctance among young adults in presenting to primary care or reflect under-identification of psychological problems. Given the high rate of prescribing, enhancing access to non-pharmacological treatments in primary care is a priority. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  18. Multiple Regression Analyses in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation,…

  19. Collective memory : A perspective from (experimental) clinical psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Ineke; Moulds, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the concept of collective memory from an experimental clinical psychology perspective. Exploration of the term collective reveals a broad distinction between literatures that view collective memories as a property of groups (collectivistic memory) and those that regard these

  20. Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

  1. Comparing School and Clinical Psychology Internship Applicant Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Emery B.; Perfect, Michelle M.; Edwinson, Roxanne M.

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of internship applicants to internship positions listed in the online directory of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) is estimated at 1.23:1. In 2014a, approximately 14% of all students who participated in the match were not placed. Although the internship crisis impacts students in clinical,…

  2. Family therapy training on a clinical psychology programme

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the intake interviewing exercise in a family therapy training unit developed for postgraduates in clinical psychology. The teaching method includes pre-class reading, video modelling, and simulated practice with live feedback. The academic material and other similar practice exercises are contained in the core textbook for this unit.

  3. Psychological/verbal abuse and utilization of mental health care in perinatal women seeking treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Suzannah; Davis, Kristina; Howard, Margaret; Pearlstein, Teri; Zlotnick, Caron

    2012-10-01

    Research on psychological violence has suggested it is common among perinatal women and is predictive of later physical violence. Psychological violence is also a strong correlate of negative mental and physical health outcomes and may influence engagement in health services. Both physical and mental health care are of critical importance for perinatal women who may be especially vulnerable to psychological violence and its deleterious effects. This study examined the clinical records of 299 perinatal patients who received treatment in a psychiatric partial hospital program to determine whether there were differences in utilization of care between those women with and without current interpersonal psychological abuse. More women than expected who reported current psychological abuse left treatment early compared to those without such reports.

  4. Research on psychological and social factors in palliative care: an invited commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary

    2013-12-01

    Psychosocial factors are a major determinant of well-being in patients with advanced disease. However, the development of valid and reliable measures of meaningful and relevant outcomes and randomized controlled trials to assess the impact of novel interventions are relatively recent accomplishments. To discuss significant developments in psychosocial research, including work of the author, in palliative populations and to identify areas where uncertainty and controversy persist. The impact of systematic research on psychosocial factors in palliative care over the past four decades is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the development of relevant measures of psychological outcomes and to the results of pilot studies and randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions. A variety of factors, including methodological limitations, protective attitudes of health-care providers, and the progressive deterioration of patients with terminal disease, have presented obstacles to psychosocial research in palliative care. The more recent development of valid and reliable measures of psychological distress and psychological well-being has significantly advanced research in the field. Pilot studies and randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions have yielded promising results, although the demonstrated impact on primary outcomes in these studies has typically been modest. Psychosocial research in palliative care has grown in rigor and volume over the past several decades, and a variety of novel interventions have been developed and evaluated. However, the findings from this research have only begun to have an impact on clinical practice in palliative care.

  5. Investigating risk factors for psychological morbidity three months after intensive care: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Dorothy M; Howell, David C; Weinman, John A; Hardy, Rebecca J; Mythen, Michael G; Brewin, Chris R; Borja-Boluda, Susana; Matejowsky, Claire F; Raine, Rosalind A

    2012-10-15

    There is growing evidence of poor mental health and quality of life among survivors of intensive care. However, it is not yet clear to what extent the trauma of life-threatening illness, associated drugs and treatments, or patients' psychological reactions during intensive care contribute to poor psychosocial outcomes. Our aim was to investigate the relative contributions of a broader set of risk factors and outcomes than had previously been considered in a single study. A prospective cohort study of 157 mixed-diagnosis highest acuity patients was conducted in a large general intensive care unit (ICU). Data on four groups of risk factors (clinical, acute psychological, socio-demographic and chronic health) were collected during ICU admissions. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and quality of life were assessed using validated questionnaires at three months (n = 100). Multivariable analysis was used. At follow-up, 55% of patients had psychological morbidity: 27.1% (95% CI: 18.3%, 35.9%) had probable PTSD; 46.3% (95% CI: 36.5%, 56.1%) probable depression, and 44.4% (95% CI: 34.6%, 54.2%) anxiety. The strongest clinical risk factor for PTSD was longer duration of sedation (regression coefficient = 0.69 points (95% CI: 0.12, 1.27) per day, scale = 0 to 51). There was a strong association between depression at three months and receiving benzodiazepines in the ICU (mean difference between groups = 6.73 points (95% CI: 1.42, 12.06), scale = 0 to 60). Use of inotropes or vasopressors was correlated with anxiety, and corticosteroids with better physical quality of life. Strikingly high rates of psychological morbidity were found in this cohort of intensive care survivors. The study's key finding was that acute psychological reactions in the ICU were the strongest modifiable risk factors for developing mental illness in the future. The observation that use of different ICU drugs correlated with different psychological outcomes merits further

  6. Women entering clinical psychology: Q-sort narratives of career attraction of female clinical psychology trainees in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Martyn; Nash, Jen

    2013-01-01

    The great majority of the UK clinical psychology workforce are women, and this fact prompted an examination of the various ways clinical psychology might be seen as attractive to women--a neglected research topic. Female clinical psychology trainees from a variety of training programmes Q-sorted statements of potential job attractors. The process of analysis is outlined before most of the article is devoted to explicating the five narratives of attraction generated: making a difference, waiting for what I want, idealising challenge, identifying with distress and acknowledging power and privilege. Two super-ordinate 'stories' spanning the narratives are suggested--an over-riding attraction to the profession and a rebuttal of the suggestion that this attraction may be based on any overtly gendered grounds. In the absence of previous empirical data of women's attraction to clinical psychology, the small but significant contribution to understanding the profession made by the analysis is acknowledged--as is the need for further research to confirm and develop the findings. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Barriers of Chinese primary care attenders to seeking help for psychological distress in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai Sing; Lam, Tai Pong; Lam, Kwok Fai; Lo, Tak Lam; Chao, David Vai Kiong; Lam, Edmund Wing Wo

    2016-05-15

    Most of the previous studies on help seeking for psychological distress were derived from Western countries. This study investigated the barriers to help-seeking for psychological distress among Chinese primary care attenders in Hong Kong. Nine focus groups and 6 individual interviews were conducted among Chinese primary care attenders with/without known distress, patients' significant others and the general public. The identified barriers were investigated in a questionnaire survey with data from 1626 primary care attenders recruited from 13 private clinics and 6 public clinics. Worries about side effects of drugs (79.9%, 95% CI:(77.9%, 81.8%)) and drug dependency (74.7%, 95% CI:(72.5%, 76.8%)) were rated as the top barriers in the survey. Qualitative interviews found both worries and actual experience of the side effects of drugs, which weakened patients' trust in the treatment. Factor analysis on all barrier items suggested three factors: 1) worries of treatment, 2) uncertainties on primary care physicians' capacity, 3) public's limited knowledge on distress and sources of help. Distress level, education level and age were associated with factor 1, whereas distress level and healthcare setting were associated with the other two factors. Qualitative interviews revealed that not having a regular primary care physician in the public setting discouraged disclosure of psychological problems. The findings were based on self-reported data from the respondents. Hong Kong is influenced by a mixed Chinese and Western culture. Relevant public education in a Chinese context should target at reducing patients' worries of drug treatment and strengthening the image of primary care physicians as a feasible source of help. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Supervisee self-disclosure: a clinical psychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Nicola; Fox, John R E; Golding, Laura; Daiches, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clinical supervision is a multi-functional intervention within numerous psychotherapeutic professions, including clinical psychology. It often relies on supervisees' verbal disclosures of pertinent information. There is limited research on supervisee self-disclosure in the UK, and none using clinical psychology populations. This study aimed to address the limitations in the evidence base. It used a constructivist grounded theory methodology to investigate qualified UK clinical psychologists' use of self-disclosure in supervision in order to develop a theoretical understanding of their self-disclosure processes. Ten clinical psychologists from various time points across the career span were recruited to the study. Four core conceptual categories were identified in the analysis as being integral to participants' decision-making processes: 'Setting the Scene', 'Supervisory Relationship', 'Using Self-disclosure' and 'Reviewing Outcome of Self-disclosure'. These four categories are comprised of a number of subcategories. The study's findings are compared with the current literature base, and it is argued that there are tensions with the scientist-practitioner model as it could be interpreted to encourage an expert stance, which may limit the self-disclosure of qualified supervisees. The implications of this perspective are discussed. Supervision is a key process in supporting qualified clinical psychologists and the use of disclosure appears to be important in facilitating useful supervision. It appears that clinical psychologists go through a number of complex processes in deciding whether to self disclose. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Systems of care: new partnerships for community psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James R; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2012-06-01

    For almost two decades, the federal government has supported the development of integrated models of mental health service delivery for children and families, known as systems of care (SOCs), that strive to be child-centered, family-focused, community-based, and culturally competent. These efforts align well with the values and principles (e.g., empowerment, collaboration, strengths emphasis, focus on macro-level social/system change) central to community psychology (CP; Kloos et al. in Community psychology, Cengage Learning, Belmont, 2012). Despite the convergence of many core values, CPs have historically been underrepresented in key roles in SOC initiatives. However, this has changed in recent years, with increasing examples of community psychology skills and principles applied to the development, implementation, and evaluation of SOCs. Because successful and sustainable implementation of SOCs requires community and system-level change, and SOCs are increasingly being urged to adopt a stronger "public health" orientation (Miles et al. in A public health approach to children's mental health: a conceptual framework, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Washington, DC, 2010), there is great potential for CPs to play important roles in SOCs. This paper discusses opportunities and roles for CPs in SOCs in applied research and evaluation, community practice, and training.

  10. Tobacco Cessation Training in Clinical Psychology and Clinical Social Work Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfelder, JoAnn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the tobacco and smoking cessation training and curriculum in graduate clinical psychology and graduate clinical social work programs. The current status of the clinical graduate programs' tobacco education curricula was evaluated by using the Transtheoretical Model's Stages of Change. Perceived barriers to…

  11. The primary care prescribing psychologist model: medical provider ratings of the safety, impact and utility of prescribing psychology in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S; Harmon, S Cory; Seavey, Brian M; Tiu, Alvin Y

    2012-12-01

    Family medicine providers at a large family medicine clinic were surveyed regarding their impression of the impact, utility and safety of the Primary Care Prescribing Psychologist (PCPP) model in which a prescribing psychologist is embedded in a primary care clinic. This article describes the model and provides indications of its strengths and weaknesses as reported by medical providers who have utilized the model for the past 2 years. A brief history of prescribing psychology and the challenges surrounding granting psychologists the authority to prescribe psychotropic medication is summarized. Results indicate family medicine providers agree that having a prescribing psychologist embedded in the family medicine clinic is helpful to their practice, safe for patients, convenient for providers and for patients, and improves patient care. Potential benefits of integrating prescribing psychology into primary care are considered and directions for future research are discussed.

  12. Multiple regression analyses in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-09-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation, analysis of mediation, assumption violations, outliers, limited dependent variables, and directed regression and its relation to structural equation modeling. Analytic guidelines are provided within each domain.

  13. Reducing Racial Health Care Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Louis A; Blair, Irene V; Albrecht, Terrance L; Dovidio, John F

    2014-10-01

    Large health disparities persist between Black and White Americans. The social psychology of intergroup relations suggests some solutions to health care disparities due to racial bias. Three paths can lead from racial bias to poorer health among Black Americans. First is the already well-documented physical and psychological toll of being a target of persistent discrimination. Second, implicit bias can affect physicians' perceptions and decisions, creating racial disparities in medical treatments, although evidence is mixed. The third path describes a less direct route: Physicians' implicit racial bias negatively affects communication and the patient-provider relationship, resulting in racial disparities in the outcomes of medical interactions. Strong evidence shows that physician implicit bias negatively affects Black patients' reactions to medical interactions, and there is good circumstantial evidence that these reactions affect health outcomes of the interactions. Solutions focused on the physician, the patient, and the health care delivery system; all agree that trying to ignore patients' race or to change physicians' implicit racial attitudes will not be effective and may actually be counterproductive. Instead, solutions can minimize the impact of racial bias on medical decisions and on patient-provider relationships.

  14. Burnout, psychological morbidity and use of coping mechanisms among palliative care practitioners: A multi-centre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Mervyn Yong Hwang; Chong, Poh Heng; Neo, Patricia Soek Hui; Ong, Yew Jin; Yong, Woon Chai; Ong, Wah Ying; Shen, Mira Li Juan; Hum, Allyn Yin Mei

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of burnout, psychological morbidity and the use of coping mechanisms among palliative care practitioners in Singapore have not been studied. We aimed to study the prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among palliative care practitioners in Singapore and its associations with demographic and workplace factors as well as the use of coping mechanisms. This was a multi-centre, cross-sectional study of all the palliative care providers within the public healthcare sector in Singapore. The study was conducted in hospital palliative care services, home hospice and inpatient hospices in Singapore. The participants were doctors, nurses and social workers. The prevalence of burnout among respondents in our study was 91 of 273 (33.3%) and psychological morbidity was 77 (28.2%). Working >60 h per week was significantly associated with burnout (odds ratio: 9.02, 95% confidence interval: 2.3-35.8, p = 0.002) and psychological morbidity (odds ratio: 7.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.8-28.8, p = 0.005). Home hospice care practitioners (41.5%) were more at risk of developing psychological morbidity compared to hospital-based palliative care (17.5%) or hospice inpatient care (26.0%) (p = 0.007). Coping mechanisms like physical well-being, clinical variety, setting boundaries, transcendental (meditation and quiet reflection), passion for one's work, realistic expectations, remembering patients and organisational activities were associated with less burnout. Our results reveal that burnout and psychological morbidity are significant in the palliative care community and demonstrate a need to look at managing long working hours and promoting the use of coping mechanisms to reduce burnout and psychological morbidity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. [Physician and medical psychologist: complementary approaches in providing psychological care to cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkova, V A; Pesterëva, E V

    2014-01-01

    In providing psychological care to an oncological patient a physician and a medical psychologist come from a variety of professional positions that require different approaches and methods. It is proposed a three-phase model of the dynamics of the psychological state of the person in the situation of cancer reflecting the process of psychological adaptation of a particular patient. Focusing on this model, the authors conclude that psychological care to cancer patient, performed by a doctor and a medical psychologist, are different kinds of psychological care that does not replace but complement each other.

  16. Barriers to psychological care among primary caregivers of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Katie A; Manne, Sharon L; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham S; Sands, Stephen A; Myers-Virtue, Shannon; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela

    2016-05-01

    This substudy of an intervention trial aimed to describe barriers to participation in psychological care among primary caregivers of children who were about to undergo a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), including demographic and medical correlates. Three hundred and twelve primary caregivers of children undergoing HSCT who were approached to participate in a psychological intervention trial (n = 218 enrollees and 94 decliners) completed a measure of barriers to psychological care. The most frequently endorsed barriers to care were focusing on the child as priority, not wanting to leave the child's bedside, and already having adequate psychosocial support. The least frequently endorsed barriers were location, wait times, and stigma around seeking psychological care. Results suggest that explaining how psychological care for a primary caregiver can positively affect their ill child may reduce barriers to seeking needed support services. Certain practical barriers to care may be irrelevant in inpatient settings where psychological support is offered.

  17. It's Time to Broaden the Replicability Conversation: Thoughts for and From Clinical Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Patrick, Christopher J; Johnson, Sheri L; Krueger, Robert F; Miller, Joshua D; Oltmanns, Thomas F; Shrout, Patrick E

    2017-09-01

    Psychology is in the early stages of examining a crisis of replicability stemming from several high-profile failures to replicate studies in experimental psychology. This important conversation has largely been focused on social psychology, with some active participation from cognitive psychology. Nevertheless, several other major domains of psychological science-including clinical science-have remained insulated from this discussion. The goals of this article are to (a) examine why clinical psychology and allied fields, such as counseling and school psychology, have not been central participants in the replicability conversation; (b) review concerns and recommendations that are less (or more) applicable to or appropriate for research in clinical psychology and allied fields; and (c) generate take-home messages for scholars and consumers of the literature in clinical psychology and allied fields, as well as reviewers, editors, and colleagues from other areas of psychological science.

  18. Making health care safer: What is the contribution of health psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Charles; Wearden, Alison; French, David P

    2015-11-01

    While health care brings great benefits, all treatments, and many investigations, carry some risk. As patients, we should be told of the risks of specific treatments but we are also at risk from failings in the health care system itself. We suggest that, while there are many examples of individual health psychologists who have made important contributions, this has not yet translated into a broader disciplinary engagement. Health psychologists have devoted much more attention to patients and devoted much less attention to the potentially huge impact of studying and intervening with staff, clinical practice, and organizations. We believe that there are considerable opportunities for health psychology to engage more closely with patient safety and, more importantly, that this would be of great benefit to both patients and staff. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? While health care brings great benefits, all treatments, and many investigations, carry some risk. Patients are also at risk from failings in the health care system itself. Studies using review of medical records in many countries have found that between 8% and 12% of patients in hospital suffer an unintended harm due to health care. What does this study add? There are many examples of individual psychologists who have made important contributions, but this has not yet translated into a broader disciplinary engagement. There are considerable opportunities for health psychology to engage more closely with patient safety. These include health behaviour change, teamwork, communication after medical error, diagnosis and decision making, organisational culture, and improving compliance with rules and standards. Psychologists providing a clinical service to specialist services in any area could expand their remit from supporting patients to a more general support and engagement with safety and quality initiatives. Health psychologists have models to understand the behaviour of people

  19. Machine Learning Approaches for Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Dominic B; Falkai, Peter; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos

    2018-01-29

    Machine learning approaches for clinical psychology and psychiatry explicitly focus on learning statistical functions from multidimensional data sets to make generalizable predictions about individuals. The goal of this review is to provide an accessible understanding of why this approach is important for future practice because of its potential to augment decisions associated with the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of people suffering from mental illness using clinical and biological data. To this end, the limitations of current statistical paradigms in mental health research are critiqued, and an introduction is provided to the critical machine learning methods used in clinical studies. A selective literature review is then presented aiming to reinforce the usefulness of machine learning methods and provide evidence of their potential. In the context of promising initial results, the current limitations of machine learning approaches are addressed, and considerations for future clinical translation are outlined. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Volume 14 is May 7, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  1. The Sensitiveness and Fulfillment of Psychological Needs: Medical, Health Care and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovec-Felser, Zlatka

    2015-09-01

    As health was defined as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely an absence of disease or infirmity, the bio-psychosocial paradigm of health and illness attests that curing occurs when the science of medicine (the biomedical and pathos-physiological aspects of disease) and the art of medicine (the psychological, social, and interpersonal aspects of illness) merge into one unified holistic approach to patient care (Hojat, 2007). In this context the relationship between health care professionals and patients also become an indispensable tool in clinical situations to achieve better patient outcomes (Engel, 1990). In our pilot study in year 2009 we try to verify how are the medical students and students of health care (University of Maribor, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Health Care) prepared for their sensitive professional relationship in their future. Testing together 211 students (N=157 women, N=57 men), we compared the level of emotional empathy, altruistic love, values, and behaviorof 40 medical students, 118 students of health care and the group of 53 students of economics. Because of their professional choice, we expected that the medical and health care students would have higher empathy and altruism scores than the students of economics. Following the self-determination behavioral theory and its concept of autonomy support (Deci, Ryan, 2000), we anticipated also that the fulfilment of basic psychological needs could be important factor in everyday health care clinical practice. As the fulfilment of needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness could lead to increased autonomy supportive orientation in interactions with other subjects, and can be useful factor that prepare doctors or nurses for active participation in relationship with patients, we verified and compared the included groups also in this way.

  2. Collective memory: a perspective from (experimental) clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Ineke; Moulds, Michelle L

    2008-04-01

    This paper considers the concept of collective memory from an experimental clinical psychology perspective. Exploration of the term collective reveals a broad distinction between literatures that view collective memories as a property of groups (collectivistic memory) and those that regard these memories as a property of individuals who are, to a greater or lesser extent, an integral part of their social environment (social memory). First, we argue that the understanding of collectivistic memory phenomena may benefit from drawing parallels with current psychological models such as the self-memory system theory of individualistic autobiographical memory. Second, we suggest that the social memory literature may inform the study of trauma-related disorders. We argue that a factual focus induced by collaborative remembering may be beneficial to natural recovery in the immediate aftermath of trauma, and propose that shared remembering techniques may provide a useful addition to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

  3. Guidelines for clinical supervision in health service psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This document outlines guidelines for supervision of students in health service psychology education and training programs. The goal was to capture optimal performance expectations for psychologists who supervise. It is based on the premises that supervisors (a) strive to achieve competence in the provision of supervision and (b) employ a competency-based, meta-theoretical approach to the supervision process. The Guidelines on Supervision were developed as a resource to inform education and training regarding the implementation of competency-based supervision. The Guidelines on Supervision build on the robust literatures on competency-based education and clinical supervision. They are organized around seven domains: supervisor competence; diversity; relationships; professionalism; assessment/evaluation/feedback; problems of professional competence, and ethical, legal, and regulatory considerations. The Guidelines on Supervision represent the collective effort of a task force convened by the American Psychological Association (APA) Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Clinical psychologists across the years: the division of clinical psychology from 1960 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Karpiak, Christie P; Santoro, Shannon O

    2005-12-01

    For more than 40 years researchers have studied the members of the American Psychological Association's (APA) Division of Clinical Psychology to obtain information about their demographic characteristics, educational experiences, theoretical orientations, employment settings, professional activities, publication histories, and career satisfactions. We summarize the results from the most recent study (N=694, 46% return rate) in the historical context of the previous findings, dating back to 1960. We provide both contemporary and historical portraits of American clinical psychology. Among the most notable trends are a steady increase in female psychologists, a decline in psychological assessment in general and projective testing in particular, the modal eclectic/integrative orientation being rivaled by the cognitive orientation, a pattern of high career satisfaction, and continued enthusiasm for the Boulder model. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol 61: 1467-1483, 2005.

  5. Characteristics of demand and psychological treatments in a university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Labrador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to describe the most common characteristics of patients receiving psychological treatment and the treatments administered. We analyzed a sample of 856 patients at the University Psychology Clinic of the Complutense University of Madrid. Five diagnostic categories accounted for 78.4% of demand: anxiety disorders (31.9%, no diagnosis (15.4%, other problems requiring clinical attention (14.2%, mood disorders (9.5% and adaptive disorders (7.4%. A total of 17.7% presented a comorbid diagnosis and 49.3% had received treatment previously. The mean of assessment and treatment sessions was 3.5 and 12.7, respectively. The most commonly applied techniques included psychoeducation (95.1%, cognitive restructuring (74.8%, relaxation (74.4%, and control of internal dialogue (68.1%.Of the patients that had finished contact with the clinic, 68.3% were a therapeutic success. We discuss the generalization of the results and the implications for the profession and clinical practice.

  6. Psychological and behavioral differences between low back pain populations: a comparative analysis of chiropractic, primary and secondary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Andreas; Bergström, Gunnar; Bodin, Lennart; Axén, Iben

    2015-10-19

    Psychological, behavioral and social factors have long been considered important in the development of persistent pain. Little is known about how chiropractic low back pain (LBP) patients compare to other LBP patients in terms of psychological/behavioral characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, the aim was to investigate patients with LBP as regards to psychosocial/behavioral characteristics by describing a chiropractic primary care population and comparing this sample to three other populations using the MPI-S instrument. Thus, four different samples were compared. A: Four hundred eighty subjects from chiropractic primary care clinics. B: One hundred twenty-eight subjects from a gainfully employed population (sick listed with high risk of developing chronicity). C: Two hundred seventy-three subjects from a secondary care rehabilitation clinic. D: Two hundred thirty-five subjects from secondary care clinics. The Swedish version of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI-S) was used to collect data. Subjects were classified using a cluster analytic strategy into three pre-defined subgroups (named adaptive copers, dysfunctional and interpersonally distressed). The data show statistically significant overall differences across samples for the subgroups based on psychological and behavioral characteristics. The cluster classifications placed (in terms of the proportions of the adaptive copers and dysfunctional subgroups) sample A between B and the two secondary care samples C and D. The chiropractic primary care sample was more affected by pain and worse off with regards to psychological and behavioral characteristics compared to the other primary care sample. Based on our findings from the MPI-S instrument the 4 samples may be considered statistically and clinically different. Sample A comes from an ongoing trial registered at clinical trials.gov; NCT01539863 , February 22, 2012.

  7. DEPATHOLOGIZING AND EMANCIPATING CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY IN THE CONTROVERSY OVER EDUCATIONAL ITINERARIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto López Méndez; Miguel Costa Cabanillas

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a critical analysis of the anatomical-clinical and psychopathological model, claiming epistemological, methodological and technological independence in psychology and professional training for analysis and solution of psychological problems. This perspective should be kept in mind in the current debate on plans of study in Clinical Psychology in and out of the scope of healthcare. A study plan is proposed for a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology for professional prac...

  8. Psychological risk factors of micro- and macrovascular outcomes in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, François; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    for macrovascular disease, its association with microvascular complications remains understudied. The predictive role of other psychological risk factors such as Type D (distressed) personality and the mechanisms that possibly link depression and Type D personality with poor vascular outcomes are also still unclear...... of all-cause or vascular mortality; and (3) the behavioral and physiological mechanisms that may mediate these associations. The DiaDDZoB Study is embedded within the larger DIAZOB Primary Care Diabetes study, which covers a comprehensive cohort of type 2 diabetes patients treated by over 200 primary...... care physicians in South-East Brabant, The Netherlands. These patients will be followed during their lifetime and are assessed annually for demographic, clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial factors. Measurements include an interviewer-administered and self-report questionnaire, regular care laboratory...

  9. Psychological distress in medical patients seeking ED care for somatic reasons: results of a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessler, Lukas; Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review is to investigate (A) currently used instruments for assessing psychological distress, (B) the prevalence of psychological distress in medical emergency department (ED) patients with acute somatic conditions and (C) empirical evidence on how predictors are associated with psychological distress. We conducted an electronic literature search using three databases to identify studies that used validated instruments for detection of psychological distress in adult patients presented to the ED with somatic (non-psychiatric) complaints. From a total of 1688 potential articles, 18 studies were selected for in-depth review. A total of 13 instruments have been applied for assessment of distress including screening questionnaires and briefly structured clinical interviews. Using these instruments, the prevalence of psychological distress detected in medical ED patients was between 4% and 47%. Psychological distress in general and particularly depression and anxiety have been found to be associated with demographic factors (eg, female gender, middle age) and illness-related variables (eg, urgency of triage category). Some studies reported that coexisting psychological distress of medical patients identified in the ED was associated with physical and psychological health status after ED discharge. Importantly, during routine clinical care, only few patients with psychological distress were diagnosed by their treating physicians. There is strong evidence that psychological distress is an important and prevalent cofactor in medically ill patients presenting to the ED with harmful associations with (subjective) health outcomes. To prove causality, future research should investigate whether screening and lowering psychological distress with specific interventions would result in better patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Palliative Care Providers' Practices Surrounding Psychological Distress Screening and Treatment: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Eghan, Claude; Moran, Sheila; Herr, Keela; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how inpatient palliative care teams nationwide currently screen for and treat psychological distress. A web-based survey was sent to inpatient palliative care providers of all disciplines nationwide asking about their practice patterns regarding psychological assessment and treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and responses, and analysis of variance was conducted to determine whether certain disciplines were more likely to utilize specific treatment modalities. A total of N = 236 respondents were included in the final analyses. Providers reported that they encounter psychological distress regularly in their practice and that they screen for distress using multiple methods. When psychological distress is detected, providers reported referring patients to an average of 3 different providers (standard deviation = 1.46), most frequently a social worker (69.6%) or chaplain (65.3%) on the palliative care team. A total of 84.6% of physicians and 54.5% of nurse practitioners reported that they prescribe anxiolytics or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to patients experiencing psychological distress. This study revealed significant variability and redundancy in how palliative care teams currently manage psychological distress. The lack of consistency potentially stems from the variability in the composition of palliative care teams across care settings and the lack of scientific evidence for best practices in psychological care in palliative care. Future research is needed to establish best practices in the screening and treatment of psychological distress for patients receiving palliative care.

  11. Correlates of psychological care strategies for people with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2(™) ) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R I G; Nicolucci, A; Kovacs Burns, K; Lucisano, G; Skovlund, S E; Forbes, A; Kalra, S; Menéndez Torre, E; Munro, N; Peyrot, M

    2016-09-01

    To assess the ways in which healthcare professionals address psychological problems of adults with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2(™) ) study. Approximately 120 primary care physicians, 80 diabetes specialists and 80 nurses and dietitians providing diabetes care participated in each of 17 countries (N=4785). Multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate independent statistically significant associations of respondent attributes concerning psychological care strategies, including assessment of diabetes impact on the patient's life, assessment of depression, provision of psychological assessment and support, and coordination with mental health professionals. Psychological care strategies were positively associated with each other but differed by healthcare practice site and discipline; nurses and dietitians were less likely to assess depression than other healthcare professionals, while primary care physicians were less likely to coordinate with mental health specialists or ask patients how diabetes affects their lives. Psychological care was positively associated with healthcare professionals' beliefs that patients need help dealing with emotional issues and that clinical success depends on doing so, and also with level of psychological care training, multidisciplinary team membership and availability of resources for psychological care. There were significant between-country variations in psychological care strategies, before and after adjustment for individual-level factors, and significant country-by-covariate interactions for almost all individual-level factors investigated. Improvements in training and resources, recognition and assessment of psychological problems, and increased belief in the efficacy of psychological support may enhance healthcare professionals' efforts to address psychological problems in adults with diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  12. Problems and opportunity of personality inventories in clinical - psychological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Benedik

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with possibilities and problems of usage of personality inventories in psychological diagnostic of persons with "heavy pathology", from aspect of validity and applicability in the first place. Personality inventories are usually designed for health population. By their usage in clinical psychology we often meet problems like specific tendencies when answering defined questions. This could be the result of situational factors but also the impact of their disorders and personality. The possibilities of classical interpretation of results are in this way limited. Do we have the opportunity of development of the diagnostic instruments that we could, not only recognise, but use such deformations (which represent cognitive style or defence of person in diagnostic purpose? The MMPI-2, most famous inventory in this field, offer us great aid, especially because its items are selected empirically. By the analysis of its items from aspect of sensing and localisation of subjects problems, we found differences between clinical scales which represent patients of different clinical groups. These differences are in accordance with psychoanalytical assumptions about characteristics of sensing self and other people.

  13. Integrated care programs for patients with psychological comorbidity : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Molema, C.C. M.; Versnel, Nathalie; Baan, C.A.; de Bruin, Simone R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Presently, little is known about the characteristics and impact of integrated care programs for patients with psychological comorbidity. The aim was to provide an overview of these integrated care programs and their effectiveness. Methods Systematic literature review including papers

  14. Palliative Care Gaps in Providing Psychological Treatment: A Review of the Current State of Research in Multidisciplinary Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Niknejad, Bahar; Reid, M C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with advanced illness often have high rates of psychological symptoms. Many multicomponent palliative care intervention studies have investigated the efficacy of overall symptom reduction; however, little research has focused explicitly on how interventions address psychological symptoms associated with serious illness. The current study reviewed 59 multicomponent palliative care intervention articles and analyzed the mental health components of palliative care interventions and their outcomes in order to better understand the current state of psychological care in palliative care. The majority of articles (69.5%) did not provide any details regarding the psychological component delivered as part of the palliative care intervention. Most (54.2%) studies did not specify which provider on the team was responsible for providing the psychological intervention. Studies varied regarding the type of outcome measure utilized; multi-symptom assessment scales were used in 54.2% of studies, mental health scales were employed in 25.4%, quality of life and distress scales were used in 16.9%, and no psychological scales were reported in 28.8%. Fewer than half the studies (42.4%) documented a change in a psychological outcome. The majority of analyzed studies failed to describe how psychological symptoms were identified and treated, which discipline on the team provided the treatment, and whether psychological symptoms improved as a result of the intervention. Future research evaluating the effects of palliative care interventions on psychological symptoms will benefit from using reliable and valid psychological outcome measures and providing specificity regarding the psychological components of the intervention and who provides it.

  15. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY – ACTUAL DIRECTION IN GROUNDING OF HEALTH MANPOWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Kucherov

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In 90-ies years of last century in our country happened the crash of the system of values with transition to the standards of capitalistic society, and it lead to the formation of chronicle psychosocial stress of high and medium levels. Medics of all directions started to face functional psychosomatic diseases. Raised the necessity in grounding of health manpower in discipline of clinical psychology, with the learning of psychophisiological bases of diseases and possibilities if their correction. This direction of development of soviet medical education and health service in general seems progressive and prospective.

  16. Resilient Systemics to Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Reliably expanding our clinical practice and lowering our overhead with telepsychiatry, telepsychology, distance counseling and online therapy, requires resilient and antifragile system and tools. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include more reliable treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The wise and proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding social results. We present, as an example, the main steps to achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support, devoted to psychiatry and psychology application. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  17. Cognitive hypnotherapy for psychological management of depression in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2017-11-27

    The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in palliative care is well documented, yet they often remain undetected and untreated, adding further to the burden of suffering on patients who are already facing severe physical and psychosocial problems. This article will focus on depression as it represents one of the most common psychiatric disorders treated by psychiatrists and psychotherapists in palliative care. Although depression in palliative care can be treated successfully with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy, a significant number of depressives do not respond to either medication or existing psychotherapies. This is not surprising considering depression is a complex disorder. Moreover, the presentation of depression in palliative care is compounded by the severity of the underlying medical conditions. It is thus important for clinicians to continue to develop more effective treatments for depression in palliative care. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy (CH), an evidence-based multimodal treatment for depression which can be applied to a wide range of depressed patients in palliative care. CH, however, does not represent a finished product; it is a work in progress to be empirically validated and refined by advances in cancer and clinical depression.

  18. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  19. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  20. Clinical caring science as a scientific discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Arman, Maria; Lindström, Unni Å

    2017-09-01

    Clinical caring science will be described from a theory of science perspective. The aim of this theoretical article to give a comprehensive overview of clinical caring science as a human science-based discipline grounded in a theory of science argumentation. Clinical caring science seeks idiographic or specific variations of the ontology, concepts and theories, formulated by caring science. The rationale is the insight that the research questions do not change when they are addressed in different contexts. The academic subject contains a concept order with ethos concepts, core and basic concepts and practice concepts that unites systematic caring science with clinical caring science. In accordance with a hermeneutic tradition, the idea of the caring act is based on the degree to which the theory base is hermeneutically appropriated by the caregiver. The better the ethos, essential concepts and theories are understood, the better the caring act can be understood. In order to understand the concept order related to clinical caring science, an example is given from an ongoing project in a disaster context. The concept order is an appropriate way of making sense of the essence of clinical caring science. The idea of the concept order is that concepts on all levels need to be united with each other. A research project in clinical caring science can start anywhere on the concept order, either in ethos, core concepts, basic concepts, practice concepts or in concrete clinical phenomena, as long as no parts are locked out of the concept order as an entity. If, for example, research on patient participation as a phenomenon is not related to core and basic concepts, there is a risqué that the research becomes meaningless. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Introduction to the special section on clinical adolescent psychology: developmental psychopathology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmbeck, Grayson N; Kendall, Philip C

    2002-02-01

    This article addresses implications of the interface between developmental psychology and clinical psychology for research on adolescence and describes the importance of considering developmental level when designing treatments for adolescent patients. In addition, the articles that constitute the special section, "Clinical Adolescent Psychology: Developmental Psychopathology and Treatment," are introduced.

  2. Mentor Relationships in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard A.; Harden, Sherry L.; Johnson, W. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Provides a contemporary picture of mentor relationships in clinical psychology, focusing on 787 survey respondents who were U.S. members or associates of the American Psychological Association and graduated with a PhD or PsyD in clinical psychology in 1994, 1995, or 1996. Presents the results and discusses implications for graduate education. (CMK)

  3. Psychological treatment of anxiety in primary care: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seekles, W.M.; Cuijpers, P.; Kok, R.N.; Beekman, A.T.F.; van Marwijk, H.W.; van Straten, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Guidelines and mental healthcare models suggest the use of psychological treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care but systematic estimates of the effect sizes in primary care settings are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of psychological therapies in

  4. Interprofessional Practice and Education in Health Care: Their Relevance to School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margison, Judith A.; Shore, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Calls for increased collaborative practices in school psychology parallel similar advances in the realm of health care. This article overviews the concepts associated with collaborative practice in school psychology and in health care (e.g., interaction, teamwork, and collaboration) and discusses how the literature emerging from interprofessional…

  5. [Clinical and psychological disorders of pregnant women induced by abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diquelou, J-Y; Amar, P; Boyer, S; Montilla, F; Karoubi, R

    2008-06-01

    This study is performed on a population of pregnant women during the second trimester of their pregnancy. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that clinical symptoms noticeable by the obstétricians during their consultations. Eight hundred and fifty-three patients have been involved in this study by responding to an anonymous questionnary. Hundred and seventy-five patients(groupI) have been abuse either physically or psychologically or sexually. The study shows that there is a strong difference between the groupI and the group without abuse in their medical past history (678 patients) about the occurracy of several disorders. The most frequently observed troubles are sexuals disorders, school failures, deficients relationship with others persons, anxiety and troubles of humor. We can concluded, about those clinical manifestations, that they do exist during pregnancy and probably thoses symptoms are linked to traumatism occured during their past history. Obstetricians must look after thoses symptoms very seriously to propose a good management of the pregnancy either about their psychological problems or about the social environnement in which they live.

