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Sample records for psychodynamic nurses treasurer

  1. [The psychodynamic nursing theory by Hildegard E. Peplau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, E; Piras, G

    1997-01-01

    Peplau's theory is one of the early Nursing theories, published in 1952. The nurse-patient relationship consists of four steps (orientation, identification, development and conclusion). In these steps nurse could have the role of foreign, reliable person, teacher, guide in nursing care, substitute and consultant. Nurse-patient relationship is influenced by psychobiological experiences (needs, frustrations, conflicts and anxiety) which need dynamism. Peplau thinks that Nursing care is an important opportunity for nurse because she can help patient to complete the infancy psychological tasks (learning to rely on other people, learning to show satisfaction, self-identifying, and developing ability in sharing) if these are not completed. For these reasons Nursing, by Peplau, is a maturation strength of civilization.

  2. The hidden treasure in nursing leadership: informal leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Marty; Parslow, Susan; Smart, Marcia

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the present article was to generate awareness of characteristics of informal leaders in healthcare with the emphasis on nurses in acute care settings. There is limited research or literature regarding informal leaders in nursing and how they positively impact nursing management, the organization and, ultimately, patient care. Identification of nurses with leadership characteristics is important so that leadership development and mentoring can occur within the nursing profession. More than ever, nursing needs energetic, committed and dedicated leaders to meet the challenges of the healthcare climate and the nursing shortage. This requires nurse leaders to consider all avenues to ensure the ongoing profitability and viability of their healthcare facility. This paper discusses clinical nurses as informal leaders; characteristics of the informal nurse leader, the role they play, how they impact their unit and how they shape the organization.   Informal nurse leaders are an underutilized asset in health care. If identified early, these nurses can be developed and empowered to impact unit performance, efficiency and environmental culture in a positive manner. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of reflective learning in a psychodynamic group of nurses caring for terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, W

    1999-11-01

    The development of a psychodynamic group comprising seven female nurses was studied for 1 year (31 sessions). The group was part of a 1-year postgraduate training in patient-centred nursing. The members of the group all worked on the same unit; none of them left the unit or the group during the study. As the nurse-patient relationship is considered to be crucial for patient-centred nursing, the group sessions focused on the problems which the nurses experienced in their relationships with the patients. The objective of the group-work was to improve the nurses' ability to reflect on these relationships. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the group sessions, concentrating on the characteristics of patients selected for discussions, group process over time, and impact of specific patient characteristics on the group-work. Transcriptions of the tape-recorded group sessions were made for systematic analysis. A category system was developed and validated to rate reflection about the patient, the nurses themselves and the nurse-patient relationship. The results showed that the nurses over-proportionally selected terminally ill patients, as well as patients who were female and within a similar age range as themselves. These results could be due to an identification with these patients, causing increased psychological stress on the nurses. Throughout the year, the nurses' verbal activity and their reflections about their patients increased, whereas their reflections about themselves decreased. The need to withdraw and protect oneself by focusing more on the patient than on oneself might have been a strategy the nurses used to cope with growing stress.

  4. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  5. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  6. Trash to Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Items that are discarded by one person become of value when assembled together in a different way by an artist. Assemblage is a sculptural art form wherein individual objects that originally served one purpose are joined together to create something new. The possibilities in creating art treasures from "trash" are endless. Louise Nevelson was an…

  7. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the…

  8. Assessing Psychodynamic Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Joshua; Constantinides, Prometheas; Perry, J Christopher; Drapeau, Martin; Sheptycki, Amanda R

    2015-09-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapies suggest that symptomatic relief is provided, in part, with the resolution of psychic conflicts. Clinical researchers have used innovative methods to investigate such phenomenon. This article aims to review the literature on quantitative psychodynamic conflict rating scales. An electronic search of the literature was conducted to retrieve quantitative observer-rated scales used to assess conflict noting each measure's theoretical model, information source, and training and clinical experience required. Scales were also examined for levels of reliability and validity. Five quantitative observer-rated conflict scales were identified. Reliability varied from poor to excellent with each measure demonstrating good validity. However a small number of studies and limited links to current conflict theory suggest further clinical research is needed.

  9. Does Psychodynamic Environmental Therapy Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul; Hansen, Kim Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first Danish prospective outcome study of psychodynamic environmental therapy of children in residential treatment with early, serious traumatisation and extential relational disturbances. The study delves beneath the surface and explores the extent to which the children...

  10. Toward a psychodynamic approach to bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Jacob M

    2011-03-01

    Although many first-generation bioethicists were psychiatrists and some received psychoanalytic training, the field of bioethics has developed largely in isolation from psychodynamic theory. While much has been written regarding the ethics of psychoanalysis, only a few scholars have attempted to explain bioethical phenomena in psychodynamic terms. This paper argues for the development of a comprehensive theory of "psychodynamic bioethics" that attempts to explain individual and collective attitudes toward bioethical controversy in psychodynamic terms.

  11. A Geologist's Treasure Trove

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for annotated version of A Geologist's Treasure Trove [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for In the Far East (QTVR) This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists are eagerly planning to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. Data from the panoramic camera's near-infrared, blue and green filters were combined to create this approximate, true-color image. The Outcrop in a Nutshell Figure 1 highlights various rock targets within the outcrop lining the inner edge of the small crater where the rover landed. Opportunity recently finished examining the rock dubbed 'Last Chance,' then rolled over to 'Wave Ripple,' a section of rock in the region nicknamed 'The Dells.' Tomorrow, March 6, 2004, Sol 41, the rover will take a series of 'touch-and-go' microscopic images at 'Wave Ripple,' before heading to another rock region with targets named 'Slick Rock' and 'Berry Bowl.'

  12. George's cosmic treasure hunt

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    George and Annie explore the galaxy in this cosmic adventure from Stephen Hawking and Lucy Hawking, complete with essays from Professor Hawking about the latest in space travel. George is heartbroken when he learns that his friend Annie and her father are moving to the US. Eric has a new job working for the space program, looking for signs of life in the Universe. Eric leaves George with a gift—a book called The User’s Guide to the Universe. But Annie and Eric haven’t been gone for very long when Annie believes that she is being contacted by aliens, who have a terrible warning for her. George joins her in the US to help her with her quest—and before he knows it, he, Annie, Cosmos, and Annie’s annoying cousin Emmett have been swept up in a cosmic treasure hunt, spanning the whole galaxy and beyond. Lucy Hawking's own experiences in zero-gravity flight and interviews with astronauts at Cape Kennedy and the Johnson Space Center lend the book a sense of realism and excitement that is sure to fire up ima...

  13. Psychodynamics in medically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Sara Siris; Kent, Laura K; Muskin, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the role of psychodynamics as it applies to the understanding and treatment of medically ill patients in the consultation-liaison psychiatry setting. It provides historical background that spans the eras from Antiquity (Hippocrates and Galen) to nineteenth-century studies of hysteria (Charcot, Janet, and Freud) and into the twentieth century (Flanders Dunbar, Alexander, Engle, and the DSM). The article then discusses the effects of personality on medical illness, treatment, and patients' ability to cope by reviewing the works of Bibring, Kahana, and others. The important contribution of attachment theory is reviewed as it pertains the patient-physician relationship and the health behavior of physically ill patients. A discussion of conversion disorder is offered as an example of psychodynamics in action. This article highlights the important impact of countertransference, especially in terms of how it relates to patients who are extremely difficult and "hateful," and explores the dynamics surrounding the topic of physician-assisted suicide, as it pertains to the understanding of a patient's request to die. Some attention is also given to the challenges surrounding the unique experience of residents learning how to treat medically ill patients on the consultation-liaison service. Ultimately, this article concludes that the use and understanding of psychodynamics and psychodynamic theory allows consultation-liaison psychiatrists the opportunity to interpret the life narratives of medically ill patients in a meaningful way that contributes importantly to treatment.

  14. The Dream: A Psychodynamically Informative Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Glucksman, Myron L.

    2001-01-01

    The dream is a unique psychodynamically informative instrument for evaluating the subjective correlates of brain activity during REM sleep. These include feelings, percepts, memories, wishes, fantasies, impulses, conflicts, and defenses, as well as images of self and others. Dream analysis can be used in a variety of clinical settings to assist in diagnostic assessment, psychodynamic formulation, evaluation of clinical change, and the management of medically ill patients. Dreams may serve as ...

  15. Treasures of the Southern Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Gendler, Robert; Malin, David

    2011-01-01

    In these pages, the reader can follow the engaging saga of astronomical exploration in the southern hemisphere, in a modern merger of aesthetics, science, and a story of human endeavor. This book is truly a celebration of southern skies.  Jerry Bonnell, Editor - Astronomy Picture of the Day The southern sky became accessible to scientific scrutiny only a few centuries ago, after the first European explorers ventured south of the equator. Modern observing and imaging techniques have since revealed what seems like a new Universe, previously hidden below the horizon, a fresh astronomical bounty of beauty and knowledge uniquely different from the northern sky. The authors have crafted a book that brings this hidden Universe to all, regardless of location or latitude. Treasures of the Southern Sky celebrates the remarkable beauty and richness of the southern sky in words and with world-class imagery. In part, a photographic anthology of deep sky wonders south of the celestial equator, this book also celebrates th...

  16. Rendang: The treasure of Minangkabau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthia Nurmufida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rendang is a traditional food originating from West Sumatra and prepared by Minangkabau people. Rendang is commonly made with beef (especially tenderloin with special sauce containing a high amount of coconut milk. In the past, Minangkabau people prepared rendang in such a way that it has long shelf life and could be stored during long journeys. The long shelf life of rendang is thought to be contributed by the spices used during the cooking process. Nowadays, rendang is known worldwide, but its history and cultural significance are given less attention. In this article, the history and philosophy of rendang as the treasure of Minang people is discussed. To date, it is believed that rendang originated from India because of its similarity to Indian curry. The long cooking process of rendang has its own philosophy about patience, wisdom, and sincerity. Proper choice of beef, spice mix, control of heat, cooking duration, and stirring technique affect the taste of rendang. Traditionally, rendang is served during special occasions and to special people.

  17. Digital Technology in Preservation of Buddist Monastery Treasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaftel, A.

    2017-08-01

    Treasure Caretaker Training (Digital Monastery Project), teaches Buddhist monks, nuns and community cultural caretakers to protect and preserve their own monastery sacred art treasures. Participants learn to create digital inventories by use of their own mobile phones. Included in this documentation is the video interview of elders who hold the oral history of many of the treasures. Risk assessment and disaster mitigation are taught.

  18. Dynamic psychiatry and the psychodynamic formulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In her book 'An Unquiet Mind' the psychologist Kay Jamison gives a moving ... Department of Psychiatry, University of Pretoria, Weskoppies Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa. Abstract: This ... psychodynamic formulation is unfortunately seldom incorporated in the psychiatric presentation of patients; guidelines are therefore ...

  19. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to psychiatric residents: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Emily; Douglas, Carolyn J; Cabaniss, Deborah L

    2013-03-01

    There is enduring controversy in our field regarding the place for supportive interventions in psychodynamic psychotherapy. This controversy is reflected in the differing ways in which psychodynamic psychotherapy has been conceptualized and taught in psychiatric residency training programs. The authors propose an "integrated" approach for teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to trainees. In the integrated model, psychodynamic psychotherapy is conceptualized as a form of therapy designed to (a) uncover unconscious elements that influence thoughts, feelings, and behavior, and (b) support weakened psychological function. Using this model, residents learning psychodynamic psychotherapy are taught both uncovering and supporting techniques side by side in one course with specific guidelines for assessing when to use one set of interventions or the other. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to residents in this integrated way prepares them to become skilled clinicians who are able to move fluidly from supporting to uncovering in a pragmatic and flexible manner, matched to the particular moment-to-moment needs of the individual patient.

  20. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY IN PRESERVATION OF BUDDIST MONASTERY TREASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shaftel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Treasure Caretaker Training (Digital Monastery Project, teaches Buddhist monks, nuns and community cultural caretakers to protect and preserve their own monastery sacred art treasures. Participants learn to create digital inventories by use of their own mobile phones. Included in this documentation is the video interview of elders who hold the oral history of many of the treasures. Risk assessment and disaster mitigation are taught.

  1. Multimedia psychodynamic psychotherapy: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Domenico Arturo

    2009-05-01

    Mourning the death of a beloved person is one of life's most stressful events. This psychotherapy case study describes a form of psychodynamic psychotherapy that the author developed in working with a patient who suffered from complicated grief after the death of her father from lung cancer. During sessions, the therapist worked with the patient to collect pictures and organize a "strip of life" of her father's most meaningful moments. The patient then wrote a short text associated with each picture. Finally, she chose music to be added to this "slide show" or "psychodynamic montage" as its soundtrack. The resulting multimedia presentation was finally posted on the Internet on a website to which only the patient and her relatives and friends had access via a password. This therapeutic strategy was effective in helping this patient resolve her symptoms of complicated grief. The author suggests that this new approach to psychodynamic psychotherapy may be a cost-effective and well-received tool for use in institutions such as hospices and general hospitals.

  2. Geochemical Treasure Hunt for Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesmer, Maja; Frick, Daniel; Gerrits, Ruben; des GFZ-GeoWunderWerkstatt, Schülerlabor

    2017-04-01

    How can you inspire school children for geochemistry, and scientific exploratory urge? The key is to raise their curiosity and make learning new things a hands-on experience. The Fellows of the European Marie Curie Initial Training Network IsoNose designed and established a "Geochemical Treasure Hunt" to excite children for scientific investigations. This workshop explains primary school children the research and scientific methods of isotopic geochemistry, and their use to understand processes on the Earth's surface. From obtaining 'samples', performing various experiments, the school children gather clues leading them to the hidden treasure on the Telegrafenberg (campus of the GFZ Potsdam). The course was designed for school children to learn hands-on the meaning of elements, atoms and isotopes. In small groups the children conduct experiments of simplified methods being indispensable to any isotope geochemist. However, prior to working in any laboratory environment, a security briefing is necessary. For the course, two stages were implemented; firstly the use of harmful substances and dangerous equipment was minimised, and secondly children were equipped with size-matched personal protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, and safety googles). The purification of elements prior to isotopic analysis was visualised using colour chromatography. However, instead of using delicate mass spectrometers for the isotope ratio measurements, the pupils applied flame spectroscopy to analyse their dissolved and purified mineral solutions. Depending on the specific element present, a different colour was observed in the flame. The children plotted their colours of the flame spectroscopy onto a map and by interpreting the emerging colour patterns they localized the treasure on the map. In small teams they swarmed out on the Telegrafenberg to recover the hidden treasure. The project leading to this outreach activity has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie

  3. Hidden treasures - 50 km points of interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommi, Matias; Kortelainen, Jaana

    2015-04-01

    Tampere is third largest city in Finland and a regional centre. During 70's there occurred several communal mergers. Nowadays this local area has both strong and diversed identity - from wilderness and agricultural fields to high density city living. Outside the city center there are interesting geological points unknown for modern city settlers. There is even a local proverb, "Go abroad to Teisko!". That is the area the Hidden Treasures -student project is focused on. Our school Tammerkoski Upper Secondary School (or Gymnasium) has emphasis on visual arts. We are going to offer our art students scientific and artistic experiences and knowledge about the hidden treasures of Teisko area and involve the Teisko inhabitants into this project. Hidden treasures - Precambrian subduction zone and a volcanism belt with dense bed of gold (Au) and arsenic (As), operating goldmines and quarries of minerals and metamorphic slates. - North of subduction zone a homogenic precambrian magmastone area with quarries, products known as Kuru Grey. - Former ashores of post-glasial Lake Näsijärvi and it's sediments enabled the developing agriculture and sustained settlement. Nowadays these ashores have both scenery and biodiversity values. - Old cattle sheds and dairy buildings made of local granite stones related to cultural stonebuilding inheritance. - Local active community of Kapee, about 100 inhabitants. Students will discover information of these "hidden" phenomena, and rendering this information trough Enviromental Art Method. Final form of this project will be published in several artistic and informative geocaches. These caches are achieved by a GPS-based special Hidden Treasures Cycling Route and by a website guiding people to find these hidden points of interests.

  4. Dynamic psychiatry and the psychodynamic formulation | Böhmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to describe the difference between descriptive and dynamic psychiatry. As part of the latter every psychiatrist should be able to construct a psychodynamic formulation. A psychodynamic formulation, an indication of psychological mindedness, helps the psychiatrist to recognize the unique, personal aspects ...

  5. On compulsive shopping and spending: a psychodynamic inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, D W

    1988-10-01

    Compulsive shopping and spending, an impulse disorder, form a specific psychodynamic complex with common developmental precursors of pathological narcissism. Compulsive shopping and spending are distinguished from other symptomatic uses of money and impulsive acts. Four cases illustrate some psychodynamic considerations and therapeutic implications.

  6. Splitting and Projection: Drawing on Psychodynamics in Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Dario W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects the author's journey into an area of psychology which is not dominant in Educational Psychology discourse, namely psychodynamic psychology. Two psychodynamic mechanisms, namely splitting and projection are explained, and then the author describes and critiques how these mechanisms have proved useful in his practice. Two case…

  7. A Psychodynamic Systems Perspective on Command Relationship during Combat Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    to acknowledge the link between individual subconscious psychology as pioneered by Dr. Sigmund Freud, the renown Austrian neurologist and founder of...psychoanalysis, and psychodynamic system theory which expands upon those principles to include organizational psychology . 3. Conflicts and...academy. This chapter therefore introduces the reader to psychodynamic system theory developed by one of the founding fathers of modern psychology

  8. A comprehensive review of psychodynamic treatments for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo

    2016-12-01

    To comprehensively review the existing literature on the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapies in eating disorders (EDs) and to stimulate both debate and research on this topic. Online and hand searches were conducted to identify papers published between 1980 and 2015 on psychodynamic treatments delivered to adults with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). A total of 47 studies were finally included in this review. Fifteen studies were available for AN, 9 for BN, 12 for BED, and 11 for samples with mixed diagnoses. Several methodological flaws emerged, but overall psychodynamic interventions showed promising results at the end of treatment and follow-up, when available. The body of literature on psychodynamic treatments is sparse and sometimes methodologically questionable; nevertheless, current data provide support to the effectiveness of these interventions, particularly for AN. However, both a defined approach (focus, themes, and techniques) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are warranted to clarify the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapies.

  9. 76 FR 66965 - Treasure Coast Specialty Pharmacy Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Pharmacy Decision and Order On September 14, 2011, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Gail A. Randall issued..., issued to Treasure Coast Specialty Pharmacy, be, and it hereby is, revoked. I further order that any pending application of Treasure Coast Specialty Pharmacy, to renew or modify his registration, be, and it...

  10. Prazer e sofrimento no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem: reflexão à luz da psicodinâmica Dejouriana Placer e sufrimiento en el trabajo del equipo de enfermería: reflexión bajo la visión de la psicodinamica Dejouriana Pleasure and suffering in the nursing group: reflection to the light of Dejour psychodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Trevisan Martins

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é uma reflexão teórica com o objetivo de refletir sobre as questões de vivências de prazer e sofrimento no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem, sob a ótica da psicodinâmica dejourina do trabalho. Esta reflexão contribui para elucidar a importância dos processos organizativos no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem, em especial por considerar os aspectos relacionados à intersubjetividade e à história singular de cada ser humano. Diagnosticar as situações cotidianas no ambiente de trabalho é importante para intervenções nas formas de organização do processo de trabalho, bem como em outras situações que forem necessárias, contribuindo, assim, para a melhoria da qualidade de vida no ambiente laboral e na vida privada.El presente trabajo es un ensayo teórico que tuvo como objetivo reflexionar sobre las cuestiones de experiencia de placer y sufrimiento en el trabajo del equipo de enfermería bajo la óptica de la psicodinámica dejouriana del trabajo. Esta reflexión contribuye a elucidar la importancia de los procesos organizativos del trabajo del equipo de enfermería, en especial por considerar los aspectos relacionados a la intersubjetividad y a la historia singular de cada ser humano. Diagnosticar las situaciones cotidianas en el ambiente de trabajo es importante para intervenciones en los modos de organización del proceso de trabajo, así como en otras situaciones en que fuera necesario hacerlo, contribuyendo de tal modo en la mejora de la calidad de vida en el propio ambiente laboral y, consecuentemente, en la vida privada.The present study is a theoretical reflection which approaches the feelings of pleasure and suffering in the nursing team work in the perspective of the psychodynamic under Dejour optics. This reflection contributes to elucidate the importance of the organization processes of nursing team work, in special for considering the aspects related to the intersubjectivity and the singular history

  11. United States National Will: A Psychodynamic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    new ad hoc group with each change of issue and results in a new "basic assumption" group. 16 This is discussed in 15Ibid., p. 14. 16 Wilfred R. Bion ...Cantril. Polls: Their Use and Misuse in Politics. New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1972. AN 95 Bion , Wilfred R. Experiences in Groups and Other Papers...empowered to decide policy on a given issue" is proposed. UtilJz!ng the concepts ot group psychodynamics developed by W. R. Bion , a model for United

  12. Psychodynamic Couple Therapy: A Practical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Arthur C

    2017-10-01

    This essay reviews the most significant contributions of psychodynamic thought to the field of couple therapy. It distills the work of numerous clinicians and researchers who, though writing from diverse perspectives, share fundamental assumptions and concerns. Rather than emphasizing differences between schools of thought, this paper mines their best contributions in a discussion of five central therapeutic targets: underlying issues, divergent subjective experiences, transferences, projective identification, and acceptance. Two detailed cases illustrate the benefits and techniques for targeting these five therapeutic domains. Video Abstract is found in the online version of the article. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. Constructing a systems psychodynamic wellness model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchen Henning

    2012-03-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to construct and refine the SPWM in order to understand psychological wellness at the individual, group and organisational levels. Motivation for the study: There is no psychological wellness model that integrates the principles of systems psychodynamics and positive psychology. Systems psychodynamics traditionally focuses on so-called negative behaviour whilst positive psychology tends to idealise positive behaviour. This research tried to merge these views in order to apply them to individual, group and organisational behaviour. Research design, approach and method: The researchers used qualitative, descriptive and conceptual research. They conducted an in-depth literature study to construct the model. They then refined it using the LP. Main findings: The researchers identified 39 themes. They categorised them into three different levels. Three first-level themes emerged as the highest level of integration: identity, hope and love. The nine second-level themes each consisted of three more themes. They were less complex and abstract than the first-level themes. The least complex 27 third-level themes followed. Practical/managerial implications: One can apply the SPWM as a qualitative diagnostic tool for understanding individual, group and organisational wellness and for consulting on systemic wellness. Contribution/value-add: The SPWM offers a model for understanding individual, group and organisational wellness and for consulting on systemic wellness.

  14. Working with boundaries in systems psychodynamic consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Struwig

    2012-03-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to produce a set of theoretical assumptions about organisational boundaries and boundary management in organisations and, from these, to develop a set of hypotheses as a thinking framework for practising consulting psychologists when they work with boundaries from a systems psychodynamic stance. Motivation for the study: The researcher used the belief that organisational boundaries reflect the essence of organisations. Consulting to boundary managers could facilitate a deep understanding of organisational dynamics. Research design, approach and method: The researcher followed a case study design. He used systems psychodynamic discourse analysis. It led to six working hypotheses. Main findings: The primary task of boundary management is to hold the polarities of integration and differentiation and not allow the system to become fragmented or overly integrated. Boundary management is a primary task and an ongoing activity of entire organisations. Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should work actively at effective boundary management and at balancing integration and differentiation. Leaders should become aware of how effective boundary management leads to good holding environments that, in turn, lead to containing difficult emotions in organisations. Contribution/value-add: The researcher provided a boundary-consulting framework in order to assist consultants to balance the conceptual with the practical when they consult.

  15. Borderline or Schizotypal? Differential Psychodynamic Assessment in Severe Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Riel, Laura; Ingenhoven, Theo J M; VAN Dam, Quin D; Polak, Marike G; Vollema, Meinte G; Willems, Anne E; Berghuis, Han; VAN Megen, Harold

    2017-03-01

    Considerable overlap in symptoms between patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and schizotypal personality disorder (STPD) complicates personality diagnostics. Yet very little is known about the level of psychodynamic functioning of both personality disorders. Psychodynamic assessment procedures may specify personality characteristics relevant for differential diagnosis and treatment planning. In this cross-sectional study we explored the differences and similarities in level of personality functioning and psychodynamic features of patients with severe BPD or STPD. In total, 25 patients with BPD and 13 patients with STPD were compared regarding their level of personality functioning (General Assessment of Personality Disorder), current quasipsychotic features (Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire), and psychodynamic functioning [Developmental Profile (DP) interview and Developmental Profile Inventory (DPI) questionnaire]. Both groups of patients showed equally severe impairments in the level of personality functioning and the presence of current quasipsychotic features. As assessed by the DP interview, significant differential psychodynamic patterns were found on the primitive levels of functioning. Moreover, subjects with BPD had significantly higher scores on the adaptive developmental levels. However, the self-questionnaire DPI was not able to elucidate all of these differences. In conclusion, our study found significant differences in psychodynamic functioning between patients with BPD and STPD as assessed with the DP interview. In complicated diagnostic cases, personality assessment by psychodynamic interviewing can enhance subtle but essential differentiation between BPD and STPD.

  16. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    subscales: Cohesion (pgroup milieu were seen. The systemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also...... in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...

  17. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    subscales: Cohesion (psystemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also...... in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...

  18. Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis as an instrument to transfer psychodynamic constructs into neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eKessler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical article makes a contribution to the field of psychoanalytically informed neuroscience. First, central characteristics of psychoanalysis and neuroscience are briefly described leading into three epistemic dichotomies. Neuroscience versus psychoanalysis display almost opposing methodological approaches (reduction vs. expansion, test quality emphases (reliability vs. validity and meaning of results (correlation vs. explanation. The critical point is to reach an intermediate level: in neuroscience an adequate position integrating both aspects – objective and subjective – of dual-aspect monism, and in psychoanalysis the appropriate level for the scientific investigation of its central concepts. As a suggestion to reach that level in both fields the system of Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD; OPD Task Force, 2008 is presented. Combining aspects of both fields, expansion and reduction as well as reliability and validity, OPD could be a fruitful tool to transfer psychodynamic constructs into neuroscience. The article closes with a short description of recent applications of OPD in neuroscience.

