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Sample records for psychoeducational eating disturbance

  1. Eating Disturbances and Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Stephen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studies the relationship between incest and bulimic behavior. Indicates incest victims are significantly more likely to binge, vomit, experience a loss of control over eating, and report body dissatisfaction than control subjects. Suggests incest may increase risk of bulimic behavior, and that eating problems may be a part of a larger pattern of…

  2. Eating disturbances among adolescent schoolgirls in Jordan.

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    Mousa, Tamara Yousef; Al-Domi, Hayder Abdullah; Mashal, Rima Hussein; Jibril, Musa Abdel-Khaleq

    2010-02-01

    Several studies indicated that the prevalence of eating disorders has increased among adolescent girls. The aim of the present study, therefore, is to investigate the occurrence and correlates of eating disorders among adolescent girls in Amman, Jordan. A sample of 432 adolescent girls aged 10-16 years were recruited from public and private schools in Amman. Information was collected from adolescent schoolgirls through a socio-demographic data sheet, eating attitude test, body shape and eating habits questionnaires. One third of participants had eating disorders, including bulimia nervosa (0.6%), binge eating disorder (1.8%) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (31%), however no anorexic cases were found. Findings also suggested that pubertal, familial and social variables were associated with eating disorders occurrence. Eating disturbances were prevalent among the present population sample. Participants have been more preoccupied with their body weight due to socio-cultural norms that are reinforced by media messages. Further research is needed to develop intervention programs to control eating disorders occurrence in Jordan. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. BEfree: A new psychological program for binge eating that integrates psychoeducation, mindfulness, and compassion.

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    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Carvalho, Sérgio A; Palmeira, Lara; Castilho, Paula; Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Duarte, Joana; Cunha, Marina; Matos, Marcela; Costa, Joana

    2017-09-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is associated with several psychological and medical problems, such as obesity. Approximately 30% of individuals seeking weight loss treatments present binge eating symptomatology. Moreover, current treatments for BED lack efficacy at follow-up assessments. Developing mindfulness and self-compassion seem to be beneficial in treating BED, although there is still room for improvement, which may include integrating these different but complimentary approaches. BEfree is the first program integrating psychoeducation-, mindfulness-, and compassion-based components for treating women with binge eating and obesity. To test the acceptability and efficacy up to 6-month postintervention of a psychological program based on psychoeducation, mindfulness, and self-compassion for obese or overweight women with BED. A controlled longitudinal design was followed in order to compare results between BEfree (n = 19) and waiting list group (WL; n = 17) from preintervention to postintervention. Results from BEfree were compared from preintervention to 3- and 6-month follow-up. BEfree was effective in eliminating BED; in diminishing eating psychopathology, depression, shame and self-criticism, body-image psychological inflexibility, and body-image cognitive fusion; and in improving obesity-related quality of life and self-compassion when compared to a WL control group. Results were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Finally, participants rated BEfree helpful for dealing with impulses and negative internal experiences. These results seem to suggest the efficacy of BEfree and the benefit of integrating different components such as psychoeducation, mindfulness, and self-compassion when treating BED in obese or overweight women. The current study provides evidence of the acceptability of a psychoeducation, mindfulness, and compassion program for binge eating in obesity (BEfree); Developing mindfulness and self-compassionate skills is an effective way of

  4. An interactive psychoeducational intervention for women at risk of developing an eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabinski, Marion F; Wilfley, Denise E; Calfas, Karen J; Winzelberg, Andrew J; Taylor, C Barr

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated a synchronous Internet-delivered intervention (chat room) for improving eating habits and body image in college-age women at risk for developing an eating disorder. Sixty at-risk women (mean age = 18.9, SD = 2.4; 65.0% Caucasian, 19% Latino/Hispanic, 8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 3% African American, 5% other; mean body mass index = 25.6, SD = 5.7) were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 30) or control (n = 30) groups. Once a week for 8 weeks, participants used a private chat room for a 1-hr moderated discussion focused on improving body image and eating behaviors. Additional treatment components included psychoeducation, asynchronous support, homework, and summaries. Assessments were conducted at baseline, posttreatment, and 10 weeks after posttreatment. Participants indicated high satisfaction with the intervention mode. Intervention participants significantly reduced eating pathology and improved self-esteem over controls at follow-up. These findings suggest that synchronous, Internet-delivered programs are efficacious and have potential to reduce problematic attitudes and behaviors that may lead to eating disorders among college-age women.

  5. Biological or psychological? Effects of eating disorder psychoeducation on self-blame and recovery expectations among symptomatic individuals.

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    Farrell, Nicholas R; Lee, Aaron A; Deacon, Brett J

    2015-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed increasing popularity and promotion of biological influences (e.g., genetics) in eating disorder (ED) development. Although research suggests biological models of EDs reduce blame-oriented stigma in the general public, their effect on symptomatic individuals' attitudes toward themselves, treatment, and their prognosis has not been studied. Additionally, little is known about how other credible forms of conceptualizing ED development (e.g., cognitive-behavioral) affect individuals with disordered eating. Accordingly, the present study assessed the effects of three different forms of psychoeducation about ED development (biology-only, malleability of biology, cognitive-behavioral) among a sample high in ED symptoms. Participants (N = 216) viewed an audiovisual presentation describing ED development from one of the three perspectives before completing measures of self-blame for symptoms, prognostic expectations, self-efficacy in recovering, and attitudes toward a description of cognitive-behavioral therapy. There were no significant differences between conditions in self-blame. Relative to biology-only, the psychoeducational messages emphasizing malleable biology and cognitive-behavioral factors produced more prognostic optimism and self-efficacy in recovering. Perceived credibility of cognitive-behavioral therapy and expectations for its efficacy were highest in the cognitive-behavioral psychoeducation condition. Implications for efforts to educate the public and treatment-seeking individuals about the nature of EDs are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hormonal Factors and Disturbances in Eating Disorders.

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    Culbert, Kristen M; Racine, Sarah E; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of the literature regarding hormonal correlates of, and etiologic influences on, eating pathology. Several hormones (e.g., ghrelin, CCK, GLP-1, PYY, leptin, oxytocin, cortisol) are disrupted during the ill state of eating disorders and likely contribute to the maintenance of core symptoms (e.g., dietary restriction, binge eating) and/or co-occurring features (e.g., mood symptoms, attentional biases). Some of these hormones (e.g., ghrelin, cortisol) may also be related to eating pathology via links with psychological stress. Despite these effects, the role of hormonal factors in the etiology of eating disorders remains unknown. The strongest evidence for etiologic effects has emerged for ovarian hormones, as changes in ovarian hormones predict changes in phenotypic and genetic influences on disordered eating. Future studies would benefit from utilizing etiologically informative designs (e.g., high risk, behavioral genetic) and continuing to explore factors (e.g., psychological, neural responsivity) that may impact hormonal influences on eating pathology.

  7. Disturbed eating behaviours and associated psychographic characteristics of college students.

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    Quick, V M; Byrd-Bredbenner, C

    2013-07-01

    Young adulthood is a stressful transition period that may increase the risk for disturbed eating, especially for college students. The present study aimed to explore disturbed eating behaviours and a broad array of associated psychographic characteristics in a large, diverse sample of college students. College students (n = 2604; 58% white; 63% female) enrolled at three large, public US universities in 2009 and 2010 were recruited to take an online survey. The survey included reliable and valid disturbed eating behaviour and associated psychographic characteristic measures. Many participants engaged in disturbed eating practices. For example, one-quarter of women and one-fifth of men engaged in dietary restraint. One in seven reported regularly binge eating. One-third used inappropriate compensatory behaviours (self-induced vomiting, medicine misuse and excessive exercise) as a means for controlling weight and/or shape, with the rate of these behaviours reaching clinically significant levels for 4%, 3% and 5% of participants, respectively. Examination of psychographic characteristics revealed that one-fifth had moderate levels of depression and anxiety severity and almost half engaged in at least one obsessive-compulsive disorder type behaviour. Females felt under more pressure to attain the media physical appearance standard than males. The findings of the present study suggest that nutrition education interventions for college students may be needed to address disturbed eating behaviours and to provide guidance on how to seek professional help. The findings also suggest that it may be prudent for healthcare professionals to routinely screen college students for disturbed eating behaviours and offer interventions early when treatment is likely to be most effective. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  8. Relationship between eating disturbance and dementia severity in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Kyoko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Amano, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hibiki; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Eating is one of the most important daily activities in managing patients with dementia. Although various eating disturbance occur as dementia progresses, to our knowledge, most of the studies focused on a part of eating disturbance such as swallowing and appetite. There have been few comprehensive studies including eating habits and food preference in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this study were to investigate almost all eating disturbance and to examine the relationship of eating disturbance to dementia stage in AD. A total of 220 patients with AD and 30 normal elderly (NE) subjects were recruited. Eating disturbance was assessed by a comprehensive questionnaire that had been previously validated. Potential relationships between the characteristics of eating disturbance and dementia stage as classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were assessed. Overall, 81.4% of patients with AD showed some eating and swallowing disturbance, whereas only 26.7% of the NE subjects had such a disturbance. Even in an early stage, patients with AD had many types of eating disturbance; "Appetite change" was shown in nearly half of the mild AD patients (49.5%). In the moderate stage, the scores of "change of eating habits and food preference" were highest, and in the severe stage "swallowing disturbance" became critical. In AD, the relationship of dementia stage to eating disturbance differs according to the type of eating disturbance. The relationships between various eating disturbance and the severity of dementia should be considered.

  9. Effectiveness and feasibility of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention for body image disturbance in women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Kelly A C; Wisniewski, Lucene; Solomon, Mindy; Heinberg, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness and feasibility of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention for the treatment of body image disturbance in women with eating disorders. The study used a multiple-baseline design and enrolled 38 participants with a range of eating disorders. The intervention targeted attitudinal and behavioral components of body image disturbance using psychoeducation, self-monitoring, systematic desensitization, and cognitive restructuring. Primary outcomes included multidimensional body image assessment (effectiveness) and treatment adherence and satisfaction (feasibility). Participants undergoing manualized group treatment reported significantly less body image disturbance than participants randomized to a waitlist control condition. However, differences disappeared after both groups had been through intervention. Participants also reported less depression and eating disorder pathology from baseline to posttreatment, however this difference was not considered statistically significant. Feasibility outcomes suggest the intervention was well received and highly acceptable to participants. Findings emphasize the importance of adding an evidence-based body image component to standard eating disorder treatment. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Childhood Abuse, Body Image Disturbance, and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Kristin K.; McCanne, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among childhood sexual and physical abuse, body image disturbance, and eating disorder symptomatology in college students, of whom 29 had been sexually abused, 32 physically abused, and 29 nonabused. There was no evidence that child sexual or physical abuse was associated with the development of body image…

  11. Childhood hyperactivity/inattention and eating disturbances predict binge eating in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, K R; Calzo, J P; Horton, N J; Field, A E; Crosby, R D; Solmi, F; Micali, N

    2015-01-01

    Identifying childhood predictors of binge eating and understanding risk mechanisms could help improve prevention and detection efforts. The aim of this study was to examine whether features of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as childhood eating disturbances, predicted binge eating later in adolescence. We studied specific risk factors for the development of binge eating during mid-adolescence among 7120 males and females from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a cohort study of children in the UK, using data from multiple informants to develop structural equation models. Repeated assessment of eating disturbances during childhood (mid-childhood overeating, late-childhood overeating and early-adolescent strong desire for food), as well as teacher- and parent-reported hyperactivity/inattention during mid- and late childhood, were considered as possible predictors of mid-adolescent binge eating. Prevalence of binge eating during mid-adolescence in our sample was 11.6%. The final model of predictors of binge eating during mid-adolescence included direct effects of late-childhood overeating [standardized estimate 0.145, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.038–0.259, p = 0.009] and early-adolescent strong desire for food (standardized estimate 0.088, 95% CI −0.002 to 0.169, p = 0.05). Hyperactivity/inattention during late childhood indirectly predicted binge eating during mid-adolescence (standardized estimate 0.085, 95% CI 0.007–0.128, p = 0.03) via late-childhood overeating and early-adolescent strong desire for food. Our findings indicate that early ADHD symptoms, in addition to an overeating phenotype, contribute to risk for adolescent binge eating. These findings lend support to the potential role of hyperactivity/inattention in the development of overeating and binge eating.

  12. An Interactive Psychoeducational Intervention for Women at Risk of Developing an Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabinski, Marion F.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Calfas, Karen J.; Winzelberg, Andrew J.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated a synchronous Internet-delivered intervention (chat room) for improving eating habits and body image in college-age women at risk for developing an eating disorder. Sixty at-risk women (mean age = 18.9, SD = 2.4; 65.0% Caucasian, 19% Latino/Hispanic, 8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 3% African American, 5% other; mean body mass…

  13. Reducing risk factors for eating disorders: targeting at-risk women with a computerized psychoeducational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabinski, M F; Pung, M A; Wilfley, D E; Eppstein, D L; Winzelberg, A J; Celio, A; Taylor, C B

    2001-05-01

    This controlled study evaluated whether an 8-week program offered over the Internet would significantly decrease body image dissatisfaction, disordered eating patterns, and preoccupation with shape/weight among women at high risk for developing an eating disorder. Fifty-six college women were recruited on the basis of elevated scores (> or =110) on the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ). Psychological functioning, as measured by the Eating Disorder Inventory Drive for Thinness (EDI-DT) subscale, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q), and the BSQ, was assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and at 10-week follow-up. All participants improved over time on most measures, although effect sizes suggest that the program did impact the intervention group. Findings suggest that technological interventions may be helpful for reducing disordered eating patterns and cognitions among high-risk women. Future research is needed to assess whether such programs are effective over time for prevention of and reduction in eating disorder symptomatology. Copyright 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Epidemiology of eating disorders, eating disordered behaviour, and body image disturbance in males: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, Deborah; Mond, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Challenges to epidemiological studies of eating and related body image disturbance disorders in males include, in addition to low base rates and the predominance of residual diagnostic categories, the female-centric nature of current classification schemes and the consequent lack of appropriate assessment instruments. In this narrative review, we summarise epidemiological data regarding the prevalence and correlates of eating disorders, related body image disturbance disorders, and eating disorder features in males. Attention is focused on disorders most likely to be observed among males, such as muscle dysmorphia and muscularity-oriented excessive exercise. It is argued that, given the multiple challenges involved in research of this kind, a focus on features is more likely to advance the field than a focus on diagnoses. In terms of correlates, we focus on impairment and help-seeking, since these issues are most relevant in informing public health burden, service provision, and related issues. We end with some thoughts about current gaps in the knowledge base and directions for future research that we consider to be most promising.

  15. Psychoeducation in Binge Eating Disorder and EDNOS: a pilot study on the efficacy of a 10-week and a 1-year continuation treatment.

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    Balestrieri, Matteo; Isola, Miriam; Baiano, Monica; Ciano, Rossana

    2013-03-01

    The goals of the present study were (a) to analyse the efficacy of short-term (10 weeks) psychoeducation group treatment in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS), and (b) to analyse the determinants of the success of psychoeducation on single outcome measures. The sample included all patients seeking help for their binge behaviour at the Psychiatric Clinic of the Teaching Hospital of Udine. They all met the inclusion DSM-IV TR criteria for a diagnosis of EDNOS or BED. Eating attitudes were measured with the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), which includes three scales: bulimia (EDI-BU), body dissatisfaction (EDI-BD) and drive to thinness (EDI-DT). Other psychometric instruments were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). Psychoeducation group treatment was carried out in an outpatient setting. It consisted in 10 weekly sessions of group therapy. At the end of this period, patients who maintained an eating disorder (ED) were asked to participate to an extension protocol, which included two fortnightly sessions followed by further monthly sessions for a period of 8 months. 98 patients were originally included in the protocol. Of these, 54 met the criteria for BED and 44 for EDNOS. At the end of the treatment, 30 patients (30.6 %) no longer suffered from an ED. All patients showed significant improvements on several other outcome measures (frequency of binges, BMI, bulimic traits, body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and alexithymia). The probability to recover from an ED was greater in subjects with higher scores of both BMI (p = 0.009) and EDI-BU (p = 0.002), together with lower TAS-20 scores at t0 (p = 0.003); the probability to reduce the frequency of binges was greater in subjects with higher frequency of binges at t0 (p binges and an improvement of BMI scores. This study may demonstrate the efficacy of psychoeducation group treatment for BED

  16. Body satisfaction, emotional intelligence, and the development of disturbed eating: a survey of Taiwanese students.

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    Wong, Yueching; Lin, Jing-Shan; Chang, Yu-Jhen

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between adolescents' emotional intelligence and the tendency to develop an eating disorder. Senior high school students in Taiwan were recruited for the study. A 3- part anonymous questionnaire measured demographic information, body weight satisfaction, and expectation of body weight. Students also completed the Adolescent Emotional Intelligence Scale and the Eating Disorders Attitude- 26 Test (EAT-26). Height and weight were also measured. The mean of EAT-26 score was 8.66 ± 7.36, and 8.6% students were at high risk to develop eating disorders. Gender, body weight, body dissatisfaction and the expected body shape were significantly related to disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours. Scores of EAT-26 were positively correlated with emotional perception, emotional expression, and emotional application. Disturbed eating behaviours exist among adolescents in Taiwan, and these behaviours may be related to emotional intelligence. However further studies with larger samples are needed.

  17. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated.

  18. A history of the identification of the characteristic eating disturbances of Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder and Anorexia Nervosa.

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    Heaner, Martica K; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-06-01

    During the last 25 years, the careful examination of the eating behavior of individuals with eating disorders has provided critical insights into the nature of these disorders. Crucially, studies investigating components of different eating behaviors have documented that Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) are characterized by objective disturbances in eating patterns that are significantly different than behaviors exhibited by individuals who do not have these eating disorders. The detailed description of the disturbances in eating behavior has helped to identify diagnostic criteria associated with each disorder, and has led to important hypotheses about the underlying pathophysiology. These advances in understanding have provided, and continue to provide, a foundation for translational research and for the development of novel treatment interventions. This review is based on a presentation given by B. Timothy Walsh, M.D. at the 40th anniversary symposium of the Columbia University Appetite talks outlining the evolution of the discovery of the characteristic eating disturbances seen with each disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Examining the relationship between religious orientation and eating disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa H; Richards, P Scott; Maglio, Christopher J

    2004-05-01

    The relationship between religion and eating concerns is receiving increasing empirical attention. The current investigation sought to examine the relationship between eating attitudes and religious orientation, utilizing the fourfold typology of religious orientation. A curvilinear relationship was found between religious orientation and eating attitudes among a subclinical college population and a clinical population of individuals receiving inpatient treatment for eating disorders, particularly among extrinsically orientated individuals with diagnosis of bulimia nervosa.

  20. Disturbed eating tendency and related factors in grade four to six elementary school students in Taiwan.

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    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen; Tsao, Shu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated Taiwanese elementary school students' status in terms of body size, body satisfaction and disturbed eating tendencies. In a cross-sectional survey, 1,261 elementary school children from grades four to six participated in this study. We used an anonymous selfreported questionnaire, which included: demographics and body satisfaction; Children's Eating Attitude Test -26 (ChEAT-26); Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale; and Influence of Significant Others Scale and Media Impact Scale. We found that 58.4% of the children were of normal weight, and 32.7% of the boys and 22.2% of the girls were over-weight or obese. Moreover, 39% of the children wanted to be thinner. The mean ChEAT-26 score was 8.71±8.35, and 10.5% of the children were at high risk for disturbed eating tendencies (ChEAT-26≥20), including 8.4% of the boys and 12.6% of the girls. Scores on the ChEAT-26, Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale, Influence of Significant Others Scale and Media Impact Scale were positively correlated. The level of external control and the influence of significant others and the media were significantly higher in children with disturbed eating attitudes than in those without them. Multivariable logistic regressions showed that disturbed eating attitudes were associated with body satisfaction, locus of control, and the level of influence of significant others and the media. Disturbed eating behaviors exist among elementary school students in Taiwan. This survey highlights the need for education in acquiring healthy mental attitudes and eating behaviors by elementary school students.

  1. The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance: a replication with a Japanese sample.

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    Yamamiya, Yuko; Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2008-01-01

    To examine the tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance as a viable sociocultural explanation for the development of eating and body image problems with young Japanese females. A sample of 289 Japanese female undergraduates completed a variety of measures designed to index family, peer, and media influences, as well as levels of body dissatisfaction, eating disturbances, and self-esteem. The data were evaluated with structural equation modeling to test the tripartite model. Fit indices indicated a moderate fit to the overall tripartite model, replicating previous findings. This study suggests that the sociocultural variables found to influence body image and eating disturbances in Japan are similar to those observed with US samples. The implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

  2. Persistent body image disturbance following recovery from eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshkevari, Ertimiss; Rieger, Elizabeth; Longo, Matthew R; Haggard, Patrick; Treasure, Janet

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with an eating disorder experience the rubber hand illusion (RHI) significantly more strongly than healthy controls on both perceptual (proprioceptive drift) and subjective (self-report embodiment questionnaire) measures. This heightened sensitivity to visual information about the body, and/or reduced somatosensory information processing about the body, suggest an increased malleability of the bodily self. The aim of the present study was to explore whether this is a state phenomenon or a persisting individual trait that outlasts the period of acute eating disorder. The RHI and self-report measures of eating disorder psychopathology (EDI-3 subscales of Drive for Thinness, Bulimia, Body Dissatisfaction, Interoceptive Deficits, and Emotional Dysregulation; DASS-21; and the Self-Objectification Questionnaire) were administered to 78 individuals with an eating disorder, 28 individuals recovered from an eating disorder, and 61 healthy controls. Proprioceptive drift in recovered individuals was intermediate between the acutely ill and HC groups. Subjective report of the strength of the illusion in recovered individuals was similar to acutely ill individuals. These results suggest that increased malleability of the bodily self persists, at least partially, following recovery and may be a trait phenomenon in people with eating disorders. Those with a lifetime history of an eating disorder may have heightened sensitivity to visual information about the body and reduced somatosensory information processing of the body. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Do Parents, Teachers, and Psychoeducational Evaluators Agree in Their Perceptions of the Problems of Black and White Emotionally Disturbed Children?

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    Kaufman, Alan S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The most disturbing result was the extent of disagreement in parents' and teachers' perceptions of the problem behaviors of Black emotionally disturbed children. There was agreement in perceptions of White emotionally disturbed children, facilitating communication. High levels of parental involvement are recommended. (Author)

  4. Pathways mediating sexual abuse and eating disturbance in children.

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    Wonderlich, S; Crosby, R; Mitchell, J; Thompson, K; Redlin, J; Demuth, G; Smyth, J

    2001-04-01

    To examine the relationship between childhood maltreatment and eating disorders in a sample of children. Twenty 10-15-year-old female children who were receiving treatment following reported childhood sexual abuse and 20 age-matched controls were compared on a series of measures assessing eating disorder behaviors, body image concerns, substance use, mood, impulsive behavior, and self-concept. Sexually abused children reported higher levels of eating disorder behaviors, impulsive behaviors, and drug abuse than controls. Furthermore, behavioral impulsivity provided the strongest mediational effect between a history of childhood sexual abuse and purging and restrictive dieting behavior. Drug use proved to be a significant secondary mediator of the childhood sexual abuse eating disorder behavior association. These data support the hypothesis that childhood sexual abuse is related to disordered eating in children, and extend similar findings that have been previously reported with adults. Behavioral impulsivity and drug use appear to be significant mechanisms that influence eating disorder behavior following childhood sexual abuse. Copyright 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance: A replication with adolescent girls.

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    Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2006-03-01

    The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance is a recent theoretical approach that includes a test of direct (peer, parental, and media factors) and mediational links (internalization of societal appearance standards, appearance comparison processes) as factors potentially leading to body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance. The theory was evaluated in the current study in a sample of 391 adolescent females. A structural equation model that evaluated the tripartite model replicated previous findings reported by Keery, van den Berg and Thompson (2004) [Keery, H., van den Berg, & Thompson, J. K. (2004). A test of the tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance in adolescent girls. Body Image: An International Journal of Research, 1, 237-251.]. Additionally, a second model extended these findings, suggesting that peer and media influences are more important than parental influences. The results are discussed in light of the need for prevention programs to incorporate formative influences and mediational processes in the construction of intervention strategies.

  6. Eating and body image disturbances in male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals.

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    Vocks, Silja; Stahn, Catharina; Loenser, Kerstin; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study was to discover whether persons with Gender Identity Disorder (GID) differed from controls of both sexes and from persons with eating disorders in terms of the degree of eating and body image disturbance, self-esteem, and depression. A total of 88 self-identified male-to-female transsexuals (MtF), 43 female-to-male transsexuals (FtM), 62 females with an eating disorder, 56 male controls, and 116 female controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Eating Disorder Inventory, Body Checking Questionnaire, Drive for Muscularity Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. MtF showed higher scores on restrained eating, eating concerns, weight concerns, shape concerns, drive for thinness, bulimia, body dissatisfaction, and body checking compared to male controls, and concerning some variables also compared to female controls. FtM displayed a higher degree of restrained eating, weight concerns, shape concerns, body dissatisfaction, and body checking compared to male controls. Furthermore, participants with GID showed higher depression scores than did controls, whereas no differences concerning drive for muscularity and self-esteem were found. Between MtF and FtM, the only significant difference emerged for body checking, with MtF displaying higher scores. Although it was shown that on these variables the values for persons with GID were lower than for those with eating disorders, these data lead us to speculate that persons with GID might be at a higher risk of eating disturbances. Therefore, the implementation of prevention programs might help persons with GID to avoid developing a clinically relevant eating disorder.

  7. Different Facets of Body Image Disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewer, Merle; Bauer, Anika

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the present review is to give an overview of the current findings on various facets of body image disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder such as body dissatisfaction, overconcern with weight and shape, body-related checking and avoidance behavior, misperception of body size, and body-related cognitive bias. In addition, treatments for a disturbed body image in BED and evidence of body image disturbance in youth with binge eating are reviewed. The results show that a disturbed body image in BED is present in the form of overconcern with weight and shape. Furthermore, there are hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as body-related checking and avoidance behavior, are also impaired. Research concerning misperception of body size in BED has been neglected so far, but first findings show that individuals with BED rate their own body shape rather accurately. Furthermore, there are first hints that body-related cognitive biases are present in individuals with BED. Moreover, in children and adolescents, there are first hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as shape and weight concerns, seem to be associated with loss of control and binge eating. Treatments aimed directly at the convertibility of a disturbed body image in BED have revealed encouraging outcomes. In conclusion, body image disturbance seems to occur in BED, and first studies show that it can be treated effectively. PMID:29182531

  8. Different Facets of Body Image Disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle Lewer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present review is to give an overview of the current findings on various facets of body image disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder such as body dissatisfaction, overconcern with weight and shape, body-related checking and avoidance behavior, misperception of body size, and body-related cognitive bias. In addition, treatments for a disturbed body image in BED and evidence of body image disturbance in youth with binge eating are reviewed. The results show that a disturbed body image in BED is present in the form of overconcern with weight and shape. Furthermore, there are hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as body-related checking and avoidance behavior, are also impaired. Research concerning misperception of body size in BED has been neglected so far, but first findings show that individuals with BED rate their own body shape rather accurately. Furthermore, there are first hints that body-related cognitive biases are present in individuals with BED. Moreover, in children and adolescents, there are first hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as shape and weight concerns, seem to be associated with loss of control and binge eating. Treatments aimed directly at the convertibility of a disturbed body image in BED have revealed encouraging outcomes. In conclusion, body image disturbance seems to occur in BED, and first studies show that it can be treated effectively.

  9. Different Facets of Body Image Disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewer, Merle; Bauer, Anika; Hartmann, Andrea S; Vocks, Silja

    2017-11-28

    The goal of the present review is to give an overview of the current findings on various facets of body image disturbance in Binge Eating Disorder such as body dissatisfaction, overconcern with weight and shape, body-related checking and avoidance behavior, misperception of body size, and body-related cognitive bias. In addition, treatments for a disturbed body image in BED and evidence of body image disturbance in youth with binge eating are reviewed. The results show that a disturbed body image in BED is present in the form of overconcern with weight and shape. Furthermore, there are hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as body-related checking and avoidance behavior, are also impaired. Research concerning misperception of body size in BED has been neglected so far, but first findings show that individuals with BED rate their own body shape rather accurately. Furthermore, there are first hints that body-related cognitive biases are present in individuals with BED. Moreover, in children and adolescents, there are first hints that body dissatisfaction, as well as shape and weight concerns, seem to be associated with loss of control and binge eating. Treatments aimed directly at the convertibility of a disturbed body image in BED have revealed encouraging outcomes. In conclusion, body image disturbance seems to occur in BED, and first studies show that it can be treated effectively.

  10. The Relation between Eating- and Weight-Related Disturbances and Depression in Adolescence: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawana, Jennine S.; Morgan, Ashley S.; Nguyen, Hien; Craig, Stephanie G.

    2010-01-01

    Depression often emerges during adolescence and persists into adulthood. Thus, it is critical to study risk factors that contribute to the development of depression in adolescence. One set of risk factors that has been recently studied in adolescent depression research is eating- and weight-related disturbances (EWRDs). EWRDs encompass negative…

  11. Positive Adult Support and Depression Symptoms in Adolescent Females: The Partially Mediating Role of Eating Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linville, Deanna; O'Neil, Maya; Huebner, Angela

    2011-01-01

    This study examined linkages between depression symptoms (DEP) and positive adult support (PAS) in female adolescents and the partially mediating influence of eating disturbances (ED). Structural equation modeling was used to establish measurement models for each of the latent constructs, determine the relationships among the latent constructs,…

  12. Body Image Dissatisfaction and Eating Disturbances among Children and Adolescents: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemp-Arlt, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction and eating disturbances are prevalent among youths and are beginning at an increasingly younger age. The glorification of the ideal, thin body type surrounds youths, in direct contrast to the increasing rates of overweight and obesity among the same population. The messages that children and adolescents are receiving are…

  13. An evaluation of the Tripartite Influence Model of body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance with adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keery, Helene; van den Berg, Patricia; Thompson, J Kevin

    2004-09-01

    The Tripartite Influence Model of body image and eating disturbance proposes that three formative influences (peer, parents, and media) affect body image and eating problems through two mediational mechanisms: internalization of the thin-ideal and appearance comparison processes. The current study evaluated this model in a sample of 325 sixth through eighth grade girls. Simple path analyses indicated that internalization and comparison fully mediated the relationship between parental influence and body dissatisfaction and partially mediated the relationship between peer influence and body dissatisfaction. Additionally, internalization and comparison partially mediated the relationship between media influence and body dissatisfaction. Six a priori SEM models based on the full Tripartite Influence Model were also evaluated. A resulting model was found to be an adequate fit to the data, supporting the viability of the Tripartite Model as a useful framework for understanding processes that may predispose young women to develop body image disturbances and eating dysfunction.

  14. Physical Activity, Decision-Making Abilities, and Eating Disturbances in Pre- and Postbariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Merle; Langenberg, Svenja; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Schulze, Mareike; Köhler, Hinrich; Crosby, Ross D; Marschollek, Michael; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) is considered to have a beneficial influence on executive functioning, including decision-making. Enhanced decision-making after bariatric surgery may strengthen patients' ability to delay gratification, helping to establish appropriate eating behavior. The objectives of this study were to (1) compare a preoperative group with a postoperative group with regard to daily PA, decision-making, and eating disturbances; and (2) investigate the relationship between these variables. The study included 71 bariatric surgery candidates (55 % women, BMI [kg/m(2)] M = 46.9, SD = 6.0) and 73 postoperative patients (57 % women, BMI M = 32.0, SD = 4.1; 89 % Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 11 % sleeve gastrectomy; months postoperative M = 8.2, SD = 3.5; total weight loss [%] M = 33.2, SD = 8.9) who completed SenseWear Pro2 activity monitoring. Decision-making was assessed using a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task and eating disorder psychopathology using the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. The number of patients who were classified as physically inactive was similarly high in the pre- and postoperative groups. No group differences emerged with regard to decision-making, but the postoperative group exhibited less eating disturbances than the preoperative group. No significant associations were found between PA, decision-making, and eating behavior. Patients after bariatric surgery were not more physically active than bariatric surgery candidates, which should be considered in care programs. Additionally, future research is needed to explore the possible link between PA, patients' decision-making abilities, and eating disturbances concerning dose-response questions.

  15. The influence of maternal modeling on body image concerns and eating disturbances in preadolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Charlotte M; Rapee, Ronald M; Fardouly, Jasmine

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that mothers may influence the development of body image concerns and eating disturbances in their daughters by modeling negative body image beliefs and unhealthy eating behaviors. However, the causal nature of that mode of influence is yet to be established. This study implemented an experimental design to examine the impact of mothers' modeling of negative comments about their own appearance and diet on their daughters' body image concerns and eating behaviors. Participants were 8-12 year old girls and their mothers (N = 50). While viewing thin-ideal magazine advertisements with their daughter, mothers were instructed to make either negative comments about their own weight, shape, and diet or to make no appearance or diet related comments. Daughters' levels of body esteem, body satisfaction, and eating attitudes were assessed pre- and post-manipulation, and their actual eating habits were measured post-manipulation. Girls whose mothers had made self-critical comments about their own appearance and diet reported lower body esteem, lower body satisfaction, more problematic eating attitudes, and ate significantly fewer sweets than girls whose mothers had not made self-critical comments. These results have implications for disordered eating prevention programs, suggesting that greater emphasis be placed on discouraging negative modeling behaviors among mothers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of biological, psychological and lifestyle risk factors for eating disturbances in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Teresa; Espinoza, Paola; Penelo, Eva; Mora, Marisol; González, Marcela L; Rosés, Rocío; Raich, Rosa M

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to assess the association of several risk factors for eating disturbances in adolescents. Participants were 448 girls and boys aged 12-15 years. Being female, higher body mass index, internalisation of standard of appearance, perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, number of lifetime addictive behaviours and lower self-esteem were associated with higher eating disturbance scores, whereas frequency of sedentary behaviours and physical activity were not (R(2) ⩾ 41%). Findings suggest the need to guide prevention efforts towards the broad spectrum of individual potentially modifiable factors. A non-specific comprehensive perspective may be adequate to prevent problems related to weight, body image and drug use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. A study of the relationship between parental bonding, self-concept and eating disturbances in Norwegian and American college populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Judith A; Silvera, David H; Neilands, Torsten B; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Hanssen, Tina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between bonding patterns and self-concept, and the influence of these constructs on a measure of sub-clinical eating disturbances. Undergraduate students from the United States (N=166) and Norway (N=233) were given self-report questionnaires that included measures of parental bonding, locus of control, self-concept clarity, self-esteem, and disturbed cognitions associated with eating. A structural equation model showed the expected pattern, with bonding predicting self-concept and self-concept predicting eating disturbances. The model fit equally well for samples from both countries and for both genders. This model links the pattern of low care and overprotective parental bonding indicators mediated through a self-concept defined by a lack of self-understanding, low self-esteem, and external locus of control to increased risk of eating disturbances for college aged men and women.

  18. Body image perceptions and symptoms of disturbed eating behavior among children and adolescents in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Kathrin; Munsch, Simone; Schneider, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Body image distortions such as perception biases are assumed to be precursors of eating disorders (ED). This study aims to investigate body image perceptions and symptoms of disturbed eating behavior among a sample of 11-17 year-old students in Germany. A cross-sectional survey study was carried out among 1524 students of twelve secondary schools from all school types in North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). A naturalistic photograph-rating consisting of photographs of young women's bodies was used to examine children's perceptions of female bodies (i.e., perceived average body size and perceived ideal body size of young women). Also, symptoms of disturbed eating behavior were examined. Compared to statistical data, children and adolescents underestimated the average body size of young women by more than two BMI-points (estimated average BMI = 20), with no differences between boys and girls. Also, girls and boys generally held a slim female thin-ideal (perceived ideal BMI = 19.5), which is nearly three BMI-points below the average body size in the young female population. Girls showed a slightly stronger female thin-ideal than boys. Among all subgroups, early-adolescent girls (13-14 years) displayed the strongest thin-ideal internalization. Nearly one-third of this group perceived a BMI below 18 as ideal female body size. Symptoms of disturbed eating behavior were common among youth and most frequent among adolescent girls (15-17 years). Girls who displayed a bias towards underestimation of female body size and girls who displayed an underweight female thin-ideal were more likely to report harmful dieting behaviors and psychological distress associated with eating, body, and weight. This study found that 11-17 year-old girls and boys do not show accurate judgements regarding the average body size of young women. Instead, there is systematic and significant underestimation, indicating considerable perception biases, which may constitute a risk factor for the

  19. Childhood sexual and physical abuse in Spanish female undergraduates: does it affect eating disturbances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Ana M; Penelo, Eva; Portell, Mariona; Raich, Rosa M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relationship between childhood sexual and physical abuse, and key attitudinal and behavioural aspects of eating disorders (ED). Participants included 708 female undergraduates in a Spanish public university, aged from 18 to 30. Abuse was measured by the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, and ED by the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). 14.3% of the sample had suffered childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and 3.8% childhood physical abuse (CPA). With respect to ED attitudinal features, we observed an increased Weight Concern score among CSA survivors. No association was found between this kind of abuse and disordered eating behaviours, after adjusting for depression, anxiety, self-esteem, body mass index, age and socioeconomic status. An inverse relationship was found between CPA and ED attitudes measured by EDE-Q (Restraint, Weight Concern, Shape Concern and the Overall Score), whereas no association was found with the behavioural aspects of eating disturbances. After controlling for different risk factors, CSA appears to be related to an increased Weight Concern, whilst other ED attitudinal features and behaviours do not seem to be related to childhood abuse. The inverse relationship found is discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Body representation disturbances in visual perception and affordance perception persist in eating disorder patients after completing treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Manja M; Keizer, Anouk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323041213

    2017-01-01

    Body image disturbances (BID) are a key feature of eating disorders (ED). Clinical experience shows that BID exists in patients who Completed their Eating Disorder Treatment (CEDT), however studies concerning BID in CEDT patients are often limited to cognition and affect, measured by interviews and

  1. Body-related sport and exercise motives and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Therme, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Motives underlying sport and exercise involvement have recently been hypothesized as potential factors influencing the positive association between sports/exercises involvement and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours (DEAB) among adolescents. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined this hypothesis or the moderating role of gender, context of practice, performance levels and sport type on these relationships. In this study, these questions were addressed among 168 male and 167 female French adolescents involved in various types, contexts and performance levels of sport and exercise. Participants were asked to indicate their main motives for involvement in sport practice and to self-report DEAB (generic DEAB, vomiting-purging behaviours, and eating-related control) on a French adaptation of the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results shared positive associations between body-related sport and exercise motives and most of the DEAB subscales. Furthermore, they show that the relationship between body-related sport and exercise motives and Vomiting-Purging Behaviours differs according to involvement in individual and competitive sports and exercises. Copyright ©2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  2. Parental attitudes, body image disturbance and disordered eating amongst adolescents and young adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel; Chabrol, H

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the existing literature regarding the contribution of parental influences to the sociocultural pressures on body image disturbance and disordered eating so as to highlight principal findings so that parents can be given practical information and identify areas that require further research. Relevant articles were located through Pubmed, Sciencedirect and PsychInfo, as well as the screening of bibliographies. The available data suggest that parents are strong communicators of sociocultural pressures. Parental influences via verbal messages and active encouragement have been shown to have more impact on offspring's body concerns and eating behaviours than modelling effects. Both mothers and fathers are important sources of influence for their offspring. Considering the role of parents could help improve public health management. Futher exploration of the way adolescents and young adults interpret and perceive parental attitudes and of potential protective factors is necessary.

  3. Body image disturbance in binge eating disorder: a comparison of obese patients with and without binge eating disorder regarding the cognitive, behavioral and perceptual component of body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewer, Merle; Nasrawi, Nadia; Schroeder, Dorothea; Vocks, Silja

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the manifestation of body image disturbance in binge eating disorder (BED) has been intensively investigated concerning the cognitive-affective component, with regard to the behavioral and the perceptual components of body image disturbance in BED, research is limited and results are inconsistent. Therefore, the present study assessed body image disturbance in BED with respect to the different components of body image in a sample of obese females (n = 31) with BED compared to obese females without an eating disorder (n = 28). The Eating Disorder Inventory-2, the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire and the Body Checking Questionnaire as well as a Digital Photo Distortion Technique based on a picture of each participant taken under standardized conditions were employed. Using two-sample t tests, we found that the participants with BED displayed significantly greater impairments concerning the cognitive-affective component of body image than the control group. Concerning the behavioral component, participants with BED reported more body checking and avoidance behavior than the controls, but group differences failed to reach significance after the Bonferroni corrections. Regarding the perceptual component, a significant group difference was found for the perceived "ideal" figure, with the individuals suffering from BED displaying a greater wish for a slimmer ideal figure than the control group. These results support the assumption that body image disturbance is a relevant factor in BED, similar to other eating disorders.

  4. Sleep disturbances and binge eating disorder symptoms during and after pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, T Frances; Von Holle, Ann; Torgersen, Leila; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2012-10-01

    We compared sleep problems during pregnancy and sleep dissatisfaction 18 months after pregnancy in pregnant women with binge eating disorder (BED) symptoms and pregnant women without an eating disorder. Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Data were gathered from 72,435 women. A total of 1,495 (2.1%) women reported having BED symptoms both before and during pregnancy; 921 (1.3%) reported pre-pregnancy BED symptoms that remitted during pregnancy; 1,235 (1.7%) reported incident BED symptoms during pregnancy; and 68,784 (95.0%) reported no eating disorder symptoms before or during pregnancy (referent). Questionnaires were collected at 3 time points, with a median completion time of 17.1 weeks gestation, 30.1 weeks gestation, and 18.7 months after childbirth. We collected information on demographics, eating disorder status before and during pregnancy, sleep problems during the first 18 weeks of pregnancy, hours of sleep during the third trimester, and sleep satisfaction 18 months after childbirth. All BED symptom groups were significantly more likely to report sleep problems during the first 18 weeks of pregnancy than the referent (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.26-1.42, false discovery rate [FDR] P pregnancy were more likely to report more hours of sleep than the referent (adjusted OR = 1.49, FDR P sleep 18 months after childbirth (adjusted ORs = 1.28-1.47, FDR P pregnancy is associated with sleeping problems during pregnancy and dissatisfaction with sleep 18 months after childbirth. Health care professionals should inquire about BED during pregnancy as it may be associated with sleep disturbances, in addition to the hallmark eating concerns.