  6. Understanding the influence of psychological and socioeconomic factors on diabetes self-care using structured equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Egede, Leonard E

    2015-01-01

    To develop and test latent variables of the social determinants of health that influence diabetes self-care. 615 adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) identified the latent factors underlying socioeconomic determinants, psychosocial determinants, and self-care (diet, exercise, foot care, glucose testing, and medication adherence). Structured equation modeling (SEM) investigated the relationship between determinants and self-care. Latent variables were created for diabetes self-care, psychological distress, self-efficacy, social support and social status. The initial model (chi2(254) = 388.04, p psychological distress (r = -0.13, p = 0.019), higher social support (r = 0.15, p = 0.008), and higher self-efficacy (r = 0.47, p care. Social status was not significantly related to self-care (r = 0.003, p = 0.952). In the trimmed model (chi2(189) = 211.40, p = 0.126, RMSEA = 0.01, CFI = 0.99) lower psychological distress (r = -0.13, p = 0.016), higher social support (r = 0.15, p = 0.007), and higher self-efficacy (r = 0.47, p care. Based on theoretical relationships, three latent factors that measure social determinants of health (psychological distress, social support and self-efficacy) are strongly associated with diabetes self-care. This suggests that social determinants should be taken into account when developing patient self-care goals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of recent graduates of clinical versus counseling psychology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, C; Johnson, M E

    1997-01-01

    Recent graduates from clinical (N = 65) and counseling (N = 64) psychology programs were surveyed to assess similarities and differences of aspects of their programs and job-related activity. Results revealed only minor differences. Counseling psychologists were more likely to provide group therapy, career counseling and assessment, public lectures and workshops, to have more knowledge of the Strong Interest Inventory, to be more likely to work in university counseling centers, and to endorse humanistic theoretical orientations. Clinical psychologists were more likely to work in medical school settings, to ascribe human behavior to internal states rather than to social causes, and to have greater knowledge of the Rorschach. However, the similarities between the two specialities relative to work setting, theoretical orientation, service, research, and teaching activities, far outweighed these minor differences. Implications of these findings are placed in the context of previous research that has suggested the possible merger of the two specialities.

  8. [Psychology and sexology are essential, from diagnosis to comprehensive care of endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, A; Azaïs, H; Garabedian, C; Bregegere, S; Rubod, C; Collier, F

    2016-06-01

    Endometriosis, defined by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, is a common but often under diagnosed pathology. The clinical manifestations are varied (chronic pelvic pain, urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms) and can sometimes be very frustrated, delaying the diagnosis. This delay in diagnosis can be a high source of stress responsible for an important psychological impact in these patients, having a sense of misunderstanding and neglect of the medical profession. This climate of stress and anxiety can cause alteration of behavior including sexual disorders. In addition, endometriosis can be revealed as part of an infertility evaluation, and the patient and the couple can already be affected by this situation. The clinical and psychological impact of endometriosis inevitably leads to an impairment of patient's quality of life and sexuality. The objective of this article is to show the psychological consequences of endometriosis and its impact on sexuality, in order to highlight this essential aspect for a comprehensive care of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Co-morbidity of depression, anxiety and fatigue in cancer patients receiving psychological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Ranchor, Adelita V; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Almansa, Josué; Sanderman, Robbert; Schroevers, Maya J

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to examine (1) subgroups of cancer patients with distinct co-morbidity patterns of depression, anxiety and fatigue; (2) how individuals transitioned between these patterns; and (3) whether socio-demographic, clinical and psychological care characteristics distinguished patients' transitions. This naturalistic, longitudinal study focused on 241 cancer patients receiving psycho-oncological care in the Netherlands. Data were collected before initiation of psychological care (T1), 3 months (T2), and 9 months thereafter (T3). Latent transition analysis was performed examining research questions. Three distinct co-morbidity patterns were identified: class 1 ('mood disturbances and fatigue'), class 2 ('mood disturbances') and class 3 ('few symptoms of mood disturbances and fatigue'). Half of those in class 1 remained in this group from T1 to T3, a quarter transitioned to class 2 and another quarter to class 3. Baseline physical symptoms distinguished these transitions: those with more physical symptoms tended to remain stable. Half of patients in class 2 remained stable from T1 to T3, 46% moved into class 3 and 8% into class 1. Baseline physical symptoms and years after cancer diagnosis significantly distinguished these transitions: the 8% moving to class 1 had more physical symptoms and were longer after cancer diagnosis. Most patients in class 3 remained stable from T1 to T3, and predictors of transitions could not be examined. Three distinct co-morbidity patterns of depression, anxiety and fatigue were identified and exhibited different symptom courses longitudinally. Those with poor physical health tended to report elevated mood disturbances and fatigue during psychological care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  11. Exploring Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students' Attitudes towards Adults with Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundon, Chandra R.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether clinical psychology doctoral students hold uniquely stigmatizing views of adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) compared to adults with other clinical disorders. Through the use of clinical vignettes and attitudinal measures, three hypotheses investigated clinical psychology doctoral students' attitudes…

  12. Reconciling the professional and student identities of clinical psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L

    2013-10-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between qualified and unqualified staff, with the aim of adding to the literature on which factors influence the development of professional identity in health professionals. An online questionnaire depicting a range of potentially unprofessional behaviours was completed by 265 clinical psychology trainees and 106 qualified clinical psychologists. The data were analysed using a general linear model with simultaneous entry in which rater (trainee vs qualified clinical psychologist), setting (student vs placement) and their interaction predicted acceptability ratings. We found that, in general, trainees and qualified staff agreed on those behaviours that were potentially unprofessional, although where significant differences were found, these were due to trainees rating the same behaviours as more professionally acceptable than qualified clinical psychologists. Despite trainees identifying a range of behaviours as professionally unacceptable, some percentage reported having engaged in a similar behaviour in the past. Irrespective of the status of the rater, the same behaviours tended to be viewed as more professionally unacceptable when in a placement (clinical) setting than in a student (university) setting. Generally, no support was found for a rater by setting interaction. The study suggests that trainee clinical psychologists are generally successful at identifying professional norms, although they do not always act in accordance with these. Conflicting student and professional norms may result in trainees viewing some potentially unprofessional behaviour as less severe than qualified staff. Health professional educators should be aware

  13. Spiritual care as a response to an exaptation: how evolutionary psychology informs the debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevern, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This article has its origins in a 2013 proposal by the author that the concept of 'spiritual care' in clinical settings might fruitfully be grounded in the findings of the Cognitive Science of Religion (CSR). In a recent paper, John Paley rejects the central arguments and asserts his conviction that a model for 'spiritual care' cannot be derived from the insights of evolutionary psychology. In this article, the author employs a modified form of Fichtean dialectic to examine the contrasting positions and, via a process of analysis and synthesis, identify the key areas for further exploration and research. He concludes, first, that CSR in itself does not provide a sufficient theoretical justification for the notion and practice of 'spiritual care'; secondly, that any attempt to develop a general theory of spiritual care would need to pay closer attention to the role of historically situated religious communities; and finally, that these objections nevertheless do not amount to an argument against the attempt to provide spiritual care as part of person-centred care. Instead, a revised model is proposed which has the potential to provide testable predictions in this field. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exploration of clinical nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Fen; Lin, Lih-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Florence Nightingale emphasized the need for nurses to honor the psychological and spiritual aspects of patients to promote patients' health. Whereas study of a public hospital in Singapore presented similar findings, few studies have explored clinical nurses' perceptions of spirituality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of specific nurse demographic characteristics in predicting perception differences with regard to spirituality and spiritual care. The Chinese version of the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale was developed using a translate and back-translate process, achieving a content validity index of .98. This study used a cross-sectional descriptive survey with 350 clinical nurses as the study sample. Three hundred forty-nine valid questionnaires were returned (response rate, 99.71%). The institutional review board of the hospital approved this study. Most participants were women, ranging in age from 23 to 64 years. Participants' clinical experience ranged from less than 1 year to 40 years, with a mean experience value of 13.42 years. Participants were distributed among all clinical specialties. Slightly less than half (41.83%) professed no religious belief, and most were not involved in religious activities (55.01%, n = 192). A little over half (53.58%, n = 187) had received spiritual care lessons during nurse training, and more than half (58.74%, n = 205) had received spiritual care continuous education after graduation. This survey found perception of spirituality positively related to holding a master's degree, 11 to 19 years of clinical experience, specialty in palliative nursing, and having received spiritual care lessons during nursing training or continuing education. Clinical nurses who held a master's degree or received spiritual care lessons during continuing education had higher levels of spiritual care perception. This study found education to have a positive impact on participants' perception of spirituality and

  15. Nephrology pre-dialysis care affects the psychological adjustment, not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Masahide; Kawazu, Minami; Takeda, Kazuhito; Kurachi, Emiko; Nakashima, Takafumi; Sagara, Rikako; Hara, Takashi; Mukai, Hideyuki; Miura, Shuhei; Sugawara, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that pre-dialysis care is associated with clinical outcomes. However, little has been reported on the influence of pre-dialysis care on the psychological adjustment to dialysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-dialysis care on psychological adjustment to dialysis and clinical characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 52 patients who started hemodialysis at our hospital. They were divided into two groups according to the time of referral to our hospital: the early referral group (over 1 year prior to first dialysis: 19 patients, mean age 69.3 ± 11.1) and the late referral group (within 1 year prior to first dialysis: 33 patients, mean age 72.3 ± 8.9). We measured the clinical characteristics and evaluated the psychological adjustment to dialysis by Shontz's stage theory. Compared with the late referral group, the early referral group had a significantly better clinical characteristics concerning blood pressure (140.2 ± 23.7 vs. 156.9 ± 23.3 mmHg, P = 0.0150), hemoglobin (10.3 ± 1.5 vs. 9.4 ± 1.0 g/dL, P = 0.0078), and phosphorus (4.5 ± 1.5 vs. 5.5 ± 1.3 mg/dL, P = 0.0166). In addition, psychological adjustment to dialysis evaluated by Shontz's stage theory was significantly better in the early referral group (P = 0.017). Our results indicate that nephrology pre-dialysis care affects not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control but also the psychological adjustment to dialysis. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Psychological evaluation of patients in critical care/intensive care unit and patients admitted in wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma B, Gaurav; Evs, Maben; Ms, Kotian; B, Ganaraja

    2014-12-01

    Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire. To assess and compare the depression, anxiety and stress Scores from the patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those admitted to ward. Eighty patients admitted to hospital, 40 from ICU and 40 admitted to ward were recruited. They were explained the procedure and after taking an informed consent, they were administered Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) Questionnaire, which contains 42-item questionnaire which includes three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress. The responses were computed and tabulated. We analysed the responses with Student's t-test and Chi-square test, ppsychological wellbeing of the patients, including the hospital environment, care givers, presence of family members nearby apart from the seriousness of illness, apprehensions about possibility of death. Such studies were rare among Indian patients. The findings of this study could be useful in incorporating suitable psychological help to the patients in hospitals to improve their recovery and wellbeing.

  17. Psychological Intervention in Primary Care After Earthquakes in Lorca, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Julio C; Garriga, Ascensión; Egea, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    After the earthquakes that occurred in Lorca, Spain, on May 11, 2011, the regional mental health management employed 2 clinical psychologists for 6 months to provide care to people referred by primary care physicians. The objective was to address the expected increased demand for treatment of mental disorders, notably posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and adjustment disorders. Referred individuals were evaluated and treated according to a clinical protocol designed ad hoc from June 12, 2011, to November 30, 2011. The protocol provided a stepped intervention guided by clinical and psychometric assessment using "normalization" for those with no psychiatric diagnosis, brief group treatment for mild to moderate PTSD or adjustment disorders, individual treatment for more severe PTSD, and referral to the local mental health center for other mental health disorders. Standard adult and child scales to assess posttraumatic, depression, and anxiety symptoms and resilience were used at initial assessment to guide treatment allocation and repeated to assess outcome status. Psychologists also provided a clinical assessment of symptom resolution at the end of the study. Rates of symptom resolution and improvements on all scales (PTSD, depression, anxiety, and resilience) demonstrated clinically and statistically significant improvement in all treatment groups (P = .000). Dropout was low. Medications were prescribed frequently to adults; no child received medication as a result of the earthquakes. No case of mental disorder related to the earthquakes was referred to the local mental health center during the 6 months of psychologist intervention. The structured intervention resulted in a high resolution of cases and low dropout, allowing treatment of a larger number of people with optimal frequency (weekly), devoting more time to the most severe cases and less to those moderately or mildly affected.

  18. Embodied Conversational Agents in Clinical Psychology: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provoost, Simon; Lau, Ho Ming; Ruwaard, Jeroen; Riper, Heleen

    2017-05-09

    Embodied conversational agents (ECAs) are computer-generated characters that simulate key properties of human face-to-face conversation, such as verbal and nonverbal behavior. In Internet-based eHealth interventions, ECAs may be used for the delivery of automated human support factors. We aim to provide an overview of the technological and clinical possibilities, as well as the evidence base for ECA applications in clinical psychology, to inform health professionals about the activity in this field of research. Given the large variety of applied methodologies, types of applications, and scientific disciplines involved in ECA research, we conducted a systematic scoping review. Scoping reviews aim to map key concepts and types of evidence underlying an area of research, and answer less-specific questions than traditional systematic reviews. Systematic searches for ECA applications in the treatment of mood, anxiety, psychotic, autism spectrum, and substance use disorders were conducted in databases in the fields of psychology and computer science, as well as in interdisciplinary databases. Studies were included if they conveyed primary research findings on an ECA application that targeted one of the disorders. We mapped each study's background information, how the different disorders were addressed, how ECAs and users could interact with one another, methodological aspects, and the study's aims and outcomes. This study included N=54 publications (N=49 studies). More than half of the studies (n=26) focused on autism treatment, and ECAs were used most often for social skills training (n=23). Applications ranged from simple reinforcement of social behaviors through emotional expressions to sophisticated multimodal conversational systems. Most applications (n=43) were still in the development and piloting phase, that is, not yet ready for routine practice evaluation or application. Few studies conducted controlled research into clinical effects of ECAs, such as a

  19. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  20. Quality of life in adults with asthma treated in allergy and pneumology subspecialties: relationship with sociodemographic, clinical and psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Freire, Beatriz; Vázquez, Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies suggest that specialist care associates with improved health-related quality of life (HRQL) in asthmatic patients. However, there are limited studies focused on differences in HRQL among subspecialties. The aim of this study was to assess the differences in HRQL between adult asthmatic patients treated in pneumology or allergy practices, and to estimate to what extent the differences in HRQL can be explained by sociodemographic, clinical or psychological characteristics of patients from each specialty. We recruited adult asthmatic outpatients from allergy and pneumology practices. Information on sociodemographic, clinical and psychological characteristics was collected, and HRQL was assessed with generic and disease-specific questionnaires. HRQL was compared between groups adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical and psychological characteristics. A total of 287 asthmatic patients participated in the study (105 from pneumology and 182 from allergy). Patients treated by pneumologists reported significantly poorer HRQL in physical dimensions of generic questionnaire and all dimensions of disease-specific questionnaire. Pneumology patients were older (p sociodemographic, clinical and psychological characteristics. Asthmatic patients treated by pneumologists reported poorer HRQL than patients treated by allergists, but this outcome is attributed to differences in several sociodemographic, clinical and psychological characteristics between the two groups of patients.

  1. Familicide from a clinical-community psychology perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Pretorius-Heuchert

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article familicide and homicide-suicide acts in South Africa and elsewhere are discussed. Issues that are considered include the following: the definition of familicide, the incidence of cases, population groups involved, the role of suicide, the role of psychopathology, familial versus nonfamilial murderers, the influence of stress, male proprietariness in combination with an exaggerated sense of responsibility, age and gender, and sociopolitical influences. A n attempt is made to integrate the personal and societal factors of familicide from a clinical-community psychology perspective, relying specifically on the theories of Frantz Fanon and Hussein Bulhan. It is proposed that an understanding of the oppressor-oppressed relationship, as well as threats to that relationship, may shed light on the current high rate of familicide that occurs mostly among white Afrikaner, South African males, and their families.

  2. Clinical leadership in health care: a position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Lynne J; Bryan, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to briefly review leadership within the contemporary UK National Health Services (NHS) including Department of Health and Royal College of Nursing (RCN) initiatives. It is argued that the concept of clinical leadership is a viable and important one, and is theoretically consistent with the contemporary social psychological literature on the importance of "local" leadership to effective organizational functioning. Field theory proposes that local influences (e.g. local management) on attitudes and behaviour will to a large extent mediate the impact of the organization (e.g. organisational structure and values) on (in this instance) health care delivery. The reality of clinical leadership must involve a judicious blend effective management in the conventional sense with skill in transformational change in order to make real difference to the care delivery process. For leadership initiatives to become truly culturally embedded into the "way we do things around here", they require more than just individual training and development. A view is offered for the practical interpretation of the clinical leadership concept in relationship terms. This will involve management of the relationship between health care professionals, between health care professionals and the "organizations" to which they are accountable and between health care professionals and service users.

  3. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  4. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Batal, Holly A; Majeres, Sharon; Adams, Jill C; Dale, Rita; Mehler, Philip S

    2009-12-04

    Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC) within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to the potential increase in urgent care volume in a universal

  5. Feasibility of Post-Intensive Care Unit Clinics: an observational cohort study of two different approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, D. S.; de Graaff, A. E.; Nollet, F.; van der Schaaf, M.

    2015-01-01

    Post-ICU clinics have been advocated to reduce long-term physical and psychological impairments among ICU survivors. A format for optimal structure, timing, and care content has not yet been established. We developed and implemented two post-ICU clinics in different hospital settings and evaluated

  6. Benefit finding trajectories in cancer patients receiving psychological care: Predictors and relations to depressive and anxiety symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Ranchor, Adelita V; Helgeson, Vicki S; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E; Sanderman, Robbert; Schroevers, Maya J

    2017-11-15

    (BF) after trauma, with some experiencing enhanced BF and others decreased BF. Empirical studies have identified subgroups of cancer patients with distinct BF trajectories. What does this study add? This is the first study showing that cancer patients followed different BF trajectories during psychological care. Only a small proportion experienced clinically meaningful increases in BF over time. More attention is needed for cancer patients with decreased BF, as they are at a higher risk of remaining depressed. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  8. University Clinics as Field Placements in School Psychology Training: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Benson, A. Jerry

    Although many school psychology programs use university-based clinics as field placements for school psychology students, there is little information in the literature on how these clinics are organized, administered, and funded or on the nature, duration, and sequencing of clinic field experiences. A national telephone survey of 71 directors of…

  9. Of Course: Prerequisite Courses for Admission into APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.; Stratigis, Katerina Y.; Zimmerman, Barrett E.

    2014-01-01

    Students often inquire about which psychology courses to complete in preparation for graduate school. This study provides data that enable students and their advisors to make research-informed decisions. We surveyed the directors of the 304 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology (97%…

  10. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the behavioral and psychological assessment of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) in clinical practice. Following a brief introduction regarding definition and etiology of CSA and discussion on issues of behavioral/psychological consequences of CSA, the paper reviews the various approaches towards behavioral/psychological assessment in…

  11. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  12. Professional Seminar in Clinical Psychology Taught from a Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ben

    1979-01-01

    Describes a ten week college level psychology seminar designed to help students take a more active role in their professional and scientific development. The first five weeks consist of tracing the historical developments in psychology; the second half focuses on contemporary topics in professional psychology. (KC)

  13. The Effects of Creating Psychological Ownership on Physicians' Acceptance of Clinical Information Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guy Paré; Claude Sicotte; Hélène Jacques

    2006-01-01

      OBJECTIVE: Motivated by the need to push further our understanding of physicians' acceptance of clinical information systems, we propose a relatively new construct, namely, psychological ownership...

  14. Health psychology and health care interventions in sub-Saharan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... patients. The role of behaviour and lifestyle in the causation of cancer and hypertension has been studied extensively and can be used to illustrate how health psychology interventions could be applied to control these diseases. Health psychology interventions could close the widening communication gap.

  15. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-12-15

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient's adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient's psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM.

  16. Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention for Patients with Chronic Pain in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-García, Francisco J; González-Ortega, María Del Carmen; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Moreno-Borrego, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    According to evidence from recent decades, multicomponent programs of psychological intervention in people with chronic pain have reached the highest levels of efficacy. However, there are still many questions left to answer since efficacy has mainly been shown among upper-middle class patients in English-speaking countries and in controlled studies, with expert professionals guiding the intervention and with a limited number of domains of painful experience evaluated. For this study, a program of multicomponent psychological intervention was implemented: (a) based on techniques with empirical evidence, but developed in Spain; (b) at a public primary care center; (c) among patients with limited financial resources and lower education; (d) by a novice psychologist; and (e) evaluating all domains of painful experience using the instruments recommended by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT). The aim of this study was to evaluate this program. We selected a consecutive sample of 40 patients treated for chronic non-cancer pain at a primary care center in Utrera (Seville, Spain), adults who were not in any employment dispute, not suffering from psychopathology, and not receiving psychological treatment. The patients participated in 10 psychological intervention sessions, one per week, in groups of 13-14 people, which addressed psychoeducation for pain; breathing and relaxation; attention management; cognitive restructuring; problem-solving; emotional management; social skills; life values and goal setting; time organization and behavioral activation; physical exercise promotion; postural and sleep hygiene; and relapse prevention. In addition to the initial assessment, measures were taken after the intervention and at a 6-month follow-up. We assessed the program throughout the process: before, during and after the implementation. Results were analyzed statistically (significance and effect size) and from a clinical

  17. Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention for Patients with Chronic Pain in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-García, Francisco J.; González-Ortega, María del Carmen; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Moreno-Borrego, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    According to evidence from recent decades, multicomponent programs of psychological intervention in people with chronic pain have reached the highest levels of efficacy. However, there are still many questions left to answer since efficacy has mainly been shown among upper-middle class patients in English-speaking countries and in controlled studies, with expert professionals guiding the intervention and with a limited number of domains of painful experience evaluated. For this study, a program of multicomponent psychological intervention was implemented: (a) based on techniques with empirical evidence, but developed in Spain; (b) at a public primary care center; (c) among patients with limited financial resources and lower education; (d) by a novice psychologist; and (e) evaluating all domains of painful experience using the instruments recommended by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT). The aim of this study was to evaluate this program. We selected a consecutive sample of 40 patients treated for chronic non-cancer pain at a primary care center in Utrera (Seville, Spain), adults who were not in any employment dispute, not suffering from psychopathology, and not receiving psychological treatment. The patients participated in 10 psychological intervention sessions, one per week, in groups of 13–14 people, which addressed psychoeducation for pain; breathing and relaxation; attention management; cognitive restructuring; problem-solving; emotional management; social skills; life values and goal setting; time organization and behavioral activation; physical exercise promotion; postural and sleep hygiene; and relapse prevention. In addition to the initial assessment, measures were taken after the intervention and at a 6-month follow-up. We assessed the program throughout the process: before, during and after the implementation. Results were analyzed statistically (significance and effect size) and from a clinical

  18. Illness, body and relationship: Giovanni Jervis and the field of clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Unlike most of his contemporaries, Jervis felt it was necessary to give new answers to last century's clinical psychology crisis. He managed to show the relevance that psychological knowledge coming from other sectors (such as philosophy, evolutionary biology, cybernetics, ethology and, nowadays, neuroscience) could have for clinical psychology. He realized that the clinical world was at risk of loosing its cultural models of reference and threatened to break up with the scientific tradition with which it had not been able to establish a profitable dialogue. Jervis' views on mental functioning allowed him to delimit the field of action of clinical psychology. The focus on pathology and existential distress suggested that correct clinical evaluation and diagnosis are at the core of the activity of clinical psychologists. The tension between relational expectations, self-deceptive aspects of identity and the bodily sources of mental life show the dynamic field on which clinical psychology can deploy its transformative action.

  19. From imagination to virtual reality: the future of clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, F

    1999-01-01

    The possible role of virtual reality (VR) in clinical psychology derives prevalently from the central role occupied by the imagination and by memory in psychotherapy. These two elements, which are fundamental in the life of everyone, present absolute and relative limits to individual potential. Thanks to virtual experiences, it is possible to transcend these limits. The re-created world may be more vivid and real at times than the one that most subjects are able to describe through their own imagination and through their own memory. This article focuses on imaginative techniques to find new ways of applications in therapy. In particular, the way VR can be used to improve the efficacy of current techniques is explored. VR produces a change with respect to the traditional relationship between client and therapist. The new configuration of this relationship is based on the awareness of being more skilled in the difficult operations of recovery of past experiences through the memory and of foreseeing future experiences through the imagination. At the same time, subjects undergoing treatment perceive the advantage of being able to recreate and use a real experiential world within the confines of their therapists's clinical offices.

  20. Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in a Psychology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador, Francisco J; Estupiñá, Francisco J; Bernaldo-de-Quirós, Mónica; Fernández-Arias, Ignacio; Alonso, Pablo; Ballesteros, Francisco; Blanco, Carmen; Gómez, Laura

    2015-10-30

    People with anxiety disorders demand psychological attention most often. Therefore, it seems important to identify both the characteristics of the patients who demand help and the clinical variables related to that demand and its treatment. A cohort of 292 patients who requested help at a university clinical facility was studied. The typical profile of the patient was: being female, young, unmarried, with some college education, and having previously received treatment, especially pharmacological one. The three most frequent diagnoses of anxiety, which include 50% of the cases, were: Anxiety Disorder not otherwise specified, Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia. Regarding the characteristics of the intervention, the average duration of the assessment was 3.5 sessions (SD = 1.2), and the duration of the treatment was 14 sessions (SD = 11.2). The percentage of discharges was 70.2%. The average cost of treatment was around €840. The results are discussed, underlining the value of empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders.

  1. Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Compliance and Clinical Significance in the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgaard, Eric C.; Fowler, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In 2005, the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology" ("JCCP") became the first American Psychological Association (APA) journal to require statistical measures of clinical significance, plus effect sizes (ESs) and associated confidence intervals (CIs), for primary outcomes (La Greca, 2005). As this represents the single largest…

  2. Pilot testing a model of psychological care for heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Aaron; Sheridan, Judith; Maddicks-Law, Joanne; Fulbrook, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are common after heart transplantation. This study aimed to pilot test the feasibility of a clinical model of psychological care for heart transplant recipients. The model of care involved nurse-led screening for anxiety and depression followed by referral for a course of telephone-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy as well as co-ordination of communication with on-going specialist and primary care services. A pilot randomised controlled trial was conducted. Heart transplant recipients who self-reported at least mild anxiety or depressive symptoms were randomised (defined as a score higher than 5 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 or the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7], or a score higher than 20 on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale [K10]). The primary outcome was assessment of feasibility of conducting a larger trial, which included identification of recruitment and attrition rates as well as the acceptability of the intervention. Follow-up was conducted at 9 weeks and 6 months. One hundred twenty-two of the 126 (97 %) heart transplant recipients assessed on their attendance at the outpatient clinic met the study eligibility criteria. Of these patients, 88 (72 %) agreed to participate. A moderate proportion of participants (n = 20; 23 %) reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety or depression. Five participants were excluded because they were currently receiving psychological counselling, two withdrew before randomisation and the remaining 13 were randomised (seven to intervention and six to usual care). The majority of the randomised participants were male (n = 9; 69 %) and aged over 60 (range 35-73). Median length of time post-transplant was 9.5 years (ranging from 1 to 19 years). On enrolment, 3 randomised participants were taking anti-depressants. One intervention group participant withdrew and a further 3 (50 %) declined the telephone-delivered CBT sessions; all because of restrictions associated

  3. Creating healing intensive care unit environments: physical and psychological considerations in designing critical care areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazuin, Doug; Cardon, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    A number of elements contribute to a healing ICU environment. The layout of a critical care unit helps create an environment that supports caregiving, which helps alleviate a host of work-related stresses. A quieter environment, one that includes family and friends, dotted with windows and natural light, creates a space that makes people feel balanced and reassured. A healing environment responds to the needs of all the people within a critical care unit-those who receive or give care and those who support patients and staff. Critical care units should be designed to focus on healing the body, the mind, and the senses. The design and policies of that department can be created in such a way to provide a sense of calm and balance. The physical environment has an impact on patient outcomes; the psychological environment can, too. A healing ICU environment will balance both. The authors discuss the ways in which architecture, interior design, and behavior contribute to a healing ICU environment.

  4. Measuring psychological outcomes following pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization: psychometric analysis of the Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, Janet E; Johnston, C Celeste; Lambert, Sylvie D; Rashotte, Judy M; Schmitz, Norbert; Earle, Rebecca J; Stevens, Bonnie J; Tewfik, Ted; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2011-11-01

    Critically ill children are at risk for psychological sequelae following pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization. This article reports on the psychometric testing of the first self-report measure of psychological distress for 6-12-yr-old children post-pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization: The Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale. This 23-item scale takes approximately 15 mins for children to complete. Psychometric testing based on Classic Test Theory and guidelines for health measurement scale development. The pediatric intensive care units of four Canadian pediatric hospitals and the ear, nose, and throat clinic of one participating hospital. A total of 172 children (pediatric intensive care unit group, n = 84; ear, nose, and throat group, n = 88) aged 6-12 yrs and their parents. None. We assessed the factor structure, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale and conducted contrasted group comparisons and convergent and concurrent validation testing. Fit indices and internal consistency were best for a three-factor solution, suggesting three dimensions of psychological distress: 1) worries about getting sick again, 2) feeling things have changed, and 3) feeling anxious and fearful about hospitalization. As expected, Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale scores were positively correlated with child anxiety and medical fear scores. The ear, nose, and throat group scores were higher than expected. Higher Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale scores in older children may reflect a better understanding of the situation and its complexity and meaning, and younger children's tendency to provide more positive self-evaluation. The Children's Critical Illness Impact Scale is a promising new self-report measure of psychological distress with demonstrated reliability and validation testing in 6-12-yr-old children post-pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization. This new measure has potential

  5. Psychological functioning in adolescents referred to specialist gender identity clinics across Europe: a clinical comparison study between four clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Nastasja M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Carmichael, Polly; de Vries, Annelou L C; Dhondt, Karlien; Laridaen, Jolien; Pauli, Dagmar; Ball, Juliane; Steensma, Thomas D

    2017-12-18

    Adolescents seeking professional help with their gender identity development often present with psychological difficulties. Existing literature on psychological functioning of gender diverse young people is limited and mostly bound to national chart reviews. This study examined the prevalence of psychological functioning and peer relationship problems in adolescents across four European specialist gender services (The Netherlands, Belgium, the UK, and Switzerland), using the Child Behavioural Checklist (CBCL) and the Youth Self-Report (YSR). Differences in psychological functioning and peer relationships were found in gender diverse adolescents across Europe. Overall, emotional and behavioural problems and peer relationship problems were most prevalent in adolescents from the UK, followed by Switzerland and Belgium. The least behavioural and emotional problems and peer relationship problems were reported by adolescents from The Netherlands. Across the four clinics, a similar pattern of gender differences was found. Birth-assigned girls showed more behavioural problems and externalising problems in the clinical range, as reported by their parents. According to self-report, internalising problems in the clinical range were more prevalent in adolescent birth-assigned boys. More research is needed to gain a better understanding of the difference in clinical presentations in gender diverse adolescents and to investigate what contextual factors that may contribute to this.

  6. Psychological treatment of anxiety in primary care: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekles, W; Cuijpers, P; Kok, R; Beekman, A; van Marwijk, H; van Straten, A

    2013-02-01

    Guidelines and mental healthcare models suggest the use of psychological treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care but systematic estimates of the effect sizes in primary care settings are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of psychological therapies in primary care for anxiety disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO and Pubmed databases were searched in July 2010. Manuscripts describing psychological treatment for anxiety disorders/increased level of anxiety symptoms in primary care were included if the research design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and if the psychological treatment was compared with a control group. In total, 1343 abstracts were identified. Of these, 12 manuscripts described an RCT comparing psychological treatment for anxiety with a control group in primary care. The pooled standardized effect size (12 comparisons) for reduced symptoms of anxiety at post-intervention was d = 0.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.84, p = 0.00, the number needed to treat (NNT) = 3.18]. Heterogeneity was significant among the studies (I 2 = 58.55, Q = 26.54, p psychological treatment of anxiety disorders in primary care. Several aspects of the treatment are related to effect size. More studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effects given the chronicity and recurrent nature of anxiety.

  7. Toward Improved Statistical Reporting in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Fiona; Cumming, Geoff; Thomason, Neil; Pannuzzo, Dominique; Smith, Julian; Fyffe, Penny; Edmonds, Holly; Harrington, Claire; Schmitt, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Philip Kendall's (1997) editorial encouraged authors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) to report effect sizes and clinical significance. The present authors assessed the influence of that editorial--and other American Psychological Association initiatives to improve statistical practices--by examining 239 JCCP articles…

  8. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  9. Evaluation of psychology practitioner competence in clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Craig J; Crowe, Trevor P

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing consensus favouring the development, advancement, and implementation of a competency-based approach for psychology training and supervision. There is wide recognition that skills, attitude-values, and relationship competencies are as critical to a psychologist's competence as are knowledge capabilities, and that these key competencies are best measured during placements, leaving the clinical supervisor in an unparalleled position of advantage to provide formative and summative evaluations on the supervisee's progression towards competence. Paradoxically, a compelling body of literature from across disciplines indicates that supervisor ratings of broad domains of competence are systematically compromised by biases, including leniency error and halo effect. The current paper highlights key issues affecting summative competency evaluations by supervisors: what competencies should be evaluated, who should conduct the evaluation, how (tools) and when evaluations should be conducted, and process variables that affect evaluation. The article concludes by providing research recommendations to underpin and promote future progress and by offering practice recommendations to facilitate a more credible and meaningful evaluation of competence and competencies.

  10. Dyadic psychological intervention for patients with cancer and caregivers in home-based specialized palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Heymann-Horan, Annika B.; Puggaard, Louise B.; Nissen, Kathrine G.

    2017-01-01

    and psychological interventions offered according to need. Its main limitation was a lack of an intervention for other family members. Significance of Results:: Our results show that psychological intervention can be systematically integrated into SPC and that it appears feasible to provide dyadic needs......Objective:: Patients with incurable cancer and their informal caregivers have numerous psychological and psychosocial needs. Many of these patients wish to receive their care and die at home. Few home-based specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions systematically integrate psychological...... support. We present a psychological intervention for patient–caregiver dyads developed for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) of home-based SPC, known as Domus, as well as the results of an assessment of its acceptability and feasibility. Method:: The Domus model of SPC for patients...

  11. Distinguishing Mediational Models and Analyses in Clinical Psychology: Atemporal Associations Do Not Imply Causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, E Samuel; Cervone, Daniel; Bryant, Jessica; McKinney, Cliff; Liu, Richard T; Nadorff, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    A popular way to attempt to discern causality in clinical psychology is through mediation analysis. However, mediation analysis is sometimes applied to research questions in clinical psychology when inferring causality is impossible. This practice may soon increase with new, readily available, and easy-to-use statistical advances. Thus, we here provide a heuristic to remind clinical psychological scientists of the assumptions of mediation analyses. We describe recent statistical advances and unpack assumptions of causality in mediation, underscoring the importance of time in understanding mediational hypotheses and analyses in clinical psychology. Example analyses demonstrate that statistical mediation can occur despite theoretical mediation being improbable. We propose a delineation of mediational effects derived from cross-sectional designs into the terms temporal and atemporal associations to emphasize time in conceptualizing process models in clinical psychology. The general implications for mediational hypotheses and the temporal frameworks from within which they may be drawn are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Psychological distress and intensive care unit stay after cardiac surgery: The role of illness concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lydia; Kidd, Tara; Leigh, Elizabeth; Ronaldson, Amy; Jahangiri, Marjan; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between psychological factors and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We studied 212 adults undergoing CABG surgery preoperatively to assess depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and illness perceptions and then followed them up during the in-hospital stay to measure length of ICU stay. Greater preoperative concern about the illness (B = .200, 95% CI [.094, .305], p = < .001), but not depression or anxiety symptoms, was significantly related to longer ICU stays after controlling for demographic, clinical, and behavioral covariates. Illness concern may be particularly relevant for CABG recovery, though more work is needed to delineate the exact mechanisms of this effect. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Clinical care management and workflow by episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, P L; Carpenter, P C; Chute, C G; Mohr, D N; Gibbons, P S

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of clinically defined episodes of care and the introduction of an episode-based summary list of patient problems across Mayo Clinic Rochester in 1996 and 1997. Although Mayo's traditional paper-based system has always relied on a type of 'episode of care' (called the "registration") for patient and history management, a new, more clinically relevant definition of episode of care was put into practice in November 1996. This was done to improve care management and operational processes and to provide a basic construct for the electronic medical record. Also since November 1996, a computer-generated summary list of patient problems, the "Master Sheet Summary Report," organized by episode, has been placed in all patient histories. In the third quarter of 1997, the ability to view the episode-based problem summary online was made available to the 3000+ EMR-capable workstations deployed across the Mayo Rochester campus. In addition, the clinically oriented problem summarization process produces an improved basic "package" of clinical information expected to lead to improved analytic decision support, outcomes analysis and epidemiological research.

  14. [Person centered clinical care: principles and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzich, Juan Enrique; Perales, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The development of person-centered clinical care is inscribed within an international programmatic movement towards a medicine focused on the totality of the person. This movement, with broad historical bases, has been maturing since 2008 through conferences among global health institutions, research projects and academic publications. This paper is aimed at elucidating the conceptual principles of person-centered medicine (PCM) and to delineate strategies for the practical application of such principles in clinical care services. The above objectives have been approached through literature reviews, international consultations, and reflections on the patterns and indications obtained. The principles identified for person-centered medicine are the following: Ethical commitment, holistic framework, cultural awareness and responsiveness, communication and relational focus, individualized clinical care, common ground among clinicians, patient and family for joint diagnostic understanding and shared decision making, person- and community-centered organization of integrated services, and person-centered medical education and research. Additionally, pertinent strategies have been delineated for the implementation of such principles in clinical care. The authors conclude that the presented principles and strategies are consistent with suggestions offered in the literature and may serve as bases for the design of indices and scales. Their continuous refinement is proposed through future international and local studies. to clarify the key concepts of the movement as well as strategies for their practical clinical application.