  19. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  20. Research in subliminal psychodynamic activation: note on Masling (1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudin, R

    1999-04-01

    Masling (1998) questioned Malik, Apel, Nelham, Rutkowski, and Ladd's 1997 suggestion that subliminal psychodynamic activation research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE should be restricted. Problems in Masling's paper and the scope of research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE are discussed. His position that such research should not be restricted is supported on the condition that subliminal psychodynamic activation research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE (and other messages) use Fudin's 1986 procedure that could clarify the interpretation of successful experimental outcomes.

  1. Geocaching: Finding Mathematics in a Global Treasure Hunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Leicha A.

    2014-01-01

    If you love taking mathematics lessons outdoors, then you will love this article. Leicha Bragg describes geocaching, which combines technology, treasure hunting and mathematics, and results in purposeful, authentic and engaging mathematics.

  2. Executive coaching experiences: A systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Integrated Executive Experiential Learning Coaching model was applied in an information technology organisation. The aim of the research was to analyse and interpret the experiences of seven executives in the form of written essays from the systems psychodynamic perspective. The manifesting themes were, experiential learning facilitates the working through of defences; interdependency facilitates taking responsibility for the self; flight reactions inhibit owning and learning; transcending defences is needed to authorise the self in role; the difficulty of moving from the paranoid-schizoid to the depressive position and valuing all parts of the self; and containment facilitates self-authorisation. Recommendations towards more effective executive coaching are presented. Opsomming Die “Integrated Executive Experiential Learning Coaching model�? is toegepas in ’n inligtings tegnologie organisasie. Die doel van die navorsing was om die ervaring van sewe uitvoerende beamptes in opstel-formaat te analiseer en te interpreteer vanuit die stelsel psigodinamiese benadering. Die manifesterende temas was, ervaringeleer fasiliteer die deurwerk van verdedigingsmeganismes; interafhanklikheid fasiliteer die neem van selfverantwoordelikheid; vlug reaksies inhibeer eienaarskap en leer; die transendering van verdedigings is nodig vir self outorisering; die moeisaamheid van beweeg vanaf die paranoide-skisiode na die depressiewe posisie en waardering van alle gedeeltes van die self; en behouering fasiliteer self-outoriteit. Aanbevelings vir meer effektiewe uitvoerende afrigting is aangebied.

  3. 78 FR 28274 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Medieval Treasures from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim,'' imported...

  4. Psychodynamics of hypersexuality in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    It has recently become evident that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents. The criteria for making the diagnosis of juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD) are in the process of being proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V). In adults, a criterion for bipolar disorder is excessive involvement in pleasurable activities including hypersexuality. Recently, some clinicians and researchers have suggested that hypersexuality be included as a criterion for JBD as well. Although abnormal sexuality has been reported to be present in some youth thought to have JBD, the reason for this association is not yet clear. Hypersexuality may be primary and intrinsic to bipolar disorder in youth, secondary and associated with it as the result of psychosocial influences or psychodynamic factors, or due to general aggression and disruptive behavior. Not only have developmental psychosocial factors that may influence sexuality in children and adolescence not been fully investigated, but psychodynamic influences have been omitted from modern etiological constructs as well. This report discusses the importance of psychosocial and psychodynamic influences on the sexual experience and activity of bipolar children. It is proposed that a developmental, psychodynamically informed model is helpful in understanding sexuality in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. It is also suggested that assessment of psychosocial and psychodynamic influences on the sexuality of bipolar children is necessary in order to adequately assess whether hypersexuality should be a criterion of bipolar disorder in youth.

  5. The systems psychodynamic leadership coaching experiences of nursing managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2010-07-01

    Opsomming Die meestal liniêre en meganistiese aard van die verpleegbestuursrol is vinnig besig om na ’n meer dinamiese en sistemiese rol te verander. Die verandering behels taak- en mensbestuur binne 'n steeds veranderende organisasie-identiteit, waar 'n verskeidenheid rolle opgeneem word, die self en ander in 'n komplekse matrikssisteem bemagtig word, en waartydens bewuste en onbewuste sielkundige grense in en tussen botsende sisteme bestuur word. Die doel van hierdie studie was om die sisteem-psigodinamiese leerervaringe van verpleegbestuurders tydens leierskapafrigting te beskryf. Die afrigtingstaak was om leergeleenthede aan die individuele leier beskikbaar te stel vir die ontwikkeling van insig in bewuste en onbewuste leierskapsdinamika in terme van angs, taak, rol, outoriteit, grense en identiteit. 'n Kwalitatiewe navorsingsontwerp is gebruik. Ses verpleegbestuurders het tien leierskapafrigtingsessies oor tien weke bygewoon. Veldnotas en besinnende opstelle is deur middel van sisteem-psigodinamiese gespreksanalise ontleed. Die bevindinge dui op duidelikheid oor en bemagtiging in hulle primêre taak en normatiewe rol; angs en ontmagtiging in hulle ervarings- en fenomenale rolle; angs in grenshandhawing wat verband hou met magsmisbruik deur andere; en die voortdurende ondersoek en integrasie van leierskapsrolidentiteit. Deelnemers se leerervarings is na aanleiding van kriteria vir organisasieleer geëvalueer, waarna die algemene hipotese geformuleer is.

  6. 32 CFR 643.37 - Policy-Requests to search for treasure trove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Policy-Requests to search for treasure trove. 643... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.37 Policy—Requests to search for treasure trove. Section... and sales of treasure trove. All searches and sales authorized by GSA under this statute are subject...

  7. THE KEY TO THE TREASURE IS THE TREASURE: BARTH’S METAFICTION IN CHIMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Drzajic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available John Barth, one of the most prominent postmodern authors, is famous for his creative literary games: while his favorite tool, metafiction, is at times hard to comprehend, he is almost always both the writer and a character of his stories. “Everyone is necessarily the hero of his own life story,” he said, thus confirming the quite loose difference between reality and fiction in post-modernism. Bearing in mind that the story within a story is a common characteristic of his work, in this paper we shall analyze the most interesting points at which we encounter this phenomenon an d discover what actually represents the treasure in one of his most perplexing, yet incredibly captivating novels, Chimera.

  8. Psychodynamics of suicide, with particular reference to the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, H

    1991-09-01

    The article reviews the literature on the psychodynamics of suicide, focusing on factors that will help in evaluating and treating the young suicidal patient. Articles published in refereed journals and books and book chapters based on such articles are the source of most of the material. Articles that first brought a new finding to notice are given preference. Methodological limitations and contradictions with the data of other studies are pointed out. The psychodynamic meaning of suicide for a patient derives from both affective and cognitive components. Rage, hopelessness, despair, and guilt are important affective states in which young patients commit suicide. The meanings of suicide can be usefully organized around the conscious (cognitive) and unconscious meanings given to death by the suicidal patient: death as reunion, death as rebirth, death as retaliatory abandonment, death as revenge, and death as self-punishment or atonement. Knowledge of the psychodynamics helps to distinguish which patients with any given diagnosis are at risk for suicide. Such knowledge is essential to the psychotherapeutic treatment of the young suicidal patient. Topics for future research include the role of anxiety in suicide; the capacity to bear hopelessness, rage, and other unpleasant affects without regression; the use of particular defense mechanisms in distinguishing the risk of either suicidal or violent behavior; and the relation of specific psychodynamic conflicts seen in suicidal patients to particular psychiatric diagnoses.

  9. Patients' Representations of Psychotherapy: A New Focus for Psychodynamic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlinsky, David E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a psychodynamic framework and research methods for examining the significance of patients' internal representations of therapy with their therapists. Two instruments, the Therapist Representation Inventory and the Intersession Experience Questionnaire, are introduced, and their psychometric characteristics are described. Findings from a…

  10. Autoethnography and Psychodynamics in Interrelational Spaces of the Research Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina; Hansson, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    is psychoanalytically informed, but autoethnography became the actual vehicle for moving beyond reflections on the psychodynamics represented in the texts. The researcher ventured into an introspection of not only the texts, but also her own feelings, fantasies, and bodily experiences at the time of the interview...

  11. Children in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: Changes in Global Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhammar, Fredrik; Sundin, Eva C.; Jonson, Mattias; Carlberg, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    This study was part of the Erica Process and Outcome Study. The aim was to investigate if children's global functioning improves after psychodynamic psychotherapy. Variables that may predict changes in global functioning were examined both statistically and qualitatively, for example, the child's age and gender; diagnosis and comorbidity;…

  12. Treasurer's report to Medical Association of Malawi AGM, June 1991 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treasurer's report to Medical Association of Malawi AGM, June 1991. JMP Moorhouse. Abstract. MAM NEWS. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  13. Communication complexity: A treasure house of lower bounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    admin

    Communication complexity: A treasure house of lower bounds. Consider the following intriguing problem in the Mughal court: Akbar, known for his political sagacity, and Birbal, skilled in administrative affairs, want to come to a common understanding on matters of state. Being men of few words, they want to achieve this with ...

  14. Innumerable treasures of the Zheleznaya Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, Nikolai E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 in Russia one of sharp problems, concerning a public, was the problem of importation of the foreign irradiated nuclear fuel (INF), unloaded from atomic power stations, on long-term storage (with its possible reprocessing in the future). The problem was, that, not looking on availability for Russia of major practical experience and most advanced technologies, economic, social and ecological validity of sharing of the Russian nuclear enterprises in the international market of a storage and reprocessing INF, the importation foreign INF required change of the current Russian legislation. It insufficiently legibly defined state policy in the field of the management with INF. With the initiative of change of the current legislation in 1999 the group of the deputies of State Duma (SD) has acted. However this initiative has not found broad support both among the deputies and the public. In this connection in 2000 the broad PR campaign to provide an explanation of necessity of the legislative solution of all problems of the management with INF, including possibility of importation for long-term storage foreign INF, was conducted. The basic purpose of this company was to bring to Russian public, authority bodies an economic feasibility, ecological safety of a storage and reprocessing INF at the Russian nuclear enterprises. Video film 'Innumerable Treasures of the Zheleznaya Mountain' tells about one of PR - shares of this company, namely, about trip of the group of the deputies on Mining Chemical Combine (MCC), city Zheleznogorsk (former Krasnoyarsk - 26). On this trip the deputies could personally on site acquaint with modern technologies of storage and reprocessing INF, ecological safety and economic efficiency. For many from the deputies this visit on MCC was the first visit on the Russian nuclear complex enterprise. Plants of MCC itself, the acting INF depository, laid up construction of the PT-2 plant on processing INF are widely presented in the

  15. Application and Utility of Psychodynamic Principles in Forensic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Eugene F; Cohen, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    Effective practice of forensic psychiatry is dependent on a clinical recognition and understanding of core psychodynamic principles and theory. Practice guidelines, rooted in the ethics-based imperative to strive for honesty and objectivity, demand that practitioners remain vigilant to the development of bias and appreciate interpersonal dynamics that may be re-enacted in the forensic setting. Although it is not feasible to maintain complete impartiality, especially when confronted with the nature of certain offenses, knowledge of both conscious and unconscious responses can bolster the intellectual integrity of the clinical assessment. The identification of defense mechanisms within both the evaluator and evaluee and attention to transference and countertransference are essential for an accurate conceptualization of an offender's psychological functioning, vulnerabilities, and risk of reoffense. In this article, we review psychodynamic concepts and their potential impact in the forensic setting and underscore interventions that may aid in the elucidation and management of these processes. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  16. Psychodynamic treatment, training, and supervision using internet-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishkin, Ralph; Fishkin, Lana; Leli, Ubaldo; Katz, Barbara; Snyder, Elise

    2011-01-01

    For several years, the China American Psychoanalytic Alliance (CAPA) has provided treatment, training, and supervision to Chinese mental health professionals over the Internet. The lack of Chinese analysts and mentors has created an intense demand for psychodynamic psychotherapy training and treatment that CAPA is addressing using Skype™ and other distance communication technologies. This article describes the project, its history, scope, and activities, and the experiences of CAPA teachers and clinicians in exploring and developing the usefulness and power of this very new teaching method. Some particular characteristics of Chinese culture have become apparent as a result of the teaching experience. Aspects of the transference and countertransference that are shaped by the virtual nature of the technology are discussed, using case material. Our hope is that, in helping to train our Chinese students in psychodynamic psychotherapy, they will go on to train future generations of clinicians. This model of teaching and training could also be applied in other underserved areas.

  17. Methodology in subliminal psychodynamic activation: basic questions remain unanswered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudin, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Birgegard and Sohlberg recently implied that the interchange between them and Fudin in 1999 to 2000 resolved methodological issues in subliminal psychodynamic activation research. There remain, however, unresolved problems, both logical and empirical, which impair interpretations of findings in this area. These issues include questions concerning the value of the presentation of partial vs complete messages and the parameters involved in the information processing of such stimuli. The pursuit of solutions to these problems would be most efficacious if such research were brought more in line with experimental principles and established procedures used in the presentation of subliminal stimuli. In the absence of these efforts, research in subliminal psychodynamic activation will probably continue to tend toward circular reasoning and the production of ambiguous results that will never reach a wide audience.

  18. Empathy deficit in antisocial personality disorder: a psychodynamic formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malancharuvil, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    Empathic difficulty is a highly consequential characteristic of antisocial personality structure. The origin, maintenance, and possible resolution of this profound deficit are not very clear. While reconstructing empathic ability is of primary importance in the treatment of antisocial personality, not many proven procedures are in evidence. In this article, the author offers a psychodynamic formulation of the origin, character, and maintenance of the empathic deficiency in antisocial personality. The author discusses some of the treatment implications from this dynamic formulation.

  19. Viewing the Disney Movie Frozen through a Psychodynamic Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christopher; Bhalla, Ruchi

    2015-10-14

    The Disney movie Frozen is the fifth highest grossing movie of all time. In order to better understand this phenomenon and to hypothesize as to why the movie resonated so strongly with audiences, we have interpreted the movie using psychodynamic theory. We pay particular attention to the themes of puberty, adolescence and sibling relationships and discuss examples of ego defenses that are employed by the lead character in relation to these concepts.

  20. Early Intervention for Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychodynamic Therapy in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Simone; Cropp, Carola; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) should be understood as a disorder of development (Streeck-Fischer 2008, 2013) that has its first manifestation in late childhood and adolescence. There are only few treatment studies of adolescents meeting the diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder, although early interventions for these patients are urgently needed (see Chanen & McCutcheon 2013). We examined the effectiveness of an inpatient psychodynamic therapy (PDT). Twenty-eight adolescents fulfilling the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder were treated with psychodynamic therapy. The mean duration of treatment was 29.87 weeks (SD = 15.88). Outcomes were remission rates, GAF, GSI, SDQ, IIP and BPI scores. Assessments were made at admission and after treatment. Pre-post comparisons and comparisons with normative data were conducted. At the end of treatment 39.29% of the patients were remitted. We found significant improvements for the GAF, GSI, SDQ, IIP (all p0.001) and the BPI (p = 0.006). These clinically relevant improvements demonstrate the effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy in adolescents with borderline personality disorder and stress the usefulness of an early intervention for these patients.

  1. Assessing levels of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" in psychodynamic psychotherapy with children: a case study approach (preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bento Gastaud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To analyze the degree of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" during the first year of two children's once-weekly psychodynamic psychotherapy.Methods: This study used a longitudinal, descriptive, repeated-measures design based on the systematic case study method. Two male school children (here referred to as Walter and Peter and their therapists took part in the study. All sessions were video and audio recorded. Ten sessions from each case were selected for analysis in this preliminary study. Trained examiners (randomly selected in pairs independently and blindly evaluated each session using the Child Psychotherapy Q-Set (CPQ. Experts in psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy from several countries rated each of the 100 CPQ items with regard to how well it characterized a hypothetical ideal session of either treatment modality. A series of paired t tests comparing analogous adherence scores within each session were conducted.Results:There were no significant correlations between time elapsed and adherence to the prototypes. Walter's treatment adhered to both prototypes and Peter's treatment did not adhere to either prototype.Conclusion:Child psychotherapy theory and practice are not absolutely coincident. Real psychotherapy sessions do not necessarily resemble the ideal prototypes.

  2. Looking at the gap between social psychological and psychodynamic perspectives on group dynamics historically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schruijer, S.G.L.; Curseu, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The paper aims to describe and understand the gap between the psychodynamic literature on groups and the social psychological perspective on group dynamics. Design/methodology/approach As Wilfred Bion is the most influential group dynamics representative of the psychodynamic tradition the

  3. Effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient psychotherapy unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short-term psychodynamic group therapy in heterogeneous patient groups is common in the public Danish psychiatric system but is in need of evaluation. AIM: To investigate improvement in 39-session psychodynamic group therapy using three criteria: 1) effect size (Cohen's d), 2) statist...

  4. When and Why Should Mental Health Professionals Offer Traditional Psychodynamic Therapy to Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuppa, David P; Meyer, Fremonta

    2017-05-01

    Given the recent studies promoting time-limited manualized therapies in the oncology setting, clinicians may be reluctant to offer traditional psychodynamic therapy to cancer patients. However, there are no studies directly comparing psychodynamic therapy and other therapy modalities in this patient population and no data suggesting harm from psychodynamic approaches. Therefore, it is inappropriate to draw the conclusion that psychodynamic therapy is inferior to manualized therapy from existing evidence. Manualized treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, is generally short term and therefore may reduce the practitioner's own anxiety stemming from exposure to patients facing grave disability and death. However, manualized treatment is not fully effective in specific clinical scenarios. We present a case reflecting these limitations and advocate for a flexible treatment approach incorporating elements of psychodynamic therapy. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  5. 77 FR 62311 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Royal Treasures From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8061] Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Royal Treasures From the Louvre: Louis XIV to Marie- Antoinette'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Royal Treasures from the Louvre: Louis XIV to Marie-Antoinette...

  6. Psychodynamic Factors Behind Online Social Networking and its Excessive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas Cheuk Wing

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the psychodynamic factors behind the popularity of one form of Internet activity, online social networking (SN). It views online SN as an extension of the social self, organized in a way that is more controllable than real life relating. The SN platforms reward its users with reassuring surfaces and novel self-object experiences while at the same time induces much anxiety. The addictive quality of online SN is understood in the context of collapse of dialectical space and the defensive use of this technology.

  7. Brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy: theoretical issues and process indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassino, S; Amianto, F; Ferrero, A

    2008-06-01

    Brief psychotherapy is gaining interest worldwide, because of its good cost/effectiveness ratio and proved efficacy. The aim of the paper was to describe the brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy (B-APP): a brief, psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy referring to the individual psychology (IP). The B-APP theory refers to the following paradigms: 1) the individual represents a psychosomatic unity integrated in the social context; 2) the individual needs to build and regulate the image of the self; 3) bond patterns regulate human relationships and represent the symbolic ''fil rouge'' connecting the elements of the life-style. Its objectives are: 1) an at least partial resolution of the focus problem; 2) a decrease or a non-increase of symptoms; 3) a global increase of quality of life. The results depend on intrapsychic and relational changes. Indications are more relative than absolute. The possibility of identifying a meaningful focus is fundamental. The treatment scheme includes 15 sessions subdivided into 5 phases. B-APP offers a technical approach to brief psychotherapy which is suitable in many fields of psychiatry and liaison medicine such as preventive interventions in at-risk subjects, somatopsychic disorders and liaison psychiatry, personality and eating disorders, and treatment of emotionally disturbed children. It was applied as psychotherapeutic approach in some clinical outcome studies about eating disorders and severe personality disorders displaying a good efficacy.

  8. Executive coaching in diversity from the systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerato Motsoaledi

    2012-03-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to describe the application of systems psychodynamic role analysis and to determine its trustworthiness in assisting executives to work effectively with conscious and unconscious diversity dynamics in their organisations. Motivation for the study: Executives generally struggle to understand the deeper meaning of diversity behaviour that manifests inside and around them, leading to conflict. Without understanding the unconscious meaning of the behaviour, organisations founder easily. Awareness of below-the-surface behaviour leads to insight and taking responsibility for diversity-related behaviours. Research design, approach and method: The researcher coached six executives in South African state departments over a period of 10 months. The coaching addressed and analysed the executives’ organisational roles. She analysed the data using discourse analysis. Main findings: Themes relating to the diversity dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, authority, disability, language, age, de-authorisation of diversity work and the coaching process emerged. The coaching assisted the executives to gain insights into below-the-surface diversity dynamics, to address diversity in a sustained manner and to take up their organisational roles more effectively. Practical/managerial implications: Coached executives will have a more objective and dynamic experience of diversity issues that manifest in organisations, between colleagues and within themselves. Contribution/value-add: Executive coaching from a systems psychodynamic perspective displays trustworthiness in improving participants’ diversity awareness, especially with regard to gender, race, ethnicity and authorisation.

  9. The systems psychodynamic experiences of organisational transformation amongst support staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Steyn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The unconscious impact of organisational transformation is often neglected and even denied. This research revealed the manifestation and impact of high levels and different forms of anxiety experienced by employees during transformation. Research objective: The objective was to study and describe the manifesting systems psychodynamic behaviour amongst support staff during organisational transformation. Motivation for the study: Organisational transformation is mostly researched from a leadership viewpoint. Little research data are available on the experiences of support staff on the receiving end of decisions about and implementation of transformation. Research design, approach and method: A qualitative approach within the phenomenological hermeneutic interpretive stance was used. The research was set in a government organisation. A semi-structured interview with four conveniently and purposefully chosen support staff members was thematically analysed using systems psychodynamics as theoretical paradigm. Main findings: Four themes manifested, namely de-authorisation and detachment, being bullied and seduced by leadership, the organisation in the mind as incompetent, and a dangerous and persecutory system. In the discussion, the basic assumptions and relevant constructs are interpreted. Practical implications: Understanding the transformation experiences of support staff could assist the industrial psychologist to facilitate appropriate support in coaching more junior staff towards increasing wellness and work performance. Contribution: Organisational transformation is highlighted as an anxiety provoking experience especially on the lower levels of the organisation. Its potentially deep and complex psychological impact could possibly derail parts of the system if not managed in a psychologically contained manner.

  10. Commentary: Coming Full Circle--Psychoanalysis, Psychodynamics, and Forensic Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    Drs. Simopoulos and Cohen argue that knowledge of one's unconscious processes improves the forensic psychiatrist's capacity to manage complex forensic situations and to generate forensic formulations and opinions that are demonstrably more valid and reliable, much like competence in cultural assessment and formulation. In practice, the challenges posed by the application of these principles in forensic settings are far outweighed by the potential benefit. Forensic practice is informed by many specialties. Forensic psychiatrists do not have to complete full training in these disciplines to make use of the knowledge and perspectives they offer. The same may not be true of psychodynamic assessment and formulation. Although much can be learned from supervision, case seminars, conferences, and reading, such knowledge does little to foster awareness of one's unconscious processes that by definition operate outside awareness and thus contribute to the vitiating effect of bias. To date, the only method whereby psychiatrists can effectively come to appreciate their own unconscious processes in action is arguably through their own analysis conducted in the course of training in analysis or psychodynamic psychotherapy. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  11. Towards an evidence-based unified psychodynamic protocol for emotional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Steinert, Christiane

    2018-05-01

    In psychotherapy research unified, transdiagnostic and modular treatments have emerged. This is true for both cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy. Recently, two unified psychodynamic protocols were presented, one for anxiety disorders, another for depressive disorders. Integrating the treatment principles for these two highly prevalent disorder groups into one protocol for "emotional disorders" may be useful for both clinical practice and training in psychotherapy. After updating the evidence for psychodynamic therapy in anxiety and depressive disorders in terms of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by a systematic search, the treatment elements applied in those RCTs providing evidence for the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy in depressive or anxiety disorders were reviewed and compared. Twenty-seven RCTs for anxiety or depressive disorders were identified. A review revealed a high overlap between the principles used for the psychodynamic treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders, reflecting the transdiagnostic nature of psychodynamic therapy. The overlap suggested to integrate the identified treatment principles into one unified psychodynamic protocol for "emotional disorders" (UPP-EMO). As a result, seven treatment principles or modules were distilled which can be flexibly applied depending on the patient´s symptoms and needs. In addition, a separate module addresses diagnostic assessment. Across modules, a focus on resources has been included. Despite being based on RCTs, UPP-EMO has not yet been examined in an RCT - which is planned as a next step. As psychodynamic therapy is transdiagnostic in origin focusing on core underlying processes of mental disorders, acceptability of UPP-EMO among psychodynamic psychotherapists is likely to be high. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Predictors of non-responding in short-term psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Selection for psychotherapy may be improved by identifying predictors of non-responding to treatment, but there are only few studies of non-responding in short-term psychodynamic group therapy. We analyzed potential socio-demographic and clinical predictors in a sample of 239 patients in 39...... sessions of psychodynamic group psychotherapy, including self-reported symptoms, personality, and extra-therapeutic events. Non-responding was assessed by the Symptom Check List-90-Revised Global Severity Index (SCL-90-R GSI) according to Jacobson and Truax’s Reliable Change Index. Non...... to explore before selection of patients to short-term time-limited psychodynamic group therapy....