  5. Fatty, Fatty, Two-by-Four: Weight-Teasing History and Disturbed Eating in Young Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Rita; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the long-term effect of weight teasing during childhood. Methods. Young adult women (n = 1533; aged 18–26 years) from 3 large universities participated in a survey (Fall 2009 to Spring 2010) that assessed disturbed eating behaviors; weight status at ages 6, 12, and 16 years; and weight-teasing history. Results. Nearly half of the participants were weight-teased as a child. Participants who experienced childhood weight teasing were significantly more likely to have disturbed eating behaviors now than non–weight-teased peers. As the variety of weight teasing insults recalled increased, so did disturbed eating behaviors and current body mass index. Those who recalled their weight at ages 6, 12, or 16 years as being heavier than average endured weight teasing significantly more frequently and felt greater distress than their lighter counterparts. Conclusions. Weight teasing may contribute to the development of disturbed eating and eating disorders in young women. Health care professionals, parents, teachers, and other childcare givers must help shift social norms to make weight teasing as unacceptable as other types of bullying. To protect the health of children, efforts to make weight teasing unacceptable are warranted. PMID:23327257

  6. Children of parents with BED have more eating behavior disturbance than children of parents with obesity or healthy weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Janet A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2017-06-01

    A limited literature suggests an association between parental eating disorders and child eating-disorder behaviors although this research has focused primarily on restrictive-type eating disorders and very little is known about families with binge-eating disorder (BED). The current study focused on parents (N = 331; 103 fathers and 226 mothers), comparing parents with core features of BED (n = 63) to parents with obesity and no eating disorder (OB; n = 85) and parents with healthy-weight and no eating disorder (HW; n = 183). Parents with BED were significantly more likely than OB and HW parents to report child binge eating, and more likely than HW parents to report child overeating. Parents with BED felt greater responsibility for child feeding than OB parents, and felt more concern about their child's weight than OB and HW parents. Dietary restriction of the child by the parents was related to child binge eating, overeating, and child overweight, and parental group was related to child binge eating (parental BED), overeating (parental BED), and child weight (parental OB). Parents with BED report greater disturbance in their children's eating than OB and HW parents, and OB parents report higher child weight than HW parents. This suggests that it is important to consider both eating-disorder psychopathology and obesity in clinical interventions and research. Our cross-sectional findings, which require experimental and prospective confirmations, provide preliminary evidence suggesting potential factors in families with parental BED and obesity to address in treatment and prevention efforts for pediatric eating disorders and obesity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:648-656). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prevalence of Eating Disturbance and Body Image Dissatisfaction in Young Girls: An Examination of the Variance across Racial and Socioeconomic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeel, Marissa L.; Hughes, Tammy L.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Hipwell, Alison; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    Eating disorder research has predominantly focused on White adolescent females. More recent research suggests that eating disorders occur in various racial and age groups. The current study examines prevalence and stability of body image dissatisfaction and eating disturbance in 9- and 10-year-old girls and whether there is variability by racial…

  8. Body-Image and Eating Disturbances Prospectively Predict Increases in Depressive Symptoms in Adolescent Girls: A Growth Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Bearman, Sarah Kate

    2001-01-01

    Examined longitudinal community data to test whether body-image and eating disturbances partially explain increased depression in adolescent girls. Found that initial pressure to be thin, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dieting, and bulimic symptoms predicted subsequent increased depressive symptoms. There was also prospective…

  9. Social comparisons, appearance related comments, contingent self-esteem and their relationships with body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Shannon D; Ricciardelli, Lina A

    2010-04-01

    This study examined social comparisons, appearance related comments and contingent self-esteem, and their relationships with body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance in young adult women. Importantly, the role of both positive and negative appearance related comments, and upward and downward comparisons, were investigated. A self-report questionnaire assessing each of these variables was completed by one hundred and ninety-six women aged 18-35. A higher frequency of negative comments and contingent self-esteem were associated with higher upward comparisons, and more positive comments were associated with higher downward comparisons. Overall, social comparisons were shown to be more important than verbal commentary and contingent self-esteem. More upward comparisons and less downward comparisons uniquely predicted higher body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance. In addition, negative appearance comments were found to be more salient than positive comments. Negative comments and contingent self-esteem uniquely predicted more eating disturbance but positive comments were not a predictor of body dissatisfaction or eating disturbance. Longitudinal studies are now required to establish the direction of these relationships and to more fully examine the interplay among the factors. In addition, given that our study only assessed self-reported social comparisons, our findings need to be validated against experimental methods. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress eating and sleep disturbance as mediators in the relationship between depression and obesity in low-income, minority women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jessica; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley; Negron, Rennie; Horowitz, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore potential mediators of the relationship between depression and obesity in a sample of low-income, minority women. Data were extracted from a sample of 535 women enrolled in a weight loss intervention for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Using a non-parametric bootstrapping procedure, the potential mediation effects of stress eating and sleep disturbance on the relationship between depression and obesity were tested. Results of a single mediation model indicated that depressive symptomatology was significantly associated with obesity (β=0.800, SE=0.290, p=0.006), and that stress eating (β=0.166, 95% CI [0.046, 0.328]) and sleep disturbance (β=1.032, 95% CI [0.612, 1.427]) were significant independent mediators of this relationship. Sleep disturbance remained a significant mediator in a combined mediation model (β=1.009, 95% CI [0.653, 1.399]). Findings add to the growing literature on the psychosocial factors implicated in the link between depression and obesity, particularly among disadvantaged populations. Future longitudinal research should aim to establish causal pathways between obesity, stress eating, sleep disturbance, and depression. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dissonance thin-ideal and didactic healthy behavior eating disorder prevention programs: results from a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusek, Jill Anne; Wendt, Sally J; Wiseman, Claire V

    2004-12-01

    Negative body image, a common problem among college-age women in the United States, strongly correlates with low self-esteem, disturbed eating behavior, and eating disorders. Psychoeducational programs have inconsistently shown improvement in body image, thin-ideal internalization, eating behaviors, psychosocial functioning, and self-esteem. In the current study, college women with body image concerns (N = 84) were randomly assigned to a cognitive dissonance-based, thin-ideal internalization, single-session workshop (DTI; n = 26); a psychoeducational, healthy behavior, single-session workshop (HB; n = 24); or a wait-list control (WL; n = 34). Comparing baseline data with 4-week follow-up data, results indicated that both DTI and HB participants reported improvement in body image, thin-ideal internalization, and eating behaviors. Results provide evidence that both interventions effectively reduce risk factors for eating pathology. Copyright 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar no tratamento dos transtornos alimentares na adolescência Grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar y tratamiento de adolescentes con trastornos de la conducta alimentaria Multifamily psycho-educational group and treatment of adolescents with eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Nicoletti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste artigo é apresentar o grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar do ambulatório do Programa de Atendimento, Ensino e Pesquisa em Transtornos Alimentares da Infância e Adolescência - PROTAD - do Instituto de Psiquiatria, do Hospital das Clínicas, da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, PROTAD-AMBULIM-HC-IPq-FMUSP, como uma das modalidades do tratamento multidisciplinar oferecidas a pacientes adolescentes com transtornos alimentares e a suas famílias. O artigo baseia-se na experiência dos encontros mensais da equipe, nos quais participam os familiares e cuidadores dos pacientes adolescentes com transtornos alimentares do ambulatório, e expõe o modelo de grupo psicoeducativo empregado, relacionando-o aos achados da literatura e à prática clínica.La propuesta de este artículo es presentar el grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar del ambulatorio del Programa de Atención, Enseñanza e Investigación en Trastornos Alimentarios en la Infancia y en la Adolescencia - PROTAD - del Instituto de Psiquiatría del Hospital de las Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de São Paulo, PROTAD-AMBULIM-HC-IPq-FMUSP, como una de las modalidades de tratamiento multidisciplinario proporcionado por PROTAD a pacientes adolescentes con trastornos alimentarios y a sus familias. En especial, el artículo parte de la experiencia obtenida en los encuentros mensuales con la participación de familiares y cuidadores de los pacientes adolescentes con trastornos alimentarios del ambulatorio y expone el modelo de grupo psicoeducativo aplicado, relacionándolo a los modelos encontrados en la literatura médica y a la práctica clínica.The psycho-educational multifamily group is part of a multidisciplinary treatment offered to adolescents with eating disorders and their families, in the out-patient Program for Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - PROTAD - of the Institute of Psychiatry, of Hospital das Cl

  13. Body image disturbance in patients with borderline personality disorder: impact of eating disorders and perceived childhood sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Anne; Borgmann, Elisabeth; Feldmann, Robert E; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Priebe, Kathlen; Bohus, Martin; Vocks, Silja

    2013-03-01

    Body image disturbances occur in women with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Systematic research on these characteristics in well-defined BPD groups is lacking. It is unknown, if the disturbances are related to eating disorders and childhood sexual abuse (CSA), which frequently co-occur in patients with BPD. In the present study, cognitive-affective and behavioral components of body image for 89 female patients with BPD (49 with lifetime eating disorders) and 41 healthy participants were assessed via Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire (BIAQ) and Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ). Within the BPD group, 43 patients reported a history of CSA. Compared to healthy controls, BPD patients reported significantly more negative scores in the BIAQ and the MBSRQ. Both a history of CSA and a comorbid eating disorder were independently associated with an even more negative body image. Results suggest a disturbance of cognitive-affective and behavioral components of body image in female BPD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Internalized weight bias in obese patients with binge eating disorder: associations with eating disturbances and psychological functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Laura E; Latner, Janet D; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M; Blomquist, Kerstin K; Morgan, Peter T; Grilo, Carlos M

    2012-04-01

    Widespread bias against obese individuals may lead to the internalization of weight bias in obese persons. This study examined correlates of internalized weight bias (IWB) in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED). One hundred treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered with the eating disorders examination interview and questionnaires assessing IWB, fat phobia, depression, and self-esteem. The mean IWB score in this group of patients with BED was significantly greater than the mean IWB score observed previously in a community sample of overweight adults. IWB was positively associated with eating disorder psychopathology, fat phobia, and depression, and negatively associated with self-esteem. IWB made significant independent contributions to the variance in eating disorder psychopathology even after accounting for fat phobia, depression, and self-esteem. Treatment-seeking obese patients with BED demonstrate high levels of IWB. IWB may contribute to the variance in eating disorder psychopathology in BED patients, beyond the contributions of fat phobia, depression, and self-esteem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Effects of a Bibliotherapy Intervention Compared to a Psycho-Educational Intervention to Improve Awareness of Self for Students with Emotional Disturbance in a Special Day School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rhonda Moore

    2017-01-01

    Students with emotional disturbances often present with internalizing behaviors, such as anxiety, and externalizing behaviors, such as verbally or physically aggressive behaviors, which lead to challenges establishing and maintaining satisfactory relationships with peers and adults. These challenging relationships also present unique disciplinary…

  16. [Psychoeducation in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata Ospina, Juan Pablo; Rangel Martínez-Villalba, Andrés Mauricio; García Valencia, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia includes the use of psychotropic drugs, psychotherapy, and psychosocial interventions that include psychoeducation. This strategy has been defined as the delivery of information about the disorder and its treatment in a systematic and structured way. To review the literature on the efficacy of psychoeducation in schizophrenia. A search in PubMed, SciELO, EMBASE and PsycINFO was made with the terms "psychoeducation", "schizophrenia" and "psychosocial intervention". Articles in Spanish and English language were reviewed. Psychoeducation can be applied to patients, family or both, and individually or in groups. The number of sessions can vary. There have been many studies that seek to determine the efficacy of psychoeducation in the clinical course, family dynamics and stigma, with results that favor its implementation, but so far it has not been possible to determine exactly how best to apply psychoeducation, mainly because of the great variability of designs. The studies on psychoeducation have shown efficacy. However, this might be an overestimation, as there is a high risk of bias. Consequently, there is not enough evidence. At least for now, it is reasonable to complement pharmacotherapy with psycoeducation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Body Dissatisfaction, Need for Social Approval, and Eating Disturbances among Japanese and American College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Takayo; Kambara, Akiko; Sasaki, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    Compares body dissatisfaction, need for social approval, and eating disorders between Japanese and American college women. Japanese women express greater dissatisfaction with their body. Need for social approval predicted Japanese eating disorders, whereas body fatness was a significant predictor for American women. (MMU)

  18. Differences in appearance-related commentary, body dissatisfaction, and eating disturbance among college women of varying weight groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbozo, Sylvia; Menzel, Jessie E; Thompson, J Kevin

    2013-04-01

    This study examined appearance-related commentary, body dissatisfaction, and eating disturbance in 924 undergraduate females. Significant group differences were found in type of appearance-related commentary received across weight groups. Overweight and obese women experienced negative weight and shape-related comments at greater frequencies and positive weight and shape-related comments at lower frequencies compared to underweight and normal weight women. A higher frequency of positive weight and shape-related commentary was associated with less body dissatisfaction for all women and less shape and weight concerns for obese women. These findings suggest that the weight status of young women likely influences the appearance-related commentary that they receive and the manner in which such commentary affects their body image and eating behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of parental comments on body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance in young adults: a sociocultural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Paxton, Susan J; Chabrol, Henri

    2009-06-01

    This study examined a sociocultural model of the influence of parental comments on body shape and eating concerns among males and females. Questionnaires were completed by 338 undergraduates. Participants reported levels of perceived parental comments, internalization of media ideals, appearance comparison, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness and bulimia. Results revealed that, regardless of gender, internalization and appearance comparison only partially mediated the relationship between parental comments and the outcome variables. The final model for females explained a larger proportion of the variability in body shape and eating concerns than in males, with positive and negative parental comments directly related to body dissatisfaction and through it to eating outcomes. In males, only negative comments were directly related to body dissatisfaction. These findings highlight the role of parental influences in sociocultural models of the development of body dissatisfaction and eating concerns, and the gender-specific patterns of sociocultural influence.

  20. Comparison of eating disorders and body image disturbances between Eastern and Western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, B; Gluck, M E; Knoll, C M; Lorence, M; Geliebter, A

    2008-06-01

    Factors associated with the development of eating disorders in countries with non-Western cultures have not been adequately investigated in relation to Westernized countries. We therefore studied 243 girls [age =16.5+/-1.2 (SD)], recruited from schools in India, Tibet, the US and France. They completed the Figure Rating Scale (FRS), the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Tibetan group had a lower body mass index (BMI) than the other groups (pbody size (p=0.03), compared to all the other countries, and had more body image discrepancy than the American group (p=0.04). After controlling only for BMI, the girls from the East had a larger current and ideal, but no difference on body image discrepancy. Body image discrepancy scores were best predicted by EAT scores and BMI, accounting for 35% of the variance (pbody image discrepancy, and drug and tobacco use, accounting for 33% of the variance (pbody image discrepancy and eating pathology in Western cultures, whether or not controlling for age, SES, and BMI. There were no differences in eating and depression pathology between those in the US, France, or India. Indeed, the Tibetans, after controlling for their low BMI and SES, had the greatest body image discrepancy.

  1. The association between disturbed eating behavior and socioeconomic status: the Online Korean Adolescent Panel Survey (OnKAPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jeung Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A limited amount of research, primarily conducted in Western countries, has suggested that higher socioeconomic status (SES is associated with higher risk of eating disorders (EDs. However, little is known about this association in Asian countries. We examined the association of SES with disturbed eating behavior (DEB and related factors in Korean adolescents. SUBJECTS: A nationwide online panel survey was conducted in a sample of adolescents (n = 6,943, 49.9% girls. DEB was measured with the 26-item Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. Participants who scored ≥20 on the EAT-26 were considered to have DEB. Participants' SES was determined based on self-reported household economic status. RESULTS: The prevalence of DEB was 12.7%: 10.5% among boys and 14.8% among girls. Both boys and girls with DEB were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, experience higher levels of stress, and have lower academic achievement. The risk for DEB was significantly higher in boys of higher SES than in those of middle SES (OR = 1.45, 95%CI = 1.05-1.99 for high SES; OR = 5.16, 95%CI: 3.50-7.61 for highest SES. Among girls, higher risk of DEB was associated with the highest and lowest SES (OR = 1.52, 95%CI: 1.13-2.06 for lowest SES; OR = 2.22, 95%CI: 1.34-3.68 for highest SES. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the lower prevalence of obesity in Korea compared with Western countries, the prevalence of DEB in Korean adolescents was high, especially among girls. Moreover, the association between SES and DEB followed a U-shaped curve for girls and a J-shaped curve for boys.

  2. Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Källman Tiia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS, are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals.

  3. Subjective face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility, sleeping disturbances and aberrant eating habits in families with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; Paavonen, Juulia E; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Sarenius, Susan; Källman, Tiia; Järvelä, Irma; von Wendt, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether a set of clinical features, which are not included in the DSM-IV or ICD-10 for Asperger Syndrome (AS), are associated with AS in particular or whether they are merely a familial trait that is not related to the diagnosis. Methods Ten large families, a total of 138 persons, of whom 58 individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for AS and another 56 did not to fulfill these criteria, were studied using a structured interview focusing on the possible presence of face recognition difficulties, aberrant sensibility and eating habits and sleeping disturbances. Results The prevalence for face recognition difficulties was 46.6% in individuals with AS compared with 10.7% in the control group. The corresponding figures for subjectively reported presence of aberrant sensibilities were 91.4% and 46.6%, for sleeping disturbances 48.3% and 23.2% and for aberrant eating habits 60.3% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion An aberrant processing of sensory information appears to be a common feature in AS. The impact of these and other clinical features that are not incorporated in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV on our understanding of AS may hitherto have been underestimated. These associated clinical traits may well be reflected by the behavioural characteristics of these individuals. PMID:15826308

  4. A model of disturbed eating behavior in men: The role of body dissatisfaction, emotion dysregulation and cognitive distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyssen, Andrea; Bryjova, Jana; Meyer, Andrea Hans; Munsch, Simone

    2016-12-30

    Comprehensive models, targeting the development of eating disorders (EDs) in males, often employ a sociocultural perspective and empathize the importance of body dissatisfaction (BD). To further illuminate psychological factors contributing to the development of ED pathology, we propose a mediator model of disturbed eating and compensatory behavior (DECB) for men. This model suggests that emotion dysregulation and the susceptibility to body-related cognitive distortions (thought-shape fusion, TSF) mediate the relationship between BD and DECB. Based on data from a cross-sectional online-survey we tested our model in a non-clinical community sample of young men (N=123, 18-37 years). We found a significant positive association between BD and DECB, accounting for participant's body mass index (BMI), age and depressive symptoms. While TSF partially mediated the relationship between BD and DECB, we did not detect a corresponding effect for emotion dysregulation. Based on our findings, we concluded that TSF, which describes specific distorted cognitions with respect to one's own body triggered by fattening/ forbidden food, contributes to the pathological eating- and body-related behavior in men who are dissatisfied with their body. We suggest that TSF should be included in etiological models as a relevant aspect of cognitive information processing with emotional and behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Body image and eating disturbance in India: media and interpersonal influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2004-03-01

    The current study was designed to examine the relationships among the variables of body mass index (BMI), interpersonal teasing, media internalization, body dissatisfaction, and drive for thinness in samples of young adult and middle school females from India. Ninety-six adolescent and 93 adult females from Bombay, India, completed measures of body dissatisfaction, restriction, teasing history, and internalization of media images. Correlational and path analytic procedures were used to examine the data. Path analyses indicated that teasing and internalization mediated the effect of BMI on body dissatisfaction and in certain cases influenced drive for thinness. These findings replicate and extend previous work with U.S., Australian, and Swedish samples, suggesting that there are similar potential risk factors, cross-culturally, that may explain the development of eating and shape-related problems. Copyright 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 35: 198-203, 2004.

  6. Prevention programme for eating disturbances in adolescents. Is their effect on body image maintained at 30 months later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Paola; Penelo, Eva; Raich, Rosa M

    2013-03-01

    We assessed changes in the body image of Spanish adolescents who participated in a programme aimed at preventing disordered eating, with a 30-month follow-up. 254 girls and 189 boys aged 12-14 were assigned to a control group (n=201) or one of two possible experimental conditions: media literacy programme (ML, n=143) and media literacy plus nutrition awareness programme (ML+NUT, n=99). Body image was assessed with the Body Image Questionnaire (Qüestionari d'Imatge Corporal; QÜIC). Pre-test, post-test, 7- and 30-month follow-up measurements were taken. Linear model analyses were carried out with a 2×3×3 ANOVA (sex×group×phase), adjusted by the baseline level. At 30-month follow-up, ML and ML+NUT participants showed fewer body problems and more body satisfaction than the control group. There is a need for prevention programmes addressing eating and body image disturbances that involve both boys and girls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors: Moderating effects of sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, M-C; Maïano, C; Morin, A J S; Therme, P

    2014-08-01

    Very few studies examined the prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEABs) among adolescents involved in sport practice, and their results are mixed and inconclusive. These inconsistencies are most likely due to their methodological heterogeneity and to the fact that none of these studies took into consideration the potentially relevant characteristics of the sport practice context. This study attempts to answer this limitation among French adolescents not involved or involved in various sports contexts defined based on their organization, leanness-centration, and competitive level. Participants were 335 adolescents involved in sport practice, and 435 adolescents not involved in any form of regular sport practice. The DEABs were measured using the Eating Attitudes Test-26. Global results do not showed any significant association between the status of the participants and DEAB. However, these results drastically changed when we considered the potential moderating role of sex and age on these relations. Indeed, sports involvement in general, and involvement in leanness and competitive sports were found to exert sex- and age-differentiated effects on the risks of presenting clinically significant levels of DEAB. This study suggests the importance of monitoring, preventive, and early intervention mechanisms within the context of practice, particularly for adolescent girls. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Psychoeducation for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Merinder, Lars Bertil; Belgamwar, Madhvi R

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia can be a severe and chronic illness characterised by lack of insight and poor compliance with treatment. Psychoeducational approaches have been developed to increase patients’ knowledge of, and insight into, their illness and its treatment. It is supposed that this increased knowledge and insight will enable people with schizophrenia to cope in a more effective way with their illness, thereby improving prognosis. Objectives To assess the effects of psychoeducational interventions compared with standard levels of knowledge provision. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2010). We updated this search November 2012 and added 27 new trials to the awaiting assessment section. Selection criteria All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducation for schizophrenia and/or related serious mental illnesses involving individuals or groups. We excluded quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors extracted data independently from included papers. We contacted authors of trials for additional and missing data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of homogeneous dichotomous data. We used a fixed-effects model for heterogeneous dichotomous data. Where possible we also calculated the numbers needed to treat (NNT), as well as weighted means for continuous data. Main results This review includes a total of 5142 participants (mostly inpatients) from 44 trials conducted between 1988 and 2009 (median study duration ~ 12 weeks, risk of bias - moderate). We found that incidences of non-compliance were lower in the psychoeducation group in the short term (n = 1400, RR 0.52 CI 0.40 to 0.67, NNT 11 CI 9 to 16). This finding holds for the medium and long term. Relapse appeared to be lower in psychoeducation group (n = 1214, RR 0.70 CI 0.61 to 0.81, NNT 9 CI 7 to 14) and this also applied to readmission (n = 206, RR 0.71 CI 0.56 to 0

  9. [Typology of disordered eating behaviour (anorexia nervosa with bulimia and vomitomanic disturbances) in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakireva, E E; Kozlova, I A; Iakupova, L P; Savost'ianova, O L

    2004-01-01

    Eighty children (66 girls and 14 boys), aged 6-16 years, with syndrome of anorexia nervosa (AN) have been studied. Two nosologic groups: pathological age crisis of childhood and adolescence (F50.0-F50.2 in ICD-10)--30 patients and slow-progressive schizophrenia (schizotypical disorder, F21.3-F21.4)--50 patients are determined. The latter group was divided according to syndrome types: syndrome of AN (28 patients); AN syndrome with predominant bulimia (11 patients); AN syndrome with dominating bulimia and vomitomanic disturbances (11 patients). Syndrome structure was determined by the stages of the course, syntropy character with other psychopathological disorders and process of their reduction. Psychotic disorders in patients of the third type were most pronounced. In each group, statistically significant EEG features, comparing to control age-matched group, were revealed. The severer were psychopathological symptoms, the less was an amount of organized and the more--desynchronized "flat" EEG.

  10. The Tripartite Influence model of body image and eating disturbance: a covariance structure modeling investigation testing the mediational role of appearance comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Patricia; Thompson, J Kevin; Obremski-Brandon, Karen; Coovert, Michael

    2002-11-01

    Recent theoretical approaches to the etiology of eating disorders and body image disturbances have begun to focus on multifactorial models. In the current study, the Tripartite Influence model was examined in a large sample of college females (ages 18-22). This model proposes that three primary core sources of influence--parents, peers and media--contribute to the development of body image and eating disturbances. Additionally, the model suggests that at least two factors mediate the relationship between influences and disturbance-appearance comparison and internalization of media information. In this study, appearance comparison was examined as a mediational link between peer, family and media influence variables and the outcome disturbance measures of eating dysfunction and body image dissatisfaction. Covariance structure modeling (CSM) was used to test the proposed pathways. The results indicated that appearance comparison mediated the effects of family and media influences on body dissatisfaction, which in turn influenced restrictive and bulimic behaviors. In addition, peer influences had a direct influence on restriction. Perfectionism was hypothesized to relate to body dissatisfaction, but was in fact found to influence appearance comparison. The findings were limited by the necessity of several modifications to the originally proposed models, yet offer replication and extension of previous work with appearance comparison and support for further testing of the Tripartite Influence model. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Weight limits, estimations of future BMI, subjective pubertal timing and physical appearance comparisons among adolescent girls as precursors of disturbed eating behaviour in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Uwe; Weitkamp, Katharina; Strauss, Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    From a clinical point of view, a high 'objective' BMI or an early biological onset of puberty are well-known risk factors for eating disorders. In contrast, little is known about irrational beliefs and subjective meanings of body weight and pubertal timing. Mostly using standardised questionnaires, 136 girls with an average age of 12 years were asked to report their eating behaviour, (body) self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, weight limits, estimations of future BMI, subjective pubertal timing and appearance-related social comparisons. Results showed significant correlations between disturbed eating behaviour and the existence of a weight limit, which was reported by 45% of the girls. Twenty two per cent wished to have a future BMI beneath the 10th percentile. In terms of pubertal timing, girls who perceived themselves as either 'early starters' or 'late starters' reported significantly more risky eating behaviour. Results are discussed with a focus on the psychotherapeutic use of our findings as well as the opportunity for the development of preventive strategies.

  12. Relations among multiple peer influences, body dissatisfaction, eating disturbance, and self-esteem: a comparison of average weight, at risk of overweight, and overweight adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J Kevin; Shroff, Hemal; Herbozo, Sylvia; Cafri, Guy; Rodriguez, Janette; Rodriguez, Melby

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate peer-related influences on appearance, body dissatisfaction, eating disturbance, and self-esteem in average weight, at risk of overweight, and overweight adolescent girls. Three hundred twenty-five adolescent girls from high schools in Florida were assessed. Ninety met criteria for being at risk of overweight or overweight. Logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate group differences on all variables and to assess the amount of variance accounted for by peer-influence variables in the prediction of body dissatisfaction, eating disturbance, and self-esteem. Overweight and at risk of overweight girls scored higher than average weight girls on body dissatisfaction, dieting, and a peer measure that assessed negative comments and attributions about appearance. They also scored lower than average weight girls on self-report measures that assessed conversations about appearance and anti-dieting advice. How influential friends were in determining one's body image was a unique predictor of body dissatisfaction but only for the overweight and at risk of overweight group. Possible implications for clinical intervention programs are discussed along with directions for future research.

  13. Are Body Dissatisfaction, Eating Disturbance, and Body Mass Index Predictors of Suicidal Behavior in Adolescents? A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Scott; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    Disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, and obesity have been associated cross sectionally with suicidal behavior in adolescents. To determine the extent to which these variables predicted suicidal ideation and attempts, the authors examined these relationships in a longitudinal design. The study population included 2,516 older adolescents and…

  14. Family psychoeducation for affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to examine the evidence of family psychoeducation (FPE) for affective disorders. Evidence indicates that FPE can be an effective supplement to the standard treatment of patients with affective disorders. FPE can effectively reduce the patients' risk of relapse and reduce...

  15. Eating Disorders in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to International Classification of Diseases by World Health Organization, eating disorders are behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances [1]. Eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, atypical bulimia nervosa, overeating associated with other psychological disturbances and vomiting associated with other psychological disturbances [1]. Maladaptive eating pattern and inadequate physical activity are seen in adolescents with eating disorders and obesity [2]. Those with comorbid eating disorder and obesity have a poorer prognosis and are at higher risk for future medical problems.

  16. Thin-Ideal Internalization and Comparison Process as Mediators of Social Influence and Psychological Functioning in the Development of Disturbed Eating Habits in Croatian College Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pokrajac-Bulian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the role of internalization and comparison as mediators of relationships between socio-cultural pressures to be thin, psychological factors, restrictive and bulimic behaviours in college females. Participants were 262 Croatian college females (mean age = 21.22 ± 1.47 years who completed self-report questionnaires. Regression analysis was used to test a model in which internalization and social comparison mediated the impact of socio-cultural pressure (parents and peers dieting, teasing, pressure to be thin, media influences, self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and perfectionism in restrictive and bulimic behaviours. Internalization is a significant mediator of the relationships between all predictors included in this research and disturbed eating habits. Social comparison is relevant as a mediator between social influence, negative affect, self-esteem, perfectionism and restrictive behaviour but does not mediate bulimic behaviour. These findings could be seful in understanding processes that may predispose young women to develop eating dysfunctions and indicate the need for prevention programs that incorporate formative influences and processes such as internalization of societal norms and comparison in the construction of therapeutic strategies.

  17. Social physique anxiety and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescents: moderating effects of sport, sport-related characteristics, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Therme, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of adolescents presenting high levels of social physique anxiety (SPA) in sport practice has been hypothesized as potentially problematic in terms of being associated with disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEAB). Indeed, sport practice itself has been reported to be associated with higher levels of SPA and DEAB, and sport settings may sometimes promote unhealthy life habits. Nevertheless, current studies are few and present several limitations. The objective of the present study was to examine these relationships among adolescents involved or not in various types (i.e., leanness and individual) and contexts (i.e., organized and competitive) of sport practice. The sample included 766 French adolescents (337 boys and 429 girls), aged between 11 and 18 years, involved (n = 335) or not (n = 431) in sport practice. SPA and DEAB were assessed using French adaptations of the SPA scale and the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results reveal a significant and positive association between SPA and the DEAB scales. Furthermore, they show a positive relationship between SPA and (a) vomiting-purging behaviors in adolescents involved in individual sports and (b) generic DEAB (i.e., a subscale covering fear of getting fat, food preoccupation, and eating-related guilt), particularly in adolescents involved in individual sports. The relationship between SPA and DEAB does not differ according to adolescents' involvement in sport practice or according to their involvement in organized, competitive, or leanness sport practice more specifically. However, higher levels of SPA and DEAB were observed in adolescents involved in individual sports.

  18. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  19. Healthy weight control and dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs: results from a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Trost, Ariel; Chase, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Because universal psychoeducational eating disorder prevention programs have had little success, we developed and evaluated two interventions for high-risk populations: a healthy weight control intervention and a dissonance-based intervention. Adolescent girls (N = 148) with body image concerns were randomized to one of these interventions or to a waitlist control group. Participants completed baseline, termination, and 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up surveys. Participants in both interventions reported decreased thin-ideal internalization, negative affect, and bulimic symptoms at termination and follow-up relative to controls. However, no effects were observed for body dissatisfaction or dieting and effects diminished over time. Results provide evidence that both interventions effectively reduce bulimic pathology and risk factors for eating disturbances. Copyright 2002 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The efficacy of psychoeducation on recurrent depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Foldager, Leslie; Makki, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of psychoeducation is well documented in the treatment of relapse prevention of schizophrenia, and recently also in bipolar disorder; however, for recurrent depression only few controlled studies focusing on the efficacy of psychoeducation have been conducted. Aims......: This randomized study tests the efficacy of treatment-as-usual supplemented with a psychoeducative programme for patients with recurrent depression, treated at Community Mental Health Centres (CMHC) in Denmark. The primary outcome measurements concern was decline in consumption of psychiatric inpatient services...... and decline in Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Methods: Eighty patients were randomized, either to the psychoeducative programme (consisting of eight sessions, each of 2 hours duration) and 2-year outpatient follow-up (42 cases), or only to 2-year outpatient follow-up (38 controls). The patients were...

  1. Psychoeducation for bipolar disorder: A discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynere; Crowe, Marie; Scott, Anne; Lacey, Cameron

    2018-02-01

    Psychoeducation has become a common intervention within mental health settings. It aims to increase people's ability to manage a life with a long-term illness. For people with bipolar disorder, psychoeducation is one of a range of psychosocial interventions now considered part of contemporary mental health practice. It has taken on a 'common sense' status that results in little critique of psychoeducation practices. Using a published manual on psychoeducation and bipolar disorder as its data, Foucauldian discourse analysis was used in the present study for a critical perspective on psychoeducation in order to explore the taken-for-granted assumptions on which it is based. It identifies that the text produces three key subject positions for people with bipolar disorder. To practice self-management, a person must: (i) accept and recognize the authority of psychiatry to know them; (ii) come to see that they can moderate themselves; and (iii) see themselves as able to undertake a reflexive process of self-examination and change. These findings highlight the circular and discursive quality to the construct of insight that is central to how psychoeducation is practiced. Using Foucault's construct of pastoral power, it also draws attention to the asymmetrical nature of power relations between the clinician and the person with bipolar disorder. An effect of the use of medical discourse in psychoeducation is to limit its ability to work with ambivalence and contradiction. A critical approach to psychotherapy and education offers an alternate paradigm on which to basis psychoeducation practices. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  3. Educators' views of eating disorder prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnado-Sullivan, Paula J; Parr, Francoise; O'Grady, Megan A; Savoy, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    Further understanding of educators' views of eating disorder prevention can further engage them in this effort. No previous studies of educators have used acceptability methodology or compared eating disorder prevention to other prevention efforts. Educators (n = 135) rated the acceptability of five sample programs and provided their opinions about eating disorder and other prevention programs. The results indicated primarily psychoeducational and general well-being programs were most acceptable. Educators-specified trained professionals should implement programs during school hours to male and female junior high students. Although eating disorder prevention was perceived as important, it was not rated as vital as other programs, such as substance abuse prevention.

  4. Effects of Psychoeducation for Offenders in a Community Correctional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Albert K.; Shively, Randy; Horn, Mary; Landau, Jennifer; Barriga, Alvaro; Gibbs, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The present study provided a randomized outcome evaluation of the psychoeducational component of the EQUIP program. The psychoeducational curriculum was implemented in a community correctional facility for adult felony offenders. The psychoeducational curriculum is designed to remedy offenders' delays in moral judgment maturity, social cognitive…

  5. Preventing eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Heather; Stice, Eric; Becker, Carolyn Black

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews eating disorder (ED) prevention programs, highlighting features that define successful programs and particularly promising interventions, and how they might be further refined. The field of ED prevention has advanced considerably both theoretically and methodologically compared with the earlier ED prevention programs, which were largely psychoeducational and met with limited success. Recent meta-analytic findings show that more than half (51%) of ED prevention interventions reduced ED risk factors and more than a quarter (29%) reduced current or future eating pathology (EP). A couple of brief programs have been shown to reduce the risk for future onset of EP and obesity. Selected interactive, multisession programs offered to participants older than 15 years, delivered by professional interventionists and including body acceptance or dissonance-induction content, produced larger effects. Understanding and applying these results can help inform the design of more effective prevention programs in the future.

  6. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Psychoeducational Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Ness, Carin M.; Dannison, Linda; Smith, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Presents results of study exploring use of psychoeducational group sessions on topics such as parenting skills, personal well-being, relationships, managing finances, and legal issues, specifically developed for custodial grandparents. Grandparents consistently met objectives of the content areas, with increased mastery as sessions progressed.…

  7. Caregiver psychoeducation for schizophrenia: is gender important?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Females care for individuals with chronic illness more commonly than males and have different attitudes to illness. Additionally, they experience greater burden and reduced quality of life, when compared to their male counterparts. Since knowledge has been shown to be related to burden, we sought to determine whether there were gender differences in knowledge acquisition during a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme (CPP).

  8. Integrating Eating Disorder and Obesity Prevention Programs for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Heather; Ng, Janet; Stice, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers in the areas of eating disorders and obesity prevention are recognizing the benefits of collaborative efforts aimed at curbing the spectrum of eating-related disturbances. Research suggests that eating disorders and overweight tend to co-occur, and that individuals cross over from one eating-related disturbance to…

  9. Predictors of early change in bulimia nervosa after a brief psychoeducational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Aranda, Fernando; Alvarez-Moya, Eva M; Martínez-Viana, Cristina; Sànchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Forcano, Laura; Peñas-Lledó, Eva

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to examine baseline predictors of treatment response in bulimic patients. 241 seeking-treatment females with bulimia nervosa completed an exhaustive assessment and were referred to a six-session psychoeducational group. Regression analyses of treatment response were performed. Childhood obesity, lower frequency of eating symptomatology, lower body mass index, older age, and lower family's and patient's concern about the disorder were predictors of poor abstinence. Suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, higher maximum BMI, higher novelty seeking and lower baseline purging frequency predicted dropouts. Predictors of early symptom changes and dropouts were similar to those identified in longer CBT interventions.

  10. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eating Healthy Eating Healthy Contact Us Resources Eating Healthy Eating healthy is part of living a healthy life. Healthy eating is a responsibility of our communities, schools, clinics, ...

  11. Eating Well While Eating Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Eating Well While Eating Out KidsHealth > For Teens > Eating Well While Eating ... emotional well-being energy strength weight future health Eating on the Go It's easier than you think ...

  12. Treating disturbances in the relationship between mothers with bulimic eating disorders and their infants: a randomized, controlled trial of video feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alan; Woolley, Helen; Senior, Robert; Hertzmann, Leezah; Lovel, Mary; Lee, Joanna; Cooper, Sandra; Wheatcroft, Rebecca; Challacombe, Fiona; Patel, Priti; Nicol-Harper, Rosemary; Menzes, Pia; Schmidt, Anne; Juszczak, Edmund; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2006-05-01

    Maternal eating disorders interfere with parenting, adversely affecting mother-infant interaction and infant outcome. This trial tested whether video-feedback treatment specifically targeting mother-child interaction would be superior to counseling in improving mother-child interaction, especially mealtime conflict, and infant weight and autonomy. The participants were 80 mothers with bulimia nervosa or similar eating disorder who were attending routine baby clinics and whose infants were 4-6 months old. They were randomly assigned to video-feedback interactional treatment or supportive counseling. Both groups also received guided cognitive behavior self-help for their eating disorder. Each group received 13 sessions. The primary outcome measure was mealtime conflict; secondary outcome measures were infant weight, aspects of mother-infant interaction, and infant autonomy. Seventy-seven mothers were followed up when their infants were 13 months old. The video-feedback group exhibited significantly less mealtime conflict than the control subjects. Nine of 38 (23.7%) in the video-feedback group showed episodes of marked or severe conflict, compared with 21 of 39 (53.8%) control subjects (odds ratio=0.27, 95% confidence interval=0.10 to 0.73). Video feedback produced significant improvements in several other interaction measures and greater infant autonomy. Both groups maintained good infant weight, with no differences between groups. Maternal eating psychopathology was reduced across both groups. Video-feedback treatment focusing on mother-infant interaction produced improvements in interaction and infant autonomy, and both groups maintained adequate infant weight. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first controlled trial to show key improvements in interaction between mothers with postnatal psychiatric disorders and their infants.

  13. Effectiveness of Simple Individual Psychoeducation for Bipolar II Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Saito-Tanji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have proven the effectiveness of psychoeducation in bipolar II disorder patients; however, simpler psychoeducation is needed in daily medical practice. Therefore, we devised a simple individual psychoeducation program, which involved 20-minute sessions spent reading a textbook aloud in the waiting time before examination. Here, we report a successful case of simple individual psychoeducation with a patient with bipolar II disorder, a 64-year-old woman who had misconceptions surrounding her mood due to 24 years of treatment for depression. Her perception of mood state, particularly mixed state, was dramatically changed, and her quality of life was improved after the simple individual psychoeducation. This case suggests that the simple individual psychoeducation could be effective for bipolar II disorder by improving understanding of the disease and by meeting different individual needs.

  14. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... Results: Twenty per cent of the learners (n = 43) achieved EAT-26 scores ≥ 20, suggestive of a possible eating disorder, while 30.2% ... identification and referral for treatment of clinical or subclinical eating disturbances by parents and ... eating attitudes and/or eating disorders in the South African Jewish.

  15. Psychoeducational and family therapy in relapse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M J

    1994-01-01

    Recent shifts to briefer hospitalization and an emphasis on community care have emphasized the significance of patient-family interactions in this phase of treatment. Psychoeducational family programs designed to increase medication compliance and effectiveness in coping with stressors have been successful in reducing the risk of relapse in the first year following hospital discharge. Various models for family intervention are discussed and their strengths and weaknesses evaluated.