  15. The HIV-positive patient in intensive care--psychological profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciuc, Carmen; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela; Roşu, F; Astărăstoae, V; Largu, Maria Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to outline the profile of HIV-positive patients in intensive care, in terms of psycho-emotional and vital parameters. We evaluated the HIV-positive patients that required intensive care (IC), from January 2011 to December 2013, in the HIV/AIDS Regional of the "Sf. Parascheva" Infectious Diseases Clinical Hospital Iaşi. From January 2011 to December 2013, the HIV/AIDS Regional Centre in Iaşi recorded 2649 hospitalizations, of which 0.67% (18 cases) required intensive medical care. Of these 10 were males and 8 females, aged between 24 and 65 years with a median of 24 years. There were 29 deaths (1.09% of all hospitalizations), 11 of which in intensive therapy (38% of all deaths)--7 men and 4 women. CD4 counts in persons requiring IC care were between 1 and 112/mm3, and most naive patients who died were late-presenters. The main diseases diagnosed were pulmonary tuberculosis and pneumocystosis, the main cause of death being multiple organ failure. The duration of hospitalization ranged between 4.5 and 30 days. Treatment success rate was correlated with the CD4 and biological status: liver and renal failure, respiratory failure, meningeal coma, hypoproteinemia, diselectrolitemia. From a psychological perspective, patients that arrived in the intensive care showed a history of non-compliance and non-adherence, a personality structure often marked by a lack of respect for them, indifference or ignorance regarding the factors that generate well-being. HIV-positive patients in the position of requiring intensive care showed a marked immunological collapse due to abandonment of therapy or late detection.

  16. The structure of mental health research: networks of influence among psychiatry and clinical psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, N; Lusher, D

    2011-12-01

    Psychiatry and clinical psychology are the two dominant disciplines in mental health research, but the structure of scientific influence and information flow within and between them has never been mapped. Citations among 96 of the highest impact psychiatry and clinical psychology journals were examined, based on 10 052 articles published in 2008. Network analysis explored patterns of influence between journal clusters. Psychiatry journals tended to have greater influence than clinical psychology journals, and their influence was asymmetrical: clinical psychology journals cited psychiatry journals at a much higher rate than the reverse. Eight journal clusters were found, most dominated by a single discipline. Their citation network revealed an influential central cluster of 'core psychiatry' journals that had close affinities with a 'psychopharmacology' cluster. A group of 'core clinical psychology' journals was linked to a 'behavior therapy' cluster but both were subordinate to psychiatry journals. Clinical psychology journals were less integrated than psychiatry journals, and 'health psychology/behavioral medicine' and 'neuropsychology' clusters were relatively peripheral to the network. Scientific publication in the mental health field is largely organized along disciplinary lines, and is to some degree hierarchical, with clinical psychology journals tending to be structurally subordinate to psychiatry journals.

  17. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... tuberculosis/HIV treatment integration in the East Europe group (27% versus 84% p

  18. Clinical hypnosis, mindfulness and spirituality in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, Consuelo

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I do not intend to present the many and well-known treatments for relieving pain and distress symptoms of the physical body, damaged by terminal diseases, such as cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis. In this article, I'd rather focus my attention on clinical hypnosis for subjects who, freed from physical pain, thanks to palliative care, are open to receiving comfort and support for their psychological and spiritual suffering. The intent of this article is to express how clinical hypnosis can harmoniously integrate psychological and spiritual aspects so that the terminal patient can make peace with his/her past, with the people who have hurt him/her, and with the people who will suffer because of his/her death. This article will present some hypnotic suggestions inspired by universal wisdom of the Stoics, by positive psychology of Mindfulness, by laws of nature regarding changes, differences and mysteries. The basic assumption of the suggestions presented is that, if disease is an enemy to fight, death is an inevitable part of life: it cannot be avoided, or postponed or exchanged with anybody. It arrives when we have finished living. When death is preceded by an incurable disease, palliative care can offer a mantle of compassion and acceptance of what cannot be avoided. The words palliative comes from the Latin pallium-mantle. This article also presents some suggestions I have utilized several times with my patients. These suggestions have demonstrated their efficacy in alleviating patients' suffering in coping with their disease and in facing death.

  19. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  20. A history of clinical psychology as a profession in America (and a glimpse at its future).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Ludy T

    2005-01-01

    Clinical psychology emerged as a profession in the United States in the 1890s with studies conducted by psychologists with patients in the mental asylums of that time, and with the founding of Witmer's psychological clinic, where he treated children with learning and behavioral problems. This chapter traces the history of clinical psychology as a profession, from the focus on assessment at the turn of the twentieth century to the provision of psychotherapy that would come to dominate the field after World War II. It concludes with a discussion of some of the contemporary concerns in the profession and how those might impact the future practice of clinical psychologists.

  1. [Psychological experience of health care professionals in intensive care unit: a qualitative and exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahraoui, K; Bioy, A; Cras, E; Gilles, F; Laurent, A; Valache, B; Quenot, J-P

    2011-04-01

    Study the subjective and emotional experience of health care professionals in intensive care unit in front of sources of professional stress connected to the emergency and to the gravity of the pathologies of hospitalized patients. A clinical interview was proposed to health care professionals of an intensive care unit during which they had to develop their personal feeling about the organization of the work and their management of the most stressful emotional situations. All interviews were entirely recorded and rewritten. Then, they were the object of a procedure of coding and a thematic analysis was detailed with the consensus of several individuals. Eighteen professionals agreed to participate in this research. The analysis of these clinical interviews showed a strong feeling of pressure in works as being mainly focused on the necessity of control the procedures and the technical means involved in intensive care unit and in the strong emotional load due to deaths of patients and to the pain of families. The management of the death and its conditions appears as a major and central difficulty. The discussion approaches the question of the feeling of pressure at works and its various items by underlining the interpersonal variations of these experiences, then the question of the emotional adaptation through the individual and collective defensive strategies organized to cope with these various situations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  3. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yuelian Sun,1 Hans Gregersen,2 Wei Yuan3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2GIOME, Department of Surgery, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 3Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide

  4. CNE article: moral distress and psychological empowerment in critical care nurses caring for adults at end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Annette M

    2013-03-01

    Critical care nurses providing care for adults at the end of life may encounter moral distress when they cannot do what they believe is ethically correct. Psychological empowerment can decrease moral distress among critical care nurses. To describe the relationships between moral distress, psychological empowerment, and demographics in critical care nurses caring for patients at the end of life. A total of 277 critical care nurses were surveyed via the Moral Distress Scale and the Psychological Empowerment Instrument. Responses were scored on a Likert scale of 1 to 7. Moral distress intensity was high (mean 5.34, SD 1.32) and positively correlated with age (r = 0.179, P = .01). Moral distress frequency was moderate (mean 2.51, SD 0.87) and negatively correlated with nurses' collaboration in end-of-life patient care conferences (r = -0.191, P = .007). Psychological empowerment scores (mean 5.31, SD 1.00) were high and positively correlated with age (r = 0.139, P = .03), years of experience (r = 0.165, P = .01), collaboration in end-of-life-care conferences (r = 0.163, P = .01), and end-of-life-care education (r = 0.221, P = .001) and were negatively correlated with moral distress frequency (r = -0.194, P = .01). Multiple regression analysis revealed that empowerment was a significant predictor of moral distress frequency (â = .222, P psychological empowerment and frequency of moral distress in these nurses indicated that nurses with higher perceived empowerment experience moral distress less often. This finding is of particular interest as interventions to decrease moral distress are sought.

  5. The effectiveness of psychological interventions on self-care, psychological and health outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure-A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Shorey, Shefaly; Seah, Betsy; Chan, Wanxian; Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wang, Wenru

    2017-08-19

    To review the evidence to determine the effects of psychological interventions on self-care and psychological and health outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We evaluated the effectiveness of randomized controlled trials using psychological methods or theory on self-care behaviors, anxiety and depression levels, HRQoL, and physical function. Studies published in English, from January 2006 to December 2016, were considered. We searched published and unpublished studies in the following electronic databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Risk of bias was assessed using a standard procedure based on the Cochrane Collaboration tool described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. A total of 29 articles, consisting of 25 studies with 3837 participants, were included in this systematic review. Findings showed that despite heterogeneity between studies, psychological interventions tend to improve self-care in CHF patients without clinical depression and cognitive impairment. Pooled results also revealed that the intervention effect on short-term HRQoL, as measured by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), was in favor of the intervention group (combined MD -7.53, 95% CI -12.83 to -2.23); however, such effect disappeared as the length of time from the intervention increased. The intervention effects on the participants' anxiety level, as measured by HADS, and physical function, as measured by 6MWT, were not statistically significant. Efforts aimed at promoting self-care were the cornerstone of HF disease management. Nurses play an important role in patient education and secondary prevention. Compared to other professionals, nurses have more patient contact opportunities and are more holistic in all aspects of disease management; therefore, more nurses can be trained to incorporate the brief psychological techniques (such

  6. Psychological treatment of depression in primary care: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; van Straten, A.; van Schaik, D.J.F.; Andersson, G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although most depressive disorders are treated in primary care and several studies have examined the effects of psychological treatment in primary care, hardly any meta-analytic research has been conducted in which the results of these studies are integrated. Aim: To integrate the

  7. Psychological treatment of depression in primary care: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Straten, van A.; Schaik, van D.J.F.; Andersson, G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Background Although most depressive disorders are treated in primary care and several studies have examined the effects of psychological treatment in primary care, hardly any meta-analytic research has been conducted in which the results of these studies are integrated. Aim To integrate

  8. Psychological Care in Nursing Education and Practice: A Search for Definition and Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Helena M.

    1999-01-01

    A literature review and analysis of nursing textbooks found little agreement on definition and dimensions of psychological care in nursing. Most texts stress the importance of patients' need for information and education, with less agreement about emotional care, counseling, assessment, and support. (SK)

  9. Do psychological and behavioral factors classified by the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (Swedish version) predict the early clinical course of low back pain in patients receiving chiropractic care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund, Erik A; Bergstrom, G.; Bodin, L.

    2016-01-01

    chiropractic care for recurrent and persistent LBP were collected at the 1st visit. A follow-up questionnaire was administered at the 4th visit. The predictive value of the MPI-S subgroups Adaptive Copers (AC), Interpersonally Distressed (ID) and Dysfunctional (DYS) was calculated against the subjective...

  10. Twenty years of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings: we hope you will enjoy the show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H; Tovian, Steven M; Sweet, Jerry J

    2014-03-01

    The 20th anniversary of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings is celebrated by highlighting the scientist-practitioner philosophy on which it was founded. The goal of the Journal-to provide an outlet for evidence-based approaches to healthcare that underscore the important scientific and clinical contributions of psychology in medical settings-is discussed. The contemporary relevance of this approach is related to the current implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care and its focus on accountability and the development of an interprofessional healthcare workforce; both of which have been foci of the Journal throughout its history and will continue to be so into the future. Several recommendations of future topic areas for the Journal to highlight regarding scientific, practice, policy, and education and training in professional health service psychology are offered. Successfully addressing these topics will support the growth of the field of psychology in the ever evolving healthcare system of the future and continue ensure that the Journal is a key source of professional information in health service psychology.

  11. Patient neglect in 21st century health-care institutions: a community health psychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Tom W; Gillespie, Alex; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological and organisational advances of 21st century health-care systems, care scandals and burgeoning complaints from patients have raised concerns about patient neglect in hospitals. This article reviews the concept of patient neglect and the role of community health psychology in understanding its occurrence. Patient neglect has previously been conceptualised as a problem associated with hospital staff attitudes and behaviours, with regulation and training cited as solutions. Yet, a community health psychology perspective shows that the wider symbolic, material and relational aspects of care are crucial for understanding why patient neglect occurs and for outlining new solutions to augment existing interventions.

  12. Clinical Reasoning in School Psychology: From Assessment to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jac J. W.; Syeda, Maisha M.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists typically conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessments, provide prevention and intervention services, and consult and collaborate with allied professionals (e.g., teachers, physicians, psychiatrists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and nurses) and parents toward better understanding and…

  13. Practicing what we know: Multicultural counseling competence among clinical psychology trainees and experienced multicultural psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Radhika; Saules, Karen; Young, Amy; Grey, Melissa J; Gillem, Angela R; Nabors, Nina A; Byrd, Michelle R; Jefferson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural (MC) competence is considered a necessary skill for clinical and counseling psychologists; however, there is little to no research on the assessment of demonstrated multicultural counseling competence (DMCCC) of clinical psychology graduate students. In this study, we developed a MC assessment instrument to assess DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students compared with MC-experienced psychologists. In addition, we assessed for differences between the endorsement of MC-appropriate strategies and actual use of these strategies in clinical practice, both by MC-experienced psychologists and clinical psychology students. Results revealed significant differences between the DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students and MC-experienced psychologists. Significant differences also emerged between endorsement of strategies as multiculturally appropriate and likelihood of actual use of these strategies. Findings suggest that future training and competence models should incorporate participants' ability to not only identify multiculturally appropriate strategies but also use these strategies in therapy.

  14. Ethical clinical practice and sport psychology: when two worlds collide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey L; Cogan, Karen D

    2006-01-01

    From their own practices, the authors offer insight into potential ethical dilemmas that may frequently develop in an applied psychology setting in which sport psychology is also being practiced. Specific ethical situations offered for the reader's consideration include confidentiality with coaches, administration, parents, and athlete-clients; accountability in ethical billing practices and accurate diagnosing; identification of ethical boundaries in nontraditional practice settings (locker room, field, rink, etc.); and establishment of professional competence as it relates to professional practice and marketing.

  15. Interreality in the Management of Psychological Stress: a Clinical Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Riva, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The term “psychological stress” describes a situation in which a subject perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. According to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the best validated approach covering both stress management and stress treatment is the Cognitive Behavioral (CBT) approach. We aim to design, develop and test an advanced ICT based solution for the assessment and treatment of psychological stress that is able to improve the actual CB...

  16. Differences in caregivers' psychological distress and associated factors by care recipients' gender and kinship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Noboru; Horiguchi, Kazuko

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we examined the level of psychological distress of Japanese caregivers according to various combinations of the gender of care recipients and the kinship of caregivers (spouse, son, daughter, or daughter-in-law). Furthermore, we explored the associated factors that could exacerbate or alleviate psychological distress. We utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design and implemented a self-administered questionnaire survey with a two-stage stratified sample of community-dwelling caregivers of frail elderly persons throughout Japan. We surveyed 1279 caregiving families, and 1020 questionnaires were completed by primary caregivers (response rate: 79.8%), with 945 respondents providing data on the Japanese version of the Kessler 6 psychological distress scale (K6). Caregivers' K6 scores varied significantly by care recipients' gender and their relationship with the caregiver. K6 scores were significantly higher among daughters-in-law caring for fathers-in-law than among daughters-in-law caring for mothers-in-law, wives caring for husbands, or daughters or sons caring for mothers. 'Negative influence of caregiving' and 'anxious about continuing caregiving' were factors that commonly exacerbated caregivers' psychological distress. Further analyses involving interactions indicated that the effects of 'anxious about continuing caregiving' and 'personal growth through caregiving' on the psychological distress of daughters-in-law varied by care recipients' gender as did the effects of an alleviating factor, 'keeping their own pace', on daughters. Psychological distress levels among family caregivers, as well as exacerbating and alleviating factors, varied depending on the gender and kinship of care recipients.

  17. Psychological Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Dionne; Denollet, Johan; Widdershoven, Jos; Kupper, Nina

    2016-05-01

    Psychological distress has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (HF), which is assumed to be partly due to poor HF self-care behavior. This systematic review and meta-analysis describes the current evidence concerning psychological determinants of self-care in patients with chronic HF. Eligible studies were systematically identified by searching electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Web of Science) for relevant literature (1980-October 17, 2014). Study quality was assessed according to the level of risk of bias. Quantitative data were pooled using random-effects models. Sixty-five studies were identified for inclusion that varied considerably with respect to sample and study characteristics. Risk of bias was high in the reviewed studies and most problematic with regard to selection bias (67%). Depression (r = -0.19, p care. Anxiety was not significantly associated with either self-reported (r = -0.18, p = .24) or objective self-care (r = -0.04, p = .79), neither was depression associated with objectively measured medication adherence (r = -0.05, p = .44). Psychological factors (depression, self-efficacy, and mental well-being) were associated with specific self-care facets in patients with chronic HF. These associations were predominantly observed with self-reported indices of self-care and not objective indices. Methodological heterogeneity and limitations preclude definite conclusions about the association between psychological factors and self-care and should be addressed in future research.

  18. [Patients, physicians and nursing personnel in intensive care units: Psychological and psychotherapeutic interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraner, V; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2016-03-01

    During intensive care treatment patients suffer from various forms of stress. Certain psychological and psychotherapeutic interventions (e. g. cognitive behavior therapy, hypnotherapy and psychoeducation) can provide relief. Even patients with a severely reduced ability to communicate can benefit from an early psychological intervention as supportive treatment. The aim of these interventions is to reduce psychological impairments and burdens, provide strategies for coping with physical handicaps or necessary treatment and avoid long-term negative psychological impacts. Organizational and institutional constraints as well as emotional stress are a specific challenge for intensive care personnel. In order to guarantee an efficient collaboration within an interdisciplinary team it is vital to follow clearly defined methods of communication exchange, such as daily ward rounds, regular multidisciplinary meetings and team or case-focused supervision. Properly functioning teamwork increases job satisfaction and is the key to an optimal therapy for the patients.

  19. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  20. Health insurance status, psychological processes, and older African Americans’ use of preventive care

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, Catherine W; Wickrama, K. A. S; Ralston, Penny A; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Harris, Cynthia M; Coccia, Catherine; Young-Clark, Iris; Lemacks, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the influence of health insurance, psychological processes (i.e. psychological competency and vulnerability), and the interaction of these two constructs on older African Americans’ utilization of five preventive care services (e.g. cholesterol screening and mammogram/prostate examination) using data from 211 older African Americans (median age = 60). In addition to direct effects, the influence of health insurance sometimes varied depending on respondents’ psychological competency and/or vulnerability. Policies and interventions to increase older African Americans’ use of preventive health services should consider structural (e.g. health insurance) and psychological (e.g. psychological competency and vulnerability) factors along with the interaction between these factors. PMID:23456216

  1. Psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia in primary care: course and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsje, Petra; Hems, Marleen A P; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Bor, Hans; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2016-08-01

    The course of psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia has been investigated in longitudinal studies with conflicting outcomes. We investigated the course and determinants of psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia in primary care. In this prospective observational cohort study, data were collected at baseline, after 9 and 18 months. We assessed cognition and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of the patient (Mini-Mental State Examination and Neuropsychiatric Inventory) and psychological distress (Sense of Competence Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and General Health Questionnaire 12-tem version) of the informal caregivers. Determinants for the course of psychological distress were caregivers' age, gender and relationship with the patient, patients' cognition and NPS, participation in a care program and admission to long-term care facilities (LTCF). With linear mixed models, the course over time for psychological distress and its determinants were explored. We included 117 informal caregivers, of whom 23.1% had a high risk for depression and 41.0% were identified to be likely to have mental problems at baseline. We found a stable pattern of psychological distress over time. Higher frequency of NPS, informal caregivers' age between 50 and 70 years and being female or spouse were associated with higher psychological distress. For patients who were admitted to a LTCF during the study psychological distress of the informal caregivers improved. GPs should focus on NPS in patients with dementia and on caregivers' psychological distress and be aware of their risk for depression and mental problems, specifically to those who are spouse, female or between 50 and 70 years of age. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Culturally Sensitive Health Care and Counseling Psychology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Keith C.; Tucker, Carolyn M.; Ferdinand, Lisa A.; Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Hasan, Nadia T.; Beato, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the Major Contribution, which focuses on counseling psychologists' roles in addressing health disparities through culturally sensitive health care research and interventions. First, the authors provide a rationale for conducting research focused on culturally sensitive health care and then offer definitions of…

  3. Integrated care programs for patients with psychological comorbidity: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Lidwien C; Molema, Claudia C M; Versnel, Nathalie; Baan, Caroline A; de Bruin, Simone R

    2015-12-01

    Presently, little is known about the characteristics and impact of integrated care programs for patients with psychological comorbidity. The aim was to provide an overview of these integrated care programs and their effectiveness. Systematic literature review including papers published between 1995 and 2014. An integrated care program had to consist of interventions related to at least two out of the six components of the Chronic Care Model. Programs had to address patients with psychological comorbidity, which is a psychological disease next to a somatic chronic disease. A meta-analysis was performed on depression treatment response and a best evidence synthesis was performed on other outcomes. Ten programs were identified, which mostly addressed comorbid depression and consisted of interventions related to three to five components of the Chronic Care Model. Meta-analysis showed significantly higher odds for depression treatment response for patients receiving integrated care (OR: 2.49, 95%CI [1.66-3.75]). Best evidence synthesis suggested moderate evidence for cost-effectiveness and for a beneficial effect on patient satisfaction and emotional well-being. Insufficient evidence was found for a beneficial effect on health-related quality of life, medication adherence, Hb1Ac levels and mortality. There are few studies evaluating integrated care programs for patients with psychological comorbidity. Although these studies suggest that integrated care programs could positively affect several patient outcomes and could be cost-effective, additional studies are recommended to further assess the value of integrated care for this patient group. This is especially important since the number of people with psychological comorbidity is rising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multicultural Grand Rounds: Competency-Based Training Model for Clinical Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Shana D.; Warholic, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing students to enter the field of psychology as competent professionals requires that multicultural practices be infused into all areas of training. This article describes how the Grand Rounds model was adapted to a graduate clinical psychology training program to foster applied learning in multicultural competence. This extension of Grand…

  5. Multicultural Training of Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students: Ideals vs. Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bryana F. C.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA), which is the advocating body for the field of psychology, emphasizes the importance of multicultural competencies for researchers and clinicians (APA, 2003; 2010). Graduate students are the field's future professionals. The multicultural training of doctoral level clinical and counseling…

  6. Lack of political diversity and the framing of findings in personality and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2015-01-01

    I extend the arguments of Duarte et al. by examining the implications of political uniformity for the framing of findings in personality and clinical psychology. I argue that the one-sided framing of psychological research on political ideology has limited our understanding of the personality correlates of liberalism and conservatism.

  7. Music therapy to promote psychological and physiological relaxation in palliative care patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Koenig, Julian; Wormit, Alexander F; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in different palliative care settings. Despite its long tradition and high acceptance by other health-care professionals, evidence on the effectiveness of music therapy interventions for terminally ill patients is rare. Recent reviews and health-care reports consistently point out the need of music therapists to provide an evidence-based rationale for their clinical treatments in this field. Therefore, the present study evaluates the psychological and physiological response of palliative care patients to a standardized music therapy relaxation intervention in a randomized controlled trial. A sample of 84 participants from a palliative care unit in Heidelberg is randomized to either two sessions of music therapy or two sessions of a verbal relaxation exercise, each lasting 30 minutes. The music therapy sessions consist of live played monochord music and a vocal improvisation, the control group uses a prerecorded excerpt from the mindfulness-based stress reduction program containing no musical elements. Outcome measures include self-report data on subjective relaxation, well-being, pain intensity, and quality of life, as well as continuous recording of heart rate variability and blood volume pulse as indicators of autonomous nervous system functioning. To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial in Europe and one of very few randomized controlled trials worldwide to systematically examine the effects of music therapy in palliative care. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137.

  8. Detecting acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity in critically ill patients: validation of the intensive care psychological assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Dorothy M; Hankins, Matthew; Smyth, Deborah A; Rhone, Elijah E; Mythen, Michael G; Howell, David C J; Weinman, John A

    2014-09-24

    The psychological impact of critical illness on a patient can be severe, and frequently results in acute distress as well as psychological morbidity after leaving hospital. A UK guideline states that patients should be assessed in critical care units, both for acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity; but no suitable method for carrying out this assessment exists. The Intensive care psychological assessment tool (IPAT) was developed as a simple, quick screening tool to be used routinely to detect acute distress, and the risk of future psychological morbidity, in critical care units. A validation study of IPAT was conducted in the critical care unit of a London hospital. Once un-sedated, orientated and alert, critical care patients were assessed with the IPAT and validated tools for distress, to determine the IPAT's concurrent validity. Fifty six patients took IPAT again to establish test-retest reliability. Finally, patients completed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety questionnaires at three months, to determine predictive validity of the IPAT. One hundred and sixty six patients completed the IPAT, and 106 completed follow-up questionnaires at 3 months. Scale analysis showed IPAT was a reliable 10-item measure of critical care-related psychological distress. Test-retest reliability was good (r =0.8). There was good concurrent validity with measures of anxiety and depression (r =0.7, P psychological morbidity was good (r =0.4, P psychological morbidity (AUC =0.7). The IPAT was found to have good reliability and validity. Sensitivity and specificity analysis suggest the IPAT could provide a way of allowing staff to assess psychological distress among critical care patients after further replication and validation. Further work is also needed to determine its utility in predicting future psychological morbidity.

  9. Managing chronic pathologies with a stepped mHealth-based approach in clinical psychology and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases and conditions typically require long-term monitoring and treatment protocols both in traditional settings and in out-patient frameworks. The economic burden of chronic conditions is a key challenge and new and mobile technologies could offer good solutions. mHealth could be considered an evolution of ehealth and could be defined as the practice of medicine and public health supported by mobile communication devices. mHealth approach could overcome limitations linked with the traditional, restricted and highly expensive in-patient treatment of many chronic pathologies. Possible applications include stepped mHealth approach, where patients can be monitored and treated in their everyday contexts. Unfortunately, many barriers for the spread of mHealth are still present. Due the significant impact of psychosocial factors on disease evolution, psychotherapies have to be included into the chronic disease protocols. Existing psychological theories of health behavior change have to be adapted to the new technological contexts and requirements. In conclusion, clinical psychology and medicine have to face the chronic care management challenge in both traditional and mHealth settings.

  10. From clinical integration to accountable care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Four key challenges to reforming health care organizations can be addressed by a clinical integration model patterned after Advocate Physician Partners (APP). These challenges are: predominance of small group practices, dominant fee-for-service reimbursement methods, weaknesses of the traditional hospital medical staff structure and a need to partner with commercial insurance companies. APP has demonstrated teamwork between 3800 physicians and hospitals to improve quality, patient safety and cost-effectiveness. Building on this model, an innovative contract with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois serves as a prototype for a commercial Accountable Care Organization. For this contract to succeed, APP must outperform the market competition. To accomplish this, APP has implemented strategies to reduce readmissions, avoid unnecessary admissions and emergency room visits, expand primary care access, and enhance quality and patient safety.

  11. How did we learn best? A retrospective survey of clinical psychology training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Pieter W; Pezzolesi, Cinzia; Stott, Dave J

    2012-09-01

    This U.K.-based study aimed to investigate qualified clinical psychologists' perceptions of the value and usefulness of the learning activities experienced during their training in clinical psychology. Members (N = 357) of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS) completed a self-report questionnaire about their training as clinical psychologists. The results indicate that most clinical psychologists believe that they learnt mainly through doing and by observing others' clinical practice. They also highlight the importance of the learning relationship and the value of personal therapy for learning. The findings point to the need for more training of trainers, especially clinical supervisors. They also draw attention to the need for more research to establish which learning activities contribute most / least to trainees' developing competence. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep quality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yia-Ling; Chiou, Ai-Fu; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Up to 74% of patients with heart failure report poor sleep in Taiwan. Poor symptom management or sleep hygiene may affect patients' sleep quality. An effective educational programme was important to improve patients' sleep quality and psychological distress. However, research related to sleep disturbance in patients with heart failure is limited in Taiwan. To examine the effects of a tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep disturbance and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. randomised controlled trial. Eighty-four patients with heart failure were recruited from an outpatient department of a medical centre in Taipei, Taiwan. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=43) or the control group (n=41). Patients in the intervention group received a 12-week tailored educational supportive care programme including individualised education on sleep hygiene, self-care, emotional support through a monthly nursing visit at home, and telephone follow-up counselling every 2 weeks. The control group received routine nursing care. Data were collected at baseline, the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks after patients' enrollment. Outcome measures included sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression. The intervention group exhibited significant improvement in the level of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness after 12 weeks of the supportive nursing care programme, whereas the control group exhibited no significant differences. Anxiety and depression scores were increased significantly in the control group at the 12th week (pcare programme (p>.05). Compared with the control group, the intervention group had significantly greater improvement in sleep quality (β=-2.22, pcare programme could effectively improve sleep quality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. We suggested that this supportive nursing care programme should be applied to clinical practice in cardiovascular nursing. Copyright © 2016

  13. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  14. Psychological and medical care of gender nonconforming youth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vance, Jr, Stanley R; Ehrensaft, Diane; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Gender nonconforming (GN) children and adolescents, collectively referred to as GN youth, may seek care to understand their internal gender identities, socially transition to their affirmed genders, and/or physically...

  15. Chronic widespread pain : clinical comorbidities and psychological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burri, Andrea; Ogata, Soshiro; Vehof, Jelle; Williams, Frances

    Recent studies have provided consistent evidence for a genetic influence on chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the etiological structure underlying CWP by examining the covariation between CWP and psychological comorbidities and psychoaffective correlates and

  16. Nonclassical and Postnonclassical epistemology in Lev Vygotsky's cultural-historical approach to clinical psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinchenko Yury P; Pervichko, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    .... Vygotsky's cultural-historical concept within the field of clinical psychology. We prove potency in application of contemporary philosophical concepts, which help distinguish between the types of scientific rationality...

  17. Integrating Geriatrics Into Oncology Ambulatory Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overcash, Janine

    2015-08-01

    Geriatric oncology offers specialized care that incorporates comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) with oncology care. Geriatric syndromes, comorbidities, and caregiver concerns are relevant to the oncology assessment in older adult patients to make treatment decisions, which should be based not on age but on health and functional status, as well as on life expectancy. Developing a geriatric oncology ambulatory care clinic (GOACC) requires numerous resources and entails planning for longer patient encounter times, devising collaboration strategies with community care providers, and establishing dedicated time for team members. The purpose of this article is to provide information regarding the construction and sustainability of a GOACC. A comprehensive review of literature published from 1991-2015 was conducted using the following key words. Oncology primary care nurses and advanced practice nurses have a large role in the development and maintenance of GOACCs. Managing comorbidities, identifying patients who likely would benefit from a CGA, providing caregiver support, conducting a CGA, and creating an MDT are core elements of developing a sustainable GOACC.

  18. Of mothers and experts: the psychology of post war period and the disciplining of maternal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Calquín Donoso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects on the discursive construction of maternal care in psychology. We discuss the emergence of this knowledge and its connections to the political and economic transformations occurred during the postwar period and the beginning of the cold War. From a Foucauldian perspective, the general hypothesis guiding this reflection states that motherly care practices, rather than having an individual and spontaneous character, represent a product of power relationships and knowledge relationships both historically situated and a social practice through which, psychology emerged as science and device of normality and subjectivity.

  19. Professional psychology in health care services: a blueprint for education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    In 2010, an interorganizational effort among the American Psychological Association, the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, and the Council of Chairs of Training Councils, known as the Health Service Psychology Education Collaborative (HSPEC), was initiated to address mounting concerns related to education and training for the professional practice of psychology. Given that professional psychology includes diverse areas of practice and the mounting concerns about psychology's role in a reformed health care system, HSPEC chose to focus on preparation of psychologists for the delivery of health care services and made seven recommendations that constitute the core of a blueprint for the future. These recommendations require significant changes in graduate education-changes critical to the future of psychology as a health profession. As part of its work, HSPEC developed a statement of core competencies for the preparation of health service psychologists, integrating feedback solicited through public comment and review by the psychology community, including education and training councils and APA governance groups. The articulation of these competencies serves to inform not only the preparation of health service psychologists but students, employers, regulators, and policymakers as well. It also reflects the discipline's commitment to quality and accountability in the preparation of its workforce. HSPEC recognizes that its recommendations to strengthen the core preparation and identity of health service psychologists will result in some limitations on degrees of freedom at the program level but believes such limitation to be in the service of coherent and uniform standards for education and training. This blueprint supports the evolution and development of the profession within a scientific context. It supports standards as meaningful, versus minimum, indicators as part of the profession's obligation to the public. The blueprint also calls for the profession

  20. Teaching psychology to nursing students-a discussion of the potential contribution of psychology towards building resilience to lapses in compassionate caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan M A; Timmins, Fiona

    2017-09-01

    Psychology is a required element in nursing education in many countries. It is particularly aimed at teaching nursing students to get a better understanding of patients, colleagues, health care organizations and themselves, and moreover to apply what they learn about psychology to optimise their care. A meaningful integration of psychology within nursing education requires an emphasis on its application in understanding aspects of care and skills development. However, its ultimate value is demonstrated when addressing problem areas in nursing and health care. In this paper the authors outline an approach to psychology education in nursing which emphasises its development as a problem solving support. An example is presented which focuses on the application of psychology to the challenge of care erosion and deficient critical nursing reflection. The discussion includes the organisational context, social pressure, social cognition, reflection and the role of inner conflict (cognitive dissonance). Nursing educators can contribute to the prevention of care erosion by a combined effort to teach awareness of psychological mechanisms, 'critical' reflection, mastery in practice, strong values and standards, and 'inoculation' against justifications of substandard care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Maternal psychological distress and visitation to the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Michelle M; Rossman, Beverly; Patra, Kousiki; Kratovil, Amanda; Khan, Samah; Meier, Paula P

    2015-07-01

    To examine associations between maternal neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) visitation rates, maternal psychological distress ('distress') and preterm infant outcome post-NICU discharge in a contemporary cohort of very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. This was a prospective study of 69 mothers and their VLBW infants. Distress was assessed 1-month postbirth, 2 weeks prior to NICU discharge and after NICU discharge at 4-month corrected age (CA). Maternal NICU visitation rates were calculated for the first 2 weeks and 1-month postbirth as well as for the entire NICU hospitalization. Regression analyses adjusted for the impact of (i) maternal and infant characteristics and distress on maternal visitation rates and (ii) the impact of visitation on long-term maternal distress and rates of infant clinic attendance and rehospitalization. Greater number of children in the home, maternal exposure to a greater number of potentially traumatic events prior to childbirth and lower maternal anxiety consistently predicted lower visitation rate. Lower maternal visitation rate predicted higher maternal depression scores at infants' 4-month CA visit. Maternal NICU visitation rate did not predict post-NICU discharge infant clinic attendance or rehospitalization. Distress is an important predictor of visitation. In turn, visitation is associated with long-term maternal distress. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Clinical Supervision and Psychological Functions: A New Direction for Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Relates Carl Jung's concept of psychological functions to four families of clinical supervision: the original clinical models, the humanistic/artistic models, the technical/didactic models, and the developmental/reflective models. Differences among clinical supervision models within these families are clarified as representing "communication…

  3. [Clinical and preventive intervention in eating behaviour: a dialogue between psychology and nutritional sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Rui; Paiva, Isabel

    2011-12-01

    The eating habits modification is a clinical challenge, both on therapeutic and preventive levels, which requires tools from various areas of health, such as psychology and nutrition. In the structured work in these areas, that includes the referral to specialist consultants, there is a need of a first intervention in Primary Health Care, in clinical and community levels. In this paper, we attempt to systematize useful information for intervention. We will start by reviewing some important interviewing skills, some models of motivational interviewing, and we will make a brief reflection about the client. Then we will analyse an individual case structured in two complementary levels of interpretation: a closer look in general factors and another that reflect the antecedents, consequences and the description of the behaviour problem. We will also tackle issues related to the context in which the individual moves. We will analyse some group intervention programs within a clinical and preventive perspectives. Finally, we will discuss some concepts related to therapeutic adherence.

  4. Modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goona Fathi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ethical leadership appeared as a new approach in the leadership perspective and provided the ground for promoting individual and organizational efficiency by giving priorities to ethics in organizations. In this regard, the present study was conducted with the aim of modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment among nurses of public hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: the research method was descriptive survey. The study sample consisted of all nurses (n=550 working in public hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Science for whom 163 nurses were selected using simple random sampling. The tools for data collection were ethical leadership, clinical governance and psychology empowerment questionnaires whose validity and reliability were confirmed. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed a significant relationship between ethical leadership and clinical governance (P<0.01 and psychological empowerment (P<0.01. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between clinical governance and psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Based on the results of the research, ethical leadership directly and through clinical governance affected the nurses’ psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Conclusion: reliance on ethics and ethical leadership in hospitals, in addition to providing the space and ground for improving the effectiveness of clinical governance approach, can promote the feeling of psychological empowerment in nurses. Accordingly, the ethical issues are required to be taken into consideration in hospitals.