  13. The enduring effects of psychodynamic treatments vis-à-vis alternative treatments: A multilevel longitudinal meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, D Martin; Goldberg, Simon B; Abbas, Maleeha; Pace, Brian T; Yulish, Noah E; Thomas, Joel G; Cullen, Megan M; Flückiger, Christoph; Wampold, Bruce E

    2015-08-01

    Although evidence suggests that the benefits of psychodynamic treatments are sustained over time, presently it is unclear whether these sustained benefits are superior to non-psychodynamic treatments. Additionally, the extant literature comparing the sustained benefits of psychodynamic treatments compared to alternative treatments is limited with methodological shortcomings. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a rigorous test of the growth of the benefits of psychodynamic treatments relative to alternative treatments across distinct domains of change (i.e., all outcome measures, targeted outcome measures, non-targeted outcome measures, and personality outcome measures). To do so, the study employed strict inclusion criteria to identify randomized clinical trials that directly compared at least one bona fide psychodynamic treatment and one bona fide non-psychodynamic treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling (Raudenbush, Bryk, Cheong, Congdon, & du Toit, 2011) was used to longitudinally model the impact of psychodynamic treatments compared to non-psychodynamic treatments at post-treatment and to compare the growth (i.e., slope) of effects beyond treatment completion. Findings from the present meta-analysis indicated that psychodynamic treatments and non-psychodynamic treatments were equally efficacious at post-treatment and at follow-up for combined outcomes (k=20), targeted outcomes (k=19), non-targeted outcomes (k=17), and personality outcomes (k=6). Clinical implications, directions for future research, and limitations are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Psychodynamic Emotional Regulation in View of Wolpe's Desensitization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Merav

    2016-01-01

    The current research belongs to the stream of theoretical integration and establishes a theoretical platform for integrative psychotherapy in anxiety disorders. Qualitative metasynthesis procedures were applied to 40 peer-reviewed psychoanalytic articles involving emotional regulation. The concept of psychodynamic emotional regulation was found to be connected with the categories of desensitization, gradual exposure, containment, and transference. This article presents a model according to which psychoanalytic psychotherapy allows anxiety to be tolerated while following the core principles of systematic desensitization. It is shown that despite the antiresearch image of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, its foundations obey evidence-based principles. The findings imply that anxiety tolerance might be a key goal in which the cumulative wisdom of the different therapies can be used to optimize psychotherapy outcomes.

  15. Subliminal psychodynamic activation method and annihilation anxiety: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, A C

    1992-02-01

    Research with the subliminal psychodynamic activation (SPA) method has led to improvements in subjects' functioning in a variety of areas, including but not limited to weight control, school grades, and feelings of general anxiety. In 1987, Hurvich proposed that the SPA method could be used to further the understanding of annihilation anxiety. 100 nonclinical subjects completed questionnaires pertaining to annihilation anxiety, psychological differentiation, and state anxiety and were tachistoscopically exposed to the subliminal message of symbiotic-like oneness, MOMMY AND I ARE ONE, and to control messages. Analysis showed that women with low annihilation anxiety had significantly lower state anxiety than women with high annihilation anxiety, regardless of the content of the subliminal message; results did not reach significance for men. Correlations among scores on the questionnaires also were noted.

  16. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  17. SCL-90-R Symptom Profiles and Outcome of Short-Term Psychodynamic Group Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik L.; Lotz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Psychodynamic group psychotherapy may not be an optimal treatment for anxiety and agoraphobic symptoms. We explore remission of SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and target symptoms in 39 sessions of psychodynamic group therapy. Methods. SCL-90-R ?target symptom? profile and GSI remission according to Danish norms were identified in 239 patients and evaluated according to reliable and clinical significant change. Results. Four major groups of target symptom cases (depression, i...

  18. Canine epididymal spermatozoa: A hidden treasure with great potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvoni, G C; Morselli, M G

    2017-04-01

    The hidden treasure represented by epididymal spermatozoa has great potential in the current reproductive technologies in dogs. In case of azoospermia or when a donor male accidentally dies or undergoes orchiectomy, the retrieval of epididymal spermatozoa opens new possibilities to generate progeny. Spermatozoa can be collected by different techniques from ex vivo or in vivo testicles and can be cryopreserved for a future use. Freeze tolerance of canine epididymal spermatozoa seems lower than that of ejaculated spermatozoa; however, puppies were born after artificial insemination with frozen epididymal semen, other than with fresh and chilled. Even though several aspects need to be further investigated, advances have been recently made in the use of epididymal spermatozoa in assisted reproduction in dogs. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Discussion of "Eating disorders and attachment: a contemporary psychodynamic perspective:" does the attachment model of eating disorders indicate the need for psychodynamic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather

    2014-06-01

    Tasca and Balfour have done admirable work highlighting the importance of attachment security in the psychopathology of eating disorders (EDs), and their contributions are extremely valuable. For their points to be fully appreciated by the research and treatment-research communities, additional data are needed in key areas. Research is needed to help clarify the relative roles and cause-and-effect relationships between attachment insecurity, reflective functioning, and emotion regulation in the development and maintenance of EDs. Tasca and Balfour furthermore call their model "psychodynamic," and call for psychodynamically informed treatment for patients with attachment insecurity. For this call to be heeded, additional research is needed to examine whether the unique elements of psychodynamic psychotherapy have particular benefit for patients with insecure attachment styles. The unique psychodynamic elements considered in this comment include a therapeutic focus on reflective functioning, the patient's developmental history, the "unconscious," and the transference and countertransference. The utility of a non-directive (or patient-directed) therapeutic process is also considered. Investigation of these treatment issues could be extremely useful to practitioners and patients alike.

  20. Treatment resistance and psychodynamic psychiatry: concepts psychiatry needs from psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 30 years psychiatry and psychoanalysis have moved in substantially divergent directions. Psychiatry has become rich in methodology but conceptually limited, with a drift toward biological reductionism. Psychoanalysis has remained relatively limited in methodology, but conceptually rich. The rich methodology of psychiatry has led to major contributions in discovering gene by environment interactions, the importance of early adversity, and to recognition of the serious problem posed by treatment resistance. However, psychiatry's biologically reductionistic conceptual focus interferes with the development of a nuanced clinical perspective based on emerging knowledge that might help more treatment resistant patients become treatment responders. This article argues that recognition of the problem of treatment resistance in psychiatry creates a need for it to reconnect with the conceptual richness of psychoanalysis in order to improve patient care. Psychodynamic psychiatry is defined as the relevant intersection of psychiatry and psychoanalysis where this reconnection can occur. I will suggest selected aspects of psychoanalysis that are especially relevant to psychiatry in improving outcomes in work with treatment resistant patients.

  1. SCL-90-R Symptom Profiles and Outcome of Short-Term Psychodynamic Group Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Psychodynamic group psychotherapy may not be an optimal treatment for anxiety and agoraphobic symptoms. We explore remission of SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and target symptoms in 39 sessions of psychodynamic group therapy. Methods. SCL-90-R “target symptom” profile a......, patients with interpersonal sensitivity target symptom may be especially suited for psychodynamic group therapy. The SCL-90-R subscales may allow for a more complex symptom-related differentiation of patients compared with both diagnoses and GSI symptom load.......Abstract Background. Psychodynamic group psychotherapy may not be an optimal treatment for anxiety and agoraphobic symptoms. We explore remission of SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and target symptoms in 39 sessions of psychodynamic group therapy. Methods. SCL-90-R “target symptom” profile...... and GSI remission according to Danish norms were identified in 239 patients and evaluated according to reliable and clinical significant change. Results. Four major groups of target symptom cases (depression, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, and phobic anxiety) covered 95.7% of the sample. As opposite...

  2. Treatment of music performance anxiety via psychological approaches: a review of selected CBT and psychodynamic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Julie J

    2010-12-01

    Performance anxiety, or stage fright, is anxiety aroused about potential mishaps in performance that expose feared inadequacies before an audience and which evoke feelings of embarrassment and humilation. For affected musicians, performance anxiety can be emotionally devastating, as their career choice in music may be terminated or severely compromised. This paper focuses on the cognitive and psychodynamic literature about music performance anxiety, with the emphasis that for treatment "one size does not fit all." It reviews the factors underlying performance anxiety and those factors which can exacerbate the condition in musicians. The two major clinical treatment modalities within contemporary psychology, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic treatments, are reviewed. While there are more empirical studies of CBT in various populations in the literature, until recently there was an indifference to empirical research by psychodynamic investigators. However, meta-analyses show strong efficacy for psychodynamic psychotherapy (in various disorders, not specifically music performance anxiety), but also that the benefits of psychodynamic psychotherapy may endure longer and increase with time.

  3. Comparing Psychodynamic and Behavioristic Approaches in the Management of Aggression in Children. Educational and Psychological Interactions, No. 103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Kris

    The paper presents a literature-based comparison of psychodynamic and behavioral approaches in the management of aggression in children. The section on psychodynamic approaches discusses the work of August Aichhorn, Fritz Redl, Nicholas Long, and William Glasser, in addition to discussions of life space interviewing and the importance of the…

  4. What Works for People with Mental Retardation? Critical Commentary on Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beail, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews what is known about the effectiveness of the more controversial use of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy with people who have mental retardation. It examines self-management approaches (problem solving, anger management, and cognitive therapy) and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The paper concludes that there has…

  5. Comment on Birgegard and Sohlberg's (1999) suggestions for research in subliminal psychodynamic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudin, R

    2000-06-01

    Methodological changes in subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments based on the assumption that multiletter messages can be encoded automatically (Birgegard & Sohlberg, 1999) are questioned. Their contention that partial experimental messages and appropriate nonsense anagram controls (Fudin, 1986) need not be presented in every experiment is supported, with a reservation. If the difference between responses to the complete message and its control is significant in the predicted direction, then Fudin's procedure should be used. A nonsignificant difference between the response to each partial message and its control is needed to support the assumption of proponents of subliminal psychodynamic activation that successful outcomes are effected by the encoding of the meaning of a complete message. Experiments in subliminal psychodynamic activation can be improved if their methodologies take into account variables that may operate when subliminal stimuli are presented and encoded.

  6. Individual psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis for schizophrenia and severe mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Lena; Fenton, Mark; Rathbone, John

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia and severe mental illness may require considerable support from health care professionals, in most cases over a long period of time. Research on the effects of psychotherapy for schizophrenia has shown mixed results. Although pharmacological interventions remain the treatment of choice, the effects of treatments focusing on psychosocial factors affecting schizophrenia are important. Objectives To review the effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, or both, for people with schizophrenia or severe mental illness. Search methods For the updated review, we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2008) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Selection criteria We sought all randomised trials of individual psychodynamic psychotherapy or psychoanalysis for people with schizophrenia or severe mental illness. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis using a fixed-effect model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) and weighted mean differences (WMD) using a fixed-effect model. Main results We included four randomised trials (total 528 participants, 5 comparisons). All used a psychodynamic approach and reported limited data. For individual psychodynamic therapy versus medication alone we found significantly more participants in the therapy group were unable to be discharged (n=92, RR 8.35 CI 2.0 to 34.3, NNH 3 CI 2 to 6). We found no significant difference between groups in the number of participants who were re-hospitalised (n=24, RR 0.63 CI 0.3 to 1.4) during long-term analyses. At 12 months, fewer participants in the psychotherapy groups needed additional medications compared with those who did receive

  7. Fy00 Treasure Valley ITS Deployment Project : advanced traffic management system (ATMS) software procurement and implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-02

    In 2000, the Treasure Valley area of the State of Idaho received a federal earmark of $390,000 to develop an Advanced Transportation Management System (ATMS) for the Treasure Valley region of Idaho. The Ada County Highway District (ACHD), located in ...

  8. A Substance Called Food: Long-Term Psychodynamic Group Treatment for Compulsive Overeating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Deborah C; Nickow, Marcia S; Arseneau, Ric; Gisslow, Mary T

    2015-07-01

    Obesity has proven difficult to treat. Many approaches neglect to address the deep-rooted underlying psychological issues. This paper describes a psychodynamically oriented approach to treating compulsive overeating as an addiction. Common to all addictions is a compulsion to consume a substance or engage in a behavior, a preoccupation with using behavior and rituals, and a lifestyle marked by an inability to manage the behavior and its harmful consequences. The approach represents a shift away from primarily medical models of intervention to integrated models focusing on the psychological underpinnings of obesity. Long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy is recommended as a primary treatment.

  9. Barley grain for ruminants: A global treasure or tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhah, Akbar

    2012-07-09

    Barley grain (Hordeum vulgare L.) is characterized by a thick fibrous coat, a high level of ß-glucans and simply-arranged starch granules. World production of barley is about 30 % of that of corn. In comparison with corn, barley has more protein, methionine, lysine, cysteine and tryptophan. For ruminants, barley is the third most readily degradable cereal behind oats and wheat. Due to its more rapid starch fermentation rate compared with corn, barley also provides a more synchronous release of energy and nitrogen, thereby improving microbial nutrient assimilation. As a result, feeding barley can reduce the need for feeding protected protein sources. However, this benefit is only realized if rumen acidity is maintained within an optimal range (e.g., > 5.8 to 6.0); below this range, microbial maintenance requirements and wastage increase. With a low pH, microbial endotoxines cause pro-inflammatory responses that can weaken immunity and shorten animal longevity. Thus, mismanagement in barley processing and feeding may make a tragedy from this treasure or pearl of cereal grains. Steam-rolling of barley may improve feed efficiency and post-rumen starch digestion. However, it is doubtful if such processing can improve milk production and feed intake. Due to the need to process barley less extensively than other cereals (as long as the pericarp is broken), consistent and global standards for feeding and processing barley could be feasibly established. In high-starch diets, barley feeding reduces the need for capacious small intestinal starch assimilation, subsequently reducing hindgut starch use and fecal nutrient loss. With its nutritional exclusivities underlined, barley use will be a factual art that can either matchlessly profit or harm rumen microbes, cattle production, farm economics and the environment.

  10. Barley grain for ruminants: A global treasure or tragedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikkhah Akbar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Barley grain (Hordeum vulgare L. is characterized by a thick fibrous coat, a high level of ß-glucans and simply-arranged starch granules. World production of barley is about 30 % of that of corn. In comparison with corn, barley has more protein, methionine, lysine, cysteine and tryptophan. For ruminants, barley is the third most readily degradable cereal behind oats and wheat. Due to its more rapid starch fermentation rate compared with corn, barley also provides a more synchronous release of energy and nitrogen, thereby improving microbial nutrient assimilation. As a result, feeding barley can reduce the need for feeding protected protein sources. However, this benefit is only realized if rumen acidity is maintained within an optimal range (e.g., > 5.8 to 6.0; below this range, microbial maintenance requirements and wastage increase. With a low pH, microbial endotoxines cause pro-inflammatory responses that can weaken immunity and shorten animal longevity. Thus, mismanagement in barley processing and feeding may make a tragedy from this treasure or pearl of cereal grains. Steam-rolling of barley may improve feed efficiency and post-rumen starch digestion. However, it is doubtful if such processing can improve milk production and feed intake. Due to the need to process barley less extensively than other cereals (as long as the pericarp is broken, consistent and global standards for feeding and processing barley could be feasibly established. In high-starch diets, barley feeding reduces the need for capacious small intestinal starch assimilation, subsequently reducing hindgut starch use and fecal nutrient loss. With its nutritional exclusivities underlined, barley use will be a factual art that can either matchlessly profit or harm rumen microbes, cattle production, farm economics and the environment.

  11. Tracking functional brain changes in patients with depression under psychodynamic psychotherapy using individualized stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wiswede

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neurobiological models of depression posit limbic hyperactivity that should normalize after successful treatment. For psychotherapy, though, brain changes in patients with depression show substantial variability. Two critical issues in relevant studies concern the use of unspecific stimulation experiments and relatively short treatment protocols. Therefore changes in brain reactions to individualized stimuli were studied in patients with depression after eight months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. METHODS: 18 unmedicated patients with recurrent major depressive disorder were confronted with individualized and clinically derived content in a functional MRI experiment before (T1 and after eight months (T2 of psychodynamic therapy. A control group of 17 healthy subjects was also tested twice without intervention. The experimental stimuli were sentences describing each participant's dysfunctional interpersonal relationship patterns derived from clinical interviews based on Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD. RESULTS: At T1 patients showed enhanced activation compared to controls in several limbic and subcortical regions, including amygdala and basal ganglia, when confronted with OPD sentences. At T2 the differences in brain activity between patients and controls were no longer apparent. Concurrently, patients had improved significantly in depression scores. CONCLUSIONS: Using ecologically valid stimuli, this study supports the model of limbic hyperactivity in depression that normalizes after treatment. Without a control group of untreated patients measured twice, though, changes in patients' brain activity could also be attributed to other factors than psychodynamic therapy.

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy in Treatment of Geriatric Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Joanne L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed whether depressed geriatric patients (N=33) would respond to group psychotherapy and, if they would respond differently to cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic modes. Results indicated that patients showed statistically and clinically significant reductions on observer-rated measures of depression and anxiety, as well as on self-report…

  13. Psychodynamic Therapy and Culture in the Treatment of Incest of a West Indian Immigrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Shirley P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses treatment of an adult West Indian female who was the victim of incest during childhood and adolescence. Studies of West Indians provide a knowledge base for incorporation into appropriate and culture-specific treatment techniques. Winnicott's psychodynamic constructs of object relations theory is used as the organizing framework for…

  14. Peer review of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Experimental studies of the American Psychological Association/CHAMPUS program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L H; Pizzirusso, D

    1982-12-01

    Two factorial experiments examined the effects of reviewer theoretical orientation, documented treatment progress, and patient concurrence data on the peer review of clinical treatment reports that described long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy with a depressed, female outpatient. The experiments employed an unobtrusive methodology; peer reviewers believed that their evaluations would affect the disposition of actual mental health insurance claims. Subjects (n = 105) were American Psychological Association/Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS) peer reviewers of a psychodynamic, behavioral, or eclectic theoretical orientation. The psychodynamic reviewers, compared with the behavioral and eclectic reviewers, were more positive in their ratings of treatment and more generous in their future care reimbursement recommendations. Additionally, the data demonstrated that APA/CHAMPUS peer review was sensitive to reported treatment progress, and that reviewers of diverse orientations were equally responsive to documented progress in psychodynamic psychotherapy. The patient concurrence manipulation had little effect on the dependent measures. Implications for mental health quality assurance programs are discussed.

  15. Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Van, H.L.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. Method: There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female,

  16. Five-Year Follow-Up of Supportive Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Susanne; Køster, Anne; Valbak, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The long-term outcomes of several approaches to intervention targeting social functioning in schizophrenia are not well documented. Contemporary supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) aims to improve social functioning. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-te...

  17. Joyful learning strategy using game method of treasure clue to improve reading comprehension skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vina Anggia Nastitie Ariawan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are (1 to describe steps in the implementation of joyful learning strategy using game method of treasure clue to improve reading comprehension skill for the fourth grade students of elementary school; (2 to improve reading comprehension skill for the fourth grade students of elementary school by implementing joyful learning strategy using game method of treasure clue. This research is collaborative Classroom Action Research (CAR and implemented within two cycles. Each cycle implemented within two meetings. This research impelemented at one of elementary school in Kuningan. Subjects of this research are 31 students of the fourth grade of elementary school. Techniques of collecting data were observation, interview, an document analysis. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis meanwhile data were validated using triangulation, member checking, and reflectivity. The results of this research show that joyful learning strategy using game method of treasure clue can increase students’ reading comprehension skill . The results proved by the increase of reading comprehension outcomes in each cycles. Passing grade percentage of students result in the first cycle is 73,86% and in the second cycle is 87,56%. Therefore, students’ learning outcomes has passed performance indicator research of 85%. The conclusion of this research is the implementation of joyful learning strategy using game method of treasure clue can improve reading comprehension skill for the fourth grade students of elementary school.

  18. 77 FR 53248 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Swiss Treasures: From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8004] Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Swiss Treasures: From Biblical Papyrus and Parchment to Erasmus, Zwingli, Calvin, and Barth... Parchment to Erasmus, Zwingli, Calvin, and Barth,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the...

  19. Acta Theologica 2013: 2 297 KRIEG, Robert A. 2013. Treasure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This apophatic bon mot, which recurs throughout Krieg's study, recaps well the theological profile and aspirations of the author. In Treasure in the. Field, he does not offer any ground-breaking insights, and yet by skilfully building upon the exegetical and theological Catholic tradition as well as contemporary psychological ...

  20. Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: Secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Ellen; Van, Henricus L; Peen, Jaap; Don, Frank J; Twisk, Jos W R; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack J M

    2017-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female, mean age = 38.9, SD = 10.3) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV ) criteria for a major depressive episode and with a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score ≥14, who were randomized to 16 sessions of individual manualized CBT or short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy. Severely depressed patients (HAM-D >24) received additional antidepressant medication according to a protocol. Outcome measures included the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Outcome Questionnaire, a visual analogue scale for pain, and EuroQol. Data were analyzed with mixed model analyses using intention-to-treat samples. Noninferiority margins were prespecified as Cohen's d = -0.30. Across treatment conditions, 45-60% of the patients who completed posttreatment assessment showed clinically meaningful change for most outcome measures. We found no significant differences between the treatment conditions on any of the outcome measures at both posttreatment and follow-up. Noninferiority of psychodynamic therapy to CBT was shown for posttreatment and follow-up anxiety measures as well as for posttreatment pain and quality of life measures, but could not be consistently demonstrated for the other outcomes. This is the first study that shows that psychodynamic therapy can be at least as efficacious as CBT for depression on important aspects of patient functioning other than depressive symptom reduction. These findings extend the evidence-base of psychodynamic therapy for depression, but replication is needed by means of rigorously designed noninferiority trials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. A unified protocol for the transdiagnostic psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone

    2014-06-01

    Although there is evidence for the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy (PDT) in anxiety disorders, results are not yet satisfactory, for example, if rates of remission and response are considered. To address this problem, a unified psychodynamic protocol for anxiety disorders (UPP-ANXIETY) is proposed that integrates the treatment principles of those methods of PDT that have proven to be efficacious in anxiety disorders. In addition, this protocol is transdiagnostic, implying that it is applicable to various forms of anxiety disorders and related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorders, avoidant personality disorder). Based on supportive-expressive therapy, the UPP-ANXIETY represents an integrated form of psychodynamic therapy that allows for a flexible use of empirically supported treatment principles. UPP-ANXIETY encompasses the following 9 treatment principles (modules): (1) socializing the patient for psychotherapy, (2) motivating and setting treatment goals, (3) establishing a secure helping alliance, (4) identifying the core conflict underlying anxiety, (5) focusing on the warded-off wish/affect, (6) modifying underlying internalized object relations, (7) changing underlying defenses and avoidance, (8) modifying underlying response of self, and (9) termination and relapse prevention. Some principles are regarded as core components to be used in every treatment (principles 3-8). A unified protocol for the psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders has several advantages, that is (1) integrating the most effective treatment principles of empirically supported psychodynamic treatments for anxiety disorders can be expected to further improve the efficacy of PDT; (2) using a unified protocol in efficacy studies has the potential to enhance the evidence-based status of PDT by aggregating the evidence; (3) a unified protocol will facilitate both training in PDT and transfer of research to clinical practice; and (4) thus, a unified

  2. Molecular characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum isolated from an outbreak in treasure hunters Histoplasma capsulatum in treasure hunters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Bertha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, primary pulmonary histoplasmosis is the most relevant clinical form of the disease. The geographical distribution of specific strains of Histoplasma capsulatum circulating in Mexico has not been fully established. Outbreaks must be reported in order to have current, updated information on this disease, identifying new endemic areas, manner of exposure to the fungi, and molecular characterization of the causative agents. We report a recent outbreak of histoplasmosis in treasure hunters and the molecular characterization of two isolates obtained from these patients. Methods Six patients admitted to the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER in Mexico City presented severe respiratory symptoms suggestive of histoplasmosis. They acquired the infection in the Veracruz (VZ endemic zone. Diagnosis was made by X-ray and Computed tomography (CT, liver function, immunological techniques, and culture. Identification of H. capsulatum isolates was confirmed by using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was conducted with a probe from the M antigen, and the isolates were characterized by means of Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR employed the 1253 oligonucleotide and a mixture of oligonucleotides 1281 and 1283. These were compared to eight reference strain isolates from neighboring areas. Results X-ray and CT revealed disseminated micronodular images throughout lung parenchyma, as well as bilateral retrocaval, prevascular, subcarinal, and hilar adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, and altered liver function tests. Five of the six patients developed disseminated histoplasmosis. Two H. capsulatum strains were isolated. The same band profile was detected in both strains, indicating that both isolates corresponded to the sole H. capsulatum strain. Molecular characterization of the isolates was similar in 100% with the EH-53 Hidalgo human (HG strain (reference strain integrated into the LAm A clade described for

  3. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment...

  4. Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral approaches of obsessive-compulsive disorder: is it time to work through our ambivalence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempke, Stefan; Luyten, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the growing convergence among psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral approaches of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). From a traditional psychoanalytic point of view, OCD is mainly conceptualized in terms of a constant conflict between feelings of love and hate. More recent psychodynamic theories of OCD, such as the object-relational model, focus on the role of ambivalent mental representations or cognitive-affective schemas of self and others. This notion of mental representations or schemas links psychodynamic formulations to cognitive-behavioral approaches of OCD. Moreover, there is increasing overlap between psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral models concerning the core dynamics involved in OCD. Implications of this convergence for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  5. Defense mechanisms and implicit emotion regulation: a comparison of a psychodynamic construct with one from contemporary neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Timothy R; Hoffman, Leon

    2014-08-01

    A growing interest in the neuroscience of emotion regulation, particularly the subfield of implicit emotion regulation, brings new opportunity for the psychodynamic treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood. At the same time, psychodynamic theorists have become more aware of the centrality of affects in mental life. This paper introduces a manualized psychodynamic approach called Regulation-Focused Dynamic Psychotherapy (RFP-C). Theoretically based on the domain construct of implicit emotion regulation (ER), this approach posits that contemporary affect-oriented conceptualizations of defense mechanisms are theoretically similar to the neuroscience construct of implicit emotion regulation. To illustrate this theoretical similarity, the literature connected with both concepts is reviewed. The implications of this idea, which could promote an interface between psychodynamics and contemporary academic psychiatry and psychology, are discussed. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  6. Comment regarding Malik, et al.'s (1996) "The method of subliminal psychodynamic activation: do individual thresholds make a difference?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, A C

    1997-06-01

    Researchers using the method of subliminal psychodynamic activation need to consider the neutrality of their control messages. Anagrams or numbers are recommended as even benign-sounding phrases can produce nonneutral effects.