  16. Eating Disorders: Facts about Eating Disorders and the Search for Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Melissa

    Eating disorders involve serious disturbances in eating behavior, such as extreme and unhealthy reduction of food intake or severe overeating, as well as feelings of distress or extreme concern about body shape or weight. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the two main types of eating disorders. Eating disorders frequently co-occur with…

  17. "Las penas con pan duelen menos": The role of food and culture in Latinas with disordered eating behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Gulisano, Monica; Silva, Yormeri; Pivarunas, Bernadette; Luna-Reyes, Kiara L; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2016-05-01

    This study elucidated the experiences of eighteen Latina adults (mean age = 38.5 years) from "Promoviendo una Alimentación Saludable" Project who received nutritional intervention as part of the clinical trial. Half of the participants were first generation immigrants from Mexico (50%), followed by U.S. born with 16.7%. Remaining nationalities represented were Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, and Venezuela with 33.3% combined. The average duration of living in the U.S. was 11.1 years. The mean body mass index (BMI) at baseline was 36.59 kg/m(2) (SD = 7.72). Based on the DSM-IV, 28% (n = 5) participants were diagnosed with binge-eating disorder, 33% (n = 6) with bulimia nervosa purging type and 39% (n = 7) with eating disorder not otherwise specified. Participants received up to three nutritional sessions; a bilingual dietitian conducted 97.8% of sessions in Spanish. In total, fifty nutritional sessions were included in the qualitative analysis. A three step qualitative analysis was conducted. First, a bilingual research team documented each topic discussed by patients and all interventions conducted by the dietitian. Second, all topics were classified into specific categories and the frequency was documented. Third, a consensus with the dietitian was performed to validate the categories identified by the research team. Six categories (describing eating patterns, emotional distress, Latino culture values, family conflicts associated with disturbed eating behaviors, lack of knowledge of healthy eating, and treatment progress) emerged from patients across all nutritional sessions. Considering the background of immigration and trauma (60%, n = 15) in this sample; the appropriate steps of nutritional intervention appear to be: 1) elucidating the connection between food and emotional distress, 2) providing psychoeducation of healthy eating patterns using the plate method, and 3) developing a meal plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. “Las penas con pan duelen menos”: The role of food and culture in Latinas with disordered eating behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Gulisano, Monica; Silva, Yormeri; Pivarunas, Bernadette; Luna-Reyes, Kiara L.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    This study elucidated the experiences of eighteen Latina adults (mean age = 38.5 years) from “Promoviendo una Alimentación Saludable” Project who received nutritional intervention as part of the clinical trial. Half of the participants were first generation immigrants from Mexico (50%), followed by U.S. born with 16.7%. Remaining nationalities represented were Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, and Venezuela with 33.3% combined. The average duration of living in the U.S. was 11.1 years. The mean body mass index (BMI) at baseline was 36.59 kg/m2 (SD=7.72). Based on the DSM-IV, 28% (n=5) participants were diagnosed with binge-eating disorder, 33% (n=6) with bulimia nervosa purging type and 39% (n=7) with eating disorder not otherwise specified. Participants received up to three nutritional sessions; a bilingual dietitian conducted 97.8% of sessions in Spanish. In total, fifty nutritional sessions were included in the qualitative analysis. A three step qualitative analysis was conducted. First, a bilingual research team documented each topic discussed by patients and all interventions conducted by the dietitian. Second, all topics were classified into specific categories and the frequency was documented. Third, a consensus with the dietitian was performed to validate the categories identified by the research team. Six categories (describing eating patterns, emotional distress, Latino culture values, family conflicts associated with disturbed eating behaviors, lack of knowledge of healthy eating, and treatment progress) emerged from patients across all nutritional sessions. Considering the background of immigration and trauma (60%, n=15) in this sample; the appropriate steps of nutritional intervention appear to be: 1) elucidating the connection between food and emotional distress, 2) providing psychoeducation of healthy eating patterns using the plate method, and 3) developing a meal plan. PMID:26911262

  19. Effectiveness of psycho-education on depression, hopelessness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of psycho-education on depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and substance use among basic diploma students at Kenya Medical ... South African Journal of Psychiatry ... Psycho-education was effective in reducing the severity of symptoms of depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and risk

  20. A Global Perspective on Psycho-Educational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Islam, Shaheen; Su, Hui; Younesian, Sharifeh

    2015-01-01

    For psychologists in less developed countries, psycho-educational assessment is often challenging due to a lack of specialist training and a scarcity of appropriate, psychometrically robust instruments. This article focuses on school psychology and psycho-educational assessment in three countries: Bangladesh, China and Iran. Despite differences in…

  1. Structuring the Group Experience: A Format for Designing Psychoeducational Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents six-step model for moving from a general statement of purpose to a psychoeducational group design that includes didactic content, experiential activities, and processing. By following this model the group facilitator will be able to develop a psychoeducational group that provides a logical sequence of learning activities fostering…

  2. Disturbing forest disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volney, W.J.A.; Hirsch, K.G. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    This paper described the role that disturbances play in maintaining the ecological integrity of Canadian boreal forests. Potential adaptation options to address the challenges that these disturbances present were also examined. Many forest ecosystems need fire for regeneration, while other forests rely on a cool, wet disintegration process driven by insects and commensal fungi feeding on trees to effect renewal. While there are characteristic natural, temporal and spatial patterns to these disturbances, recent work has demonstrated that the disturbances are being perturbed by climatic change that has been compounded by anthropogenic disturbances in forests. Fire influences species composition and age structure, regulates forest insects and diseases, affects nutrient cycling and energy fluxes, and maintains the productivity of different habitats. Longer fire seasons as a result of climatic change will lead to higher intensity fires that may more easily evade initial attacks and become problematic. Fire regimes elevated beyond the range of natural variation will have a dramatic effect on the regional distribution and functioning of forest ecosystems and pose a threat to the safety and prosperity of people. While it was acknowledged that if insect outbreaks were to be controlled on the entire forest estate, the productivity represented by dead wood would be lost, it was suggested that insects such as the forest tent caterpillar and the spruce bud worm may also pose a greater threat as the climate gets warmer and drier. Together with fungal associates, saproxylic arthropods are active in nutrient cycling and ultimately determine the fertility of forest sites. It was suggested that the production of an age class structure and forest mosaic would render the forest landscape less vulnerable to the more negative aspects of climate change on vegetation response. It was concluded that novel management design paradigms are needed to successfully reduce the risk from threats

  3. Self-reported symptoms of eating disorders amongst university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disturbances are common amongst female athletes, especially those participating in dance. We investigated the prevalence and correlates of eating disorder risk symptoms amongst female student dancers. Fifty-eight female university dancers completed a self-report measure of eating disorders and eating disorder ...

  4. Prevalence and Correlates of Eating Disordered Behaviors among Undergraduate Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Betz, Nancy E.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated eating disordered behaviors among nonobese, nonanorexic college women (N=643). Classified 3 percent as bulimic, 61 percent as having intermediate form of eating behavior problem, 33 percent as having normal eating habits. Degree of disturbed eating was strongly correlated with lowered self-esteem, negative body image, endorsement of…

  5. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stres: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.; Christensen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published

  6. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stress: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published

  7. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stress: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in Septemb...

  8. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stres: a meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.; Christensen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in Septemb...

  9. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. Methods: This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients...... in substance use were associated with randomization to Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling. The findings support the usefulness of providing psycho-education to outpatients with antisocial personality disorder. Trial registration: ISRCTN registry, ISRCTN67266318, 17/7/2012...

  10. Psychoeducational programs for reducing prison violence: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Auty, Katherine Mary; Cope, A; Liebling, A

    2017-01-01

    Institutional violence presents significant challenges to the accomplishment of legitimate social order in prison. This systematic review examines the effect of psychoeducational programs on violent behaviour in prison. Comprehensive searches of the empirical research literature were conducted to identify randomized and non-randomized studies carried out in the last two decades (1996–2016) that compared psychoeducational programs with treatment as usual (TAU). The content of programs was anal...

  11. Psychological interventions for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, are common conditions, characterised by disturbances of eating behaviours and a core psychopathology centred on food, eating and body image concerns.(1,2) Eating disorders are associated with medical and psychological comorbidities; a significantly impaired health-related quality of life; a high rate of inpatient, outpatient and emergency care; significant healthcare costs; and increased mortality.(3-10) Here, we focus on the evidence for non-drug interventions for eating disorders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children...... and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets.......OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children...... and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all...

  13. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Healthy Eating KidsHealth > For Parents > Healthy Eating Print A A A What's in this article? ... best strategies to improve nutrition and encourage smart eating habits: Have regular family meals . Serve a variety ...

  14. [Eating behavior, eating disorders and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, S; Löwe, B; Herzog, W

    2000-08-01

    Over the last 50 years, the nutritional and socioeconomic conditions have dramatically changed in all industrialized countries. As a consequence, there has been a sharp rise in the prevalence of obesity. Simultaneously, social and cultural pressures to maintain a thin body shape have significantly increased. This untoward situation is largely responsible for the steady increase of eating disorders, especially bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder, which are common disorders among normal or overweight individuals. Although the criteria for bulimia nervosa were first described in the DSM-III in 1980 (APA, 1980), recent studies have demonstrated that only about 12% of these patients are detected by their GP's. One reason for this low rate of detection may be due to the tendency of patients to conceal their illness from others. It is also possible, however, that general practitioners lack sufficient knowledge about bulimia nervosa, preventing proper identification. To help improve this situation, diagnostic guidelines and therapeutic options were summarized. Binge-eating disorder (BED), which is classified as an "eating disorder not otherwise specified" in the DSM-IV (APA, 1994), has been described as the most relevant eating disorder for overweight individuals. It has been estimated that approximately 20-30% of overweight persons seeking help at weight loss programs are classified as binge eaters. Initial results from these studies suggest that binge eaters may require a modified psychotherapeutic approach which focuses on normalizing disordered eating patterns before attempting weight loss. In addition to the importance of screening for eating disorder behaviors, overweight patients should be assessed for other comorbid conditions, such as depression and anxiety. Further, body image disturbances should be assessed during the evaluation. In the event that comorbid disorders are present, it is recommended that specific psychotherapeutic interventions which target

  15. Hitting Closer to Home: A Multiple Family Prevention Group for Adolescent Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Colleen E.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an innovative multiple family psychoeducational group for the prevention of disordered eating among adolescent females. An overview of the concerns facing adolescents today is presented, including sociocultural norms, body dissatisfaction associated with pubertal changes, teasing regarding weight and shape, and family…

  16. Benefits of consumer psychoeducation: a pilot program in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedat, Soraya; Haskis, Anne; Stein, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that patient adherence to antidepressant treatment is unsatisfactory. There is, however, little published data on adherence in the South African context. In this pilot study we explore the possible benefits of a consumer psychoeducation program. First, drop-out rates during the first four months of paroxetine treatment were surveyed in patients participating in a psychoeducational program focused on depression and its treatment. Practitioners were also surveyed about their perceptions of the program. Second, drop-out rates during the first four months of paroxetine treatment were estimated from a pharmacy database of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescriptions in South Africa. Patients who participated in a psychoeducational program demonstrated comparatively lower drop-out rates during treatment compared with drop-out rates in patients on paroxetine (and other SSRIs) obtained from a national pharmacy database. Improved adherence on the psychoeducational program was attributed to an increased understanding of depression and the need to take medication, a realization that patients are not alone (i.e., depression is a widespread problem) and a better understanding and acceptance of the possible side-effects of medication. Both practitioners and patients were positive about their experience of the program and 80% of doctors judged the program to be very useful. Drop-out rates during SSRI treatment in South Africa appear to be unacceptably high, whether or not patients receive concomitant benzodiazepines. Psychoeducational programs may prove valuable in increasing adherence to treatment regimes.

  17. A Randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing + self-help versus psychoeducation + self-help for binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella-Zarb, Rachel A; Mills, Jennifer S; Westra, Henny A; Carter, Jacqueline C; Keating, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative therapy that focuses on strengthening a person's internal motivation to change. Research suggests that MI may be helpful for treating binge eating; however, findings are limited and little is known about how MI for binge eating compares to active therapy controls. The present study aimed to build on current research by comparing MI as a prelude to self-help treatment for binge eating with psychoeducation as a prelude to self-help treatment for binge eating. Participants with full or subthreshold DSM-IV Binge Eating Disorder or nonpurging Bulimia Nervosa were randomly assigned to receive either 60 minutes of MI followed by a self-help manual (n = 24) or 60 minutes of psychoeducation followed by a self-help manual (n = 21). Questionnaires were completed pre- and postsession, and at 1 and 4 months postsession. MI significantly increased readiness to change and confidence in ability to control binge eating, whereas psychoeducation did not. No group differences were found when changes in eating disorder attitudes and behaviors were examined. MI offers benefits for increasing motivation and self-efficacy. However, it may not be a uniquely effective treatment approach for reducing binge eating. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Effects of Psychoeducational Methods on College Students' Attitudes Toward Ptsd

    OpenAIRE

    Amna, Zaujatul; Lin, Hsiu Chen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of psycho-education methods on college students' attitudes toward post traumatic stress disorder. Analysis of results indicated that lecturing was the most effective psycho-educational method to obtain attitudinal changes. The effects of psycho-education methods of a short-duration intervention for college students' positive attitudes toward PTSD. Findings from the study led to the results that a short-duration of psycho-education intervention on PTSD...

  19. Electroencephalography in eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Clinical applications of electroencephalography (EEG) are used with different objectives, EEG being a noninvasive and painless procedure. In respect of eating disorders, in the 1950s a new line of study about the neurological bases of anorexia nervosa was started and has since been developed. The purpose of this review is to update the existing literature data on the main findings in respect of EEG in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. Despite the fact that weight gain tends to normalize some brain dysfunctions assessed by means of EEG, the specific effect of gaining weight remains controversial. Different studies have reported that cortical dysfunctions can be found in patients with anorexia nervosa even after weight gain, whereas others have reported a normalization of EEG in respect of the initial reduced alpha/ increased beta power in those patients with refeeding. Findings of studies that have analyzed the possible relationship between eating disorders and depression, based on sleep EEG disturbances, do not support the idea of eating disorders as a variant of depression or affective disorders. Some EEG findings are very consistent with previous neuroimaging results on patients with anorexia nervosa, reporting neural disturbances in response to stimuli that are relevant to the pathology (eg, stimuli like food exposure, different emotional situations, or body images). PMID:22275841

  20. Electroencephalography in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera1,21Behavioral Sciences Institute, 2Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Clinical applications of electroencephalography (EEG are used with different objectives, EEG being a noninvasive and painless procedure. In respect of eating disorders, in the 1950s a new line of study about the neurological bases of anorexia nervosa was started and has since been developed. The purpose of this review is to update the existing literature data on the main findings in respect of EEG in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. Despite the fact that weight gain tends to normalize some brain dysfunctions assessed by means of EEG, the specific effect of gaining weight remains controversial. Different studies have reported that cortical dysfunctions can be found in patients with anorexia nervosa even after weight gain, whereas others have reported a normalization of EEG in respect of the initial reduced alpha/increased beta power in those patients with refeeding. Findings of studies that have analyzed the possible relationship between eating disorders and depression, based on sleep EEG disturbances, do not support the idea of eating disorders as a variant of depression or affective disorders. Some EEG findings are very consistent with previous neuroimaging results on patients with anorexia nervosa, reporting neural disturbances in response to stimuli that are relevant to the pathology (eg, stimuli like food exposure, different emotional situations, or body images.Keywords: electroencephalography, event-related potentials, sleep, depression, refeeding, weight gain

  1. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become ...

  2. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) The Deal With Diets Body Dysmorphic Disorder Compulsive Exercise Emotional Eating Binge Eating Disorder Female Athlete Triad Body Image and Self-Esteem Anemia I Think My ...

  3. Application of Focal Conflict Theory to Psychoeducational Groups: Implications for Process, Content, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Group psychoeducation is a common group type used for a range of purposes. The literature presents balancing content and process as a challenge for psychoeducational group leaders. While the significance of group psychoeducation is supported, practitioners are given little direction for addressing process in these groups. Focal Conflict Theory…

  4. Methods of psychoeducational program evaluation in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J

    1992-04-01

    Psychoeducational programs for families of the mentally ill became widespread during the 1980s as a means of providing a forum for the relevant education and mutual support of participants. While these programs are thought to be extremely useful as interventions, very little emphasis has been placed on evaluation as a means of demonstrating their effectiveness in achieving goals. There is a possibility, then, that psychoeducation will continue to flourish with little direct evidence of positive outcomes for its family participants. This article consists of a literature review of existing methods of psychoeducational program evaluation, both quantitative and qualitative, all of which may be applicable in certain circumstances. The process by which an evaluation instrument was developed for a program with families of the mentally ill is then presented in some detail.

  5. Family psychoeducation and schizophrenia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, William R; Dixon, Lisa; Lukens, Ellen; Lucksted, Alicia

    2003-04-01

    Family psychoeducation has emerged as a treatment of choice for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and other disorders. More than 30 randomized clinical trials have demonstrated reduced relapse rates, improved recovery of patients, and improved family well-being among participants. Interventions common to effective family psychoeducation programs have been developed, including empathic engagement, education, ongoing support, clinical resources during periods of crisis, social network enhancement, and problem-solving and communication skills. Application of family psychoeducation in routine settings where patients having these disorders are usually treated has been limited, reflecting attitudinal, knowledge, practical, and systemic implementation obstacles. Through consensus among patient and family advocacy organizations, clinician training, and ongoing technical consultation and supervision, this approach has been implemented in routine clinical settings.

  6. Emotional Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illnesses can affect persons of any age, race, religion, or income. Further: Mental illnesses are not the ... Detailed information on specific emotional disturbances , or related issues such as positive behavior supports, is also available ...

  7. On the Continuum of Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Lana Lee Munro

    2007-01-01

    Theorists and researchers have long debated as to whether the differences between subthreshold levels of eating disturbances and diagnosable eating disorders are a difference of degree (the continuum hypothesis) or a difference of kind (the discontinuity hypothesis). The present study investigated the relationship between level of eating disordered behaviour and the psychopathology associated with, and thought by some to be prodromal factors in, the development of clinically diagnosable eatin...

  8. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary- school girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disturbed eating attitude - and possible eating disorder - is present in their child. Communication about food and dieting to lose weight were both predictive of higher mean. EAT scores; mothers therefore need to be aware of the potential significance of such topics of conversation. Both of these findings have previously been ...

  9. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and stres: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, T.; Griffiths, K.M.; Cuijpers, P.; Christensen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of

  10. Effectiveness of psycho-education on depression, hopelessness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the effectiveness of psycho-education on symptom severity in depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and risk of substance abuse .... anger-management techniques, relaxation exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, general ...... and syndromes in Kenyan children and adolescents. J Child Adolesc ...

  11. Stress Reduction through Psychoeducation: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Tom; Hermans, Dirk; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions in reducing stress and to gain more insight in determining features moderating the magnitude of effects. Relevant studies were selected from 1990 to 2010 and were included according to predetermined criteria. For each study, the standardized mean…

  12. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  13. The Effectiveness of Psycho-Education on the Psychological Well ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effectiveness of psycho-education training in the enhancement of the psychological well-being of spouse of incarcerated males in Ibadan, Nigeria. Using the pre-test and post-test quasi experimental research design, a total of 16 spouses of male inmates in Ibadan participated in the study. The ages ...

  14. Testing the effectiveness of existing psycho-educational material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen Setswana speaking participants, with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were exposed to the programme. Semi-structured and screening ... films over formal lectures. Conclusion: Psycho-education material given to people suffering from schizophrenia and their caregivers has to be adapted to their context to be effective.

  15. The psychoeducational aspects of the psychiatric rehabilitation aproach

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William; Cohen, Mikal

    1991-01-01

    Psychiatric Rehabilitation is an approach which utilizes the principles of physical rehabilitation with psychotherapeutic techniques. It incorporates both psychoeducational techniques (skill development) and environmental modification (resource development). It includes a complex variety of didactic, modeling, experimental, follow-up activities in the context of a strong interpersonal relationship that permits a systematic intervention to be delivered in a flexible, hi...

  16. Predicting the effect of psychoeducational group treatment for hypochondriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, F.M.; Bouman, T.K.

    2008-01-01

    Both individual cognitive-behavioural therapy and short-term psychoeducational courses have shown to be effective in reducing hypochondriacal complaints. However, it is unknown which patients benefit from treatment. The aim of the present study is to explore which variables predict treatment outcome

  17. Home-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün İnan, Figen; Üstün, Besti

    2017-03-15

    It is important to manage psychological distress and improve the quality of life (QOL) in patients after breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based, psychoeducational program on distress, anxiety, depression, and QOL in breast cancer survivors. The study was a single-group pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. The data were collected using the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Turkish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, short form. The home-based, individual, face-to-face psychoeducational program was structured according to breast cancer survivors' needs and the Neuman Systems Model. A total of 32 Turkish breast cancer survivors participated in this study. There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores for distress, anxiety, and depression in the breast cancer survivors over 4 measurements. The mean scores for all subscales of the QOL at 6 months postintervention were significantly higher than the mean scores at baseline. The results indicated that the psychoeducational program may be effective in reducing distress, anxiety, and depression and in improving the QOL in breast cancer survivors. Psychoeducational programs may be effective and should be considered as part of the survivorship care for breast cancer survivors.

  18. Elderly Individuals with Diabetes: Adding Cognitive Training to Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna Paulo, Debora Lee; Sanches Yassuda, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The present research examined the effects of a cognitive training program combined with psychoeducational intervention for diabetic elderly patients. Specifically, it aimed at assessing the effects of an eight-session cognitive training and educational program in diabetic elderly individuals and investigating changes in their awareness about…

  19. Outcome in psychoeducational day school programs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenen, Randall S; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Glenwick, David S

    1986-04-01

    Psychoeducational day schools provide clinical and special education services to children with severe behavior disorders. Outcome studies indicate that treated children tend to improve in behavioral, academic, and family functioning but warrant continued intervention. Family therapy, development of academic skills, and coordination of aftercare services appear critical to long-term program success.

  20. Evaluation of a Psychoeducational Program to Help Adolescents Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Claire; Morgan, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Over 20% of a sample of 706 young adolescents identified themselves as experiencing difficulties and being in need of specific help in coping. A psychoeducational Program "Helping Adolescents Cope" was offered to 112 of those. This was adapted, with permission, from the "Coping with Stress Course," devised by Albano et al. (1997). Participants'…

  1. A Critical Analysis of Time Allocation in Psychoeducational Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Gordon E.; Valentine, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This study provides results form a national survey examining school psychologists' allocation of time in psychoeducational evaluations. A total of 177 participants with an average of 13.45 years professional experience in school psychology, representing 39 states, participated in the survey. The results indicate that school psychologists spend the…

  2. Use of Clustering Techniques in Deriving Psychoeducational Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Esther; Kheifets, Leeka

    1982-01-01

    This study examined whether a synthesis of clinical and statistical data taken from psychoeducational reports completed on 42 boys referred to a child psychiatric outpatient department for school-learning problems would yield discrete clinical categories or clusters of children. Cluster membership and educational placement recommendations were…

  3. Eating disorders in the male athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Antonia

    2006-01-01

    Eating disorders do occur in male athletes. They are less prominent than in female athletes, and therefore in danger of being missed. The high-risk sports fall into the same categories as with females: aesthetic sports, sports in which low body fat is advantageous, such as cross-country and marathon running, and sports in which there is a need to "make weight", including wrestling and horse racing. Athletic involvement may foster the development of an eating disorder. Some male athletes, in their preoccupation with body image, will abuse anabolic steroids. While sports participation may contribute to the aetiology of an eating disorder, the converse is also true. Exercise may be used as therapy for some cases of eating disorder. In order to adequately treat eating disorders in the male athlete, it is first essential to identify cases. Psychoeducation of athletes, their families, coaches and trainers is an important first step. Counselling an athlete to pursue a sport appropriate to his body type, or to leave his sport behind altogether (an unpopular recommendation from a coach's perspective) can be important to treatment. Treatment of co-morbid psychiatric conditions is essential. Treatment can be structured using a biopsychosocial approach, and all appropriate modalities of therapy, including individual, family and group, as well as psychopharmacotherapy, where appropriate, should be applied.

  4. Binge eating disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorder - binge eating; Eating - binge; Overeating - compulsive; Compulsive overeating ... The exact cause of binge eating is unknown. Things that may lead to this disorder include: Genes, such as having close relatives who also have an eating ...

  5. Psychoeducation for siblings of people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Jordan, Cheryl D; Barley, Elizabeth A; Henderson, Claire; Norman, Ian

    2015-05-08

    Many people with severe mental illness (SMI) have siblings. Siblings are often both natural agents to promote service users' recovery and vulnerable to mental ill health due to the negative impact of psychosis within the family. Despite a wealth of research evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation for service users with SMI and their family members, in reducing relapse and promoting compliance with treatment, siblings remain relatively invisible in clinical service settings as well as in research studies. If psychoeducational interventions target siblings and improve siblings' knowledge, coping with caring and overall wellbeing, they could potentially provide a cost-effective option for supporting siblings with resulting benefits for service users' outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of psychoeducation compared with usual care or any other intervention in promoting wellbeing and reducing distress of siblings of people affected by SMI.The secondary objective was, if possible, to determine which type of psychoeducation is most effective. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register and screened the reference lists of relevant reports and reviews (12th November 2013). We contacted trial authors for unpublished and specific data on siblings' outcomes. All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducational interventions targeting siblings of all ages (on their own or amongst other family members including service users) of individuals with SMI, using any means and formats of delivery, i.e. individual (family), groups, computer-based. Two review authors independently screened the abstracts and extracted data and two other authors independently checked the screening and extraction process. We contacted authors of trials to ascertain siblings' participation in the trials and seek sibling-specific data in those studies where siblings' data were grouped together with other participants' (most commonly other family members

  6. Psychoeducation Interventions in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Reis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies in expressed emotions allowed establishing a pattern in educational and psychoeducative interventions within the families of schizophrenic patients. In this paper, the author synthesises his research developed in expressed emotions of the chronic patient's relatives. The author refers the importance of the relative's cognitive variables about mental representation of the patient and his disease. These variables are studied through the attributions made about the patient's personality and causes of disease. Other cognitive variables are analysed, relying to the conceptualisation in family psycho educative intervention, such as, transactional games, family conflicts and parental relationship style. The evaluation of the relatives and families is considered as being part of the process of family psycho-educative intervention.

  7. Self-Compassion: Evaluation of a Psychoeducational Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, France; Thériault, Judith; French, Douglas J

    2017-03-01

    Low levels of self-compassion are associated with a number of mental health problems. Recent findings suggest that self-compassion can be significantly increased through traditional therapist led interventions such as Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC). The goal of this study was to assess the impact of a psychoeducational website modeled on MSC on measured levels of self-compassion and two related constructs: shame and rumination. Participants (N = 9) were recruited from a pool of university students and employees. Single case AB protocols were used. Analyses using the Critical Difference statistic revealed significant improvement in self-compassion and shame for the majority of participants, but limited changes in rumination. These preliminary findings suggest that self-compassion may be enhanced through the use of a psychoeducational website. It may be worthwhile to develop a structured internet-based treatment course for individuals who would not otherwise access traditional psychological services.

  8. Impact of Psychoeducation on Professional Stress Reduction Among Prison Guards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Mehmedbasic, Alma; Salcic, Dubravka; Kucukalic, Abdulah; Fadilpasic, S.; Cakovic, L.; Mehmedika-Suljic, Enra; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Through psychological support for prison guard’s awareness about professional stress and burn-out, cognitive assessment of stress consequences, insight in coping strategies, as well as prevention of stress consequences is achieved. Aim Evaluation of psychoeducation effects on professional stress consequences within prison guards. Method In the research were included 122 prison guards from three prisons in Bosnia and Herzegovina. All of them have been tested before and after psychoeducation was finished using following instruments: Index of reaction, STAI questionnaire, SAMAČA questionnaire. Results Differences between first and second measuring of subjects included in this study in Sarajevo prison indicated statistically significant reduction of stress reactions, improvement of coping strategies and communication skills. In prisons Zenica and Kula there are differences between first and second measurement in stress reactions reduction, improvement of coping strategies and overcoming of stress and improvement of communication skills as well, which are not statistically significant. In Kula prison, significant differences between two measurements in attitudes of prison guards toward detainees were observed. Conclusions Results of this study show that prison guards within prisons where are detained persons with long period of imprisonment are more exposed to professional stress, comparing to prison guards who are employed in investigation prison. Psychoeducation resulted in positive effects and it should be obligatory included in prison guards training with the aim of decreasing of psychological consequences of prolonged professional stress to which they are exposed to. Psychoeducation should be on continuous basis and led by educated mental health professionals. PMID:24133378

  9. The Bipolar Interactive Psychoeducation (BIPED study: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorders affect between 3–5% of the population and are associated with considerable lifelong impairment. Since much of the morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is caused by recurrent depressive symptoms, which are often only poorly responsive to antidepressants, there is a need to develop alternative, non-pharmacological interventions. Psychoeducational interventions have emerged as promising long-term therapeutic options for bipolar disorder. Methods/design The study is an exploratory, individually randomised controlled trial. The intervention known as 'Beating Bipolar' is a psychoeducational programme which is delivered via a novel web-based system. We will recruit 100 patients with a diagnosis of DSM-IV bipolar disorder (including type I and type II currently in clinical remission. The primary outcome is quality of life. This will be compared for those patients who have participated in the psychoeducational programme with those who received treatment as usual. Quality of life will be assessed immediately following the intervention as well as 10 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include current depressive and manic symptoms, number of episodes of depression and mania/hypomania experienced during the follow-up period, global functioning, functional impairment and insight. An assessment of costs and a process evaluation will also be conducted which will explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention as well as potential barriers to effectiveness. Discussion Bipolar disorder is common, under-recognised and often poorly managed. It is a chronic, life-long, relapsing condition which has an enormous impact on the individual and the economy. This trial will be the first to explore the effectiveness of a novel web-based psychoeducational intervention for patients with bipolar disorder which has potential to be easily rolled out to patients. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  10. [Psychoeducation and cognitive remediation, which place in rehabilitation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péneau, Elie; Franck, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation techniques aim to reduce the functional impact of severe psychological disorders. The recent development of techniques aimed at the manifestations of the pathology, such as psychoeducation and cognitive remediation, raise questions about how they differ from standard therapies. Beyond their functional purpose, the consideration of the individual's current or future action potential, seems to constitute one of the key aspects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of In-School Psychoeducational Services For Emotionally Disturbed Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Matthew; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A model designed first to identify and encourage available resources and then to provide consultation and direct services within the school is described. An example of how the model was utilized to respond to a crisis situation within a particular elementary school is given. The resulting program is then evaluated and implications for future…

  12. Immersive Eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Dannie Michael; Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Bjørner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents a pilot study evaluating a simple approach allowing users to eat real food while exploring a virtual environment (VE) through a head-mounted display (HMD). Two cameras mounted on the HMD allowed for video-based stereoscopic see-through when the user’s head orientation pointed...... toward the food, and the VE would appear when the user turned elsewhere. The pilot study revealed that all participants were able to eat their meals using the system, and a number of potential challenges relevant to immersive eating scenarios were identified....

  13. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by a complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Researchers are using the latest technology and science to better understand eating disorders. One approach involves ...

  14. Eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient’s health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one’s own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases.

  15. Differences in the Nature of Body Image Disturbances between Female Obese Individuals with versus without a Comorbid Binge Eating Disorder: An Exploratory Study Including Static and Dynamic Aspects of Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Betz, Sabrina; Puigcerver, Maria Jose Baguena; Benecke, Andrea; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Ruddel, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Various components of body image were measured to assess body image disturbances in patients with obesity. To overcome limitations of previous studies, a photo distortion technique and a biological motion distortion device were included to assess static and dynamic aspects of body image. Questionnaires assessed cognitive-affective aspects, bodily…

  16. Prevalence of Obesity, Binge Eating, and Night Eating in a Cross-Sectional Field Survey of 6-Year-Old Children and Their Parents in a German Urban Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamerz, Andreas; Kuepper-Nybelen, Jutta; Bruning, Nicole; Wehle, Christine; Trost-Brinkhues, Gabriele; Brenner, Hermann; Hebebrand, Johannes; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2005-01-01

    Background: To assess the prevalence of obesity, obesity-related binge eating, non-obesity-related binge eating, and night eating in five- to six-year-old children and to examine the impact of parental eating disturbances. Methods: When 2020 children attended their obligatory health exam prior to school entry in the city of Aachen, Germany, 1979…

  17. Family-Based Psychoeducation for Children and Adolescents with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Say How; Caron, Annalise

    2008-01-01

    Psychoeducation is often used for family members of adult patients with mood disorders. An increase in family's knowledge of the patient's illness course and outcome is thought to improve treatment compliance and may reduce relapse rates through identification of early symptoms and risks. While studies on family-based psychoeducation of adult…

  18. Stress Prevention and Mindfulness: A Psychoeducational and Support Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; Murphy, Susan L.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A stress prevention and mindfulness (SPAM) group is described, which is a 6-week psychoeducational and support group for teachers. The group incorporated psychoeducation about stress and utilized elements of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The group was implemented in a public charter school in the Southwest. Preliminary evaluation…

  19. The effectiveness of psychoeducation programs following first episode psychosis: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Kei; Kajiwara, Tomomi; Endo, Yoshimi; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this review is to establish whether psychoeducational programs can lead to improved outcomes (reduced relapse or readmission) in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) compared with usual care. Specifically, the review question is: Are psychoeducational programs for patients with first-episode psychosis effective in improving outcomes compared with those receiving usual care?

  20. A Psychoeducational School-Based Group Intervention for Socially Anxious Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Damer, Diana E.; Mellou, Angeliki; Mitropoulou, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a psychoeducational group for social anxiety aimed at elementary children. An 8-week psychoeducational program based on empirically validated risk factors was designed. Interventions included cognitive restructuring, anxiety management techniques, and social skills training. Pre-and posttest data from 3 groups…

  1. Psychoeducation and compliance in the treatment of schizophrenia: results of the Munich Psychosis Information Project Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitschel-Walz, Gabriele; Bäuml, Josef; Bender, Wolfram; Engel, Rolf R; Wagner, Michael; Kissling, Werner

    2006-03-01

    The present study examined whether psychoeducational groups for patients with schizophrenic disorders and for their families can reduce rehospitalization rates and improve compliance. 236 inpatients who met DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and who had regular contact with at least 1 relative or other key person were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions. In the intervention condition, patients and their relatives were encouraged to attend psychoeducational groups over a period of 4 to 5 months. The patients' and relatives' psychoeducational programs were separate, and each consisted of 8 sessions. Patients in the other treatment condition received routine care. Outcomes were compared over 12-month and 24-month follow-up periods. The study was conducted from 1990 to 1994. It was possible to significantly reduce the rehospitalization rate after 12 and 24 months in patients who attended psychoeducational groups compared with those receiving routine care (p psychoeducational groups showed better compliance than patients under routine care without psycho-education. The results suggest that a relatively brief intervention of 8 psychoeducational sessions with systematic family involvement in simultaneous groups can considerably improve the treatment of schizophrenia. Psychoeducation should be routinely offered to all patients with schizophrenia and their families.

  2. Development of the internet based psychoeducation for patients with bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Jelenova, Daniela; Ociskova, Marie; Sedlackova, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Despite pharmacological treatment of bipolar affective disorder has many advantages; only drug treatment remains insufficiently beneficial to many patients. The combination of pharmacotherapy and internet psychoeducation seems to be the effective way how to improve remission. Internet-based therapy programs offer an exclusive chance for large underserved parts of the population to make evidence-based treatment without the need of full-time therapist. Our goal was to create a psychoeducational program for patients suffering from bipolar disorder that can be used in Czech Republic. There were identified studies through Web of Science, PUBMED, and Scopus databases as well as existing reviews were used in development of comprehensive internet psychoeducational program for patients with bipolar disorder. The search terms included "bipolar disorder", "psychoeducation", and "internet psychoeducation". The search was performed with no language or time restrictions. The internet psychoeducational program was developed in accordance to the data from the literature review. The aim of the Internet psychoeducational program of the Department of Psychiatry University Hospital in Olomouc is to familiarize patients with the fundamental nature of bipolar affective disorder, the character and principles of pharmacotherapy, the recognition of the warning signs of relapse, inappropriate and stressful stereotypes in communication within families, and finally the practice of social skills. Information from studies can help to prepare comprehensive psychoeducational program for bipolar patients.

  3. Accessing Early Behavioral Intervention for Autism: The Development and Testing of a Psychoeducational Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, Michele Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of psychoeducation within a stepped care model as applied to the problem of autism treatment. The current study developed and pilot tested a psychoeducational website for parents who recently had a child diagnosed with autism. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design was used to evaluate the…

  4. The role of psycho-education in improving outcome at a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: While psychoeducation has been shown to positively affect outcomes in psychiatric disorders, its utility has been little studied in developing countries. The current study sought to examine the role of psychoeducation at a general psychiatric outpatient clinic in Kampala, Uganda in improving clinic attendance, ...

  5. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  6. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trach - eating ... take your first bites. Certain factors may make eating or swallowing harder, such as: Changes in the ... easier to swallow. Suction the tracheostomy tube before eating. This will keep you from coughing while eating, ...

  7. Emotional Eating (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Emotional Eating KidsHealth > For Teens > Emotional Eating Print A A ... make you feel sickeningly full? What Is Emotional Eating? Emotional eating is when people use food as ...

  8. Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after a binge, people might feel guilty and sad about the out-of-control eating. Binge eating ... have a binge eating problem. Both guys and girls can have binge eating disorder. But because people ...

  9. A psychoeducational nursing intervention to enhance coping and affective state in newly diagnosed malignant melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, N W

    1995-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if a psychoeducational nursing intervention including (a) health education, (b) stress management, and (c) the teaching of coping skills could enhance the coping behavior and affective state of newly diagnosed Stage I/II malignant melanoma patients. The secondary purpose was to determine if this intervention could be implemented by a nurse and integrated into the overall patient care program. Sixty-one patients were randomized to a control condition or an experimental condition that received and educational manual plus 3 h of individual nurse teaching. Despite randomization, experimental patients had significantly higher baseline distress. By 3 months there was a complete reversal of the baseline trend in Profile of Mood States (POMS) total mood disturbance (TMD), suggesting that the experimental subjects were experiencing less distress over time. Between-group analysis of change scores found significant decreases in experimental subjects for POMS TMD, fatigue, and Brief Symptom Index (BSI) somatization. Within-group analysis found significant experimental decreases for BSI somatization, anxiety, grand total, General Severity Index, and Positive Symptom Distress Index as well as for POMS anxiety, fatigue, confusion, vigor, and TMD. No significant changes were found for controls. Experimental patients were using significantly fewer ineffective passive resignation coping strategies than controls at 3 months.

  10. Mindful Eating With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K

    2017-05-01

    IN BRIEF This article provides a description of mindfulness and mindful eating and addresses the application of mindful eating as a component of diabetes self-management education. Mindful eating helps individuals cultivate awareness of both internal and external triggers to eating, interrupt automatic eating, and eat in response to the natural physiological cues of hunger and satiety. Mindful eating interventions have been effective in facilitating improvement in dysregulated eating and dietary patterns. Through practice over time, eating mindfully can interrupt habitual eating behaviors and provide greater regulation of food choice. More research is needed to determine the long-term impact of mindful eating programs.

  11. Thought–shape fusion and body image in eating disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jáuregui-Lobera I; Bolaños-Ríos P; Ruiz-Prieto I

    2012-01-01

    ...), specific instruments to assess body image disturbances, and body image quality of life in eating disorder patients in order to improve the understanding of the links between body image concerns...

  12. Thought-shape fusion and body image in eating disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    ...), specific instruments to assess body image disturbances, and body image quality of life in eating disorder patients in order to improve the understanding of the links between body image concerns...

  13. Family and schizophrenia - psychoeducational group in a pilot programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordas, Wojciech; Kokodyńska, Katarzyna; Kurtyka, Agnieszka; Sikorska, Iwona; Walczewski, Krzysztof; Bogacz, Józef

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present the programme, the outcomes and the conclusions of a psychoeducational training series for families with schizophrenia carried out by the Babiński Specialist Hospital in Kraków, Poland. The paper sets out to describe an explorative project based on qualitative study methods. The programme described in the paper adheres to the systemic and narrative approach to therapy. The project involved 23 people from 16 families, who attended 14 psychoeducational meetings for 4 months. A variety of methods was applied: lectures, case studies, discussion, interactive workshops, psycho-drawing, multimediapresentations, simulations of crisis situations, training in subgroups. Upon the completion of the programme, no significant increase in the participants'theoretical knowledge on schizophrenia was observed, which in turn concurred with a decrease in the subjective sense of strain in the family. Even though only 11% of the participants initially expected emotional support from the group, 60% of them identified support as the most important benefit from the programme. The systemic narrative approach used in the programme has been accepted and assessed well by families of patients with schizophrenia. It seems to provide an effective alternative to traditional psychotherapy. The combination of effective training tools with activities to create a space for participants to exchange their thoughts and experiences has proved to be an effective form of support to families in adversity.

  14. Eating insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Hui Shan Grace

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, edible insects have gained global attention due to their nutritional and environmental advantages over conventional meat. While numerous species of edible insects are enjoyed in various cultures around the world, most Western consumers react with disgust and aversion towards eating

  15. Subclinical Eating Disorders in Adolescent Women: A Test of the Continuity Hypothesis and Its Psychological Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L.; Omori, Mika

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the severity of disturbed eating and its psychological correlates in college freshman women. Reports that 9% fell into the problem bulimic or dieter at-risk categories, 23% were classified as intensive dieters, 17% as casual dieters, and over half were non-dieters. Depression, dysfunctional thinking, and disturbed eating attitudes…

  16. Eating styles in major depressive disorder: Results from a large-scale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, N.P.G.; Bot, M.; Strien, T. van; Brouwer, I.A.; Visser, M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2018-01-01

    Depressed persons have been found to present disturbances in eating styles, but it is unclear whether eating styles are different in subgroups of depressed patients. We studied the association between depressive disorder, severity, course and specific depressive symptom profiles and unhealthy eating

  17. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Night Eating Syndrome and Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; DeBate, Rita DiGioacchino

    2010-01-01

    Night eating syndrome criteria include skipping breakfast, night eating, and sleep difficulties. It is associated with mood disturbances, particularly depression, and may contribute to later obesity development. Most research on night eating syndrome has focused on obese persons seeking weight loss treatment, and little is known about night eating…

  18. Mental health consumer parents' recommendations for designing psychoeducation interventions for their minor children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebschleger, Joanne; Onaga, Esther; Tableman, Betty; Bybee, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    This research explores consumer parents' recommendations for developing psychoeducation programs for their minor children. Data were drawn from a purposive sample of 3 focus groups of parent consumers of a community mental health agency. The research question was: "What do consumer parents recommend for developing psychoeducation programs for their minor children?" Parents recommended content foci of mental illness, recovery, heritability, stigma, and coping. The next step is youth psychoeducation intervention development and evaluation. Parents, youth, and professionals should be included in the program planning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Eating insects

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hui Shan Grace

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, edible insects have gained global attention due to their nutritional and environmental advantages over conventional meat. While numerous species of edible insects are enjoyed in various cultures around the world, most Western consumers react with disgust and aversion towards eating creatures that are not regarded as food. The low consumer acceptance of this culturally inappropriate food is currently considered to be one of the key barriers to attaining the benefits of this po...