  5. Burnout and Psychological Distress Among Pediatric Critical Care Physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Asha N; Kalyanaraman, Meena; Pillai, Aravind; Raghava, Preethi S; Day, Scottie

    2018-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of physician burnout, psychological distress, and its association with selected personal and practice characteristics among pediatric critical care physicians and to evaluate the relationship between burnout and psychological distress. Cross-sectional, online survey. Pediatric critical care practices in the United States. Pediatric critical care physicians. None. A nonrandom sample of 253 physicians completed an online survey consisting of personal and practice characteristics, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the General Health Questionnaire. Nearly half of the participants (49%; 95% CI, 43-55%; n = 124) scored high burnout in at least one of the three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and 21% reported severe burnout. The risk of any burnout was about two times more in women physicians (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.2-3.4). Association between other personal or practice characteristics and burnout was not evident in this study, while regular physical exercise appeared to be protective. One third of all participants (30.5%) and 69% of those who experienced severe burnout screened positive for psychological distress. About 90% of the physicians reporting severe burnout have considered leaving their practice. Burnout is high among pediatric critical care physicians in the United States. About two thirds of the physicians with severe burnout met the screening criteria for psychological distress that suggests possible common mental disorders. Significant percentages of physicians experiencing burnout and considering to leave the profession has major implications for the critical care workforce.

  6. Life after care: psychological adjustment to bereavement in family carers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachogianni, Aggeliki; Efthymiou, Areti; Potamianou, Dimitra; Sakka, Paraskevi; Orgeta, Vasiliki

    2016-05-01

    Despite well-documented evidence of the psychological effects of caring for a relative with dementia, little is known about the bereavement experiences of family carers. The aim of this study was to explore the key psychological changes associated with carers' adjustment to bereavement and "life after care." All carers taking part were recruited from a day care center, providing specialist services to people with dementia. We asked carers to describe the key changes associated with psychological adjustment to bereavement through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Strategies carers used to cope with and adapt to their new role were also explored. All data were thematically analysed. Thirty-one carers were interviewed. The most frequent emotional reactions to bereavement were feelings of loneliness, loss, void, sadness, anger, and relief. Most carers were able to adapt to their new role, and engaging in pleasant activities was the most frequent strategy used to cope with loss and "life after care." Feelings of loneliness and loss are amongst the key emotional reactions shaping carers' adjustment to bereavement. Most carers are able to adapt to loss; however, a minority experience increased psychological distress after the death of their loved one. A small percentage of carers continues caring for other dependants. Further research is required to identify how carers of people with dementia adapt to bereavement and how this increasing number of individuals can be best supported.

  7. Psychological consequences of aggression in pre-hospital emergency care: cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo-De-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Gómez, M Mar; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care is a particularly vulnerable setting for workplace violence. However, there is no literature available to date on the psychological consequences of violence in pre-hospital emergency care. To evaluate the psychological consequences of exposure to workplace violence from patients and those accompanying them in pre-hospital emergency care. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 70 pre-hospital emergency care services located in Madrid region. A randomized sample of 441 health care workers (135 physicians, 127 nurses and 179 emergency care assistants). Data were collected from February to May 2012. The survey was divided into four sections: demographic/professional information, level of burnout determined by Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), mental health status using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and frequency and type of violent behaviour experienced by staff members. The health care professionals who had been exposed to physical and verbal violence presented a significantly higher percentage of anxiety, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and burnout syndrome compared with those who had not been subjected to any aggression. Frequency of verbal violence (more than five times) was related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Type of violence (i.e. physical aggression) is especially related to high anxiety levels and frequency of verbal aggression is associated with burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization). Psychological counselling should be made available to professional staff who have been subjected to physical aggression or frequent verbal violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Archetypal facets: analysis of clinical case supporting the Analytical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odéssia Fernanda Gomes de Assis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study of a patient who came to us complaining of difficulties within the family due to the fact that he could not deny anything to people. The case was analyzed based on the framework of Analytical Psychology, founded mainly on Carl Gustav Jung. Psychological counseling sessions were held, and after the sessions, theoretical approaches have been made based on the material presented by the patient. The interventions were performed with the goal of enabling the patient and insights she sought other ways to position themselves in the world and to relate to the people around. Over the course of the sessions, the patient was able to construct a context in which allow and deny more in accordance with their abilities and possibilities.

  9. The integration of psychology in pediatric oncology research and practice: collaboration to improve care and outcomes for children and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Anne E; Noll, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancers are life-threatening diseases that are universally distressing and potentially traumatic for children and their families at diagnosis, during treatment, and beyond. Dramatic improvements in survival have occurred as a result of increasingly aggressive multimodal therapies delivered in the context of clinical research trials. Nonetheless, cancers remain a leading cause of death in children, and their treatments have short- and long-term impacts on health and well-being. For over 35 years, pediatric psychologists have partnered with pediatric oncology teams to make many contributions to our understanding of the impact of cancer and its treatment on children and families and have played prominent roles in providing an understanding of treatment-related late effects and in improving quality of life. After discussing the incidence of cancer in children, its causes, and the treatment approaches to it in pediatric oncology, we present seven key contributions of psychologists to collaborative and integrated care in pediatric cancer: managing procedural pain, nausea, and other symptoms; understanding and reducing neuropsychological effects; treating children in the context of their families and other systems (social ecology); applying a developmental perspective; identifying competence and vulnerability; integrating psychological knowledge into decision making and other clinical care issues; and facilitating the transition to palliative care and bereavement. We conclude with a discussion of the current status of integrating knowledge from psychological research into practice in pediatric cancer. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

    2011-11-01

    Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1 ± 6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants.

  11. Emergency care provision for, and psychological distress in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background This study aimed (i) to ascertain the number of treatment referrals and information about protection orders given to survivors of domestic violence presenting for emergency trauma care, as reported at the one-month visit, (ii) to obtain a profile of violent incidents and injuries, and (iii) to assess self-esteem and ...

  12. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) and mild (25.0 to 21.7%) and those without increased (43.3 to 73.3%). In conclusion, GPT is a useful adjunct to OF care as it improves their overall mental health status. (Afr J Reprod Health 2014; 18[1]: 156-160). Keywords: Obstetric fistula ...

  13. Life stressors and psychological well-being. Does Access to Health Care Help the Older Lebanese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, May H; Sibai, Abla M

    2015-01-01

    Health care should protect against the detrimental effects of stress on psychological well-being by providing both direct and indirect benefits. Using a sample of 490 older Lebanese (age 60 and over), this study examines whether access to and utilization of medical care buffer the impact of specific stressors on depressive symptoms. Findings show that access to medical care is associated with depressive symptoms for those who experienced recent death, serious accident and health-related stressors and that limited access increases depression for those exposed to recent violent stressors. The saliency of health-related events may be associated with health care access which is imposed under distressing contexts, likely worsening psychological well-being.

  14. Dysfunctional psychological responses among Intensive Care Unit nurses: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karanikola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo systematically review evidence on dysfunctional psychological responses of Intensive Care Units nurses (ICUNs, with focus on anxiety and depressive symptoms and related factors.METHODA literature search was performed in CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus databases, from 1999 to present, along with a critical appraisal and synthesis of all relevant data. The following key words, separately and in combination, were used: "mental status" "depressive symptoms" "anxiety" "ICU nurses" "PTSD" "burnout" "compassion fatigue" "psychological distress".RESULTSThirteen quantitative studies in English and Greek were included. The results suggested increased psychological burden in ICUNs compared to other nursing specialties, as well as to the general population.CONCLUSIONSStudies investigating psychological responses of ICUNs are limited, internationally. Future longitudinal and intervention studies will contribute to a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  15. Dysfunctional psychological responses among Intensive Care Unit nurses: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Mpouzika, Meropi; Kaite, Charis P; Tsiaousis, Georgios Z; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E

    2015-10-01

    To systematically review evidence on dysfunctional psychological responses of Intensive Care Units nurses (ICUNs), with focus on anxiety and depressive symptoms and related factors. A literature search was performed in CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus databases, from 1999 to present, along with a critical appraisal and synthesis of all relevant data. The following key words, separately and in combination, were used: "mental status" "depressive symptoms" "anxiety" "ICU nurses" "PTSD" "burnout" "compassion fatigue" "psychological distress". Thirteen quantitative studies in English and Greek were included. The results suggested increased psychological burden in ICUNs compared to other nursing specialties, as well as to the general population. Studies investigating psychological responses of ICUNs are limited, internationally. Future longitudinal and intervention studies will contribute to a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  16. A three musketeering approach to pastoral care: Reflections on collaboration between pastoral care, narrative therapy and positive psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred R. Brunsdon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current times of change, deconstruction and ever-growing relativisation, pastoral praxis finds itself in methodological limbo. Pastoral practitioners currently face the challenge of effectively reaching postmodern people through the pastoral process. This challenge is intensified by the innate tension between revelation and experience in pastoral theology as well as the philosophical migration from modernism to postmodernism, which necessitates an on-going rethinking of pastoral praxis. This research investigates a collaborative approach between pastoral care, narrative therapy and positive psychology as a possible method for dispensing pastoral care. A broad outline of these approaches as well as their underlying philosophical frameworks is contemplated in order to evaluate their suitability for a pastoral collaboration. Markers for a collaborative model are suggested where the narrative and positive psychology are employed as strategies in a so-called three- musketeering approach to pastoral care.

  17. Psychology Consequences of Abortion Among The Post Abortion Care Seeking Women in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Pourreza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: abortion either medical or criminal has distinctive physical, social, and psychological side effects. Detecting types and frequent psychological side effects of abortion among post abortion care seeking women in Tehran was the main objective of the present study. "n Method: 278 women of reproductive age (15-49 interviewed as study population. Response rate was 93/8. Data collected through a questionnaire with 2 parts meeting broad socio-economic characteristics of the respondents and health- related abortion consequences. Tehran hospitals were the site of study. "nResults: The results revealed that at least one-third of the respondents have experienced psychological side effects. Depression, worrying about not being able to conceive again and abnormal eating behaviors were reported as dominant psychological consequences of abortion among the respondents. Decreased self-esteem, nightmare, guilt, and regret with 43.7%, 39.5%, 37.5%, and 33.3% prevalence rates have been placed in the lower status, respectively. "nConclusion: Psychological consequences of abortion have considerably been neglected. Several barriers made findings limited. Different types of psychological side effects, however, experienced by the study population require more intensive attention because of chronic characteristic of psychological disorders, and women's health impact on family and population health.

  18. Effectiveness and Safety of Dementia Care Management in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrian, Jochen René; Hertel, Johannes; Wucherer, Diana; Eichler, Tilly; Michalowsky, Bernhard; Dreier-Wolfgramm, Adina; Zwingmann, Ina; Kilimann, Ingo; Teipel, Stefan; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    Dementia care management (DCM) can increase the quality of care for people with dementia. Methodologically rigorous clinical trials on DCM are lacking. To test the effectiveness and safety of DCM in the treatment and care of people with dementia living at home and caregiver burden (when available). This pragmatic, general practitioner-based, cluster-randomized intervention trial compared the intervention with care as usual at baseline and at 12-month follow-up. Simple 1:1 randomization of general practices in Germany was used. Analyses were intent to treat and per protocol. In total, 6838 patients were screened for dementia (eligibility: 70 years and older and living at home) from January 1, 2012, to March 31, 2016. Overall, 1167 (17.1%) were diagnosed as having dementia, and 634 (9.3%) provided written informed consent to participate. Dementia care management was provided for 6 months at the homes of patients with dementia. Dementia care management is a model of collaborative care, defined as a complex intervention aiming to provide optimal treatment and care for patients with dementia and support caregivers using a computer-assisted assessment determining a personalized array of intervention modules and subsequent success monitoring. Dementia care management was targeted at the individual patient level and was conducted by 6 study nurses with dementia care-specific qualifications. Quality of life, caregiver burden, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, pharmacotherapy with antidementia drugs, and use of potentially inappropriate medication. The mean age of 634 patients was 80 years. A total of 407 patients received the intended treatment and were available for primary outcome measurement. Of these patients, 248 (60.9%) were women, and 204 (50.1%) lived alone. Dementia care management significantly decreased behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (b = -7.45; 95% CI, -11.08 to -3.81; P dementia receiving DCM had an increased chance of

  19. Utilization of professional psychological care in a large German sample of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Hermann; Weis, Joachim; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Boehncke, Anna; Hund, Bianca; Reuter, Katrin; Richard, Matthias; Sehner, Susanne; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Although one-third of cancer patients are perceived to have a need for psychological support based on the percentage of mental disorders, little is known about the actual utilization of psychological care in cancer. We aimed to assess cancer patients' reported use of psychological care and its correlates in a large, representative sample. In a multicenter, cross-sectional study in Germany, 4020 cancer patients (mean age 58 years, 51% women) were evaluated. We obtained self-reports of use of psychotherapy and psychological counseling. We measured distress with the Distress Thermometer, symptoms of depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire, anxiety with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and social support with the Illness-specific Social Support Scale. In a subsample of 2141, we evaluated the presence of a mental disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. In total, 28.9% (95% confidence interval 27.4%-30.4%) reported having used psychotherapy or psychological counseling or both because of distress due to cancer. Independent correlates of utilization included age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97 per year], sex (male, OR = 0.55), social support (OR = 0.96), symptoms of depression (OR = 1.04) and anxiety (OR = 1.08), the diagnosis of a mental disorder (OR = 1.68), and a positive attitude toward psychosocial support (OR = 1.27). Less than half of those currently diagnosed with a mental disorder reported having taken up psychological support offers. Special efforts should be made to reach populations that report low utilization of psychological care in spite of having a need for support. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of psychological treatments for depressive disorders in primary care: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Rücker, Gerta; Sigterman, Kirsten; Jamil, Susanne; Meissner, Karin; Schneider, Antonius; Kriston, Levente

    2015-08-19

    A variety of psychological interventions to treat depressive disorders have been developed and are used in primary care. In a systematic review, we compared the effectiveness of psychological treatments grouped by theoretical background, intensity of contact with the health care professional, and delivery mode for depressed patients in this setting. Randomized trials comparing a psychological treatment with usual care, placebo, another psychological treatment, pharmacotherapy, or a combination treatment in adult depressed primary care patients were identified by database searches up to December 2013. We performed both conventional pairwise meta-analysis and network meta-analysis combining direct and indirect evidence. Outcome measures were response to treatment (primary outcome), remission of symptoms, post-treatment depression scores and study discontinuation. A total of 37 studies with 7,024 patients met the inclusion criteria. Among the psychological treatments investigated in at least 150 patients face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT; OR 1.80; 95 % credible interval 1.35-2.39), face-to-face counselling and psychoeducation (1.65; 1.27-2.13), remote therapist lead CBT (1.87; 1.38-2.53), guided self-help CBT (1.68; 1.22-2.30) and no/minimal contact CBT (1.53; 1.07-2.17) were superior to usual care or placebo, but not face-to-face problem-solving therapy and face-to-face interpersonal therapy. There were no statistical differences between psychological treatments apart from face-to-face interpersonal psychotherapy being inferior to remote therapist-lead CBT (0.60; 0.37-0.95). Remote therapist-led (0.86; 0.21-3.67), guided self-help (0.93; 0.62-1.41) and no/minimal contact CBT (0.85; 0.54-1.36) had similar effects as face-to-face CBT. The limited available evidence precludes a sufficiently reliable assessment of the comparative effectiveness of psychological treatments in depressed primary care patients. Findings suggest that psychological interventions

  1. Exploring the link between clinical managers involvement in budgeting and performance: Insights from the Italian public health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinati, Manuela S; Rizzo, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    The public health care sector has had an increase in initiatives, mostly inspired by New Public Management principles, aimed at assigning financial accountability to clinical managers. However, clinical managers might experience a scarce alignment between professional values and organizational requirements, which is a potentially important phenomena that may result in negative consequences on clinical managers' job performance. Building on Psychological Ownership Theory and adopting a psychology-based management accounting research approach, we focus on the managerial (nonmedical) role the clinical manager fulfills and explore the budgetary participation-performance link via the indirect effects of job-based psychological ownership, role clarity, and clinical managers' affective commitment toward managerial roles. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The research hypotheses were tested employing a path model. Our study revealed new insights that shed some light on underexplored processes through which mental states mediate the participation-performance link. Among these latter, the findings demonstrate that (a) budgetary participation has a direct effect on job-based psychological ownership; (b) role clarity mediates participation- and job-based psychological ownership link; (c) role clarity and job-based psychological ownership partially mediate the participation-commitment link; and (d) job-based psychological ownership, role clarity, and commitment fully mediate the participation-performance link. From a managerial viewpoint, an understanding of how clinical managers' feelings of ownership toward managerial roles could be enhanced is imperative in health care because ownership accounts for important attitudinal and organizational consequences. Results suggest that health care organizations that invest in budgetary participation will directly and indirectly affect clinical managers' psychological ownership, and this, along with

  2. Clinical psychology and disability studies: bridging the disciplinary divide on mental health and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jane; Thomas, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Clinical psychology and disability studies have traditionally occupied very different academic, philosophical and political spaces. However, this paper aims to illustrate the positive consequences and implications of attempts to understand and bridge this disciplinary divide. A narrative review format was used with evidence selected pragmatically as opposed to systematically. The construction of the argument determined the evidence selected. The concept of psycho-emotional disablism, which originated within disability studies, is argued to be a useful concept to bridge the divide between understandings of distress from both disability studies and clinical psychology perspectives. However, this can be usefully augmented by psychological research on the mechanisms through which disablism can affect individuals. Perspectives from both disability studies and clinical psychology can be usefully combined to bring important new perspectives; combined, these perspectives should help - on theoretical, service and social levels - to improve the mental health of disabled people. Implications for Rehabilitation Mental health is an important determinant of overall health-related quality of life and psychological therapy should be available for those disabled people who would value it. Psychological therapists working with disabled people should be more aware of the challenging social context in which disabled people live. Understandings of distress should not just include individual factors but also incorporate the psychological impact of stresses caused by societal barriers preventing inclusion. Psychologists should be more willing to work and engage at a societal and political level to influence change.

  3. ["Psychological employees" in psychiatry. The establishment of clinical psychology at the example of Lilo Süllwolds diagnostic efforts to incipient schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzesnitzek, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Lilo Süllwold (*1930) was the first psychologist in the German Federal Republic to acquire habilitation for Clinical Psychology at a Medical Faculty. However, she had already been appointed professor for Clinical Psychology following to a new University Act implementing the recommendations of the National Council of Science and Humanities. Her habilitation treatise to justify the initial professorship appointment centered on a self-made questionnaire as a diagnostic tool for beginning schizophrenia. The manner how the questionnaire together with the politico-scientific structural changes at the German Federal universities endowed the young psychologist with a carrier in psychiatry, is an illuminating example of psychology's way into psychiatry: the institutionalization and professionalization of Clinical Psychology in psychiatry since the end of the 1950s up to the end of the 1970s. In a comparative perspective on the developments of Clinical Psychology in the German Democratic Republic, the example demonstrates not only the role of new psychological theories und methods in research and clinic in enabling the entry of the new profession into psychiatry, but also the importance of initial socio-economic and socio-politic frame conditions and decisions. The negotiation of the scope or limits of competences between doctors and psychologists created more than a professional niche inside the clinic; it changed psychiatry and psychology as academic branches in their structures due to the establishment of new Clinical Psychology departments. The role of the psychologist turned from a doctor's "assistant" into a colleague at "eye level".

  4. Self-report disability in an international primary care study of psychological illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VonKorff, M; Ustun, TB; Ormel, J; Kaplan, [No Value; Simon, GE

    We assessed the replicability of reliability and validity of a brief self-report disability scale, adapted from the Medical Outcomes Survey (short form), in a 15-center, cross-national, multilingual study of psychological illness among primary care patients (n = 5438). Across all 15 centers in the

  5. Acceptance of insulin therapy: a long shot? Psychological insulin resistance in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, Y. J. C.; Lucas, C.; Latour, C.; Scholte Op Reimer, W. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 796802 (2012) Abstract Aim To explore which factors are associated with psychological insulin resistance in insulin-naive patients with Type 2 diabetes in primary care. Methods A sample of 101 insulin-naive patients with Type 2 diabetes completed self-administered questionnaires

  6. Psychological Factors Influencing the Decision of Urban Adolescents With Undiagnosed Asthma to Obtain Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Kingston, Sharon; Zhao, Yihong; DiMeglio, John S; Céspedes, Amarilis; George, Maureen

    2016-11-01

    Adolescents are low users of medical care. Psychological factors and perceived reasons to not seek routine medical care may increase risk of nonuse by adolescents with undiagnosed asthma. This study tests if psychological factors were associated with seeing a medical provider for asthma-like symptoms; identifies adolescents' perceived reasons for not obtaining care; explores if psychological factors are associated with these perceptions; and explores if asthma severity moderates the relationships with psychological factors. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a baseline assessment of 349 urban, primarily ethnic minority adolescents with moderate to severe asthma-like symptoms but no asthma diagnosis who were enrolled in a controlled trial. The odds of seeing a provider for their asthma-like symptoms were significantly higher for those with asthma-related anxiety (odds ratio [OR]: 1.644; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.242-2.176) and depressive symptoms (OR: 1.031; 95% CI: 1.004-1.059). The most commonly endorsed reason for noncare included a characterization of symptoms as not serious, past medical visits not diagnosed as asthma, fear of diagnosis, busy lifestyles, and not wanting medication. Psychological factors were not related to the number of reasons or to most of the commonly endorsed reasons. Adolescents with more asthma-related anxiety were less likely to characterize their breathing problems as serious (OR = .0583; 95% CI: .424-.802) and were more likely to report busy lifestyles (OR = 1.593; 95% CI: 1.122-2.261). Adolescent-perceived reasons for noncare were not pragmatic, but instead highlighted denial. Asthma-related anxiety was the most robust psychological factor associated with the decision to seek medical care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Neuro-ophthalmological conditions: Study of the clinical care pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, I; Challe, G; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B; Touitou, V

    2017-09-01

    . And finally, patient support groups, AFM-Téléthon (myasthenia) and the ARIBa Association (visual disability) were solicited by 2 patients for their involvement. A disturbance in activities of daily living leading to disabilities with psychological repercussions was noted by a number of patients. The most frequent complaints involve mobility (29.41%) and reading (23.52%). In total, 77% of patients state that their well-being has been affected and they are disturbed by the progression of their disease. The review of the clinical care pathway of patients affected by neuro-ophthalmological conditions shows that these pathologies are, on the one hand, often poorly understood, and on the other hand complex, leading to an often significant number of steps for the patient. This also emphasizes the necessity of a care network, specialized and structured to improve the efficiency of this management. Finally, these results demonstrate the existence of a very frequent disability, which may affect all aspects of the patients' lives, highlighting the importance of rehabilitation services and individuals participating in the follow-up of these patients beyond their acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. An oncology mind-body medicine day care clinic: concept and case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anna; Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Altner, Nils; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2013-11-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment are often associated with physical and psychosocial impairments. Many cancer patients request complementary and alternative therapies such as mind-body medicine. The department of internal and integrative medicine at the Essen-Mitte Clinics offer a mind-body medicine day care clinic for cancer patients that is based on the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program and the mind-body medicine cancer program of the Harvard Mind/Body Medical Institute. The program encompasses mindfulness training, yoga, mindful exercise, nutrition, naturopathic self-help strategies, and cognitive restructuring. Two patients who had participated in the day care clinic program are presented here. One patient presented with anxiety and depression after recently diagnosed breast cancer and the other with psychological impairments as a result of multiple nevi excision after malignant melanoma surgery. Both patients improved in terms of anxiety and further psychological symptoms. The Essen-Mitte Clinics mind-body medicine day care clinic appears to alleviate psychological consequences of cancer and its treatment. Further studies and randomized controlled trials are necessary to confirm these results.

  9. Assessing national provision of care: variability in bariatric clinical care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana A; Majid, Saniea F; Powers, Kinga; DeMaria, Eric; Morton, John; Jones, Daniel B

    2017-02-01

    The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QIPS) Committee hypothesized that collecting and sharing clinical pathways could provide a valuable resource to new and existing bariatric programs. To shed light on the variability in practice patterns across the country by analyzing pathways. United States Centers of Excellence METHODS: From June 2014 to April 2015, clinical pathways pertaining to preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management of bariatric patients were solicited from the ASMBS executive council (EC), QIPS committee members, and state chapter presidents. Pathways were de-identified and then analyzed based on predetermined metrics pertaining to preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. Concordance and discordance were then analyzed. In total, 31 pathways were collected; response rate was 80% from the EC, 77% from the QIPS committee, and 21% from state chapter presidents. The number of pathways sent in ranged from 1 to 10 with a median of 3 pathways per individual or institution. The majority of pathways centered on perioperative care (80%). Binary assessment (presence or absence) of variables found a high concordance (defined by greater than 65% of pathways accounting for that parameter) in only 6 variables: nutritional evaluation, psychological evaluation, intraoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, utilization of antiemetics in the postoperative period, a dedicated pain pathway, and postoperative laboratory evaluation. There is considerable national variation in clinical pathways among practicing bariatric surgeons. Most pathways center on Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accredited Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) accreditation parameters, patient satisfaction, or Surgical Care Improvement Protocol (SCIP) measures. These pathways provide a path toward standardization of improved care. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Scientific communication in clinical psychology: examining patterns of citations and references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselica, Andrew M; Ruscio, John

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of scientific communication used citation mapping, establishing psychology as a 'hub science' from which many other fields draw information. Within psychology, the clinical and counselling discipline is a major 'knowledge broker'. This study analyzed scientific communication among three major subdisciplines of clinical psychology-the cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic and humanistic schools of thought-by examining patterns of references within and citations to 305 target articles published in leading journals of these subdisciplines. The results suggest that clinical researchers of each theoretical orientation engage in more insular scientific communication than an integrationist would find desirable and that cognitive-behavioural articles are more closely connected to mainstream psychology and related fields. Eclectic practitioners draw on several different theoretical orientations to inform their practice; as such, they should be interested in understanding the patterns of scientific communication within and across theoretical orientations. Practitioners work in a variety of different mental health settings, with a variety of other professionals in psychology-related fields, and should be interested in how much influence their particular theoretical orientation has on the work of colleagues. Many practitioners rely on new, evidence-based research to inform their work. The results of this study provide these individuals with an objective measure of the influence of empirical work in different areas of clinical psychology. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Prevalence, burden, and correlates of physical and psychological symptoms among HIV palliative care patients in sub-Saharan Africa: an international multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Richard; Selman, Lucy; Agupio, Godfrey; Dinat, Natalya; Downing, Julia; Gwyther, Liz; Mashao, Thandi; Mmoledi, Keletso; Moll, Tony; Sebuyira, Lydia Mpanga; Ikin, Barbara; Higginson, Irene J

    2012-07-01

    Despite HIV remaining life limiting and incurable, very little clinical research focus has been given to the prevalence and related burden of physical and psychological symptoms for those accessing palliative care. Despite evidence of problems persisting throughout the trajectory and alongside treatment, scant attention has been paid to these manageable problems. This study aimed to measure the seven-day period prevalence and correlates of physical and psychological symptoms, and their associated burden, in HIV-infected individuals attending palliative care centers in sub-Saharan Africa. Consecutive patients in five care centers across two countries completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form, with additional demographic and disease-oriented variables. Two hundred twenty-four patients participated. The most common symptoms were pain in the physical dimension (82.6%) and worry in the psychological dimension (75.4%). Interestingly, 71.4% reported hunger. Women, and those with worse physical function, were more likely to experience burden. However, being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) was not associated with global, physical, or psychological symptom burden. This study is the first to report physical and psychological symptom burden in HIV-infected populations receiving palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite increasing access to ART, these burdensome and manageable problems persist. The assessment of these problems is essential alongside assessment of ART virological outcomes. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical and psychological stress for nurses in intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Hroudová, Šárka

    2011-01-01

    A profession as a nurse is one of the most responsible and the most hazardous jobs. According to the statistic data a discipline of health care has the great number of "occupational diseases" cases and they are caused by overdone physical load and mental stress. The thesis targets are the assessments of the load related to the type of work, the awareness of nurses about the prevention against the undue physical load and the mental stress, the motivation and the satisfaction for the nurses at ...

  13. Early psychological screening of intensive care unit survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Anna; Brück, Emily; Schandl, Anna; Bottai, Matteo; Sackey, Peter

    2017-11-09

    A majority of patients survive their episode of critical illness but up to 30% of patients suffer from psychological problems such as post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression in the year after intensive care unit (ICU) stay. A method to identify discharged patients at risk for adverse psychological outcome would be helpful in the triage for ICU follow-up and could enable early intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early screening with validated questionnaires after ICU discharge can identify patients at risk for symptoms of post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression 3 months after ICU stay. We performed a prospective observational cohort study in the general ICU at the Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. All adult patients surviving ≥ 24 hours in the ICU in a 9-month period were eligible for inclusion. Patients with mental disability, serious auditory and visual disorder, aphasia or who were unable to understand Swedish were excluded. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included and visited by a follow-up nurse within 1 week after ICU discharge. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms Checklist-10 (PTSS-10) were administered. Three months after ICU discharge the patients received the same questionnaires by postal mail. We assessed the predictive values of the questionnaires using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). For correlation calculations, we used Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Negative and positive predictive values for each questionnaire were calculated. Eighty-two patients returned the follow-up questionnaires. We found correlation between early and late scores and reasonable predictive precision regarding 3-month outcomes, with an AUROC of 0.90 for PTSS-10 part B, 0.80 for the HADS anxiety subscale and 0.75 for the HADS depression subscale. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression

  14. Caring for the Elderly at Work and Home: Can a Randomized Organizational Intervention Improve Psychological Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Thompson, Rebecca J; Lawson, Katie M; Bodner, Todd; Perrigino, Matthew B; Hammer, Leslie B; Buxton, Orfeu M; Almeida, David M; Moen, Phyllis; Hurtado, David A; Wipfli, Brad; Berkman, Lisa F; Bray, Jeremy W

    2017-12-07

    Although job stress models suggest that changing the work social environment to increase job resources improves psychological health, many intervention studies have weak designs and overlook influences of family caregiving demands. We tested the effects of an organizational intervention designed to increase supervisor social support for work and nonwork roles, and job control in a results-oriented work environment on the stress and psychological distress of health care employees who care for the elderly, while simultaneously considering their own family caregiving responsibilities. Using a group-randomized organizational field trial with an intent-to-treat design, 420 caregivers in 15 intervention extended-care nursing facilities were compared with 511 caregivers in 15 control facilities at 4 measurement times: preintervention and 6, 12, and 18 months. There were no main intervention effects showing improvements in stress and psychological distress when comparing intervention with control sites. Moderation analyses indicate that the intervention was more effective in reducing stress and psychological distress for caregivers who were also caring for other family members off the job (those with elders and those "sandwiched" with both child and elder caregiving responsibilities) compared with employees without caregiving demands. These findings extend previous studies by showing that the effect of organizational interventions designed to increase job resources to improve psychological health varies according to differences in nonwork caregiving demands. This research suggests that caregivers, especially those with "double-duty" elder caregiving at home and work and "triple-duty" responsibilities, including child care, may benefit from interventions designed to increase work-nonwork social support and job control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Positive Clinical Psychology: a new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alex M; Tarrier, Nicholas

    2010-11-01

    This review argues for the development of a Positive Clinical Psychology, which has an integrated and equally weighted focus on both positive and negative functioning in all areas of research and practice. Positive characteristics (such as gratitude, flexibility, and positive emotions) can uniquely predict disorder beyond the predictive power of the presence of negative characteristics, and buffer the impact of negative life events, potentially preventing the development of disorder. Increased study of these characteristics can rapidly expand the knowledge base of clinical psychology and utilize the promising new interventions to treat disorder through promoting the positive. Further, positive and negative characteristics cannot logically be studied or changed in isolation as (a) they interact to predict clinical outcomes, (b) characteristics are neither "positive" or "negative", with outcomes depending on specific situation and concomitant goals and motivations, and (c) positive and negative well-being often exist on the same continuum. Responding to criticisms of the Positive Psychology movement, we do not suggest the study of positive functioning as a separate field of clinical psychology, but rather that clinical psychology itself changes to become a more integrative discipline. An agenda for research and practice is proposed including reconceptualizing well-being, forming stronger collaborations with allied disciplines, rigorously evaluating the new positive interventions, and considering a role for clinical psychologists in promoting well-being as well as treating distress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Pinocchio and the unattained identity: Jervis' contribution to child clinical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacci, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Giovanni Jervis is mainly known as a psychiatrist, but he also worked on psychological methodology and tackled important issues in clinical psychology. This essay describes the concept of personal identity elaborated by Jervis and its importance in Child Clinical Psychology. The problems related to personal identity appear very early in Jervis' work, influenced by the ethnologist Ernesto De Martino. His first considerations are found in his Preface to The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (1968), in which Jervis describes the unhappy upbringing, the anti-social behaviour, and the unattained identity of the wooden puppet. Subsequently, in Presenza e identith (1984), Fondamenti di Psicologia Dinamica (1993) and La conquista dell'identith (1997), Jervis dealt with the theme of identity from a Dynamic Psychology perspective, showing that the formation of personal identity is a basic aspect of the development of the individual that starts in early childhood.

  17. Leaving behind our preparadigmatic past: Professional psychology as a unified clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchert, Timothy P

    2016-09-01

    The behavioral and neurosciences have made remarkable progress recently in advancing the scientific understanding of human psychology. Though research in many areas is still in its early stages, knowledge of many psychological processes is now firmly grounded in experimental tests of falsifiable theories and supports a unified, paradigmatic understanding of human psychology that is thoroughly consistent with the rest of the natural sciences. This new body of knowledge poses critical questions for professional psychology, which still often relies on the traditional theoretical orientations and other preparadigmatic practices for guiding important aspects of clinical education and practice. This article argues that professional psychology needs to systematically transition to theoretical frameworks and a curriculum that are based on an integrated scientific understanding of human psychology. Doing so would be of historic importance for the field and would result in major changes to professional psychology education and practice. It would also allow the field to emerge as a true clinical science. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Clinical Features of Psychogenic Voice Disorder and the Efficiency of Voice Therapy and Psychological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcaner, Zahide Çiler; Gökmen, Muhammed Fatih; Yıldırım, Sibel; Dursun, Gürsel

    2017-11-06

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical features of psychogenic voice disorder (PVD) and explore the treatment efficiency of voice therapy and psychological evaluation. Fifty-eight patients who received treatment following the PVD diagnosis and had no organic or other functional voice disorders were assessed retrospectively based on laryngoscopic examinations and subjective and objective assessments. Epidemiological characteristics, accompanying organic and psychological disorders, preferred methods of treatment, and previous treatment outcomes were examined for each patient. A comparison was made based on voice disorders and responses to treatment between patients who received psychotherapy and patients who did not. Participants in this study comprised 58 patients, 10 male and 48 female. Voice therapy was applied in all patients, 54 (93.1%) of whom had improvement in their voice. Although all patients were advised to undergo psychological assessment, only 60.3% (35/58) of them underwent psychological assessment. No statistically significant difference was found between patients who did receive psychological support concerning their treatment responses and patients who did not. Relapse occurred in 14.7% (5/34) of the patients who applied for psychological assessment and in 50% (10/20) of those who did not. There was a statistically significant difference in relapse rates, which was higher among patients who did not receive psychological support (P psychological assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional and psychological features immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesz, Patrini Silveira; Costanzi, Monise; Stolnik, Débora; Dietrich, Camila; de Freitas, Karen Lisiane Chini; Silva, Letícia Aparecida; de Almeida, Carolina Schünke; de Souza, Camila Oliveira; Ondere, Jorge; Souza, Dante Lucas Santos; Neves, Taciano Elias de Oliveira; Meister, Mariana Vianna; Barbosa, Eric Schwellberger; de Paiva, Marília Paz; Carvalho, Taiana Silva; Savi, Augusto; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Cremonese, Rafael Viégas; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2013-01-01

    To assess the functional and psychological features of patients immediately after discharge from the intensive care unit. Prospective cohort study. Questionnaires and scales assessing the degree of dependence and functional capacity (modified Barthel and Karnofsky scales) and psychological problems (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), in addition to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, were administered during interviews conducted over the first week after intensive care unit discharge, to all survivors who had been admitted to this service from August to November 2012 and had remained longer than 72 hours. The degree of dependence as measured by the modified Barthel scale increased after intensive care unit discharge compared with the data before admission (57 ± 30 versus 47 ± 36; p psychological changes identified mood disorders (anxiety and/or depression) in 31% of the sample, whereas sleep disorders occurred in 43.3%. Patients who remained in an intensive care unit for 72 hours or longer exhibited a reduced functional capacity and an increased degree of dependence during the first week after intensive care unit discharge. In addition, the incidence of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and sleep disorders was high among that population.

  20. IBS and FAPS in children: a comparison of psychological and clinical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Vlieger, Arine M.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that different subcategories of childhood abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) are not separate clinical entities, but represent variable expressions of the same FGID. The aim of the present study was to compare clinical and psychological

  1. Revisioning the Clinical Relationship: Heinz Kohut and the Viewpoint of Self-Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Robert J.

    Psychoanalysis is undergoing rapid and remarkable changes in its basic metapsychology, theoretical reflections, and concrete, clinical interventions. Through self-psychology, Heinz Kohut's alternative views on the clinical relationship have contributed to this restructuring of psychoanalysis. Traditionally, mainstream psychoanalysis has viewed the…

  2. Addiction training in clinical psychology: Are we keeping up with the rising epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimoff, John D; Sayette, Michael A; Norcross, John C

    2017-10-01

    Addiction has emerged as a serious public health crisis. Clinical psychology as a hub science has a long-standing interest in addiction and is particularly well suited to offer multifaceted treatment to those struggling with substance use disorders. To examine how well clinical psychology training is addressing this proliferation of addiction-related problems, we surveyed the directors of clinical training at all APA-accredited U.S. clinical psychology doctoral programs on 7 occasions between 1999 and 2013. The number of clinical programs rose from 181 to 237 programs across the years, with at least 95% response at each wave of data collection. Results indicated that less than 40% of programs had even 1 faculty member studying addiction, and less than 1 third offered any specialty clinical training in addiction. Results also revealed that both the percentage of programs reporting any faculty studying addiction and the percentage of programs offering specialty clinics in addiction have not increased over the 14-year period. We argue that clinical psychology training must bolster its focus on addiction research and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A decade of the International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology (2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Zych

    2011-01-01

    and that the journal has published works of authors from 29 different countries. The highest percentages were found for ex post facto studies, works on test validation and adaptation and adult clinical samples. These results are in agreement with the journal's mission of promoting advancement in clinical and health psychology and show that it is a truly international journal.