  7. [Psychodynamic and forensic approach of constitutional mythomania: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Thabet, J; Zouari, N; Charfeddine, F; Zouari, L; Maâlej, M

    2012-12-01

    Constitutional mythomania presents several diagnostic, aetiopathogenic and forensic problems for the doctor. We have discussed these aspects through the analysis of a case report. The case report relates to a 43 year-old man, who was subjected to a penal expertise following the emission of cheques without provision. During the examination, he pretended being both a doctor and a lawyer at the same time. He was in charge, among other things, of sale contracts dealing sometimes with high value transactions, obviously without following the required legal procedure. He was pursued subsequently for many other affairs of swindle. Data collected from his medical file indicated that he was the only boy of his family. Since his father had suffered from psychotic episodes, his grandfather had reared him; which he did it in a strictly religious way. He spent his childhood isolated. He was 15 years old when his grandfather died. He had then expressed religious and megalomaniac ideas that had motivated psychiatric management. Later on, he expressed imaginative ideas evoking unsystematized delusion (he pretended to have made a trip to America and to have seen a fish flying and turning into a woman). From a psychodynamic point of view, constitutional mythomania is considered as a borderline personality. It reflects an important narcissisic cleavage. The deceitfulness of the mythomaniac allows him to keep in touch with reality and to avoid mental disintegration. The recognition, by others, of these delusions allows the mythomaniac to have access to his proper level of existence. For a while, to the experts our patient appeared to be suffering from schizophrenia. Therefore, we can apply the Maleval theory to him, which identifies four periods as delusion structuring levels in psychosis : P0 (consequence of the phallic signification deficiency, it includes anxiety, annihilation, perplexity, interrogative attitude), P1 (stage of paranoid delusion), P2 (stage of paranoiac delusion

  8. Psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ben; Turner, William

    2013-07-31

    The sexual abuse of children and adolescents is a significant worldwide problem. It is associated with a wide variety of negative psychological, social and physical consequences for the victims. These effects can often be seen immediately following sexual abuse, but they may manifest later on and sometimes only in adult life. There are a number of different interventions aimed at helping children and adolescents who have been sexually abused, and psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy has a long-established tradition of being used for such victims. In this review, we set out to find the evidence for its effectiveness specifically in children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. To assess the effectiveness of psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. We searched the following databases in May 2013: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Science and Humanities, LILACS and WorldCat. We also searched three trials registers, checked the reference lists of relevant studies and contacted known experts. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy with treatment as usual or no treatment/waiting list control for children and adolescents up to age of 18 who had experienced sexual abuse at any time prior to the intervention. The review authors (BP and WT) independently screened search results to identify studies that met eligibility criteria. No studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria for this review. There are no randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare psychoanalytic/psychodynamic therapy with treatment as usual, no treatment or waiting list control for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. As a result, we cannot draw any conclusions as to the effectiveness of psychoanalytic/psychodynamic

  9. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) for social phobia into clinical practice: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltink, Jörg; Ruckes, Christian; Haselbacher, Antje; Canterino, Marco; Leichsenring, Falk; Joraschky, Peter; Leweke, Frank; Pöhlmann, Karin; Beutel, Manfred E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychodynamic psychotherapy is frequently applied in the treatment of social phobia. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of studies on the transfer of manualized treatments to routine psychodynamic practice. Our study is the first one to examine the effects of additional training in a manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) procedure on outcome in routine psychotherapy for social phobia. This study is an extension to a large multi-site RCT (N = 512) compar...

  10. Criticism in the Self, Brain, Relationships, and Social Structure: Implications for Psychodynamic Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Golan

    An integrative-psychodynamic theory of criticism in self and relationships is presented (Shahar, 2015). My theoretical starting point is the tension between Authenticity (A; our inherited potential, tantamount to Winnicott's True Self) and Self-Knowledge (SK; what we [think] we know about ourselves). Self-criticism, a formidable dimension of vulnerability to a wide array of psychopathologies, is construed as a distorted form of self-knowledge, reducing internal confusion at the expense of widening the gap between A and SK. Amalgamated by a genetic and neuroanatomic makeup, criticism of the self quickly translates into criticism-based interpersonal exchanges across the life span, culminating in an Axis of Criticism (ACRIM). A psychodynamic-integrative psychotherapy of malignant criticism in self and relationships is described. The article is concluded with some broad reflections on the implication of this work to the theory development and therapeutic action.

  11. Defense style changes with the addition of psychodynamic group therapy to clonazepam in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knijnik, Daniela Z; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Blanco, Carlos; Moraes, Carolina; Hauck, Simone; Mombach, Clarissa K; Strapasson, Atahualpa C P; Manfro, Gisele G; Eizirik, Cláudio L

    2009-07-01

    Psychodynamic Group Therapy (PGT) and clonazepam are strategies to reduce symptoms of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). The addition of PGT might lead to changes in defense styles. The objective of this study is to examine changes in defense styles when comparing clonazepam to psychodynamic group therapy plus clonazepam in GSAD during 12 weeks. Fifty-seven patients that met DSM-IV criteria for GSAD participated. social anxiety disorder symptoms were evaluated with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, and defense styles with the Defense Style Questionnaire. All defense styles changed overtime for both groups, especially mature defense style, which increased independently of the treatment allocation group. Regression analyses found that overtime there was a reduction in neurotic defenses in the combined group, whereas there was an increase in the clonazepam group. Neurotic defense style can change toward greater adaptiveness with the addition of PGT to clonazepam in GSAD, even in 12 weeks.

  12. Affect-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression and anxiety through the Internet: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Johansson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a psychological treatment approach that has a growing empirical base. Research has indicated an association between therapist-facilitated affective experience and outcome in psychodynamic therapy. Affect-phobia therapy (APT, as outlined by McCullough et al., is a psychodynamic treatment that emphasizes a strong focus on expression and experience of affect. This model has neither been evaluated for depression nor anxiety disorders in a randomized controlled trial. While Internet-delivered psychodynamic treatments for depression and generalized anxiety disorder exist, they have not been based on APT. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based, psychodynamic, guided self-help treatment based on APT for depression and anxiety disorders.Methods. One hundred participants with diagnoses of mood and anxiety disorders participated in a randomized (1:1 ratio controlled trial of an active group versus a control condition. The treatment group received a 10-week, psychodynamic, guided self-help treatment based on APT that was delivered through the Internet. The treatment consisted of eight text-based treatment modules and included therapist contact (9.5 min per client and week, on average in a secure online environment. Participants in the control group also received online therapist support and clinical monitoring of symptoms, but received no treatment modules. Outcome measures were the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9 and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7. Process measures were also included. All measures were administered weekly during the treatment period and at a 7-month follow-up.Results. Mixed models analyses using the full intention-to-treat sample revealed significant interaction effects of group and time on all outcome measures, when comparing treatment to the control group. A large between-group effect size

  13. Change of the model of homosexuality in psychodynamic approach (review of foreign literature references

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strokova S.S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available At present homosexuality is not regarded as a mental disorder in contrast to a long period in the past when it was treated as a disease. The majority of psychodynamic approach representatives adhered to the estimation of nontraditional sexual orientation as a psychopathic state. Homosexuality was often viewed as a symptom of a major psychic impairment like confused self-identity, but with time the authors came to a conclusion that homosexuality is an alternative, yet possible type of psychosexual self-identity. The article discloses the evolution of a homosexual model in psychodynamic approach and describes the current view on the issue. It also specifies the questions brought up by the modern researchers of homosexuality.

  14. Use of the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with a Severely Traumatized Patient

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    Carol eGeorge

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George & West, 2012. The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention.

  15. The Outsider's Syndrome Model: an inquiry into the psychodynamics of culture shock experience

    OpenAIRE

    Med HAFSI

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the nature, or the psychodynamics of culture shock experience. The term culture shock, as far as I know, was first introduced by Oberg (1960), when studying the adjustment process of anthropologists to different cultures during their field research. For a longtime a subject for anthropology, thep henomenon of culture shock was studied as one of the phenomena observed during the course of adjustment to a new culture (Berry,1985). Recently, as can be shown by the large numbe...

  16. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltink, Jörg; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred E.; Ruckes, Christian; Herpertz, Stephan; Joraschky, Peter; Koranyi, Susan; Michal, Matthias; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Strauss, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT). No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA) to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatmen...

  17. Internet-delivered psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment of social anxiety disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hesslow, Thomas; Nilsson, Maja; Johansson, R.; Färdig, S.; Jansson, A.; Jonsson, L.; Karlsson, J.; Hesser, H.; Ljótsson, B.; Frederick, R.J.; Lilliengren, Peter; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is one of the most common mental health disorders. Effective treatments exist, but limited access and high costs causes many sufferers to remain untreated. As not all patients accept the CBTmodel of psychopathology, alternative treatments are desirable. We conducted two studies to help establish the efficacy of a psychodynamic model of guided self-help (IPDT). In the first study (N=72) participants were randomized to either ten weeks of IPDT or a waiting list control c...

  18. Operationalizing the psychodynamic diagnostic manual: a preliminary study of the psychodiagnostic chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert M; Stoffey, Ronald W

    2014-01-01

    The Psychodiagnostic Chart (PDC) operationalizes the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM) Adult section. The authors collected 104 PDC cases from 15 psychologists who are experts with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). They found very good construct validity when the PDC was compared to MMPI-2, the Karolinska Psychodynamic Profile (KAPP), and the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD) Psychic Structure/Mental Functioning Scales. They found very good reliability for the 73 cases with a 2-week test-retest of the PDC. Additionally, 61 psychologists were recruited from listservs and asked to use the PDC on a recent client; 84% rated Level of Personality Organization as "helpful-very helpful" in understanding their patients. There was also similar support for the Personality Patterns or Disorders and Mental Functioning dimensions. In comparison, only 31% rated the ICD or DSM symptoms as "helpful-very helpful" in understanding their patients. The PDC may be used for diagnoses, treatment formulations, progress reports, and outcome assessment, as well as for empirical research on the PDM.

  19. Facets of Object Representation: Process and Outcome Over the Course of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Anthony S J; Hilsenroth, Mark J; Gold, Jerold; Farber, Barry A

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy in improving facets of object relations (OR) functioning over the course of treatment. The sample consisted of 75 outpatients engaged in short-term dynamic psychotherapy at a university-based psychological services clinic. Facets of OR functioning were assessed at pre- and posttreatment by independent raters using the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale-Global rating method (SCORS-G; Stein, Hilsenroth, Slavin-Mulford, & Pinsker, 2011 ; Westen, 1995 ) from in-session patient relational narratives. The Comparative Psychotherapy Process Scale (CPPS; Hilsenroth, Blagys, Ackerman, Bonge, & Blais, 2005 ) was used to assess therapist activity and psychotherapy techniques early in treatment. Independent clinical ratings of OR functioning and psychotherapy technique were conducted and all were found to be in the good to excellent range of reliability. Specific facets of OR functioning improved with medium to large effect changes posttreatment. These adaptive changes were significantly related to the incidence of psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques. Also, this study identified the role specific psychodynamic techniques had in facilitating change in a number of underlying dimensions of OR. Patient self-reported reliable change in symptomatology and reliable change in facets of OR were significantly related as well. This study highlights the utility of incorporating psychological assessment into psychotherapy practice to assess change at the explicit (symptoms) and implicit (OR) level. Limitations of this study, future research directions, and implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  20. Comparing Psychodynamic Teaching, Supervision, and Psychotherapy Over Videoconferencing Technology with Chinese Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert M; Wang, Xiubing; Tune, Jane

    2015-12-01

    How do experts compare teaching, supervision, and treatment from a psychodynamic perceptive over the Internet with in-person work? Our methodology was based on the expert opinions of 176 teachers, supervisors, and therapists in the China American Psychoanalytic Alliance (CAPA) who use videoconferencing (VCON) with Chinese students. The results from our online survey indicate: (1), The longer teachers teach, the more effective they rate teaching over VCON; (2), Teaching, supervision, and treatment were all rated in the range of "slightly less effective" than in-person, with supervision rated significantly more effective than teaching and treatment over VCON; (3), When doing psychodynamic treatment over VCON the issues of symptom reduction, exploring mental life, working on transference, relational problems, resistance, privacy issues, countertransference, are all equally rated in the range of "slightly less effective" than in-person treatment; (4), The highest significantly rated indications for treatment over VCON are: "To offer high quality treatment to underserved or remote patients" and "When patient is house-bound or travel would be impractical"; and (5), The highest significantly rated contraindication for treatment over VCON is: "Patient needs close observation due to crisis or decompensation." Overall, this survey suggests that VCON teaching, supervision, and treatment from a psychodynamic perceptive is a worthwhile option when considering its unique contribution to extending services where needed.

  1. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for social phobia: a treatment manual based on supportive-expressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Beutel, Manfred; Leibing, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Social phobia is a very frequent mental disorder characterized by an early onset, a chronic unremitting course, severe psychosocial impairments and high socioeconomic costs. To date, no manual for the psychodynamic treatment of social phobia exists. After a brief description of the disorder, a manual for a short-term psychodynamic treatment of social phobia is presented. The treatment is based on Luborsky s supportive-expressive (SE) therapy, which is complemented by treatment elements specific to social phobia. The treatment includes the characteristic elements of SE therapy, that is, setting goals, focus on the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) associated with the patient s symptoms, interpretive interventions to enhance insight into the CCRT, and supportive interventions, in particular fostering a helping alliance. In order to tailor the treatment more specifically to social phobia, treatment elements have been added, for example informing the patient about the disorder and the treatment, a specific focus on shame and on unrealistic demands, and encouraging the patient to confront anxiety-producing situations. More directive interventions are included as well, such as specific prescriptions to stop persisting self-devaluations. The treatment manual is presently being used in a large-scale randomized controlled multicenter study comparing short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of social phobia.

  2. Key competencies of the psychodynamic psychotherapist and how to teach them in supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Joan

    2010-03-01

    Four of Rodolfa et al.'s (2005) competencies in professional psychology-relationship, self-reflection, assessment-case conceptualization, and intervention-are key for the psychodynamic psychotherapist. Relationship lies at the heart of what is understood to be curative about psychodynamic psychotherapy. Self-reflection implies a complex and highly developed process that includes but goes beyond Rodolfa et al.'s and Kaslow, Dunn, and Smith's (2008) definitions. Competent assessment, diagnosis, and case conceptualization entails making inferences about unconscious processes by observing the client and also one's own experience, and integrating these inferences with theory. Effective psychodynamic intervention is derived from what the psychotherapist has experienced, processed, and conceptualized about the relationship with the client and about the client's internal object world. An extended vignette shows these competencies emerging in a psychotherapist-in-training, facilitated by an intense interaction with a supervisor. Although the supervisory and clinical tasks are different, the supervisor provides a relationship experience that models these same competencies for the supervisee and catalyzes their development in the supervisee. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  3. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2011-04-27

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized trials comparing the effect of psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included six trials randomizing a total of 648 participants. Five trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and only one trial assessed 'psychodynamic psychotherapy'. All six trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on all six trials showed that the psychodynamic interventions significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.12 (95% confidence interval -4.39 to -1.86;Pinterpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy compared with 'treatment as usual' for patients with major depressive disorder. The potential beneficial effect seems small and effects on major outcomes are unknown. Randomized trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed.

  4. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Christian Jakobsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized trials comparing the effect of psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included six trials randomizing a total of 648 participants. Five trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and only one trial assessed 'psychodynamic psychotherapy'. All six trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on all six trials showed that the psychodynamic interventions significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.12 (95% confidence interval -4.39 to -1.86;P<0.00001, no heterogeneity compared with 'treatment as usual'. Trial sequential analysis confirmed this result. DISCUSSION: We did not find convincing evidence supporting or refuting the effect of interpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy compared with 'treatment as usual' for patients with major depressive disorder. The potential beneficial effect seems small and effects on major outcomes are unknown. Randomized trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed.

  5. Psychological experiences in South African society before the 2010 FIFA World Cup from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Koortzen

    2012-05-01

    Research purpose: The objective of this study was to analyse and describe the psychological experiences of South Africans before the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Research design, approach and method: The researchers conducted the study from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives. The study comprised a qualitative, explorative and social phenomenological study. The researchers conducted interviews with a wide range of their colleagues and clients. Main findings: The results seemed to indicate that South Africans had had a number of positive and negative experiences before the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Practical/managerial implications: The researchers presented the findings as a number of systems psychodynamic and positive psychology themes. Contribution/value-add: This study presents original research that contributes valuable new knowledge to the positive psychology and systems psychodynamic perspectives.

  6. Social functioning of patients with psychotic disorders in long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy: preliminary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restek-Petrović, Branka; Gregurek, Rudolf; Petrović, Ratimir; Orešković-Krezler, Nataša; Mihanović, Mate; Ivezić, Ena

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, social functioning of patients has increasingly been used as a criterion for assessing therapeutic efficacy of the group psychotherapy. The purpose of this preliminary study was to examine whether social functioning of patients with diagnosed psychotic disorders changes during their participation in psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The sample consisted of 30 patients involved in the psychodynamic group psychotherapy (PGP), and a comparative group of 30 patients treated only with antipsychotic medication therapy (treatment as usual; TAU). After two years of therapy, the instruments designed for this study (self-assessment and therapist-assessment questionnaire) were applied to examine changes in patient communication in their interpersonal relations, romantic and working functioning, and overall social functioning. The research also included data as to whom patients turned to for help, and the number of hospitalisations in the observed period. The majority of patients from both groups assessed their social functioning as improved, with significant differences found only in the area of romantic relations: more patients in the TAU group assessed their functioning as worsened. Nevertheless, a significantly higher number of patients in the PGP group were assessed by their therapists to have improved social functioning in all dimensions, except in the area of romantic relations, where there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. In comparison with the TAU group, twice as many patients in the PGP group turned to their psychiatrist for help and had four times fewer hospitalisations. Considering the limitations of this preliminary study, it can be concluded that the findings are promising, although further research is required to determine whether a psychodynamic approach to group psychotherapy truly leads to improved social functioning of patients with psychotic disorders.

  7. Internal Representations of the Therapeutic Relationship Among Adolescents in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzil-Slonim, Dana; Tishby, Orya; Shefler, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes in adolescents' internal representations of their relationship with their therapist and the extent to which these changes were related to changes in their representations of their relationship with their parents and to treatment outcomes. Thirty adolescents (aged 15-18 years, 70% women) undergoing psychodynamic psychotherapy participated in relationship anecdote paradigms interviews based on the core conflictual relationship theme method and completed outcome measures at the beginning of treatment and a year later. Adolescents' positive representations of their therapists increased throughout the year of treatment, whereas their negative representations did not change. There was an association between the development of the therapeutic relationship and improvement in the perception of the relationship with parents over the course of therapy. Increases in the level of positive representations and decreases in the level of negative representations of the therapist were associated with greater satisfaction with treatment but not with the other outcome measures. These results support the centrality of the therapeutic relationship in the process of change during adolescents' psychodynamic psychotherapy. The finding that positive representations of the therapist increased throughout treatment but that negative representations remained steady suggests that therapists who treat adolescents should expect and be able to hear adolescent clients' positive and negative internal representations of themselves. Therapists need to realize that although adolescents often experience negative emotions and perceptions in therapy as in other significant relationships, this does not necessarily block the development of positive emotions. The finding that changes in the representations of the therapist are associated with changes in the representations of parents is in line with psychodynamic theory, which posits that psychotherapy facilitates new

  8. Psychodynamic day treatment programme for patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Dynamics and predictors of therapeutic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Ondrej; Bob, Petr; Pec, Jan; Hrubcova, Adela

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a psychodynamically based group psychotherapeutic programme might improve symptoms, social functions, or quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to investigate factors that might predict clinical improvement or dropouts from the programme. A quantitative prospective cohort study. We have investigated 81 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who participated in a 9-month psychodynamically based psychotherapeutic day programme. The patients were assessed at the beginning and end of the programme, and then at 1-year follow-up. The assessment included psychotic manifestations (HoNOS), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), demographic data, and daily doses of medication. 21 patients dropped out from the programme, and 46 patients succeeded in undergoing follow-up assessment. The psychotic manifestations (self-rating version of HoNOS) and quality of life measured with WHOQOL-BREF (domains of social relationships and environment) were significantly improved at the end of the programme and at follow-up. However, the manifestations on the version for external evaluators of HoNOS were improved only at follow-up. Years of psychiatric treatment, number of hospitalizations or suicide attempts, and experience of relationships with a partner were negatively related to clinical improvement, whereas symptom severity, current working, or study activities were related positively. The results show that a group psychodynamic programme may improve the clinical status and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This type of programme is more beneficial for patients with higher pre-treatment symptom severity and the presence of working or study activities. A psychodynamically based group programme improves the clinical status and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Data indicate that changes on the subjective level are detectable by the end of the

  9. Sadism linked to loneliness: psychodynamic dimensions of the sadistic serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Willem H J

    2011-08-01

    In this article the psychodynamic link between loneliness and sadism is examined on basis of a case report of the sadistic and cannibalistic serial killer Jeffery Dahmer. Envy, shame/rage mechanism, a disturbed oral-sadistic development, castration fear and severe feelings of inferiority, the conviction of being unlovable and unacceptable, need to diminish tension, powerful and sadistic fantasies as a consequence of inadequate and frustrated parenting, and reality distortion appear to be involved in sadistic etiology. © 2011 N.P.A.P.

  10. Expanding Subjectivities: Introduction to the Special Issue on ‘New Directions in Psychodynamic Research’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Soldz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understanding, especially but not exclusively in observational and interview-based studies. Psychodynamic or psychoanalytic approaches to research add an emphasis on unconscious motivational processes in both researchers and research participants that impact research experience and data. Building upon Anglo-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding.

  11. Exploring the meaning of trauma in the South African Police Service: A systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This study explores individual stories of trauma and their dissonance with the official, dominant discourse on trauma in the South African Police Service (SAPS from a systems psychodynamic perspective.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was, firstly, to explore how trauma experienced by South African Police Service members is constructed or ‘talked about’ and made sense of. Questions and issues that are considered relevant to the primary purpose are: which aspects of the working environment do members consider to be the most stressful, traumatic and difficult to cope with, and what is the effect of the change and transition processes on members’ working experiences?Motivation for the study: The authors set out to explore the role of systems psychodynamics in the experience of trauma and stress in the SAPS.Research design, approach and method: Through this qualitative, explorative, social phenomenological study, contributing circumstances and processes are included as additional discourses in an attempt to deepen understanding. The epistemology viewpoint of the study is found in the social constructionism and the data comprise 15 essays by members of the SAPS, all of which have been analysed from the perspective of systems psychodynamics.Main findings: Although the effect of trauma on police officers can never be negated, the way in which they deal with trauma seems to be different from what was initially believed. Further, their experience of stress is not solely the result of traumatic experiences but rather the result of traumatic experiences and systems psychodynamics operating within their organisation – which includes both organisational stressors or dynamics and transformation dynamics.Practical/managerial implications: The history of psychological trauma indicates that constructions of traumatic stress are strongly related to cultural, social and political circumstances. Current psychoanalytic thinking

  12. Subliminal psychodynamic activation: an experiment controlling for major possible confounding influences outlined by Fudin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, R; Källmén, H

    1991-08-01

    40 and 48 subjects participated in two separate experiments aimed at reproducing the subliminal psychodynamic activation (SPA) phenomenon and taking into account the major methodological critique by Fudin (1986, 1990). Subjects were first exposed either to a full or one of all possible partial symbiotic messages and then to their anagram equivalents. Confounding and irrelevant influences were controlled; the results indicate that only the full symbiotic message improved motor performance. This strongly suggests that subjects encode the meaning of the full message and supports an interpretation in terms of an alleviation of an internal symbiotic conflict leading to a state of calmness conducive to improved motor performance.

  13. Linguistic measures of the referential process in psychodynamic treatment: the English and Italian versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Rachele; Maskit, Bernard; Bucci, Wilma; De Coro, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    The referential process is defined in the context of Bucci's multiple code theory as the process by which nonverbal experience is connected to language. The English computerized measures of the referential process, which have been applied in psychotherapy research, include the Weighted Referential Activity Dictionary (WRAD), and measures of Reflection, Affect and Disfluency. This paper presents the development of the Italian version of the IWRAD by modeling Italian texts scored by judges, and shows the application of the IWRAD and other Italian measures in three psychodynamic treatments evaluated for personality change using the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure (SWAP-200). Clinical predictions based on applications of the English measures were supported.

  14. LOCAL PIG BREEDS AND PORK PRODUCTS IN CROATIA AND SLOVENIA – UNEXPLOITED TREASURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kušec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The rationale, the concept and key challenges of the H2020 project TREASURE dealing with local pig breeds is presented and discussed. The action addresses the phenotypic and genetic characterization, performance of local pig breeds in diverse production systems and their environmental impact, specific quality of their products and market potential. The goal is to build up the capacities to develop sustainable pork chains based on local pig breeds. A special emphasis is given to describe the workplan for Black Slavonian and Turopolje local pig breeds from Croatia and Slovenian Krškopolje pig.

  15. A groundwater-flow model for the Treasure Valley and surrounding area, southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolino, James R.; Vincent, Sean

    2017-04-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and Idaho Water Resource Board (IWRB), will construct a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Treasure Valley and surrounding area. Resource managers will use the model to simulate potential anthropogenic and climatic effects on groundwater for water-supply planning and management. As part of model construction, the hydrogeologic understanding of the aquifer system will be updated with information collected during the last two decades, as well as new data collected for the study.