  20. Binge Eating in Obesity: Associated MMPI Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkin, Ronette L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Determined Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) characteristics' association with binge-eating severity among obese women. Indicated much variability in binge severity among obese women seeking treatment. MMPI characteristics were significantly related to binge severity. As binge severity increased, so did psychological disturbance,…

  1. Preocupación por la apariencia física y alteraciones emocionales en mujeres con trastornos alimentarios con autoestima baja (Body shape concern and emotional disturbances in women with eating disorders and low self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Avargues Navarro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in age, nutritional state (Body Mass Index or BMI, anxiety, depression and body dissatisfaction in eating disorder (ED patients with low, medium and high self-esteem. We also attempted to identify discrepancies between the real and desired nutritional state. A total of 146 women with EDs (anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa; DSM-IV-TR criteria were evaluated. The Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES were used as measurement instruments. The results showed significant differences between the low, medium and high self-esteem patients regarding anxiety, depression, body dissatisfaction, desired BMI and the relationship between real and desired BMI. The women with low self-esteem presented higher levels of anxiety, depression and body dissatisfaction than the other groups. Furthermore, ED patients with low self-esteem have a stronger desire to achieve their ideal BMI. We suggest including self-esteem techniques in ED prevention and treatment programs in order to decrease anxiety and depression symptoms.

  2. Exploring the Role of YouTube in Disseminating Psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nikki Hei Tong; Tsiang, John Ta-Hsiang; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2017-12-01

    Social media can bridge the gap between health care and ethnic minorities over cultural barriers. This study explores the role of YouTube in delivering schizophrenia education to individuals in the USA who are also fluent in Chinese. Three psychoeducational YouTube videos related to schizophrenia were uploaded. Data were collected for a 12-month period, and results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The videos recorded 4935 views with a total viewing time of 35,614 min. The first-episode psychosis video had the most number of views and shares, and the longest total watch time and average view duration. The targeted age group (YouTube is a useful tool that delivers schizophrenia education to Chinese-speaking individuals in the USA. It may also help alleviate the negative stigma regarding schizophrenia and other mental health issues.

  3. The Family Series Workshop: A Community-Based Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanque, Sarah M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cheng, An-Lin; Doty, Leilani; Brotto, Marco A.; Kelly, Patricia J.; Niedens, Michelle; Caserta, Michael S.; Savage, Lynette M.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an evaluation of a community-based psychoeducational intervention, called The Family Series Workshop, for caregivers of community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias (ADRD). In a one-group pretest–posttest design, participants (n = 35) attended six weekly sessions. Caregiver stress, coping, and caregiving competence were evaluated along with demographic characteristics of participants. There was a significant improvement found for caregiving competence, and a marginally significant increase in coping with humor. Using regression analysis we also found that coping with humor, along with stress, were significant predictors of caregiving competence. These findings indicate that it is possible to increase caregiving competence utilizing a “grassroots” approach and that it is feasible to hold educational, group discussions on a plethora of challenging caregiving topics. PMID:25609602

  4. The Effectiveness of Psychoeducational Interventions Focused on Sexuality in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Yang, Younghee; Hwang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual health is a common concern for oncology patients, no practical guidelines to sexual intervention exist, perhaps because of a lack of systematic reviews or meta-analyses. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect size for psychoeducational intervention focused on sexuality and to compare effect sizes according to intervention outcomes and characteristic. We explored quantitative evidence for the effects of sexual intervention for cancer patients or partners by using the electronic databases. Among them, we considered 15 eligible articles. The meta-analysis provided 133 effect sizes from 15 primary studies. The analysis revealed significant improvements after intervention, with a random-effects standardized mean difference of 0.75. Psychoeducational interventions focused on sexuality after cancer diagnosis were effective for compliance (2.40), cognitive aspect (1.29), and psychological aspect (0.83). Individual-based interventions (0.85) were more effective in improving outcomes than group approach and group combined with individual intervention. With regard to intervention providers, registered nurse only (2.22) and team approach including the registered nurse (2.38) had the highest effect size. Face-to-face intervention combined with telephone or the Internet (1.04) demonstrated a higher effect size than face-to-face (0.62) and telephone (0.58) independently. We conducted an analysis of data from various subgroups of preexisting studies, obtained an overall estimate of the effectiveness of the intervention, and compared its effectiveness across variables that affect intervention outcomes. These results provide empirical data for evidence-based practice and inform the development of useful intervention programs through a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of the results.

  5. [Eating disorders in childhood and adolescence. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinghoff, M; Backmund, H

    2004-03-01

    The most important eating disorders are anorexia and bulimia, which most frequently occur for the first time during adolescence and continue into adulthood. Medical complications and accompanying psychological disturbances cause a significant mortality rate of up to 6% in anorexia and up to 3% in bulimia. The pathogenesis of eating disorders is still unclear. Current etiological concepts are multidimensional including biological, individual, familial, and sociocultural factors. In spite of a great variety of therapeutic possibilities, the prognosis for eating disorders is quite poor. In the long term, only about 50% of the persons affected overcome their illness. Preventive measures are therefore indispensable.

  6. Survey on eating disorder-related thoughts, behaviors, and their relationship with food intake and nutritional status in female high school students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Jhen; Lin, Wei; Wong, Yueching

    2011-02-01

    Eating disorders are now a global health problem for adolescents and young female adults. The level of eating disorders among young female adults is growing in Asian countries. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate body image, weight concerns, eating attitudes, dietary intake, and nutritional status related to eating disorders of female high school students in Taiwan. A total of 1605 female high school students participated in this study. The written questionnaire included respondents' demographics and weight concerns, the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), and 24-hour dietary recall. Blood chemistry data were also collected. The data were analyzed using a Student t test, χ(2) analysis, and logistic regression. Disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors were found in 17.11% of participants (measured by an EAT-26 score ≥20). Logistic regression analyses showed that disturbed eating attitudes/behaviors were significantly associated with overestimation of body weight, unrealistic body weight goal, dissatisfaction with body weight, and weight loss experiences. The reported intakes of energy, protein, carbohydrate, zinc, and vitamins B6 and B12 were significantly lower in participants with disturbed eating patterns than in participants without disturbance issues. Conversely, participants with disturbed eating patterns had higher dietary and crude fiber intake than participants without disturbed eating issues. The percentage of participants with abnormal values of total iron-binding capacity and serum iron was significantly higher in those with disturbed eating patterns than in those without disturbed eating patterns. Disturbed eating attitudes/behaviors exist among female adolescents in Taiwan, and these behaviors jeopardize their nutritional status. The possibility of using the EAT-26 as a reference to predict the quality and quantity of food intake among female adolescents is worthy of further study.

  7. Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Symptoms in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Giada; Berioli, Maria Giulia; Cerquiglini, Laura; Ceccarini, Giulia; Grohmann, Ursula; Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-08-19

    Eating problems in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be divided into two groups. The first includes the diagnosed eating disorders (EDs), i.e., diseases specifically identified by defined signs and symptoms for which a degree of severity has been established, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, pica, and rumination. The second is the group of disordered eating symptoms (DES), which include behaviors such as dieting for weight loss, binge eating, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and laxative or diuretic use; these behaviors cannot be categorized as complete diseases, and, although apparently mild, they must be closely evaluated because they can evolve into true EDs. In this review, present knowledge about the clinical relevance of EDs and DES and the possible preventive and therapeutic measures used to reduce their impact on the course of T1D will be discussed. As adolescents with diabetes are at higher risk of eating disturbances and consequently for higher rates of disease complications, care providers should pay attention to clinical warning signs that raise suspicion of disturbed eating to refer these patients early to an expert in nutrition and mental health disorders. To ensure the best care for adolescents with T1D, diabetes teams should be multidisciplinary and include a pediatric diabetologist, a skilled nurse, a dietician, and a psychologist.

  8. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Maricourt, P; Gorwood, P; Hergueta, Th; Galinowski, A; Salamon, R; Diallo, A; Vaugeois, C; Lépine, J. P; Olié, J. P; Dubois, O

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term...

  9. Sustained Benefit of a Psycho-educational Training Program for Dementia Caregivers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chi Hsu

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The caregivers for dementia patients may have sustained benefit of reducing burden, decreasing psychological morbidity and enhancing psychological wellbeing after the intensive psycho-educational training programs' intervention.

  10. Food, Eating and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... challenge for people with dementia. As a person's cognitive function declines, he or she may become overwhelmed with too many food choices, forget to eat or have difficulty with eating utensils. Nutrition tips Make mealtimes easier Encourage independence Minimize eating ...

  11. Neurocircuity of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Walter H; Wagner, Angela; Fudge, Julie L; Paulus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews brain imaging findings in anorexia and bulimia nervosa which characterize brain circuitry that may contribute to the pathophysiology of eating disorders (EDs). Recent imaging studies provide evidence of disturbed gustatory processing in EDs which involve the anterior insula as well as striatal regions. These results raise the possibility that individuals with anorexia nervosa have altered appetitive mechanism that may involve sensory, interoceptive, or reward processes. Furthermore, evidence of altered reward mechanisms is supported by studies that suggest that individuals with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa share a trait toward similar anterior ventral striatal pathway dysregulation. This shared trait disturbance of the modulation of reward and emotionality may create a vulnerability for dysregulated appetitive behaviors. However, those with anorexia nervosa may be able to inhibit appetite and have extraordinary self-control because of exaggerated dorsal cognitive circuit function, whereas individuals with bulimia nervosa are vulnerable to overeating when they get hungry, because they have less ability to control their impulses. Current therapeutic interventions have modest success. Better understanding of neurocircuits that may be related to altered appetite, mood, impulse control, and other symptoms underlying the pathophysiology of EDs might improve psychotherapeutic and drug treatment strategies.

  12. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijpers Pim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in September 2008. Additional materials were obtained from reference lists. Papers describing passive psychoeducational interventions for depression, anxiety and psychological distress were included if the research design was a randomized controlled trial and incorporated an attention placebo, no intervention or waitlist comparison group. Results In total, 9010 abstracts were identified. Of these, five papers which described four research studies targeting passive psychoeducation for depression and psychological distress met the inclusion criteria. The pooled standardized-effect size (four studies, four comparisons for reduced symptoms of depression and psychological distress at post-intervention was d = 0.20 (95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.40; Z = 2.04; P = 0.04; the number needed to treat: 9. Heterogeneity was not significant among the studies (I2 = 32.77, Q:4.46; P = 0.22. Conclusions Although it is commonly believed that psychoeducation interventions are ineffective, this meta-analysis revealed that brief passive psychoeducational interventions for depression and psychological distress can reduce symptoms. Brief passive psychoeducation interventions are easy to implement, can be applied immediately and are not expensive. They may offer a first-step intervention for those experiencing psychological distress or depression and might serve as an initial intervention in primary care or community models. The findings suggest that the quality of psychoeducation may be

  13. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers Pim; Griffiths Kathleen M; Donker Tara; Christensen Helen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in Septemb...

  14. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Tara; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Cuijpers, Pim; Christensen, Helen

    2009-12-16

    Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in September 2008. Additional materials were obtained from reference lists. Papers describing passive psychoeducational interventions for depression, anxiety and psychological distress were included if the research design was a randomized controlled trial and incorporated an attention placebo, no intervention or waitlist comparison group. In total, 9010 abstracts were identified. Of these, five papers which described four research studies targeting passive psychoeducation for depression and psychological distress met the inclusion criteria. The pooled standardized-effect size (four studies, four comparisons) for reduced symptoms of depression and psychological distress at post-intervention was d = 0.20 (95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.40; Z = 2.04; P = 0.04; the number needed to treat: 9). Heterogeneity was not significant among the studies (I2 = 32.77, Q:4.46; P = 0.22). Although it is commonly believed that psychoeducation interventions are ineffective, this meta-analysis revealed that brief passive psychoeducational interventions for depression and psychological distress can reduce symptoms. Brief passive psychoeducation interventions are easy to implement, can be applied immediately and are not expensive. They may offer a first-step intervention for those experiencing psychological distress or depression and might serve as an initial intervention in primary care or community models. The findings suggest that the quality of psychoeducation may be important.

  15. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  16. Reducing the stigma of depression through neurobiology-based psychoeducation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Der-Yan; Chen, Sue-Huei

    2014-09-01

    Attribution theory claims that people who are stigmatized experience more negative emotional and behavioral reactions from others when they are thought to be responsible for their problems. Accordingly, this study proposed a neurobiology-based psychoeducational intervention, which attempted to reduce people's blameworthy attitudes toward and social distance from depressed individuals. One hundred and thirty-two college students were randomly assigned to an experimental and control group. Participants in the experimental group received a 30-min lecture on neurobiology-based psychoeducation for depressive disorders, and were asked to fill out questionnaires before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The control group, with no intervention, also filled out the same questionnaires before and 2 weeks after the experiment. The main contents of the neurobiology-based psychoeducation concerned the neurotransmission processes and biological mechanisms of depression, in order to emphasize the biological attribution of depression. An ancova indicated that the neurobiology-based psychoeducational intervention significantly elevated the biological attribution of depression and reduced the social distance from depressed individuals. Psychological blameworthy attitudes toward depression, however, did not significantly change. Through a brief psychoeducation program about depression, knowledge of neuroscience could lead to positive benefits. Public awareness that depression can be effectively prevented and treated may be a way in which people can accept depressed individuals. Further studies are needed to certify the mechanisms of the effect of neurobiology-based psychoeducation. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  17. Eating disorders in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Czyzyk, Adam; Katulski, Krzysztof; Smolarczyk, Roman; Grymowicz, Monika; Maciejewska-Jeske, Marzena; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are disturbances that seriously endanger the physical health and often the lives of sufferers and affect their psychosocial functioning. EDs are usually thought of as problems afflicting teenagers. However, the incidence in older women has increased in recent decades. These cases may represent either late-onset disease or, more likely, a continuation of a lifelong disorder. The DSM-5 classification differentiates 4 categories of eating disorder: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorders and other specified feeding and eating disorders. The weight loss and malnutrition resulting from EDs have widespread negative consequences for physical, mental and social health. The main risk factors for developing long-term consequences are the degree of weight loss and the chronicity of the illness. Most of the cardiac, neurological, pulmonary, gastric, haematological and dermatological complications of EDs are reversible with weight restoration. EDs are serious illnesses and they should never be neglected or treated only as a manifestation of the fashion for dieting or a woman's wish to achieve an imposed standard feminine figure. Additionally, EDs are associated with high risk of morbidity and mortality. The literature concerning EDs in older, postmenopausal women is very limited. The main aim of this paper is to ascertain the epidemiology and prognosis of EDs in older women, and to review their diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte; Thornton, Laura M; Quaranta, Michela; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Pisetsky, David; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-12-01

    Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44). Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and eating disorders across the lifespan: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Rivka L; Rawana, Jennine S

    2016-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and eating disorders are common and concerning mental health disorders. There is both empirical and theoretical support for an association between ADHD and eating disorders or disordered eating. This systematic review aims to summarize the extant literature on the comorbidity of ADHD and eating disorders across the lifespan, including the influences of sex, age, eating disorder diagnosis, and potential mediators. A total of 37 peer-reviewed studies on diagnosed ADHD and eating disturbances were identified through key research databases. Twenty-six studies supported a strong empirical association between ADHD and eating disorders or disordered eating. The systematic review findings suggest that children with ADHD are at risk for disordered eating, while adolescents, emerging adults, and adults are at risk for both eating disorders and disordered eating. Methodological considerations, future research, and clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychoeducational intervention focused on healthy living improves psychopathological severity and lifestyle quality in psychiatric patients: preliminary findings from a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Biondi, Massimo; Coviello, Marialuce; Fagiolini, Andrea; Majorana, Michele; Minichino, Amedeo; Rusconi, Anna Carlotta; Vergnani, Lucilla; Vicinanza, Roberto; Coccanari De' Fornari, Maria Antonietta

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with psychiatric disorders incur an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, with higher prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors s largely contributing to a significant reduction in life expectancy. The aim of the present study was at evaluating the clinical effectiveness of an educational intervention targeting lifestyle habits in patients with mood and psychotic disorders. Patients (n = 32) were randomly assigned to receive, in addition to the pharmacological treatment, either five sessions of group psychoeducation focused on healthy lifestyle or five sessions of a control group therapy. Both psychopathological severity (i.e. the brief psychiatric rating scale) and lifestyle quality (i.e. physical activity, sleep quality and adherence to the Mediterranean diet) improved significantly over time in patients who underwent specific psychoeducational sessions but not in the controls. These findings add to the accumulating evidence that educational interventions focused on lifestyle habits can ameliorate general and mental health in patients with psychiatric disorders and suggest that educational programs represent an effective non-pharmacological intervention to manage drug-induced cardiometabolic disturbances.

  1. Mindfulness vs psychoeducation in adult ADHD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxhaj, E; Sadohara, C; Borel, P; D'Amelio, R; Sobanski, E; Müller, H; Feige, B; Matthies, S; Philipsen, Alexandra

    2018-01-22

    Mindfulness training is a promising treatment approach in adult ADHD. However, there has not yet been a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness to an active control condition. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a mindfulness training program (MAP) compared to structured psychoeducation (PE). After randomization 81 medication-free adult ADHD patients participated either in an 8-week MAP or PE group program. At baseline (T1), after 8 weeks (T2) and after 8 months (T3), severity of ADHD and associated symptoms (depression, general psychopathology, quality of life) were measured with the Conner's ADHD Rating Scales (CAARS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the SF-36 by self and blind observer ratings. Both groups showed significant pre-post improvements in observer-rated Inattention scale (p load in adult ADHD. Furthermore in exploratory post hoc tests the study provides evidence for a potential gender-specific treatment response in adult ADHD.

  2. [Psychoeducational intervention in high ability: intellectual functioning and extracurricular enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Riba, Sylvia

    2014-02-24

    The 'new paradigm' defines the high intellectual ability as a potential that should crystallize progressively throughout development. Its main feature is a high intellectual initial multidimensional potential, which is transformed so that, being a person with high intellectual ability is the result of a developmental process from a neurobiological substrate and the incidence of variables (psychosocial and education) which determines its manifestation more or less stable and optimal to excellence. It is interesting to know the effectiveness of psychoeducational intervention of the extracurricular enrichment programs and their effects on the expression of differential functioning and the optimization of the management of cognitive resources that lead to excellence. An extracurricular enrichment program is described and evaluated through: 1) the stability of the intellectual measures; 2) the satisfaction level of participants and families. Participants are 58 high ability students on the enrichment program and 25 parents. Intellectual profiles are obtained on T1-T2 and calculated their stability by regression analysis, the CSA and CSA-P questionnaires were applied in order to know the participants and families' satisfaction measure. Results show the basic stability of intellectual profiles with five cases of instability among the 58 profiles obtained, and a high satisfaction with the results obtained in the domain of cognitive and personal management among the participants.

  3. Psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1993, a randomized intervention study among patients with malignant melanoma showed a significant decrease in psychological distress and increased coping capacity 6 months after the intervention and enhanced survival 6 years later. We applied a similar intervention with a few modifica......PURPOSE: In 1993, a randomized intervention study among patients with malignant melanoma showed a significant decrease in psychological distress and increased coping capacity 6 months after the intervention and enhanced survival 6 years later. We applied a similar intervention with a few...... modifications in a randomized controlled trial among Danish patients with malignant melanoma and evaluated results on immediate and long-term effects on psychological distress and coping capacity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 262 patients with primary cutaneous malignant melanoma were randomly assigned...... to the control or intervention group. Patients in the intervention group were offered six weekly sessions of 2 hours of psychoeducation, consisting of health education, enhancement of problem-solving skills, stress management, and psychological support. The participants were assessed at baseline before random...

  4. Eating concerns and media influences in an Irish adolescent context.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: EPICA is the first large-scale Irish study of a school-going population examining the impact of media influences on eating attitudes. METHOD: Students were screened using the EAT-26, EDI-III and a study-specific questionnaire. A sub-sample of parents\\' views was included. RESULTS: Three thousand and thirty-one students (mean age 14.74) and 56 parents enrolled. The majority (71.4%) of adolescents felt adversely affected by media portrayal of body weight and shape, with more than a quarter (25.6%) believing it to be \\'far too thin\\'. A significant correlation between media impact and high EAT scores (chi2 = 450.78, df = 2, p < 0.05) and EDI-III scores (chi2 = 387.51, df = 4, p < 0.05) was demonstrated. Parents also view media portrayal as too thin (94.7%), less than half are adversely affected by it (49.2%) but the majority (71.9%) believe their children to be. CONCLUSION: Media portrayal of body weight and shape is correlated with eating psychopathology and may affect adolescents more than adults. School psycho-educational programmes and media policies are urgently needed to minimise any detrimental effect.

  5. Body Image Avoidance, Body Dissatisfaction, and Eating Pathology: Is There a Difference Between Male Gym Users and Non–Gym Users?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stapleton, Peta; McIntyre, Timothy; Bannatyne, Amy

    ... image and eating disturbances in a sample of male gym users and non–gym users (N = 180). Based on previous research, it was predicted that male gym users would report greater body image disturbance...

  6. Book Review Overcoming Body Image Disturbance: A Programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review Overcoming Body Image Disturbance: A Programme for People with Eating Disorders By Lorraine Bell and Jenny Rushforth (2008). Carla Dukas. Abstract. Routledge, London Paperback, ISBN 978-0-415-42330-4, ZAR 393 160 pages40. Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health 2008, 20(2): 133–134.

  7. Effects of a psychoeducational intervention in family caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Costa Ponce

    Full Text Available Abstract Psychoeducational activities are a way of promoting help for caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease, representing a forum for knowledge sharing, and in which the primary focus is on psychological themes aimed at carers developing coping skills and strategies. Objective: The main objective of this study was to gauge perceptions about care and its impact among family caregivers of patients with AD participating in a psychoeducational group intervention, as well as the possible positive and negative aspects associated with this role. The subjective impact of AD on the lives of these caregivers was assessed on each of the dimensions of the Caregiver Burden Scale using a semi-directed interview on perceptions about care. Methods: This was a prospective study, in which information was collected twice, before and after, psychoeducational intervention. Through the application of the scale, benefits were evident for all dimensions assessed in the instrument (general strain, isolation, disappointment, emotional involvement and environment. Results: The results showed that after the psychoeducational intervention, caregivers felt less burdened by care compared to pre-intervention. Conclusion: These findings confirm that expanded implementation of psychoeducational interventions for caregivers of patients with AD can be beneficial for both caregivers and patients.

  8. A meta-analytic review of eating disorder prevention programs: encouraging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C Nathan

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analytic review found that 51% of eating disorder prevention programs reduced eating disorder risk factors and 29% reduced current or future eating pathology. Larger effects occurred for programs that were selected (versus universal), interactive (versus didactic), multisession (versus single session), solely offered to females (versus both sexes), offered to participants over 15 years of age (versus younger ones), and delivered by professional interventionists (versus endogenous providers). Programs with body acceptance and dissonance-induction content and without psychoeducational content and programs evaluated in trials using validated measures and a shorter follow-up period also produced larger effects. Results identify promising programs and delineate sample, format, and design features associated with larger effects, which may inform the design of more effective prevention programs in the future.

  9. Prevalence and treatment of eating disorders among Hispanics/Latino Americans in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marisol; Ohrt, Tara K; Hoek, Hans W

    2016-11-01

    We reviewed the recent literature on prevalence rates, and application of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States. Lifetime prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa are lower among Hispanic/Latinos than non-Hispanic Whites. There are comparable rates of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED) among Hispanic/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. BED is the most common eating disorder among Hispanic/Latinos. Evidence-based treatments have begun to be implemented with Hispanics/Latinos. The core concepts of cognitive behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and BED apply to this population. Culture-specific adaptations include strengthening the collectivistic framework within an individualistic treatment, psychoeducation of immediate and extended family, and adjustment of meal plans that incorporated cultural foods. There are more similarities than differences in the prevalence of eating disorders across Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. However, the social context such as immigration status and acculturation is important to consider in the development of eating disorders. In addition, the Westernization of Latin America may change the future relationship of immigration status and development of eating disorder within the United States. Overall, cultural adaptations of evidence-based treatments involved the inclusion of family within treatment, acculturation-related issues, and managing family conflicts that arise because of the changes in eating patterns.

  10. Body Image and Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders should be understood in a multidimensional perspective, emphasizing a biopsicossocial context. In these pathologies it`s the body, in the first instance, that reveals the disease, being in this way the target of the conflict, revealing a disturbed body experience and as a consequence a weak conception of their personal body image. The body image is conceptualised as a subjective image that the individuals form in their own mind, about their body, in relation with differ- ent contexts of life. The intent of the studies is to comprehend the level of body image disturbance, which have concluded that in the majority of the cases, significant changes on perceptive capacity of the patients do not exist. In this way it`s important to study in a more effective and qualitative way the affective and personal factors. The authors pretend with this bibliographic revision, make a research of body image assessment to the Eating Disorders (Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa, and to reflect which are the best ones to adapt for Portuguese reality.

  11. Youth internalizing symptoms, sleep-related problems, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors: A moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, Marie L; Janicke, David M; Carmody, Julia K; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn C

    2016-04-01

    Internalizing symptoms increase the risk for disordered eating; however, the mechanism through which this relationship occurs remains unclear. Sleep-related problems may be a potential link as they are associated with both emotional functioning and disordered eating. The present study aims to evaluate the mediating roles of two sleep-related problems (sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness) in the relationship between youth internalizing symptoms and disordered eating, and to explore if age moderates these relations. Participants were 225 youth (8-17years) attending a primary care appointment. Youth and legal guardians completed questionnaires about youth disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, internalizing symptoms, sleep disturbance, and daytime sleepiness. Mediation and moderated mediation analyses were utilized. The mediation model revealed both youth sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness independently mediated the association between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, and explained 18% of the variance in disordered eating. The moderated mediation model including youth age accounted for 21% of the variance in disordered eating; youth age significantly interacted with sleep disturbance, but not with daytime sleepiness, to predict disordered eating. Sleep disturbance only mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating in youth 12years old and younger, while daytime sleepiness was a significant mediator regardless of age. As sleep-related problems are frequently improved with the adoption of health behaviors conducive to good sleep, these results may suggest a relatively modifiable and cost-effective target to reduce youth risk for disordered eating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Turan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Binge Eating Disorder, characterized by frequent and persistent overeating episodes that are accompanied by feeling of loss of control over eating without regular compensatory behaviors and was identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as a new eating disorder category. Binge Eating Disorder is the most common eating disorder among adults. Binge Eating Disorder is associated with significant morbidity, including medical complications related to obesity, eating disorder psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity; reduced quality of life, and impaired social functioning. Current treatments of Binge Eating Disorder include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and bariatric surgery. In this review, the definition, epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and also mainly treatment of Binge Eating Disorder are discussed.

  13. Factors Influencing Service Utilization and Mood Symptom Severity in Children with Mood Disorders: Effects of Multifamily Psychoeducation Groups (MFPGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Amy N.; Fristad, Mary A.; Early, Theresa J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of psychoeducation on service utilization and mood symptom severity in children with mood disorders. Parents' knowledge of mood disorders, beliefs about treatment, and perceptions of children's need for treatment were hypothesized to mediate the relationship between psychoeducation and service utilization and…

  14. The relation of depression and anxiety to measures of attention in young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, B D; Smitherman, Todd A; Pella, Russell D; O'Jile, Judith R; Gouvier, Wm Drew

    2008-01-01

    The relation between mood and attentional functioning in young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation has not been previously reported. This study examined the relation of self-reported depression and anxiety on attentional abilities among 161 young adults referred for psychoeducational evaluation. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Attentional functioning was assessed using the Trail Making Test, the d2 Test of Attention, the Conners' Continuous Performance Test, and the WAIS-III Working Memory and Processing Speed Indices. The unique variance accounted for by depression or anxiety was minimal (typically attention within samples of young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation is minimally related to self-reported depression and anxiety.

  15. The effect of psycho-educational strategies on marital conflict among dual-career couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghamari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of psycho--educational strategies on decreasing the components of marital conflict among dual-career couples. The method of research was experimental design. 11 couples were selected using random sampling and then were assigned into the groups of experimental and control. The experimental group participated in psycho-educational sessions. Data were collected using Barati and Sanai’s marital conflict questionnaire and analyzed using repeated measure test. Results showed that psycho-educational strategies are effective in decreasing all components of marital conflict among dual-career couples (p<0/01 except for two components of seeking child support and separating financial events.

  16. A psychoeducational program for families of affectively ill children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, D A; Poling, K; McKain, B; Baugher, M

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of a family psychoeducational program for the parents of affectively ill adolescents. Sixty-two parents of 34 affectively ill adolescents received one 2-hour psychoeducational session that covered information about the diagnosis, course, and treatment of affective illness. Methods of coping with an affectively ill family member also were discussed. The view of depression as a chronic and recurrent illness was strongly emphasized. Participants showed improvement in knowledge about depression and in modification of dysfunctional beliefs about depression and its treatment. Almost all participants found the program both useful and interesting. These findings support the feasibility, acceptability, and to a modest degree, the efficacy of a family psychoeducational program for parents of affectively ill adolescents. Additional studies should address the impact of such programs on compliance with treatment, clinical outcome, and family life.

  17. Treatment of sleep disturbances in trauma-affected refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Hinuga; Jennum, Poul; Baandrup, Lone

    2017-01-01

    for poor treatment outcome. Controlled trials on treatment of sleep disturbances in refugees suffering from PTSD are scarce. The present study aims to examine sleep-enhancing treatment in refugees with PTSD. We aim to assess if add-on treatment with mianserin and/or Imagery Rehearsal Therapy (IRT......-affected refugees. The patients are randomised into four groups. All four groups receive TAU - an interdisciplinary treatment approach covering a period of 6-8 months with pharmacological treatment, physiotherapy, psychoeducation and manual-based cognitive behavioural therapy within a framework of weekly sessions...... and anxiety, pain, quality of life and psychosocial functioning. DISCUSSION: This trial will be the first randomised controlled trial to examine sleep-enhancing treatment in trauma-affected refugees, as well as the first trial to investigate the effect of IRT and mianserin in this population. Therefore...

  18. [Group psychoeducation in the complex treatment of bipolar disorder--Cracow experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczka, Grzegorz; Grabski, Bartosz; Gierowski, Józef Krzysztof; Dudek, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    To share our experience in introducing an original, structured group psychoeducational programme entitled "Familiarizing bipolar disorder" into the integrated complex treatment of bipolar disorder (BP). The programme is partially based on the Barcelona Bipolar Disorders Program format and represents our proposal of a short, easily applied group psychoeducation. It consists of 8 meetings, conducted by a psychiatrist and a psychologist who are both trained in cognitive-behavioural therapy. Two groups of patients accomplished the programme so far. We would like to present our conclusions and qualitative observations. The patients noticed a change in a philosophical view on the bipolar disorder treatment (access to information, partnership between a doctor and a patient, appreciation of psychological aspects of bipolar illness), which is embodied by the psychoeducational approach. They welcomed our programme with enthusiasm and interest. Many questions were asked about different aspects of bipolar disorder, especially concerning pharmacotherapy, genetic and legal issues. Our participants assessed the number of sessions as optimal, but some of them insisted on devoting one more meeting to interactively discuss pharmacotherapy of BP. The programme revealed many other relevant issues concerning patients' attitudes toward bipolar disorder like: common presence of dysfunctional beliefs patients hold regarding their illness, unawareness of importance of mood stabilizer serum level examination, insufficient knowledge on hypomania or--in some cases--ignorance of a hypomania phenomenon. Moreover, patients appreciated the fact that the psychoeducational programme helped them to diminish the sense of stigma, shame, and the feeling of being different or worse. Finally we are amazingly impressed by the unsatisfied need existing in bipolar patients to share their fears, emotions and to be fully informed. Our observations support the statement, that the psychoeducational approach to

  19. Eating behaviour, eating attitude and body mass index of dietetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating behaviour, eating attitude and body mass index of dietetic students versus non-dietetic majors: a South African perspective. ... South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition ... Keywords: dietetic students, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test 26, body mass index, eating behaviour, eating disorders ...

  20. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Biegańska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Preliminary patients’ opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients’ lives.

  1. Psychoeducation program on strategies for coping with stress in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegańska, Joanna; Pihut, M

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives.

  2. Psycho-educational support to family and formal caregivers of older people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Figueiredo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidence of dementia poses several challenges to the social support networks of people with dementia. Managing the symptoms of the disease is highly demanding and affects the well-being of the caregivers. Psycho-educational approaches have the potential to reduce the stress and burnout related to dementia caregiving demands. This paper describes the experience of two psycho-educational programs for family and formal caregivers. Main results are reported and recommendations for further intervention developments are identified. 

  3. Eating disorders - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aedweb.org Overeaters Anonymous -- www.oa.org National Eating Disorders Association -- www.nationaleatingdisorders.org National Institute of Mental Health -- www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/eating-disorders/ ...

  4. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to ... Aim for a Healthy Weight Pocket Guide to Eating Healthy on the Go features tips on ordering ...

  5. Males and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys ...

  6. DASH Eating Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. It is an eating plan that is based on research studies sponsored ... your risk of getting heart disease. The DASH eating plan Emphasizes vegetables, fruits, and whole-grains Includes ...

  7. A Brief, Intensive Application of Multi-Family-Based Treatment for Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knatz, Stephanie; Murray, Stuart B; Matheson, Brittany; Boutelle, Kerri N; Rockwell, Roxanne; Eisler, Ivan; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    There is a continued need to improve upon the efficacy and availability of treatments for anorexia nervosa. Family-based therapy for anorexia nervosa demonstrates strong empirical evidence; however, trained treatment providers are limited and a subsample of participants receiving the treatment fail to respond. The intensive family treatment program is a brief, time-limited, multi-family program that trains families of adolescents with eating disorders to oversee their adolescents' recovery at home by providing psychoeducation, skills training, and immersive practice over the course of a 5-day period. This article provide a description of the program by summarizing underlying theoretical principles and key therapeutic components.

  8. Eating Healthy for Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    You are what you eat—and so is your baby. In addition to being smokefree, eating well during pregnancy is one of the best and most important things you can do for yourself and your baby. But healthy “eating for two” is more than just eating more.

  9. Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and emotional eating. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology; 32(3): 335-61. Kelly, N.R., Lydecker, J.A., Mazzeo, S.E. (2012). Positive cognitive coping strategies and binge eating in college women . Eating Behaviors; 13(3): 289-92. Rikani, A.A., Choudhry, ...

  10. The Effects of a Web-Based Interactive Psycho-Educational Program and a Traditional Psycho-Educational Program Based on Cognitive- Behavioral Approach upon Children’s Cognitive Distortions and Psychological Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BUĞA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to compare the effects of a web-based interactive psycho-educational program and a traditional psycho-educational program based on the cognitive-behavioral approach upon children’s cognitive distortions and psychological symptoms. The study group of the research consisted of a total of 36 8th grade middle school students. Of the participants, 12 students participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program, 12 students participated in the traditional psycho-educational program, and 12 students were in the control group. Children’s Negative Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CNCDQ, which was adapted into Turkish by Aydın (2006, and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI adapted for adolescents by Şahin, Batıgün and Uğurtaş (2002 were used as data collection tools. The students included in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program participated in an online program which covered 10 modules, one module for each week. The students in the traditional psycho-educational program participated in an 8-week program. The control group did not participate in any programs. A post-test was administered one week after the research was completed, and follow-up measurements were done both one month and three months later. The results of the research indicated that cognitive distortions of children who participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program and the traditional psycho-educational program decreased after the intervention, and that the decrease continued in the follow-up periods. Psychological symptoms decreased in the children who participated in the web-based interactive program, and this decrease lasted in follow-up periods. However, there was no statistical difference in psychological symptoms of the children who participated in the traditional psycho-educational program and the control group

  11. A Review of Psychoeducational Interventions to Improve Sexual Functioning, Quality of Life, and Psychological Outcomes in Gynecological Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ka Ming; Chan, Joanne C Y; Choi, Kai K C; Chan, Carmen W H

    2016-01-01

    Psychoeducational interventions are recommended for use with clinical gynecological cancer patients to improve their patient care outcomes. However, the evidence of their effectiveness is far from conclusive. The objective of this study was to identify the best available research evidence related to the effects of psychoeducational interventions on sexual functioning, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in gynecological cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted to identify English and Chinese articles from the inception of the databases to April 2012 and included 13 English databases and 7 Chinese databases. Gray literature or unpublished studies were also searched. A total of 11 studies involving 975 gynecological cancer patients were included in the review. Meta-analysis results for 4 comparable studies indicated that psychoeducational interventions were effective in treating depressive symptoms among gynecological cancer patients (standardized mean difference = -0.80; 95% confidence interval, -1.05 to -0.54), whereas information provision significantly improved the mental aspect of quality of life (standardized mean difference = -0.41; 95% confidence interval, -0.74 to -0.08). With regard to sexual functioning, psychoeducational interventions appeared to have benefits in improving the sexual life of patients. Findings confirm the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions on depressive symptoms and mental aspect of the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients. The authors discuss the implications of review findings for the effective design of psychoeducational interventions including components, provider, provision time frame, and duration for clinical practice, as well as psychoeducational intervention research.

  12. Transitioning Together: A Multi-Family Group Psychoeducation Program for Adolescents with ASD and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaWalt, Leann Smith; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2018-01-01

    Currently there are few evidence-based programs available for families of individuals with ASD during the transition to adulthood. The present study provided a preliminary evaluation of a multi-family group psychoeducation intervention using a randomized waitlist control design (n = 41). Families in the intervention condition participated in…

  13. Anger and Depression Management: Psychoeducational Skill Training Interventions for Women Caregivers of a Relative with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry; Steffen, Ann; Sorocco, Kristen; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the short-term impact of two theoretically based psychoeducational small group interventions with distressed caregivers, and it also examines the role of specific moderator and mediator variables on caregiver outcomes. Design and Methods: Female participants (N = 169) aged 50 and older who were caring for a…

  14. An Analysis of Adolescent and Parental Views on the Psychoeducation Program for Coping with Aggressive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçarslan, Suat; Atici, Meral

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the views of parents and adolescents who participated in psychoeducation programs for coping with adolescent aggressive behaviors. Parents who participated in the study were provided with a program known as the "Non-Violent Resistance Parent Program," and adolescents participated in the…

  15. Recent Developments in Family Psychoeducation as an Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucksted, Alicia; McFarlane, William; Downing, Donna; Dixon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Among potential resources for people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) and their families, professionally delivered family psychoeducation (FPE) is designed to engage, inform, and educate family members, so that they can assist the person with SMI in managing their illness. In this article, we review research regarding FPE outcomes and…

  16. The effects of group psychoeducational programme on family burden in caregivers of Iranian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Sheikhona, M; Rahgouy, A; Rahgozar, M; Sodagari, F

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the impact of group psychoeducation therapy on family burden in caregivers of Iranian patients with schizophrenia during the acute phase of the disease. Using a randomized-controlled trial design, 71 caregivers of patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to either a 4-week group psychoeducational programme (n = 36) or the control group (n = 35). Family burden was assessed by Family Burden Index Schedule (FBIS) at the beginning, and after a month of psychoeducation therapy as a follow-up. FBIS assesses family burden in six different dimensions with score ranging from 0 to 48, higher scores indicating higher burdens. At baseline mean, FBIS score was not significantly different between the cases and the controls. After the intervention, the mean total FBIS score was significantly lower in the case group compared with the control group (P family burden has been achieved by implementing group psychoeducational programmes for inpatients with acute phase schizophrenia in Iranian population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Psycho-educational interventions for children and young people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Rayman, G.; Skinner, T. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: A systematic review of the literature in 2000 revealed numerous methodological shortcomings in education research, but in recent years progress has been made in the quantity and quality of psycho-educational intervention studies. Summary of contents: This review focuses on diabetes ed...