  4. Gender differences in psychological morbidity and treatment in intensive care survivors--a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandl, Anna; Bottai, Matteo; Hellgren, Elisabeth; Sundin, Örjan; Sackey, Peter

    2012-05-14

    Many hospitals have initiated follow-up to facilitate rehabilitation after critical illness and intensive care, although the efficacy of such an intervention is uncertain. Studies in trauma research indicate significant differences in psychological reactions to traumatic events between men and women. Our aim, in a quasi-experimental design, was to compare psychological morbidity and treatment effects between men and women enrolled in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) follow-up programme (follow-up group) and ICU patients not offered such follow-up (control group). Men and women treated more than four days in the ICU in 2006, before ICU follow-up started, were compared with men and women treated in 2007 and 2008, when all patients with an ICU stay of more than four days were offered ICU follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post-ICU. Fourteen months after ICU discharge, psychological problems were measured with Impact of Event Scale (IES) for posttraumatic stress and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression. Women with no follow-up reported significantly higher IES scores than men. Women in the follow-up group reported significantly lower IES scores compared to women in the control group, both in crude analysis and after adjusting for significant confounders/predictors (age, ICU length of stay and previous psychological problems). Furthermore, the 75th percentile for IES and HADS-Depression scores (high scores and degree of symptoms of psychological problems) in women in the follow-up group was lower than in those without follow-up (IES: -17.4 p, P Psychological problems after critical illness and intensive care appear to be more common in women than in men. A multidisciplinary ICU follow-up may reduce the incidence of long-term symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression for women.

  5. Apartheid and post-apartheid intern clinical psychology training in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Anthony L

    2009-12-01

    An analysis of race and sex of clinical psychology interns was undertaken at a major training hospital complex during the Apartheid and Post-apartheid periods. 7 of 87 (8.1%) interns trained in the apartheid period were Black African. Significantly more Black Africans and women were trained during the Post-apartheid period. The results were discussed within the context of South Africa's social and political transition, as well as international trends relating to sex and professional psychology.

  6. Sexual dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: magnetic resonance imaging, clinical, and psychological correlates.

    OpenAIRE

    Barak, Y; Achiron, A.; Elizur, A; Gabbay, U; Noy, S; Sarova-Pinhas, I

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the sexual complaints and severity of sexual dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and to correlate them with psychological, neurological, and radiological variables. Frequency and characteristics of sexual disturbances were reported by 41 multiple sclerosis patients (32 females, 9 males; mean age 35.4 +/- 10.2 y). Clinical neurologic variables tested were disease duration, exacerbation rate, and disability; psychological varia...

  7. Reconciling the Professional and Student Identities of Clinical Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A.; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L.

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between…

  8. Rendering clinical psychology an evidence-based scientific discipline: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Stoyanov, Drozdstoj; Machamer, Peter K; Schaffner, Kenneth F

    2012-02-01

    Both modern neuroscience and clinical psychology taken as separate fields have failed to reveal the explanatory mechanisms underlying mental disorders. The evidence acquired inside the mono-disciplinary matrices of neurobiology, clinical psychology and psychopathology are deeply insufficient in terms of their validity, reliability and utility. Further, no effective trans-disciplinary connections have been developed between them. In this context, our case study aims at illustrating some specific facets of clinical psychology as a crucial discipline for explaining and understanding mental disorder. The methods employed in clinical psychology are scrutinized using the exemplar case of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). We demonstrate that a clinical interview and a clinical psychological rating scale consist of the same kind of cognitive content. The provisional difference can be described in terms of its having two comparable complementary cognitive structures. The test is composed of self-evaluation reports (items) formulated as questions or statements. The psychopathological structured interview is formulated in terms of subjective experience indicated as symptoms (these are self-reports recorded by the physician), complemented with the so-called 'signs' or the presumably 'objective' observations of the overt behaviours of the patient. However, the cognitive content of clinical judgment is beyond any doubt as subjective as the narrative of the patient. None of the components of the structured psychopathological interview is independent of the inter-subjective system created in the situation of clinical assessment. Therefore, the protocols from various clinicians that serve to sustain the reliability claim of the 'scientific' Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders cannot be regarded as independent measurements of the cognitive content and value of the psychological rating scales or vice versa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Clinical and psychological effects of excessive screen time on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues-Montanari, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Over recent years, screen time has become a more complicated concept, with an ever-expanding variety of electronic media devices available throughout the world. Television remains the predominant type of screen-based activity among children. However, computer use, video games and ownership of devices, such as tablets and smart phones, are occurring from an increasingly young age. Screen time, in particular, television viewing, has been negatively associated with the development of physical and cognitive abilities, and positively associated with obesity, sleep problems, depression and anxiety. The physiological mechanisms that underlie the adverse health outcomes related to screen time and the relative contributions of different types of screen and media content to specific health outcomes are unclear. This review discusses the positive and negative effects of screen time on the physiological and psychological development of children. Furthermore, recommendations are offered to parents and clinicians. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Clinical adolescent psychology: what it is, and what it needs to be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2002-02-01

    This commentary on the special section on clinical adolescent psychology (G. Holmbeck & P. Kendall. 2002) reviews and critiques the conceptual and empirical articles that this compilation comprises. As articulated in the conceptual contributions to this collection, two fundamental principles should guide research on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of psychological disorder and dysfunction during adolescence: First, drawing on the fiel of developmental psychopathology, the study of clinical adolescent psychology should focus on the trajectories of disorder that precede, characterize, and follow adolescence. Second, drawing on the literature on normative adolescent development, the study of clinical adolescent psychology must proceed with an explicit recognition of the unique biological, cognitive, psychosocial, and contextual features that define adolescence as a developmental period. The empirical contributions to this compilation are evaluated with respect to the extent to which they reflect these tenets. Although the study of clinical adolescent psychology, as evidenced by this collection of articles, is appropriately grounded in the broader enterprise of developmental psychopathology, less progress has been made with respect to the integration of the study of clinical phenomena in adolescence with the study of normative adolescent development.

  11. Effect of spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout on caring behaviour of nurses: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Devinder; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-11-01

    To propose a model of prediction of caring behaviour among nurses that includes spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout. Caring behaviour of nurses contributes to the patients' satisfaction, well-being and subsequently to the performance of the healthcare organisations. This behaviour is influenced by physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual factors. A cross-sectional survey was used, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling. Data were collected between July-August 2011. A sample of 550 nurses in practice from seven public hospitals in and around Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) completed the questionnaire that captured five constructs. Besides nurses, 348 patients from seven hospitals participated in the study and recorded their overall satisfaction with the hospital and the services provided by the nurses. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The key findings are: (1) spiritual intelligence influences emotional intelligence and psychological ownership, (2) emotional intelligence influences psychological ownership, burnout and caring behaviour of nurses, (3) psychological ownership influences burnout and caring behaviour of nurses, (4) burnout influences caring behaviour of nurses, (5) psychological ownership mediates the relationship between spiritual intelligence and caring behaviour and between emotional intelligence and caring behaviour of nurses and (6) burnout mediates the relationship between spiritual intelligence and caring behaviour and between psychological ownership and caring behaviour of nurses. Identifying the factors that affect caring behaviour of nurses is critical to improving the quality of patient care. Spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout of nurses play a significant role in effecting caring behaviour of nurses. Healthcare providers must consider the

  12. Borders and Modal Articulations. Semiotic Constructs of Sensemaking Processes Enabling a Fecund Dialogue Between Cultural Psychology and Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Picione, Raffaele; Freda, Maria Francesca

    2016-03-01

    The notion of the border is an interesting advancement in research on the processes of meaning making within the cultural psychology. The development of this notion in semiotic key allows to handle with adequate complexity construction, transformation, stability and the breakup of the relationship between person/world/otherness. These semiotic implications have already been widely discussed and exposed by authors such Valsiner (2007, 2014), Neuman (2003, 2008), Simão (Culture & Psychology, 9, 449-459, 2003, Theory & Psychology, 15, 549-574, 2005, 2015), with respect to issues of identity/relatedness, inside/outside, stability/change in the irreversible flow of the time. In this work, after showing some of the basics of such semiotic notion of border, we discuss the processes of construction and transformation of borders through the modal articulation, defined as the contextual positioning that the person assumes with respect to the establishment of a boundary in terms of necessity, obligation, willingness, possibility, permission, ability. This modal subjective positioning acquires considerable interest from the clinical point of view since its degree of plasticity vs that of rigidity is the basis of processes of development or stiffening of relations between person/world/otherness.

  13. The Psychological Effects of Providing Personal Care to a Partner: A Multidimensional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Slagsvold, Britt

    2013-04-18

    The expected increasing demand for informal care in aging societies underscores the importance of understanding the psychological implications of caregiving. This study explores the effect of providing regular help with personal care to a partner on different aspects of psychological well-being. We use cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Life Course, Ageing and Generation study (n. ~15,000; age 40-84) and two-wave panel data from the Norwegian study on Life Course, Ageing and Generation (n. ~3000; age 40-84). To separate the effects of providing care from those of the partner's disability, caregivers are contrasted with non-caregivers with both disabled and nondisabled partners. We separate outcomes into cognitive well-being (life satisfaction), psychological functioning (self-esteem, mastery), and affective well-being (happiness, depression, loneliness). Findings show that caregiving has important cross-sectional and longitudinal detrimental psychological effects. These effects are fairly consistent across all aspects of well-being, demonstrating that caregiving has a broad-based negative impact. Among women, however, these effects are similar to if not weaker than the effects of a partner's disability. Caregiving effects are constant by age, education, and employment status, but stronger among caregivers with health problems. Providing personal care to a partner is associated with marked adverse psychological effects for men and women irrespective of age and socio-economic status. Hence, no sociodemographic group is immune from caregiving stress, so programs should be targeted generally. The results also suggest that the health needs of caregivers demand more attention.

  14. Prenatal psychological distress and access to mental health care in the ELFE cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, M; Pambrun, E; Melchior, M; Glangeaud-Freudenthal, N M-C; Charles, M-A; Verdoux, H; Sutter-Dallay, A-L

    2015-02-01

    Pregnant women are vulnerable to the deleterious impact of environmental stressors. The aims were to identify the environmental and pregnancy characteristics independently associated with prenatal psychological distress and access to mental health care. We used data from the French cohort Étude Longitudinale Française depuis l'Enfance (ELFE), a nationally representative cohort of children followed-up from birth to adulthood. Information about prenatal psychological status and access to mental health care was collected during the maternity stay. Maternal/pregnancy characteristics independently associated with psychological distress and access to mental health care were explored using multivariate analyses. Of the 15,143 mothers included, 12.6% reported prenatal psychological distress. Prenatal distress was more frequent in women with very low economical status, alcohol/tobacco use, unplanned/unwanted pregnancy, late pregnancy declaration, multiparity and complicated pregnancy (high number of prenatal visits, prenatal diagnosis examination, obstetrical complications). Of the women reporting prenatal distress, 25% had a prenatal consultation with a mental health specialist and 11% used psychotropic drugs during pregnancy. Decreased likelihood to consult a mental health specialist was found in young women, with intermediate educational level and born abroad. Causal inferences should be made cautiously as the questionnaire did not collect information on the temporal sequence between psychological distress and associated characteristics. Women with social and obstetrical vulnerabilities are at increased risk of poor mental health during pregnancy. Improving mental health care access during pregnancy is a public health priority. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The psychological effects of providing personal care to a partner: a multidimensional perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hansen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The expected increasing demand for informal care in aging societies underscores the importance of understanding the psychological implications of caregiving. This study explores the effect of providing regular help with personal care to a partner on different aspects of psychological well-being. We use cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Life Course, Ageing and Generation study (n. ~15,000; age 40-84 and two-wave panel data from the Norwegian study on Life Course, Ageing and Generation (n. ~3000; age 40-84. To separate the effects of providing care from those of the partner’s disability, caregivers are contrasted with non-caregivers with both disabled and nondisabled partners. We separate outcomes into cognitive well-being (life satisfaction, psychological functioning (self-esteem, mastery, and affective well-being (happiness, depression, loneliness. Findings show that caregiving has important cross-sectional and longitudinal detrimental psychological effects. These effects are fairly consistent across all aspects of well-being, demonstrating that caregiving has a broad-based negative impact. Among women, however, these effects are similar to if not weaker than the effects of a partner’s disability. Caregiving effects are constant by age, education, and employment status, but stronger among caregivers with health problems. Providing personal care to a partner is associated with marked adverse psychological effects for men and women irrespective of age and socio-economic status. Hence, no socio-demographic group is immune from caregiving stress, so programs should be targeted generally. The results also suggest that the health needs of caregivers demand more attention.

  16. Strengthening primary health care teams with palliative care leaders: protocol for a cluster randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Joan; Sansó, Noemí; Ruiz, Amador; Llagostera, Merce; Serratusell, Estefania; Serrano, Carlos; Roselló, María Luisa Martín; Benito, Enric; Castaño, Eusebio J; Leiva, Alfonso

    2017-07-10

    The objective of the Balearic Islands Palliative Care (PC) Program is to improve the quality of PC through a shared model consisting of primary health care professionals, home-based PC teams, and PC units in hospitals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), patients with advanced cancer and other terminal diseases benefit from early identification and proactive PC. We will evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention in which a PC leader is established in the primary health care center, and assess the effect of this intervention on the early identification of patients in need of PC, the efficient use of health care services, and direct health care costs. Design: A two-arm cluster randomized clinical trial of 30 Primary Health Care Centers (PHCC) in Mallorca (Spain), in which each center was randomized to an intervention arm or a usual care arm. We expect that the number of patients identified as suitable for PC (including non-oncological PC) is at least 5% greater in the intervention arm. A total of 4640 deceased patients. Outcomes will be assessed by a blinded external review of the electronic records. General practitioners (GPs) and nurse leaders in PC for each PHCC will be appointed. These leaders will help promote PC training of colleagues, improve symptom management and psychological support of patients, and evaluate the complexity of individual cases so that these cases receive assistance from PC home-based teams. Early identification (>90 days before death), evaluation of case complexity, level of case complexity (with referral to a home-based PC team), use and cost of hospital and primary care services, and quality of life during the last month of life (≥2 emergency room visits, ≥2 hospital admissions, ≥14 days of hospitalization). PC leaders in primary care teams will improve the early identification of patients eligible for PC. This initiative could improve the quality of end-of-life care and utilization of hospital resources. ISRCTN

  17. Positive psychological impact of treating victims of politically motivated violence among hospital-based health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Shimon; Wexler, Isaiah D; Alkalay, Yasmin; Meiner, Zeev; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2008-01-01

    Health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence are at risk for traumatic stress symptoms. Few studies have assessed the positive psychological impact of politically motivated violence on health care workers. In this study, the level of positive psychological impact among health care workers with recurrent exposure to victims of politically motivated violence was examined. A validated questionnaire survey of health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence during 2000-2005 in two hospital settings was conducted. Positive psychological impact was assessed by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and traumatic stress symptoms were assessed using the Revised Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Inventory. Subjects included physicians (surgeons and anesthesiologists), nurses, and psychotherapists. The rate of response to the mail-in questionnaires was 68.3% (n = 138). The sample consisted of 70 physicians, 37 nurses, and 31 hospital-based psychotherapists. Positive psychological impact was noted for the entire sample and among all professions. Traumatic stress symptoms predicted positive psychological impact for the entire sample and for each profession, and there was a curvilinear relationship between traumatic stress symptoms and positive psychological impact. Women experienced greater levels of positive psychological impact. Hospital-based health care providers treating victims of politically motivated violence experience both positive and negative psychological impact. Individuals who are more traumatized by their experience are more likely to also have a positive psychological impact. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Measuring psychological change during cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care: a Polish study using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Czachowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychological outcome measures are evolving into measures that depict progress over time. Interval measurement during therapy has not previously been reported for a patient-generated measure in primary care. We aimed to determine the sensitivity to change throughout therapy, using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles, and to determine if new problems appearing during therapy diminish overall improvement. METHODS: Responses to PSYCHLOPS, pre-, during- and post-therapy were compared. SETTING: patients offered brief cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care in Poland. RESULTS: 238 patients completed the pre-therapy questionnaire, 194 (81.5% the during-therapy questionnaire and 142 the post-therapy questionnaire (59.7%. For those completing all three questionnaires (n = 135, improvement in total scores produced an overall Effect Size of 3.1 (2.7 to 3.4. We estimated change using three methods for dealing with missing values. Single and multiple imputation did not significantly change the Effect Size; 'Last Value Carried Forward', the most conservative method, produced an overall Effect Size of 2.3 (1.9 to 2.6. New problems during therapy were reported by 81 patients (60.0%: new problem and original problem scores were of similar magnitude and change scores were not significantly different when compared to patients who did not report new problems. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of outcome data is lost when outcome measures depend upon completed end of therapy questionnaires. The use of a during-therapy measure increases data capture. Missing data still produce difficulties in interpreting overall effect sizes for change. We found no evidence that new problems appearing during therapy hampered overall recovery.

  19. Clinical predictors of psychological distress in patients presenting for evaluation of a spinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubs, Michael D; Hung, Man; Adams, Jacob R; Patel, Alpesh A; Lawrence, Brandon D; Neese, Ashley M; Brodke, Darrel S

    2014-09-01

    Psychological distress has been shown to adversely affect the treatment outcomes of many spinal disorders. Most physicians do not routinely use psychological screening questionnaires. Additionally, physicians have not performed well when assessing patients for psychological distress while using clinical impression alone. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical factors that most accurately predict the presence of psychological distress in patients presenting for the evaluation of a spinal disorder. This is a retrospective study. Three hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients presented for an initial evaluation of a spinal disorder at a tertiary spine clinic. Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS), and distress risk assessment method (DRAM). Three hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients presenting for the evaluation of a spinal disorder with a completed DRAM, ODI, and VAS were evaluated. The DRAM was used to classify the patients' level of psychological distress. Clinical variables such as history of depression, use of antidepressants, use of other psychotropic medications, history of surgery, and history of chronic pain syndromes along with ODI and VAS scores were used to develop a model to predict a patient's level of psychological distress. Our model was highly accurate (92%), sensitive (92%), and specific (95%) in predicting a patient's level of psychological distress. If patients' VAS is 4 or 5, their ODI is less than 45, and they are not on any psychotropic medications, they likely will fall into the normal group. Patients with a VAS greater than 7, currently taking antidepressants or other psychotropic medications, an ODI greater than 58, and a history of surgery are likely to fall into the higher distressed categories of distressed depressive or distressed somatic. A patient's clinical history, ODI, and VAS scores can predict their level of psychological distress. In general, patients with higher VAS pain scores, higher

  20. Maternal Psychological Problems Associated with Neonatal Intensive Care Admission

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    Ziya Yurdakul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mothers of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are believed to have heightened distress. The purpose of this paper was to determine depression and anxiety symptoms and attachment style in NICU mothers. Methods. The NICU group consisted of mothers whose infants were admitted to the NICU and the control group consisted of mothers of healthy term infants. The psychosocial assessments were done at the first month. Results. The mean Edinburgh Postpartum Depression (EPDS score of NICU mothers was significantly higher than that of the control group mothers (9.6±5.6 versus 7.3±4.9, P=.005. NICU mothers who had high EPDS (≥13 scores had significantly higher anxiety scores and insecure attachment style in comparison to the subgroup of NICU mothers who had low EPDS scores. Conclusion. Mothers of NICU babies had higher EPDS scores. Mothers who had higher EPDS scores had higher anxiety scores as well. These NICU mothers should receive appropriate counseling during the hospitalization of their babies.

  1. Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: theoretical and practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen; Wood, Alex

    2010-11-01

    Positive psychology has led to an increasing emphasis on the promotion of positive functioning in clinical psychology research and practice, raising issues of how to assess the positive in clinical setting. Three key considerations are presented. First, existing clinical measures may already be assessing positive functioning, if positive and negative functioning exist on a single continuum (such as on bipolar dimensions from happiness to depression, and from anxiety to relaxation). Second, specific measures of positive functioning (e.g., eudemonic well-being) could be used in conjunction with existing clinical scales. Third, completely different measures would be needed depending on whether well-being is defined as emotional or medical functioning, or as humanistically orientated growth (e.g., authenticity). It is important that clinical psychologists introduce positive functioning into their research and practice in order to widen their armoury of therapeutic interventions, but in doing so researchers and practitioners need also to be aware that they are shifting the agenda of clinical psychology. As such, progress in clinical psychology moving toward the adoption of positive functioning requires reflection on epistemological foundations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Psychology Training in Sleep and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Phillips, Cindy; Mindell, Jodi A.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that clinical psychologists would benefit from more training in sleep and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances are commonly comorbid with mental health disorders and this relationship is often bidirectional. In addition, psychologists have become integral members of multidisciplinary sleep medicine teams and there are not enough qualified psychologists to meet the clinical demand. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current education on sleep and ...

  3. The clinical differential approach of Sante De Sanctis in Italian "scientific" psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Giovanni Pietro; Cicciola, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Sante De Sanctis, a psychiatrist and psychologist, is one of the most representative figures of Italian "scientific" psychology. He is considered one of the founders of the discipline as well as one of its main protagonists in the years between the two World Wars. Both with his extensive scientific productions (which include more than three hundred works) and with his uninterrupted institutional activity, he has left his significant mark on the history of Italian psychology. He was the first professor of Experimental Psychology and was internationally known: some of his works have been published in French, Swiss, American, German, Scandinavian, and English journals, and some of his volumes have been translated into English and German. Together with the other psychologists of the second generation (Binet, Külpe, Münsterberg, Stern, Claparède, Ebbinghaus), he was the Italian psychologist who decided to enrich the classical paradigm of Wundt's physiological psychology, by developing during the twentieth century the program of methodological and epistemological enlargement of the discipline. In his fundamental treatise Psicologia Sperimentale, written in 1929-30, a clear modern conception of psychology emerged: it jointly included both the generalist aspect (with some studies on psychophysical proportionality, thought mimicry, dreams, attention, emotions, etc.) and the applicative one, which included psychopathology, labor psychology, educational psychology, and criminal psychology, all seen in a general experimental framework. The present paper aims precisely to highlight the originality of De Sanctis' experimentalism that applied the differential clinical approach to the discipline of psychology, causing it for the first time in Italy to be seen in a unitary way as both general and applied psychology.

  4. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, Jessica; Kienhuis, Mandy; Di Benedetto, Mirella; Reece, John

    2015-01-01

    Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress. The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207) aged 17-41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62) across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an online survey comprising a demographics questionnaire, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales. Results revealed significant and interpretable multivariate correlations between distress and both mindfulness and self-care. Furthermore, the dispositional mindfulness observation subscale was found to be a significant moderator of the relationship between several dimensions of self-care and psychological distress. The present study points to the potential of self-care and mindfulness to decrease medical student distress and enhance well-being.

  5. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Slonim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress. Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress. Methods: The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207 aged 17–41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62 across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an online survey comprising a demographics questionnaire, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales. Results: Results revealed significant and interpretable multivariate correlations between distress and both mindfulness and self-care. Furthermore, the dispositional mindfulness observation subscale was found to be a significant moderator of the relationship between several dimensions of self-care and psychological distress. Conclusions: The present study points to the potential of self-care and mindfulness to decrease medical student distress and enhance well-being.

  6. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, Jessica; Kienhuis, Mandy; Di Benedetto, Mirella; Reece, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress. Objective The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress. Methods The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207) aged 17–41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62) across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an online survey comprising a demographics questionnaire, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales. Results Results revealed significant and interpretable multivariate correlations between distress and both mindfulness and self-care. Furthermore, the dispositional mindfulness observation subscale was found to be a significant moderator of the relationship between several dimensions of self-care and psychological distress. Conclusions The present study points to the potential of self-care and mindfulness to decrease medical student distress and enhance well-being. PMID:26112354

  7. Effectiveness of psychological treatments for depressive disorders in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Sigterman, Kirsten; Kriston, Levente; Rücker, Gerta; Jamil, Susanne; Meissner, Karin; Schneider, Antonius

    2015-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of the currently available evidence on whether psychological treatments are effective for treating depressed primary care patients in comparison with usual care or placebo, taking the type of therapy and its delivery mode into account. Randomized controlled trials comparing a psychological treatment with a usual care or a placebo control in adult, depressed, primary care patients were identified by searches in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PsycINFO up to December 2013. At least 2 reviewers extracted information from included studies and assessed the risk of bias. Random effects meta-analyses were performed using posttreatment depression scores as outcome. A total of 30 studies with 5,159 patients met the inclusion criteria. Compared with control, the effect (standardized mean difference) at completion of treatment was -0.30 (95% CI, -0.48 to -0.13) for face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), -0.14 (-0.40 to 0.12) for face-to-face problem-solving therapy, -0.24 (-0.47 to -0.02) for face-to-face interpersonal psychotherapy, -0.28 (-0.44 to -0.12) for other face-to-face psychological interventions, -0.43 (-0.62 to -0.24) for remote therapist-led CBT, -0.56 (-1.57 to 0.45) for remote therapist-led problem-solving therapy, -0.40 (-0.69 to -0.11) for guided self-help CBT, and -0.27 (-0.44 to -0.10) for no or minimal contact CBT. There is evidence that psychological treatments are effective in depressed primary care patients. For CBT approaches, substantial evidence suggests that interventions that are less resource intensive might have effects similar to more intense treatments. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. [Art therapy for cancer patients in outpatient care. Psychological distress and coping of the participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Singer, Susanne; Schwarz, Reinhold

    2009-02-01

    Various types of art therapy increasingly gain importance in psycho-oncology. The aim of this article is to determine whether art therapy may help decrease psychological distress and increase coping skills in cancer patients. An art therapy course for use in psycho-oncological care for outpatients was developed and implemented in a prospective observation study of the Department of Social Medicine,Leipzig University. Participants' levels of psychological distress (HADS) as well as their coping skills (TSK) were quantitatively evaluated before (t1) and after (t2) the intervention. After completion of the course mean anxiety of the participants(n = 18) had significantly decreased from 11.06 to 9.33 (p Art therapy interventions can make an important contribution to the psychological well-being of cancer patients.

  9. Psychological symptoms of family members of high-risk intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Jennifer L; Fontaine, Dorrie K; White, Douglas B; Dracup, Kathleen A; Puntillo, Kathleen A

    2012-11-01

    Family members of patients in intensive care are at increased risk for psychological symptoms. To compare levels of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression during and 3 months after the intensive care experience in family members of patients at high risk for dying and to determine if differences were related to the patient's final disposition. Longitudinal descriptive study of 41 family members in 3 tertiary care intensive care units. By repeated-measures analysis of variance, family members' levels of posttraumatic stress disorder were significantly lower (P = .01) at 3 months after (mean score, 1.27; SD, 0.86) than during (mean, 1.61; SD, 0.81) the experience. Mean anxiety and depression scores were significantly lower (P intensive care experience and did not differ according to the patients' final disposition. However, many family members still had significant risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline anxiety and depression at 3 months.

  10. Chronic widespread pain: clinical comorbidities and psychological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Andrea; Ogata, Soshiro; Vehof, Jelle; Williams, Frances

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have provided consistent evidence for a genetic influence on chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the etiological structure underlying CWP by examining the covariation between CWP and psychological comorbidities and psychoaffective correlates and (2) the decomposition of the covariation into genetic and environmental components. A total of 3266 female twins (mean age 56.6 years) were subject to multivariate analyses. Using validated questionnaires to classify twins as having CWP, the prevalence of CWP was 20.8%. In the multivariate analysis, the most suitable model was the common pathway model. This model revealed 2 underlying latent variables, one common to anxiety, emotional intelligence, and emotional instability (f1) and the other common to depression and CWP (f2), the latter being highly heritable (86%). Both latent variables (f1 and f2) shared an additive genetic and a nonshared environmental factor. In addition, a second additive genetic factor loading only on f2 was found. This study reveals the structure of genetic and environmental influences of CWP and its psychoaffective correlates. The results show that the clustering of CWP and depression is due to a common, highly heritable, underlying latent trait. In addition, we found evidence that CWP, anxiety, emotional instability, and emotional intelligence are influenced by different underlying latent traits sharing the same genetic and nonshared environmental factors. This is the first study to reveal the structure and relative importance of genetic and environmental influences on complex etiological mechanisms of CWP and its correlates.

  11. Association between serious psychological distress and health care use and expenditures by cancer history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Lin, Chun Chieh; Li, Chunyu; de Moor, Janet S; Rodriguez, Juan L; Kent, Erin E; Forsythe, Laura P

    2015-02-15

    Serious psychological distress (SPD) is associated with adverse health outcomes such as poor quality of life and shorter survival in cancer survivors, but to the authors' knowledge, the relationship between SPD and health care use and medical expenditures is not clear. A total of 4326 cancer survivors and 57,109 noncancer participants were identified from the 2008 through 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationwide population-based survey, and their psychological distress was assessed with the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (SPD defined by a score ≥13). The association between SPD and use and medical expenditures of various types of health care (office-based, outpatient, hospital inpatient, emergency department, dental, and prescriptions) was examined using a 2-part modeling approach that adjusted for demographic, personal, and comorbidity factors. The marginal effects of SPD on health care use and expenditures were calculated for cancer survivors and were compared with those of noncancer participants. The weighted prevalence of SPD in cancer survivors was 8.2% compared with 4.8% in the noncancer participants. SPD was significantly associated with higher use of all care types except dental care in cancer survivors. Cancer survivors with SPD spent $4431 (95% confidence interval, $3419-$5443) more than survivors without SPD on medical services each year, whereas this extra expenditure associated with SPD for participants without cancer was $2685 (95% confidence interval, $2099-$3271). In a national representative sample of cancer survivors, SPD was found to be associated with higher health care use and medical expenditures. Distress screening and psychosocial care in cancer survivors may help reduce the economic burden of cancer in the United States. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  12. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring. Gerda-Marie Meyer, Elsabe Nel, Charlene Downing. Abstract. Background: Caring is the core of nursing and should be cultivated in student nurses. However, there are serious concerns about the caring concern in the clinical environment and in nursing ...

  13. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M.A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. PMID:23123567

  14. Treatment via videoconferencing: a pilot study of delivery by clinical psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Debra A; Tooth, Susan M

    2012-04-01

    This pilot study explored the outcomes of clinical psychology trainees delivering treatments via videoconferencing. A noncurrent, multiple baseline across subjects and settings. University outpatient psychology clinic. Six clients (two men and four women) with an anxiety or depressive disorder were randomly assigned to received six sessions of individual therapy (either via videoconferencing or face to face) from a male or female clinical psychology trainee. Participants provided daily ratings (0-10) of subjective distress/well-being via text messaging, and at pre-, post-, and 1 month follow-up of treatment, completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the Outcome Questionnaire-45. Along with the trainees, participants also provided feedback on the therapy experience. The subjective well-being of all participants improved, and all videoconferencing participants showed a statistically and clinically significant reduction in symptomology and gains in general life functioning. Feedback comments were positive. This study suggests that there is value in clinical psychology trainees gaining experience in the delivery of treatments via videoconferencing. Further study is needed to demonstrate the potential for university clinics to deliver mental health services, via this modality, to rural and remote areas. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © 2012 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  15. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: a review of imagery measures and a guiding framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M A; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Holmes, Emily A

    2013-02-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Independent effects of socioeconomic and psychological social determinants of health on self-care and outcomes in Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the independent effects of socioeconomic and psychological social determinants of health on diabetes knowledge, self-care, diabetes outcomes and quality of life. Cross-sectional sample of 615 adults from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. Primary outcome variables were diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviors (diet, exercise, medication adherence, blood sugar testing, foot care) and diabetes outcomes (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, physical component summary score of SF12 quality of life, mental component summary score of SF12 quality of life). Covariates included age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, health literacy and comorbidity. Linear regression models were used to assess independent associations controlling for covariates. In final adjusted models, significant associations for HbA1c included education [β = -0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.36 to -0.08], income (β = -0.66, CI: -1.30 to -0.16), self-efficacy (β = -0.12, CI: -0.15 to -0.08) and diabetes distress (β = 0.43, CI: 0.14 to 0.72). Significant associations for self-care included medication adherence with diabetes distress (β = -0.58, CI: -0.91 to -0.25) and perceived stress (β = -0.12, CI: -0.18 to -0.05) and exercise with depression (β = -0.06, CI: -0.10 to -0.01) and self-efficacy (β = 0.06, CI: 0.01 to 0.10). Significant associations for quality of life included depression (β = -0.08, CI: -0.12 to -0.03), serious psychological distress (β = -0.09, CI: -0.12 to -0.05), social support (β = 0.01, CI: 0.001 to 0.02) and perceived stress (β = -0.12, CI: -0.19 to -0.06). Social determinants of health were significantly associated with diabetes self-care and outcomes with socioeconomic factors being most often associated with diabetes outcomes and psychological factors, specifically self-efficacy and perceived stress being most often associated with self-care and quality of life. Copyright

  17. Addressing fear of recurrence: improving psychological care in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, Christina; Lebel, Sophie; Maheu, Christine; Mutsaers, Brittany

    2016-07-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is defined as "the fear or worry that the cancer will return or progress in the same area or another part of the body." FCR is associated with impaired functioning and lower quality of life in cancer patients. A cognitive-existential (CE) manualized group intervention for women with FCR showed a moderate effect size in reducing FCR, cancer-specific distress, and maladaptive coping. However, it appears that no individual intervention for FCR exists for both men and women. Therefore, the group intervention was adapted to an individual format. This study was conducted to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and satisfaction of the individual intervention. The intervention was pilot-tested on n = 3 cancer survivors. The 6-week sessions included cognitive restructuring, structured exercises, and relaxation techniques. Participants completed questionnaire packages during a 4-week baseline period and throughout the 6-week intervention. Participants completed exit interviews following the intervention. General trends in baseline and intervention stages were compared. Based on the line graphs, the individual intervention appears to help survivors lower their elevated FCR and cancer-specific distress. Qualitative exit interviews conducted with the study participants demonstrated that the intervention was acceptable and satisfactory. This clinical intervention allows researchers to systematically focus on evidence-based treatments for managing FCR, and displays the availability of treatment options in different therapeutic modalities. However, further research is needed to identify the active therapeutic ingredients and mechanisms of change in the intervention. Overall, intervention studies suggest it is possible to help cancer survivors manage their FCR.

  18. The interface of self psychology, infant research, and neuroscience in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustin, Judith

    2009-04-01

    This article focuses on the integration of self psychology with findings from infant research and neuroscience. While Kohut's psychology of the self provides a useful theoretical model for psychoanalytic practice, aspects of infant research and neuroscience offer specificity and nuance to basic self-psychological concepts. Kohut proposed that self-psychological psychoanalysis ameliorates derailed development through patient-analyst interaction, while a listening stance of empathic immersion begins the curative process of derailed development and sets the stage for reparative psychoanalytic work. Findings from infant research delineate much more specifically the nature of attunement both in early mother-infant and analyst-patient interactions. Findings from neuroscientific research delineate how early mother-infant experiences are encoded in implicit memory and explicates the emotional substrate of affects and feelings. This emotional substrate exists at birth and provides a means of communication both in infancy and adulthood. Additionally, infant research delineates the mutuality of the interactive process. Thus, both infant research and neuroscience add subtlety and nuance to basic self-psychological concepts. This subtlety opens up new ways of understanding patients and expands the clinical repertoire. Three clinical vignettes demonstrate how this nuance and expansion of self-psychological concepts are applied in the context of an ongoing psychoanalytic treatment.

  19. Does Psychological Safety Impact the Clinical Learning Environment for Resident Physicians? Results From the VA's Learners' Perceptions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralba, Karina D; Loo, Lawrence K; Byrne, John M; Baz, Samuel; Cannon, Grant W; Keitz, Sheri A; Wicker, Annie B; Henley, Steven S; Kashner, T Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psychological safety (PS) is the perception that it is safe to take interpersonal risks in the work environment. In teaching hospitals, PS may influence the clinical learning environment for trainees. We assessed whether resident physicians believe they are psychologically safe, and if PS is associated with how they rate satisfaction with their clinical learning experience. Data were extracted from the Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS) of residents who rotated through a Department of Veterans Affairs health care facility for academic years 2011-2014. Predictors of PS and its association with resident satisfaction were adjusted to account for confounding and response rate biases using generalized linear models. The 13 044 respondents who completed the LPS (30% response rate) were comparable to nonpediatric, non-obstetrics-gynecology residents enrolled in US residency programs. Among respondents, 11 599 (89%) agreed that ". . . members of the clinical team of which I was part are able to bring up problems and tough issues." Residents were more likely to report PS if they were male, were in a less complex clinical facility, in an other medicine or psychiatry specialty, or cared for patients who were aged, had multiple illnesses, or had social supports. Nonpsychiatric residents felt safer when treating patients with no concurrent mental health diagnoses. PS was strongly associated with how residents rated their satisfaction across 4 domains of their clinical learning experience (P < .001). PS appears to be an important factor in resident satisfaction across 4 domains that evaluators of graduate medical education programs should consider when assessing clinical learning experiences.

  20. A Review of the Multi-Authored Monograph “The Medical (Clinical) Psychology Diagnosis: Current State and Prospects”

    OpenAIRE

    Vachkov I.V.

    2017-01-01

    The monograph presents a number of articles written by leading domestic clinical psychologists on various issues connected with psychological diagnosis. The multi-authored monograph was written for the international research-to-practice conference “The medical (clinical) psychology diagnosis: tradition and prospects”. The conference took place in Moscow on November 29-30, 2016. The book consists of the following sections: "Research methodology in clinical psychology", “The development of endo...