  16. [Nursing in prison: inmates as patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Marie; Saint-Jean, Micheline; Therriault, Pierre-Yves; Rhéaume, Jacques; Ruelland, Isabelle; Lavoie, Myriam

    2013-06-01

    There are very few studies investigating the work nurses do in prisons. Based on data stemming from a research in Psychodynamics of Work and a literature review, this paper describes nursing practices in a Canadian penitentiary institution. Three male nurses and two female nurses participated in three two-hour long focus group sessions. Central sources of pleasure that emerged from the focus groups were the scope of nursing care practice ; the autonomy and collaboration with physicians; nursing care practices devoid of moral value judgments, the humanitarian approach, caring and the wish to make a difference in the lives of the inmates ; the pride connected to this unusual professional context, and the recognition by peers and inmates. The main sources of suffering on the other hand were the feeling that rehabilitation was more an ideal than reality ; the paradox of providing both care and safety ; the scary characteristics of working alone ; the fear of lawsuits, and the feeling of being observed continuously. The resulting data we discuss show the issues of a certain dissociation that exists between the patient and the inmate, the fear of contamination of a healthcare nursing identity by the place of practice, but also the feeling of plenitude and sublimation. The conclusion stresses the tension that exists between security and caring, distance and proximity.

  17. Exploring the development of an organisational culture of control and dependency from a systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Eeden

    2010-05-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this research was to study the impact of the change process at a plant of a South African production company. Motivations for the study: Problems were experienced in terms of production and a need for transformation at different levels was expressed. Co-dependence in the environment necessitated exploration of intra-organisational dynamics. Research design, approach and method: The study focused on the management team at a specifc plant, but by applying the systems psychodynamic perspective it was possible to also explore the mutual effect of relationships with other systems in the organisation, the company as a whole and the environment. Respondents included the directors of manufacturing and of human resources, the general manager, an 11-member management team and staff representatives. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews, group interviews and a group consultation session were held. Main findings: Hypotheses were formulated regarding the change experienced in the company, the overemphasis of control in the various systems, efforts to move from dependency to interdependence, personal authority as a requirement for interdependent functioning and problems with interrelatedness. Practical/managerial implications: The study illustrates the application of the systems psychodynamic approach in exploring the interaction between and mutual infuence of various organisational systems, especially in times of change. Contribution/value add: At a broader level, the study contributes to the understanding of the application of the theory as well as suggesting the use of a methodology. Recommendations for an intervention of this nature were also made.

  18. A proposed model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Zelda Gillian

    2017-09-01

    Just as Freud used stages of psychosexual development to ground his model of psychoanalysis, it is possible to do the same with Erik Erikson's stages of development with regards to a model of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper proposes an eight-stage model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Various suggestions are offered. One such suggestion is that as each of Erikson's developmental stages is triggered by a crisis, in therapy it is triggered by the client's search. The resolution of the search often leads to the development of another search, which implies that the therapy process comprises a series of searches. This idea of a series of searches and resolutions leads to the understanding that identity is developmental and therapy is a space in which a new sense of identity may emerge. The notion of hope is linked to Erikson's stage of Basic Trust and the proposed model of therapy views hope and trust as essential for the therapy process. Two clinical vignettes are offered to illustrate these ideas. Psychotherapy can be approached as an eight-stage process and linked to Erikson's eight stages model of development. Psychotherapy may be viewed as a series of searches and thus as a developmental stage resolution process, which leads to the understanding that identity is ongoing throughout the life span. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Psychodynamic Psychiatry in the 21st Century: Constructing a Comprehensive Science of Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Yakov

    2018-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychiatry is not limited to psychotherapy practice. It is defined by systematic attention to the "common factors" underlying both psychotherapy and psychopharmacology outcomes, which include the patient's subjective systems of meaning and the complex flow of the patient-provider relationship in addition to the patient's "objective" psychopathology. It allows for a non-reductionist milieu where the meaning of the illness and the full complexity of the treatment process can be explored in order to achieve a qualitative and lasting change in the patient's psychopathology. The author proposes an integrated psychobiological model of psychiatric care where attention to the patient's subjective experience and the unique flow of the patient-provider relationship stand on an equal footing with the patient's objective behavioral and symptomatic presentation. This model provides a common foundation for diverse psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions to enable a paradigm shift from symptom- or syndrome-focused approach to individualized, process-oriented philosophy of care. Psychodynamically informed treatment provision helps to unify psychiatric practice by integrating objective, subjective, and intersubjective science in order to construct a systematic science of experience.

  20. Therapist affect focus and patient outcomes in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Marc J; Hilsenroth, Mark J; Weinberger, Joel

    2007-06-01

    The authors systematically examined the relationship between therapist facilitation of patient emotional experience/expression and outcome in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Computer and manual searches were conducted for relevant publications, and 10 independent samples of short-term dynamic psychotherapy were included in a meta-analysis. Data analysis included calculation of an overall effect size of the relationship between therapist affect focus and outcome, statistical significance, and test for homogeneity. In addition, moderator analyses were conducted to examine the potential impact of type of outcome construct used and the methodological quality of individual studies. The overall average weighted effect size across all outcome types was statistically significant (r=0.30), and the homogeneity statistic was nonsignificant. Moderator analyses indicated a statistically significant relationship between therapist facilitation of patient emotional experience/expression and outcome when more than one outcome construct was included but not when either a single or an unclear outcome construct was used. There were no significant relationships between methodological quality and the size of the effects, although use of audio- or videotaping for supervision demonstrated a moderate effect. These data indicate that therapist facilitation of patient affective experience/expression is associated with patient improvement over the course of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Although the size of this relationship was not significantly related to methodological quality, results suggest the importance of close supervision of actual techniques through the use of audio- or videotapes. Additionally, results highlight the importance of defining outcome in a multidimensional way to properly assess theoretically relevant effects.

  1. Treasure hunt of mineral resources: a serious game in a virtual world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniello, Annalisa

    2015-04-01

    This posterdescribes a geoscience activities on mineral resources for students of 14-18 years old. The activities are created as a treasure hunt of mineral resources, students must pass test and solve questions, search mineral in different environments: near a volcanos, in the river, in a lake, in a cave, under the sea and on a mountain. The activity is created using a virtual environment a virtual world built with a software, Opensim, a opensource software. In this virtual world every student as avatar, a virtual rapresentation of himself, search information, objects, mineral as in a serious game, a digital serious game. In the serious game buit as a treasure hunt, students interact with environment in a learning by doing, and they interact with other students in a cooperative learning and a collaborative environment. In the hunt there is a challenge that student must overcome: understanding what is a mineral resource collecting data on mineral analyzing environments where they are created so the students can improve motivation and learn, and improve scientific skills.

  2. “Green Ocean Treasure Hunting” Guided by Policy Support in a Transitional Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Ge

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For countries in the process of economic transition, improvement of industrialization is no longer the sole goal of their economic development. While upgrading the level of industrial development, these countries also gradually attach importance to resource utilization efficiency and environmental protection, which is why green entrepreneurship has become increasingly popular in recent years. With the intensification of policy guidance, a new “sea area” named green entrepreneurship ushers in more and more “treasure hunters” exploring “the treasure” therein. Based on this, this paper constructs the model of “Green Ocean Treasure Hunting” for green entrepreneurial enterprises to analyze the role played by their government’s relevant policies and puts forward the research proposition of this article based on the relevant literature. On this basis, this paper chooses and analyzes a medium-sized, high-tech enterprise in China which follows a certain typical green entrepreneurial process as evidence of the propositions we have put forward.

  3. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  4. Is brief psychodynamic psychotherapy in primary fibromyalgia syndrome with concurrent depression an effective treatment? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Carl Eduard; Waller, Elisabeth; Endorf, Katharina; Schmidt, Stefan; König, Ralf; Zeeck, Almut; Joos, Andreas; Lacour, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There are no studies investigating the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). We conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating an adapted form of individual short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (ASTPP) versus primary care management (TAU). The study focused on FMS patients with psychiatric comorbidity. Forty-six female patients with FMS and an International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnosis of a comorbid depression or anxiety disorder were recruited in a hospital setting. Participants were randomized to receive either ASTPP (25 sessions, 1 session/week) or TAU (4 consultations/6 months). Outcome measures included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Pain Disability Index, the Symptom Checklist 27 and the health-related quality of life. Primary endpoints of the outcome assessment were the FIQ total score and the HADS depression scale at 12-month follow-up. Both treatments were effective in reducing the FIQ total score (ES=0.56 and ES=0.75, respectively). Intent-to-treat analyses failed to provide evidence suggesting a marked superiority of individual psychodynamic psychotherapy as compared to TAU. A high-standard routine treatment focusing on the improvement of health behavior and including antidepressant and analgesic medication is equally effective as a short-term individual psychodynamic psychotherapy in improving fibromyalgia-related symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The association between retrospective outcome evaluations and pre-post-treatment changes in psychodynamic group-psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the present study of 203 patients in psychodynamic group psychotherapy, we explore associations between patient and therapist global retrospective outcome evaluations (ROE), and pre-post-treatment changes on the Symptom Check List 90 Revised (SCL-90-R) and non-symptomatic focus of therapy. The......, and associated with personality factors or domains not captured by standard questionnaires....

  6. The Role of Psychodynamic Assessment in Diagnosis and Treatment of Personality Disorders: Reliability and Validity of the Developmental profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Ingenhoven (Theo)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The aim of this thesis is to improve our understanding of the role of psychodynamic models, and their assessment procedures, in diagnosis and treatment of patients with personality disorders. In this introduction we briefly describe the current status of

  7. U.S. DOE’s Energy Treasure Hunt Exchange In-Plant Trainings – DOE Resources, Early Results and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [ORNL; Brockway, Walter F. [ORNL; Lung, Bruce [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Thirumaran, Kiran [ORNL; Wenning, Thomas J. [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    The primary objective of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Treasure Hunt In-Plant Training (INPLT) is to train Better Plants partner employees to lead and conduct future energy efficiency Treasure Hunts within their facilities without DOE assistance. By taking a “learning-by-doing” approach, this INPLT, like other DOE INPLT trainings, has the added benefit of uncovering real energy and cost-saving opportunities. This INPLT leverages DOE and Better Plants technical staff, resources and tools and the EPA “Energy Treasure Hunt Guide: Simple Steps to Finding Energy Savings” process. While Treasure Hunts are a relatively well-known approach to identifying energy-savings in manufacturing plants, DOE is adding several additional elements in its Treasure Hunt Exchanges. The first element is technical assistance and methodology. DOE provides high-quality technical resources, such as energy efficiency calculators, fact sheets, source books etc., to facilitate the Treasure Hunt process and teaches four fundamentals: 1) how to profile equipment, 2) how to collect data, and 3), data & ROI calculation methodologies. Another element is the “train the trainer” approach wherein the training facilitator will train at least one partner employee to facilitate future treasure hunts. Another element is that DOE provides energy diagnostic equipment and teaches the participants how to use them. Finally, DOE also offers partners the opportunity to exchange teams of employees either within a partners’ enterprise or with other partners to conduct the treasure hunt in each other’s facilities. This exchange of teams is important because each team can bring different insights and uncover energy-saving opportunities that would otherwise be missed. This paper will discuss DOE methodology and the early results and lessons learned from DOE’S Energy Treasure Hunt In-Plant Trainings at Better Plants Partner facilities.

  8. The attitudes of nursing students to euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseh, Ladan; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common morally controversial issues in endof-life care is euthanasia. Examining the attitudes of nursing students to this issue is important because they may encounter situations related to euthanasia during their clinical courses. The aim of our study was to examine nursing students' attitudes to euthanasia in Shahrekord city in western Iran. This was done using the Euthanasia Attitude Scale. The scale is divided into four categories, ie ethical considerations, practical considerations, treasuring life and naturalistic beliefs. Of 132 nursing students, 120 participated in the study (response rate 93.1%). According to the study's findings, 52.5%, 2.5% and 45% of the students reported a negative, neutral and positive attitude to euthanasia, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the nursing students' attitudes to euthanasia and some demographic characteristics, including sex, age and religious beliefs. Iranian Muslim nursing students participating in the study had a negative attitude to euthanasia. Further studies are recommended among nursing students from different cultures and of different religious faiths.

  9. Exploring the meaning of trauma in the South African Police Service: A systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna Young

    2012-06-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of the research was, firstly, to explore how trauma experienced by South African Police Service members is constructed or ‘talked about’ and made sense of. Questions and issues that are considered relevant to the primary purpose are: which aspects of the working environment do members consider to be the most stressful, traumatic and difficult to cope with, and what is the effect of the change and transition processes on members’ working experiences? Motivation for the study: The authors set out to explore the role of systems psychodynamics in the experience of trauma and stress in the SAPS. Research design, approach and method: Through this qualitative, explorative, social phenomenological study, contributing circumstances and processes are included as additional discourses in an attempt to deepen understanding. The epistemology viewpoint of the study is found in the social constructionism and the data comprise 15 essays by members of the SAPS, all of which have been analysed from the perspective of systems psychodynamics. Main findings: Although the effect of trauma on police officers can never be negated, the way in which they deal with trauma seems to be different from what was initially believed. Further, their experience of stress is not solely the result of traumatic experiences but rather the result of traumatic experiences and systems psychodynamics operating within their organisation – which includes both organisational stressors or dynamics and transformation dynamics. Practical/managerial implications: The history of psychological trauma indicates that constructions of traumatic stress are strongly related to cultural, social and political circumstances. Current psychoanalytic thinking emphasises the meaning of the real occurrence, which causes trauma by changing the person’s experience of the self in relation to self-objects. Practical implications are the loss of the supportive subculture of the police, the loss

  10. Opening the Treasure Chest: A Newborn Star Cluster Emerges from Its Dust Pillar in Carina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Bally, John

    2005-02-01

    We present detailed observations of the Treasure Chest, a compact nebula at the head of a dust pillar in the southern Carina Nebula. This object is of interest because it is an example of a dense young cluster containing at least one massive star, the formation of which may have been triggered by feedback from the very massive stars in the Carina Nebula, and possibly η Carinae itself. Our observations include narrowband images of Hα, [S II], [O III], Paβ, [Fe II], and H2, broadband JHK images, and a visual wavelength spectrum of the nebula. We use these data to investigate both the nebular and stellar content of the object. The near-infrared emission-line images reveal a cavity inside the head of the dust pillar, which contains a dense cluster of young stars, whereas the observed spectrum of the nebula is consistent with an H II region ionized by the O9.5 V star CPD -59°2661. The embedded infrared cluster was discovered in Two Micron All Sky Survey data, but our new JHK images have improved spatial resolution and sensitivity, allowing an analysis of the stellar content of the newborn cluster. After subtracting contamination of field stars within the Carina Nebula itself, we compare the cluster's color-magnitude diagram with pre-main-sequence isochrones to derive a likely cluster age of less than about 0.1 Myr. This is in reasonable agreement with the dynamical age of a few times 104 yr for the expanding nebular cavity, indicating extreme youth. Stars in the Treasure Chest cluster are highly reddened, with extinction values as large as AV~50. Two-thirds of cluster members show strong infrared excess colors indicative of circumstellar disks, which may prove to be among the highest fraction yet seen for a young cluster once L-band photometry is considered. All evidence suggests that the Treasure Chest is an extremely young cluster that is just now breaking out of its natal cloud into the surrounding massive star-forming region and is a good target for more

  11. How does addressing patient's defenses help to repair alliance ruptures in psychodynamic psychotherapy?: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerostathos, Antonios; de Roten, Yves; Berney, Sylvie; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; Ambresin, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    Interpreting or addressing defenses is an important aspect of psychoanalytic technique. Previous research has shown that therapist addressing defenses (TADs) can produce a positive effect on alliance. The potential value of TADs during the process of alliance rupture and resolution has not yet been documented. We selected patients (n = 17) undertaking a short-term dynamic psychotherapy in which the therapeutic alliance, measured with the Helping Alliance Questionnaire and monitored after each session, showed a pattern of rupture and resolution. Two control sessions (5 and 15) were also selected. Presence of TADs was examined in each therapist interpretation. Compared with control sessions, rupture sessions were characterized by fewer TADs and especially fewer TADs addressing specifically intermediate-essentially neurotic-defenses. Resolution sessions were characterized by more TADs addressing specifically intermediate defenses. This confirms the link between therapist technique and alliance process in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  12. The addiction concept and technology: diagnosis, metaphor, or something else? a psychodynamic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Todd

    2012-11-01

    Many today suffer from an imbalance between life and life on the screen. When extreme, such as excessive gaming, clinicians retreat to familiar explanations, such as "Internet addiction." But the addiction concept is of limited value, limiting both research and treatment options. This article discusses an alternative. Pathological overuse is seen as a failed solution in which people become entrapped by technology's promise of delivering that which only life can offer, such as the grand adventure simulated in World of Warcraft. A two-part treatment approach of such "simulation entrapment" is described in which both the original problem and the entrapment are treated, the former by traditional psychodynamic psychotherapy and the later by highlighting differences between the technologically mediated experience and traditional experiences of being bodies together. The case of a college student suffering from pathological shame with excessive gaming as the failed solution is offered as an illustration. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Understanding and working with the psychodynamics of practitioner-patient relationships in the manual therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Danny; Sher, Mannie

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we argue that practitioner-patient relationships in the manual therapies would be strengthened by a deeper understanding of the psychodynamics and emotions of those relationships. We suggest that in many cases, a purely bio-mechanical approach may neglect underlying psychological and emotional reasons of the patient's presenting condition, and consequently, lead to a less than adequate outcome for the patient. We offer easily adopted suggestions that could enhance the practice of practitioners of manual therapies as well as other professions that rely on the application of physical methods of diagnosis and treatment. These suggestions could lead to improved prognosis and increased professional satisfaction for practitioners. This paper describes five key dynamics that characterize practitioner-patient relationships: (i) pain as a form of communication; (ii) the 'heart-sink' patient; (iii) dependency; (iv) the erotic transference; (v) endings and loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The clinical relevance of psychophysiology: support for the psychobiology of empathy and psychodynamic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marci, Carl; Riess, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Psychophysiologic measures, such as skin conductance and heart rate, have been used in both psychotherapy process research and clinical practice. We present a case report of a patient and therapist who participated in a process-oriented psychotherapy research protocol using simultaneous measures of skin conductance. Data from the research protocol were used to broaden an empathic understanding of the patient, which facilitated insight and enhanced the exploration of conscious and unconscious processes that originated in the past and have come to dominate the present--the core of psychodynamic theories of change. The case illustrates the clinical relevance of psychophysiology and its use as a potential bridge between psychotherapy research and the theory and practice of psychotherapy. The implications of the case in support of the role of empathy in psychotherapy are discussed.

  15. Heterogeneity of treatment changes after psychodynamic therapy within a one year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    psychodynamic group therapy unit, the majority with anxiety, personality, and mood disorders. The study revealed large discharge and follow-up effect sizes but more than one third of the patients were without measurable improvement. The major clusters described above were confirmed, and revealed unique clinical...... and socio-demographic characteristics. Late improvers, as compared with early improvers, were characterized by anxiety symptoms and lack of network support after controlling for GSI at admission. Similarly, deteriorating patients had longer duration of illness and less favourable social characteristics...... compared with the other two groups. Early improving patients were less likely to have participated in short-term groups, and only one third participated in additional treatment compared with more than 69% of the other patients. Severe and socially affected psychiatric patients, and patients with anxiety...

  16. Using Psychodynamic Interaction as a Valuable Source of Information in Social Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    of social education, I demonstrate how the often conflicting demands and expectations are being played out in the interrelational tension between the researcher (myself) and the interviewee or narrator. In a confrontation with "inner" expectations and concerns regarding a future profession and one's ability......This article will address the issue of using understandings of psychodynamic interrelations as a means to grasp how social and cultural dynamics are processed individually and collectively in narratives. I apply the two theoretically distinct concepts of inter- and intrasubjectivity to gain insight...... into how social and cultural dynamics are processed as subjective experiences and reflected in the interrelational space created in narrative interviews with trainee social educators. By using a combination of interactionist theory and psychosocial theory in the analysis of an interview with a student...

  17. The power of subtle interpersonal hostility in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a speech acts analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Timothy; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Stiles, William B; Ordoñez, Tatiana; Heckman, Bernadette D

    2012-01-01

    This study compared participants' speech acts in low-hostile versus moderate-hostile interpersonal episodes in time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. Sixty-two cases from the Vanderbilt II psychotherapy project were categorized as low or moderate in interpersonal hostility based on ratings of interpersonal process using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (Benjamin, 1996). Representative episodes were coded using a taxonomy of speech acts (Stiles, 1992), and speech acts were compared across low- and moderate-hostile episodes. Therapists in moderate-hostility episodes used more interpretations and edifications, and fewer questions and reflections. Patients in moderate-hostility episodes used more disclosures and fewer edifications. Content coding showed that therapist interpretations with a self/intrapsychic self focus were more characteristic of moderate-hostility than low-hostility episodes, whereas the two types of episodes contained similar levels of interpretations focused on the patient's interpersonal relationships and the therapeutic relationship.

  18. Critique of Sohlberg and Birgegard's (2003) report of persistent complex effects of subliminal psychodynamic activation messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudin, Robert

    2006-10-01

    Silverman in 1983 held that the unconscious encoding of MOMMY AND I ARE ONE triggers a fantasy of symbiotic union with the good mother of early childhood. In contrast, later Sohlberg and Birgegard contended that MOMMY AND I triggers associations to similarity issues with mother, associations that may be influenced by the words following MOMMY AND I. Although their messages produce, lmost invariably, no reportable sensation, Sohlberg and Birgegard claimed strong evidence for the influence of such messages on perception, motivation, and memory, 10 ays poststimulation and suggestive evidence 4 mo. later. Their findings are not compelling evidence for these claims; and there is no evidence that any result was associated with the unconscious encoding of the psychodynamic meaning of a multiword message.

  19. Critical importance of stimulus unawareness for the production of subliminal psychodynamic activation effects. An attributional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, R F

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes a new theoretical model of subliminal psychodynamic activation (SPA) effects. The model conceptualizes subliminal-supraliminal differences in SPA effects as being due to differences in subjects' attributions for the changes in anxiety level that are produced by subliminal versus supraliminal SPA stimuli. Changes in anxiety level produced by supraliminal SPA stimuli can be attributed by subjects to the experimental procedures, diminishing the impact of these messages on subjects' responses. In contrast, subjects cannot attribute changes in anxiety level produced by subliminal SPA stimuli to the experimental procedures. Therefore, no "discounting" (i.e., situational) attributions for subliminally induced changes in anxiety levels are available to subjects, and subliminal SPA messages produce significantly stronger effects on responding than do supraliminal SPA messages. The attributional model of SPA effects is discussed in the context of other long-term research programs investigating subliminal phenomena. The implications of this model for clinical treatment and empirical research utilizing the SPA paradigm are discussed.

  20. The method of subliminal psychodynamic activation: do individual thresholds make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Paraherakis, A; Joseph, S; Ladd, H

    1996-12-01

    The present experiment investigated the effects of subliminal psychodynamic stimuli on anxiety as measured by heart rate. Following an anxiety-inducing task, male and female subjects were tachistoscopically shown, at their subjective thresholds, one of five subliminal stimuli, MOMMY AND I ARE ONE, DADDY AND I ARE ONE (symbiotic messages). MOMMY HAS LEFT ME (abandonment message), I AM HAPPY AND CALM (positively toned but nonsymbiotic phrase), or MYMMO NAD I REA ENO (control stimulus). It was hypothesized that men would exhibit a greater decrease in heart rate after exposure to the MOMMY stimulus than the control message. No definitive predictions were made for women. The abandonment phrase was expected to increase heart rate. A positively toned message was included to assess whether its effects would be comparable to those hypothesized for the MOMMY message. The results yielded no significant effects for stimulus or gender and so provided no support for the hypotheses.

  1. Contributions from personality- and psychodynamically oriented assessment to the development of the DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K

    2011-07-01

    Advances in personality assessment over the past 20 years have notably influenced the proposed assessment and classification of personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]). However, a considerable body of personality assessment and psychodynamically oriented assessment research has significant relevance to the way in which personality disorders are evaluated that appears to have gone unrecognized in the current proposals for DSM-5. In this article, I discuss the ways in which some of these 2 bodies of literature can and should inform the DSM-5 so that the diagnostic nomenclature can be more scientifically and comprehensively informed and consequently improve the clinical utility of a diagnostic system in need of considerable revision.

  2. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Zwerenz

    Full Text Available Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress.In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG. The control group (CG received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE, and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months and at follow-up (12 months. We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group.N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74% and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG.Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  3. Hypnosis-based psychodynamic treatment in ALS: a longitudinal study on patients and their caregivers.

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    Johann Roland Kleinbub

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence of psychological treatment efficacy is strongly needed in ALS, particularly regarding long-term effects.Methods: Fifteen patients participated in a hypnosis treatment and self-hypnosis training protocol after an in-depth psychological and neurological evaluation. Patients’ primary caregivers and 15 one-by-one matched control patients were considered in the study.Measurements of anxiety, depression and quality of life were collected at the baseline, post-treatment, and after 3 and 6 months from the intervention. Bayesian linear mixed-models were used to evaluate the impact of treatment and defense style on patients’ anxiety, depression, quality of life, and functional impairment (ALSFRS-r, as well as on caregivers’ anxiety and depression.Results: The statistical analyses revealed an improvement in psychological variables’ scores immediately after the treatment. Amelioration in patients’ and caregivers’ anxiety as well as caregivers’ depression, were found to persist at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. The observed massive use of primitive defense mechanisms was found to have a reliable and constant buffer effect on psychopathological symptoms in both patients and caregivers. Notably, treated patients decline in ALSFRS-r score was observed to be slower than that of control group’s patients.Discussion: Our brief psychodynamic hypnosis-based treatment showed efficacy both at psychological and physical levels in patients with ALS, and was indirectly associated to long-lasting benefits in caregivers. The implications of peculiar psychodynamic factors and mind-body techniques are discussed. Future directions should be oriented toward a convergence of our results and further psychological interventions, in order to delineate clinical best practices for ALS.