  18. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  19. Psychoeducational interventions targeting core symptoms to achieve remission and prevent relapses and recurrence in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2008-01-01

    Depressive disorders have a high prevalence and incidence, and are associated with a huge burden of disease and economic costs. Most respond satisfactorily to drug therapy and/or psychological intervention, in particular to psychoeducation. By far the best-studied example of this approach is the

  20. Brief Psychoeducational Group Treatment with Re-Traumatized Refugees and Asylum Seekers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a psychoeducational group treatment with students with a history of refugee trauma, war, and human rights abuses who were further traumatized by the 9/11 attacks in New York City. The rationale for group intervention and specific techniques utilized to promote emotional and behavioral stabilization and…

  1. Evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children treated for cancer: A descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice-Stam, H.; Silberbusch, L.M.; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present paper reports about the content and evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children growing up with a history of cancer, Op Koers Oncologie (OK Onco). OK Onco is aimed at empowerment of survivors of childhood cancer by teaching disease-related skills. The

  2. Improving Empathy and Communication Skills of Visually Impaired Early Adolescents through a Psycho-Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an interpersonal communication skills psycho-education program to improve empathy and communication skills of visually impaired adolescents. Participants of the study were sixteen early adolescents schooling in an elementary school for visually impaired youth in Diyarbakir. The…

  3. Dealing with Fear of Blushing : A Psychoeducational Group Intervention for Fear of Blushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Corine; Buwalda, Femke M.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical impression is that people who fear blushing do not easily seek psychological help for their complaints. Therefore, we designed a low-threshold psychoeducational group intervention to reduce fear of blushing. The intervention followed a cognitivebehavioural approach, but in a course

  4. Outcome of Comprehensive Psycho-Educational Interventions for Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeseth, Svein

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates comprehensive psycho-educational research on early intervention for children with autism. Twenty-five outcome studies were identified. Twenty studies evaluated behavioral treatment, 3 studies evaluated TEACCH and 2 studies evaluated the Colorado Health Sciences Project. Outcome studies are graded according to their scientific…

  5. Effect of a family psychoeducational program on relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sota, Satoko; Shimodera, Shinji; Kii, Masaru; Okamura, Kayoko; Suto, Koichirou; Suwaki, Mitsuru; Fujita, Hirokazu; Fujito, Ryosuke; Inoue, Shimpei

    2008-08-01

    Family psychoeducational programs have been shown to be effective in terms of knowledge acquirement and relapse prevention, but few studies have looked at whether one mode of educational method is more effective than another. The aim of the present study was to compare several modes of educational approaches and to elucidate which mode of education is more effective. A total of 110 relatives of 95 patients with schizophrenia received three types of family psychoeducational programs between January 1995 and September 2003: a small group with two sessions (P1), a large group with nine sessions (P2), and a large group with five sessions (P3). In addition to the demographic data, acquired knowledge was measured using the modified Knowledge About Schizophrenia Interview (KASI), family expressed emotion (EE), and relapse episodes. Overall there were significant increases in many KASI subcategory scores after the three programs, in mothers in particular. The change in KASI scores indicated that the low EE group was able to be highly educated and that the relatives of non-relapsers were more effectively educated. As for the mode of the family psychoeducational program, the P1 and P2 groups surpassed the P3 in terms of knowledge acquired. Effects of family psychoeducation may depend not on the number of members or sessions but on the time spent on the program per member.

  6. Preventing Boys' Problems in Schools through Psychoeducational Programming: A Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, James M.; Lujan, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy currently exists on whether boys are in crises and, if so, what to do about it. Research is reviewed that indicates that boys have problems that affect their emotional and interpersonal functioning. Psychoeducational and preventive programs for boys are recommended as a call to action in schools. Thematic areas for boys' programming…

  7. Project IMPPACT: A Psycho-Educational Problem-Solving Intervention for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Micah L.; Young, Jessica J.; Jones, Monica Y.; Pasquariello, Cassandra D.; Fife, John E.; Grosz, Erin; Stewart, Nina; Desmangles, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The current article presents a model of a summer and after-school psychoeducational intervention for children ages 4 to 11 and parents offered at an African American church. The IMPPACT program may be best described as a community-based program that applies salient dimensions of African American religiosity and cultural values to the cultivation…

  8. Development and Implementation of a Psychoeducational Group for Ghanaian Adolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyi, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents development and informal assessment of a 10-week psychoeducational program designed for 8 adolescent group members experiencing parental divorce in a rural community in Ghana. Group design, cultural considerations, program implementation, and impacts are described. The literature review pertaining to group work as an…

  9. Keep Your Brain Fit! A Psychoeducational Training Program for Healthy Cognitive Aging: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Jennifer; van Heugten, Caroline; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A psychoeducational face-to-face training program (Keep Your Brain Fit!) was developed to support the working population in coping with age-related cognitive changes and taking proactive preventive measures to maintain cognitive health. A feasibility study was conducted to test the training program presented in a workshop format. Participants…

  10. Responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-Third Edition for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chiang, Fu-Mei; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Fu, Chung-Pei; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We investigated the responsiveness in terms of three types of scores (i.e., raw scores, developmental ages, and percentile ranks) of the subtests and composites of the PEP-3 and three…

  11. The Impact of a Psychoeducational Prevention Program for Behaviorally At-Risk Students: EQUIP for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, Ann-Marie

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a multicomponent psychoeducational prevention program ("EQUIP for Educators") Two aspects were examined: (1) if there was a significant relationship among the three psychometric measures: Social Skills Rating System (SSRS), Children's Inventory of Anger (ChIA), Sociomoral Reflection and…

  12. Parenting Young Children: Comparison of a Psychoeducational Program in Mexico and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Camara, Pedro R.; Fox, Robert A.; Nicholson, Bonnie C.

    2000-01-01

    Compared the cross-cultural effectiveness of a 10-hour psychoeducational program with 82 Mexican and 63 American mothers of very young children. Found that both groups significantly increased their expectations and use of nurturing strategies and reduced their use of verbal and corporal punishment following the program. Reported child behavior…

  13. Psycho-educational Therapy among Nigerian Adult Patients with Epilepsy: A Controlled Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, B. O.; Osinowo, H. O.; Brieger, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluates the efficacy of a two-day psychoeducational program among patients with epilepsy in Nigeria. Results reveal that participants showed a substantial significant decrease in level of depression; a significant increase in the knowledge about epilepsy; and significant decrease in all measures of neurotic disorders except for hysterical…

  14. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Practices in Psychoeducational Reports for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Past researchers suggested there are a number of shortcomings in the psychoeducational evaluation process and practices used with English language learners (ELLs). In the present exploratory study, the authors descriptively examined the assessment practices used in the special education eligibility determination process for ELLs as documented in…

  15. Psychoeducational treatment and prevention of depression: The coping with depression course thirty years later

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Munoz, R.F.; Clarke, G.N.; Lewinsohn, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The "Coping with Depression" course (CWD) is by the far the best studied psychoeducational intervention for the treatment and prevention of depression, and is used in routine practice in several countries. The CWD is a highly structured cognitive-behavioral intervention, which has been adapted for

  16. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löhr HD

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hildegard D Löhr1,2, Jan H Rosenvinge1,3, Rolf Wynn2,41Division of General Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 4Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course.Keywords: cognitive therapy, information technology, occupational rehabilitation, psychoeducation, self-help, social anxiety

  17. A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Psychoeducational Group for Chinese People with Chronic Illnesses: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Ip, Priscilla S. Y.; Lee, Kim Man

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) psychoeducational group for Chinese people with chronic illness in Hong Kong. It adopted a single group design, and 52 participants joined the group. A questionnaire with three outcome measures, measuring general mental health, quality of life…

  18. Psycho-Educational Factors in the Prediction of Academic Buoyancy in Second Life®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Cheril C.

    2013-01-01

    Academic resilience has been widely researched in traditional and online educational settings, but it has not been sufficiently studied in three-dimensional (3D) virtual learning environments (VLEs). This inferential research used multiple regression to quantitatively investigate the extent to which psycho-educational factors including academic…

  19. A Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Psychoeducational Group Manual for Problem Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Abigail; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on problem gambling in adults and includes a detailed mindfulness-based psychoeducational group manual for problem gambling, complete with an extensive group counselling consent form, assessment and screening protocols, 10 user-friendly lesson plans, templates for a…

  20. The role of psycho-education in improving outcome at a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: While psychoeducation has been shown to positively affect outcomes in psychiatric disorders, its utility has been little studied in ... mental health intervention in a developing country that may increase compliance with medication and result in greater knowledge of mental .... common attitudes including stigma.

  1. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Education Program on Learned Helplessness and Irrational Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Yagmur; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a psycho-education program aimed at reducing learned helplessness and irrational beliefs of eight-grade elementary students. The study was an experimental study based on the pre-test-post-test model with control and placebo group. A total of 27 participants, 9 group members in each group,…

  2. The Effects of a Web-Based Interactive Psycho-Educational Program and a Traditional Psycho-Educational Program Based on Cognitive- Behavioral Approach upon Children’s Cognitive Distortions and Psychological Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    BUĞA, Ahmet; HAMAMCI, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare the effects of a web-based interactive psycho-educational program and a traditional psycho-educational program based on the cognitive-behavioral approach upon children’s cognitive distortions and psychological symptoms. The study group of the research consisted of a total of 36 8th grade middle school students. Of the participants, 12 students participated in the web-based interactive psycho-educational program, 12 students participated in the tr...

  3. Enhancing motivation for change in treatment-resistant eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, K; Watson, S; Wilson, G T

    1998-06-01

    Denial and resistance to change are prominent features in most patients with anorexia nervosa. The egosyntonic quality of symptoms can contribute to inaccuracy in self-report, avoidance of treatment, difficulties in establishing a therapeutic relationship, and high rates of attrition and relapse. Individuals with bulimia nervosa are typically more motivated to recover, but often ambivalent about forfeiting the ideal of slenderness and the protective functions of binge-purge behavior. Few attempts have been made to assess denial and resistance in the eating disorders, or to examine alternative strategies for enhancing motivation to change. Review of the clinical literature indicates a striking convergence of recommendations across conceptually distinct treatment approaches. Clinicians are encouraged to acquire a frame of reference that can help them understand the private experience of individuals with eating disorders, empathize with their distress at the prospect of weight gain, and acknowledge the difficulty of change. The Socratic method seems particularly well-suited to work with this population because of its emphasis on collaboration, openness, curiosity, patience, focused and systematic inquiry, and individual discovery. Four themes are crucial in engaging reluctant eating-disordered clients in therapy: the provision of psychoeducational material, an examination of the advantages and disadvantages of symptoms, the explicit use of experimental strategies, and an exploration of personal values.

  4. SCREENING FOR EARLY DETECTION OF EATING DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisaveta Pavlova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating Disorders (EDs are characterized by a persistent disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that significantly impairs physical health or psychosocial functioning. EDs are caused by a complex interaction of genetic, biological, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Their epidemiology is rising for the past decades, and EDs affect all races, social levels and both genders. Due to the long and expensive treatment, chronic course, and the fact that most of the sufferers do not realize the need for therapy or do not seek treatment, the demand on developing prevention programs, early detection and assessment is essential. Despite the fact, that many new EDs screening tools were developed already, there is a great lack of validated screening instruments, adapted to the Bulgarian conditions. Objects and methods: Our study aimed at eliciting a comprehensive battery for screening of not only specific ED pathology, but also some risk factors, such as negative body image, weight and depressive symptoms. The object of our study consisted of 201 females, aged 18 to 45 (mean 24.65. SCOOF- questionnaire, Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS-5, Body Image Questionnaire-34 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied. Results: Our preliminary results show that approximately 45% of the tested subjects show some of the: negative body image, eating disorders’ clinical pathology, distorted eating patterns, subclinical eating disorders pathology, overweight/obesity, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Our ongoing efforts in area of research also are aimed at developing and refining strategies for preventing and treating ED among adolescents and adults.

  5. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian; Bech, Per; Csillag, Claudio

    2016-08-30

    Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies conducted within this area indicate that family psychoeducation as a supplement to traditional treatment can effectively reduce the risk of relapse in patients with major depression as well as being beneficial for the relatives involved. However, the evidence is currently limited. This study will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one of two conditions: either four sessions of manualized family psychoeducation or four sessions in a social support group led by a health care professional. Patients will not participate in the groups and will continue their treatment as usual. A total of 100 patients, each accompanied by one relative, will be recruited primarily from two outpatient clinics in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is the occurrence of depressive relapse at 9-month follow-up defined as a score ≥7 on the Hamilton six-item subscale. Secondary outcomes will include time to relapse. It is hoped that the results from this study will help to clarify the mechanisms behind any beneficial changes due to family psychoeducation and provide information on the long-term effect of this intervention for both patient and relatives. If the results are positive, the family psychoeducation program may be suitable for implementation within a clinical setting. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02348827 , registered 5 January 2015.

  6. Effect of a Childbirth Psychoeducation Program on the Level of Fear of Childbirth in Primigravid Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Kordi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Severe fear of childbirth (FOC is the most important cause of elective and emergency cesarean section and results in an unpleasant experience among women. Implementing a psychoeducational program can promote mothers’ knowledge and reduce the FOC. Aim: the aim of this study was to determine the effect of childbirth psychoeducational program on the FOC intensity in primigravid women. Method: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 122 primigravid women with a gestational age of 14 to 28 weeks referred to healthcare centers of Mashhad, Iran, during 2015-2016. The Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ, versions A and B, was used for the data collection. The subjects had the FOC scores of 66 or higher based on the W-DEQ, version A. The women in the intervention group received the psychoeducational program for three weeks (one 90-minute session per week by a clinical psychologist; however, the control group underwent the routine prenatal care. The FOC intensity was reassessed using W-DEQ, version B, six weeks postpartum in both groups. Data analysis was performed in SPSS, version 20, using Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 23.2±3.6 and 24.2±4.4 years in the intervention and control groups, respectively. After the intervention, the Mann-Whitney U test demonstrated a significant difference between the intervention (83.5±21.7 and control (92.6±18.4 groups regarding the mean FOC score (P=0.001. Implications for Practice: The childbirth psychoeducational program could diminish the FOC in primigravid women with severe FOC. We recommend midwives and expert psychologists to incorporate psychoeducational programs in childbirth classes.

  7. Psychoeducational rehabilitation for health behavior change in coronary artery disease: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldcroft, Sheryl A; Taylor, Nicholas F; Blackstock, Felicity C; O'Halloran, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Psychoeducation is a recommended component of cardiac rehabilitation, but to date, evidence from high quality trials examining behavior change has not been synthesized. The primary aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of psychoeducation on behavior change in adults with coronary artery disease participating in cardiac rehabilitation; and to identify if changes in health behavior had an effect on modifiable physiological risk factors. A search of electronic databases was conducted for randomized controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention, stable angina, or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Trials comparing psychoeducational programs to exercise only, standard cardiac rehabilitation or medical care were included. Primary outcomes were smoking status, physical activity, dietary habits, supplemental oxygen, or medication use. Included trials were assessed for quality with the PEDro scale, and data synthesized descriptively or with meta-analysis. Six randomized controlled trials and 1 quasiexperimental trial were included, a total of 536 participants. A meta-analysis from 213 participants showed psychoeducational interventions produced a significant positive effect on physical activity levels over the medium term (6-12 months) when compared with exercise and risk factor education, (δ = .62, 95% CI 0.3-0.94). However, there was limited positive evidence for change in smoking and dietary behavior. No effect was found on physiological risk factors. Psychoeducational interventions produce a significant positive effect on physical activity levels and potentially on dietary habits and smoking. Strategies such as goal setting, problem solving, self-monitoring, and role modeling appear to be influential in this change.

  8. Patient and family psychoeducation: Service development and implementation in a center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsepassi, Zahra; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Sharifi, Vandad; Mottaghipour, Yasaman

    2018-02-01

    Family and patient psychoeducation have demonstrated significant improvement in clinical and social outcomes for patients suffering from severe mental disorders and their families. However, these evidence-based practices are not widely implemented at service delivery level and into routine clinical practice, especially in less developed countries. The aim of this article is to report the processes of development and implementation of a psychoeducational service for patients with severe mental illnesses and their families in Iran. The program was developed at Roozbeh Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A group of clinicians worked on the development phase of the program and drafting the manuals. Then, a series of workshops and supervision sessions were held to train group leaders for implementation of the group psychoeducation for patients and families. In the pilot phase, the services were delivered to two groups of patients and families, and then the manual was revised based on the feedback from group leaders and participants. The program consisted of eight 90-minute weekly patient group sessions and 6 weekly multiple family group sessions. Two manuals for patient education (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) were developed. Several information sheets were developed and distributed during different sessions of family and patient psychoeducation related to the content of each session. Despite providing the hospital clinicians with the information regarding these new services, less than 10% of the admitted patients were referred by their clinicians. Feasibility and sustainability of the program are affected by a number of factors. Low referral rate of clinicians, limited resources of the hospital, issues related to stigma and logistic issues are barriers in implementation of these services. Administrators' and clinicians' understanding of the importance of patient and family psychoeducation seems to be crucial in sustainability of such programs in routine service delivery.

  9. Eating disorders: assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W G; Schlundt, D G

    1985-09-01

    Anorexia and bulimia are eating disorders affecting a significant number of adolescent and young adult women. The core symptoms of both disorders are similar and include a fear of obesity, body image disturbance, erratic eating patterns, and purging. These symptoms produce significant physical and psychologic complications. Both anorexia and bulimia appear to have a common origin in a fear of obesity and dieting. Anorectics, being "successful" dieters, lose a significant amount of weight; whereas bulimics alternate between binges and purges. Treatment for the eating disorders is gradually evolving as clinical research experience accumulates. For anorexia, hospitalization is indicated when weight falls below 15% of ideal, and most investigators agree that therapy for the core symptoms cannot be undertaken until weight is restored. During the impatient stay, a behavior modification program can effectively organize medical, nutritional, and psychologic support, and offers the quickest and most direct route to weight restoration. The nasogastric tube and total parenteral nutrition are used primarily for those who are severely emaciated or who actively resist standard modes of therapy. Inpatient treatment is most effectively and efficiently rendered in a specialized eating disorder unit. Once weight restoration is progressing, behavior therapy for core symptoms is commenced and continued on an outpatient basis. A variety of behavioral techniques are employed, and they are designed primarily to influence anorectic assumptions and beliefs. Although there may be a brief inpatient stay for initiation of treatment, the bulk of therapy for bulimia occurs on an outpatient basis. The available literature indicates that behavioral techniques and antidepressant medication are effective for the symptoms of bulimia. Early identification of core symptoms of both disorders can lead to an initiation of treatment before the core symptoms become ingrained. A potentially more effective

  10. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of ionization...

  11. Night Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tuncel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hunger is an awakening related biological impulse. The relationship between hunger and sleep is moderated by the control of homeostatic and circadian rhytms of the body. Abnormal eating behavior during sleep period could result from different causes. Abnormal eating during the main sleep period has been categorized as either night eating syndrome or sleep related eating disorder. Night eating syndrome (NES is an eating disorder characterised by the clinical features of morning anorexia, evening hyperphagia, and insomnia with awakenings followed by nocturnal food ingestion. Recently night eating syndrome, conceptualized as a delayed circadian intake of food. Sleep-related eating disorder, thought to represent a parasomnia and as such included within the revised International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2, and characterized by nocturnal partial arousals associated with recurrent episodes of involuntary food consumption and altered levels of consciousness. Whether, however, sleep-related eating disorder and night eating syndrome represent different diseases or are part of a continuum is still debated. This review summarizes their characteristics, treatment outcomes and differences between them.

  12. A Study on the Socialization of Dining : IV Students Eating Out, Eating Habits and Eating Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    西脇, 泰子; Yasuko, Nishiwaki; 聖徳学園女子短期大学; Shotoku Gakuen Women's Junior College

    1993-01-01

    This survey was conducted on this school's students, with a view to looking at changes in eating habits, centered on eating out. How studests perceptions regarding their eating habits outside the home were measured and evaluated. Results included the following : 1. Eating out has increased. Most respondents replied that eating out was more convenient. 2. Many students have little knowledge regarding a well-balanced, nutritious meal. They have poor eating habits. 3. Few students eat breakfast....

  13. The Caregiver Eating Messages Scale: Development and psychometric investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Tylka, Tracy L

    2010-09-01

    Certain caregiver eating messages - restriction of food intake and pressures to eat - are associated with body dissatisfaction and eating disturbances among young girls. This study explored whether these messages are also associated with body attitudes and eating behaviors of young adult women and men. The Caregiver Eating Messages Scale was developed to measure this construct. Two studies (Ns=238, 288) indicated that it contained two factors (restrictive/critical messages and pressure to eat messages) and yielded internally consistent, stable, and valid scores. Both factors were positively related to women's BMI, and restrictive/critical messages were positively related to men's BMI. Restrictive/critical messages predicted lower perceived familial body acceptance and intuitive eating and higher perceived familial pressure to be lean and disordered eating. Restrictive/critical messages predicted participants' body attitudes indirectly via their perceptions of their family's attitude toward their body, with one exception: restrictive/critical messages uniquely predicted men's body appreciation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ADOLESCENTS’ HEALTHY EATING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne

    This PhD thesis contributes with knowledge about adolescent healthy eating by studying consumer socialisation, social influence and behavioural change in relation to adolescent healthy eating. The introduction provides the important reasons for studying adolescents and healthy eating and explains...... that a more holistic approach is needed in order to respond to the rising levels of overweight among adolescents. It is important to understand the development of and influences on adolescent healthy eating behaviour and the possibilities for promoting healthy eating through interventions. By reviewing...... relevant literature on consumer socialisation, social influence and behaviour change through interventions employing feedback in relation to adolescent healthy eating, it is argued that a socio-cognitive approach to consumer socialisation and behaviour change provides a richer and more nuanced...

  15. [Eating disorders among athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Skårderud, Finn

    2004-08-26

    Over the past 20 years, a number of studies have been published that generally suggest a higher frequency of eating disorders among athletes than among non-athletes. Participation in competitive sport has also been considered an important factor related to the development of eating disorders. Taken together, most studies have suggested that eating disorders are particularly prevalent in sports that emphasise leanness or low body weight. However, some studies suggest a similar or lower prevalence of eating disorders compared with controls or athletes at a lower competitive level. Athletes constitute a unique population and the impact of factors such as training, eating pattern, extreme diets, restriction of food intake and psychopathological profile among them must be evaluated differently from that among non-athletes. A concerted effort by coaches, athletic trainers, parents, athletes and healthcare personnel is optimal in order to recognise, prevent and treat eating disorders in athletes.

  16. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational group program for major depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casañas, Rocío; Catalán, Rosa; del Val, Jose Luis; Real, Jordi; Valero, Sergi; Casas, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    ... to be effective.The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a psychoeducational program, which includes aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle, in patients with mild/moderate depression...

  17. Schizophrenia: a five-year follow-up of patient outcome following psycho-education for caregivers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that psycho-education courses for caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia improve the short-term outcome of the condition. However, most of the outcome studies are limited to two-year follow-up.

  18. Family-Based Psychoeducation Programs for Prevention of Depression in Adolescents with Depressed Parents: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Basogul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the effects of family-based psychoeducation programs to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents and investigates participant, intervention, provider, and research designs. Family-based psychoeducation programs described by articles in several national and international databases were reviewed. Five studies were identified using this approach and are included in this review. The adolescents who participated in Family-Based Psychoeducation programs reported a significant decrease in symptoms of depression, internalizing and externalizing symptoms and increase in secondary control coping. Moreover, it was noted that there was an increase in positive parental skills and a moderate effect for episodes of depression of the parents who participated in the programs. Studies evaluating effects of family-based psychoeducation programs have indicated positive results to the prevention depression for children of depressed parents. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 265-279

  19. Antipsychotic treatment, psychoeducation & regular follow up as a public health strategy for schizophrenia: Results from a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channaveerachari Naveen Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Treatment with antipsychotics and psychoeducation can favourably influence the course of schizophrenia and reduce disability in a substantial proportion of patients. Structured psychosocial interventions may be indicated in the significant minority who show suboptimal outcome with this strategy.

  20. Eating behaviour and body image in a sample of young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneti, Carlo A; Montecucco, Michele; Fontana, Federico; Fante, Chiara; Morese, Rosalba; Lento, Renè M

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND ANDAIM: Adolescence is a period of great risk for the development of eating disorders since many teenagers engage in long periods of dieting or exhausting sports activities in order to achieve their ideal body image. Research has shown that a potential majority of athletes display attitudes very similar to those observed in cases involving disturbed eating behaviour, particularly with regard to their exaggerated attention to their body image and the type of diet that they consider necessary for their activities. The aim of this study is to analyze young athletes dedicated to attaining the mesomorphic physical ideal and to identify possible dysfunctional eating habits like risk factors in the development of more serious disturbances. We further plan to evaluate possible differences in how members of the sample group perceive their bodies and behave in connection with their diet. The sample is made up of 109 males and females, aged 16-24 years. Participants completed the Pisa Survey for Eating Disorders and underwent measurements for the calculation of body mass index (BMI). The young athletes in our sample show a markedly distorted perception of their own bodies. They show a widespread presence of eating behaviour that is not functional to high athletic achievement as well as a series of noteworthy risk factors connected with the onset of eating behaviour disturbances. The obtained results underscore the need for primary projects in prevention against and awareness of eating problems and awareness of dysmorphic and phobic disturbances in young athletes.

  1. A literature critique using outcomes model and substruction in nursing science - Psychoeducational therapy for schizophrenic patients -

    OpenAIRE

    松田, 光信

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this article are (1) to introduce the outline of the outcomes model and substruction, and (2) to introduce the example of synthesis and critique of literature about psychoeducational therapy for schizophrenic patients. Recently, psychiatrists or psychologists are providing patients with education for medication using cognitive therapy, social skills training and psychoeducational therapy in Japan. Psychiatrists and psychologists are doing evaluation research of these structure...

  2. Binge Eating Disorder and Night Eating Syndrome: A Comparative Study of Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Stunkard, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors compared eating patterns, disordered eating, features of eating disorders, and depressive symptoms in persons with binge eating disorder (BED; n = 177), with night eating syndrome (NES; n = 68), and in an overweight comparison group without BED or NES (comparison; n = 45). Participants completed semistructured interviews and several…

  3. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... para deportistas Eat Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down ... from getting sick. Eating a balanced diet, including lots of different fruits and veggies, should provide the ...

  4. Body Image and Eating Disorders Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Zachary; Peebles, Rebecka

    2016-12-01

    Adolescence is a crucial period for emerging sexual orientation and gender identity and also body image disturbance and disordered eating. Body image distortion and disordered eating are important pediatric problems affecting individuals along the sexual orientation and gender identity spectrum. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for eating disorders and body dissatisfaction. Disordered eating in LGBT and gender variant youth may be associated with poorer quality of life and mental health outcomes. Pediatricians should know that these problems occur more frequently in LGBT youth. There is evidence that newer treatment paradigms involving family support are more effective than individual models of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Forest development leading to disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton E. Carlson; Stephen F. Arno; Jimmie Chew; Catherine A. Stewart

    1995-01-01

    Natural disturbance in western U.S.A. forest ecosystems is related to forest succession, growth, and structural development. Natural disturbance may be biotic (insects and diseases) or abiotic (fire, wind, avalanche, etc.). Natural disturbances are more appropriately thought of as natural processes; disturbance is a social connotation implicating economic loss. Forest...

  6. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højskov, Ida Elisabeth; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V

    2016-01-01

    , no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. AIMS: The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment......BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However......, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. METHODS AND DESIGN: Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise...

  7. Psychoeducational Services for Children and Youth in the Orient: Current Status, Problems, and some Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, T; Hu, S

    1989-01-01

    Utilizing information obtained through an international survey and existing literature, patterns in the practices, research, and preparation of professionals who deliver psychoeducational services to children and youth in six Oriental countries (i.e., China, Hong Kong(1), Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand) are described. Services are provided by many professional groups. While few formal programs exist for the preparation of psychologists to work in schools, those providing such services have at least a bachelor's degree. Services commonly provided include assessment, vocational and educational guidance, counseling, parent education, and teaching. School psychological services generally are not governed by legislation or professional standards. Research tends to be applied and directed toward the construction and translations of tests and toward the needs of the mentally retarded, learning disabled, and behaviorally disordered. Ten major problems creating barriers for the delivery of psychoeducational services are identified. Three suggestions to help resolve these problems are offered.

  8. Bipolar disorder and family communication: effects of a psychoeducational treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, T L; Miklowitz, D J; Richards, J A; Saleem, R; George, E L

    1999-11-01

    Family psychoeducational programs are efficacious adjuncts to pharmacotherapy for patients with schizophrenic and bipolar disorders, but little is known about what these programs change about families. The authors assessed changes in face-to-face interactional behavior over 1 year among families of bipolar patients who received a 9-month family-focused psychoeducational therapy (FFT; n = 22) or crisis management with naturalistic follow-up (CMNF; n = 22), both administered with maintenance pharmacotherapy. Members of families who received FFT showed more positive nonverbal interactional behavior during a 1-year posttreatment problem-solving assessment than families who received CMNF, although no corresponding decreases were seen in negative interactional behaviors. The positive effect of family treatment on patients' symptom trajectories over 1 year was partially mediated by increases in patients' positive nonverbal interactional behaviors during this same interval.

  9. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    conducted within this area indicate that family psychoeducation as a supplement to traditional treatment can effectively reduce the risk of relapse in patients with major depression as well as being beneficial for the relatives involved. However, the evidence is currently limited. This study......BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies...... will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one...

  10. Recollections of pressure to eat during childhood, but not picky eating, predict young adult eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jordan M; Galloway, Amy T; Webb, Rose Mary; Martz, Denise M; Farrow, Claire V

    2016-02-01

    Picky eating is a childhood behavior that vexes many parents and is a symptom in the newer diagnosis of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in adults. Pressure to eat, a parental controlling feeding practice aimed at encouraging a child to eat more, is associated with picky eating and a number of other childhood eating concerns. Low intuitive eating, an insensitivity to internal hunger and satiety cues, is also associated with a number of problem eating behaviors in adulthood. Whether picky eating and pressure to eat are predictive of young adult eating behavior is relatively unstudied. Current adult intuitive eating and disordered eating behaviors were self-reported by 170 college students, along with childhood picky eating and pressure through retrospective self- and parent reports. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that childhood parental pressure to eat, but not picky eating, predicted intuitive eating and disordered eating symptoms in college students. These findings suggest that parental pressure in childhood is associated with problematic eating patterns in young adulthood. Additional research is needed to understand the extent to which parental pressure is a reaction to or perhaps compounds the development of problematic eating behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interventions for preventing eating disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, B M; Woolfenden, S R

    2002-01-01

    psychopathology or general psychological and physical well-being in the general sample or those classified as being at high risk for eating disorder (Buddeberg-F 1998; Killen 1993/1996; Santonastaso 1999; Zanetti 1999). Given only one program used a psychoeducation approach to prevent bulimia nervosa (Jerome, unpublished) and only one program adopted a focus on self-esteem (O'Dea 2000), the effect of these approaches could not be evaluated via meta-analyses. In relation to potential harmful effects, there is not sufficient evidence to suggest that harm resulted from any of the prevention programs included in the review. The one significant pooled effect in the current review does not allow for any firm conclusions to be made about the impact of prevention programs for eating disorders in children and adolescents, although none of the pooled comparisons indicated evidence of harm. From a clinical perspective, the development and refinement of prevention programs is complicated by a lack of knowledge about risk factors associated with eating disorders and the need to strike a balance between delivering preventive interventions for eating disorders and considering the potential to cause harm. From a research perspective, the idea of "thresholds" for identifying young people at risk of developing eating disorders has been raised, and denial of concern or denial of illness represents a further issue complicating early identification in relation to eating disorder symptomatology. Longer-term effects of the intervention approaches will need to be monitored across development in order to demonstrate a decline in the incidence of eating disorders and associated risk factors.

  12. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    OpenAIRE

    P. De Maricourt; Gorwood, P.; Th. Hergueta; Galinowski, A.; Salamon, R; Diallo, A.; Vaugeois, C.; Lépine, J P; J. P. Olié; O. Dubois

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinu...

  13. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Biegańska; Pihut, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in p...

  14. Survival after a psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma: a replication study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Boesen, Sidsel H; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The results of a randomized, intervention study done in 1993 of psychoeducation for patients with early-stage malignant melanoma showed a beneficial effect on recurrence and survival 6 years after the intervention. In the present study, we replicated the study with 258 Danish patients with malign...... with malignant melanoma. We also compared recurrence and survival among the participants in the randomized study with 137 patients who refused to participate....

  15. Impact of psychoeducation intervention module on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Suravi Patra; Priti Arun; Bir Singh Chavan

    2015-01-01

    Context: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in India face a host of challenges, while seeking care which ranges from unavailability of information to difficulty in availing services. Aims: To develop a psycho-education intervention module for parents of children with ASD and to study its impact on parent stress and knowledge. Settings and Design: Child Guidance Clinic Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Interventional study. Met...

  16. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-11-14

    Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients were randomly allocated to treatment as usual (TAU, n = 80) or TAU plus a psycho-educative program, Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling (ILC, n = 96) delivered by site clinicians (n = 39). Using follow-up interviews 3 and 9 months after randomization, we examined changes in drug and alcohol use (Addiction Severity Index Composite Scores), percent days abstinent (PDA) within last month, and aggression as measured with the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire-Short Form and the Self-Report of Aggression and Social Behavior Measure. Overall engagement in psychological interventions was modest: 71 (76 %) of participants randomized to psycho-education attended at least one counselling session, and 21 (23 %) attended all six sessions. The Median number of sessions was 2. All patients reduced drug and alcohol problems at 9 months with small within-group effect sizes. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated significant differences between ILC and TAU in mean drugs composite score (p = .018) and in PDA (p = .041) at 3 months. Aggression declined in both groups, but no differences between ILC and TAU were observed in terms of alcohol problems or aggression at any follow-up. Moderate short-term improvements in substance use were associated with randomization to Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling. The findings support the usefulness of providing psycho-education to outpatients with antisocial personality disorder. ISRCTN registry, ISRCTN67266318 , 17/7/2012.

  17. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei-Yu; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Horng, Fen-Fang; Sung, Su-Ching

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour. The prevalence of alcohol abuse has increased over the past 10 years, and the age of initial alcohol use has decreased gradually in Taiwan. Alcohol dependence is one of the leading causes of disability and has led to increases in the incidence of crime and violence, with alcohol abuse identified as a problem in society. A quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent pre/post-testing was used. Alcohol-dependent inpatients undergoing alcohol treatment were selected from the psychiatric ward of a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The effectiveness of the psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour was evaluated with the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Data Questionnaire and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale. In total, 24 and 51 participants were recruited to the experimental and control groups, respectively, for the baseline survey, and 14 and 17 were in the final survey, respectively. After adjustment for baseline survey scores, the experimental group showed significantly greater increases in recognition and ambivalence relative to those observed in the control group. The results not only showed that the psychoeducational programme was effective in reinforcing addicted inpatients' motivation for changing their drinking behaviour but also provided clinical nurses with practical methods via which to enhance patient motivation. The psychoeducational programme could assist clinical nurses in helping alcohol-dependent patients to recognise the nature of their problematic drinking; increase participants' ambivalence towards their drinking behaviour, leading to the contemplation of change; and strengthen the possibility that they will change their addictive behaviour. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Psychoeducation and the family burden in schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kausar Rukhsana; Nasr Tanveer

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The majority of patients with schizophrenia live with their relatives in Pakistan, thereby families experience a considerable burden. We aimed to study the impact of psychoeducation on the burden of schizophrenia on the family in a randomised controlled trial. Methods A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and their family members from the outpatient department of a teaching hospital in Lahore, Pakistan were randomised. Both groups received psychotropic drugs but one g...

  19. [Effects of Psychoeducational Intervention for Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Bae, Sun Hyoung

    2017-04-01

    This study was a systematic review and meta-analysis designed to investigate effects of psychoeducational intervention for cancer survivors. Ten databases were searched. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data extraction and assessment. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane Collaboration's tool. To estimate the effect size, meta-analysis of the studies was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis and RevMan programs. Of 18,781 publications identified, 35 met inclusion criteria, and 25 studies were used to estimate effect size of psychoeducational intervention. Effect sizes (standardized mean difference [SMD]) were heterogeneous and random effects models were used in the analyses. Psychoeducational intervention was effective for quality of life (n=2,410, ES=0.23; 95% CI: 0.09~0.37), coping and self-efficacy (n=179, ES=0.68; 95% CI: 0.26~1.11), anxiety (n=1,786, ES=-0.26; 95% CI: -0.37~-0.15), depression (n=1,910, ES=-0.28; 95% CI: -0.37~-0.18), and psychological distress (n=2,242, ES=-0.31; 95% CI: -0.46~-0.17). Subgroup analysis showed that counseling was the most effective intervention for quality of life, and behavioral therapy was an effective intervention for all positive and negative outcomes. Publication bias was not detected except for psychological distress. Psychoeducational intervention appears to be effective in improving quality of life and coping and self-efficacy, and it is effective in reducing psychological symptoms in cancer survivors. Behavioral therapy, especially, is commonly effective in improving psychosocial outcomes. However, low-quality evidence, variability in the designs of existing studies, and publication bias suggest that additional high-quality trials should be conducted in the future.

  20. A Psychoeducational Group Intervention for Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzos, Andreas; Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Tassi, Christina

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an 8-week psychoeducational group program for siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The sample consisted of 38 siblings aged 6-15 years (M = 10.75), allocated to the experimental (n = 22) or control group (n = 16). Self-report questionnaires were administered before and after the…

  1. Adults with Autism: Outcomes, Family Effects, and the Multi-Family Group Psychoeducation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Leann E.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an increasing number of individuals with autism spectrum disorders are entering adulthood, currently there are few evidence-based programs for individuals later in the life course. In this paper we present an overview of recent research on outcomes for adolescents and adults with ASD and highlight the role of the family for individuals with ASD during the transition to adulthood. We also discuss multi-family group psychoeducation as a promising model for use with individuals with ASD...

  2. Stress and eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Achim; Langemann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    How stress, the stress response, and the adaptation of the stress response influence our eating behavior is a central question in brain research and medicine. In this report, we highlight recent advances showing the close links between eating behavior, the stress system, and neurometabolism.

  3. Enjoy healthy eating

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet aims to increase public awareness and understanding of healthy eating messages. The leaflet includes the new eatwell plate, information on the five main food groups, along with top tips for cutting down on fat and what to choose when eating out. It also includes sections on the importance of breakfast and cutting down on salt.

  4. Boys with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmaker, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Although commonly associated with girls and women, eating disorders do not discriminate. School nurses need to be aware that male students also can suffer from the serious health effects of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, anorexia athletica, and eating disorders not otherwise specified. Sports that focus on leanness and weight limits can add to a…

  5. Eating Disordered Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliot, Alexandra O.; Baker, Christina Wood

    2001-01-01

    Described a sample of eating disordered adolescent males who were seen for treatment at Boston Children's Hospital Outpatient Eating Disorders Clinic. Findings suggest the idea that clinicians, coaches, peers, and family should encourage young men to share concerns about body image and weight at an earlier, less severe juncture, with the assurance…

  6. Eat for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sherbet, and fat-free or low-fat frozen yogurt. Keep portion sizes moderate. Limit the number of egg yolks you eat. Two or fewer yolks per week—including yolks in baked goods and in cooked or processed foods. Egg whites contain no fat or cholesterol, so you can eat them often. In most ...

  7. Eating-Disordered Behaviour in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Barros, Vânia; Rui Gomes, A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate dysfunctional eating behaviour, self-esteem, social physique anxiety and quality of life in adolescents with type 1 diabetes who have differing desired weights and to evaluate the predictors of dysfunctional eating behaviour in these adolescents, with a focus on personal and psychological variables. We evaluated 79 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (mean age of 15.71 years) of both sexes (58.2% females) using the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS-R) and the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQoL) measure. Of the adolescents, 44 with type 1 diabetes reported the desire to maintain or increase their current weight, and 35 reported the desire to reduce their current weight. The participants with the desire to weigh less were mainly females who exercised regularly and demonstrated more frequent binge eating and purging. Additionally, this group exhibited an increased frequency of eating disturbances, such as restraint and eating, weight and shape concerns. Moreover, this group demonstrated increased social physique anxiety and decreased diabetes quality of life in relation to the impact of diabetes, worries about diabetes and satisfaction with life. Finally, predictors of eating disturbances included the desire for lower weight, higher social physique anxiety and lower diabetes-related quality of life. The desire for a lower weight in adolescents with type 1 diabetes may increase problems related to eating behaviour and general quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mindful Eating: Benefits, Challenges, and Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Cindy; Cromwell, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Mindful eating focuses on wellness and how we eat, not what we eat. This fact sheet describes the benefits of mindful eating, the challenges, and strategies for incorporating mindful eating into our daily lives.

  9. Supporting direct care workers in dementia care: effects of a psychoeducational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana; Nolan, Mike; Sousa, Liliana; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study using a pre-posttest control group design was conducted to assess the effects of a person-centered care-based psychoeducational intervention on direct care workers' stress, burnout, and job satisfaction. The intervention aimed to develop person-centered care competences and tools for stress management. Four aged care facilities were randomly assigned to a psychoeducational or an education-only intervention (control). Data were collected from 56 direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72 ± 9.02) through measurements of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), job satisfaction (Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire-short form), and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) and focus-group interviews. Results showed significant positive effects in emotional exhaustion (P = .029) and positive but no significant effects in stress and job satisfaction. According to qualitative data, the experimental group perceived enhanced group cohesion, emotional management, and self-care awareness. Psychoeducational interventions may contribute to reduce direct care workers' burnout. Further work is needed to determine the extent of its benefits. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Impact of psychoeducation intervention module on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Suravi; Arun, Priti; Chavan, Bir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in India face a host of challenges, while seeking care which ranges from unavailability of information to difficulty in availing services. Aims: To develop a psycho-education intervention module for parents of children with ASD and to study its impact on parent stress and knowledge. Settings and Design: Child Guidance Clinic Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Interventional study. Methodology: Parents of children diagnosed with ASD as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria, recruited through consecutive sampling. Total number of 18 participants participated in the two phase study. Phase I included preparation of a parent training module through a four stage process and Phase II was evaluation of impact of the final version of the module on parental stress and knowledge. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test using SPSS version 17.0. Results: There was an improvement in all the domains of parenting stress and knowledge. Social stress score and total stress score showed significant improvement. Conclusions: Parent psycho-education intervention module on ASD decreases parenting stress, and improves knowledge about ASD. Psycho-education intervention module is a feasible and acceptable way of parent empowerment. PMID:26752898

  11. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Maricourt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (% use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  12. Impact of psychoeducation intervention module on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suravi Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD in India face a host of challenges, while seeking care which ranges from unavailability of information to difficulty in availing services. Aims: To develop a psycho-education intervention module for parents of children with ASD and to study its impact on parent stress and knowledge. Settings and Design: Child Guidance Clinic Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Interventional study. Methodology: Parents of children diagnosed with ASD as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria, recruited through consecutive sampling. Total number of 18 participants participated in the two phase study. Phase I included preparation of a parent training module through a four stage process and Phase II was evaluation of impact of the final version of the module on parental stress and knowledge. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test using SPSS version 17.0. Results: There was an improvement in all the domains of parenting stress and knowledge. Social stress score and total stress score showed significant improvement. Conclusions: Parent psycho-education intervention module on ASD decreases parenting stress, and improves knowledge about ASD. Psycho-education intervention module is a feasible and acceptable way of parent empowerment.