  1. The genome clinic: a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the opportunities and challenges of integrating genomic analysis into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdin, Sarah; Ray, Peter N; Cohn, Ronald D; Meyn, M Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Our increasing knowledge of how genomic variants affect human health and the falling costs of whole-genome sequencing are driving the development of individualized genetic medicine. This new clinical paradigm uses knowledge of an individual's genomic variants to guide health care decisions throughout life, to anticipate, diagnose, and manage disease. While individualized genetic medicine offers the promise of transformative change in health care, it forces us to reconsider existing ethical, scientific, and clinical paradigms. The potential benefits of presymptomatic identification of at risk individuals, improved diagnostics, individualized therapy, accurate prognosis, and avoidance of adverse drug reactions coexist with the potential risks of uninterpretable results, psychological harm, outmoded counseling models, and increased health care costs. Here, we review the challenges of integrating genomic analysis into clinical practice and describe a prototype for implementing genetic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team of bioinformaticians, health economists, ethicists, geneticists, genetic counselors, and clinicians has designed a "Genome Clinic" research project that addresses multiple challenges in genomic medicine-ranging from the development of bioinformatics tools for the clinical assessment of genomic variants and the discovery of disease genes to health policy inquiries, assessment of clinical care models, patient preference, and the ethics of consent. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Analysis of variance frameworks in clinical child and adolescent psychology: issues and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2002-03-01

    Reviewed existing practices of factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA), a major analytic tool used in clinical child and adolescent psychology, in the Journal of Clinical Child Psychology (JCCP) and noted several suboptimal strategies. Issues surrounding the analysis of multiple outcome variables, omnibus F tests, and single degree of freedom contrasts, simple main effects analysis, and single degree of freedom interaction contrasts were considered and recommendations were made about analytic strategies. Among the practices questioned were the use of multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) as a means of controlling Type I errors across multiple outcome variables and the use of simple main effects analysis to elucidate the nature of interaction effects.

  3. Social Construction: Vistas in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Kenneth J.; Lightfoot, Cynthia; Sydow, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    We explore here the potentials of a social constructionist orientation to knowledge for research and clinical practice. Dialogues on social construction emphasize the communal origins of knowledge. They stress the cultural basis of knowledge claims, the significance of language, the value saturation of all knowledge, and the significance of…

  4. Assessing Cultural and Linguistic Competencies in Doctoral Clinical Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Rosanna

    2017-01-01

    The increase of Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. has resulted in an increased demand for culturally competent, Spanish-speaking mental health providers. Yet, little is known about the methods in which academic programs and clinical training sites are preparing their bilingual students to deliver services in Spanish to the Latino…

  5. Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Training on Clinical Psychology Trainee Stress, Therapist Skills and Attributes, and ACT Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakenham, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing uptake of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) by mental health practitioners, few studies have investigated the effects of ACT training on trainees. Clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) are susceptible to high stress such that their training represents a teachable moment for personal application of the therapy skills they learn for clinical practice. This study investigates the effects of ACT training on stress, therapist skills and attributes, and the personal acquisition of ACT strategies in CPTs. Thirty-two CPTs completed questionnaires before and after university-based ACT training that consisted of 12 2-h weekly workshops. Pairwise t-tests showed that CPTs reported improvements from before to after training on measures of counselling self-efficacy, client-therapist alliance, self-kindness, acceptance, defusion, mindfulness and values, and a marginally significant improvement on somatic symptoms, despite a trend towards increased work-related stress. As predicted, each of the ACT process variables was related to one or more of the therapist stress, skill and attribute variables, such that greater levels of mindfulness, values and acceptance, and less thought suppression were related to better trainee outcomes. This study provides preliminary data on therapist skill development and personal benefits for CPTs related to receiving ACT training that interweaves instruction in competencies acquisition with self-care. This study provides preliminary data on therapist skill development and personal benefits for clinical psychology trainees related to receiving ACT training that integrates training in competencies acquisition with self-care. The ACT training offers a framework for integrating the acquisition of clinical competencies and self-care skills and positive therapist attributes in trainees. Findings support a strong positive union between the ACT processes and better trainee personal and professional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John

  6. Psychological Distress and the Use of Clinical Preventive Services by Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Szu-Hsuan; Adepoju, Omolola E; Kash, Bita A; DeSalvo, Bethany; McMaughan, Darcy K

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we explored whether psychological distress plays a role in the use of recommended clinical preventive services among community-dwelling older adults. The sample is drawn from respondents 65 years and older who participated in the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Logistic regressions with selected covariates were entered in the model to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for the independent effect of psychological distress on the utilization of each of five preventive services. With the exception of breast cancer screening where the uptake of preventive services was significantly lower for older adults with psychological distress (OR = 0.57, p < .001), uptake of other key preventive measures revealed no significant utilization differences between older adults with and without psychological distress. The results suggest that adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines may be increased by improving recognition and treatment of emotional health problems in older women.

  7. [Clinical, neurophysiological and psychological characteristics of neurosis in patients with panic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuter, N V

    2008-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with panic disorders (PD), aged 31,5 years, 17 men, 31 women, were studied. The results were analyzed in comparison to a control group which comprised 16 healthy people, 6 men, 10 women, mean age 29,5 years. A traditional clinical approach, including somatic, neurologic and psychiatric examination, was used in the study. Also, a neurophysiological study using compression and spectral analyses, EEG, cognitive evoked potentials, skin evoked potentials, was conducted. A psychological examination included assessment of personality traits (Cattell's test), MMPI personality profile, mechanisms of psychological defense, the "Life style index" and Sondy test. A decrease of - and -rhythms was found that implied the reduction of activation processes. The psychological data mirror as common signs characteristic of all PD, as well as psychological features characteristic of neurotic disorders. The results obtained confirm the heterogeneity of PD in nosological aspect that demands using differential approach to the problems of their diagnostics and treatment.

  8. Psychological violence in the health care settings in iran: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Najafi, Fereshteh; Ghazanfari, Nahid; Tamizi, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Hatam

    2015-03-01

    Psychological violence is the most common form of workplace violence that can affect professional performance and job satisfaction of health care workers. Although several studies have been conducted in Iran, but there is no consensus regarding current status of such violence. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of psychological violence among healthcare workers employed at teaching hospitals in Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 5874 health professionals were selected using multistage random sampling. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Organization, International Council of Nurses, World Health Organization, and Public Services International. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. It was found that 74.7% of the participants were subjected to psychological violence during the past 12 months. Totally, 64.5% of psychological violence was committed by patients' families, but 50.9% of participants had not reported the violence, and 69.9% of them believed that reporting was useless. The results are indicative of high prevalence of psychological violence against healthcare workers. Considering non-reporting of violence in more than half of participants, use of an appropriate reporting system and providing training programs for health professionals in order to prevent and manage workplace violence are essential.

  9. Screening for psychological distress in adult primary brain tumor patients and caregivers: considerations for cancer care coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa eTrad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to assess psychological distress (PD as scored by the Distress Thermometer (DT in adult primary brain tumor (PBT patients and caregivers in a clinic setting, and ascertain if any high risk sub-groups for PD exist. Material and MethodsFrom May 2012 to August 2013, n=96 patients and n=32 caregivers (CG underwent DT screening at diagnosis, and a differing cohort of n=12 patients and n=14 caregivers at first recurrence. Groups were described by diagnosis (high grade, low grade and benign, and English versus non-English speaking. Those with DT score≥4 met caseness criteria for referral to psycho-oncology services. One-way ANOVA tests were conducted to test for between group differences where appropriate.ResultsAt diagnosis and first recurrence, 37.5% and 75.0% (respectively of patients had DT scores above the cut-off for distress. At diagnosis, 78.1% of caregivers met caseness criteria for distress. All caregivers at recurrence met distress criterion. Patients with high grade glioma had significantly higher scores than those with a benign tumor. For patients at diagnosis, non-English speaking participants did not report significantly higher DT scores than English speaking participants.DiscussionPsychological distress is particularly elevated in caregivers, and in patients with high grade glioma at diagnosis. Effective PD screening, triage and referral by skilled care coordinators is vital to enable timely needs assessment, psychological support and effective intervention.

  10. Postgraduate Clinical Psychology Students' Perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Stress Management Intervention and Clinical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakenham, Kenneth I.; Stafford-Brown, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research into stress management interventions for clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) is limited, despite evidence indicating that these individuals are at risk for elevated stress, which can negatively impact personal and professional functioning. This study explored: (1) CPTs' perceptions of a previously evaluated Acceptance and…

  11. A qualitative exploration of acute care and psychological distress experiences of ECMO survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramm, Ralph; Ilic, Dragan; Murphy, Kerry; Sheldrake, Jayne; Pellegrino, Vincent; Hodgson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    To explore the acute care experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients. ECMO is used in life-threatening scenarios of acute lung or heart failure. The patient's experience with ECMO treatment and the psychological distress are unknown. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with ECMO survivors 12 months after discharge were conducted and thematically analyzed. Ten participants treated with ECMO for life-threatening acute heart or lung failure were interviewed. Six themes that captured the ICU experience of ECMO patients were identified including; dealing with crisis, critical care, memory, role of significant others and existence today and tomorrow. Deconditioning was the most frequently reported experience. Patchy factual memories contrasted with detailed delirious memories and paranoid ideations. Patients treated with ECMO experienced deconditioning, perceived threats of serious injury or death and delusional episodes with recalls of psychological distress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The psychology of neurofeedback: Clinical intervention even if applied placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Robert T; Raz, Amir

    2017-10-01

    Advocates of neurofeedback make bold claims concerning brain regulation, treatment of disorders, and mental health. Decades of research and thousands of peer-reviewed publications support neurofeedback using electroencephalography (EEG-nf); yet, few experiments isolate the act of receiving feedback from a specific brain signal as a necessary precursor to obtain the purported benefits. Moreover, while psychosocial parameters including participant motivation and expectation, rather than neurobiological substrates, seem to fuel clinical improvement across a wide range of disorders, for-profit clinics continue to sprout across North America and Europe. Here, we highlight the tenuous evidence supporting EEG-nf and sketch out the weaknesses of this approach. We challenge classic arguments often articulated by proponents of EEG-nf and underscore how psychologists and mental health professionals stand to benefit from studying the ubiquitous placebo influences that likely drive these treatment outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. [The evaluation of psychological development in the dispensarios de lactantes (infant and toddler clinics) in Buenos Aires: medicine and psychology in Argentina, 1935-1942].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briolotti, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the medical use of techniques for psychological evaluation in the dispensarios de lactantes (infant and toddler clinics) in Buenos Aires within the framework of historical studies of psychology in Argentina. It analyzes the institutional environment in order to shed light on the framework of discourses within which the interest in controlling psychological development may be situated. It studies the tests used, the characteristics of application and the most significant results. It explores the vicissitudes of the professional field, in the light of which psychology was useful for consolidating the legitimacy of medical knowledge. It points out a divergence between this medical use of psychology and the production and circulation of psychological knowledge in academic and educational environments.

  14. The clinical practice with difficult patients in the collective imaginary of psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Aguetoni Cambuí

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The conducts that occur in the context of intersubjectivity are arranged from unconscious psychological fields which influence individual and collective practices. Therefore, it becomes important to consider the collective imagination of psychology students as this may interfere about the exercise of their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the collective imaginary of psychology students about the clinical practice with patients considered difficult in the analytic setting. Based on the psychoanalytic method, this research utilized the Procedure of Drawings-Stories with Theme in group interview, for the purpose of discuss on the vicissitudes of contemporary clinical work with these patients. In the present study, participated eight undergraduates of the eighth semester of a psychology course.The resulting material of the interview constituted by drawings-stories and the narrative was psychoanalytically analyzed, in the light of the Multiple Fields Theory proposed by Herrmann and in dialogue with the winnicottian thought, allowing to apprehend the follows fields of affective-emotional meaning: “Insecurity”, “Perfect Therapist”, “Mutuality”, “Experience”, “Negation of Madness” and “Madness as tal”. In general the imaginary manifestations of psychology students constitute the analytic relationship with the difficult patients by mobilizing feelings of insecurity, distress, anxiety, incapacity and helplessness.

  15. Stress-related Psychological Disorders Among Surgical Care Nurses in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Kristaps Circenis; Kristaps Circenis; Liana Deklava

    2011-01-01

    Background: The subject of stress related psychological disorders is considered to be one of the mostcritical problems in the 21st century. Latvia’s social-economic situation is stressful and a lot of nurses stillneed to work more than one shift. There are no complete studies about surgical care nurses and operatingroom nurses burnout, depression, anxiety and compassion fatigue situation in Latvia.Aim and Objectives: Research aim was to find out burnout, depression, compassion fatigue and anx...

  16. Conceptualising psychological distress in families in palliative care: Findings from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Clare M; Smith, Annetta; Forbat, Liz

    2015-07-01

    Adult palliative care patients and their family members experience significant psychological distress and morbidity. Psychosocial interventions adopting a systemic approach may provide a cogent model to improve the psychosocial care of families in palliative care. To facilitate design of these interventions, the construct of psychological distress in families in palliative care should be empirically derived. To ascertain how psychological distress is conceptualised in families receiving palliative care. A systematic review of the literature; this was followed by a thematic analysis and narrative synthesis. Using pre-defined search terms, four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Behavioural Sciences collections) were searched with no date restrictions imposed. Pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were then applied. A total of 32 papers were included in the review. Two findings emerged from data synthesis. First, distress is conceptualised as a multi-dimensional construct but little consensus exists as to how to capture and measure distress. Second, distress in the families within these studies can be conceptualised using a tiered approach, moving from individual non-interactive depictions of distress through gradations of interaction to convey a systemic account of distress within the family system. Thus, distress shifts from a unitary to a systemic construct. Currently, there is a paucity of research examining distress informed by family systems theories. This review proposes that distress in families in palliative care can be conceptualised and illustrated within a tiered model of distress. Further research is merited to advance current explanatory frameworks and theoretical models of distress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Impact of an intensive care unit diary on psychological distress in patients and relatives*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Coquet, Isaline; Périer, Antoine; Timsit, Jean-François; Pochard, Frédéric; Lancrin, Frédéric; Philippart, François; Vesin, Aurélien; Bruel, Cédric; Blel, Youssef; Angeli, Stéphanie; Cousin, Natalie; Carlet, Jean; Misset, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    To assess the impact of an intensive care unit diary on the psychological well-being of patients and relatives 3 and 12 months after intensive care unit discharge. Prospective single-center study with an intervention period between two control periods. Medical-surgical intensive care unit in a 460-bed tertiary hospital. Consecutive patients from May 2008 to November 2009 and their relatives. Study inclusion occurred after the fourth day in the intensive care unit. A diary written by both the patient's relatives and the intensive care unit staff. Patients and relatives completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire 3 months after intensive care unit discharge, and completed the Impact of Events Scale assessing posttraumatic stress-related symptoms 12 months after intensive care unit discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted during the study period, 143 were included (48 in the prediary period, 49 in the diary period, and 46 in the postdiary period). In relatives, severe posttraumatic stress-related symptoms after 12 months varied significantly across periods (prediary 80%, diary 31.7%, postdiary 67.6%; pintensive care unit diary significantly affected posttraumatic stress-related symptoms in relatives and surviving patients 12 months after intensive care unit discharge.

  18. Effects of Bullying Experience on Psychological Well-Being Mediated by Conflict Management Styles and Psychological Empowerment among Nursing Students in Clinical Placement: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liping; Kim, Hyunli

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to test a proposed structural equation model in which bullying experience, conflict management styles and psychological empowerment predict psychological well-being among Chinese nursing students in clinical placement. Three hundred and sixty-six nursing students recruited from five hospitals in J city and Y city were assessed with self-report questionnaires on bullying experience, conflict management styles, psychological empowerment and psychological well-being including depression, self-esteem, and academic major satisfaction. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 and AMOS version 22.0. The evaluation parameters included the comparative fit index at .90, the goodness of fit index at .93, the root mean square error of approximation at .07, and χ²/df ratio at 2.66, indicating that the proposed structural equation model provided a good fit to the data. Experience of being bullied during clinical placement, conflict management styles and psychological empowerment explained 93.0% of the variance and had significant effects on psychological well-being, with conflict management styles and psychological empowerment mediating the association between bullying and psychological well-being. The findings indicated that mediation by conflict management styles and psychological empowerment alleviated the negative influence of bullying on psychological well-being. To limit bullying and its negative effects, development of effective guidelines to deal with bullying will be a critical tool for both Chinese nursing students and their instructors. Further research should incorporate conflict management styles and psychological empowerment into the specific intervention strategies for handling bullying behaviors among nursing students and staff nurses and promoting nursing students' psychological well-being.

  19. Caregiver psychological health and hospitalization characteristics of older adult care recipients: an integrative review of U.S. studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, Margaret L; Wong, Yu-Ning; Fang, Carolyn Y

    2014-01-01

    This integrative review involved studies conducted in the United States that assessed hospitalizations of older adults receiving family care and the psychological health of their family caregivers. The primary objectives were to (a) summarize findings between caregiver psychological health and older care recipient hospitalizations, and (b) describe how caregiver psychological health has been measured with regard to older care recipient hospitalizations. Online databases were searched for articles assessing caregiver psychological health (e.g., burden, strain, depressive or anxious symptoms) and older care recipient hospitalizations in the United States. According to the findings, few studies in the United States have assessed hospitalization characteristics of older care recipients and the psychological health of their family caregivers. All analyses incorporated a measure of depression; however, the measurement of other psychological health constructs (e.g., anxious symptoms, perceived burden) was limited or absent. Findings note the potential importance of focusing on readmission rates in light of caregiver psychological health. Findings also note the benefit of caregiver emotional and instrumental support toward reducing hospitalizations among older adults receiving family care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. The Relationship of Clinical Nurses' Perceptions of Structural and Psychological Empowerment and Engagement on Their Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNapoli, Jean Marie; O'Flaherty, Deirdre; Musil, Carol; Clavelle, Joanne T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe relationships between structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and engagement among clinical nurses. Empowerment and engagement are key drivers of retention and quality in healthcare. Creating an empowering culture and an engaged staff supports initiatives that are essential for positive work environments. A survey of 280 nurses in a national conference was conducted using the Conditions of Work Effectiveness, Psychological Empowerment Instrument, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis were used to determine relationships between demographic data and study variables. Overall, nurses had high perceptions of structural empowerment and psychological empowerment and were moderately engaged. Also, significant positive relationships were found between the key study variables. Results show positive correlations between empowerment and perceived engagement among clinical nurses.

  1. Use of Portable Digital Devices to Analyze Autonomic Stress Response in Psychology Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Velasco, Ana Isabel; Bellido-Esteban, Alberto; Ruisoto-Palomera, Pablo; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier

    2018-01-12

    The aim of the present study was to explore changes in the autonomic stress response of Psychology students in a Psychology Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and their relationship with OSCE performance. Variables of autonomic modulation by the analysis of heart rate variability in temporal, frequency and non-linear domains, subjective perception of distress strait and academic performance were measured before and after the two different evaluations that composed the OSCE. A psychology objective structured clinical examination composed by two different evaluation scenarios produced a large anxiety anticipatory response, a habituation response in the first of the evaluation scenarios and a in the entire evaluation, and a no habituation response in the second evaluation scenario. Autonomic modulation parameters do not correlate with academic performance of students.

  2. Effectiveness of Psychological Interventions for Postnatal Depression in Primary Care: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Sian; Ford, Elizabeth; Paudyal, Priya; Smith, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Postnatal depression affects 10% to 15% of new mothers, and approximately 90% of cases are managed in primary care. Antidepressants are effective, but adherence is poor; therefore, psychological interventions must be investigated. In this systematic review, we assessed the efficacy of psychological therapies for postnatal depression in primary care. We undertook a systematic search to identify articles published in English between 2000 and 2014 that reported studies meeting our eligibility criteria: (1) had a randomized controlled trial design; (2) assessed psychological interventions for postnatal depression against any other treatment or a wait-list control; (3) recruited patients in primary care; and (4) enrolled mothers with a diagnosed depressive episode or a score of at least 12 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale or at least 10 on the Beck Depression Inventory at baseline who had a child younger than 12 months. Quality was assessed using an adapted Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety, and Neurosis (CCDAN) quality rating scale, and meta-analysis was carried out using RevMan 5.3 (The Cochrane Collaboration). Screening of 5,919 articles identified 10 studies that met inclusion criteria. These studies reported on 14 psychological intervention arms: 7 using cognitive behavioral therapy, 2 using interpersonal therapy, 2 using counseling, and 3 using other interventions. Psychological interventions resulted in lower depressive symptomatology than control both immediately after treatment (standardized mean difference = -0.38; 95% CI, -0.49 to -0.27) and at 6 months of follow-up (standardized mean difference =-0.21; 95% CI, -0.37 to -0.05). We did not find any significant differences between the various types of therapy. Compared with control, the interventions also led to improvements in adjustment to parenthood, marital relationship, social support, stress, and anxiety. Psychological interventions deliverable in the primary care setting are

  3. Person-centered approaches in medicine: clinical tasks, psychological paradigms, and postnonclassic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezzich J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate advances in methodological means suggested by Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept in association with a theoretical model of a Person-centered diagnosis and practical use of the construct for clinical psychology and medicine. This, to a greater extent, arises from the fact that the cultural-historical concept (due to its humanistic nature and epistemological content is closely related to the person-centered integrative approach. But for all that the concept corresponds to the ideals of postnonclassical model of scientific rationality with a number of ‘key’ features. Above all it manifests its “methodological maturity” to cope with open self-developing systems, which is most essential at the modern stage of scientific knowledge.The work gives consideration to ‘defining pillars’ of Person-centered approach in modern medicine, to humanistic traditions of the Russian clinical school, and high prospects in diagnostics of such mental constructs as “subjective pattern of disease” and “social situation of personal development in disease” - within the context of person-centered integrative diagnosis.This article discusses the need for implementation a cross-cultural study of subjective pattern of disease and its correlation with a particular “social situation of personality development under disease conditions”. It aims at development and substantiation of the model of person-centered integrative approach, enhancement of its diagnostic scope and, consequently, improvement of the model of person-centered care in modern psychiatry and medicine.

  4. Examining clinical performance feedback in Patient-Aligned Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Knox, Melissa K; Haidet, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The move to team-based models of health care represents a fundamental shift in healthcare delivery, including major changes in the roles and relationships among clinical personnel. Audit and feedback of clinical performance has traditionally focused on the provider; however, a team-based model of care may require different approaches. Identify changes in audit and feedback of clinical performance to primary care clinical personnel resulting from implementing team-based care in their clinics. Semi-structured interviews with primary care clinicians, their department heads, and facility leadership at 16 geographically diverse VA Medical Centers, selected purposively by their clinical performance profile. An average of three interviewees per VA medical center, selected from physicians, nurses, and primary care and facility directors who participated in 1-hour interviews. Interviews focused on how clinical performance information is fed back to clinicians, with particular emphasis on external peer-review program measures and changes in feedback associated with team-based care implementation. Interview transcripts were analyzed, using techniques adapted from grounded theory and content analysis. Ownership of clinical performance still rests largely with the provider, despite transitioning to team-based care. A panel-management information tool emerged as the most prominent change to clinical performance feedback dissemination, and existing feedback tools were seen as most effective when monitored by the nurse members of the team. Facilities reported few, if any, appreciable changes to the assessment of clinical performance since transitioning to team-based care. Although new tools have been created to support higher-quality clinical performance feedback to primary care teams, such tools have not necessarily delivered feedback consistent with a team-based approach to health care. Audit and feedback of clinical performance has remained largely unchanged, despite material

  5. Does clinical supervision of healthcare professionals improve effectiveness of care and patient experience? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, David A; Leggat, Sandra G; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-11-28

    To ensure quality of care delivery clinical supervision has been implemented in health services. While clinical supervision of health professionals has been shown to improve patient safety, its effect on other dimensions of quality of care is unknown. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether clinical supervision of health professionals improves effectiveness of care and patient experience. Databases MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and AMED were searched from earliest date available. Additional studies were identified by searching of reference lists and citation tracking. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of each study was rated using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument. Data were extracted on effectiveness of care (process of care and patient health outcomes) and patient experience. Seventeen studies across multiple health professions (medical (n = 4), nursing (n = 7), allied health (n = 2) and combination of nursing, medical and/or allied health (n = 4)) met the inclusion criteria. The clinical heterogeneity of the included studies precluded meta-analysis. Twelve of 14 studies investigating 38,483 episodes of care found that clinical supervision improved the process of care. This effect was most predominant in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and African health settings. Three of six studies investigating 1756 patients found that clinical supervision improved patient health outcomes, namely neurological recovery post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 1) and psychological symptom severity (n = 2). None of three studies investigating 1856 patients found that clinical supervision had an effect on patient experience. Clinical supervision of health professionals is associated with effectiveness of care. The review found significant improvement in the process of care that may improve compliance with processes that are associated with enhanced patient health

  6. Healthcare utilization in general practice before and after psychological treatment: a follow-up data linkage study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Smit, Dineke; Verheij, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Literature suggests that serious mental health problems increase the use of health services and psychological interventions can reduce this effect. This study investigates whether this effect is also found in primary care patients with less serious mental health problems. Routine electronic health records (EHR) from a representative sample of 128 general practices were linked to patient files from 150 primary care psychologists participating in the NIVEL Primary Care Database, using a trusted third party. Data were linked using the date of birth, gender, and postcode. This yielded 503 unique data pairs that were listed in one of the participating GP practices in 2008-2010, for people who had psychological treatment from a psychologist that ended in 2009. The number of contacts, health problems presented, and prescribed medication in general practice were analysed before and after the psychological treatment. Nearly all 503 patients consulted their GP during the six months preceding the psychological treatment (90.9%) and also in the six months after this treatment had ended (83.7%). The frequency of contacts was significantly higher before than after the psychological treatment (6.1 vs. 4.8). Fewer patients contacted their GPs specifically for psychological or social problems (46.3% vs. 38.8%) and fewer patients had anxiolytic drug prescriptions (15.5% vs. 7.6%) after psychological treatment. After psychological treatment, patients contact their GPs less often and present fewer psychological or social problems. Although contact rates seem to decrease, clients of psychologists are still frequent GP attenders.

  7. Social construction: vistas in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Kenneth J; Lightfoot, Cynthia; Sydow, Lisa

    2004-06-01

    We explore here the potentials of a social constructionist orientation to knowledge for research and clinical practice. Dialogues on social construction emphasize the communal origins of knowledge. They stress the cultural basis of knowledge claims, the significance of language, the value saturation of all knowledge, and the significance of relationships as opposed to individuals. An initial illustration of constructionism in action centers on adolescent risk behavior. Such behavior is often constructed negatively within popular writings and the social science and thus ignores the meaning of such actions to the adolescents themselves. Discourse analysis indicates that for adolescents risky behavior serves important functions of enhancing group solidarity and establishing positive identity. A second illustration, exploring the implications of constructionism for therapy, places a strong emphasis on the therapist as a collaborator in the building of meaning. Traditional investments in diagnosis and treatment are replaced with the collaborative creation of new possibilities for action.

  8. Challenges of nurse delivery of psychological interventions for long-term conditions in primary care: a qualitative exploration of the case of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The evidence base for a range of psychosocial and behavioural interventions in managing and supporting patients with long-term conditions (LTCs) is now well-established. With increasing numbers of such patients being managed in primary care, and a shortage of specialists in psychology and behavioural management to deliver interventions, therapeutic interventions are increasingly being delivered by general nurses with limited training in psychological interventions. It is unknown what issues this raises for the nurses or their patients. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced by non-specialist nurses when delivering psychological interventions for an LTC (chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis [CFS/ME]) within a primary care setting. Methods A qualitative study nested within a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN 74156610] explored the experiences and acceptability of two different psychological interventions (pragmatic rehabilitation and supportive listening) from the perspectives of nurses, their supervisors, and patients. Semi structured in-depth interviews were conducted with three nurse therapists, three supervisors, and 46 patients. An iterative approach was used to develop conceptual categories from the dataset. Results Analyses identified four sets of challenges that were common to both interventions: (i) being a novice therapist, (ii) engaging patients in the therapeutic model, (iii) dealing with emotions, and (iv) the complexity of primary care. Each challenge had the potential to cause tension between therapist and patient. A number of strategies were developed by participants to manage the tensions. Conclusions Tensions existed for nurses when attempting to deliver psychological interventions for patients with CFS/ME in this primary care trial. Such tensions should be addressed before implementing psychological interventions within routine clinical practice. Similar tensions may be found for other LTCs. Our

  9. Challenges of nurse delivery of psychological interventions for long-term conditions in primary care: a qualitative exploration of the case of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sarah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence base for a range of psychosocial and behavioural interventions in managing and supporting patients with long-term conditions (LTCs is now well-established. With increasing numbers of such patients being managed in primary care, and a shortage of specialists in psychology and behavioural management to deliver interventions, therapeutic interventions are increasingly being delivered by general nurses with limited training in psychological interventions. It is unknown what issues this raises for the nurses or their patients. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced by non-specialist nurses when delivering psychological interventions for an LTC (chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis [CFS/ME] within a primary care setting. Methods A qualitative study nested within a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN 74156610] explored the experiences and acceptability of two different psychological interventions (pragmatic rehabilitation and supportive listening from the perspectives of nurses, their supervisors, and patients. Semi structured in-depth interviews were conducted with three nurse therapists, three supervisors, and 46 patients. An iterative approach was used to develop conceptual categories from the dataset. Results Analyses identified four sets of challenges that were common to both interventions: (i being a novice therapist, (ii engaging patients in the therapeutic model, (iii dealing with emotions, and (iv the complexity of primary care. Each challenge had the potential to cause tension between therapist and patient. A number of strategies were developed by participants to manage the tensions. Conclusions Tensions existed for nurses when attempting to deliver psychological interventions for patients with CFS/ME in this primary care trial. Such tensions should be addressed before implementing psychological interventions within routine clinical practice. Similar tensions may be found

  10. Use of Social Desirability Scales in Clinical Psychology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinelli, Enrico; Gremigni, Paola

    2016-06-01

    There is still an open debate about the utility of social desirability indicators. This report systematically reviewed the use of social desirability scales in studies addressing social desirability in clinical psychology. A systematic review (January 2010-March 2015) was conducted, including 35 studies meeting the inclusion criteria of being published in peer-reviewed journals and describing quantitative findings about an association of social desirability with clinical psychology variables using a cross-sectional or longitudinal design. Social desirability was associated with self-reports of various clinical-psychological dimensions. Most of the included studies treated social desirability as a 1-dimensional variable and only 10 of 35 disentangled the impression management and self-deception components. Although theoretical literature does not consider social desirability a mere response bias, only 4 of the reviewed articles controlled for the possible suppressor effect of personality variables on social desirability, while the majority focused upon the stylistic (response bias) rather than the substantive (personality) nature of this construct. The present review highlighted some limitations in the use of social desirability scales in recent clinical psychology research and tried to offer a few suggestions for handling this issue. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Psychological, Relational, and Biological Correlates of Ego-Dystonic Masturbation in a Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Castellini, PhD, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Clinicians should consider that some subjects seeking treatment in a sexual medicine setting might report compulsive sexual behaviors. EM represents a clinically relevant cause of disability, given the high level of psychological distress reported by subjects with this condition, and the severe impact on quality of life in interpersonal relationships.

  12. What Comes before Report Writing? Attending to Clinical Reasoning and Thinking Errors in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Gabrielle; Schroeder, Meadow

    2015-01-01

    Psychoeducational assessment involves collecting, organizing, and interpreting a large amount of data from various sources. Drawing upon psychological and medical literature, we review two main approaches to clinical reasoning (deductive and inductive) and how they synergistically guide diagnostic decision-making. In addition, we discuss how the…

  13. Religion and Spirituality within Counselling/Clinical Psychology Training Programmes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to attend to religious and spiritual issues within clinical/counselling psychology. However, there is limited research demonstrating how successfully such content is integrated into existing training programmes. This investigation sought to review primary research literature related to training…

  14. Experiences of Master's Students Regarding Clinical Supervision in an Applied Psychology Programme in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Lindi; Fouche, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This study explored and described the experiences regarding clinical supervision of master's students in professional psychology programmes in South Africa. Four participants were purposively selected from four different universities. The participants engaged in reflective writings and in-depth interviews over a one-year span. Data were analysed…

  15. Ethnic Diversity in Clinical Psychology: Recruitment and Admission Practices among Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Dunbar, Rocio; Stanton, Annette L.

    1999-01-01

    Examines graduate recruitment and admissions processes for ethnic minority students in clinical psychology by surveying graduate admissions directors. Reports that 98% of programs reported efforts to recruit minority applicants with 82% using flexible criteria when evaluating applicants; directors identified community characteristics, financial…

  16. Prediction of 6-yr symptom course trajectories of anxiety disorders by diagnostic, clinical and psychological variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Batelaan, Neeltje; Rhebergen, Didi; van Balkom, Anton; Schoevers, Robert; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify course trajectories of anxiety disorder using a data-driven method and to determine the incremental predictive value of clinical and psychological variables over and above diagnostic categories. 703 patients with DSM-IV panic disorder with or without agoraphobia,

  17. Factors That Help and Hinder Scientific Training in Counseling and Clinical Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to better understand scientific training within clinical and counseling psychology doctoral programs. A primary goal is to extend previous research by expanding the scientific training outcome variables from research interest and productivity to include additional characteristics of scientific mindedness such as…

  18. Survey Response Rates and Survey Administration in Counseling and Clinical Psychology: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Pamela S.; Green, Kathy E.; Martinussen, Monica

    2009-01-01

    This article reports results of a meta-analysis of survey response rates in published research in counseling and clinical psychology over a 20-year span and describes reported survey administration procedures in those fields. Results of 308 survey administrations showed a weighted average response rate of 49.6%. Among possible moderators, response…

  19. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  20. Cultural Responsivity in Clinical Psychology Graduate Students: A Developmental Approach to the Prediction of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrin, Sebastian Everett

    2010-01-01

    This study used a mixed-method approach to examine students' experiences in multicultural training and their opinions about various aspects of their course(s). A developmental model of learning was employed to analyze results. More specifically, this study explored the relationship between clinical psychology doctoral students' self-reported…

  1. Cross-Gender Mentorship in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs: An Exploratory Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Sherry L.; Clark, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Brad; Larson, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The mentorship experiences of recent clinical psychology doctorates reporting a primary mentor in graduate school were assessed by means of a survey. Among 518 responding psychologists, male graduates were significantly more likely to have a same-gender mentor, and female graduates were more likely to report receiving support from mentors of both…

  2. White Clinical Psychology Trainees' Views on Racial Equity within Programme Selection in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, Craig M.; Swartz, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The issue of diversity in both physical and epistemological access to programmes in higher education is an important concern worldwide. In South Africa, as elsewhere, access to professional clinical psychology training programmes is extremely competitive, and there is an important imperative to diversify the student profile. Perspectives of black…

  3. Doctoral training in clinical psychology across 23 years: Continuity and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Sayette, Michael A; Pomerantz, Andrew M

    2018-03-01

    Doctoral training in clinical psychology has undergone substantial changes in recent decades, especially with the increasing heterogeneity of training models and graduate students. To document these changes, we analyzed program, student, and faculty characteristics of American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited clinical psychology programs over a 23-year span. We surveyed directors of clinical training about their doctoral programs every 2 years from 1991 to 2013, securing 90%-98% response rates. With minimal exceptions, the survey questions remained constant. Percentages of female and racial/ethnic minority students continued to grow, such that women now comprise about three quarters of trainees and ethnic minorities about one quarter. There has been a decisive shift in faculty theoretical orientation toward cognitive/cognitive-behavioral and away from psychodynamic/psychoanalytic. Internship match rates were relatively high and stable until the early 2010s but have recently rebounded. We discuss the limitations of these survey results and their implications for the future of doctoral training in clinical psychology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cliques and Cohesion in a Clinical Psychology Graduate Cohort: A Longitudinal Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kimberley Annette

    2013-01-01

    To date, no published research has utilized social network analysis (SNA) to analyze graduate cohorts in clinical psychology. The purpose of this research is to determine how issues of likability among students correlate with other measures, such as disclosure, health, spiritual maturity, help in projects, familiarity, and ease of providing…

  5. Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

  6. Suicidal Behaviors among Clients at an Outpatient Psychology Clinic versus the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Marsha M.; Laffaw, Julie A.

    1982-01-01

    Compared suicidal behaviors among two populations in the same geographical area: clients at a psychology clinic versus individuals from the general population. In both samples, 10 percent of the individuals reported prior parasuicidal behavior; the two populations were also quite similar on reports of prior suicidal ideation. (JAC)

  7. Advancing the Scientific Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael C; Blossom, Jennifer B; Evans, Spencer C; Amaro, Christina M; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become a central focus in clinical child and adolescent psychology. As originally defined, EBP in psychology is the integration of the best available research evidence, patient characteristics, and clinical expertise. Although evidence-based perspectives have garnered widespread acceptance in recent years, there has also been some confusion and disagreement about the 3-part definition of EBP, particularly the role of research. In this article, we first provide a brief review of the development of EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology. Next, we outline the following 4 points to help clarify the understanding of EBP: (a) knowledge should not be confused with epistemic processes, (b) research on clinician and client factors is needed for EBP, (c) research on assessment is needed for EBP, and (d) the 3-part conceptualization of EBP can serve as a useful framework to guide research. Based on these principles, we put forth a slightly revised conceptualization of EBP, in which the role of research is expanded and more clearly operationalized. Finally, based on our review of the literature, we offer illustrative examples of specific directions for future research to advance the evidence base for EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

  8. Contribution of the psychosocial work environment to psychological distress among health care professionals before and during a major organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Lesage, Alain D; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Laroche, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between 4 dimensions of the psychosocial work environment (psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and effort-reward) among health care professionals as well as their psychological distress during a reorganization process. A correlational descriptive design was used for this quantitative study. A total of 159 health care professionals completed the questionnaire at T1, and 141 at T2. First, before the work reorganization, effort-reward imbalance was the sole variable of the psychological work environment that significantly predicted psychological distress. Second, the high overall level of psychological distress increased during the process of organizational change (from T1 to T2). Finally, effort-reward imbalance, high psychological demands, and low decision latitude were all significant predictors of psychological distress at T2, during the organizational change. In conclusion, to reduce the expected negative outcomes of restructuring on health care practitioners, managers could increase the number of opportunities for rewards, carefully explain the demands, and clarify the tasks to be performed by each of the employees to reduce their psychological burden and increase their perceptions of autonomy.