  4. Hypnosis-based psychodynamic treatment in ALS: a longitudinal study on patients and their caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbub, Johann R.; Palmieri, Arianna; Broggio, Alice; Pagnini, Francesco; Benelli, Enrico; Sambin, Marco; Sorarù, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence of psychological treatment efficacy is strongly needed in ALS, particularly regarding long-term effects. Methods: Fifteen patients participated in a hypnosis treatment and self-hypnosis training protocol after an in-depth psychological and neurological evaluation. Patients' primary caregivers and 15 one-by-one matched control patients were considered in the study. Measurements of anxiety, depression and quality of life (QoL) were collected at the baseline, post-treatment, and after 3 and 6 months from the intervention. Bayesian linear mixed-models were used to evaluate the impact of treatment and defense style on patients' anxiety, depression, QoL, and functional impairment (ALSFRS-r), as well as on caregivers' anxiety and depression. Results: The statistical analyses revealed an improvement in psychological variables' scores immediately after the treatment. Amelioration in patients' and caregivers' anxiety as well as caregivers' depression, were found to persist at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. The observed massive use of primitive defense mechanisms was found to have a reliable and constant buffer effect on psychopathological symptoms in both patients and caregivers. Notably, treated patients decline in ALSFRS-r score was observed to be slower than that of control group's patients. Discussion: Our brief psychodynamic hypnosis-based treatment showed efficacy both at psychological and physical levels in patients with ALS, and was indirectly associated to long-lasting benefits in caregivers. The implications of peculiar psychodynamic factors and mind-body techniques are discussed. Future directions should be oriented toward a convergence of our results and further psychological interventions, in order to delineate clinical best practices for ALS. PMID:26136710

  5. Exploring the development of an organisational culture of control and dependency from a systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Eeden

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Globalisation and accelerating rates of change characterise the work environment.Research purpose: The aim of this research was to study the impact of the change process at a plant of a South African production company.Motivations for the study: Problems were experienced in terms of production and a need for transformation at different levels was expressed. Co-dependence in the environment necessitated exploration of intra-organisational dynamics.Research design, approach and method: The study focused on the management team at a specifc plant, but by applying the systems psychodynamic perspective it was possible to also explore the mutual effect of relationships with other systems in the organisation, the company as a whole and the environment. Respondents included the directors of manufacturing and of human resources, the general manager, an 11-member management team and staff representatives. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews, group interviews and a group consultation session were held.Main findings: Hypotheses were formulated regarding the change experienced in the company, the overemphasis of control in the various systems, efforts to move from dependency to interdependence, personal authority as a requirement for interdependent functioning and problems with interrelatedness.Practical/managerial implications: The study illustrates the application of the systems psychodynamic approach in exploring the interaction between and mutual infuence of various organisational systems, especially in times of change.Contribution/value add: At a broader level, the study contributes to the understanding of the application of the theory as well as suggesting the use of a methodology. Recommendations for an intervention of this nature were also made.

  6. State Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2013-01-01

    When a music teacher is named Teacher of the Year for an entire state, one just know a special story awaits. The narrative of Heidi Welch, director of music at Hillsboro-Deering High School in New Hampshire, does not disappoint. Welch, who grew up in abject poverty and was often homeless, developed her love of music through memorizing and singing…

  7. Treasure Islands

    OpenAIRE

    James R. Hines

    2010-01-01

    In movies and novels, tax havens are often settings for shady international deals; in practice, they are rather less flashy. Tax havens, also known as "offshore financial centers" or "international financial centers," are countries and territories that offer low tax rates and favorable regulatory policies to foreign investors. For example, tax havens typically tax inbound investment at zero or very low rates and further encourage investment with telecommunications and transportation facilitie...

  8. Hidden Treasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Pamela; Euscher, Gisela

    2001-01-01

    Over 100 women immigrants were interviewed in the United Kingdom, Denmark, Czech Republic, and Germany. Two-thirds had participated in higher education in their home countries, one-third had degrees, some had owned businesses, and over half had good English skills. Despite their qualifications, only five were currently not underemployed. (SK)

  9. Integrated three-dimensional models for noninvasive monitoring and valorization of the Morgantina silver treasure (Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Alberghina, Filippo; Allegra, Dario; Di Paola, Francesco; Maniscalco, Laura; Milazzo, Giuseppe; Milotta, Filippo L. M.; Pellegrino, Lorella; Schiavone, Salvatore; Stanco, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    The Morgantina silver treasure belonging to the Archaeological Museum of Aidone (Sicily) was involved in a three-dimensional (3-D) survey and diagnostics campaign for monitoring the collection over time in anticipation of their temporary transfer to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for a period of 4 years. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a scientific and methodological protocol based on noninvasive techniques to achieve a complete and integrated knowledge of the precious items and their conservation state, as well as to increase their valorization, has been developed. All acquired data, i.e., 3-D models, ultraviolet fluorescence, x-ray images, and chemical information, will be made available, in an integrated way, within a web-oriented platform, which will present an in-progress tool to deepen existing archaeological knowledge and production technologies and to obtain referenced information of the conservation state before and after moving of the collection from its exposure site.

  10. Feelings of nurses in the reception and risk classification evaluation in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Midori Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal feelings of nurses who host with risk assessment and classification in an emergency room of a pubic hospital. Methods: it is a qualitative research approach with 12 nurses interviewed. The data were analyzed, categorized and discussed according to the theoretical framework of work psychodynamics. Results: the nurses expressed feelings of satisfaction in meeting the user needs assistance. They reported feeling as fear, stress and fatigue due to the sharp pace of work, gaps in health care network and situations of violence. They highlighted coping strategies to reduce the burden of this assignment, how to share the completion of the screening with the nursing staff. Conclusion: the host with risk assessment and classification favors the autonomy of nurses and provide greater accountability to this professional users, but the limitations of available resources to solve the complaint of patients generate physical and psychological burden to this worker.

  11. Feelings of nurses in the reception and risk classification evaluation in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Midori Sakai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal feelings of nurses who host with risk assessment and classification in an emergency room of a pubic hospital. Methods: it is a qualitative research approach with 12 nurses interviewed. The data were analyzed, categorized and discussed according to the theoretical framework of work psychodynamics. Results: the nurses expressed feelings of satisfaction in meeting the user needs assistance. They reported feeling as fear, stress and fatigue due to the sharp pace of work, gaps in health care network and situations of violence. They highlighted coping strategies to reduce the burden of this assignment, how to share the completion of the screening with the nursing staff. Conclusion: the host with risk assessment and classification favors the autonomy of nurses and provide greater accountability to this professional users, but the limitations of available resources to solve the complaint of patients generate physical and psychological burden to this worker.

  12. Comparing Treatment Outcome of Guided Imagery and Music and Psychodynamic Imaginative Trauma Therapy for Women with Complex PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Carola

    2013-01-01

    of Complex PTSD, structural and somatoform dissociation, interpersonal problems, and factors promoting health before treatment and after 50 therapy hours or before and after waiting. Results showed significant differences in all scores when either of the treatment conditions was compared to the control group......To investigate whether the use of recorded music enhances therapy outcome in psychodynamic trauma therapy for women with Complex PTSD, outcome measures of three groups of patients were compared. One group received 50 hours of outpatient trauma therapy with the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery...... and Music (GIM), another group received 50 hours of outpatient trauma therapy with Psychodynamic Imaginative Trauma Therapy (PITT). The third group was a waiting-list control group of women who had to wait at least nine months for therapy. The participants filled out questionnaires measuring symptoms...

  13. [The Psychoanalytic-interactional Method (PIM): A Psychodynamic Treatment for Adolescents with Severe Disorders of Personality Functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Carola

    2017-07-01

    The Psychoanalytic-interactional Method (PIM): A Psychodynamic Treatment for Adolescents with Severe Disorders of Personality Functioning The psychoanalytic-interactional method (PIM) was developed as a psychodynamic treatment for adult patients with severe disorders of personality functioning (Streeck u. Leichsenring, 2015). However, it is also well suited for the treatment of adolescent patients because its techniques fit with specific conditions of adolescence. A modified version of the PIM for adolescents (Streeck-Fischer, Cropp, Streeck, Salzer, 2016) has proven to be efficacious. The paper describes the basic principles of the PIM and names aspects that have to be taken into account in the treatment of adolescents with severe disorders of personality functioning. Finally, previous empirical results regarding the PIM treatment in adolescence are presented.

  14. Problems in Silverman's work indicate the need for a new approach to research on subliminal psychodynamic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudin, R

    2001-06-01

    The basic assumption in subliminal psychodynamic activation research is that participants can unconsciously perceive the psychodynamic meaning of a complete message as it is intended by the experimenter. In attempts to account for negative findings Silverman contended that this assumption holds only under certain luminance conditions and visual field positions of a message. Paradoxically, almost all of his findings, his major evidence in support of the basic assumption, came from experiments in violation of those strictures. Further, Silverman never presented MOMMY AND I ARE ONE under a critical condition required for it to be effective. These and other considerations identify the need for an account of empirical findings other than his and for changes in his experimental method. Such research must take into account the encoding of subliminal stimuli, an area neglected almost completely by Silverman. Shevrin and his colleagues' 1996 work is outlined as a model for the use of subliminal stimuli to investigate psychoanalytically generated hypotheses.

  15. Treatment of a suicide attempt through psychodynamic therapy in a 17-year-old boy with depression: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Caroline; Mazet, Philippe; Cohen, David

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old boy hospitalized after a violent and dramatic suicide attempt and the interpretative therapy that helped him overcome his depression. His course appeared to be typical of the difficulties encountered by clinicians when in charge of a severely depressed teenager, and of the liability of therapeutic treatment as the patient failed to improve with two consecutive antidepressant trials, and with a first attempted treatment by psychodynamic therapy. The present report stresses that: (i) in some cases, prolonged hospitalization might be helpful in managing treatment of acute phases; (ii) every effort should be made to help a depressed adolescent who attempts suicide to verbalize his experiences and give them meaning, whatever the psychotherapeutic technique. In the case of a suicide attempt with a staged component, the psychodynamic approach appears to be an interesting option as it may help the patient understand his pathological behavior as if it were a dream.

  16. Nursing Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  17. A new model of techniques for concurrent psychodynamic work with parents of child and adolescent psychotherapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kerry Kelly; Novick, Jack

    2013-04-01

    To address the neglect of the importance of parent work in the psychodynamic psychotherapy of children and adolescents, the authors present a model of concurrent dynamic parent work that has demonstrated success with patients of all ages. The model includes dual goals for all therapies, addresses the challenge of confidentiality by differentiating privacy and secrecy, and emphasizes the importance of parent work throughout treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of psychodynamic short-term psychotherapy for depressed breast cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwerenz Rüdiger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of psychotherapeutic trials of treatments of comorbid depression in cancer patients. Our study determines the efficacy of a manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and predictors of outcome by personality and quality of the therapeutic relationship. Methods/design Eligible breast cancer patients with comorbid depression are assigned to short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (up to 20 + 5 sessions or to treatment as usual (augmented by recommendation for counseling center and physician information. We plan to recruit a total of 180 patients (90 per arm in two centers. Assessments are conducted pretreatment, after 6 (treatment termination and 12 months (follow-up. The primary outcome measures are reduction of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and remission of depression as assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV Disorders by independent, blinded assessors at treatment termination. Secondary outcomes refer to quality of life. Discussion We investigate the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in acute care and we aim to identify predictors for acceptance and success of treatment. Trial registration ISRCTN96793588

  19. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  20. Nursing theories as nursing ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaming, Don

    2004-10-01

    By understanding the constructions of knowledge we currently label nursing theories as nursing ontologies, nurses can perceive these conceptualizations differently. Paul Ricoeur and Stephen White offer a conceptualization of ontology that differs from traditional, realist perspectives because they assume that a person's experience of a phenomenon (e.g., nursing) will change, but also maintain some stability. Discussing nursing ontologies, rather than nursing theories, might increase philosophy's status in nursing and may also more accurately reflect the experience of being a nurse.

  1. Economic evaluation of brief psychodynamic interpersonal therapy in patients with multisomatoform disorder.

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    Nadja Chernyak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A brief psychodynamic interpersonal therapy (PIT in patients with multisomatoform disorder has been recently shown to improve health-related quality of life. AIMS: To assess cost-effectiveness of PIT compared to enhanced medical care in patients with multisomatoform disorder. METHOD: An economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number ISRCTN23215121 conducted in 6 German academic outpatient centres was performed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was calculated from the statutory health insurance perspective on the basis of quality adjusted life years (QALYs gained at 12 months. Uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness of PIT was presented by means of a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. RESULTS: Based on the complete-case analysis ICER was 41840 Euro per QALY. The results did not change greatly with the use of multiple imputation (ICER = 44222 and last observation carried forward (LOCF approach to missing data (ICER = 46663. The probability of PIT being cost-effective exceeded 50% for thresholds of willingness to pay over 35 thousand Euros per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: Cost-effectiveness of PIT is highly uncertain for thresholds of willingness to pay under 35 thousand Euros per QALY.

  2. Interactions between Obsessional Symptoms and Interpersonal Ambivalences in Psychodynamic Therapy: An Empirical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Cornelis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The classical symptom specificity hypothesis (Blatt, 1974 particularly associates obsessional symptoms to interpersonal behavior directed at autonomy and separation from others. Cross-sectional group research, however, has yielded inconsistent findings on this predicted association, and a previous empirical case study (Cornelis et al., in press; see Chapter 2 documented obsessional pathology to be rooted in profound ambivalences between autonomous and dependent interpersonal dynamics. Therefore, in the present empirical case study, concrete operationalizations of the classical symptom specificity hypothesis are contrasted to alternative hypotheses based on the observed complexities in Chapter 2. Dynamic associations between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal functioning is further explored, aiming at further contribution to theory building (i.e., through suggestions for potential hypothesis-refinement; Stiles, 2009. Similar to the first empirical case study (Chapter 1, Consensual Qualitative Research for Case studies is used to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the longitudinal, clinical interplay between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal dynamics throughout the process of supportive-expressive psychodynamic therapy. In line with findings from Chapter 1, findings reveal close associations between obsessions and interpersonal dynamics, and therapist interventions focusing on interpersonal conflicts are documented as related to interpersonal and symptomatic alterations. Observations predominantly accord to the ambivalence-hypothesis rather than to the classical symptom specificity hypothesis. Yet, meaningful differences are observed in concrete manifestations of interpersonal ambivalences within significant relationships. Findings are again discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations; and limitations and future research indications are addressed.

  3. Corrective relational experiences in psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy: Antecedents, types, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teresa Chen-Chieh; Hill, Clara E; Strauss, Nicole; Heyman, Michelle; Hussain, Mahum

    2016-03-01

    In posttherapy interviews with 31 clients who had recently terminated from individual open-ended psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy, 18 reported having had at least 1 corrective relational experience (CRE) during psychotherapy, whereas 13 did not report any CREs. CREs typically occurred in the context of therapeutic relationships that were primarily positive but also had minor difficulties. Therapists typically facilitated CREs by identifying or questioning client behavior patterns and conveying trustworthiness. Corrective shifts for clients typically involved a new understanding of the therapy experience and variantly involved gaining a new understanding of behavior patterns. Consequences generally included improvements in the therapy relationship and intrapersonal well-being. Qualitatively, the 13 non-CRE clients more frequently reported wishing the therapist's theoretical orientation was a better match than did the 18 CRE clients. Quantitatively, the CRE clients rated themselves as having more interpersonal problems at intake on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-32 (Barkham, Hardy, & Startup, 1996), had marginally significant improvements in interpersonal functioning over time, rated their therapy alliances higher on the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Revised (Hatcher & Gillaspy, 2006) midtherapy, and rated their therapy alliances higher over time compared with the non-CRE clients. Implications for practice and research are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Interactions between Obsessional Symptoms and Interpersonal Ambivalences in Psychodynamic Therapy: An Empirical Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Shana; Desmet, Mattias; Van Nieuwenhove, Kimberly L H D; Meganck, Reitske; Willemsen, Jochem; Inslegers, Ruth; Feyaerts, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    The classical symptom specificity hypothesis (Blatt, 1974) particularly associates obsessional symptoms to interpersonal behavior directed at autonomy and separation from others. Cross-sectional group research, however, has yielded inconsistent findings on this predicted association, and a previous empirical case study (Cornelis et al., in press; see Chapter 2) documented obsessional pathology to be rooted in profound ambivalences between autonomous and dependent interpersonal dynamics. Therefore, in the present empirical case study, concrete operationalizations of the classical symptom specificity hypothesis are contrasted to alternative hypotheses based on the observed complexities in Chapter 2. Dynamic associations between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal functioning is further explored, aiming at further contribution to theory building (i.e., through suggestions for potential hypothesis-refinement; Stiles, 2009). Similar to the first empirical case study (Chapter 1), Consensual Qualitative Research for Case studies is used to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the longitudinal, clinical interplay between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal dynamics throughout the process of supportive-expressive psychodynamic therapy. In line with findings from Chapter 1, findings reveal close associations between obsessions and interpersonal dynamics, and therapist interventions focusing on interpersonal conflicts are documented as related to interpersonal and symptomatic alterations. Observations predominantly accord to the ambivalence-hypothesis rather than to the classical symptom specificity hypothesis. Yet, meaningful differences are observed in concrete manifestations of interpersonal ambivalences within significant relationships. Findings are again discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations; and limitations and future research indications are addressed.

  5. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Wiltink

    Full Text Available Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT. No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder.In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions.Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent, while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not.We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research.Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394.

  6. Clinicians' emotional responses and Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual adult personality disorders: A clinically relevant empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Del Corno, Franco; Genova, Federica; Bornstein, Robert F; Gordon, Robert M; McWilliams, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between level of personality organization and type of personality disorder as assessed with the categories in the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM; PDM Task Force, 2006) and the emotional responses of treating clinicians. We asked 148 Italian clinicians to assess 1 of their adult patients in treatment for personality disorders with the Psychodiagnostic Chart (PDC; Gordon & Bornstein, 2012) and the Personality Diagnostic Prototype (PDP; Gazzillo, Lingiardi, & Del Corno, 2012) and to complete the Therapist Response Questionnaire (TRQ; Betan, Heim, Zittel-Conklin, & Westen, 2005). The patients' level of overall personality pathology was positively associated with helpless and overwhelmed responses in clinicians and negatively associated with positive emotional responses. A parental and disengaged response was associated with the depressive, anxious, and dependent personality disorders; an exclusively parental response with the phobic personality disorder; and a parental and criticized response with narcissistic disorder. Dissociative disorder evoked a helpless and parental response in the treating clinicians whereas somatizing disorder elicited a disengaged reaction. An overwhelmed and disengaged response was associated with sadistic and masochistic personality disorders, with the latter also associated with a parental and hostile/criticized reaction; an exclusively overwhelmed response with psychopathic patients; and a helpless response with paranoid patients. Finally, patients with histrionic personality disorder evoked an overwhelmed and sexualized response in their clinicians whereas there was no specific emotional reaction associated with the schizoid and the obsessive-compulsive disorders. Clinical implications of these findings were discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Some problems with non-inferiority tests in psychotherapy research: psychodynamic therapies as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Winfried; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2018-02-14

    In virtually every field of medicine, non-inferiority trials and meta-analyses with non-inferiority conclusions are increasingly common. This non-inferiority approach has been frequently used by a group of authors favoring psychodynamic therapies (PDTs), concluding that PDTs are just as effective as cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT). We focus on these examples to exemplify some problems associated with non-inferiority tests of psychological treatments, although the problems also apply to psychopharmacotherapy research, CBT research, and others. We conclude that non-inferiority trials have specific risks of different types of validity problems, usually favoring an (erroneous) non-inferiority conclusion. Non-inferiority trials require the definition of non-inferiority margins, and currently used thresholds have a tendency to be inflationary, not protecting sufficiently against degradation. The use of non-inferiority approaches can lead to the astonishing result that one single analysis can suggest both, superiority of the comparator (here: CBT) and non-inferiority of the other treatment (here PDT) at the same time. We provide recommendations how to improve the quality of non-inferiority trials, and we recommend to consider them among other criteria when evaluating manuscripts examining non-inferiority trials. If psychotherapeutic families (such as PDT and CBT) differ on the number of investigating trials, and in the fields of clinical applications, and in other validity aspects mentioned above, conclusions about their general non-inferiority are no more than a best guess, typically expressing the favored approach of the lead author.

  8. Clinical wisdom in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy: a philosophical and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum-Baicker, Cynthia; Sisti, Dominic A

    2012-01-01

    To precisely define wisdom has been an ongoing task of philosophers for millennia. Investigations into the psychological dimensions of wisdom have revealed several features that make exemplary persons "wise." Contemporary bioethicists took up this concept as they retrieved and adapted Aristotle's intellectual virtue of phronesis for applications in medical contexts. In this article, we build on scholarship in both psychology and medical ethics by providing an account of clinical wisdom qua phronesis in the context of the practice of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy. With the support of qualitative data, we argue that the concept of clinical wisdom in mental healthcare shares several of the key ethical dimensions offered by standard models of phronesis in medical ethics and serves as a useful, albeit overlooked, reference point for a broader development of virtue-based medical ethics. We propose that the features of clinical wisdom are pragmatic skills that include, but are not limited to, an awareness of balance, the acceptance of paradox, and a particular clinical manner that maintains a deep regard for the other. We offer several suggestions for refining training programs and redoubling efforts to provide long-term mentorship opportunities for trainees in clinical mental healthcare in order to cultivate clinical wisdom.

  9. [Differential group experiences of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic group psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzke, Birgit; Scheel, Sylvia; Bauer, Christina; Rüddel, Heinz; Jürgensen, Ralph; Andreas, Sylke; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Research concerning the question, whether and to what extent cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic (PD) therapy consist of differing process components under clinical representative conditions, is relevant especially for a valid interpretation of comparative outcome research, for identifying differential beneficial factors of psychotherapy and for a systematic indication for, respectively assignment of, patients to the two treatments. In this study it is investigated whether PD and CB differ concerning the realisation of factors of group experience, respectively of beneficial group elements (e. g. cohesion, catharsis, learning by feedback). For this purpose, in a naturalistic design, a stratified sample (N = 36) of 104 videotaped sessions (PD groups, interactional CB groups and indicative CB groups; N = 171 patients with a broad spectrum of F-diagnoses of ICD-10, especially F3/F4) were rated by observers using the Kieler-Gruppenpsychotherapie-Prozess-Skala (KGPPS). Analyses of variance and a priori Helmert-contrasts reveal differences between PD and CB with at least medium effect sizes in 12 of the 16 factors of group experience. However, differences also were found between the two CB group treatments (9 factors of group experience with differences with large effect sizes). The results suggest that the different treatment approaches foster different qualities and quantities of group experience and that the latter seems not to evolve from the group context "per se" (i. e. by the plurality of the group).

  10. THE CHALLENGE OF WORKING WITH TEENAGERS IN CONFLICT WITH THE LAW: PSYCHODYNAMIC WORK INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Emanoeli Moreira da Costa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Socio-educational Reintegration Workers play a role in the custody, safety and monitoring of teenagers, complying with socio-educational measures for having infringed the law according to Brazil’s Child and Teenager Statute. This study in terms of public policies has to do with education and sanction. Further, it discusses collective defense strategies from social reintegration workers, who deal on a daily basis with teenagers in conflict with the law. The methodology applied is based upon Work Psychodynamics.  The study concludes that given their strong unity, social reintegration workers protect themselves from work-related pathologies given that they preserve themselves from isolation by inserting themselves in a space of intersubjective relations that support their work and keep them from fear and anxiety. Collective strength comes through cooperation built around the almost prison-like discipline shown towards teenagers deprived of their freedom. This discipline disguises a collective defense strategy that denies the fact that teenagers in conflict with the law are in a vulnerable psychosocial situation. This collective defense strategy serves under current work conditions to protect social reintegration workers from the fear of building a close relationship with teenagers given the certainty that this relationship will leave the first group at risk and unprotected.

  11. Amplification of the concept of erroneous meaning in psychodynamic science and in the consulting room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Crittenden E

    2007-01-01

    Previous papers dealt with the concept of psyche as that dynamic field which underlies the subjective experience of mind. A new paradigm, psychodynamic science, was suggested for dealing with subjective data. The venue of the psychotherapeutic consulting room is now brought directly into science, expanding the definition of psychotherapy to include both humanistic and scientific elements. Certain concepts were introduced to amplify this new scientific model, including psyche as hypothetical construct, the concept of meaning as replacement for operational validation in scientific investigation, the synonymity of meaning and insight, and the concept of synchronicity, together with the meaning-connected affect of numinosity. The presence of unhealthy anxiety as the conservative ego attempts to preserve its integrity requires a deeper look at the concept of meaning. This leads to a distinction between meaning and erroneous meaning. The main body of this paper amplifies that distinction, and introduces the concept of intolerance of ambiguity in the understanding of erroneous meanings and their connection with human neurosis.

  12. An augmented model of brief psychodynamic interpersonal therapy for patients with nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Stephanie; Reuber, Markus

    2009-03-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) are one of the most common functional (medically unexplained) symptoms seen by neurologists. Although most experts consider psychotherapy the treatment of choice, few therapeutic approaches have been described in detail. Given that NES occur in the context of many different psychopathologies, it remains uncertain whether there is 1 intervention that can benefit all comers or whether it is necessary to offer individualized psychotherapy. This article describes an approach grounded in psychodynamic interpersonal therapy but augmented with elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy, somatic trauma therapy, and the involvement of caregivers and family members. The approach was developed in the setting of a specialist psychotherapy service for patients with functional neurological disorders presenting to British hospital-based neurologists. The authors have previously shown that it is associated with significant improvements in psychological functioning, health-related functioning, and a symptom count. Three case reports illustrate how the treatment can be adapted to meet different patients' needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltink, Jörg; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred E; Ruckes, Christian; Herpertz, Stephan; Joraschky, Peter; Koranyi, Susan; Michal, Matthias; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Strauss, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT). No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder. In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA) to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems) and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions. Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems) with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent), while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not. We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication) in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research. Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394.