  13. The effects of suicide prevention measures reported through a psychoeducational video: a practice in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Shinji; Tanaka, Eriko; Kameyama, Akiko; Takizawa, Tohru; Takizawa, Shiho; Fujishima, Satoko; Nara, Mieko; Sakashita, Tomoe; Oyama, Hirofumi; Ono, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    As the suicide rate in Japan has remained high since 1998, various suicide prevention measures have been implemented in Japanese local communities. To report our findings on the effect of a psychoeducational video as a suicide prevention measure in a Japanese rural town. Questionnaires were randomly mailed to 2,000 residents aged between 30 and 79 years. Within 4 weeks, volunteers in the town visited the residents individually and collected the questionnaires. The variables reported in this study are demographics, awareness of suicide prevention measures available in the town, whether the residents watched the video, help-seeking from advisers regarding suicidal ideation and financial problems and attitudes towards suicide. We analysed data collected from 1,118 people who reported their demographics (i.e. sex, age, and job) and whether they had watched the video. By conducting a series of logistic regression and multiple regression analyses and controlling for demographic variables, we found that watching the video had substantial psychoeducational effects. Despite conducting a cross-sectional study, our new suicide prevention measures were considered effective for psychoeducation. However, further studies using a longitudinal design are needed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maricourt, P; Gorwood, P; Hergueta, Th; Galinowski, A; Salamon, R; Diallo, A; Vaugeois, C; Lépine, J P; Olié, J P; Dubois, O

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  15. Nutritional disturbances by adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Stassart, Martine

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional disturbances are frequent by adolescents. That is a psychological defense against dependance toward the mother but also a middle to remain in a childish position i.e. either as a fat baby - in the fall of obesity- or as the ideal pre- or bisexual great child - in the case of anorexia.

  16. Pathological eating and body dissatisfaction in middle-aged and older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangweth-Matzek, Barbara; Hoek, Hans W; Pope, Harrison G

    2014-11-01

    To summarize the recent literature examining eating disorders, eating behavior, and body image in middle-aged and elderly women. A small but evolving literature has begun to address the epidemiology, features, and potential treatment of eating disorders and related body-image concerns in middle-aged and elderly women. Preliminary findings suggest that pathological eating behaviors and frank eating disorders are surprisingly common in older women, as are associated body-image disturbances. Older women appear less likely to exhibit anorexia and bulimia nervosa and more likely to exhibit binge eating disorder and eating disorder not otherwise specified. The prevalence of such conditions in older women has likely increased in recent decades. On many indices of disordered eating and body image, older women with eating disorder resemble younger women with similar conditions, although older women exhibit certain unique concerns, such as dealing with menopause and with aging. It appears that clinicians should be alert for eating and body-image disorder even in women well beyond the younger age range in whom these disorders have traditionally been described. Subsequent research should consider treatment strategies tailored for older women with eating disorders.

  17. A note on eating disorders and appetite and satiety in the orthodox Jewish meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafran, Yigal; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between religion and eating concerns is receiving increasing empirical attention; and because religion seems to be important to many women with eating concerns, there is an interest in investigating the role religion plays and ways that religion might be employed therapeutically. Research has indicated that women who feel loved and accepted by God are buffered from eating disorder risk factors. An aspect of religiosity that is unique to Judaism is Halakhah, the system of Jewish Law and Ethics which informs the life of a religiously observant orthodox Jew. In this note, we briefly describe how Halakhah approaches the issues of appetite and satiety in eating meals. These might well contribute to the protective influence regarding tendencies for eating disorders in a person whose culture demands an awareness of and commitment to halakhic norms. Some of the most significant characteristics of disordered eating-lack of appetite, disturbed satiated response, withdrawal from community and decreased spirituality-correlate inversely with the halakhic requirements of eating a meal. We suggest that future studies of orthodox Jewish women measuring eating-order symptomatology and its correlation with religiosity might focus not only on well-known indicators of halakhic adherence such as kashrut and Sabbath observance, but also on the specifics of how their kosher meals are eaten, including ritually washing one's hands before eating, saying the appropriate blessing before and after eating, eating the required two meals on the Sabbath, and fully participating in the Passover Seder meal.

  18. Negative reinforcement eating expectancies, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaki, Jumi

    2009-09-01

    Research suggests that emotion dysregulation or difficulties in the modulation of emotional experience constitute risk for eating disorders. Recent work has also highlighted the role of certain eating-related cognitions, specifically expectations of negative emotional reinforcement from eating, in the development of disturbed eating patterns. However, it is unclear whether these expectancies are merely a dimension of a general inability to regulate emotions effectively or rather a unique cognitive-affective risk factor for the development of an eating disorder. This study examines the unique contribution of eating expectancies to symptoms of bulimia nervosa (BN) after controlling for two dimensions of emotion dysregulation (alexithymia and experiential avoidance) previously implicated in the phenomenology of eating disorders. Participants were 115 undergraduate women who self-reported demographics, alexithymia, experiential avoidance, eating expectancies, and symptoms of BN. Eating expectancies uniquely contributed 12.4% of the variance in symptoms of BN, F(2, 108) = 11.74, p eating to provide emotional relief may be especially susceptible to disordered eating. Findings are discussed in terms of emotional risk models and clinical interventions for BN.

  19. Forest disturbances under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Thom, Dominik; Kautz, Markus; Martin-Benito, Dario; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Vacchiano, Giorgio; Wild, Jan; Ascoli, Davide; Petr, Michal; Honkaniemi, Juha; Lexer, Manfred J.; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Mairota, Paola; Svoboda, Miroslav; Fabrika, Marek; Nagel, Thomas A.; Reyer, Christopher P. O.

    2017-06-01

    Forest disturbances are sensitive to climate. However, our understanding of disturbance dynamics in response to climatic changes remains incomplete, particularly regarding large-scale patterns, interaction effects and dampening feedbacks. Here we provide a global synthesis of climate change effects on important abiotic (fire, drought, wind, snow and ice) and biotic (insects and pathogens) disturbance agents. Warmer and drier conditions particularly facilitate fire, drought and insect disturbances, while warmer and wetter conditions increase disturbances from wind and pathogens. Widespread interactions between agents are likely to amplify disturbances, while indirect climate effects such as vegetation changes can dampen long-term disturbance sensitivities to climate. Future changes in disturbance are likely to be most pronounced in coniferous forests and the boreal biome. We conclude that both ecosystems and society should be prepared for an increasingly disturbed future of forests.

  20. Forest disturbances under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Thom, Dominik; Kautz, Markus; Martin-Benito, Dario; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Vacchiano, Giorgio; Wild, Jan; Ascoli, Davide; Petr, Michal; Honkaniemi, Juha; Lexer, Manfred J.; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Mairota, Paola; Svoboda, Miroslav; Fabrika, Marek; Nagel, Thomas A.; Reyer, Christopher P. O.

    2017-01-01

    Forest disturbances are sensitive to climate. However, our understanding of disturbance dynamics in response to climatic changes remains incomplete, particularly regarding large-scale patterns, interaction effects and dampening feedbacks. Here we provide a global synthesis of climate change effects on important abiotic (fire, drought, wind, snow and ice) and biotic (insects and pathogens) disturbance agents. Warmer and drier conditions particularly facilitate fire, drought and insect disturbances, while warmer and wetter conditions increase disturbances from wind and pathogens. Widespread interactions between agents are likely to amplify disturbances, while indirect climate effects such as vegetation changes can dampen long-term disturbance sensitivities to climate. Future changes in disturbance are likely to be most pronounced in coniferous forests and the boreal biome. We conclude that both ecosystems and society should be prepared for an increasingly disturbed future of forests. PMID:28861124

  1. Exhibitionist Eating: Who Wins Eating Competitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; Kniffin, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    How and why does competition and spectator involvement influence eating behaviors? The primary objective of this article is to explore the nature of competitive eating with the goal of identifying implications for other social situations. Study 1 investigated how many chicken wings were eaten by men and women in a 30-min eating competition when cheering spectators either were or were not present (compared to a control condition). The second study sought to explain Study 1's findings through a survey of 93 students who rated male or female competitive eaters (in randomized order) based on intelligence, attractiveness, health, strength, and how romantic they expected the eaters to be. Exploratory findings show competitive eaters ate approximately four times as many chicken wings as a similar control group, and the presence of a cheering audience further increased wing consumption for males (but decreased consumption for females). Study 2 suggests part of the over-performance of males may be related to a shared positive perception that competitive male eaters are strong and virile. Even in relatively low-stakes environments, competitive visibility may dramatically increase how much males eat. These preliminary results help illuminate recent discoveries that males overeat in various social situations where there are opportunities for men to "show off." This may have relevance for dining behavior - especially among younger males - at parties, banquets, group dinners, and similar social situations.

  2. Exhibitionist eating: Who wins eating competitions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wansink

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: How and why does competition and spectator involvement influence eating behaviors? The primary objective of this article is to explore the nature of eating competitions with the goal of identifying implications for other social situations.Design: Study 1 investigated how many chicken wings were eaten by men and women in a 30-minute eating competition when cheering spectators either were or were not present (compared to a control condition. A second study sought to explain Study 1’s findings through a survey of 93 students who rated male or female competitive eaters (in randomized order based on intelligence, attractiveness, health, strength, and how romantic they expected the eaters to be.Results: Exploratory findings show competitive eaters ate approximately four times as many chicken wings as a similar control group, and the presence of a cheering audience further increased wing consumption for males (but decreased consumption for females. Study 2 suggests part of the over-performance of males may be related to a shared positive perception that competitive male eaters are strong and virile. Conclusions: Even in relatively low-stakes environments, competitive visibility may dramatically increase how much males eat. These preliminary results help illuminate recent discoveries that males overeat in various social situations where there are opportunities for men to show off. This may have relevance for dining behavior – especially among younger males – at parties, banquets, group dinners, and similar social situations.

  3. A preliminary examination of a nonpurging compensatory eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A; Holland, Lauren A; Keel, Pamela K

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate correlates of a compensatory eating disorder (CED) characterized by recurrent nonpurging compensatory behaviors in the absence of objectively large binge episodes among normal weight individuals who endorse undue influence of weight/shape on self-evaluation as possible indicators of clinical significance and distinctiveness. Women with CED (n = 20), women with bulimia nervosa (BN) (n = 20), and controls (n = 20) completed an interview and questionnaires assessing eating disorder and general psychopathology and weight history. Compared with controls, women with CED reported significantly greater body image disturbance and disordered eating, higher anxiety proneness, increased perfectionism, and greater weight suppression. Compared with BN, CED was associated with significantly less body image disturbance, disordered eating, weight suppression, and lower likelihood of being overweight in childhood. However, CED and BN did not differ on anxiety proneness or perfectionism. CED merits further examination to determine whether it is a clinically significant and distinct eating disorder. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An examination of the food addiction construct in obese patients with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearhardt, Ashley N; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M; Morgan, Peter T; Crosby, Ross D; Grilo, Carlos M

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Yale food addiction scale (YFAS) in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and explored its association with measures of eating disorder and associated psychopathology. Eighty-one obese treatment-seeking BED patients were given the YFAS, structured interviews to assess psychiatric disorders and eating disorder psychopathology, and other pathology measures. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a one-factor solution with an excellent fit. Classification of "food addiction" was met by 57% of BED patients. Patients classified as meeting YFAS "food addiction" criteria had significantly higher levels of depression, negative affect, emotion dysregulation, eating disorder psychopathology, and lower self-esteem. YFAS scores were also significant predictors of binge eating frequency above and beyond other measures. The subset of BED patients classified as having YFAS "food addiction" appear to represent a more disturbed variant characterized by greater eating disorder psychopathology and associated pathology. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Charge Fat Fuel Shun Supplements Ditch Dehydration Caffeine Game-Day Eats en español Guía de alimentación para deportistas Eat Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports drinks. The good news is that eating to reach your peak ...

  6. Eating Disorders in Paraguayan Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Maria E.; McIntosh, David E.; Kruczek, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders, once thought to be exclusively a disorder of the more affluent Western countries, are now spreading around the world. Despite the wealth of information on the prevalence of eating disorders in developed countries, epidemiological data for South America is scarce. The 26-item Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26) was used to explore the…

  7. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating ... español Guía de alimentación para deportistas Eat Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for ...

  8. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's ... Eat Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs ...

  9. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic

  10. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature rhythm......An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention...... night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively...

  11. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively....... There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The circadian activity rhythm was also disturbed after both minor and major surgery. The daytime AMT6s excretion in urine after major...... surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin substitution...

  12. The Effects of Social Skills Training vs. Psychoeducation on Negative Attitudes of Mothers of Persons with Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chulkwon; Mueser, Kim T

    2011-06-01

    We compared the effects of two brief psychoeducation programs and social skills training on the negative attitudes of mothers with a son who has schizophrenia. 15 mothers with strong negative feelings towards a sons with schizophrenia were assigned by convenience to participate in one of three brief (5 session) group programs at an outpatient clinic: lecture-based psychoeducation, video-based psychoeducation, or social skills training. Assessments using the Patient Rejection Scale were conducted with the mothers at post-treatment, and 3-, 6-, and 9-months later. Mothers in the three groups demonstrated significantly different patterns of changes in their negative attitudes following treatment. Whereas the mothers who received the two psychoeducation interventions showed reductions in rejecting attitudes immediately following the program, their scores gradually increased at the subsequent follow-up assessments. In contrast, the mothers in the social skills training group showed reductions in negative attitudes that were sustained across all of the follow-up assessments. Brief social skills training may be more effective than psychoeducation in reducing negative attitudes of parents who have an offspring with schizophrenia.

  13. DASH Eating Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... should eat only as many calories as you burn by being physically active. This is called energy ...

  14. Surviving Cancer, Eating Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer survivors are taught about healthy eating and weight management. For people who want to learn more about cancer survivorship, an NCI ... leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce the ...

  15. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Healthy Eating for Men Published June 23, 2014 ...

  16. What Can I Eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Mission and Purpose CDF Strategic Plan Financials & Annual Report Leadership & Staff CDF Strategic Partnerships 2017 Year in ... Sources of Gluten What Can I Eat? Label Reading and The FDA Vitamins & Supplements Gluten in Medication ...

  17. Canadians' eating habits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garriguet, Didier

    2007-01-01

    This report is an overview of Canadians' eating habits: total calories consumed and the number of servings from the various food groups, as well as the percentage of total calories from fat, protein and carbohydrates...

  18. Eating habits and behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to function. Food is also a part of traditions and culture. This can mean that eating has ... chap 220. Thompson M, Noel MB. Nutrition and family medicine. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook ...

  19. Kids and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's in this article? Dangerous Habits What Is Anorexia? What Is Bulimia? What Causes Eating Disorders? Can Somebody Catch an ... and have constant stomach pain. Like girls with anorexia, girls with bulimia also may stop menstruating. In addition to the ...

  20. DASH Eating Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fresh or dried herbs and spices, or fresh lemon or lime juice. Rinse canned foods or foods ... are particularly important. Ways to Control Calories To benefit from the DASH eating plan, it is important ...

  1. Effect of adjuvant sleep hygiene psychoeducation and lorazepam on depression and sleep quality in patients with major depressive disorders: results from a randomized three-arm intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi A

    2016-06-01

    depression, but not for sleep. Nevertheless, risks and benefits of benzodiazepine prescriptions should be taken into account. Keywords: sleep hygiene, psychoeducation, pharmacotherapy, lorazepam, sleep disturbances, depression

  2. Vegetarianism and eating disorders: association between eating attitudes and other psychological factors among Turkish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baş, Murat; Karabudak, Efsun; Kiziltan, Gül

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences exist in eating attitudes, self-esteem, social trait anxiety and social physique anxiety of self-reported vegetarian and nonvegetarian Turkish adolescents. The sample for the Turkish University' students is designed to provide the estimates of vegetarian indicators and prevalence. The participants were 608 females and 597 males, in total 1205 adolescents aged between 17 and 21 years. Disturbed eating behaviors (EAT-26> or =20) was found in 45.2% (14 of vegetarian) of the total vegetarian sample; which included two of the male vegetarians and 12 of the female vegetarians. The mean BMI was 19.78+/-1.49 kg/m(2) for female vegetarians and 20.78+/-2.46 kg/m(2) for female nonvegetarians (pvegetarians had significantly higher score than male nonvegetarians on EAT-26 (17.25+/-11.18 for male vegetarians and 9.38+/-6.60 for male nonvegetarians), dieting (6.50+/-7.65 for male vegetarians and 2.55+/-3.87 for male nonvegetarians) and oral control (6.13+/-4.67 for male vegetarians and 3.20+/-3.19 for male nonvegetarians) scores (pvegetarians had significantly higher score than female nonvegetarians on EAT-26 (22.04+/-13.62 for female vegetarians and 11.38+/-8.28 for female nonvegetarians), dieting (10.35+/-9.58 for female vegetarians and 4.41+/-5.30 for female nonvegetarians), oral control (7.78+/-5.13 for female vegetarians and 3.33+/-3.51 for female nonvegetarians) and STAI (51.39+/-7.28 for female vegetarians and 47.29+/-5.13 for female nonvegetarians) scores (pvegetarian adolescents. The vegetarian adolescents may be more likely to display disordered eating attitudes and behaviors than nonvegetarians.

  3. Eating styles in major depressive disorder: Results from a large-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paans, Nadine P G; Bot, Mariska; van Strien, Tatjana; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Visser, Marjolein; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-02-01

    Depressed persons have been found to present disturbances in eating styles, but it is unclear whether eating styles are different in subgroups of depressed patients. We studied the association between depressive disorder, severity, course and specific depressive symptom profiles and unhealthy eating styles. Cross-sectional and course data from 1060 remitted depressed patients, 309 currently depressed patients and 381 healthy controls from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety were used. Depressive disorders (DSM-IV based psychiatric interview) and self-reported depressive symptoms (Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology) were related to emotional, external and restrained eating (Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire) using analyses of covariance and linear regression. Remitted and current depressive disorders were significantly associated with higher emotional eating (Cohen's d = 0.40 and 0.60 respectively, p eating (Cohen's d = 0.20, p = 0.001 and Cohen's d = 0.32, p eating styles between depression course groups were observed. Associations followed a dose-response association, with more emotional and external eating when depression was more severe (both p-values eating (p depressive symptoms, neuro-vegetative depressive symptoms contributed relatively more to emotional and external eating, while mood and anxious symptoms contributed relatively less to emotional and external eating. No depression associations were found with restrained eating. Intervention programs for depression should examine whether treating disordered eating specifically in those with neuro-vegetative, atypical depressive symptoms may help prevent or minimize adverse health consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Binge-Eating Disorder in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, Kimberly A.; Berkman, Nancy D.; Peat, Christine M.; Lohr, Kathleen N.; Cullen, Katherine E.; Bann, Carla M.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The best treatment options for binge-eating disorder are unclear. Purpose To summarize evidence about the benefits and harms of psychological and pharmacologic therapies for adults with binge-eating disorder. Data Sources English-language publications in EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Academic OneFile, CINAHL, and ClinicalTrials.gov through 18 November 2015, and in MEDLINE through 12 May 2016. Study Selection 9 waitlist-controlled psychological trials and 25 placebo-controlled trials that evaluated pharmacologic (n = 19) or combination (n = 6) treatment. All were randomized trials with low or medium risk of bias. Data Extraction 2 reviewers independently extracted trial data, assessed risk of bias, and graded strength of evidence. Data Synthesis Therapist-led cognitive behavioral therapy, lisdexamfetamine, and second-generation antidepressants (SGAs) decreased binge-eating frequency and increased binge-eating abstinence (relative risk, 4.95 [95% CI, 3.06 to 8.00], 2.61 [CI, 2.04 to 3.33], and 1.67 [CI, 1.24 to 2.26], respectively). Lisdexamfetamine (mean difference [MD], −6.50 [CI, −8.82 to −4.18]) and SGAs (MD, −3.84 [CI, −6.55 to −1.13]) reduced binge-eating–related obsessions and compulsions, and SGAs reduced symptoms of depression (MD, −1.97 [CI, −3.67 to −0.28]). Headache, gastrointestinal upset, sleep disturbance, and sympathetic nervous system arousal occurred more frequently with lisdexamfetamine than placebo (relative risk range, 1.63 to 4.28). Other forms of cognitive behavioral therapy and topiramate also increased abstinence and reduced binge-eating frequency and related psychopathology. Topiramate reduced weight and increased sympathetic nervous system arousal, and lisdexamfetamine reduced weight and appetite. Limitations Most study participants were overweight or obese white women aged 20 to 40 years. Many treatments were examined only in single studies. Outcomes were measured inconsistently across trials and rarely

  5. The Role of Ghrelin, Salivary Secretions, and Dental Care in Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Inui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders, including anorexia and bulimia nervosa, are potentially life-threatening syndromes characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior. An effective treatment strategy for these conditions remains to be established, as patients with eating disorders tend to suffer from multiple relapses. Because ghrelin was originally discovered in the stomach mucosa, it has been widely studied over the past decade in an effort to uncover its potential roles; these studies have shed light on the mechanism by which ghrelin regulates food intake. Thus, studying ghrelin in the context of eating disorders could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of eating disorders, possibly resulting in a promising new pharmacological treatment strategy for these patients. In addition, early detection and treatment of eating disorders are critical for ensuring recovery of young patients. Oral symptoms, including mucosal, dental, and saliva abnormalities, are typically observed in the early stages of eating disorders. Although oral care is not directly related to the treatment of eating disorders, knowledge of the oral manifestations of eating disorder patients may aid in early detection, resulting in earlier treatment; thus, oral care might contribute to overall patient management and prognosis. Moreover, ghrelin has also been found in saliva, which may be responsible for oral hygiene and digestion-related functions. This review discusses the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in regulating food-intake and the role of saliva and oral care in young patients with eating disorders.

  6. A Web-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Adolescent Depression: Design and Development of MoodHwb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan Jones, Rhys; Thapar, Anita; Rice, Frances; Beeching, Harriet; Cichosz, Rachel; Mars, Becky; Smith, Daniel J; Merry, Sally; Stallard, Paul; Jones, Ian; Thapar, Ajay K; Simpson, Sharon A

    2018-02-15

    Depression is common in adolescence and leads to distress and impairment in individuals, families and carers. Treatment and prevention guidelines highlight the key role of information and evidence-based psychosocial interventions not only for individuals but also for their families and carers. Engaging young people in prevention and early intervention programs is a challenge, and early treatment and prevention of adolescent depression is a major public health concern. There has been growing interest in psychoeducational interventions to provide accurate information about health issues and to enhance and develop self-management skills. However, for adolescents with, or at high risk of depression, there is a lack of engaging Web-based psychoeducation programs that have been developed with user input and in line with research guidelines and targeted at both the individual and their family or carer. There are also few studies published on the process of development of Web-based psychoeducational interventions. The aim of this study was to describe the process underlying the design and development of MoodHwb (HwbHwyliau in Welsh): a Web-based psychoeducation multimedia program for young people with, or at high risk of, depression and their families, carers, friends, and professionals. The initial prototype was informed by (1) a systematic review of psychoeducational interventions for adolescent depression; (2) findings from semistructured interviews and focus groups conducted with adolescents (with depressive symptoms or at high risk), parents or carers, and professionals working with young people; and (3) workshops and discussions with a multimedia company and experts (in clinical, research, and multimedia work). Twelve interviews were completed (four each with young people, parents or carers, and professionals) and six focus groups (three with young people, one with parents and carers, one with professionals, and one with academics). Key themes from the interviews and

  7. An experimental investigation of a psychoeducational strategy designed to reduce men's endorsement of societal ideals of women's attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamiya, Yuko; Thompson, J Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated whether a psychoeducational manipulation, focused on reducing an unrealistic view of women's attractiveness, might affect men's ratings of the attractiveness of females. The participants were 159 male undergraduate students who were randomly assigned to four conditions: psychoeducational message (beauty ideals; marketing strategies) and photo exposure (attractive females; household products). The results indicated that males pre-exposed to attractive female images subsequently evaluated average females as less attractive than those exposed to household products. However, a psychoeducational information condition designed to challenge "beauty ideals" did not reduce the adverse exposure effect and was comparable in effectiveness to the "marketing strategies" manipulation. The limitations of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research in this area offered.

  8. Effect of a Nurse-Led Psychoeducational Intervention on Healthcare Service Utilization Among Adults With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Friese, Christopher; Kershaw, Trace; Given, Charles W; Fendrick, A Mark; Northouse, Laurel

    2015-07-01

    To examine differences in healthcare service utilization among patients with advanced cancer participating in a nurse-led psychoeducational intervention. Secondary analysis of trial data. Four Michigan cancer centers. 484 patients with advanced cancer. Patients were randomized to three groups. Study arm (brief, extensive, or control), ED visitation (one or more times versus none), inpatient hospitalizations (one or more times versus none), and covariates. No significant differences in ED visits or inpatient hospitalizations were observed among study arms. ED visits were more frequent for patients with lung or colorectal cancer, more comorbidities, and lower baseline QOL. Baseline QOL was associated with inpatient hospitalizations in the adjusted analysis. The psychoeducational intervention, either in brief or extensive format, is unlikely to increase healthcare service utilization. Efficacious nurse-led psychoeducational interventions to improve QOL do not place undue burdens on the healthcare system and may improve care.

  9. Assessment and treatment of eating disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Rebecca; Nicholls, Dasha

    2016-12-01

    Feeding and eating disorders (FEDs) are serious mental health disorders that cause impairments in physical health, development, cognition and psychosocial function and can go undetected for months or years. They are characterised by disturbed eating behaviour associated with concerns about weight and shape or by disinterest in food, phobic avoidance or avoidance due to sensory aspects of food. Restrictive forms of FEDs lead to significant weight loss requiring intervention. Without specific knowledge of these conditions, they can evade detection, delaying time to diagnosis and treatment and potentially influencing outcome. This review article focuses on the key factors involved in the psychiatric assessment and treatment of four feeding or eating disorders (EDs): anorexia nervosa, avoidant-restrictive food intake disorder, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. They have been chosen for discussion as they are most likely to be encountered in both a psychiatric and paediatric setting. It emphasises the importance of a family-focused, developmentally appropriate and multidisciplinary approach to care. It does not address aspects of medical assessment and treatment. Other feeding or EDs not included in this article are pica, rumination disorder, other specified feeding and eating disorder and unspecified feeding and eating disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors among gay Hispanic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Joseph P; Layerla, Dennys Martin; Barroso, Susana; Gattamorta, Karina A; Sanchez, Michael; Prado, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Gay men are a vulnerable population at risk for a number of health disparities, but little is known about eating disorders among gay Hispanic men. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of eating attitudes and behaviors with alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors to determine predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of gay Hispanic men. Significant numbers of the participants were at risk for eating disorders (13%), alcohol abuse (18%), body image disturbance (29%), depression (25%), low self-esteem (12%), and high-risk sexual behaviors (34%). Alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors were significant predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors and accounted for 38% of the variance in eating attitudes and behaviors. Nurses providing care to this population of gay men must be aware of this cluster of related mental health conditions that are experienced by these men. Addressing and treating these health conditions as a group of related mental health conditions are necessary. More research is needed to further explore this cluster of health issues among gay Hispanic men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and Effectiveness of a Psychoeducational Wellness Program for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic-Radic, Jelena; Strober, Lauren; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D.; DeLuca, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) mostly affects young and middle-aged adults and is known to be associated with a host of factors involved in overall quality of life and well-being. The biopsychosocial model of disease takes into account the multifaceted nature of chronic illness and is commonly applied to MS. The present investigation examined the effectiveness of a 10-week psychoeducational MS wellness program that was developed on the basis of the biopsychosocial model and a wellness approach to treatment. Methods: The program consisted of 90-minute, weekly psychoeducational wellness group sessions aimed at improving quality of life by increasing awareness of the various social, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual factors that can affect the overall well-being of people living with MS. Fifty-four individuals with MS participated in the study (43 individuals who completed the wellness intervention and 11 individuals with MS who did not participate; “controls”). All participants completed a series of self-report questionnaires at baseline and at the 10-week follow-up, assessing depression, anxiety, perceived stress, cognitive complaints, pain, social support, and fatigue. Results: Repeated-measures analysis revealed improvements in depression, anxiety, overall mental health, perceived stress, and pain in the treatment group compared with the control group. No significant differences were observed between the groups on measures assessing social support, cognitive complaints, and fatigue. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a psychoeducational wellness program is effective in improving the overall quality of life and well-being of individuals with MS. PMID:25741221

  12. Pilot study of a culturally adapted psychoeducation (CaPE) intervention for bipolar disorder in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Muhammad Ishrat; Chaudhry, Imran B; Rahman, Raza R; Hamirani, Munir M; Mehmood, Nasir; Haddad, Peter M; Hodsoll, John; Young, Allan H; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2017-12-01

    Despite the use of maintenance medication, recurrence rates in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) are high. To date, there are no clinical trials that have investigated the use of psychological interventions in bipolar disorder in Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted bipolar psychoeducation programme (CaPE) in Pakistan. Thirty-four euthymic bipolar I and II outpatients were randomized to either 12 weekly sessions of individual psychoeducation plus Treatment As Usual (Intervention) or Treatment As Usual (TAU) (Control). Outcomes were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), EuroQoL (EQ-5D), Bipolar Knowledge and Attitudes and Questionnaire (BKAQ), and a self-reported measure of medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items, MMAS-4). Effect sizes were derived from baseline adjusted standardized regression coefficients. Retention in the study was good, 80% of patients in the TAU follow-up assessment and 100% of patients in the CaPE group attended all 12 sessions. Patient satisfaction was higher in the CaPE group relative to control (ES = 1.41). Further, there were large effect sizes shown for CaPE versus TAU for medication adherence (MMAS-4: ES = 0.81), knowledge and attitudes towards bipolar (BKAQ: ES = 0.68), mania (YMRS: ES = 1.18), depression (BDI: ES = 1.17) and quality of life measures (EQ-5D: ES ⇒ 0.88). Culturally adapted psychoeducation intervention is acceptable and feasible, and can be effective in improving mood symptoms and knowledge and attitudes to BPAD when compared with TAU. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02210390.

  13. How Patients Contribute to an Online Psychoeducation Forum for Bipolar Disorder: A Virtual Participant Observation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Ria; Smith, Daniel; Simpson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    In a recent exploratory randomized controlled trial, an online psychoeducation intervention for bipolar disorder has been found to be feasible and acceptable to patients and may positively impact on their self-management behaviors and quality of life. The objective of the study was to investigate how these patients contribute to an online forum for bipolar disorder and the issues relevant for them. Participants in the intervention arm of the Bipolar Interactive PsychoEDucation ("BIPED") trial were invited to contribute to the Beating Bipolar forum alongside receiving interactive online psychoeducation modules. Within this virtual participant observation study, forum posts were analyzed using thematic analysis, incorporating aspects of discourse analysis. The key themes which arose from the forum posts included: medication, employment, stigma, social support, coping strategies, insight and acceptance, the life chart, and negative experiences of health care. Participants frequently provided personal narratives relating to their history of bipolar disorder, life experiences, and backgrounds, which often contained emotive language and humor. They regularly sought and offered advice, and expressed encouragement and empathy. The forum would have benefitted from more users to offer a greater support network with more diverse views and experiences. Online forums are inexpensive to provide and may offer peer support and the opportunity for patients to share their experiences and explore issues related to their illness anonymously. Future research should focus on how to enhance patient engagement with online health care forums. ISRCTN81375447; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN81375447 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6YzWtHUqu).

  14. Sleep Disturbances in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael J; Peterson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is frequently accompanied by sleep disturbances such as insomnia or hypersomnia and polysomnographic sleep findings of increased rapid-eye-movement sleep and decreased slow wave sleep. For many patients, insomnia persists even after mood symptoms have been adequately treated. These patients have poorer outcomes than patients without sleep problems. These outcomes suggest that overlapping neural mechanisms regulate sleep and mood. Treatment of these patients can incorporate sedating antidepressants, nonbenzodiazepine γ-aminobutyric acid agonists, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Sleep restriction has been found to improve mood in depressed patients; however, the benefits typically disappear after recovery sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Defining Disturbance for Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J

    2017-08-01

    Disturbance can profoundly modify the structure of natural communities. However, microbial ecologists' concept of "disturbance" has often deviated from conventional practice. Definitions (or implicit usage) have frequently included climate change and other forms of chronic environmental stress, which contradict the macrobiologist's notion of disturbance as a discrete event that removes biomass. Physical constraints and disparate biological characteristics were compared to ask whether disturbances fundamentally differ in microbial and macroorganismal communities. A definition of "disturbance" for microbial ecologists is proposed that distinguishes from "stress" and other competing terms, and that is in accord with definitions accepted by plant and animal ecologists.

  16. Efficacy of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention in patients with advanced COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, D. G.; Lomborg, K.; Jensen, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    -based psychoeducative intervention versus usual care for reducing symptoms of anxiety in patients with advanced COPD. METHODS: The trial included 66 participants with advanced COPD and symptoms of anxiety. The primary outcome was anxiety assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) subscale for anxiety......BACKGROUND: Anxiety is a common comorbidity in patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with major impact on quality of life and associated with increased risk of death. The objective of this randomised controlled trial was to test the efficacy of a minimal home...

  17. The Dialectical Psychoeducational Workshop (DPEW): the conceptual framework and curriculum for a preventative intervention for males at risk for IPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Mary M; Solomon, Phyllis; Gelles, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Current programs aimed at reducing intimate partner violence (IPV) have demonstrated little effect on at-risk males, who may potentially engage in acts of IPV. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provides the conceptual and empirical foundation for the dialectical psychoeducational workshop (DPEW). The DPEW offers a targeted preventative intervention for individuals potentially at risk for IPV. This article offers the rationale and theoretical basis for a specialized preventative approach to IPV and delineates a brief psychoeducational program that may stimulate further research and provide an alternate preventative intervention strategy in an area in need of innovative programs.

  18. Postoperative circadian disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where these endogenous rhythms have been investigated in relation to surgery we performed a series of studies exploring different endogenous rhythms and factors affecting these rhythms. We also wanted to examine whether the disturbances in the postoperative circadian rhythms could be correlated to postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively. There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The

  19. Motor-based bodily self is selectively impaired in eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Gianluigi; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Beatrice; Sottocornola, Simona; Molteni, Massimo; Micali, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Background Body representation disturbances in body schema (i.e. unconscious sensorimotor body representations for action) have been frequently reported in eating disorders. Recently, it has been proposed that body schema relies on adequate functioning of the motor system, which is strongly implicated in discriminating between one’s own and someone else’s body. The present study aimed to investigate the motor-based bodily self in eating disorders and controls, in order to examine the role of the motor system in body representation disturbances at the body schema level. Method Female outpatients diagnosed with eating disorders (N = 15), and healthy controls (N = 18) underwent a hand laterality task, in which their own (self-stimuli) and someone else’s hands (other-stimuli) were displayed at different orientations. Participants had to mentally rotate their own hand in order to provide a laterality judgement. Group differences in motor-based bodily self-recognition—i.e. whether a general advantage occurred when implicitly processing self- vs. other-stimuli − were evaluated, by analyzing response times and accuracy by means of mixed ANOVAs. Results Patients with eating disorders did not show a temporal advantage when mentally rotating self-stimuli compared to other-stimuli, as opposed to controls (F(1, 31) = 5.6, p = 0.02; eating disorders-other = 1092 ±256 msec, eating disorders-self = 1097±254 msec; healthy controls-other = 1239±233 msec, healthy controls -self = 1192±232 msec). Conclusion This study provides initial indication that high-level motor functions might be compromised as part of body schema disturbances in eating disorders. Further larger investigations are required to test motor system abnormalities in the context of body schema disturbance in eating disorders. PMID:29091967

  20. Slow-growing craniopharyngioma masquarading as early-onset eating disorder: Two cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad Winkler, Laura; Andersen, Marianne; Hørder, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Craniopharyngiomas are slow-growing tumors, which can either be asymptomatic or present themselves with visual, neuropsychiatric or endocrine disturbances. Eating disorders (EDs) are syndromes with unknown etiology, associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. In pediatric cases...... the possibility of an as yet unidentified structural hypothalamic disorder to be implicated in the etiopathogeny of ED. (c) 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord, 2009....

  1. Motor-based bodily self is selectively impaired in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Mansi, Gianluigi; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Beatrice; Sottocornola, Simona; Molteni, Massimo; Micali, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Body representation disturbances in body schema (i.e. unconscious sensorimotor body representations for action) have been frequently reported in eating disorders. Recently, it has been proposed that body schema relies on adequate functioning of the motor system, which is strongly implicated in discriminating between one's own and someone else's body. The present study aimed to investigate the motor-based bodily self in eating disorders and controls, in order to examine the role of the motor system in body representation disturbances at the body schema level. Female outpatients diagnosed with eating disorders (N = 15), and healthy controls (N = 18) underwent a hand laterality task, in which their own (self-stimuli) and someone else's hands (other-stimuli) were displayed at different orientations. Participants had to mentally rotate their own hand in order to provide a laterality judgement. Group differences in motor-based bodily self-recognition-i.e. whether a general advantage occurred when implicitly processing self- vs. other-stimuli - were evaluated, by analyzing response times and accuracy by means of mixed ANOVAs. Patients with eating disorders did not show a temporal advantage when mentally rotating self-stimuli compared to other-stimuli, as opposed to controls (F(1, 31) = 5.6, p = 0.02; eating disorders-other = 1092 ±256 msec, eating disorders-self = 1097±254 msec; healthy controls-other = 1239±233 msec, healthy controls -self = 1192±232 msec). This study provides initial indication that high-level motor functions might be compromised as part of body schema disturbances in eating disorders. Further larger investigations are required to test motor system abnormalities in the context of body schema disturbance in eating disorders.

  2. Use of yoga in outpatient eating disorder treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Allison; Ofei-Tenkorang, Nana Ama; Machan, Jason T.; Gordon, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with restrictive eating disorders present with co-morbid psychiatric disorders and many attempt to control symptoms using strenuous exercises that increase caloric expenditure. Yoga offers a safe avenue for the engagement in physical activity while providing an outlet for disease-associated symptoms. This study sought to examine use of yoga practice in an outpatient setting and its impact on anxiety, depression and body image disturbance in adolescents with eating disor...

  3. [Prevalence and relationship between physical activity and abnormal eating attitudes in Spanish women university students in Health and Education Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela Carral, José María; Ayán Pérez, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Future education and health professionals will be responsible for promoting physical activity and correct eating habits among the general population. This work aims to describe the prevalence and the degree of correlation between physical level and eating disorders in a sample made of nursing, physiotherapy and education female students. A total of 258 female students doing university courses during the academic year 2009-2010 at the University of Vigo (Pontevedra's Campus) and who were registered in nursing (87), physiotherapy (73) and education (98) took part in this transversal descriptive study. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Eating Attitude Test were used to assess the prevalence of physical activity and eating disturbed attitudes respectively. The data showed that 63 (64,7%) of nursing students and 63 (72,1%) of education students reported the higher physical inactivity values, while 19 (19.4%) and 13 (15,3%) of them were likely to suffer from eating disorders respectively. Significant differences were found between the academic degree and the physical activity level of the sample (chi²=10,265; Sig.eating disturbed attitudes was only significant among education students (OR= 3,58; IC 95%= 1,29-9,93; Sig.eating disturbed attitudes seems to exist attitudes among education and nursing students. There is a chance that the performance of intense physical activity could be related to inadequate eating habits.

  4. Eating disorders in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Pratap; Sundar, A. Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have been classically described in young females in Western population. Recent research shows that they are also seen in developing countries including India. The classification of eating disorders has been expanded to include recently described conditions like binge eating disorder. Eating disorders have a multifactorial etiology. Genetic factor appear to play a major role. Recent advances in neurobiology have improved our understanding of these conditions and may possibly help us develop more effective treatments in future. Premorbid personality appears to play an important role, with differential predisposition for individual disorders. The role of cultural factors in the etiology of these conditions is debated. Culture may have a pathoplastic effect leading to non-conforming presentations like the non fat-phobic form of anorexia nervosa, which are commonly reported in developing countries. With rapid cultural transformation, the classical forms of these conditions are being described throughout the world. Diagnostic criteria have been modified to accommodate for these myriad presentations. Treatment of eating disorders can be quite challenging, given the dearth of established treatments and poor motivation/insight in these conditions. Nutritional rehabilitation and psychotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment, while pharmacotherapy may be helpful in specific situations. PMID:26330646

  5. Neuroimaging in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-LoberaBehavioral Sciences Institute and Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Neuroimaging techniques have been useful tools for accurate investigation of brain structure and function in eating disorders. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry have been the most relevant technologies in this regard. The purpose of this review is to update the existing data on neuroimaging in eating disorders. The main brain changes seem to be reversible to some extent after adequate weight restoration. Brain changes in bulimia nervosa seem to be less pronounced than in anorexia nervosa and are mainly due to chronic dietary restrictions. Different subtypes of eating disorders might be correlated with specific brain functional changes. Moreover, anorectic patients who binge/purge may have different functional brain changes compared with those who do not binge/purge. Functional changes in the brain might have prognostic value, and different changes with respect to the binding potential of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and D2/D3 receptors may be persistent after recovering from an eating disorder.Keywords: neuroimaging, brain changes, brain receptors, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders

  6. Break the bonds of emotional eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity - emotional eating; Overweight - emotional eating; Diet - emotional eating; Weight loss - emotional meaning ... bad mood, or feel bad about yourself. Emotional eating often becomes a habit. If you have used ...