  9. Implications for better nursing practice: psychological aspects of patients undergoing post-operative wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Reiko; Shiromaru, Mizue; Yamane, Reiko; Hikoyama, Hiroko; Sato, Mikiyo; Takahashi, Natsuko; Yoshida, Sumie; Nakamura, Misuzu; Kojima, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-01

    To understand the psychological aspects in patients undergoing post-operative wound care and to gain insights for improving nursing practice. Very few studies have examined education on or practice of wound care with a view towards the patient's psychology. Descriptive exploratory qualitative study. Four patients who had undergone open surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract were interviewed using a semi-structured format to gain an understanding of their feelings and opinions with regard to wound care. Interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive coding approach. Fifteen categories of responses were finally identified from the data. Patients wanted nursing staff to observe their wound more often so that patients could recognise improvement, to have better knowledge of the patient's disease and condition, to explain the patient's situation more completely and to appropriately answer questions. Patients also said that they felt more comfortable in posing questions or concerns regarding their condition to nursing staff than to their surgeons and did so while the wounds were being taken care of by nurses. These findings suggested the importance of nursing staff to fully understand and to be ready to share feelings regarding a patient's postoperative condition and to have skills in properly explaining the importance of each procedure or steps in treatments that a patient must undergo. The present study also indicates that it is imperative for nursing staff to learn methods to build relationships with patients so that they can express their feelings of fear or anxiety freely to nurses. It is not possible to develop nursing practice without understanding psychological aspects of patients undergoing postoperative wound care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Functional and psychological features immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit: prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesz, Patrini Silveira; Costanzi, Monise; Stolnik, Débora; Dietrich, Camila; de Freitas, Karen Lisiane Chini; Silva, Letícia Aparecida; de Almeida, Carolina Schünke; de Souza, Camila Oliveira; Ondere, Jorge; Souza, Dante Lucas Santos; Neves, Taciano Elias de Oliveira; Meister, Mariana Vianna; Barbosa, Eric Schwellberger; de Paiva, Marília Paz; Carvalho, Taiana Silva; Savi, Augusto; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Cremonese, Rafael Viégas; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the functional and psychological features of patients immediately after discharge from the intensive care unit. Methods Prospective cohort study. Questionnaires and scales assessing the degree of dependence and functional capacity (modified Barthel and Karnofsky scales) and psychological problems (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), in addition to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, were administered during interviews conducted over the first week after intensive care unit discharge, to all survivors who had been admitted to this service from August to November 2012 and had remained longer than 72 hours. Results The degree of dependence as measured by the modified Barthel scale increased after intensive care unit discharge compared with the data before admission (57±30 versus 47±36; p<0.001) in all 79 participants. This impairment was homogeneous among all the categories in the modified Barthel scale (p<0.001) in the 64 participants who were independent or partially dependent (Karnofsky score ≥40) before admission. The impairment affected the categories of personal hygiene (p=0.01) and stair climbing (p=0.04) only in the 15 participants who were highly dependent (Karnofsky score <40) before admission. Assessment of the psychological changes identified mood disorders (anxiety and/or depression) in 31% of the sample, whereas sleep disorders occurred in 43.3%. Conclusions Patients who remained in an intensive care unit for 72 hours or longer exhibited a reduced functional capacity and an increased degree of dependence during the first week after intensive care unit discharge. In addition, the incidence of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and sleep disorders was high among that population. PMID:24213085

  11. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  12. Medical and psychological outcomes for young adults with Type 1 diabetes: no improvement despite recent advances in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B; Elliott, J; Scott, A; Heller, S; Eiser, C

    2014-02-01

    To assess medical and psychological outcomes among young people with Type 1 diabetes and to compare medical outcomes with a previous audit. An observational study in two diabetes clinics for young adults (aged 16-21 years) in Sheffield, UK. Young people (n = 96: 81.4% response rate) with Type 1 diabetes (diagnosed > 6 months) completed measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety and disordered eating and consented for their medical records to be consulted. Mean HbA1c (86 ± 23 mmol/mol; 10.0 ± 2.1%); was comparable with that reported previously and considerably higher than recommended (advances and improvements to delivery of care, HbA1c remain above recommended levels in a significant proportion of young people, many of whom already have microvascular complications. We need to learn from European centres who achieve better results, improve transition from paediatric care, integrate mental health support with diabetes care provision and take into account young people's views about clinic. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  13. Ethical dilemmas experienced by clinical psychology trainee therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Poornima; Sinha, Ananya; Sonkar, Suruchi; Raguram, Ahalya

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inevitable during psychotherapeutic interactions, and these complexities and challenges may be magnified during the training phase. The experience of ethical dilemmas in the arena of therapy and the methods of resolving these dilemmas were examined among 35 clinical psychologists in training, through an anonymous and confidential online survey. The trainees' responses to four open-ended questions on any one ethical dilemma encountered during therapy were analysed, using thematic content analysis. The results highlighted that the salient ethical dilemmas related to confidentiality and boundary issues. The trainees also raised ethical questions regarding therapist competence, the beneficence and non-maleficence of therapeutic actions, and client autonomy. Fifty-seven per cent of the trainees reported that the dilemmas were resolved adequately, the prominent methods of resolution being supervision or consultation and guidance from professional ethical guidelines. The trainees felt that the professional codes had certain limitations as far as the effective resolution of ethical dilemmas was concerned. The findings indicate the need to strengthen training and supervision methodologies and professional ethics codes for psychotherapists and counsellors in India.

  14. Virtual reality and imaginative techniques in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, F; Molinari, E

    1998-01-01

    The great potential offered by Virtual Reality (VR) derives prevalently from the central role, in psychotherapy, occupied by the imagination and by memory. These two elements, which are fundamental in the life of every one of us, present absolute and relative limits to individual potential. Thanks to virtual experiences, it is possible to transcend these limits. The re-created world may at times be more vivid and real than the one that most subjects are able to describe through their own imagination and through their own memory. This chapter focuses on imaginative techniques to find new ways of applications in therapy. In particular the chapter analyses in which way VR can be used to improve the efficacy of current techniques. VR produces a change with respect to the traditional relationship between client and therapist. The new configuration of this relationship is based on the awareness of being more skilled in the difficult operations of recovery of past experiences, through the memory, and of foreseeing of future experiences, through the imagination. At the same time, the subject undergoing treatment perceives the advantage of being able to re-create and use a real experiential world within the walls of the clinical office of his own therapist.

  15. Effects of staffing choices on collaborative care for depression at primary care clinics in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruszewski, Pamela B; Mundt, Marlon P; Hadzic, Senka; Brown, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed associations between staffing of a collaborative care program for depression and enrollment in the program and remission rates. Data were collected from depression care registries at 63 primary care clinics that participated in the initiative through early 2012. Project leaders at the 12 medical groups that operate the clinics were surveyed about the background of care managers and clinic characteristics. Generalized linear mixed models assessed associations of care manager background and configuration of staffing with enrollment and remission rates. Enrollment was higher (p=.050) and there was a trend toward higher remission rates (p=.105) at clinics where care managers were dedicated exclusively to depression care. No differences in outcomes were obtained by registered nurses versus certified medical assistants and licensed practical nurses. Hiring dedicated paraprofessional care managers may maximize the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care programs and should be supported by regulations and reimbursement policies.

  16. Clinical and Psychological Variables Present in Patients with Chronic Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed José Pomares Avalos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: chronic back pain is regarded as a major public health problem with a substantial socio-economic impact. Objective: to determine the main clinical and psychological variables present in patients with chronic back pain. Methods: a case series study including the comparison of variables was conducted from July to December 2015 at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos. The study variables were: age, sex, educational level, occupation, origin, characteristics of pain (intensity, frequency, duration, type of treatment used for its relief, anxiety, depression, anger and hostility as personality traits, and anxiety, depression and stress as negative emotional states. A non-probability sample of patients with chronic back pain was used. The information was obtained through a questionnaire and various psychological instruments. Results: predominant psychological variables were pathological stress as negative emotional state, as well as trait anxiety and depression. The prevailing clinical variables were moderate intensity of pain, episodic occurrence, duration longer than 2 years and medical treatment as the most frequent type of treatment used.Conclusions: high trait anxiety and pathological stress as negative emotional state coexist in patients with chronic back pain. These psychological aspects may be influencing the presence and clinical characteristics of pain.

  17. A systematic review of psychological treatments for clinical anxiety during the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, Siobhan A; Wallace, Matthew; Joubert, Amy E; Haskelberg, Hila; Andrews, Gavin; Newby, Jill M

    2018-01-24

    Maternal anxiety is common during the perinatal period, and despite the negative outcomes of anxiety on the mother and infant, its treatment has received limited attention. This paper describes the first review of psychological interventions for clinical anxiety during the perinatal period. A systematic search was carried out of six electronic databases. Five studies which evaluated psychological interventions for clinical anxiety in perinatal women were identified. Of the five studies included, four were open trials and one was a randomised controlled trial. Three studies evaluated group-based interventions; one study evaluated an online-delivered intervention; and one study a combined pharmacologic-psychological intervention. All participants demonstrated significant reductions in anxiety symptom severity from pre- to post-treatment. However, this review was limited to published literature evaluating treatments for clinical anxiety in perinatal women, which may have excluded important intervention studies and prevention programs, and unpublished literature. This review identifies an area of research that needs urgent attention, as very few studies have evaluated psychological treatments for perinatal anxiety. The studies included in this review demonstrate that symptoms of anxiety during the perinatal period appear to improve during treatment. Future research is needed to establish the efficacy of perinatal anxiety interventions in randomised controlled trials, whether reductions persist long term and whether benefits extend to other outcomes for the mother, infant and family.

  18. Effects of Cognition, Function, and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms on Medicare Expenditures and Health Care Utilization for Persons With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Kane, Robert L; Dowd, Bryan; Gaugler, Joseph E; MacLehose, Richard F; Kuntz, Karen M

    2017-06-01

    Clinical features of dementia (cognition, function, and behavioral/psychological symptoms [BPSD]) may differentially affect Medicare expenditures/health care utilization. We linked cross-sectional data from the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study to Medicare data to evaluate the association between dementia clinical features among those with dementia and Medicare expenditures/health care utilization (n = 234). Cognition was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Function was evaluated as the number of functional limitations (0-10). BPSD was evaluated as the number of symptoms (0-12). Expenditures were estimated with a generalized linear model (log-link and gamma distribution). Number of hospitalizations, institutional outpatient visits, and physician visits were estimated with a negative binomial regression. Medicare covered skilled nursing days were estimated with a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Cognition and BPSD were not associated with expenditures. Among individuals with less than seven functional limitations, one additional limitation was associated with $123 (95% confidence interval: $19-$227) additional monthly Medicare spending. Better cognition and poorer function were associated with more hospitalizations among those with an MMSE less than three and less than six functional limitations, respectively. BPSD had no effect on hospitalizations. Poorer function and fewer BPSD were associated with more skilled nursing among individuals with one to seven functional limitations and more than four symptoms, respectively. Cognition had no effect on skilled nursing care. No clinical feature was associated with institutional outpatient care. Of individuals with an MMSE less than 15, poorer cognition was associated with fewer physician visits. Among those with more than six functional limitations, poorer function was associated with fewer physician visits. Poorer function, not cognition or BPSD, was associated with higher Medicare

  19. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Marie Meyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring is the core of nursing and should be cultivated in student nurses. However, there are serious concerns about the caring concern in the clinical environment and in nursing education. Clinical instructors are ideally positioned to care for student nurses so that they in turn, can learn to care for their patients. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional and correlational quantitative research design with convenience sampling was conducted to describe the perceptions of junior student nurses (n = 148 and senior student nurses (n = 168 regarding clinicalin structor caring. A structured self administered questionnaire using the Nursing Student Perceptions of Instructor Caring (NSPIC (Wade & Kasper, 2006 was used. Descriptive statistics and hypotheses testing using parametric and non parametric methods were conducted. The reliability of the NSPIC was determined. Results: Respondents had a positive perception of their clinical instructors' caring. No relationship could be found between the course the respondents were registered for, the frequency of contact with a clinical instructor, the ages of the respondents and their perceptions of clinical instructor caring. The NSPIC was found to be reliable if one item each from two of the subscales were omitted. Conclusions: Student nurses perceived most strongly that a caring clinical instructor made them feel confident, specifically when he/she showed genuine interest in the patients and their care, and when he/she made them feel that they could be successful.

  20. Improving transparency and reproducibility through registration: The status of intervention trials published in clinical psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Lukasz; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Prospective registration increases the validity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In the United States, registration is a legal requirement for drugs and devices regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and many biomedical journals refuse to publish trials that are not registered. Trials in clinical psychology have not been subject to these requirements; it is unknown to what extent they are registered. We searched the 25 highest-impact clinical psychology journals that published at least 1 RCT of a health-related psychological intervention in 2013. For included trials, we evaluated their registration status (prospective, retrospective, not registered) and the completeness of their outcome definitions. We identified 163 articles that reported 165 RCTs; 73 (44%) RCTs were registered, of which only 25 (15%) were registered prospectively. Of registered RCTs, only 42 (58%) indicated their registration status in the publication. Only 2 (1% of all trials) were registered prospectively and defined their primary outcomes completely. For the primary outcome(s), 72 (99%) of all registrations defined the domain, 67 (92%) the time frame, and 48 (66%) the specific measurements. Only 19 (26%) and 5 (7%) defined the specific metric and method of aggregation, respectively, for all primary outcomes. Very few reports of RCTs published in clinical psychology journals were registered prospectively and completely. Clinical psychology journals could improve transparency and reproducibility, as well as reduce bias, by requiring complete prospective trial registration for publication and by including trial registration numbers in all reports of RCTs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The difficulty of making psychology research and clinical practice relevant to medicine: experiences and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Rodger

    2008-03-01

    Psychology and medicine research and practice have demonstrated substantial and unique bodies of knowledge designed to both improve patient care and respond to contemporary health care needs for use of evidence and cost consciousness. At their full potential they represent a significant paradigm shift in healthcare. Despite impressive successes, it is clear that we are just on the cusp of such a change. These findings have had limited impact and penetration into medical practice, particularly outside of academic medicine and large, organized systems of health care, and there are multiple examples of such limitations in various arenas of health care. There also appear to be common themes to such examples which provide us opportunities to consider how psychologists might move things ahead. They also suggest how our unique position in academic medicine can both limit our impact and provide ways of creating continued shifts in the healthcare paradigm.

  2. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  3. FORENSIC-CLINICAL INTERVIEW: RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Fariña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forensic evaluation of psychological injury involves the use of a multimethod approximation i.e., a psychometric instrument, normally the MMPI-2, and a clinical interview. In terms of the clinical interview, the traditional clinical interview (e.g., SCID is not valid for forensic settings as it does not fulfil the triple objective of forensic evaluation: diagnosis of psychological injury in terms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD, a differential diagnosis of feigning, and establishing a causal relationship between allegations of intimate partner violence (IPV and psychological injury. To meet this requirement, Arce and Fariña (2001 created the forensic-clinical interview based on two techniques that do not contaminate the contents i.e., reinstating the contexts and free recall, and a methodic categorical system of contents analysis for the diagnosis of psychological injury and a differential diagnosis of feigning. The reliability and validity of the forensic-clinical interview designed for the forensic evaluation of psychological injury was assessed in 51 genuine cases of (IPV and 54 mock victims of IPV who were evaluated using a forensic-clinical interview and the MMPI-2. The result revealed that the forensic-clinical interview was a reliable instrument (α = .85 for diagnostic criteria of psychological injury, and α = .744 for feigning strategies. Moreover, the results corroborated the predictive validity (the diagnosis of PTSD was similar to the expected rate; the convergence validity (the diagnosis of PTSD in the interview strongly correlated with the Pk Scale of the MMPI-2, and discriminant validity (the diagnosis of PTSD in the interview did not correlate with the Pk Scale in feigners. The feigning strategies (differential diagnosis also showed convergent validity (high correlation with the Scales and indices of the MMPI2 for the measure of feigning and discriminant validity (no genuine victim was classified as a feigner

  4. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. What Do Clinical Supervisors Require to Teach Residents in Family Medicine How to Care for Seniors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Anik M C; Lebel, Paule; Morin, Michèle; Proust, Françoise; Rodríguez, Charo; Carnovale, Valerie; Champagne, Louise; Légaré, France; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Martineau, Bernard; Karazivan, Philippe; Durand, Pierre J

    2018-03-01

    We assessed clinicians' continuing professional development (CPD) needs at family practice teaching clinics in the province of Quebec. Our mixed methodology design comprised an environmental scan of training programs at four family medicine departments, an expert panel to determine priority clinical situations for senior care, a supervisors survey to assess their perceived CPD needs, and interviews to help understand the rationale behind their needs. From the environmental scan, the expert panel selected 13 priority situations. Key needs expressed by the 352 survey respondents (36% response rate) included behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, polypharmacy, depression, and cognitive disorders. Supervisors explained that these situations were sometimes complex to diagnose and manage because of psychosocial aspects, challenges of communicating with patients and families, and coordination of interprofessional teams. Supervisors also reported more CPD needs in long-term and home care, given the presence of caregivers and complexity of senior care in these settings.

  6. Primary palliative care clinic pilot project demonstrates benefits of a nurse practitioner-directed clinic providing primary and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Darrell; Eby, Kerry; Burson, Sean; Green, Meghan; McGoodwin, Wendy; Isaac, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Primary Palliative Care Pilot Project was to determine if patients with a life-limiting illness who receive their primary care and palliative care from a consistent provider via a nurse practitioner (NP)-founded and-directed Primary Palliative Care Clinic at a public hospital would have improved symptom management and decreased emergency department utilization over time. All patients followed in the Harborview Primary Palliative Care Clinic from January to March 2010. The results of this project demonstrate that patients with a life-limiting illness who receive their primary care and palliative care in an NP-founded and -directed Primary Palliative Care Clinic have decreased utilization of the emergency department, and some experience improvement in symptom assessment scores. Palliative care providers and administrators should explore opportunities to expand outpatient palliative care clinics with an emphasis on primary care and continuity of care. NPs by experience and education are ideally suited to manage both primary and palliative care needs for people at the end of life. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. An exploration of how spiritual nursing care is applied in clinical nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia V. Monareng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual nursing care is a significant concept for nurses as they are expected to provide holistic care to patients. Many nurses have difficulty to understand and integrate it into practice and consequently neglect this aspect of care. The study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses provide spiritual care to patients. A generic qualitative, explorative and descriptive study was conducted based on Symbolic Interactionism as the philosophical base. The population comprised professional nurses from a public hospital. Participants were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling methods. Data were collected through the use of individual, focus group interviews and observation. Data analysis methods utilised included the NUD*ISTcomputer program, coding, constant comparison method and Tesch’s guidelines on data analysis. Findings revealed that nurses struggled to conceptualise spiritual nursing care and to differentiate it from emotional, social or psychological care. However, prayer with or for patients and singing spiritual songs had the highest count of interventions perceived to be effective. Recommendations suggest that the scope of practice and curriculum of training of nurses be reviewed to consider how spiritual nursing care can be evidenced and realised both in the classroom and in the clinical setting. Spiritual nursing care is still a neglected and seemingly complex component of patient care. However, the scientific worldview practices, beliefs and insufficient statutory endorsement of such care hamper its realisation in practice.

  8. [Clinical and psychopathological profile of women victims of psychological partner violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, C; Dubois, F; Jaafari, N; Carl, T; Gaillard, P; Camus, V; El Hage, W

    2009-08-01

    Partner violence is a serious public health problem, due to their potential short-, medium- or long-term physical and psychological consequences. Violence is unbearable when it occurs between family members, and often remains unrevealed, invisible, hidden and repeated. The woman possibly feels trapped in a relationship of imprisonment. International studies have well-explored the psychopathological aspects of physical and sexual abuse within couples, but few explored the clinical profile of women victims of psychological violence or moral harassment. This study aims to define the clinical and psychopathological profile of women who are victims of psychological intimate partner violence. We contacted 628 women who consulted consecutively at the emergency ward of a university hospital covering a 300,000 catchment area. The telephone screening of psychological violence was therefore carried out using the Women's Experience with Battering (WEB) questionnaire (N=226). An optional clinical interview was given to the women declaring themselves as victims of psychological intimate partner violence (N=56) to evaluate the life events and the psychiatric disorders according to the DSM-IV. Finally, 43 participants (77%) gave their opinion on the qualitative aspects of the WEB questionnaire and their level of ease with this report. In 63% (N=35) of the cases, the victims and their partners had a rather high socioprofessional level. Women refer to emergency ward mostly for complaint of vague idiopathic pain (49%) or for psychiatric disorders (52%) with predominance of anxiety (28%) or addictive disorders (19%). The prevalence of potentially traumatic life events was found to be high in this group (83%). The traumatic psychological intimate partner violence was associated with a heightened prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities, like anxiety (72%), depression (100%), posttraumatic stress disorder (100%), and addiction to alcohol (100%) or another psychoactive substance (50

  9. Process evaluation of the national clinical care programmes in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Darker, Catherine D; Nicolson, Gail; Barry, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Integrated networks of clinical leadership have been increasingly recognised as a strategy to improve patient care. Research has shown that these interventions can be effective vehicles for quality improvement through standardised patient care and also in improved patient outcomes. The aim of the current research is to determine whether a subset of the National Clinical Care Programmes (NCCPs) in Ireland have been implemented as intended. This study will also identify barriers a...

  10. Correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression perpetration in a clinical sample of alcoholic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachadourian, Lorig K; Taft, Casey T; O'Farrell, Timothy J; Doron-Lamarca, Susan; Murphy, Christopher M

    2012-04-01

    This study longitudinally examined correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression in a sample of 178 men seeking treatment for alcoholism and their partners, building on a previous investigation examining correlates of intimate partner physical aggression (Taft et al., 2010). The men were largely Caucasian; average age was 41.0 years. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires that assessed distal and proximal predictors of psychological aggression perpetration. Distal factors, assessed at baseline, included initial alcohol problem severity, beliefs about alcohol, and antisocial personality characteristics. Proximal factors, assessed at baseline and at follow-ups 6 and 12 months later, included alcohol and drug use, relationship adjustment, and anger. Psychological aggression was assessed at all three time points. Findings showed that both groups of variables were associated with psychological aggression perpetration. Beliefs that drinking causes relationship problems and variables related to alcohol consumption exhibited the strongest associations with psychological aggression. The findings are consistent with theoretical models that emphasize both distal and proximal effects of drinking on intimate partner aggression. Implications for clinical interventions and directions for future research are discussed. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Correlates of Intimate Partner Psychological Aggression Perpetration in a Clinical Sample of Alcoholic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachadourian, Lorig K.; Taft, Casey T.; O’Farrell, Timothy J.; Doron-LaMarca, Susan; Murphy, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    This study longitudinally examined correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression in a sample of 178 men seeking treatment for alcoholism and their partners, building on a previous investigation examining correlates of intimate partner physical aggression (Taft et al., 2010). The men were largely Caucasian; average age was 41.0 years. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires that assessed distal and proximal predictors of psychological aggression perpetration. Distal factors, assessed at baseline, included initial alcohol problem severity, beliefs about alcohol, and antisocial personality characteristics. Proximal factors, assessed at baseline and at follow-ups 6 and 12 months later, included alcohol and drug use, relationship adjustment, and anger. Psychological aggression was assessed at all three time points. Findings showed that both groups of variables were associated with psychological aggression perpetration. Beliefs that drinking causes relationship problems and variables related to alcohol consumption exhibited the strongest associations with psychological aggression. The findings are consistent with theoretical models that emphasize both distal and proximal effects of drinking on intimate partner aggression. Implications for clinical interventions and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:22409160

  12. Dyadic psychological intervention for patients with cancer and caregivers in home-based specialized palliative care: The Domus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heymann-Horan, Annika B; Puggaard, Louise B; Nissen, Kathrine G; Benthien, Kirstine Skov; Bidstrup, Pernille; Coyne, James; Johansen, Christoffer; Kjellberg, Jakob; Nordly, Mie; Sjøgren, Per; Timm, Helle; von der Maase, Hans; Guldin, Mai-Britt

    2017-03-30

    Patients with incurable cancer and their informal caregivers have numerous psychological and psychosocial needs. Many of these patients wish to receive their care and die at home. Few home-based specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions systematically integrate psychological support. We present a psychological intervention for patient-caregiver dyads developed for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) of home-based SPC, known as Domus, as well as the results of an assessment of its acceptability and feasibility. The Domus model of SPC for patients with incurable cancer and their caregivers offered systematic psychological assessment and dyadic intervention as part of interdisciplinary care. Through accelerated transition to SPC, the aim of the model was to enhance patients' chances of receiving care and dying at home. Integration of psychological support sought to facilitate this goal by alleviating distress in patients and caregivers. Psychologists provided needs-based sessions based on existential-phenomenological therapy. Feasibility and acceptability were investigated by examining enrollment, nonparticipation, and completion of psychological sessions. Enrollment in the RCT and uptake of the psychological intervention indicated that it was feasible and acceptable to patients and caregivers. The strengths of the intervention included its focus on dyads, psychological distress, and existential concerns, as well as interdisciplinary collaboration and psychological interventions offered according to need. Its main limitation was a lack of an intervention for other family members. Our results show that psychological intervention can be systematically integrated into SPC and that it appears feasible to provide dyadic needs-based sessions with an existential therapeutic approach. The Domus RCT will provide evidence of the efficacy of a novel model of multidisciplinary SPC.

  13. The effect of exercise on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia: the EVIDEM-E randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, David; Cerga-Pashoja, Arlinda; Iliffe, Steve; Thuné-Boyle, Ingela; Griffin, Mark; Lee, James; Bailey, Alex; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Warner, James

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple dyadic (person with dementia and their main carer) exercise regimen as a therapy for the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. A two arm, pragmatic, randomised, controlled, single-blind, parallel-group trial of a dyadic exercise regimen (individually tailored walking regimen designed to become progressively intensive and last between 20-30 min, at least five times per week).Community-dwelling individuals with ICD-10 confirmed dementia with the following: clinically significant behavioural and psychological symptoms, a carer willing and able to co-participate in the exercise regimen, and no physical conditions or symptoms that would preclude exercise participation were invited by mental health or primary care services into the study. One hundred and thirty-one dyads were recruited to this study. There was no significant difference in Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms as measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory at week 12 between the group receiving the dyadic exercise regimen and those that did not (adjusted difference in means (intervention minus control) = -1.53, p = 0.6, 95% CI [-7.37, 4.32]). There was a significant between-group difference in caregiver's burden as measured by the Zarit Caregiver Burden Inventory at week 12 (OR = 0.18, p = 0.01, CI [0.05, 0.69]) favouring the exercise group. This study found that regular simple exercise does not appear to improve the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, but did seem to attenuate caregiver burden. Further study to improve exercise uptake are needed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Psychological well-being over time among informal caregivers caring for persons with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethin, Connie; Renom-Guiteras, Anna; Zwakhalen, Sandra; Soto-Martin, Maria; Saks, Kai; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Challis, David J; Nilsson, Christer; Karlsson, Staffan

    2017-11-01

    To investigate informal caregivers' psychological well-being and predicted increase in psychological well-being, when caring for persons with dementia (PwDs) living at home, related to caregiver, PwD and formal care (FC) factors. A cohort study at baseline and 3 months' follow-up in eight European countries. Caregivers included (n = 1223) were caring for PwDs aged ≥ 65 years at home. Data on caregivers, PwDs and FC were collected using standardized instruments. Regression analysis of factors associated with caregiver psychological well-being at baseline and 3 months later was performed. Factors associated with caregiver psychological well-being at baseline were positive experience of caregiving, low caregiver burden, high quality of life (QoL) for caregivers, male gender of PwD, high QoL of PwD, few neuropsychiatric symptoms and depressive symptoms for the PwD. At follow-up, caregivers with increased psychological well-being experienced of quality of care (QoC) higher and were more often using dementia specific service. Predicting factors for caregivers' increased psychological well-being were less caregiver burden, positive experience of caregiving, less supervision of the PwD and higher caregiver QoL, if PwD were male, had higher QoL and less neuropsychiatric symptoms. Furthermore, higher QoC predicted increased caregivers' psychological well-being. Informal caregiving for PwDs living at home is a complex task. Our study shows that caregivers' psychological well-being was associated with, among other things, less caregiver burden and higher QoL. Professionals should be aware of PwD neuropsychiatric symptoms that might affect caregivers' psychological well-being, and provide proper care and treatment for caregivers and PwDs.

  15. Psychological, interpersonal, and clinical factors predicting time spent on physical activity among Mexican patients with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ybarra Sagarduy JL

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available José Luis Ybarra Sagarduy,1 Dacia Yurima Camacho Mata,1 José Moral de la Rubia,2 Julio Alfonso Piña López,3 José Luis Masud Yunes Zárraga4 1Unit of Social Work and Human Development, Autonomous University of Tamaulipas, Ciudad Victoria, 2School of Psychology, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, 3Independent Researcher, Hermosillo, 4Institute of Health and Safety Services for State Workers, Clinic for the Study and Prevention of the Chilhood Obesity, Ciudad Victoria, Mexico Background: It is widely known that physical activity is the key to the optimal management and clinical control of hypertension.Purpose: This research was conducted to identify factors that can predict the time spent on physical activity among Mexican adults with hypertension.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 182 Mexican patients with hypertension, who completed a set of self-administered questionnaires related to personality, social support, and medical adherence and health care behaviors, body mass index, and time since the disease diagnosis. Several path analyses were performed in order to test the predictors of the study behavior.Results: Lower tolerance to frustration, more tolerance to ambiguity, more effective social support, and less time since the disease diagnosis predicted more time spent on physical activity, accounting for 13.3% of the total variance. The final model shows a good fit to the sample data (pBS =0.235, χ2/gl =1.519, Jöreskog and Sörbom’s Goodness of Fit Index =0.987, adjusted modality =0.962, Bollen’s Incremental Fit Index =0.981, Bentler-Bonett Normed Fit Index =0.946, standardized root mean square residual =0.053.Conclusion: The performance of physical activity in patients with hypertension depends on a complex set of interactions between personal, interpersonal, and clinical variables. Understanding how these factors interact might enhance the design of interdisciplinary intervention programs so

  16. Effects of mindfulness-based psychological care on mood and sleep of leukemia patients in chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixing Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore the benefits of mindfulness-based psychological care (MBPC and assess whether the intervention would be beneficial in reducing insomnia and emotional symptoms of leukemia patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods: A randomized control design study was applied in two hematology departments in a hospital in Zhengzhou. Patients in the experimental group received mindfulness-based psychological care(MBPC, and those in the control group received conventional care. Anxiety, depression, and sleeping problems were measured using the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed among anxiety, depression, and sleeping problems between the two groups in the post-test (P < 0.05. A significant decrease in anxiety and depression and an improvement in sleep were observed between pre- and post-interventions (P < 0.05 in the experimental group. Conclusions: MBPC significantly improved sleep quality and mood of the experimental group. It is an effective complementary therapy for leukemia treatment that is inexpensive, noninvasive, and associated with relaxation and pain reduction. Keywords: Chemotherapy, Leukemia, Mood, Sleep, Mindfulness

  17. The STarT Back Screening Tool and Individual Psychological Measures: Evaluation of Prognostic Capabilities for Low Back Pain Clinical Outcomes in Outpatient Physical Therapy Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Mark D.; Fritz, Julie M.; Robinson, Michael E.; Asal, Nabih R.; Nisenzon, Anne N.

    2013-01-01

    disability at 6 months. Limitations Physical therapy treatment was not standardized or accounted for in the analysis. Conclusions Prediction of clinical outcomes by psychology-based measures was dependent upon the clinical outcome domain of interest. Similar to studies from the primary care setting, initial screening with the SBT provided additional prognostic information for 6-month disability and changes in SBT overall scores may provide important clinical decision-making information for treatment monitoring. PMID:23125279

  18. The STarT back screening tool and individual psychological measures: evaluation of prognostic capabilities for low back pain clinical outcomes in outpatient physical therapy settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M; Bishop, Mark D; Fritz, Julie M; Robinson, Michael E; Asal, Nabih R; Nisenzon, Anne N; George, Steven Z

    2013-03-01

    not standardized or accounted for in the analysis. Prediction of clinical outcomes by psychology-based measures was dependent upon the clinical outcome domain of interest. Similar to studies from the primary care setting, initial screening with the SBT provided additional prognostic information for 6-month disability and changes in SBT overall scores may provide important clinical decision-making information for treatment monitoring.

  19. Confidence intervals for effect sizes: compliance and clinical significance in the Journal of Consulting and clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgaard, Eric C; Fowler, Robert L

    2010-06-01

    In 2005, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) became the first American Psychological Association (APA) journal to require statistical measures of clinical significance, plus effect sizes (ESs) and associated confidence intervals (CIs), for primary outcomes (La Greca, 2005). As this represents the single largest editorial effort to improve statistical reporting practices in any APA journal in at least a decade, in this article we investigate the efficacy of that change. All intervention studies published in JCCP in 2003, 2004, 2007, and 2008 were reviewed. Each article was coded for method of clinical significance, type of ES, and type of associated CI, broken down by statistical test (F, t, chi-square, r/R(2), and multivariate modeling). By 2008, clinical significance compliance was 75% (up from 31%), with 94% of studies reporting some measure of ES (reporting improved for individual statistical tests ranging from eta(2) = .05 to .17, with reasonable CIs). Reporting of CIs for ESs also improved, although only to 40%. Also, the vast majority of reported CIs used approximations, which become progressively less accurate for smaller sample sizes and larger ESs (cf. Algina & Kessleman, 2003). Changes are near asymptote for ESs and clinical significance, but CIs lag behind. As CIs for ESs are required for primary outcomes, we show how to compute CIs for the vast majority of ESs reported in JCCP, with an example of how to use CIs for ESs as a method to assess clinical significance.

  20. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, W Y; Lam, Cindy L K; Lo, S V

    2011-06-01

    To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders) project and clinical guidelines from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States. This review was limited to studies involving adult, primary care patients. Where available, evidence from systematic reviews and meta-analyses were used to synthesise findings. Combinations of the following terms (and related terms) were used to identify studies: primary care, clinic, allied-health, nurse-led, fall prevention, continence care, incontinence, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary disease, respiratory rehabilitation, mental health, mental wellbeing, depression, anxiety, wound care, leg ulcer, venous ulcer, dressings clinic, wound clinic, medication review, pharmacist-led, pharmaceutical care. A total of 21 international guidelines and 33 studies were selected for data synthesis. Despite a lack of consistent outcomes data, it is apparent that certain aspects of organisational structure and clinical care processes are important though not necessarily sufficient indicators of quality of care, because they themselves can influence care outcomes. Seven key factors were identified which seem important determinants of the quality of care provided by nurse- and allied health personnel-led clinics. Delivery of primary health care by nurse and allied health personnel-led teams is a well-established model, internationally. Evidence from the literature provides benchmarks for standards of good practice. Knowledge of factors influencing quality of care can assist the planning

  1. Introduction of an Advance Care Planning Clinic in a Regional Care Coordination Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Belinda; Appleton, Wendy; Heazlewood, Toni; Ironside, Jan; Dugdale, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Advance Care Planning is an increasingly important consideration in health care service provision. Barriers to Advance Care Planning including lower prioritization than clinical care, and the complex logistics of completing the documentation have been identified in the literature and clinical practice. The Chronic Care Program within Canberra Hospital and Health Services introduced mobile and outpatient Advance Care Planning Clinics for care coordinated patients with chronic diseases, to address some of these barriers and facilitate end-of-life care discussion amongst this patient group. The implementation of the clinics was evaluated, looking at the practicality of running these clinics within existing resources and patient acceptability. The number of Statement of Choices completed was used as a marker of whether the clinics led to an increase in Advance Care Planning amongst this patient group. The introduction of the clinics received positive feedback from patients and was able to beimplemented without requiring additional external resources. Following introduction of the Advance Care Planning clinics, an increase in the proportion of patients with a completed a Statement of Choices was seen.

  2. [Education of clinical pharmacy specialists in critical care in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Mikihiro

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, recent initiation of the reimbursement from the government to monitor patients in intensive care unit (ICU) and the foundation of certified emergency medicine and critical care specialist resulted in the increased number of ICU pharmacists. Because most pharmacy schools in Japan have provided few lectures or rotations related to critical care, pharmacy students may think critical care is a difficult field. Pharmacy students in the United States usually have basic didactic courses for critical care such as sepsis or sedation. They can also take critical care rotations as an elective advanced rotation. An organized postgraduate training programs, pharmacy practice residency programs (PGY1; post graduate year 1) and specialized pharmacy practice residency programs (PGY2), develop clinical knowledge and skills as clinical pharmacists. Critical care is one of the most popular areas in PGY2 specialty residency programs. Through three years pharmacy students and residents can develop required knowledge and skills in critical care such as patient monitoring skill. As a part of new pharmacists training, our institution provides a week of critical care rotation. The main objective is the introduction of critical care to be a pharmacy generalist and to develop patient monitoring skills. The critical care rotation is the first step to develop critical care clinical pharmacy specialists in the future.