  14. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: an efficacy and partial effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Susan M; Wijts, Paul; Oort, Frans J; Sallaerts, Steph J M

    2014-05-01

    Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted of up to 36 sessions (average PDT 31.4 and CBT 19.8 sessions). Assessments took place at waitlist: pretest, after 12 and 24 weeks for those who received longer treatment: posttest, 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Changes in the main outcome measure self-reported social anxiety composite, as well as in other psychopathology, social skills, negative social beliefs, public self-consciousness, defense mechanisms, personal goals, independent rater's judgments of SAD and general improvement, and approach behavior during an objective test, were analyzed using multilevel analysis. No improvement occurred during waitlist. Treatments were highly efficacious, with large within-subject effect sizes for social anxiety, but no differences between PDT and CBT on general and treatment-specific measures occurred. Remission rates were over 50% and similar for PDT and CBT. Personality disorders did not influence the effects of PDT or CBT. PDT and CBT are both effective approaches for SAD. Further research is needed on the cost-effectiveness of PDT versus CBT, on different lengths PDT, and on patient preferences and their relationship to outcome of PDT versus CBT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Varieties of Castration Experience: Relevance to Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graeme J

    2016-03-01

    Although Freud considered castration to be one of the two major anxieties of human life, the castration complex has been relatively neglected in contemporary psychoanalytic writing and is insufficiently discussed in presentations of clinical cases. This article discusses the relevance of the concept to contemporary psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy, in particular the important contributing role of castration conflicts in the pathogenesis of a wide range of clinical symptoms. The author begins by briefly reviewing some classical and contemporary psychoanalytic ideas about castration to show how the concept has broadened and is currently used not only to signify fear of damage to or loss of the genital, but also metaphorically to indicate a threat to or loss of any valued human characteristic or function. He outlines Brenner's distinction between castration anxiety and castration depression, and reviews the role of childhood trauma in intensifying castration conflicts. He then illustrates the clinical application of these ideas by describing aspects of his psychotherapeutic work with three male patients who presented with a variety of symptoms and distressing psychological experiences that were gradually resolved through the analysis of underlying castration anxiety and/or castration depression. Although castration anxiety is frequently intermingled with separation anxiety, the author concludes that with many traumatized patients castration conflicts are in the foreground and the therapist needs to focus on the patient's proneness to humiliation, powerlessness, and shame.

  16. Dreaming of you: client and therapist dreams about each other during psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Knox, Sarah; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E; Hess, Shirley A; Miles, Joe; Spangler, Patricia T; Pudasaini, Sakar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to describe the frequency of therapists' dreams about their clients and clients' dreams about their therapists, to determine how therapists and clients who had such dreams differed from those who did not have such dreams, whether therapy process and outcome differed for those who had and did not have such dreams, and to describe the content and consequences of these dreams. Thirteen doctoral student therapists conducted psychodynamic psychotherapy with 63 clients in a community clinic. Therapists who had dreams about clients had higher estimated and actual dream recall than did therapists who did not dream about clients. Qualitative analyses indicated that therapists' dreams yielded insights about the therapist, clients, and therapy; therapists used insights in their work with the clients. Among the clients, only two (who were particularly high in attachment anxiety and who feared abandonment from their therapists) reported dreams that were manifestly about their therapists. Therapists-in-training dreamed more about their clients than their clients dreamed about them. Dreams about clients can be used by therapists to understand themselves, clients, and the dynamics of the therapy relationship.

  17. Transference and counter-transference in systems psychodynamic group process consultation: The consultant’s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cilliers

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored consultants’ experiences of transference and counter-transference when conducting group relations training from the systems psychodynamic stance. A phenomenological research design was used with semistructured interviews conducted on a purposive sample of 13 organisational development consultants in a financial institution. The data was analysed by means of content analysis. The results showed that consultants have varied receptiveness in terms of receiving projections and managing transference. These differences involve triggers, characteristics and systemic valence. The consultants experienced counter- transference on five different cognitive and emotional levels. Distinguishing between personal and group emotions, receiving projections and managing transference, all contribute to the complexity of organisational consulting. Opsomming Hierdie studie het ondersoek ingestel na konsultante se ervarings van oordrag en teen-oordrag tydens groepverhoudingsopleiding vanuit die sistemiese psigodinamiese posisie. ’n Fenomenologiese navorsingsontwerp is gebruik met semi-gestruktureerde onderhoude gevoer met ’n doelgerigte steekproef van 13 organisasie ontwikkelingskonsultante in ’n finansiële instelling. Die data is ontleed deur middel van inhoudsontleding. Die resultate het aangetoon dat konsultante uiteenlopende ontvanklikheid het wat betref die ontvangs van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag. Hierdie verskille behels snellers, kenmerke en sistemiese valensie. Die konsultante het teen-oordrag ervaar op vyf verskillende kognitiewe and emosionele vlakke. Om onderskeid te tref tussen persoonlike en groep-emosies, die ontvang van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag, dra alles by tot die kompleksiteit van konsultering.

  18. The Effect of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and other Psychodynamic Therapies versus ‘Treatment as Usual’ in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. Methods/Principal Findings Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized trials comparing the effect of psychodynamic therapies versus ‘treatment as usual’ for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included six trials randomizing a total of 648 participants. Five trials assessed ‘interpersonal psychotherapy’ and only one trial assessed ‘psychodynamic psychotherapy’. All six trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on all six trials showed that the psychodynamic interventions significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference −3.12 (95% confidence interval −4.39 to −1.86;Pinterpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy compared with ‘treatment as usual’ for patients with major depressive disorder. The potential beneficial effect seems small and effects on major outcomes are unknown. Randomized trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed. PMID:21556370

  19. Treasure Na-ion anode from trash coke by adept electrolyte selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Marta; Chyrka, Taras; Klee, Rafael; Aragón, María J.; Bai, Xue; Lavela, Pedro; Vasylchenko, Gennadiy M.; Alcántara, Ricardo; Tirado, José L.; Ortiz, Gregorio F.

    2017-04-01

    Converting 'trash' waste residua to active functional materials 'treasure' with high added value is being regarded as a promising way to achieve the sustainable energy demands. Carbonaceous materials cannot insert sodium except when graphite co-intercalates solvents such as diglyme. Here, we show that petroleum coke and shale coke annealed at different temperatures can also insert sodium by reversible intercalation phenomena in a diglyme-based electrolyte. The structural and morphological studies will reveal significant differences justifying their distinct electrochemical behavior. Galvanostatic tests exhibit a flat plateau at about 0.7 V ascribable to the reversible reaction. At the end of the discharge, a Stage-I ternary intercalation compound is detected. Two diglyme molecules are co-intercalated per alkali ion, as evidenced by 1-D Patterson diagrams, FTIR and TGA analyses. The full sodium-ion cell made with P-2500/NaPF6(diglyme)/Na3V2(PO4)3 delivered an initial reversible capacity of 75 mA h g-1 at C rate and an average potential of 2.7 V. Thus, the full cell provides an energy density of 202 W h kg-1. This sodium-ion system can be considered a promising power source that encourages the potential use of low-cost energy storage systems.

  20. Trash to treasure: converting plastic waste into a useful graphene foil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Linfan; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Nan; Ji, Bingxue; Qu, Liangti

    2017-07-06

    Recycling of plastic waste has commercial value and practical significance for both environmental safety and recovery of resources. To realize trash recycling, a cheap, simple, and safe solid-state chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to convert a series of daily plastic wastes to a high quality graphene foil (GF) at a large scale. The GF possesses a high electrical conductivity of 3824 S·cm -1 , which is much higher than that of the conventional free-standing graphene film treated at an extremely high temperature of 2200-2500 °C. Further, the GF can act as various flexible elements such as a free-standing electrode in a foldable lithium-ion battery, which shows stable electrochemical performances. On the other hand, it presents a fast and ultra low-voltage responsivity to be used as a flexible electrothermal heater, which generates a temperature of up to 322.6 °C at a low input voltage of only 5 V. The convenient trash-to-treasure conversion of plastics to GF provides a unique pathway for waste recycling and opens new application possibilities of graphene in various fields.

  1. The family of berberine bridge enzyme-like enzymes: A treasure-trove of oxidative reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Bastian; Konrad, Barbara; Toplak, Marina; Lahham, Majd; Messenlehner, Julia; Winkler, Andreas; Macheroux, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Biological oxidations form the basis of life on earth by utilizing organic compounds as electron donors to drive the generation of metabolic energy carriers, such as ATP. Oxidative reactions are also important for the biosynthesis of complex compounds, i.e. natural products such as alkaloids that provide vital benefits for organisms in all kingdoms of life. The vitamin B 2 -derived cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) enable an astonishingly diverse array of oxidative reactions that is based on the versatility of the redox-active isoalloxazine ring. The family of FAD-linked oxidases can be divided into subgroups depending on specific sequence features in an otherwise very similar structural context. The sub-family of berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes has recently attracted a lot of attention due to the challenging chemistry catalyzed by its members and the unique and unusual bi-covalent attachment of the FAD cofactor. This family is the focus of the present review highlighting recent advancements into the structural and functional aspects of members from bacteria, fungi and plants. In view of the unprecedented reaction catalyzed by the family's namesake, BBE from the California poppy, recent studies have provided further insights into nature's treasure chest of oxidative reactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits in matching patients with major depression to cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkert, Martijn J; Driessen, Ellen; Peen, Jaap; Barber, Jacques P; Bockting, Claudi; Schalkwijk, Frans; Dekker, Jeff; Dekker, Jack J M

    2016-11-15

    Barber and Muenz (1996) reported that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was more effective than interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depressed patients with elevated levels of avoidant personality disorder, while IPT was more effective than CBT in patients with elevated levels of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. These findings may have important clinical implications, but have not yet been replicated. We conducted a study using data from a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of CBT and short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of depression. We found no evidence indicating that avoidant patients may benefit more from CBT compared to short-term psychodynamic supportive therapy (SPSP). Our results indicate that treatment effect does not depend on the level of avoidance, or obsessive-compulsiveness personality disorders further examine the influence of personality disorders on the effectiveness of CBT or psychodynamic therapy in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioural therapy versus short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy versus no intervention for patients with hypochondriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per; Birket-Smith, M; Wattar, U

    2011-01-01

    Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim of this ......Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim...... of this study was to test CBT for hypochondriasis in a centre that was not involved in its development and compare both CBT and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) to a waiting-list control and to each other. CBT was modified by including mindfulness and group therapy sessions, reducing the therapist...

  4. The “Three National Treasures of Silla (新羅三寶” and Their Transfer: The Symbol of the Unification of the Koryŏ Dynasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-kwang Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the significance of the three national treasures of Silla (Silla sambo in the history of Koryŏ through analyzing the significance of the Three National Treasures of Silla. There are the three national in Silla—a sixteen-foot bronze Buddha statue and a nine-tiered pagoda at Hwangnyong Temple, and the jade belt bestowed by the heavens. These are made from the time of King Chinhŭng to the time of Queen Sŏndŏk. Moreover, these treasures came to occupy the status of treasures that protect the nation, as the mere existence of the treasures was able to persuade the “king of Koryŏ” to abandon his plan to attach Silla. As a result, the treasures were made by the kings of the “sacred bone” sŏng’gol with the Buddhist background, and again, the treasures added to power and authority to the “sacred bone” sŏng’gol family, so the treasure 'Sambo' became a symbol of the nation. The stories that demonstrate the miraculous powers of the three national treasures of Silla appear in the legends of the nine-tiered pagoda of Hwangnyong Temple and of the jade belt. And it is correct to understand that the “king of Koryŏ” mentioned in these stories is a “king of Koguryŏ” rather than Wang Kŏn, the founder of the Koryŏ dynasty. Above all, it is important to take into consideration the fact that the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms was compiled in the Koryŏ dynasty. Therefore in the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, Koryŏ is consistently referred to as “this dynasty” and Wang Kŏn as “T'aejo.” Such circumstances eliminate the possibility that T'aejo would have been referred to as simply the “king of Koryŏ.” T'aejo Wang Kŏn, who was aware of the need for and had the will to unify the then-divided three kingdoms, or Samhan, showed interest in the three treasures of Silla. Then in 935 and 937, the three treasures were handed over to Wang Kŏn after Silla's surrender and through Kim Pu's presentation of

  5. In the footsteps of Arieti and Fromm-Reichmann: psychodynamic treatments of psychosis in the current era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Ann-Louise S

    2005-01-01

    The contributions of Silvano Arieti to the psychodynamic treatment of schizophrenia were pivotal at the time he wrote and lectured, but regretfully, they have slipped from current attention. They bear reviewing given the current era of biological reductionism in the treatment of psychoses in general. To illustrate Arieti's approach, he is imagined as the supervisor of a patient who was treated by the author during her psychiatric residency. Other clinical examples highlight the relevance of Arieti's philosophy for current work with patients suffering from psychotic disorders.

  6. Changes in Emotion Processing following Brief Augmented Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy for Functional Neurological Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Howlett, Stephanie; Levita, Liat; Reuber, Markus

    2018-01-25

    Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) are considered non-volitional and often very disabling, but are not explainable by neurological disease or structural abnormalities. Brief Augmented Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy (BAPIT) was adapted to treat the putative emotion processing deficits thought to be central to FNS aetiology and maintenance. BAPIT for FNS has previously been shown to improve levels of distress and functioning, but it is unknown whether improvements on such measures correlate with changes in emotion processing ‒ which this treatment focuses on. To determine (a) whether the recently developed Emotional Processing Scale-25 can be used to demonstrate BAPIT-associated changes in patients with FNS, and (b) whether changes in the EPS-25 are associated with changes in previously validated outcome measures. 44 patients with FNS completed questionnaires including the EPS-25 and measures of clinical symptomology (health-related quality of life (SF-36), somatic symptoms (PHQ-15), psychological distress (CORE-10) and illness understanding (BIPQ)) pre- and post-therapy. At group level, emotion processing improved following therapy (p = .049). Some measures of clinical symptomology also improved, namely health-related quality of life (p = .02) and illness understanding (p = .01). Improvements in the EPS-25 correlated with improvements in mental health-related quality of life and psychological distress. Emotion processing and some measures of clinical symptomology improved in patients with FNS following BAPIT. The EPS-25 demonstrated changes that correlated with previously validated outcome measures. The EPS-25 is a suitable measure of psychotherapy-associated change in the FNS patient population.

  7. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy. PMID:18454245

  8. The role of cognitive biases in short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ueli; Ortega, Diana; Ambresin, Gilles; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; de Roten, Yves

    2017-09-13

    The concept of biased thinking - or cognitive biases - is relevant to psychotherapy research and clinical conceptualization, beyond cognitive theories. The present naturalistic study aimed to examine the changes in biased thinking over the course of a short-term dynamic psychotherapy (STDP) and to discover potential links between these changes and symptomatic improvement. This study focuses on 32 self-referred patients consulting for Adjustment Disorder according to DSM-IV-TR. The therapists were experienced psychodynamically oriented psychiatrists and psychotherapists. Coding of cognitive biases (using the Cognitive Errors Rating Scale; CERS) was made by external raters based on transcripts of interviews of psychotherapy; the reliability of these ratings on a randomly chosen 24% of all sessions was established. Based on the Symptom Check List SCL-90-R given before and after, the Reliable Change Index (RCI) was used. The assessment of cognitive errors was done at three time points: early (session 4-7), mid-treatment (session 12-17), and close to the end (after session 20) of the treatment. The results showed that the total frequency of cognitive biases was stable over time (p = .20), which was true both for positive and for negative cognitive biases. In exploring the three main subscales of the CERS, we found a decrease in selective abstraction (p = .02) and an increase in personalization (p = .05). A significant link between RCI scores (outcome) and frequency of positive cognitive biases was found, suggesting that biases towards the positive might have a protective function in psychotherapy. Therapists may be attentive to changes in biased thinking across short-term dynamic psychotherapy for adjustment disorder. Therapists may foster the emergence of positive cognitive biases at mid-treatment for adjustment disorder. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM, salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference. This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  10. [The cognitive point of view in psychodynamic psychotherapy: mentalization-based treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Akifumi

    2011-01-01

    patient and therapist, and of placing an emphasis on the context of transference, MBT is still psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  11. Optimizing Canal Structure Operation Using Meta-heuristic Algorithms in the Treasure Valley, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, J.; Ha, W.; Campbell, A.

    2012-12-01

    The computer program that was proven to produce optimal operational solutions for open-channel irrigation conveyance and distribution networks for synthetic data in previous research was tested for real world data. Data gathered from databases and the field by the Boise Project, Idaho, provided input to the hydraulic model for the physical characteristics of the conveyance system. We selected three reaches of the Deer Flat Low Line in the Treasure Valley for optimizing actual gate operations. The total of 59.1 km canal with a maximum capacity of 34 m3/s irrigates mainly corn, wheat, sugar-beet and potato crops. The computer model uses an accuracy-based learning classifier system (XCS) with an embedded genetic algorithm to produce optimal rules for gate structure operation in irrigation canals. Rules are generated through the exploration and exploitation of genetic algorithm population, with the support of RootCanal, an unsteady-state hydraulic simulation model. The objective function was set for satisfying variable demand along three reaches while minimizing water level deviations from target. All canal gate structures operate simultaneously while maintaining water depth near target values during variable-demand periods, with a hydraulically stabilized system. It is noteworthy to mention that this very simple 3-reach problem, requires the computer performing several thousand simulations during continuous days for finding plausible solutions. The model is currently simulating the Deer Flat Low Line Canal in Caldwell, Idaho with promising results. The population evolution is measured by a fitness parameter, which shows that canal structure operations generated by the model are improving towards plausible solutions. This research is one step forward for optimizing the way we use and manage water resources. Relying on management practices of the past will no longer work in a world that is impacted by global climate variability.

  12. From dust to treasure: building a proper self-image through astronomy course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoying

    2015-08-01

    Self-image is how we perceive ourselves. It is the impression built up over time from how we see ourselves and how the others see ourselves. As a teacher in a small college in China since 2013, I have found that most of my undergraduate students’ self-image is not “so healthy”, even some of them “de-valuate” themselves. After I got my PhD degree in astronomy, I have taught the astronomy introduction course in my college for three semesters. Since last semester, I decide not only to aim to warm up my students’ enthusiasm for astronomy, but also to try to help them build a proper self-image through astronomical teaching. In the course, solar system, planet formation, habitable planet, life on the planet are first few lectures to make students understand what a low probability that a habitable planet supporting life is formed. In a following lecture: from dust to treasure, I illustrate how precious each of us on earth, which are results of several billion years of evolution. At the same time, psychological survey and discussion are carried out during the course, helping students better understand themselves. Students are divided into groups to finish assignments via discussion and team work. In the final exam, each group present what they have learnt in a 10-15 min show, such as drama, musical, debate, crosstalk, dance etc.. I will present the structure of my course, the technique I use to teach, the most recent results of a survey of students’ self-image, and the students’ thought of the course in this meeting.

  13. Position paper for health authorities: archived clinical pathology data-treasure to revalue and appropriate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwose, E U; Richards, R S; Butkowski, E; Cann, Nathan

    2010-12-01

    Archived clinical pathology data (ACPD) is recognized as useful for research. Given our privileged de-identified ACPD from South West Pathology Service (SWPS), attempt is made to estimate what it would cost any researcher without such privilege to generate the same data. The Ethics Committee of the Area Health Service approved a request for Dr. Uba Nwose to use de-identified ACPD acquired by the SWPS for clinical laboratory-based translational biomedical science research. 10-years (1999-2008) have been pooled to constitute the database. Data include blood sugar, cholesterol, D-dime, ESR, glucose tolerance, haematocrit, HbA 1 c, homocysteine, serum creatinine, total protein and vitamins [C & E] amongst others. For this report, the bulk-billed-cost of tests were estimated based on number and unit price of each test performed. AU$ 17,507,136.85 is the cost paid by Medicare in the period. This amount is a conservative estimate that could be spent to generate such 10-years data in the absence of ACPD. The health/pathology service has not given any financial research grant. However, the support-in-kind is worth more than celebrated competitive research grants. It calls for revaluatrion by academic, research and scientific institutions the use ofACPD. For the countries where such provision is non-existent, this report provides a 'Position Paper' to present to the directorates or institutes of health authorities to appropriate the value of ACPD and approve of their use as a research treasure and resource management tool.

  14. The earrings of Pancas treasure: Analytical study by X-ray based techniques – A first approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, I., E-mail: isabel.tissot@archeofactu.pt [Archeofactu – Rua do Cerrado das Oliveiras, No. 14, 2°Dto., 2610-035 Alfragide (Portugal); Tissot, M., E-mail: matthias.tissot@archeofactu.pt [Archeofactu – Rua do Cerrado das Oliveiras, No. 14, 2°Dto., 2610-035 Alfragide (Portugal); Museu Nacional de Arqueologia – Praça do Império, 1400-206 Lisboa (Portugal); Manso, M., E-mail: marta974@gmail.com [Centro de Física Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av., Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, L.C., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt [IST/ITN, Univ. Técnica de Lisboa, E.N. 10, UFA-LFI, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Barreiros, M.A., E-mail: alexandra.barreiros@lneg.pt [LNEG, I.P., Estrada do Paço do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Marcelo, T., E-mail: teresa.marcelo@lneg.pt [LNEG, I.P., Estrada do Paço do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: lcalves@itn.pt [Centro de Física Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av., Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Corregidor, V., E-mail: vicky.corregidor@itn.pt [IST/ITN, Univ. Técnica de Lisboa, E.N. 10, UFA-LFI, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Guerra, M.F., E-mail: maria.guerra@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France and UMR8220 CNRS - 14, quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    The development of new metallurgical technologies in the Iberian Peninsula during the Iron Age is well represented by the 10 gold earrings from the treasure of Pancas. This work presents a first approach to the analytical study of these earrings and contributes to the construction of a typological evolution of the Iberian earrings. The manufacture techniques and the alloys composition were studied with three complementary X-ray spectroscopy techniques: portable EDXRF, μ-PIXE and SEM–EDS. The results were compared with earrings from the same and previous periods.

  15. IBA investigations of loose garnets from Pietroasa, Apahida and Cluj-Someşeni treasures (5th century AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugoi, R.; Oanţă-Marghitu, R.; Calligaro, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the archaeometric investigations of 418 loose garnets from Pietroasa and Cluj-Someşeni treasures and Apahida II and III princely grave inventories (5th century AD). The chemical composition of the gems was determined by external beam micro-PIXE technique at the AGLAE accelerator of C2RMF, Paris, France. Complementary observations made by Optical Microscopy revealed details on the gemstones cutting and polishing and permitted to identify certain mineral inclusions. The compositional results evidenced several types of garnets from the pyralspite series, suggesting distinct provenances for these Early Medieval gems.

  16. IBA investigations of loose garnets from Pietroasa, Apahida and Cluj-Someşeni treasures (5th century AD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugoi, R., E-mail: bugoi@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Măgurele 077125 (Romania); Oanţă-Marghitu, R., E-mail: rodicamarghitu@yahoo.com [Muzeul Naţional de Istorie a României, Bucureşti 030026 (Romania); Calligaro, T., E-mail: thomas.calligaro@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France, C2RMF, Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 75001 Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, UMR8247, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports the archaeometric investigations of 418 loose garnets from Pietroasa and Cluj-Someşeni treasures and Apahida II and III princely grave inventories (5th century AD). The chemical composition of the gems was determined by external beam micro-PIXE technique at the AGLAE accelerator of C2RMF, Paris, France. Complementary observations made by Optical Microscopy revealed details on the gemstones cutting and polishing and permitted to identify certain mineral inclusions. The compositional results evidenced several types of garnets from the pyralspite series, suggesting distinct provenances for these Early Medieval gems.

  17. Nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia: a cross-sectional study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseh, Ladan; Rafiei, Hossein; Heidari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Nurses have an important role in caring for terminally ill patients. They are often confronted with euthanasia but little is known about their attitudes towards it. The present study aimed to examine Iranian Muslim nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia. In this exploratory cross-sectional study, all qualified registered nurses working in two teaching hospitals (Kashani and Hajar hospitals) in Iran were invited to participate. The Euthanasia Attitude Scale (EAS) was used to assess the nurses' attitude towards euthanasia. Of 266 nurses who fit the criteria, 190 participated in the study (response rate 72.9%); 91.1% (n=173) were female and 8.9% (n=17) were male. In total, 57.4%, 3.2% and 39.5% of nurses reported a negative, neutral and positive attitude to euthanasia respectively. Nurses reported their most negative attitude to the domain 'practical consideration' with mean of 2.36±0.9 and most positive attitude to the domain 'treasuring life' with a mean EAS score of 2.85±0.4. The majority of Muslim nurses were found to have negative attitudes to euthanasia. We recommend that future studies should be conducted to examine Muslim nurses' attitudes to euthanasia in different cultures to determine the role of culture and religious beliefs in attitude to euthanasia.

  18. How do patients with anorexia nervosa "process" psychotherapy between sessions? A comparison of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeck, A; Hartmann, A; Wild, B; De Zwaan, M; Herpertz, S; Burgmer, M; Von Wietersheim, J; Resmark, G; Friederich, H-C; Tagay, S; Dinkel, A; Loewe, B; Teufel, M; Orlinsky, D; Herzog, W; Zipfel, S

    2016-11-03

    Patients' processing of psychotherapy between sessions ("inter-session process" (ISP)) has been repeatedly shown to be related to outcome. The aim of this study was to compare ISP characteristics of cognitive-behavioral vs. psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and their relation to outcome. Data of 106 patients participating in a randomized-controlled trial who received either 40 sessions of enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E) or focal psychodynamic therapy (FPT) were analyzed. The ISP was measured with the Inter-session Experience Questionnaire (IEQ). Three outcome classes were distinguished: full recovery, partial recovery, and still fulfilling all AN criteria. Patients receiving CBT-E reported more on "applying therapy" in the initial and the final treatment phase compared to FPT patients. In terms of process-outcome relations, higher levels of "recreating the therapeutic dialogue between sessions," "recreating the therapeutic dialogue with negative emotions" as well as "applying therapy with negative emotions" in the final phase of treatment predicted negative outcome in FPT, whereas overall higher levels of negative emotions predicted negative outcome in CBT-E. In outpatient treatment in AN, the processing of therapy as measured by the IEQ showed surprisingly few differences between CBT-E and FPT. However, different ISP patterns were predictive of outcome, pointing to different mechanisms of change.