  7. The effectiveness of a trauma-focused psycho-educational secondary prevention program for children exposed to interparental violence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Children who witness interparental violence are at a heightened risk for developing psychosocial, behavioral and cognitive problems, as well as posttraumatic stress symptoms. For these children the psycho-educational secondary prevention program 'En nu ik...!' ('It's my turn now!') has been developed. This program includes specific therapeutic factors focused on emotion awareness and expression, increasing feelings of emotional security, teaching specific coping strategies, developing a trauma narrative, improving parent-child interaction and psycho-education. The main study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of the specific therapeutic factors in the program. A secondary objective is to study mediating and moderating factors. Methods/design This study is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial across cities in the Netherlands. Participants (N = 140) are referred to the secondary preventive intervention program by police, social work, women shelters and youth (mental health) care. Children, aged 6-12 years, and their parents, who experienced interparental violence are randomly assigned to either the intervention program or the control program. The control program is comparable on nonspecific factors by offering positive attention, positive expectations, recreation, distraction, warmth and empathy of the therapist, and social support among group participants, in ways that are similar to the intervention program. Primary outcome measures are posttraumatic stress symptoms and emotional and behavioral problems of the child. Mediators tested are the ability to differentiate and express emotions, emotional security, coping strategies, feelings of guilt and parent-child interaction. Mental health of the parent, parenting stress, disturbances in parent-child attachment, duration and severity of the domestic violence and demographics are examined for their moderating effect. Data are collected one week before the program starts (T1), and one week

  8. Randomized controlled pilot trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction compared to psychoeducational support for persistently fatigued breast and colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Shelley A; Brown, Linda F; Beck-Coon, Kathleen; Talib, Tasneem L; Monahan, Patrick O; Giesler, R Brian; Tong, Yan; Wilhelm, Laura; Carpenter, Janet S; Von Ah, Diane; Wagner, Christina D; de Groot, Mary; Schmidt, Karen; Monceski, Diane; Danh, Marie; Alyea, Jennifer M; Miller, Kathy D; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-10-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a disruptive symptom for many survivors. Despite promising evidence for efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in reducing CRF, no trials comparing it to an active comparator for fatigued survivors have been published. The purpose of this trial was to compare MBSR to psychoeducation for CRF and associated symptoms. Breast (n = 60) and colorectal (n = 11) cancer survivors (stage 0-III) with clinically significant CRF after completing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy an average of 28 months prior to enrollment were randomized to MBSR or psychoeducation/support groups (PES). MBSR focused on mindfulness training; PES focused on CRF self-management. Outcomes included CRF interference (primary), CRF severity and global improvement, vitality, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and pain. Outcomes were assessed at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 6-month follow-up (T3) using intent-to-treat analysis. Between-group differences in CRF interference were not significant at any time point; however, there was a trend favoring MBSR (d = -0.46, p = 0.073) at T2. MBSR participants reported significantly greater improvement in vitality (d = 0.53, p = 0.003) and were more likely to report CRF as moderately to completely improved compared to the PES group (χ2 (1) = 4.1765, p = 0.041) at T2. MBSR participants also reported significantly greater reductions in pain at T2 (d = 0.53, p = 0.014). In addition, both MBSR and PES produced moderate-to-large and significant within-group improvements in all fatigue outcomes, depression, anxiety, and sleep at T2 and T3 compared to T1. MBSR and PES appear efficacious for CRF and related symptoms. Larger trials including a usual care arm are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01724333.

  9. The effectiveness of a trauma-focused psycho-educational secondary prevention program for children exposed to interparental violence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Mathilde M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children who witness interparental violence are at a heightened risk for developing psychosocial, behavioral and cognitive problems, as well as posttraumatic stress symptoms. For these children the psycho-educational secondary prevention program 'En nu ik...!' ('It's my turn now!' has been developed. This program includes specific therapeutic factors focused on emotion awareness and expression, increasing feelings of emotional security, teaching specific coping strategies, developing a trauma narrative, improving parent-child interaction and psycho-education. The main study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of the specific therapeutic factors in the program. A secondary objective is to study mediating and moderating factors. Methods/design This study is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial across cities in the Netherlands. Participants (N = 140 are referred to the secondary preventive intervention program by police, social work, women shelters and youth (mental health care. Children, aged 6-12 years, and their parents, who experienced interparental violence are randomly assigned to either the intervention program or the control program. The control program is comparable on nonspecific factors by offering positive attention, positive expectations, recreation, distraction, warmth and empathy of the therapist, and social support among group participants, in ways that are similar to the intervention program. Primary outcome measures are posttraumatic stress symptoms and emotional and behavioral problems of the child. Mediators tested are the ability to differentiate and express emotions, emotional security, coping strategies, feelings of guilt and parent-child interaction. Mental health of the parent, parenting stress, disturbances in parent-child attachment, duration and severity of the domestic violence and demographics are examined for their moderating effect. Data are collected one week before the program

  10. Disturbance hydrology: Preparing for an increasingly disturbed future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre- and post-disturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  11. Mindful Eating: The Art of Presence While You Eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joseph B

    2017-08-01

    IN BRIEF Mindfulness, a practice based on Zen Buddhism, has become popular as a way of self-calming and as a method of changing eating behaviors. Mindful eating is being incorporated into behavior change programs along with recommended dietary behavior changes. This article describes mindful eating and offers ideas for how to teach the basics of this practice.

  12. Examining Duration of Binge Eating Episodes in Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gregory, Deanna N.; Lavender, Jason M.; Engel, Scott G.; Wonderlich, Steve A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Simonich, Heather; Crow, Scott; Durkin, Nora; Mitchell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of this paper is to examine and clarify characteristics of binge eating in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED), particularly the duration of binge eating episodes, as well as potential differences between individuals with shorter compared to longer binge eating episodes. Method Two studies exploring binge eating characteristics in BED were conducted. Study 1 examined differences in clinical variables among individuals (N = 139) with BED who reported a short (binge duration. Study 2 utilized an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) design to examine the duration and temporal pattern of binge eating episodes in the natural environment in a separate sample of nine women with BED. Results Participants in Study 1 who were classified as having long duration binge eating episodes displayed greater symptoms of depression and lower self-esteem, but did not differ on other measures of eating disorder symptoms, compared to those with short duration binge eating episodes. In Study 2, the average binge episode duration was approximately 42 minutes, and binge eating episodes were most common during the early afternoon and evening hours, as well as more common on weekdays versus weekends. Discussion Past research on binge episode characteristics, particularly duration, has been limited to studies of binge eating episodes in BN. This study contributes to the existing literature on characteristics of binge eating in BED. PMID:23881639

  13. Examining duration of binge eating episodes in binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gregory, Deanna N; Lavender, Jason M; Engel, Scott G; Wonderlich, Steve A; Crosby, Ross D; Peterson, Carol B; Simonich, Heather; Crow, Scott; Durkin, Nora; Mitchell, James E

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of this article is to examine and clarify characteristics of binge eating in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED), particularly the duration of binge eating episodes, as well as potential differences between individuals with shorter compared to longer binge eating episodes. Two studies exploring binge eating characteristics in BED were conducted. Study 1 examined differences in clinical variables among individuals (N = 139) with BED who reported a short (binge duration. Study 2 utilized an ecological momentary assessment design to examine the duration and temporal pattern of binge eating episodes in the natural environment in a separate sample of nine women with BED. Participants in Study 1 who were classified as having long duration binge eating episodes displayed greater symptoms of depression and lower self-esteem, but did not differ on other measures of eating disorder symptoms, compared to those with short duration binge eating episodes. In Study 2, the average binge episode duration was approximately 42 min, and binge eating episodes were most common during the early afternoon and evening hours, as well as more common on weekdays versus weekends. Past research on binge episode characteristics, particularly duration, has been limited to studies of binge eating episodes in bulimia nervosa. This study contributes to the existing literature on characteristics of binge eating in BED. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effectiveness of a psychoeducative intervention in a summer camp for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Lidia; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro; Del Mar Trujillo-Martín, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psychoeducative intervention implemented in a summer camp for children with type 1 diabetes. A prospective cohort study was conducted comparing 2 groups of children with type 1 diabetes. The intervention group (n = 34) received interventions that addressed knowledge, behaviors, skills, and psychological factors during a summer camp. The control group (n = 23) received the usual education and care. Evaluated measurements were glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), diabetes knowledge, anxiety, psychological adaptation, and use of health care services. No significant changes in A1C annual average, body mass index (BMI), diabetes knowledge, anxiety, medical visits, or hospital admissions were observed after the intervention in comparison with before intervention. Only the adaptation to the school environment improved significantly. The control group significantly increased BMI and A1C. No relevant variations in diabetes knowledge, anxiety, psychological adaptation, or use of health care services were found after the psychoeducative intervention implemented in the summer camp. Future studies with random allocation of subjects are necessary to confirm the intervention's effectiveness.

  15. Internet-based psychoeducation for bipolar disorder: a qualitative analysis of feasibility, acceptability and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poole Ria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent exploratory randomised trial we found that a novel, internet-based psychoeducation programme for bipolar disorder (Beating Bipolar was relatively easy to deliver and had a modest effect on psychological quality of life. We sought to explore the experiences of participants with respect to feasibility, acceptability and impact of Beating Bipolar. Methods Participants were invited to take part in a semi-structured interview. Thematic analysis techniques were employed; to explore and describe participants’ experiences, the data were analysed for emerging themes which were identified and coded. Results The programme was feasible to deliver and acceptable to participants where they felt comfortable using a computer. It was found to impact upon insight into illness, health behaviour, personal routines and positive attitudes towards medication. Many participants regarded the programme as likely to be most beneficial for those recently diagnosed. Conclusions An online psychoeducation package for bipolar disorder, such as Beating Bipolar, is feasible and acceptable to patients, has a positive impact on self-management behaviours and may be particularly suited to early intervention. Alternative (non-internet formats should also be made available to patients.

  16. Effects of Early-Stage Group Psychoeducation Programme for Patients with Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sachie; Ishikawa, Eri; Mochida, Ayumi; Kawano, Koujiro; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a psychoeducational group programme on inpatients with depression. We compared the attributes and Inventory Scale for Mood and Sense of Fatigue (SMSF) scores of 45 people who participated in the programme (participation group) with those of 37 people who did not participate (control group). Further, we investigated the rate of readmission 6 months after discharge and the number of patients in the participation group who had consulted a psychiatric social worker. Statistically, there were no significant differences in the SMSF score between the two groups on admission and at the time of discharge. The programme had no effect on the readmission rate. However, the SMSF score of the participation group significantly improved from the start of the programme to patient discharge. Furthermore, improvement of depressive symptoms, feeling of recovery and adherence were found in the participation group. The programme seemed to provide a psychotherapeutic effect for the patients and promoted cooperation with occupational therapist and other specialists in the hospital. The efficacy of psychoeducation in preventing recurrence of depression remains to be demonstrated, and methods of investigating effective approaches for this purpose need to be considered in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A psycho-educational intervention for depressed women: a qualitative analysis of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Ma Asunción; Navarro, Claudia; Acevedo, Maricarmen; Berenzon, Shoshana; Mondragón, Liliana; Rubí, Norma Angélica

    2004-12-01

    Yalom (1995) has stated that psycho-educational interventions could be made more effective by incorporating a focus on the interpersonal process. A qualitative analysis is proposed to investigate the degree of fidelity with which a psycho-educational intervention for women with depressive symptoms was delivered and to identify Yalom's significant therapeutic mechanisms operating in group therapy. The intervention consisted of six 2 two-hour weekly sessions organized around educational material. Eight groups were conducted with 5-19 participants each. A qualitative analysis was undertaken based on Kvale's (1996) technique of 'categorization of meanings' for the transcribed registers of audiotaped recordings. The analysis led to the definition of five major group process categories: establishment of rules, educational exchange, experiential exchange, reflexive work designed to achieve cognitive and behavioural change, and limitations on the exchange process. It showed that the facilitators largely adhered to the goals of the intervention, its strategies and model, and that the main limitations concerned facilitators' and participants'speaking for over-long periods of time and facilitators' failure to cover all the material due to lack of time. The subsequent analysis identified four of Yalom's categories: installation of hope, didactic instruction, catharsis, and universality. In support of Yalom's assertion, we concluded that this exercise was useful in that it highlighted important therapeutic factors that could be more purposefully manipulated in the future.

  18. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  19. An Effective Psychoeducational Intervention for Early Childhood Caries Prevention: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Ghosheh, Natalie; Warren, Joh J.; Drake, David R.; Kramer, Katherine W.O.; Dawson, Deborah V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to compare whether mothers exposed to an autonomy-supportive psychoeducational videotaped message, informed by the self-determination theory (SDT), demonstrated greater changes in oral health knowledge and behavioral intentions as a preventive means for early childhood caries (ECC) than mothers exposed to a neutral message delivered by brochure. Methods Data were collected at baseline, one-, and six-month follow-ups from 415 12- to 49-month-old WIC-enrolled children and their mothers: 283 in the video intervention group and 132 in the brochure control group. Mothers completed questionnaires on maternal knowledge and behavioral intentions for oral health care. Chi-square, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze data (P<.05). Results Relative to their baseline scores, the intervention group showed a greater increase in knowledge than the control group, both at one-month (P=.002) and six-month follow-ups (P<.001). The video group also demonstrated a greater increase in behavioral intentions than controls, both at one-month (P<.05) and six-month follow-ups (P<.001). Knowledge and behavioral intention levels at six-month follow-up did not differ significantly from those at one-month follow-up, indicating that intervention-based increases in these measures were maintained over time. Conclusions Data provided evidence of the effectiveness of the autonomy-supportive psychoeducational intervention for ECC prevention relative to a neutral brochure. PMID:23756308

  20. Psycho-educational preparation of children for anaesthesia: A review of intervention methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Michele; Ragni, Benedetta

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the different methods available for the psycho-educational preparation of children for anaesthesia induction. Articles were searched in Academic Search Premier, OvidSP, Web of Science, and PsycINFO. Inclusion criteria were psychological and educational preparation of children for anaesthesia and anxiety reduction. The titles of papers and abstracts were reviewed and full copies of selected papers were scrutinized. Forty-four empirical studies were identified. Twenty-one articles described preoperative preparation programmes, twelve examined the effects of distractive techniques and eleven reported the effect of parental presence during anaesthesia's induction. Some general characteristics of the different interventions are discussed together with some key psychological and educational factors mediating anxiety in children undergoing anaesthesia. The effectiveness of interventions were linked to several factors. Psychological and contextual aspects are discussed. Psycho-educational activities should be better described when reporting their effectiveness in children's preparation for an anaesthesia. Patient and family characteristics together with organizational and systemic aspects are described in order to guide the choice of the most appropriate preparation method for diverse health care setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychoeducative groups help control type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Cuesta, Miguel Ángel; García-Talavera Espín, Noelia Victoria; Brotons Román, Josefa; Núñez Sánchez, M Ángeles; Brocal Ibáñez, Pedro; Villalba Martín, Pilar; Saura García, Carmen; Sánchez Esteban, Tomasa; Romero López-Reinoso, Helena; Delgado Aroca, Ma José; Sánchez Gil, Dolores; Meoro Avilés, Amparo; Soriano Palao, José

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of a psychoeducational group intervention in diabetes using glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), the body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) compared with conventional educational measures provided individually. A quasi-experimental study (pre/post-intervention) with a non-equivalent control group was conducted, including 72 type 2 individuals with diabetes (mean data: age 63.08 years, HbA1C 6.98%, BMI 30.48 kg/m2).The beneficial effect of psychoeducational group therapy in the study group (PGT) was compared with conventional diabetes education in the control group (CG). The PGT had a higher mean HbA1c reduction (-0.51 ± 1.7 vs. -0.06 ± 0.53%, p 0.003), met the objectives of optimal control of HbA1c to a higher degree (80% vs. 48%, p 0.005) and greater mean weight reduction (-1.93 ± 3.57 vs. 0.52 ± 1.73 kg, p 0002) than the CG.A significant improvement in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was achieved in PGT (all p programs should be considered to introduce these more efficient therapies for diabetes education in primary care. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. [Psycho-educational coping-oriented group therapy for schizophrenia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Christina; Andres, Karl; Hofer, Alex; Hummer, Martina; Gutweniger, Sarah; Kemmler, Georg; Pfammatter, Mario; Meise, Ullrich

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational, coping-oriented therapy programme for patients with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. Controlled, prospective study design. In the experimental group the Therapy Manual for Psycho-education and Coping with Illness (PKB) was used, providing targeted information on the illness, medical treatment, prodromal symptoms, and health behaviour. Controls participated in supportive dialogues or in an occupational rehabilitation programme. Psychopathology, re-hospitalisations, knowledge, functional outcome and coping strategies were assessed before, directly after and 12 months post therapy. 82 patients participated. In both groups (experimental, control) a significant improvement in psychopathology and general functioning level were observed. Specific advantages for patients of the experimental group were limited to a few aspects, including rehospitalizations in the first year and certain coping strategies. In the treatment of schizophrenia different forms of psycho-social intervention (experimental, control) can be effective. Identification of subgroups profiting specially from certain types of intervention should be subject of future research.

  3. Postischaemic circulation disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, U; Bodendieck, P

    1975-01-01

    Restoration of blood supply after ischaemic conditions in extremities and testes is inhibited by reversible intravasal aggregation of erythrocytes. This process is promoted by the increased permeability of the capillaries associated with the formation of oedema and the entailing increase of the haematocrit. For overcoming the stasis the increased structural viscosity caused by the aggregation of erythrocytes requires an increase in pressure as a starter effect which is not achieved by the flow pressure at once everywhere. Intravenously administered particles of Indian ink mark the formation and dissolution of aggregates. Even areas with originally normal blood supply may be obstructed by the later formation of aggregates. Thrombi on the walls of arterial and venous vessels and other lesions of the intima do not sufficiently explain the disturbance of perfusion. Oedema and extravasating leucocytes are found in the microcirculation. The parenchyma to be supplied shows formation of necrosis.

  4. Binge Eating Disorder and Body Uneasiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Cuzzolaro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Debate continues regarding the nosological status of binge eating disorder (BED and the specific diagnostic criteria, including whether, like anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, it should be characterized by body image disturbances in addition to abnormal eating behaviour. The aims of this article are: a to concisely review the main points of the literature that has developed on diagnosis and treatment (especially pharmacological of BED and b to present the results of an original research on body image in obese patients with BED. The study was aimed to verify the following hypothesis: in persons with obesity, BED is associated with greater body uneasiness independently of some possible modulating factors. We studied a clinical sample of 159 (89 females and 70 males adult obese patients who fulfilled DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for BED matched to 159 non-BED obese patients for gender, ethnicity, BMI class, age, weight, stature, onset age of obesity, education level, and marital status. We used the Body Uneasiness Test (BUT, a valuable multidimensional tool for the clinical assessment of body uneasiness in subjects suffering from eating disorders and/or obesity. Obese patients with BED reported higher scores than non-BED patients in the General Severity Index (BUT-A GSI and in every BUT-A subscale. All differences were statistically significant in both sexes. As expected women obtained higher scores than men. According to some other studies, our findings suggest that a negative body image should be included among diagnostic criteria for BED. Consequently, treatment should be focused not simply on eating behaviour and outcome studies should evaluate changes of body image as well.

  5. Eating Disorders and Epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Lea; Steiger, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are characterized by intense preoccupation with shape and weight and maladaptive eating practices. The complex of symptoms that characterize EDs often arise through the activation of latent genetic potentials by environmental exposures, and epigenetic mechanisms are believed to link environmental exposures to gene expression. This chapter provides an overview of genetic factors acting in the etiology of EDs. It then provides a background to the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms link stresses such as obstetric complications and childhood abuse as well as effects of malnutrition to eating disorders (EDs). The chapter then summarizes the emerging body of literature on epigenetics and EDs-mainly studies on DNA methylation in samples of anorexia and bulimia. The available evidence base suggests that an epigenetically informed perspective contributes in valuable ways to the understanding of why people develop EDs.

  6. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  7. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  8. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Sports Print A A A What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes and Dieting Eat a Variety of Foods Muscular Minerals and Vital Vitamins Protein Power Carb Charge Fat Fuel Shun Supplements Ditch ...

  9. Eating practices and diet quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lotte; Lund, Thomas Bøker; Niva, Mari

    2015-01-01

    is based on eight food frequency questions focusing on fats, vegetables, fruits and fish in the diet. Results: Eating activities were associated with diet quality even when motivation to eat healthily and sociodemographic factors were controlled for. The number of daily eating events and eating main meals......Background/objectives: Daily practices related to eating are embedded in the social and cultural contexts of everyday life. How are such factors associated with diet quality relative to motivational factors? And, are associations universal or context-specific? We analyze the relationship between...... diet quality and the following practices: social company while eating, the regularity and duration of eating and the activity of watching TV while eating. Subjects/methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based internet survey was conducted in April 2012 with stratified random samples...

  10. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  11. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  12. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  13. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  14. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  15. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  16. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... In addition, eating candy bars or other sugary snacks just before practice or competition can give athletes ... yogurt, or pasta with tomato sauce). Eat a snack less than 2 hours before the game: If ...

  17. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... dairy products, like butter. Choosing when to eat fats is also important for athletes. Fatty foods can slow digestion, so it's a good idea to avoid eating these foods for a ...

  18. Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity Nutrition and physical activity ... What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going ...

  19. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Hot Topics Breast Exams Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Prescription Drug Abuse A Guide to Eating for ... eat from different food groups based on age, gender, and activity level. Reviewed by: Sarah R. Gibson, ...

  20. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Sports Print A A A What's in this article? Eat Extra for Excellence Athletes and Dieting Eat ... performance. Plus, taking certain medications — including supplements — can make caffeine's side effects seem even worse. Never drink ...

  1. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Prescription Drug Abuse A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  2. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  3. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  4. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Reputation ADHD Medicines A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for ... vitamins and minerals needed for good health and sports performance. previous continue Protein Power Athletes may need ...

  5. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Breath? Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  6. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Online Safety Getting Help for Intense Grief A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  7. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Thyroid Disease Growth Problems Cervical Cap HPV Vaccine A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > ... perform your best while also losing weight. Eat a Variety of Foods You may have heard about " ...

  8. [Prevention of eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papežová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    The quality of the prevention of eating disorders represents in several last decades frequently discussed issue in the context of rapidly changing socio-economic conditions, a significant increase of influence of the media, new technologies and knowledge of risk factors. Primary prevention aims to reduce the risk of developing eating disorders, but secondary and tertiary prevention play the important role as well. Effective and coordinated prevention is still missing. Our experience of international cooperation of the last 20 years led to the development and evaluation of prevention programs. We are describing their fast development and ongoing programs following the new trends recommended by WHO.

  9. Ghrelin and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalayer, Deniz; Gibson, Charlisa; Konopacka, Alexandra; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence supporting a multifactorial etiology that includes genetic, neurochemical, and physiological components for eating disorders above and beyond the more conventional theories based on psychological and sociocultural factors. Ghrelin is one of the key gut signals associated with appetite, and the only known circulating hormone that triggers a positive energy balance by stimulating food intake. This review summarizes recent findings and several conflicting reports on ghrelin in eating disorders. Understanding these findings and inconsistencies may help in developing new methods to prevent and treat patients with these disorders. PMID:22960103

  10. Bulimia nervosa symptomatology and body image disturbance associated with distance running and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleaves, D H; Williamson, D A; Fuller, R D

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that problems characteristic of eating disorders may often be associated with distance running, 20 women who had lost weight through distance running were compared with a control group who did not exercise and had not lost weight and a comparison group of bulimia nervosa patients. Dependent variables were measures of depression, bulimia nervosa symptomatology, and body image disturbance. No differences were found between the runner group and the normal controls. Bulimics differed from runners and controls on most measures. Thus, the results did not support the proposition that weight loss through running leads to problems related to eating and body image. The failure to find disturbances in body image in runners suggests that body image disturbances are not a direct result of weight loss, as suggested by some theorists. PMID:1422651

  11. Prevalence of disordered eating and pathogenic weight control behaviors among male collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterton, Justine M; Petrie, Trent A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of disordered eating and pathogenic weight control behaviors in male collegiate athletes. Male collegiate athletes (N = 732) from the across the U.S. completed questionnaires online. Results suggested that (a) most eating disturbances occur at the subclinical level, (b) exercising and dieting were the most commonly used weight control practices, and (c) athletes who participate in weight class sports are more likely to be classified as symptomatic and engage in pathogenic eating and weight control behaviors compared to endurance sport or ball game athletes. Implications for professionals working with athletes and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  12. Binge eating disorder, anxiety, depression and body image in grade III obesity patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Isabel R Matos; Luciana S Aranha; Alessandra N. Faria; Ferreira,Sandra R G; Bacaltchuck,Josué; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of Binge Eating Disorder (BED) or Binge Eating episodes (BINGE), anxiety, depression and body image disturbances in severely obese patients seeking treatment for obesity. METHOD: We assessed 50 patients (10M and 40F) with Body Mass Index (BMI) between 40 and 81.7 Kg/m² (mean 52.2±9.2 Kg/m²) and aging from 18 to 56 years (mean 38.5±9.7). Used instruments: Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns ¾ Rev...

  13. Peer influences, body-image dissatisfaction, eating dysfunction and self-esteem in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2006-07-01

    A sample of 344 adolescent girls completed a variety of measures designed to index the associations among peer influences, body-image dissatisfaction, eating dysfunction and self-esteem. Results indicated that participants were significantly similar to their nominated friends on self-esteem, but not body image or eating disturbance. Peer measures were significantly associated with body dissatisfaction, eating problems and self-esteem. Peer suppression of feelings, internalization of the thin-ideal and appearance comparison were significant mediators in path analyses testing the direct and indirect role of peer influences on outcome variables. Implications for intervention and prevention programs are discussed.

  14. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  15. Exploring gender differences in the link between weight suppression and eating pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, C Blair; Simpson, Courtney C; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2017-12-01

    Weight suppression (WS), the difference in one's highest weight (excluding pregnancy) and current weight at current height, is associated with the onset of eating disorders. Previous research has explored the influence of WS in predominantly clinical, female samples. However, the transition to college is a particularly high-risk time for weight gain and the development of eating pathology and men with eating disorders often have higher premorbid weights. This study investigated the associations of WS and dimensions of eating pathology in an undergraduate sample (N=859) and examined the effect of gender. Results demonstrated that higher levels of WS were associated with more dietary restraint (p=0.004) and more frequent purging behaviors (peating through dietary restraint for both men and women (peating. This approach might be particularly beneficial with college students due to their heightened risk of eating and weight disturbances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensory Processing as a Predictor of Feeding/Eating Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerilyn Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD frequently have feeding and eating difficulties as well as unusual responses to sensory stimuli. This can lead to significantly compromised occupational performance. Method: A secondary data analysis study design was used to investigate sensory processing characteristics as predictors of feeding and eating disturbances. Study subjects were children aged 2 to 14 years (N = 171 with ASD. The Short Sensory Profile (SSP was used to determine the child’s sensory processing abilities. Correlational and multiple regression methods were employed to analyze the relationship between sensory processing and feeding and eating behaviors. Results: Results suggest that six out of eight of the sensory domains from the SSP were predictive of eating behaviors. Discussion: This study provides evidence to inform practice regarding the association of sensory processing and eating behaviors and supports the need for assessing sensory processing in children with ASD.

  17. Self-esteem, body shame and eating disorder risk in obese and normal weight adolescents: A mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Mara; D'Olimpio, Francesca; Cella, Stefania; Cotrufo, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    To investigate dysfunctional eating behaviors and psychological variables typically associated to eating disturbances such as low self-esteem, perfectionism, shame, perceived parental care and protectiveness in obese and normal weight adolescents and to examine how the main powerful eating disorder risk factors interact with each other which explains eating psychopathology vulnerability. 111 high school students (68 males; age range 13-19years) classified as obese and 111 age-, sex- and social status-homogeneous normal weight controls were included in the current study. All participants were asked to fill out self-report measures of parental behavior as perceived by the offspring, eating disturbance attitudes and behaviors, self-esteem, perfectionism and shame. Significant differences between the two groups in relation to dysfunctional eating behaviors emerged. Body shame had the strongest relationship to eating problems vulnerability and acted as a mediator in the relationship between low self-esteem and eating disorder risk among both obese and non-obese youngsters. These findings further our understanding of a potential underlying mechanism for eating pathology development in youngsters in general and in obese adolescents in particular, which is of great importance in terms of prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The mediating role of appearance comparisons on the relationship between negative appearance commentary and binge eating symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbozo, Sylvia; Stevens, Serena D; Thurston, Idia B

    2017-08-01

    While the frequency of weight-based teasing during childhood/adolescence has been linked to eating disturbance, limited research has examined the impact of negative appearance commentary experienced in young adulthood. Appearance comparisons have been shown to mediate the relationship between weight-based teasing frequency in childhood/adolescence and eating disturbance; however, less is known about the impact of other forms of negative appearance commentary and binge eating symptoms. The current study examined appearance comparisons to others as a mediator of the relationship between the impact of negative appearance commentary from interpersonal sources and binge eating symptoms in college women. Three hundred and seventeen young adult women from universities in the southwest and midsouth U.S. completed measures of appearance-related commentary, physical appearance comparisons, and binge eating symptoms. Controlling for body mass index, the mediation effect of appearance comparisons was tested using the PROCESS macro for SPSS. Appearance comparisons was a significant mediator of the relationship between the impact of negative appearance comments and binge eating symptoms, F(3,312)=40.256, pappearance comments on binge eating symptoms. Study findings indicate that appearance comparisons play a role in the extent to which the impact of negative appearance commentary influences binge eating symptoms. Results also suggest the need to address the impact of negative appearance commentary and appearance comparisons simultaneously in interventions for eating disorder psychopathology among college women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Guide to Eating for Sports

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  20. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Problems Cervical Cap HPV Vaccine A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in ... Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or ...

  1. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Reputation ADHD Medicines A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  2. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Cap HPV Vaccine A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  3. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... for Intense Grief A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  4. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... School Lunch Planner A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  5. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in ... Extra for Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or ...

  6. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Eco-Friendly Celebrations A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  7. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Arrhythmias Abuse A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  8. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  9. Cultural trends and eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, Kathleen M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Dunne, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Culture has long been recognized as significant to the cause and expression of eating disorders. We reviewed the recent literature about recent trends in the occurrence of eating disorders in different cultures. Recent findings While historically, eating disorders were

  10. Eating Disorders in Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shannon L.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that the primary onset of eating disorders occurs in adolescence and that there is a growing prevalence of adolescent males with eating disorders. This article describes the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as they relate to adolescent males. Diagnostic criteria, at-risk groups, and implications for…

  11. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cold-Weather Sports A Guide to Eating for Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guide to Eating for Sports Print A A A What's in this article? ... Excellence There's a lot more to eating for sports than chowing down on carbs or chugging sports ...

  12. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Utility of the Psychoeducational Profile-3 for Assessing Cognitive and Language Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Mandy L.; D'Entremont, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The Psychoeducational Profile-3's (PEP-3) ability to estimate cognitive and language skills of 136 children (20-75 months) with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) across a range of functioning, and the association between the PEP-3 and ASD symptomatology was examined using retrospective data. PEP-3 cognitive and language measures were positively…

  14. The Therapeutic Alliance and Family Psychoeducation in the Treatment of Schizophrenia: An Exploratory Prospective Change Process Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerud, Phyllis E.; Rosenfarb, Irwin S.

    2008-01-01

    Although family psychoeducation has been shown to be highly efficacious in the treatment of schizophrenia, the mechanisms underlying the treatment's success are poorly understood. The therapeutic alliance in behavioral family management (BFM) was examined to determine whether the alliance plays a role in the efficacy of this treatment. One early…

  15. Efficacy of a Brief Psychoeducational Intervention for Mothers of Children with Breath-Holding Spells: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolat, Nurullah; Eliacik, Kayi; Sargin, Enis; Kanik, Ali; Baydan, Figen; Sarioglu, Berrak

    2016-08-01

    Objective Mothers of individuals with breath-holding spells (BHS) suffer more often from anxiety and experience more stressors in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of psychoeducational intervention in reducing BHS and coping with these spells. Participants and Methods Mothers who have children with BHS were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: an intervention group receiving psychoeducational therapy in addition to the routine follow-up (n = 31) and a control group who did not receive psychoeducation in their routine follow-up (n = 28). The data collected at the beginning of the study and at the end of 3rd and 6th months about the frequency of the spells per month, maternal anxiety, and depression levels and mothers' perceived self-knowledge about coping BHS of both groups were compared. Results Mothers in psychoeducation group, compared with controls, improved significantly on state anxiety, depression, perceived anticipation anxiety level for BHS of their children and self-knowledge about coping with the spells. Conclusion The intervention program had a positive effect on anxiety-depression levels of the mothers and the frequency of BHS among the children. The possible link between emotional and autonomic dysregulation in children with BHS and maternal mental health were discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  17. A C.L.E.A.R. Approach to Report Writing: A Framework for Improving the Efficacy of Psychoeducational Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastoras, Sarah M.; Climie, Emma A.; McCrimmon, Adam W.; Schwean, Vicki L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychoeducational reports are the primary means for a school psychologist to communicate the results of an assessment. Although reports should be written in the most efficient and reader-friendly manner, this is not always the case. Additionally, problems in report writing have remained relatively consistent for several decades, despite…

  18. Effects of a Group Psychoeducation Program on Self-Stigma, Empowerment and Perceived Discrimination of Persons with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Sesar, Marijan Alfonso; Mužinić, Lana

    2017-03-01

    Self-stigma adversely affects recovery from schizophrenia. Analyses of self stigma reduction programs discovered that few studies have investigated the impact of education about the illness on self-stigma reduction. The objective of this study was to determine whether psychoeducation based on the principles of recovery and empowerment using therapeutic group factors assists in reduction of self-stigma, increased empowerment and reduced perception of discrimination in patients with schizophrenia. 40 patients participated in psychoeducation group program and were compared with a control group of 40 patients placed on the waiting list for the same program. A Solomon four group design was used to control the influence of the pretest. Rating scales were used to measure internalized stigma, empowerment and perception of discrimination. Two-way analysis of variance was used to determine the main effects and interaction between the treatment and pretest. Simple analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to additionally test effect of treatment onself-stigma, empowerment and perceived discrimination. The participants in the psychoeducation group had lower scores on internalized stigma (F(1,76)=8.18; pdiscrimination. Group psychoeducation decreased the level of self stigma. This intervention can assist in recovery from schizophrenia.

  19. A Demonstration of Long Term Follow-Up of a Psychoeducational Intensive Day Treatment Facility for Emotionally Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Jerome

    To determine the status of emotionally handicapped children who had attended a psychoeducational intensive day treatment facility and to explore procedures for long term assessment, a followup telephone interview was undertaken with 37 parents or guardians of the elementary program clients. It was found that the children are for the most part…

  20. Psycho-educational interventions designed to prevent deployment-related psychological ill-health in Armed Forces personnel: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, K; Fear, N T; Jones, N; Wessely, S; Greenberg, N

    2011-04-01

    Employers such as the Armed Forces (AF) and emergency services, who predictably expose their staff to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), often provide psycho-educational briefings in an attempt to mitigate possible adverse psychological sequelae. Within the military, psycho-educational briefings are widely used, particularly following exposure to PTEs on operations. The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of these interventions and make appropriate recommendations. A search of Medline, PsycINFO and EMBASE was conducted, bibliographies of retrieved articles were searched and experts in the field were consulted. Two surveys and seven intervention studies were identified for inclusion in the review. Only three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Overall, the review found some evidence of benefit of psycho-educational interventions but it was not consistent across studies or outcomes and effects were small. However, there was also little evidence to suggest that they caused harm. There was some evidence that the beneficial effects may be greater for those who have been exposed to a higher number of PTEs. Given the high operational tempo currently faced by coalition forces personnel, there remains a pressing need to identify the most effective way of minimizing the impact of exposure to potentially traumatic deployment incidents. To date, few psycho-educational interventions designed to prevent deployment-related psychological ill-health have been evaluated systematically in methodologically robust studies. The review recommends that future interventions are theoretically based and evaluated in cluster RCTs that examine both process and outcome variables.

  1. Evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children treated for cancer: a descriptive pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Silberbusch, Lobke M.; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present paper reports about the content and evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children growing up with a history of cancer, Op Koers Oncologie (OK Onco). OK Onco is aimed at empowerment of survivors of childhood cancer by teaching disease-related skills. The

  2. Evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children treated for cancer: A descriptive pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice-Stam, H.; Last, B.F.; Silberbusch, L.M.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The present paper reports about the content and evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention for children growing up with a history of cancer, Op Koers Oncologie (OK Onco). OK Onco is aimed at empowerment of survivors of childhood cancer by teaching disease-related skills. The

  3. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  4. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  5. Positive effets of a psycho-educational group intervention for children with a chronic disease: First results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Last, B.F.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a psycho-educational group intervention for chronically ill children. Methods: Based on principles from cognitive behavior therapy and information from previous research about children's experiences with coping with a chronic disease we developed an

  6. Positive effects of a psycho-educational group intervention for children with a chronic desease: First results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Last, B.F.; Stam, H.; Onland-van Nieuwenhuizen, A.M.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a psycho-educational group intervention for chronically ill children. Methods: Based on principles from cognitive behavior therapy and information from previous research about children's experiences with coping with a chronic disease we developed an

  7. Psychoeducation for hypochondriasis : A comparison of a cognitive-behavioural approach and a problem-solving approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Femke M.; Bouman, Theo. K.; van Duijn, Marijtje A. J.; Van der Duin, M.

    In this study, two 6-week psychoeducational courses for hypochondriasis are compared, one based on the cognitive-behavioural approach, and the other on the problem-solving approach. Effects of both courses on hypochondriacal complaints, depression, trait anxiety, and number of problems encountered

  8. A Bilingual (English and Spanish) Psychoeducational Assessment MODEL Grounded in Cattell-Horn Carroll (CHC) Theory: A Cross Battery Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera, Pedro; Gomez-Cerrillo, Lino

    2011-01-01

    The Individual with Disabilities Education Act mandates nondiscriminatory assessment for children who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Because of the overrepresentation of English Language Learners (ELL) in special education programs in the United States, the focus of this article is the psychoeducational assessment of Spanish- and…

  9. Effect of Psycho-Educational Training Program for Parent's Having Child with Leukemia on Their Experience and Psychological Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Elaziz, Nahla Ahmed Abd

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is a significant public health and life-threatening problem for pediatric cancer patients. Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their care giving role. This study aims to assess the effect of psycho-educational training program to enhancing practice and psychosocial adaptation…

  10. Effects of a psychoeducational intervention program on the attitudes and health perceptions of relatives of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Ferrer-García, Marta

    2009-05-01

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the role played by families in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. Some family interventions may significantly reduce clinical difficulties and may have a positive impact, both emotionally and economically. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of a family psychoeducational program in changing attitude and health perceptions in relatives of patients with schizophrenia. 45 relatives, key caregivers of patients with schizophrenia seen at a public mental health outpatient centre in Arica (Chile). Attitudes of Relatives toward Schizophrenia Questionnaire and General Health Questionnaire SF-36. The sample was randomly divided into a control group, in which caregivers received the usual treatment (a monthly interview with a psychiatric nurse), and an experimental group, which participated in a family psychoeducational intervention program in addition to the usual treatment. Medication of patients remained unchanged in both groups. The psychoeducational program was effective in modifying caregivers' attitudes. However, it had no effect on their health perceptions. This family psychoeducational treatment program modifies the negative attitudes of relatives towards schizophrenia. However, programs of this kind may not improve health problems; alternatively, their effects may only be seen in the long term.