  3. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives....... Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for public...

  4. Wise Additions Bridge the Gap between Social Psychology and Clinical Practice: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as an Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Johanna B; Disabato, David J; Goodman, Fallon R; Carter, Sarah P; DiMauro, Jennifer C; Riskind, John H

    2016-01-01

    Progress in clinical science, theory, and practice requires the integration of advances from multiple fields of psychology, but much integration remains to be done. The current article seeks to address the specific gap that exists between basic social psychological theories and the implementation of related therapeutic techniques. We propose several "wise additions," based upon the principles outlined by Walton (2014), intended to bridge current social psychological research with clinical psychological therapeutic practice using cognitive behavioral therapy as an example. We consider how recent advances in social psychological theories can inform the development and implementation of wise additions in clinical case conceptualization and interventions. We specifically focus on self and identity, self-affirmation, transference, social identity, and embodied cognition, five dominant areas of interest in the field that have clear clinical applications.

  5. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Gynecologic and Obstetric Care for Breast Cancer Survivors: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Griffin

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer treatment has an impact on the physical, psychologic, sexual, and reproductive aspects of women's lives. Therefore, it is important for obstetrician-gynecologists to be well versed in the screening, diagnosis, and management of breast cancer. This monograph is an overview of critical issues related to the provision of ongoing care to breast cancer survivors.

  6. The relationship between voice climate and patients' experience of timely care in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Yuan, Christina T; Shabanova, Veronika; Cleary, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of the patient care experience, despite being central to quality care, are often problematic. In particular, patients frequently report problems with timeliness of care. As yet, research offers little insight on setting characteristics that contribute to patients' experience of timely care. The aims of this study were to assess the relationship between organizational climate and patients' reports of timely care in primary care clinics and to broadly examine the link between staff's work environment and patient care experiences. We test hypotheses about the relationship between voice climate--staff feeling safe to speak up about issues--and reported timeliness of care, consistency in reported voice climate across professions, and how climate differences for various professions relate to timely care. We conducted a cross-sectional study of employees (n = 1,121) and patients (n = 8,164) affiliated with 37 clinics participating in a statewide reporting initiative. Employees were surveyed about clinics' voice climate, and patients were surveyed about the timeliness of care. Hypotheses were tested using analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations. Clinical and administrative staff (e.g., nurses and office assistants) reported clinics' climates to be significantly less supportive of voice than did clinical leaders (e.g., physicians). The greater the difference in reported support for voice between professional groups, the less patients reported experiencing timely care in three respects: obtaining an appointment, seeing the doctor within 15 minutes of appointment time, and receiving test results. In clinics where staff reported climates supportive of voice, patients indicated receiving more timely care. Clinical leaders' reports of voice climate had no relationship to reported timeliness of care. Our findings suggest the importance of clinics developing a strong climate for voice, particularly for clinical and administrative staff, to support better

  7. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The contribution of maternal psychological functioning to infant length of stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Amanda S; Mignogna, Melissa R; Roddenberry Vaz, Angela; Hetherington, Carla; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Anderson, Michael P; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Assess maternal psychological functioning within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and its contribution to neonate length of stay (LOS) in the NICU. Mothers of infants admitted to the NICU (n=111) were assessed regarding postpartum depression, postpartum social support, postpartum NICU stress, and maternal anxiety at 2 weeks postpartum. Illness severity was assessed with the Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB). Postpartum depression was not significantly correlated with LOS, but was significantly correlated with trait anxiety (r=0.620), which was significantly correlated with LOS (r=0.227). Among mothers with previous mental health history, substance abuse history and CRIB score were the best predictors of LOS. For mothers without a prior mental health issues, delivery type, stress associated with infant appearance, and CRIB scores were the best predictors of LOS. In this group, LOS was found to increase on average by 7.06 days per one unit increase in stress associated with infant appearance among mothers with the same delivery type and CRIB score. Significant correlations of trait anxiety, stress associated with infant appearance, and parental role with LOS support the tenet that postpartum psychological functioning can be associated with NICU LOS.

  9. Psychological experience of patients 3 months after a stay in the intensive care unit: A descriptive and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahraoui, Khadija; Laurent, Alexandra; Bioy, Antoine; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The purpose was to describe psychological experiences of patients 3 months after a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) using qualitative methods. Twenty patients underwent clinical interview lasting 1 hour and completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised and Hospital Anxiety and Depression questionnaires. All interviews were recorded and coded using thematic analysis. All patients (100%) reported that they could not remember their ICU stay; half reported confused memories (50%) or disorientation (50%). Negatives memories were also reported (20%-45%), namely, pain, distress, sleep difficulties, noise, fear, feeling of abandonment; 20% reported positive memories. At 3 months, for 10 (50%) of 20 patients, their ICU experience was characterized by anxiety; 3 (15%) of 20 presented posttraumatic stress disorder; 7 (35%) of 20 reported a feeling of well-being with positive life changes. Well-being seems to be associated with use of coping strategies, such as active coping, positive reframing, optimism, humor, acceptance, leisure activities, and family support. Our study highlights the need to investigate patients' memories of ICU and the coping strategies used by patients to improve their ICU experience. Our findings suggest that a systematic follow-up consultation after ICU discharge would be useful for monitoring of post-ICU psychological outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Promoting Mentalization in Clinical Psychology at Universities: A Linguistic Analysis of Student Accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Maria Francesca; Esposito, Giovanna; Quaranta, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the structure of mentalization (Bateman & Fonagy, 2012) in a training context. The dual purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of practicum student training and whether the Linguistic Inquiry method (Pennebaker, 2000) could be used to evaluate the three dimensions of mentalization - relational, cognitive, and emotional. The training utilized the groups and their accounts as devices and mediators to conceptualize the relationship between self-mentalizing training, the academic context and the practicum experience. Accounts from 38 Italian students pursuing master degree in Clinical, Dynamic, and Community Psychology were analyzed by LIWC software. The Wilcoxon test showed a significant increase in mentalizing words during the middle and end of the term, as compared with the beginning. The results displayed a need to promote mentalization within academic settings and indicated the value of this competence for clinical psychology.

  11. Visual Impairment/lntracranial Pressure Risk Clinical Care Data Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Mason, Sara S.; Taiym, Wafa; Wear, Mary L.; Moynihan, Shannan; Alexander, David; Hart, Steve; Tarver, William

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2010, several ISS crewmembers returned from spaceflight with changes to their vision, ranging from a mild hyperopic shift to frank disc edema. As a result, NASA expanded clinical vision testing to include more comprehensive medical imaging, including Optical Coherence Tomography and 3 Tesla Brain and Orbit MRIs. The Space and Clinical Operations (SCO) Division developed a clinical practice guideline that classified individuals based on their symptoms and diagnoses to facilitate clinical care. For the purposes of clinical surveillance, this classification was applied retrospectively to all crewmembers who had sufficient testing for classification. This classification is also a tool that has been leveraged for researchers to identify potential risk factors. In March 2014, driven in part by a more comprehensive understanding of the imaging data and increased imaging capability on orbit, the SCO Division revised their clinical care guidance to outline in-flight care and increase post-flight follow up. The new clinical guidance does not include a classification scheme

  12. Barriers and enablers to the delivery of psychological care in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in China: a qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Anna; Yang, Hui; Thomas, Shane A; Searle, Kendall; Browning, Colette

    2016-03-29

    China has the largest number of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) cases globally and individuals with T2DM have an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and functional problems. Despite guidelines recommending that psychological care be delivered in conjunction with standard T2DM care; psychological care is not routinely delivered in China. Community Health Centre (CHC) doctors play a key role in the management of patients with T2DM in China. Understanding the behavioural determinants of CHC doctors in the implementation of psychological care recommendations allows for the design of targeted and culturally appropriate interventions. As such, this study aimed to examine barriers and enablers to the delivery of psychological care to patients with T2DM from the perspective of CHC doctors in China. Two focus groups were conducted with 23 CHC doctors from Shenzhen, China. The discussion guide applied the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) that examines current practice and identifies key barriers and enablers perceived to influence practice. Focus groups were conducted with an interpreter, and were digitally recorded and transcribed. Two researchers independently coded transcripts into pre-defined themes using deductive thematic analysis. Barriers and enablers perceived by doctors as being relevant to the delivery of psychological care for patients with T2DM were primarily categorised within eight TDF domains. Key barriers included: CHC doctors' knowledge and skills; time constraints; and absence of financial incentives. Other barriers included: societal perception that treating psychological aspects of health is less important than physical health; lack of opinion leaders; doctors' intentional disregard of psychological care; and doubts regarding the efficacy of psychological care. In contrast, perceived enablers included: training of CHC doctors in psychological skills; identification of afternoon/evening clinic times when recommendations could be

  13. Cognitive Impairment and Psychological Distress at Discharge from Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chi Ryang; Yoo, Hye Jin; Park, Jinkyeong; Ryu, Seunghyong

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate cognitive impairment and psychological distress of critically ill patients at discharge from intensive care unit (ICU). This study included 30 critically ill patients who had neither pre-existing dementia nor ongoing delirium. At ICU discharge, they performed a screening test for cognitive impairment (Mini-Cog test) and completed questionnaires for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-2, PHQ-2) and for 4 stressful experiences during ICU stay including nightmares, severe anxiety or panic, severe pain, and trouble to breathe or feeling of suffocation (Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome 14-Question Inventory, PTSS-14 Part A). Thirteen patients (43.3%) screened positive for cognitive impairment and 18 patients (60.0%) exhibited depressive symptoms. Twenty three patients (76.7%) recollected one or more stressful in-ICU experiences. Female patients (88.9%) was more likely to feel depressed at ICU discharge, compared to male patients (47.6%) (χ2=4.47, p=0.03). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on cognitive and psychological outcomes of ICU survivors in Korea. In this study, we observed that a considerable number of critically ill patients had experienced cognitive impairment or psychological distress at ICU discharge.

  14. Financial and psychological stressors associated with caring for children with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Anthony; Narcisse, Marie-Rachelle; Hall, David E; Kuo, Dennis Z

    2014-09-01

    The magnitude of stress and associated health consequences experienced by caregivers compromises their ability to effectively provide care to children, especially children with disability. We used latent class analysis of data from the 2010 Ohio Family Health Survey and identified 3 distinct classes of caregivers based on patterns of responses to 15 financial and psychological stresses they experienced. Compared with children residing in households in which caregivers experienced very little or no stress, children with disability were twice as likely to reside with caregivers with high levels of financial stress and almost 3.5 times as likely to reside with caregivers with high levels of financial stress and very high levels of psychological stress than typically developing children. Reducing caregiver stress is a critical step to ensuring the best health outcomes possible for children with disability. We identify the heterogeneity that is present in the population of caregivers by virtue of patterns of responses to various financial and psychological stressors. Children with disability are more likely to live in households in which a greater number of stressors affect caregivers. Different confounders are also associated with the latent classes of stress we identify. This is an important implication when determining the right interventions to target to the right subpopulations.

  15. Burnout and psychological well-being of personnel of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe E. García

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The working conditions in intensive care units (ICUs are related to a high risk of burnout. In this study we aim to measure the influence of rumination and social support on burnout and psychological well-being in members of the staff of an ICU in a reference hospital in Chile. We proposed a model showing an indirect influence of brooding mediated by social support and burnout on the psychological well-being. We surveyed one hundred and thirty six employees (81.9% of the total of ages 23 to 59 years of age. This sample consisted of 85.3% women and 14.7% men. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, the Ryff Scales of Psychological Well-Being (PWB, Zimet’s Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS, and the Ruminative Responses Scale by Treynor et al (RRS. Results indicated direct relations between social support and well-being, and between brooding and burnout. They also indicated inverse relations between social support and burnout, and between brooding and well-being. The mediation model showed adequate indices of fit.

  16. Measuring Work Engagement, Psychological Empowerment, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior Among Health Care Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Liane; Berta, Whitney; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Rohit Dass, Adrian; Laporte, Audrey; Reid, R Colin; Squires, Janet; Taylor, Deanne

    2016-04-01

    Health care aides (HCAs) provide most direct care in long-term care (LTC) and home and community care (HCC) settings but are understudied. We validate three key work attitude measures to better understand HCAs' work experiences: work engagement (WEng), psychological empowerment (PE), and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB-O). Data were collected from 306 HCAs working in LTC and HCC, using survey items for WEng, PE, and OCB-O adapted for HCAs. Psychometric evaluation involved confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Predictive validity (correlations with measures of job satisfaction and turnover intention) and internal consistency reliability were examined. CFA supported a one-factor model of WEng, a four-factor model of PE, and a one-factor model of OCB-O. HCC workers scored higher than LTC workers on Self-determination (PE) and lower on Impact, demonstrating concurrent validity. WEng and PE correlated with worker outcomes (job satisfaction, turnover intention, and OCB-O), demonstrating predictive validity. Reliability and validity analyses indicated sound psychometric properties overall. Study results support psychometric properties of measures of WEng, PE, and OCB-O for HCAs. Knowledge of HCAs' work attitudes and behaviors can inform recruitment programs, incentive systems, and retention/training strategies for this vital group of care providers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Health care students' personal experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakojärvi, Henna-Riikka; Salminen, Leena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that health care students have experienced bullying by nursing staff in clinical training. Although these studies provide plenty of information considering the manifestation and consequences of bullying on students, there is a gap of knowledge on how health care students' cope with bullying. In addition, previous studies seem to have focused only on the experiences of nursing and midwifery students. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study exploring the bullying experiences of Finnish health care students (n=41) representing two Universities of Applied Sciences. In order to provide information for faculties of health care on bullying intervention and prevention strategies, this study aimed at describing health care students' experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training. Based on previous study findings, an electronic semi-structured questionnaire was developed for the data collection. The qualitative data was analysed using inductive content analysis. The results show that the students experienced verbal and non-verbal bullying in clinical training. In addition to psychological and physical symptoms, bullying also decreased the students' learning, their studying motivation and their professional engagement. One reason why some students did not share their bullying experiences with their teachers and clinical instructors was their idea that sharing their experiences would be useless. On the other hand, students who did share their experiences with a teacher or a clinical instructor usually received emotional support, information, and help in the form of bullying intervention. The results of this study suggest that faculties of health care need to develop action plans against bullying in co-operation with clinical training sites in order to ensure students' learning and professional engagement. In the future, it is suggested that research is focused on factors preventing and contributing to bullying towards health care

  18. The information-processing paradigm: a valuable framework for clinical child and adolescent psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijttebier, Patricia; Vasey, Michael W; Braet, Caroline

    2003-03-01

    Provides an introduction to the special section on information-processing (I-P) factors in child and adolescent psychopathology. First, we describe the I-P paradigm and summarize its central tenets, presenting examples of past research that illustrate the heuristic value of the paradigm. Next, we discuss the potential benefits of the I-P paradigm for the field of clinical child and adolescent psychology. Finally, we present an overview of the articles in the special section.

  19. Clinical, nociceptive and psychological profiling to predict acute pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, I E; Kehlet, H; Petersen, M A

    2017-01-01

    outcome. Predictive variables collected prior to surgery included demographics, nociceptive testing (pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pressor tolerance, electrical pain threshold and tolerance) and psychological profile (pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and hospital anxiety and depression scale...... catastrophizing are predictive of moderate severe post-TKA pain. If validated in a larger population, the clinically applicable tests should be considered in future interventions aiming to minimize post-operative pain in high-risk patients....

  20. Randomised controlled trial of non-directive counselling, cognitive-behaviour therapy, and usual general practitioner care for patients with depression. I: Clinical effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Elaine; King, Michael; Lloyd, Margaret; Bower, Peter; Sibbald, Bonnie; Farrelly, Sharon; Gabbay, Mark; Tarrier, Nicholas; Addington-Hall, Julia

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effectiveness of general practitioner care and two general practice based psychological therapies for depressed patients. Design: Prospective, controlled trial with randomised and patient preference allocation arms. Setting: General practices in London and greater Manchester. Participants: 464 of 627 patients presenting with depression or mixed anxiety and depression were suitable for inclusion. Interventions: Usual general practitioner care ...

  1. The Influence of Preoperative and Postoperative Psychological Symptoms on Clinical Outcome after Shoulder Surgery: A Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; van 't Riet, Esther; Gerritsen, Marleen J J; Madden, Kim; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2016-01-01

    Psychological symptoms are highly prevalent in patients with shoulder complaints. Psychological symptoms in patients with shoulder complaints might play a role in the aetiology, perceived disability and pain and clinical outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess whether preoperative symptoms of distress, depression, anxiety and somatisation were associated with a change in function after shoulder surgery and postoperative patient perceived improvement of pain and function. In addition, the change of psychological symptoms after shoulder surgery was analyzed and the influence of postoperative symptoms of psychological disorders after surgery on the change in function after shoulder surgery and perceived postoperative improvement of pain and function. A prospective longitudinal cohort study was performed in a general teaching hospital. 315 consecutive patients planned for elective shoulder surgery were included. Outcome measures included change of Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score and anchor questions about improvement in pain and function after surgery. Psychological symptoms were identified before and 12 months after surgery with the validated Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ). Psychological symptoms were encountered in all the various shoulder diagnoses. Preoperative symptoms of psychological disorders persisted after surgery in 56% of patients, 10% of patients with no symptoms of psychological disorders before surgery developed new psychological symptoms. Preoperative symptoms of psychological disorders were not associated with the change of DASH score and perceived improvement of pain and function after shoulder surgery. Patients with symptoms of psychological disorders after surgery were less likely to improve on the DASH score. Postoperative symptoms of distress and depression were associated with worse perceived improvement of pain. Postoperative symptoms of distress, depression and somatisation were

  2. Diagnosing Hypertension in Primary Care Clinics According to Current Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolsey, Sarah; Brown, Brittany; Ralls, Brenda; Friedrichs, Michael; Stults, Barry

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive study examines hypertension diagnostic practices in Utah primary care clinics relative to the 2015 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for the accurate diagnosis of hypertension. We assessed clinic procedures in place to facilitate accurate in-office and out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measurement. An online questionnaire was administered to 321 primary care clinics. We compared current clinic BP measurement practices with the USPTF recommendations and assessed the level of adherence to the recommendations by level of clinic integration with a hospital. Of the 321 primary care clinics that received the assessment, 123 (38.3%) completed the questionnaire. Clinics varied significantly in their ability to provide accurate in-office measurement, ranging from 57.5% to 93.5% of clinics complying with USPSTF recommendations. Only 25.2% of clinics reported having access to ambulatory monitoring and 36.6% had instructional materials for accurate home BP monitoring. Clinics integrated with a hospital were more likely to report adherence to recommendations than solo or independent clinics (36.4% vs 10.5%; P primary care clinics are not well prepared to implement the USPSTF guidelines for accurate diagnosis of hypertension. Most office practices will benefit from support to develop their capacities. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Effectiveness of psychological interventions for chronic pain on health care use and work absence: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Andrew; Hearn, Leslie; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2016-04-01

    Psychological interventions for chronic pain and its consequences have been shown to improve mood, disability, pain, and catastrophic thinking, but there has been no systematic review specifically of their effects on health care use or time lost from work as treatment outcomes in mixed chronic pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies for chronic pain (excluding headache) in adults for these outcomes. We used searches from 2 previous systematic reviews and updated them. Eighteen randomized controlled trials were found that reported health care use (15 studies) and work loss (9 studies) as outcomes. Fourteen studies provided data for meta-analysis. There were moderate effects for psychological interventions compared with active controls, treatment as usual and waiting list controls in reducing health care use, with confidence in the findings. No benefits were found for medication reduction, but with less confidence in this result. Analysis of work loss showed no significant effects of psychological interventions over comparisons, but the use of many different metrics necessitated fragmenting the planned analyses, making summary difficult. The results are encouraging for the potential of routine psychological intervention to reduce posttreatment health care use, with associated cost savings, but it is likely that the range and complexity of problems affecting work necessitate additional intervention over standard group psychological intervention.

  4. Attitudes toward Substance Abuse Clients: An Empirical Study of Clinical Psychology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundon, Chandra R; Anderson, Melissa L; Najavits, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) and its frequent comorbidity with mental illness, individuals with SUD are less likely to receive effective SUD treatment from mental health practitioners than SUD counselors. Limited competence and interest in treating this clinical population are likely influenced by a lack of formal training in SUD treatment. Using a factorial survey-vignette design that included three clinical vignettes and a supplementary survey instrument, we investigated whether clinical psychology doctoral students differ in their level of negative emotional reactions toward clients with SUD versus major depressive disorder (MDD); whether they differ in their attributions for SUD versus MDD; and how their negative emotional reactions and attributions impact their interest in pursuing SUD clinical work. Participants were 155 clinical psychology graduate-level doctoral students (72% female). Participants endorsed more negative emotional reactions toward clients with SUD than toward clients with MDD. They were also more likely to identify poor willpower as the cause for SUD than for MDD. More than a third reported interest in working with SUD populations. Highest levels of interest were associated with prior professional and personal experience with SUD, four to six years of clinical experience, and postmodern theoretical orientation.

  5. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2012-01-01

    acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While......The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally....... This article proposes strategies for improving the evidence base for wound care decision making....

  6. Prediction of 6-yr symptom course trajectories of anxiety disorders by diagnostic, clinical and psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Batelaan, Neeltje; Rhebergen, Didi; van Balkom, Anton; Schoevers, Robert; Penninx, Brenda W

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify course trajectories of anxiety disorder using a data-driven method and to determine the incremental predictive value of clinical and psychological variables over and above diagnostic categories. 703 patients with DSM-IV panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, agoraphobia, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder were selected from a prospective cohort study. Latent Growth Mixture Modeling was conducted, based on symptoms of anxiety and avoidance as assessed with the Life Chart Interview covering a 6-year time period. In 44% of the participants symptoms of anxiety and avoidance improved, in 24% remained stable, in 25% slightly increased, and in 7% severely increased. Identified course trajectories were predicted by baseline DSM-IV anxiety categories, clinical variables (i.e., severity and duration and level of disability) and psychological predictors (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, anxiety sensitivity, worry, and rumination). Clinical variables better predicted unfavorable course trajectories than psychological predictors, over and above diagnostic categories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Nurse Specialist Perceptions' of Spiritual Care: Nurses Need Support, Care Falls Short.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mitzi M; Harris, Karen; Hale, Deborah L

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is positioned to influence spiritual care at three levels of practice: patient, nurse, and system. This study, the first to explore CNS spiritual care, reports on CNSs' perceptions in providing spiritual care. Four themes were extracted from interview data: 1) Providing direct spiritual support for patients, 2) Nurses need support in providing spiritual care, 3) Using existing resources, and 4) Spiritual care falls short. Not one CNS mentioned barriers to their direct provision of spiritual care. Results support that CNSs can improve spiritual care delivery.

  8. Narcissistic Personality Disorder in Clinical Health Psychology Practice: Case Studies of Comorbid Psychological Distress and Life-Limiting Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacel, Elizabeth L; Ennis, Nicole; Pereira, Deidre B

    2017-01-01

    Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is characterized by a persistent pattern of grandiosity, fantasies of unlimited power or importance, and the need for admiration or special treatment. Individuals with NPD may experience significant psychological distress related to interpersonal conflict and functional impairment. Research suggests core features of the disorder are associated with poor prognosis in therapy, including slow progress to behavioral change, premature patient-initiated termination, and negative therapeutic alliance. The current manuscript will explore challenges of working with NPD within the context of life-limiting illness for two psychotherapy patients seen in a behavioral health clinic at a large academic health science center. The ways in which their personality disorder affected their illness-experience shared significant overlap characterized by resistance to psychotherapeutic change, inconsistent adherence to medical recommendations, and volatile relationships with providers. In this manuscript we will (1) explore the ways in which aspects of narcissistic personality disorder impacted the patients' physical health, emotional well-being, and healthcare utilization; (2) describe psychotherapeutic methods that may be useful for optimizing psychosocial, behavioral, and physical well-being in individuals with co-morbid NPD and life-limiting disease; and (3) review conceptualizations of NPD from the DSM-5 alternative model for assessing personality function via trait domains.

  9. A Return to "The Clinic" for Community Psychology: Lessons from a Clinical Ethnography in Urban American Indian Behavioral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William E; St Arnault, Denise M; Gone, Joseph P

    2017-12-21

    Community psychology (CP) abandoned the clinic and disengaged from movements for community mental health (CMH) to escape clinical convention and pursue growing aspirations as an independent field of context-oriented, community-engaged, and values-driven research and action. In doing so, however, CP positioned itself on the sidelines of influential contemporary movements that promote potentially harmful, reductionist biomedical narratives in mental health. We advocate for a return to the clinic-the seat of institutional power in mental health-using critical clinic-based inquiry to open sites for clinical-community dialogue that can instigate transformative change locally and nationally. To inform such works within the collaborative and emancipatory traditions of CP, we detail a recently completed clinical ethnography and offer "lessons learned" regarding challenges likely to re-emerge in similar efforts. Conducted with an urban American Indian community behavioral health clinic, this ethnography examined how culture and culture concepts (e.g., cultural competence) shaped clinical practice with socio-political implications for American Indian peoples and the pursuit of transformative change in CMH. Lessons learned identify exceptional clinicians versed in ecological thinking and contextualist discourses of human suffering as ideal partners for this work; encourage intense contextualization and constraining critique to areas of mutual interest; and support relational approaches to clinic collaborations. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  10. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Astrid P; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne H

    2014-06-01

    Concern about obesity has prompted numerous public health campaigns that urge people to be more physically active. The campaigns often include normative statements and attempt to impose restrictions on individuals' lives without considering the complexities of daily life. We suggest that broadening the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for public health initiatives and future efforts should incorporate this aspect.

  11. Identification of clinically significant psychological distress and psychiatric morbidity by examining quality of life in subjects with occupational asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzo Heberto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Juniper Asthma Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ(S is a questionnaire that allows measurement of disease specific quality of life. We wanted to examine correlations between the (AQLQ(S general and different subscale scores and both psychiatric morbidity and levels of psychological distress in individuals with occupational asthma (OA and to determine if results in the emotional function subscale allow identification of individuals with clinically significant psychological distress or current psychiatric disorders. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of individuals with OA who were assessed during a re-evaluation for permanent disability, after they were no longer exposed to the sensitizing agent. Patients underwent a general sociodemographic and medical history evaluation, a brief psychiatric interview (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, PRIME-MD and completed a battery of questionnaires including the AQLQ(S, the St-Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, and the Psychiatric Symptom Index (PSI. Results There was good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.936 for the AQLQ(S total score and construct validity for the AQLQ(S (Spearman rho = -0.693 for the SGRQ symptom score and rho = -0.650 for the asthma severity score. There were medium to large correlations between the total score of the AQLQ(S and the SGRQ symptom score (r = -.693, and PSI total (r = -.619 and subscale scores (including depression, r = -.419; anxiety, r = -.664; anger, r = -.367; cognitive disturbances, r = -.419. A cut-off of 5.1 on the AQLQ(S emotional function subscale (where 0 = high impairment and 7 = no impairment had the best discriminative value to distinguish individuals with or without clinically significant psychiatric distress according to the PSI, and a cut-off of 4.7 best distinguished individuals with or without a current psychiatric disorder according to the PRIME-MD. Conclusions Impaired quality of life is

  12. Help-seeking preferences for psychological distress in primary care: effect of current mental state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kate; Buszewicz, Marta; Weich, Scott; King, Michael

    2008-10-01

    There is much debate over when it is appropriate to intervene medically for psychological distress, and limited evidence on patients' perspectives about a broad range of possible treatment options. It is currently unclear whether preferences may differ for those patients with milder symptoms compared to those experiencing more severe distress. To determine patient preferences for professional, informal, and alternative help for psychological distress in primary care, and the impact of their current mental state on these. Cross-sectional survey in seven general practices across suburban/urban London. Participants were 1357 consecutive general practice attenders aged 18 years and over. The main outcome measure was the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version and a questionnaire on help-seeking preferences. Overall, only 47% of participants reported wanting 'some help' if feeling stressed, worried, or low and it was affecting their daily life. Those currently experiencing mild-to-moderate distress preferred informal sources of help such as friends/family support, relaxation/yoga, exercise/sport, or massage along with general advice from their GP and talking therapies. Self-help (books/leaflets or computer/internet) was not popular at any level of distress, and less favoured by those with mild-to-moderate distress (odds ratio [OR] = 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35 to 0.70). Those experiencing severe distress were much more likely to want talking therapies (OR = 3.43, 95% CI = 2.85 to 4.14), tablets (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = 2.00 to 4.71), and support groups (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = 1.72 to 5.47). People with mild-to-moderate distress appear to prefer informal sources of help and those involving human contact, compared to medication or self-help. This has implications for the implementation of potential interventions for psychological distress in primary care.

  13. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: a patient-based questionnaire of intensive care unit staff perception and relatives' psychological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane S; Schwarzkopf, Daniel; Riedemann, Niels C; Pfeifer, Ruediger; Guenther, Albrecht; Egerland, Kati; Sprung, Charles L; Hoyer, Heike; Gensichen, Jochen; Reinhart, Konrad

    2015-04-01

    Communication is a hallmark of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. It may influence the impact of end-of-life care on patients' relatives. We aimed to assess end-of-life care and communication from the perspective of intensive care unit staff and relate it to relatives' psychological symptoms. Prospective observational study based on consecutive patients with severe sepsis receiving end-of-life care; trial registration NCT01247792. Four interdisciplinary intensive care units of a German University hospital. Responsible health personnel (attendings, residents and nurses) were questioned on the day of the first end-of-life decision (to withdraw or withhold life-supporting therapies) and after patients had died or were discharged. Relatives were interviewed by phone after 90 days. Overall, 145 patients, 610 caregiver responses (92% response) and 84 relative interviews (70% response) were analysed. Most (86%) end-of-life decisions were initiated by attendings and only 2% by nurses; 41% of nurses did not know enough about end-of-life decisions to communicate with relatives. Discomfort with end-of-life decisions was low. Relatives reported high satisfaction with decision-making and care, 87% thought their degree of involvement had been just right. However, 51%, 48% or 33% of relatives had symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression, respectively. Predictors for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were patient age and relatives' gender. Relatives' satisfaction with medical care and communication predicted less anxiety (p = 0.025). Communication should be improved within the intensive care unit caregiver team to strengthen the involvement of nurses in end-of-life care. Improved communication between caregivers and the family might lessen relatives' long-term anxiety. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Shared care requires a shared vision: communities of clinical practice in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jessica; Egan, Tony; Jaye, Chrystal; Williamson, Martyn; Askerud, Anna; Radue, Peter; Penese, Maree

    2017-09-01

    To understand how a vision of care is formed and shared by patients and the primary care professionals involved in their care. To achieve the best health outcomes, it is important for patients and those who care for them to have a mutual understanding about what is important to the patient in their everyday life and why, and what care is necessary to realise this vision. Shared or team care does not necessarily translate to a consistent and integrated approach to a patient's care. An individual patient's care network of clinical and lay participants can be conceptualised as the patient's own 'Community of Clinical Practice' of which they are the central member. Working alongside a long-term conditions nursing team, we conducted a focused ethnography of nine 'Communities of Clinical Practice' in one general practice setting. Participant observation, in-depth qualitative interviews with 24 participants including nine patients, and the patients' medical records. Data were analysed using a template organising style. Primary care professionals' insight into a patient's vision of care evolves through a deep knowing of the patient over time; this is shared between 'Community of Clinical Practice' members, frequently through informal communication and realised through respectful dialogue. These common values - respect, authenticity, autonomy, compassion, trust, care ethics, holism - underpin the development of a shared vision of care. A patient's vision of care, if shared, provides a focus around which 'Community of Clinical Practice' members cohere. Nurses play an important role in sharing the patient's vision of care with other participants. A shared vision of care is an aspirational concept which is difficult to articulate but with attentiveness, sustained authentic engagement and being driven by values, it should evolve amongst the core participants of a 'Community of Clinical Practice'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Developing a Peer Mentorship Program to Increase Competence in Clinical Supervision in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Aleksandra A; Kennard, Beth D; Rodgers, Cynthia; Wolfe, Kristin L; Cassedy, Hannah F; Thomas, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Supervision has recently been recognized as a core competency for clinical psychologists. This recognition of supervision as a distinct competency has evolved in the context of an overall focus on competency-based education and training in health service psychology, and has recently gained momentum. Few clinical psychology doctoral programs offer formal training experiences in providing supervision. A pilot peer mentorship program (PMP) where graduate students were trained in the knowledge and practice of supervision was developed. The focus of the PMP was to develop basic supervision skills in advanced clinical psychology graduate students, as well as to train junior doctoral students in fundamental clinical and practical skills. Advanced doctoral students were matched to junior doctoral students to gain experience in and increase knowledge base in best practices of supervision skills. The 9-month program consisted of monthly mentorship meetings and three training sessions. The results suggested that mentors reported a 30% or more shift from the category of not competent to needs improvement or competent, in the following supervision competencies: theories of supervision, improved skill in supervision modalities, acquired knowledge in supervision, and supervision experience. Furthermore, 50% of the mentors reported that they were not competent in supervision experience at baseline and only 10% reported that they were not competent at the end of the program. Satisfaction data suggested that satisfaction with the program was high, with 75% of participants indicating increased knowledge base in supervision, and 90% indicating that it was a positive addition to their training program. This program was feasible and acceptable and appears to have had a positive impact on the graduate students who participated. Students reported both high satisfaction with the program as well as an increase in knowledge base and experience in supervision skills.

  16. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...... scales and survival. RESULTS: Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0...

  17. Expanding the Aperture of Psychological Assessment: Introduction to the Special Section on Innovative Clinical Assessment Technologies and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary psychological assessment is dominated by tried-and-true methods like clinical interviewing, self-report questionnaires, intellectual assessment, and behavioral observation. These approaches have served as the mainstays of psychological assessment for decades. To be sure, these methods have survived over the years because clinicians…

  18. The impact of windows and daylight on acute-care nurses' physiological, psychological, and behavioral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Rana Sagha; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Williams, Gary; Chung, Susan Sung Eun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the physiological and psychological effects of windows and daylight on registered nurses. To date, evidence has indicated that appropriate environmental lighting with characteristics similar to natural light can improve mood, alertness, and performance. The restorative effects of windows also have been documented. Hospital workspaces generally lack windows and daylight, and the impact of the lack of windows and daylight on healthcare employees' well being has not been thoroughly investigated. Data were collected using multiple methods with a quasi-experimental approach (i.e., biological measurements, behavioral mapping, and analysis of archival data) in an acute-care nursing unit with two wards that have similar environmental and organizational conditions, and similar patient populations and acuity, but different availability of windows in the nursing stations. Findings indicated that blood pressure (p windows and daylight. A possible micro-restorative effect of windows and daylight may result in lowered blood pressure and increased oxygen saturation and a positive effect on circadian rhythms (as suggested by body temperature) and morning sleepiness. Critical care/intensive care, lighting, nursing, quality care, work environment.

  19. Effectiveness of Collaborative Care for Depression in Public-Sector Primary Care Clinics Serving Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, Isabel T; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Green, Jennifer M; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Duan, Naihua; Miranda, Jeanne

    2017-04-01

    Quality improvement interventions for depression care have been shown to be effective for improving quality of care and depression outcomes in settings with primarily insured patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a collaborative care intervention for depression that was tailored for low-income Latino patients seen in public-sector clinics. A total of 400 depressed patients from three public-sector primary care clinics were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a tailored collaborative care intervention versus enhanced usual care. Social workers without previous mental health experience served as depression care specialists for the intervention patients (N=196). Depending on patient preference, they delivered a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention or facilitated antidepressant medication given by primary care providers or both. In enhanced usual care, patients (N=204) received a pamphlet about depression, a letter for their primary care provider stating that they had a positive depression screen, and a list of local mental health resources. Intent-to-treat analyses examined clinical and process-of-care outcomes at 16 weeks. Compared with patients in the enhanced usual care group, patients in the intervention group had significantly improved depression, quality of life, and satisfaction outcomes (pclinics. Social workers without prior mental health experience can effectively provide CBT and manage depression care.

  20. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-06-14

    The world population has become more globalised with increasing number of people residing in another country for work or other reasons. Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia. Data were derived from the 2012 National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a cross sectional survey of primary care encounters from public and private primary care clinics sampled from five regions in Malaysia. Patients with foreign nationality were identified and analysed for demographic profiles, reasons for encounter (RFEs), diagnosis, and provision of care. Foreigners accounted for 7.7 % (10,830) of all patient encounters from NMCS. Most encounters were from private clinics (90.2 %). Median age was 28 years (IQR: 24.0, 34.8) and 69.9 % were male. Most visits to the primary care clinics were for symptom-based complaints (69.5 %), followed by procedures (23.0 %) and follow-up visit (7.4 %). The commonest diagnosis in public clinics was antenatal care (21.8 %), followed by high risk pregnancies (7.5 %) and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) (6.8 %). Private clinics had more cases for general medical examination (13.5 %), URTI (13.1 %) and fever (3.9 %). Medications were prescribed to 76.5 % of these encounters. More foreigners were seeking primary medical care from private clinics and the encounters were for general medical examinations and acute minor ailments. Those who sought care from public clinics were for obstetric problems and chronic diseases. Medications were prescribed to two-thirds of the encounters while other interventions: laboratory investigations, medical procedures and follow-up appointment had lower rates in private clinics. Foreigners are generally of young working group and are expected to have mandatory medical checks. The preponderance of obstetrics seen in public

  1. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: day-care versus clinical observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, Y.; Eshuis, J.; de Haes, H.; de Wit, L. T.; Gouma, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the fe