  11. Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but…

  12. Using a Psychoeducational Approach To Increase the Self-Esteem of Adolescents at High Risk for Dropping Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Don; Miller, Mark; Tobacyk, Jerome; Clanton, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of an ecologically oriented approach in changing the self-concepts of 80 high-risk adolescents. Participants were administered a self-esteem scale before and after an eight-week psychoeducational program designed for dropout prevention. Results indicated significant reductions in dropout rates and increased…

  13. Psychoeducational and Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Programs: Implementation and Evaluation From 1995 to 2015 in Kraepelin's Former Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Annette; Hippius, Hanns; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Falkai, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Programs that view individuals as capable of taking an active role in managing their illness have gained importance in Europe and the United States. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of group psychoeducational and cognitive behavioral treatment programs at the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany, over the past 20 years. Implementing psychoeducational programs was the first step to establish cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and dispel the myth of schizophrenia for patients. Programs are also provided for patients with mood disorders, substance use disorders, or both. These groups include topics such as psychoeducation about the illness, establishing rewarding activities, stress management, cognitive therapy, and relapse prevention. More than 1000 patients with schizophrenia or mood disorders (380 schizophrenia, 563 major depression, and 110 bipolar) have participated in illness management groups to learn about their illness and its treatment, and to learn skills to manage their illness. Patients have expressed satisfaction with the programs, and research has supported their effectiveness. Individuals with severe disorders can benefit from psychoeducational and cognitive treatment programs if the programs are adapted to the level of neuropsychological functioning and compensate for cognitive deficits and emotional overload. These findings suggest that providing information about the illness and coping skills for patients and relatives are important for treatment outcome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Psychoeducational and Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Programs: Implementation and Evaluation From 1995 to 2015 in Kraepelin’s Former Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Annette; Hippius, Hanns; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Falkai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Programs that view individuals as capable of taking an active role in managing their illness have gained importance in Europe and the United States. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of group psychoeducational and cognitive behavioral treatment programs at the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany, over the past 20 years. Methods: Implementing psychoeducational programs was the first step to establish cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and dispel the myth of schizophrenia for patients. Programs are also provided for patients with mood disorders, substance use disorders, or both. These groups include topics such as psychoeducation about the illness, establishing rewarding activities, stress management, cognitive therapy, and relapse prevention. Results: More than 1000 patients with schizophrenia or mood disorders (380 schizophrenia, 563 major depression, and 110 bipolar) have participated in illness management groups to learn about their illness and its treatment, and to learn skills to manage their illness. Patients have expressed satisfaction with the programs, and research has supported their effectiveness. Conclusions: Individuals with severe disorders can benefit from psychoeducational and cognitive treatment programs if the programs are adapted to the level of neuropsychological functioning and compensate for cognitive deficits and emotional overload. These findings suggest that providing information about the illness and coping skills for patients and relatives are important for treatment outcome. PMID:27460621

  15. Differential Effects of Emotion-Focused Therapy and Psychoeducation in Facilitating Forgiveness and Letting Go of Emotional Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie J.; Warwar, Serine H.; Malcolm, Wanda M.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) involving gestalt empty-chair dialogue in the treatment of individuals who were emotionally injured by a significant other with therapy in a psychoeducation group designed to deal with these injuries. In addition, this study examined aspects of the emotional process of…

  16. Therapeutic Factors and Members' Perception of Co-Leaders' Attitudes in a Psychoeducational Group for Greek Children with Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzos, Andreas; Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Baourda, Vasiliki C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate therapeutic factors and perception of co-leaders' attitudes in elementary children. The Critical Incident Questionnaire was collected from participants during 8 sessions of 3 psychoeducational groups for social anxiety, whereas the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory was administered twice. It was…

  17. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  18. Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

  19. Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend: food and diet as instigators of bizarre and disturbing dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tore; Powell, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1900s, the Dream of the Rarebit Fiend comic strip conveyed how the spicy cheese dish Welsh rarebit leads to bizarre and disturbing dreams. Today, the perception that foods disturb dreaming persists. But apart from case studies, some exploratory surveys, and a few lab studies on how hunger affects dreaming, there is little empirical evidence addressing this topic. The present study examines three aspects of the food/dreaming relationship; it attempts to: (1) assess the prevalence of the perception of food-dependent dreaming and the types of foods most commonly blamed; (2) determine if perceived food-dependent dreaming is associated with dietary, sleep or motivational factors; and (3) explore whether these factors, independent of food/dreaming perceptions, are associated with reports of vivid and disturbing dreams. Three hundred and ninety six students completed questionnaires evaluating sleep, dreams, and dietary habits and motivations. Items queried whether they had noticed if foods produced bizarre or disturbing dreams and if eating late at night influenced their dreams. The perception of food-dependent dreaming had a prevalence of 17.8%; with dairy products being the most frequently blamed food category (39–44%). Those who perceived food-dependent dreaming differed from others by reporting more frequent and disturbing dreams, poorer sleep, higher coffee intake, and lower Intuitive Eating Scale scores. Reports of disturbing dreams were associated with a pathological constellation of measures that includes poorer sleep, binge-eating, and eating for emotional reasons. Reports of vivid dreams were associated with measures indicative of wellness: better sleep, a healthier diet, and longer times between meals (fasting). Results clarify the relationship between food and dreaming and suggest four explanations for the perception of food-dependent dreaming: (1) food specific effects; (2) food-induced distress; (3) folklore influences, and (4) causal

  20. Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend: food and diet as instigators of bizarre and disturbing dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tore; Powell, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1900s, the Dream of the Rarebit Fiend comic strip conveyed how the spicy cheese dish Welsh rarebit leads to bizarre and disturbing dreams. Today, the perception that foods disturb dreaming persists. But apart from case studies, some exploratory surveys, and a few lab studies on how hunger affects dreaming, there is little empirical evidence addressing this topic. The present study examines three aspects of the food/dreaming relationship; it attempts to: (1) assess the prevalence of the perception of food-dependent dreaming and the types of foods most commonly blamed; (2) determine if perceived food-dependent dreaming is associated with dietary, sleep or motivational factors; and (3) explore whether these factors, independent of food/dreaming perceptions, are associated with reports of vivid and disturbing dreams. Three hundred and ninety six students completed questionnaires evaluating sleep, dreams, and dietary habits and motivations. Items queried whether they had noticed if foods produced bizarre or disturbing dreams and if eating late at night influenced their dreams. The perception of food-dependent dreaming had a prevalence of 17.8%; with dairy products being the most frequently blamed food category (39-44%). Those who perceived food-dependent dreaming differed from others by reporting more frequent and disturbing dreams, poorer sleep, higher coffee intake, and lower Intuitive Eating Scale scores. Reports of disturbing dreams were associated with a pathological constellation of measures that includes poorer sleep, binge-eating, and eating for emotional reasons. Reports of vivid dreams were associated with measures indicative of wellness: better sleep, a healthier diet, and longer times between meals (fasting). Results clarify the relationship between food and dreaming and suggest four explanations for the perception of food-dependent dreaming: (1) food specific effects; (2) food-induced distress; (3) folklore influences, and (4) causal

  1. Dreams of the rarebit fiend: Food and diet as instigators of bizarre and disturbing dreams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore eNielsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1900s, the Dream of the Rarebit Fiend comic strip conveyed how the spicy cheese dish Welsh rarebit leads to bizarre and disturbing dreams. Today, the perception that foods disturb dreaming persists. But apart from case studies, some exploratory surveys, and a few lab studies on how hunger affects dreaming, there is little empirical evidence addressing this topic. The present study examines 3 aspects of the food/dreaming relationship; it attempts to: 1 assess the prevalence of the perception of food-dependent dreaming and the types of foods most commonly blamed; 2 determine if perceived food-dependent dreaming is associated with dietary, sleep or motivational factors; and 3 explore whether these factors, independent of food/dreaming perceptions, are associated with reports of vivid and disturbing dreaming. 396 students completed questionnaires evaluating sleep, dreams, and dietary habits and motivations. Items queried whether they had noticed if foods produced bizarre or disturbing dreams and if eating late at night influenced their dreams. The perception of food-dependent dreaming had a prevalence of 17.8%; dairy products were the most frequently blamed food type (39%-44%. Those who perceived food-dependent dreaming differed from others by reporting more frequent and disturbing dreams, poorer sleep, higher coffee intake, and lower Intuitive Eating Scale scores. Reports of disturbing dreams were associated with a pathological constellation of measures that include poorer sleep, binge-eating, and eating for emotional reasons. Reports of vivid dreams were associated with measures indicative of wellness: better sleep, a healthier diet, and longer times between meals (fasting. Results clarify the relationship between food and dreaming and suggest 4 explanations for the perception of food-dependent dreaming: 1 food specific effects; 2 food-induced distress; 3 folklore influences, and 4 causal misattributions. Clinical implications are

  2. Male Eating Disorder Symptom Patterns and Health Correlates From 13 to 26 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzo, Jerel P; Horton, Nicholas J; Sonneville, Kendrin R; Swanson, Sonja A; Crosby, Ross D; Micali, Nadia; Eddy, Kamryn T; Field, Alison E

    2016-08-01

    Research on the manifestations and health correlates of eating disorder symptoms among males is lacking. This study identified patterns of appearance concerns and eating disorder behaviors from adolescence through young adulthood and their health correlates. Participants were 7,067 males from the prospective Growing Up Today Study. Surveys from 1999 to 2007 (spanning ages 13-26 years) provided repeated measures data on muscularity and leanness concerns, eating disorder behaviors (purging, overeating, binge eating, use of muscle-building products), and health correlates (obesity, non-marijuana drug use, binge drinking, and depressive symptoms). Latent class analyses of observations at ages 13 to 15, 16 to 18, 19 to 22, and 23 to 26 years identified 1 large Asymptomatic class and 4 symptomatic patterns: Body Image Disturbance (high appearance concerns, low eating disorder behaviors; 1.0%-6.0% per age period); Binge Eating/Purging (binge eating and purging, use of muscle-building products, low appearance concerns; 0.1%-2.5%); Mostly Asymptomatic (low levels of muscularity concern, product use, and overeating; 3.5%-5.0%); and Muscularity Concerns (high muscularity concerns and use of products; 0.6%-1.0%). The Body Image Disturbance class was associated with high estimated prevalence of depressive symptoms. Males in the Binge Eating/Purging and Muscularity Concerns classes had high prevalence of binge drinking and drug use. Despite exhibiting modestly greater appearance concerns and eating disorder behaviors than the Asymptomatic class, being in the Mostly Asymptomatic class was prospectively associated with adverse health outcomes. Results underscore the importance of measuring concerns about leanness, muscularity, and use of muscle-building products when assessing eating disorder presentations among males in research and clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational group program for major depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies show the effectiveness of group psychoeducation in reducing symptoms in people with depression. However, few controlled studies that have included aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle (diet, physical exercise, sleep) together with cognitive-behavioral techniques in psychoeducation are proven to be effective. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a psychoeducational program, which includes aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle, in patients with mild/moderate depression symptoms in Primary Care (PC). Methods In a randomized, controlled trial, 246 participants over 20 years old with ICD-10 major depression were recruited through nurses/general practitioners at 12 urban Primary Care Centers (PCCs) in Barcelona. The intervention group (IG) (n=119) received a group psychoeducational program (12 weekly, 1.5 h sessions led by two nurses) and the control group (CG) (n=112) received usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at, 3, 6 and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the BDI, EQ-5D and remission based upon the BDI. Results 231 randomized patients were included, of whom 85 had mild depression and 146 moderate depression. The analyses showed significant differences between groups in relation to remission of symptoms, especially in the mild depression group with a high rate of 57% (p=0.009) at post-treatment and 65% (p=0.006) at 9 month follow up, and only showed significant differences on the BDI at post-treatment (p=0.016; effect size Cohen’s d’=.51) and at 6 and 9 month follow-up (p= 0.048; d’=.44). In the overall and moderate sample, the analyses only showed significant differences between groups on the BDI at post-treatment, p=0.02 (d’=.29) and p=0.010 (d’=.47), respectively. The psychoeducation group improved significantly on the EQ-5D at short and long-term. Conclusions This psychoeducational intervention is a short and long-term effective treatment for patients with mild

  4. Binge eating disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Birgitte Hartvig; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Binge eating disorder kaldes også bulimi uden opkastning eller den tredje spiseforstyrrelse. Det er en udbredt, men mindre kendt spiseforstyrrelse end anoreksi og bulimi. Patienterne er ofte overvægtige og har ikke kompenserende adfærd over for overspisningen i form af opkastning eller brug af...

  5. Eating at School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Steen; Christiansen, Tenna Holdorff

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine how the policies formulated by Danish school authorities concerning eating at school are implemented by staff and interpreted by schoolchildren. We use positioning theory in order to analyse how authorities, staff, and children engage in a mutual positioning, within...

  6. Eating Disorders and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    Since sports can sometimes lend themselves to eating disorders, coaches and sports administrators must get involved in the detection and treatment of this problem. While no reliable studies or statistics exist on the incidence of anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia among athletes, some research suggests that such disorders occur frequently among…

  7. [Sexuality and eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Chiara; Castellini, Giovanni; Benni, Laura; Godini, Lucia; Lazzeretti, Lisa; Pracucci, Chiara; Talamba, Gabriela Alina; Ricca, Valdo; Faravelli, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the sexual functioning of an Eating Disorders (ED) sample composed by Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) patients. 98 patients (AN: 23; BN: 14; EDNOS: 61) have been compared with 88 health subjects. All participants have filled in the following questionnaires: Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), Eating Disorders Examination (EDE-q), Binge Eating Scale (BES), Emotional Empathy Scale (EES). For the evaluation of the sexual activity Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was applied. 67 patients (68.4%) and 80 healthy controls (90.9%) reported a sexual activity with a partner or masturbation in the four latest weeks. Only one healthy control (1.1%) reported masturbation and 79 (89.8%) controls showed sexual activity with a partner, on the contrary 11 patients (11.2) reported masturbation and 56 (57.1%) patients showed sexual activity with a partner. Moreover patients showed higher scores on every FSFI subscales. No significant differences were observed between AN, BN and BED in terms of FSFI scores. Women with ED show a lower sexual activity with a partner, a six-fold increase in the risk of sexual dysfunction and an higher frequency of masturbation as the only sexual activity when compared with healthy controls. The cognitive distraction produced by the discomfort to show own body during a sexual intercourse with the partner may explain our results.

  8. Eating Right during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of folate include legumes, green leafy vegetables and citrus fruits. Folate also can be obtained through fortified ... acid and other nutrients. Reviewed November 2016 Tags Health Pregnancy What to Eat When Expecting For Women Latest Content 1 2 3 4 5 Benefits of Java How to Handle Food Cravings How ...

  9. Ghrelin in eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Heppner, Kristy; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating hormone that acts on peripheral and central targets to increase food intake and promote adiposity. The present review focuses on the possible clinical relevance of ghrelin in the regulation of human feeding behavior in individuals with obesity and other eating

  10. Effectiveness of psycho-educational intervention in improving outcome of unipolar depression: results from a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K; Gupta, M

    2015-03-01

    Depressive disorders are one of the leading components of the global burden of disease with a prevalence of up to 14% in the general population. Numerous studies have demonstrated that pharmacotherapy combined with non-pharmacological measures offer the best treatment approach. Psycho-education as an intervention has been studied mostly in disorders such as schizophrenia and dementia, less so in depressive disorders. The present study aimed to assess the impact of psycho-education of patients and their caregivers on the outcome of depression. A total of 80 eligible depressed subjects were recruited and randomised into 2 groups. The study group involved an eligible family member and all were offered individual structured psycho-educational modules. Another group (controls) received routine counselling. The subjects in both groups also received routine pharmacotherapy and counselling from the treating clinician and were assessed at baseline, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI). Results from both groups were compared using statistical methods including Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, as well as univariate and multiple regression analyses. Baseline socio-demographic and assessment measures were similar in both groups. The study group had consistent improvement in terms of outcome measures with HDRS, GAF, and PGWBI scores showing respective mean change of -15.08, 22, and 60 over 12 weeks. The comparable respective changes in the controls were -8.77, 18.1, and 43.25. Structured psycho-education combined with pharmacotherapy is an effective intervention for people with depressive disorders. Psycho-education optimises the pharmacological treatment of depression in terms of faster recovery, reduction in severity of depression, and improvement in subjective wellbeing and social functioning.

  11. Emotions and health: findings from a randomized clinical trial on psychoeducational nursing to patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Støier, Louise; Moons, Philip; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Winkel, Per; Ulrich Pedersen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Serious illness will inevitably lead to a fundamental emotional reaction. Traditionally, in interventional treatment or rehabilitation trials, the psychological status of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators has been evaluated with anxiety and depression as outcome measures. In caring for these patients, the aim of nursing is to help patients manage life with complex heart disease. The early detection and management of negative emotional response might prevent the development of pathological conditions such as depression. The aims of this study were to (a) describe the trajectory of primary emotions over time in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators and (b) examine the potential effects of psychoeducational nursing on primary emotions. During the inclusion period (October 2007 to November 2009), 196 patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator were randomized (1:1) to rehabilitation versus usual care. Rehabilitation consisted of a psychoeducational nursing component and an exercise training component. This article concerns phase 1, psychoeducational nursing, guided by a theory of nursing, Rosemary Rizzo Parses Human Becoming Practice Methodologies. The outcome measure is the Emotions and Health Scale. The scale consists of 8 primary emotions: joy, agreeableness, surprise, fear, sadness, disgust, anger, and anticipation. Mean (SD) age was 58 (13) years, and 79% of the participants were men. Significant improvements were found in primary emotional responses over time (P nursing intervention (P > .05). Primary emotions are affected after implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation. Improvements over time were found. However, it was not possible to detect any effect of a short-term psychoeducational nursing intervention. Evaluating the primary emotions might be a good way for nurses to monitor patients' psychological outcomes because the instrument is sensitive to changes over a short period. Further development of early

  12. Thought-shape fusion and body image in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños-Ríos, Patricia; Ruiz-Prieto, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among thought-shape fusion (TSF), specific instruments to assess body image disturbances, and body image quality of life in eating disorder patients in order to improve the understanding of the links between body image concerns and a specific bias consisting of beliefs about the consequences of thinking about forbidden foods. The final sample included 76 eating disorder patients (mean age 20.13 ± 2.28 years; 59 women and seven men). After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Appreciation Scale (BAS), Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ), Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and Thought-Shape Fusion Questionnaire (TSF-Q). Significant correlations were found between TSF-Q and body image-related variables. Those with higher scores in TSF showed higher scores in the BSQ (P Eating Disorder Inventory - Drive for Thinness (EDI-DT) (P Eating Disorder Inventory - Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-BD) (P body image-related variables, TSF, and body image quality of life.

  13. Body attitudes and eating behaviors of female clothing sales personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell-Kral, L; Thomas, C D

    1990-10-01

    Recent research suggests that social standards for ideal female beauty are related to negative body-image and dieting among young women. We hypothesized that women who work in settings that emphasize physical appearance (women's fashion clothing sales) would have more disturbed body attitudes and eating behaviors than college women. Sales personnel (n = 21) and students (n = 25) answered questions about their occupational status, weight, and demographic characteristics, and completed the Body-esteem Scale and the Eating Disorder Inventory. Weight and scores on the two scales were similar in both groups except that sales personnel reported more dissatisfaction with their body parts on the Body dissatisfaction scale of the Eating Disorder Inventory. Among sales personnel, those who perceived their appearance to be of greater importance in their work also reported more concern about dieting and weight, as reflected on the Drive for thinness subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory. Results are discussed with regard to situational influences on women's body attitudes and their implications for eating behaviors.

  14. Influence of Weight on Shared Core Symptoms in Eating Disorders: Support or Challenge for a Transdiagnostic Perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Catalina; Schnicker, Katja; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    In terms of the transdiagnostic model of eating disorders, Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) share the same distinctive psychopathology. However, empirical evidence showing similarities between these eating disorder diagnoses for core symptoms is scarce, and the role of weight status is unclear. Data from a total of 168 female participants were collected between April 2004 and April 2008, at an outpatient unit specialized in eating disorder treatment. Core symptoms of eating disorders were measured via self-report questionnaires. In particular, women with BED and BN showed similar patterns of core symptomatology compared with AN. However, when body mass index (BMI) was considered in the analyses, there were no differences between the three diagnostic groups in relation to body image. Differences in eating behavior are not solely triggered by weight differences, whereas body image disturbances are a transdiagnostic phenomenon among EDs and should also be considered in the treatment of BED. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yueren Zhao,1–3 Taro Kishi,1 Nakao Iwata,1 Manabu Ikeda3,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital Fujita Kokoro Care Center, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan Abstract: A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set, an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy. Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8% were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4% relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total

  16. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational program for improving quality of life of fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesano Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most fibromyalgia patients are seen in primary care (PC. However, the effectiveness of the treatments prescribed by general practitioners is usually minimal. The main objective of the present research is to assess the efficacy of structured psycho-educational intervention, combined with relaxation, developed to improve the quality of life of patients suffering fibromyalgia (FM. The second objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of this multimodal intervention. Method/Design Design. Randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up involving two groups, one of which is the intervention group that includes patients receiving a psychoeducational program and the other the control group consisting of patients treated for FM in the usual way. Setting. Three urban PC centers in the province of Barcelona (Spain. Sample. The total sample comprises 218 patients (over 18 years of age suffering FM, selected from a database (Rheumatology service-Viladecans Hospital of patients with this illness. Only those patients introduced in the database between the years 2005 and 2007 were included in the selection. Selected patients will be asked for written informed consent to participate in the study. Intervention. Multi-component program including information about the illness, counselling about physical exercise and training in autogenic relaxation. The intervention consists of nine 2-hour sessions delivered during a two-month period. The pharmacological treatment prescribed by the physician was maintained in both groups. Main variables. Sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life, use and cost of healthcare and social services. Measures. Quality of life is to be measured with the FIQ and the EuroQol-5D, and the use of healthcare services with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI. These variables will be measured before the beginning of the program (baseline and 1, 2, 6 and 12 months later. Discussion

  17. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  18. The modernisation of Nordic eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lotte; Ekström, Marianne Pipping; Gronow, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    It is often claimed that in post-industrial societies eating is characterised by the dissolution of traditional cultural patterns regarding eating rhythms, the structure of meals and the social context of eating. This paper presents results from a Nordic quantitative and comparative study which...... was conducted in 1997 based on interviews with almost 5000 individuals from four nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). The study showed that even through some flexibility was evident, eating was characterized by nationally different, but socially coordinated rhythms. Two distinct meal patterns...... were identified, a "western" pattern with one daily hot meal (Denmark, Norway), and an "eastern" patterns with two, daily hot meals (Finalnad, Sweden). Even though a lot of eating took place in solitude, eating was most often a social activity. It is concluded that daily eating patterns are still...

  19. Prevalence of eating disorders and eating attacks in narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Dahmen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Norbert Dahmen, Julia Becht, Alice Engel, Monika Thommes, Peter TonnPsychiatry Department, University of Mainz, GermanyAbstract: Narcoleptic patients suffer frequently from obesity and type II diabetes. Most patients show a deficit in the energy balance regulating orexinergic system. Nevertheless, it is not known, why narcoleptic patients tend to be obese. We examined 116 narcoleptic patients and 80 controls with the structured interview for anorectic and bulimic eating disorders (SIAB to test the hypothesis that typical or atypical eating attacks or eating disorders may be more frequent in narcoleptic patients. No difference in the current prevalence of eating disorders bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or anorexia nervosa was found, nor was the frequency of eating attacks higher in the narcolepsy group. We conclude that present eating disorders and eating attacks as defined in DSM IV are not the reason for the observed differences in body composition. Additional factors, such as basal metabolic rates and lifestyle factors need to be considered.Keywords: narcolepsy, eating disorder, SIAB, bulimia, anorexia, eating attack

  20. Qualitative analysis of experiences of members of a psychoeducational assertiveness group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrakouli, Effi; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2007-04-01

    This study describes qualitatively a psychoeducational assertiveness intervention for 20 women's perceptions of positive and negative experiences, undertaken to identify whether therapeutic mechanisms operating in group therapy as described by Yalom might be inferred. There were 14 90-min. weekly sessions organized around educational material. Two groups were conducted with 10 university women each (M= 20.9 yr., SD= 1.9). Qualitative analysis of the 20 interviews identified five of Yalom's therapeutic mechanisms, namely, self-understanding, universality, acceptance, catharsis, and self-disclosure. The positive experiences were group cohesiveness, self-understanding, self-disclosure, positive views about the self and learning, and cognitive benefits. Self-disclosing at the early stages of group development was the most frequently reported negative experience or difficulty in the group. Although participants stated they improved interpersonal communication skills, analysis suggested the cultural context was an important mediator of assertive behavior.

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy: a psychoeducational treatment approach for the American worker with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, L F

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 2.1 million Americans. This condition often leads to chronic pain, inflammation, joint destruction, feelings of helplessness, maladaptive coping, depression and activity limitations. For those individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic arthritic pain, the role of the worker has become difficult to maintain. Research suggests that cognitive-behavioral intervention reduces chronic arthritic pain, decreases disease activity and improves coping skills in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. To be effective, cognitive-behavioral techniques must be practiced on a regular basis. The literature suggests that the American worker with rheumatoid arthritis would greatly benefit from work-site wellness programs that provide cognitive-behavioral intervention as a 'reasonable accommodation'. Occupational therapy practitioners can help to advance the positive effects of this psychoeducational intervention by providing 'booster treatments' to clients after formal treatment sessions have ceased.

  2. Patterns of Enrollment and Engagement of Custodial Grandmothers in a Randomized Clinical Trial of Psychoeducational Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory C.; Strieder, Frederick; Greenberg, Patty; Hayslip, Bert; Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The authors used Andersen’s (2008) behavior model to investigate patterns of enrollment and treatment engagement among 343 custodial grandmothers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of three psychosocial interventions:(a) a behavioral parenting program, (b) a cognitive behavioral coping program, or (c) an information-only condition. Treatment completion was superior to that typically found with birth parents, even though the grandmothers and their target grandchildren both had high levels of mental and physical health challenges. Compliance did not differ significantly by condition but was higher among grandmothers who self-reported less positive affect, were older, and were using mental health professionals. Treatment satisfaction was highest in grandmothers who attended more treatment sessions, reported lower annual family income, had a health problem, and were using mental health professionals. The practice and policy implications of these findings are discussed, especially in terms of strategies for enhancing the engagement of custodial grandfamilies in future psychoeducational interventions. PMID:27667888

  3. The efficacy of a compact psychoeducational group training program for married couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Hahlweg, K; Fehm-Wolfsdorf, G; Groth, T

    1998-10-01

    There is a lack of psychoeducational programs for married couples who, although subjectively concerned about their marriages, do not seek marital therapy. In this study, the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program delivered on a weekend by 2 trainers for groups of 4 couples was investigated. Couples (n = 67) were recruited by newspaper announcements, then randomly assigned to the intervention program or a waiting-list control group. The program consisted of communication and problem-solving training, couples' discussions to clarify their relationship expectations, and exercises to enhance their sensual or sexual relationship. At postassessment, intervention couples emitted more positive verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors during a conflict discussion task than did control couples, who reported significantly more relationship problem areas and displayed more negative communication behaviors. At the 1-year follow-up, intervention couples reported fewer problem areas in comparison with preassessment.

  4. Impact of Psychoeducational Content Delivered Online to a Positive Psychology Aware Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeck, Carly; Schueller, Stephen M; Parks, Acacia C

    Happiness-increasing interventions demonstrate significant variation in outcomes, suggesting that the people who use them might be as important as the interventions themselves to determine efficacy. In light of this, instructive interventions might not be necessary to increase happiness given a population with knowledge of happiness-increasing strategies. We recruited 270 participants with knowledge of positive psychology to receive six weeks of online psychoeducation. We explored participants' use of the website, reported use of happiness strategies, and changes in well-being. Those who spent more time on the website reported smaller changes in well-being than those who spent less time on the website. Conversely, those who reported employing more happiness strategies reported greater increases in well-being than those who used fewer strategies. This shows that for those already familiar with positive psychology, information, rather than instruction, might increase well-being. This has implications for studies evaluating the efficacy of happiness-increasing interventions more broadly.

  5. EFFECT OF A PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, and HEALTH RESOURCE USE IN ICD PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Sandra B.; Langberg, Jonathan J.; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Viswanathan, Bindu; McCarty, Frances; Culler, Steven D.; O’Brien, Marian C.; Weintraub, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Psychological responses have been reported for some patients after insertion of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This study tested the effects of a psychoeducational intervention on anxiety, depressive symptoms, functional status and health resource use during the first year after ICD implantation. Methods ICD patients (n=246) were randomized to usual care (UC), group (GRP), or telephone counseling (TC) intervention that included education, symptom management, and coping skill training. Participants were 58 ± 11 years, 73% men, and 23% minorities. Anxiety (STAI), depressive symptoms (BDI-II), and functional status (DASI) were measured at baseline and after 1, 3, 6 & 12 months. Health resource use and disability days were tracked. Analyses were repeated-measures ANCOVA to assess Group X Time effects, Chi-square for percentage with clinically significant anxiety and depression at each time point, and logistic regression. Results All groups experienced decreased anxiety and depressive symptoms over the 12 months; GRP intervention had lower STAI (p=.03) than UC at 3 months. Logistic regression revealed group differences for predicted probability of having depressive symptoms at 12 months (UC=.31, GRP=.17, TC=.13, p=.03). UC had greater calls to providers at 1 and 6 months (p<.05) and more sick/disability days at 12 months (p=.01) than intervention groups. Conclusions A psychoeducational intervention reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms early after ICD, lowered probability of depressive symptoms at one year, and decreased disability days/calls to providers. These findings support further study and clinical use of both group and telephone interventions to yield better psychological outcomes after ICD implant. PMID:19796343

  6. Study protocol for reducing childbirth fear: a midwife-led psycho-education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny; Creedy, Debra K; Buist, Anne; Turkstra, Erika; Sneddon, Anne; Scuffham, Paul A; Ryding, Elsa L; Jarrett, Vivian; Toohill, Jocelyn

    2013-10-20

    Childbirth fear has received considerable attention in Scandinavian countries, and the United Kingdom, but not in Australia. For first-time mothers, fear is often linked to a perceived lack of control and disbelief in the body's ability to give birth safely, whereas multiparous women may be fearful as a result of previous negative and/or traumatic birth experiences. There have been few well-designed intervention studies that test interventions to address women's childbirth fear, support normal birth, and diminish the possibility of a negative birth experience. Pregnant women in their second trimester of pregnancy will be recruited and screened from antenatal clinics in Queensland, Australia. Women reporting high childbirth fear will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The psycho-educational intervention is offered by midwives over the telephone at 24 and 34 weeks of pregnancy. The intervention aims to review birth expectations, work through distressing elements of childbirth, discuss strategies to develop support networks, affirm that negative childbirth events can be managed and develop a birth plan. Women in the control group will receive standard care offered by the public funded maternity services in Australia. All women will receive an information booklet on childbirth choices. Data will be collected at recruitment during the second trimester, 36 weeks of pregnancy, and 4-6 weeks after birth. This study aims to test the efficacy of a brief, midwife-led psycho-education counselling (known as BELIEF: Birth Emotions - Looking to Improve Expectant Fear) to reduce women's childbirth fear. 1) Relative to controls, women receiving BELIEF will report lower levels of childbirth fear at term; 2) less decisional conflict; 3) less depressive symptoms; 4) better childbirth self-efficacy; and 5) improved health and obstetric outcomes. Australian New Zealand Controlled Trials Registry ACTRN12612000526875.

  7. Psychosocial and psychoeducational group program for main caregiver of mentally sick in early phase of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz Amaro Martín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Deinstitutionalization processes in recent times have led to a new age in relations between family and mental health professionals. Care professionals were replaced, after the psychiatric reform, for care carried out by the family without the knowledge, information and skills to assume these functions. This is the situation of many families of patients with schizophrenia.Disabling features of schizophrenia usually cause depends on their families, who take care with the consequent impact on their lives. Psychosocial interventions assessing their work and want to build an alliance with them by giving them skills and coping mechanisms to reduce adverse family atmosphere, anticipate and solve problems and reduce the expressions of anger and guilt keeping appropiate expectations. However, these actions must be enforced by providing main caregivers with the skills that enable them to gain control, this is the main target of psychoeducational programs.Today there are many people in favour of such interventions in the early stages of schizophrenia. However, it is no clear how far development of these programs is supported by evidence of effectiveness. So it has proposed a psychosocial and psychoeducational program aimed at main caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in early stages. This program will be led by a psychiatric nurse in collaboration with other professionals in the interdisciplinary team; psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and social worker. It has developed clinical trial with a control group who will receive the gide for families, caregivers and people affected, "Cómo afrontar la esquizofrenia," and an experimental group will receive, in addition to the guide, the group intervention sessions.

  8. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yueren; Kishi, Taro; Iwata, Nakao; Ikeda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set), an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy). Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8%) were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4%) relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total scores (P = 0.0031), BPRS positive (P = 0.0451), BRPS negative (P < 0.0001), and general subscale scores (P = 0.0031), and GAF (P < 0.0001) from baseline to 6 months. In conclusion, the lower relapse rate observed in patients treated with COMPASS plus risperidone LAI than in patients treated with risperidone LAI alone suggests that COMPASS may have benefits in the treatment of schizophrenia, indicating a need for randomized, controlled trials in larger numbers of patients. PMID:24194642

  9. Efficacy and implementation of an Internet psychoeducational program for teens with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Robin; Liberti, Lauren S; Jeon, Sangchoon; Chao, Ariana; Minges, Karl E; Murphy, Kathryn; Grey, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the participation and preliminary efficacy of an Internet psychoeducational program (Teens.Connect) shown to be efficacious under controlled conditions compared with an open-access diabetes website for youth (Planet D) on the primary outcomes of A1C and quality of life (QoL), and secondary outcomes of psychosocial and behavioral factors. Teens with type 1 diabetes (n = 124, 11-14 yr) from two clinical sites were randomly prescribed one of the programs and completed baseline, 3-month and 6-month data. A1C was obtained from clinic records. Participation data included number of log ins, posts to the discussion board, and lessons completed (Teens.Connect only). Descriptive and mixed model analyses were used. Eighty-five percent (85%) of consented teens registered for their prescribed program. Satisfaction and log ins were similar between groups (satisfaction ranged 3.3-3.5/5; mean log ins = 14/teen). Posts to the discussion forum were higher in Planet D (mean = 28 vs. 19). Participation in the Teens.Connect lessons was low, with only 69% of teens completing any lesson. After 6 months there were no significant differences in A1C, QoL or secondary outcomes between groups. Teens in the Teens.Connect group reported lower perceived stress over time (p psychoeducational program when they do not have frequent reminders, which may have contributed to a lack of treatment effect. Teens have many competing demands. Strategic implementation that includes targeted reminders and family support may be necessary to assure participation and improvement in health outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Psychoeducational intervention for people at high risk of developing another melanoma: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Mbathio; Kasparian, NA; Mireskandari, Shab; Butow, Phyllis; Costa, Daniel; Morton, Rachael; Mann, Graham; Menzies, Scott; Cust, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Information and psychological needs have been reported as one of the greatest areas of unmet needs for patients with melanoma. To respond to these needs, we developed the Melanoma Care Intervention, a developed psychoeducational intervention for people at high risk of developing another melanoma comprising of a newly developed melanoma educational booklet and individually tailored telephone support sessions provided by trained psychologists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acceptability and feasibility of the Melanoma Care Intervention. Methods Twenty-four adults (14 men, 10 women, mean age: 58 years, SD: 12.2) at high risk of developing a subsequent primary melanoma were recruited and randomly assigned 1:1 to the intervention (a psychoeducational booklet, a Cancer Council booklet on melanoma and up to five telephone-based sessions with a psychologist) or usual care (Cancer Council booklet only). Acceptability, feasibility, fear of cancer recurrence and secondary psychosocial outcomes were assessed at baseline, 1 and 6 months. Results Satisfaction and perceived benefits were rated highly for all intervention components, particularly the telephone-based psychology sessions (mean satisfaction and benefits: both 9.27 out of 10, SD=2.41). The quality of information and support provided throughout the trial was rated as ‘high’ by the intervention group, with a mean score of 4.6 out of a possible 5 (SD=0.9) and 4.2 (SD=1.2) for the control group. Conclusions The intervention was feasible and acceptable for improving psychological adjustment. Timely access to effective, evidence-based, psychological care is a recognised need for people with melanoma. The intervention is designed to directly address this need in a way that is feasible in a clinical setting, acceptable to patients and health professionals. Trial registration number The trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on 19

  11. Contributions of mindful eating, intuitive eating, and restraint to BMI, disordered eating, and meal consumption in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lisa M; Reilly, Erin E; Schaumberg, Katherine; Dmochowski, Sasha; Anderson, Drew A

    2016-03-01

    Mindful eating and intuitive eating are promoted as means to circumvent potentially maladaptive dietary restraint while maintaining a healthy weight. Although theoretically related, no studies have examined the correlations between intuitive eating, mindful eating, and restraint in the same sample. This study sought to examine these constructs and their correlations with body mass index (BMI), eating-disordered behaviors, and meal consumption in a college sample. Participants (N = 125) completed a laboratory taste-test meal and measures of each eating-related construct using the EDDS, IES, MEQ, and TFEQ-Restraint Subscale. Mindful eating, intuitive eating, and restraint were not strongly correlated. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that restraint and intuitive eating accounted for significant variance in disordered eating and BMI. Elevated restraint was associated with increased BMI and disordered eating; elevated intuitive eating was associated with decreased BMI and disordered eating. Mindful eating did not correlate with any outcome variables. Follow-up analyses suggested that specific intuitive eating subscales accounted for unique variance in the relation between intuitive eating and disordered eating. Intuitive eating was the only construct that was significantly associated with meal consumption. Intuitive eating and restraint appear to be only weakly correlated, and each is differentially associated with meal consumption. Mindful eating does not appear to relate to outcome variables.

  12. Emotion and eating in binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeck, Almut; Stelzer, Nicola; Linster, Hans Wolfgang; Joos, Andreas; Hartmann, Armin

    2011-01-01

    This study compares 20 binge eaters (BED), 23 obese patients (OB) and 20 normal weight controls (CO) with regard to everyday emotions and the relationship between emotions, the desire to eat and binge eating. Modified versions of the Differential Affect Scale and Emotional Eating Scale were used and the TAS-20 and Symptom-Check-List-27 administered to assess overall psychopathology and alexithymia. BED-subjects show a more negative pattern of everyday emotions, higher alexithymia scores and the strongest desire to eat, especially if emotions are linked to interpersonal aspects. The emotion most often reported preceding a binge was anger. Feelings of loneliness, disgust, exhaustion or shame lead to binge eating behaviour with the highest probability. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  13. Healthy eating at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria Louisa; Egberg Mikkelsen, Bent

    provision were selected. All schools had a framework for student participation, a policy for including nutrition in the curriculum as well as canteen facilities. Schools were sampled to represent different social layers, different regions and different sizes of schools. The study investigated the attitudes......Unhealthy eating are common among adolescents and the school is a well suited setting for promoting healthy eating. For the school to play a role here, however an environment must be created, in which the school and the students develop a sense of ownership for a healthy food and nutrition "regime......". This paper highlights the role that the organisation of food provision plays by comparing the attitudes of students towards in-school food provision as opposed to out-of-school provision where food is provided by outside caterers. Schools having internal food production and schools having external food...

  14. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for binge eating disorder in adolescents: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja

    2013-09-25

    Binge eating disorder is a prevalent adolescent disorder, associated with increased eating disorder and general psychopathology as well as an increased risk for overweight and obesity. As opposed to binge eating disorder in adults, there is a lack of validated psychological treatments for this condition in adolescents. The goal of this research project is therefore to determine the efficacy of age-adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy in adolescents with binge eating disorder - the gold standard treatment for adults with binge eating disorder. In a single-center efficacy trial, 60 12- to 20-year-old adolescents meeting diagnostic criteria of binge eating disorder (full-syndrome or subthreshold) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th or 5th Edition, will be centrally randomized to 4 months of cognitive-behavioral therapy (n = 30) or a waiting-list control condition (n = 30). Using an observer-blind design, patients are assessed at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups after the end of treatment. In 20 individual outpatient sessions, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents focuses on eating behavior, body image, and stress; parents receive psychoeducation on these topics. Primary endpoint is the number of episodes with binge eating over the previous 28 days at post-treatment using a state-of-the art clinical interview. Secondary outcome measures address the specific eating disorder psychopathology, general psychopathology, mental comorbidity, self-esteem, quality of life, and body weight. This trial will allow us to determine the short- and long-term efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy in adolescent binge eating disorder, to determine cost-effectiveness, and to identify predictors of treatment outcome. Evidence will be gathered regarding whether this treatment will help to prevent excessive weight gain. If efficacy can be demonstrated, the results from this trial will enhance

  15. Provision of group psychoeducation for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment--a cross-sectional survey of acute care hospitals in Germany

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank, Fabian; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Berger, Mathias; Bitzer, Eva M; Hölzel, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    ...". Since there is limited knowledge on the provision of psychoeducational groups for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment, we conducted a survey among acute care hospitals in Germany...

  16. Intervening Early with Family Members during First-Episode Psychosis: An Evaluation of Mental Health Nursing Psychoeducation within an Inpatient Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Melissa; Laxton, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Provision of psychoeducation to families of service users experiencing a first-episode psychosis has been found to assist with relapse prevention and promoting recovery for service users. Psychoeducation also assists families to reduce isolation and gain relevant information and support. This study aimed to clarify the role inpatient staff can best have with families, targeted to the acute phase and early stage of the illness. Family members were provided an inpatient carer psychoeducation meeting and recruited for a feedback interview 6 months later. Findings suggest that family members require information provision and support during the admission, in addition to beneficial psychoeducation groups offered later in the community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comprehensive examination of the trans-diagnostic cognitive behavioral model of eating disorders in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Timko, C Alix; Clerici, Massimo; Zanetti, M Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-diagnostic Model (TM) of eating pathology describes how one or more of four hypothesized mechanisms (i.e., mood intolerance, core low self-esteem, clinical perfectionism and interpersonal difficulties) may interrelate with each other and with the core psychopathology of eating disorders (i.e., over-evaluation of weight and shape) to maintain the disordered behaviors. Although a cognitive behavioral treatment based on the TM has shown to be effective in treating eating disorders, the model itself has undergone only limited testing. This is the first study to both elaborate and test the validity of the TM in a large sample (N=605) of undergraduate men. Body mass index was controlled within structural equation modeling analyses. Although not all expected associations for the maintenance variables were significant, overall the validity of the model was supported. Concern about shape and weight directly led to exercise behaviors. There was a direct path from binge eating to exercise and other forms of compensatory behaviors (i.e., purging); but no significant path from restriction to binge eating. Of the maintaining factors, mood intolerance was the only maintaining variable directly linked to men's eating disorder symptoms. The other three maintaining factors of the TM indirectly impacted restriction through concerns about shape and weight, whereas only interpersonal difficulties predicted low self-esteem and binge eating. Potential implications for understanding and targeting eating disturbances in men are discussed. © 2013.

  18. Adolescence and Eating Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Caggiano

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorders have received growing attention by professionals aswell as mass media (Shorter, Quinton et al. 2007). The most recent ISTAT data (Italian Institute for Statistics) reveal that about 3 million people (5% of the Italian population) suffer from these disorders, 90-95% females with two peaks of onset at 14 and at 18. Especially at this age, socio-cultural factors are crucialto the development of ideals (Tylche, Subich 2002), cognitions and expectations concerning body image (Schi...

  19. Lecture - "Move! Eat better"

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    As part of the "Move! Eat better" campaign, Novae’s nutrition adviser, Irène Rolfo, will give a talk on the subject of everyday good nutrition. This will be held in the main building auditorium at 12:30 on Thursday, 20 September 2012. Don’t miss this informative event. For more information, go to http://cern.ch/bpmm            

  20. Eating habits of students

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Silvestra; Zupančič, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with eating habits of students. Its purpose was to ascertaineating habits of students living outside their primary home and are under different forms of stress. Methods: the pattern is represented by students living in student homer where they can cook and prepare their own meals. In the research, 81 students living in the students home on Cesta v Mestni log in Ljubljana. The inquiry was composed from 34 questions. The data were processed with Microsoft Excel. Body mass inde...