  19. Psychodynamic Treatment of the Criminal Offender: Making the Case for Longer-Term Treatment in a Longer-Term Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Abby L; Kelly, Elspeth; Cain, Nicole M

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, prisons and jails have become de facto psychiatric hospitals, responsible for the care and treatment of individuals with serious mental illness. Historically, cognitive-behaviorally informed therapeutic approaches have been the treatment of choice among mental health practitioners in correctional settings. However, inmate-clients often present with complex diagnostic issues that are arguably better served by long-term treatment options, such as psychodynamic psychotherapy. We first review the nature of psychotherapy in the correctional setting, as well as treatment barriers and challenges faced by both mental health providers and inmate-clients. We then review treatment studies that examine the efficacy of various therapeutic techniques in correctional/forensic contexts. Finally, we argue that, due to the complex nature of psychopathology, average length of time incarcerated, and treatment issues that arise in this multifaceted and challenging setting, mental health treatment providers should consider providing psychodynamic treatment modalities when working with incarcerated individuals. We also argue that more research is needed to examine the efficacy of these treatment approaches with inmate-clients.

  20. [Concepts and scenarios in the teaching of psychiatric nursing and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorski, L P; da Silva, G B; da Silva, E N

    2001-01-01

    This work approaches the contradictions that are present in the teaching of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health in four public universities in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It consists of a qualitative study based on a dialectic referential. The instruments used for the investigation were the programs of the courses of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health and interviews with fifteen teachers and fourteen students of the area. The central themes of the analysis were the conceptions and scenarios in which the teaching of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health takes place. It was observed that these courses focus predominantly the concepts of normality and pathology during the cycle of life and are influenced by the discourse of preventive psychiatry and by psychoanalysis. It was also noticed that the courses mentioned adopt a psychodynamic approach. The majority of the training in the area still takes place in big psychiatric hospitals and emphasizes psychopathologies and its psychosocial determinations which consolidate the hospice model.

  1. An investigation on the effectiveness of group psychodynamic psychotherapy on the personality dimensions in divorced and non-divorce woman with low marital satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mehryar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Present study is aimed at investigating the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy on the personality characteristics of divorced and non-divorced women with low marital satisfaction. Materials and Methods: This clinical research conducted in the clients referred to Khane Roshan-e-Doost Psychological Studies Institute. They are evaluated clinically through interviews and questionnaires. So, 45 patients selected and divided in three equal groups of divorced women, non-divorced women (married with low marital satisfaction, and control group. Then, the groups of divorced and non-divorced women with low marital satisfaction participated in 24 sessions of psychodynamic psychotherapy. To collect data, Cattel’s 16-item questionnaire and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire were used. Data analyzed through multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results of this study indicated that training of psychodynamic psychotherapy caused a significant change in personality traits in divorced women and in married women with low marital satisfaction. Only in factor B (intelligent - low intelligence and factor Q1 (conservatism there was no significant difference between experimental and control groups. The results of correlation between personality factors and low marital satisfaction pointed that there is a significant relationship between all factors of personality except the factor of conservatism.  Conclusion: Based on the results, psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective in significant improvement of most of personality traits. Therefore, applying this method can be useful in improving marital personality traits, reducing divorce and maintaining mental health.

  2. Short psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy, antidepressants, and their combination in the treatment of major depression: A mega-analysis based on three randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Maat, S.C.M.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Schoevers, R.A.; van Aalst, G.; Natijk, C.G.; Hendriksen, M.; Kool, S.; Peen, J.; Van, R.; de Jonghe, F.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of Short Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy (SPSP) has not yet been compared with pharmacotherapy. A mega-analysis based on three original Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) was performed. Patients with (mild to moderate) major depressive disorder were randomized in (24 weeks) SPSP

  3. Using Psychodynamic, Cognitive Behavioral, and Control Mastery Prototypes to Predict Change: A New Look at an Old Paradigm for Long-Term Single-Case Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Nnamdi; Ablon, J. Stuart; O'Connor, Lynn E.

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates a method of testing models of change in individual long-term psychotherapy cases. A depressed client was treated with 208 sessions of control mastery therapy (CMT), an unmanualized approach that integrates elements of psychodynamic therapy (PDT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Panels of experts developed prototypes…

  4. ‘You have to keep your head on your shoulders’: A systems psychodynamic perspective on women leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Helene Mayer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Women leaders within Higher Education Institutions (HEIs in South Africa have increased in numbers over the past years and they have changed the dynamics in these institutions. Yet, it is a subject that has hardly been explored from the perspective of women leaders. Aim:The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of women leaders in HEIs from a systems psychodynamic perspective using the conflict, identity, boundaries, authority, roles, task (CIBART model, a well-researched model to analyse systems psychodynamics and to gain a deeper understanding of (unconscious dynamics within organisations. Methods:This qualitative study is based on Dilthey‘s modern hermeneutics. Interviews were conducted with 23 women leaders from the Higher Education Resource Services South Africa, network across 8 HEIs. Observations were conducted in one organisation to support the data analysis and interpretation. Data were analysed through content analysis. Findings:Findings show that women leaders re-evaluate and reconstruct themselves constantly within organisations. This continuous re-evaluation and reconstruction become visible through the constructs of the CIBART model. The findings reveal deeper insights into systems psychodynamics, which considers anxiety within the system where women leaders seem to contain such anxiety by mobilising specific defence mechanisms. Certain diversity markers, such as race, gender, mother tongue, position within the organisation and generational belonging play a role in creating the dynamics. Women leaders’ experience of de-authorisation and role confusion impacts significantly on women leadership and their action towards ownership. Practical implications: The study provides new, valuable and context-specific insights into women leadership seen through the lens of the CIBART model, highlighting unconscious dynamics that need practical attention in the HEIs to empower women leaders for gender-specific leadership

  5. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  6. Outcomes of specific interpersonal problems for binge eating disorder: comparing group psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy and group cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Balfour, Louise; Presniak, Michelle D; Bissada, Hany

    2012-04-01

    We assessed whether an attachment-based treatment, Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) had a greater impact compared to Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) on Cold/Distant and Intrusive/Needy interpersonal problems. Ninety-five individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) were randomized to GPIP or GCBT and assessed at pre-, post-, and six months post-treatment. Both therapies resulted in a significant decrease in all eight interpersonal problem subscales except the Nonassertive subscale. GPIP resulted in a greater reduction in the Cold/Distant subscale compared to GCBT, but no differences were found for changes in the Intrusive/Needy subscale. GPIP may be most relevant for those with BED who have Cold/Distant interpersonal problems and attachment avoidance.

  7. A view from Riggs: treatment resistance and patient authority-IX. Integrative psychodynamic treatment of psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Jane G

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic spectrum disorders present treatment challenges for patients, families, and clinicians. This article addresses the history of the dualism in the field between biological and psychological approaches to mental disorders, and surveys the contemporary literature about the etiology and treatment of psychotic spectrum disorders. An integrative approach to treatment derived from work at Austen Riggs with previously treatment refractory patients with psychotic spectrum disorders is described that combines individual psycho- dynamic psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, family systems approaches, and intensive psychosocial engagement. Helping patients develop their own authority to join the treatment, use relationships for learning, and understand the meaning of their symptoms is central to the treatment at Austen Riggs. An extended case vignette of a patient diagnosed with a schizoaffective disorder is presented illustrating this integrative psychodynamic treatment approach.

  8. Are competence frameworks fit for practice? Examining the validity of competence frameworks for CBT, psychodynamic, and humanistic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Practitioners transporting psychological therapies from a research context to clinical settings need to know what competences they should demonstrate to maintain congruence with the evidence base. This study explores the validity of a suite of competence frameworks for cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), humanistic, and psychodynamic therapies developed to aid the transportation process. Experienced psychological therapists (N = 111) undertook a Q-sort of 100 items, drawn from frameworks representing each of the modalities and including a set of pantheoretical generic competences, rating items as characteristic or uncharacteristic of their orientation. There were significant differences in the way competences were assigned, with practitioners strongly favoring items from their own modality framework and eschewing items from the others. These results confirm the validity of the items within the frameworks; their utility and application is discussed.

  9. Observing the determinants of the psychotherapeutic process in depressive disorders. A clinical case study within a psychodynamic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmano eOasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the relationship between depressive disorders, personality configurations, and mental functioning. A years treatment of a young man with the diagnosis of Depression is presented: the clinical and empirical points of view are described in depth through an assessment at the beginning and at one year after of an oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy. SCID I and II and HAMRS were administered to the patient in assessement phase. In the same phase he filled in BDI-II, and DEQ; the psychotherapist completed SWAP-200. These clinician instruments were used again after one year of the treatment. The PDM point of view is also presented. All sessions are audiotaped: twelve verbatim transcripts were coded with the Defense Mechanisms Rating Scale and CCRT. The results show a decrease in depressive symptoms, a change in some personality configurations, but a substantial invariance of the introjective profile, and a modification in mental functioning.

  10. Integrating empirically supported therapies for treating personality disorders: a synthesis of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Margo; Darke, Juliet L

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical foundations and components of an intensive group treatment program for individuals diagnosed with personality disorders. The Chrysalis Community Day Treatment Program integrates aspects of three empirically supported therapies: Transference-Focused Psychotherapy and Mentalization-Based Therapy, both psychodynamic psychotherapies, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, a cognitive-behavioral therapy. Each of these modalities is structured for the treatment of individuals suffering from the symptoms of borderline personality disorder, and each of the treatments addresses problems that occur across a wide spectra of beliefs, capacities, and behaviors. The program is comprised of expressive, psycho-educational and skills-training groups, and participants attend three days per week, for 15 weeks. Preliminary evaluation is promising, reflecting decreases in self-injurious behavior, suicide attempts, psychiatric hospitalizations, and psychiatric symptoms at a one-year follow-up.

  11. Gerontological Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Tyra J. Withers

    2017-01-01

    The core idea of this literature is to explain a summarized point of view regarding the gerontological nursing and its present condition in our society. The literature will explain the clear definition and at the same time will point out the core ideas that can help the administrators to increase the interest of nursing students in gerontological nursing

  12. The Effect of Abuse History on Adolescent Patients with Feeding and Eating Disorders Treated through Psychodynamic Therapy: Comorbidities and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangio, Annamaria M; Rinaldi, Lucio; Monniello, Gianluigi; Sisti, Leuconoe Grazia; de Waure, Chiara; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of our study was to compare the characteristics and comorbidities of patients with eating disorders between those who suffered from a childhood abuse and those who did not. Our second aim was to analyze the differences in the outcome of the psychodynamic therapy between abused and not abused patients. Twenty-six adolescent patients with eating disorders were assessed. Adolescent were evaluated by a single expert psychiatrist by checklists and questionnaires: EDI 3, SCL 90, BIS11, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Global Assessment of Functioning, SCID II, and CTQ-Self control (SF). According to the results of CTQ-SF (cut-off ≥ 8), patients were divided into two groups: those who had experienced a history of abuse and those who had not. They underwent a psychodynamic psychotherapy and were assessed again after 12 months. Eleven patients (42.3%) had a history of abuse according to CTQ score. No significant differences were found in abused and not abused patients in their demographic, clinical, and comorbid characteristics (sex, age, type of eating disorder, comorbid impulse control, personality, and addictive disorders). Abused patients showed a significantly higher score in many scale. The psychotherapeutic intervention in patients with a history of abuse resulted only in a significant decrease in symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) psychoticism dimension ( p  Eating Disorder Inventory-3 interceptive deficits, and the dissociative experience scale. Regarding the first aim of our study, we proved that history of abuse is not significantly related to patient comorbidities. Regarding our second aim, history of abuse was related to patient improvement only for psychotic symptoms; whereas patients who had not experienced an abuse improved in a variety of symptoms. Thus, abuse history can be considered as a negative prognostic factor for patients with eating disorders undergoing dynamic psychotherapy. However, this psychotherapy may have a role in

  13. The treasure trove of yeast genera and species described by Johannes van der Walt (1925-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maudy Th; Groenewald, Marizeth

    2012-12-01

    Yeast taxonomy and systematics have in recent years been dealt with intensively primarily by a small group of individual researchers with particular expertise. Amongst these was Johannes P. van der Walt, who had a major role in shaping our current understanding of yeast biodiversity and taxonomy. Van der Walt based his taxonomic studies not only on available cultures, but also by going into the field to isolate yeasts from various substrates. This pioneering work led to the discovery of many new genera and species, which were deposited in the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) collections for future studies in taxonomy, genomics, and industrial uses. These treasures collected during more than 60 years provide an outstanding legacy to the yeast community and will continue to exist in his absence. This contribution provides a comprehensive overview of the current nomenclatural and taxonomic status of the yeast genera and species introduced by van der Walt during his career.

  14. Different Places, Different Ideas: Reimagining Practice in American Psychiatric Nursing After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M

    2018-01-01

    In 1952, Hildegard Peplau published her textbook Interpersonal Relations in Nursing: A Conceptual Frame of Reference for Psychodynamic Nursing. This was the same year the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (1st ed.; DSM-I; APA). These events occurred in the context of a rapidly changing policy and practice environment in the United States after World War II, where the passing of the National Mental Health Act in 1946 released vast amounts of funding for the establishment of the National Institute of Mental Health and the development of advanced educational programs for the mental health professions including nursing. This article explores the work of two nurse leaders, Hildegard Peplau and Dorothy Mereness, as they developed their respective graduate psychiatric nursing programs and sought to create new knowledge for psychiatric nursing that would facilitate the development of advanced nursing practice. Both nurses had strong ideas about what they felt this practice should look like and developed distinct and particular approaches to their respective programs. This reflected a common belief that it was only through nurse-led education that psychiatric nursing could shape its own practice and control its own future. At the same time, there are similarities in the thinking of Peplau and Mereness that demonstrate the link between the specific social context of mental health immediately after World War II and the development of modern psychiatric nursing. Psychiatric nurses were able to gain significant control of their own education and practice after the war, but this was not without a struggle and some limitations, which continue to impact on the profession today.

  15. Crucial aspects promoting meaning and purpose in life: perceptions of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Haugan, Gørill; Tranvåg, Oscar

    2017-10-30

    Meaning and purpose in life are fundamental to human beings. In changing times, with an aging population and increased life expectancy, the need for health care services and long-term care is likely to grow. More deeply understanding how older long-term care residents perceive meaning and purpose in life is critical for improving the quality of care and the residents' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore crucial aspects promoting nursing home residents' experience of meaning and purpose in everyday life. An exploratory hermeneutical design with qualitative interviews for collecting data. Four key experiences were found to promote meaning and purpose in life: 1) physical and mental well-being, 2) belonging and recognition, 3) personally treasured activities and 4) spiritual closeness and connectedness. In supporting meaning and purpose in life of nursing home residents, the residents' everyday well-being should be a central focus of care and facilitate personally treasured activities. Focused attention should also be given to the meaning-making power of experiencing belonging, recognition and spiritual connectedness.

  16. Crucial aspects promoting meaning and purpose in life: perceptions of nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorunn Drageset

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meaning and purpose in life are fundamental to human beings. In changing times, with an aging population and increased life expectancy, the need for health care services and long-term care is likely to grow. More deeply understanding how older long-term care residents perceive meaning and purpose in life is critical for improving the quality of care and the residents’ quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore crucial aspects promoting nursing home residents’ experience of meaning and purpose in everyday life. Method An exploratory hermeneutical design with qualitative interviews for collecting data. Results Four key experiences were found to promote meaning and purpose in life: 1 physical and mental well-being, 2 belonging and recognition, 3 personally treasured activities and 4 spiritual closeness and connectedness. Conclusion In supporting meaning and purpose in life of nursing home residents, the residents’ everyday well-being should be a central focus of care and facilitate personally treasured activities. Focused attention should also be given to the meaning-making power of experiencing belonging, recognition and spiritual connectedness.

  17. Baseline training in cognitive and psychodynamic psychotherapy during a psychologist training program. Exploring client outcomes in therapies of one or two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennhag, Inga; Armelius, Bengt-Åke

    2012-01-01

    This effectiveness study explored the outcomes of 187 clients seen by 187 students undergoing baseline training in psychotherapy. Clients reduced their symptoms (SCL-90) and increased their positive self-image (SASB introject) during the therapy. Multiple regression analyses showed no differences between the cognitive and the psychodynamic training approaches and no differences between one and two semesters duration of the therapies. However, 2-3% of variance in end states was accounted for by the interaction between the variables, indicating a moderating effect of duration in the two approaches. Outcomes for clients in the cognitive training approach were significantly better with two semesters than with one semester, while there was no such difference in the psychodynamic approach. Consequences for baseline training are discussed.

  18. Essentials of psychoanalytic process and change: How can we investigate the neural effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy in individualized neuro-imaging?

    OpenAIRE

    Heinz eBoeker; André eRichter; Holger eHimmighoffen; Jutta eErnst; Laura eBohleber; Elena eHofmann; Johannes eVetter; Georg eNorthoff

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the essentials of psychoanalytic process and change and the question of how the neural correlates and mechanisms of psychodynamic psychotherapy can be investigated. The psychoanalytic approach aims at enabling the patient to ?remember, repeat, and work through? concerning explicit memory. Moreover, the relationship between analyst and patient establishes a new affective configuration which enables a reconstruction of the implicit memory. If psychic change can be achieved ...

  19. [Changes in OPD-CA Axis Structure During Inpatient Psychodynamic Treatment of Adolescents Suffering from Comorbid Disorders of Conduct and Emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Carola; Salzer, Simone; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) we evaluated an inpatient psychodynamic treatment for adolescents suffering from mixed disorders of conduct and emotions. The sample consisted of severely impaired adolescents with remarkable deficits regarding psychic structure. The current study wanted to examine if the manualized treatment did not only reduce symptoms but also enhance the structural level of the patients. The axis structure of the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics in Childhood and Adolescence (OPD-CA) was used to assess the structural level of N = 46 adolescent inpatients. To examine differences between the patients‘ structural level at the beginning and at the end of inpatient treatment we conducted a repeated measures ANOVA. The overall score as well as the three subscores of the axis structure improved significantly during inpatient treatment. The corresponding effect sizes were large (η(2) = .29 to .47). The inpatient psychodynamic treatment led to significant improvements regarding symptomatology as well as psychic structure. However, further studies with larger sample size and control group data should be conducted to confirm these results.

  20. Introduction to the JPA special issue: Can the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual put the complex person back at the center-stage of personality assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K; Meyer, Gregory J

    2011-03-01

    We briefly introduce this special issue, which focuses both on the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM) and the practice of idiographic, depth-oriented personality assessment. The 7 articles in this issue are diverse in scope but all address these 2 important topics. To set the stage, the special issue opens with a description of the history behind, the purposes of, and the steps taken to develop the PDM, and the next article provides a compelling illustration of depth-oriented personality assessment in the context of a long-term course of psychodynamic treatment. The third and fourth articles describe how the PDM model fosters attention to dynamic processes, not just overt symptoms, and they articulate the challenges and benefits of integrating this model into both the revitalized practice of assessment and diagnosis and the research avenues that will evaluate its validity and utility. The fifth article provides a broad overview of interesting experimental research on implicit processes from personality, social, and cognitive psychology, with implications for understanding and assessing dynamic processes. The sixth article illustrates how a PDM-based assessment of an adolescent boy helpfully contributed to his psychodynamic therapy. Finally, the issue closes with an illuminating article describing a PDM-based training model for the graduated development of assessment and diagnosis skills in a doctoral program. Overall, this special issue helps show how the PDM can invigorate multimethod personality assessment by placing the complex idiographic understanding of a person at the center-stage in the assessment process.

  1. Nursing Revalidation

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, F.; McCutcheon, K.

    2016-01-01

    This article details the Nursing and Midwifery Council revalidation requirements essential for all registered nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. Nursing revalidation is effective from April 2016 and is built on the pre-existing Post-registration education and practice. Unlike the previous process, revalidation provides a more robust system which is clearly linked to the Code and should assist towards the delivery of quality and safe effective care

  2. [Cultural Identity, social health, and the Social State Under the rule of law. The case of "The Quimbaya Treasure". Quindío, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Martínez, Felipe A

    2015-07-01

    We approach the concept of "cultural identity" as a cohesive element within a group in the context of history and territory. We posit the relationship between this cultural identity with symbols of affiliation and origin, such as archeological heritage; in this case "The Quimbaya Treasure". We present "social health" as the capacity of a community, immersed in a culture and a territory, to relate healthily and cherish sentiments of support and trust. Rudiments of identity such as ancestral legacies allow for the creation of feelings of "sociocultural belonging" and self-determination of peoples that take paret in the health of a society. The autonomy of peoples and the recognition of their diversity appear in the notion of Nation State and Social State Under the Rule of Law. In this document, it is argued that, though the construction of this state was a political task, the edification of the nation was not. This edification was the result of earlier cultural labor. Nevertheless, historical rights are reflected in established constitutions. The Quimbaya Treasure was donated to Spain as part of Colombia's participation in ceremonies commemorating the 400th anniversary of the "Discovery of the Americas". This essay documents the legislative acts that prove the inconstitutionality of that donation and, as a result, the treasure's possible repatriation. It places emphasis on the importance of the repatriation given the value it possesses as an agent of cultural identity for Colombians in general and the residents of Quindío in particular.

  3. Psicoterapia psicodinâmica em grupo para fobia social generalizada Psychodynamic group treatment for generalized social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zippin Knijnik

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a efetividade do tratamento psicodinâmico em grupo de pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: 30 pacientes foram incluídos em um estudo randomizado, simples-cego, comparando Terapia Psicodinâmica de Grupo (TPG com um Grupo de Controle Placebo com Credibilidade (CPC. A TPG foi conduzida em 12 sessões de terapia de orientação psicodinâmica em grupo. Os pacientes do grupo controle receberam um pacote de aulas-discussões e tratamento de apoio por 12 semanas, que foi comparado à TPG. Todos os participantes preencheram a Escala de Liebowitz para Ansiedade Social (LSAS, a Escala Hamilton de Ansiedade (HAM-A e a Escala de Impressão Clínica Global (CGI, na entrevista inicial e na 12ª semana de tratamento. Os dados foram analisados com uma ANOVA de medidas repetidas. Pacientes em vigência de tratamento farmacológico ou psicoterápico foram excluídos. RESULTADOS: Ambos os grupos apresentaram melhora na maioria das medidas. Na LSAS, os pacientes da TPG obtiveram melhora superior aos do grupo controle, ao cabo de 12 semanas (F1,28=4.84, p=0.036. Nas medidas basais dos sujeitos que completaram o estudo, não houve diferença entre os grupos em variáveis demográficas e de desfecho. CONCLUSÃO: Neste estudo, a TPG foi superior ao tratamento placebo com credibilidade no tratamento da fobia social generalizada, em um ensaio clínico randomizado, simples-cego, de 12 semanas.OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of psychodynamic group therapy in patients with generalized social phobia. METHODS: Thirty patients were included in a randomized single-blind clinical trial comparing psychodynamic group treatment (PGT with a credible placebo control group (CPC. PGT was carried out within a 12-session psychodynamically-oriented group psychotherapy. Control patients received a treatment package of lecture-discussion and support group for 12 weeks which was compared to PGT

  4. Fostering nursing ethics for practical nursing

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 敏子; モリタ, トシコ; Morita, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    Higher nursing ethics can raise nursing quality. The author attempts to define theproblem from the seedling of sensibility in practical nursing and focuses on the clinical environment surrounding nursing ethics from its pedagogical and historicalaspects. On the basis of these standpoints, the author discusses issues on the practical nursing as a practitioner of nursing ethics.

  5. A pilot study of clonazepam versus psychodynamic group therapy plus clonazepam in the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knijnik, Daniela Z; Blanco, Carlos; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Moraes, Carolina U; Mombach, Clarissa; Almeida, Ellen; Pereira, Marília; Strapasson, Atahualpa; Manfro, Gisele G; Eizirik, Cláudio L

    2008-12-01

    Both psychodynamic group therapy (PGT) and clonazepam are used as treatment strategies in reducing symptoms of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). However, many individuals remain symptomatic after treatment with PGT or clonazepam. Fifty-eight adult outpatients with a diagnosis of GSAD according to DSM-IV were randomized to 12 weeks PGT plus clonazepam or clonazepam. The Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) Scale was the primary efficacy measure. Secondary efficacy measures included the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) total score, the World Health Organization Instrument to Assess Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Bref) Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). CGI-I data from 57 patients (intent-to-treat population) showed that patients who received PGT plus clonazepam presented significantly greater improvement than those who received clonazepam (P=0.033). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the secondary efficacy measures. Our study suggests that the combination of PGT with clonazepam may be a promising strategy for the treatment of GSAD, regarding gains in the global functioning. However the present study failed to detect more specific changes in social anxiety symptomatology between the two groups.

  6. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Impaired Sexual Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical follow-up study, we examined the effect of clinical holistic medicine (psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients with poor self-assessed sexual functioning and found that this problem could be solved in 41.67% of the patients ((95% CI: 27.61–56.7%; 1.75 < NNT < 3.62, p = 0.05. The bodywork was inspired by the Marion Rosen method and helped the patients to confront painful emotions from childhood trauma(s, and thus accelerated and deepened the therapy. The goal of therapy was the healing of the whole life of the patient through Antonovsky-salutogenesis. In this process, rehabilitation of the character and purpose of life of the patient was essential, and assisted the patient to recover his or her sense of coherence (existential coherence. We conclude that clinical holistic medicine is the treatment of choice if the patient is ready to explore and assume responsibility for his or her existence (true self, and willing to struggle emotionally in the therapy to reach this important goal. When the patient heals existentially, quality of life, health, and ability to function in general are improved at the same time. The therapy was “mindful” in its focus on existential and spiritual issues. The patients received in average 14.8 sessions at the cost of 1,188 EURO.

  7. [About the heterogeneity in adolescents with gender identity disorder: differential importance of psychiatric comorbidity and considerations of individual psychodynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Alexander; Beier, Klaus M; Vukorepa, Julia; Mersmann, Maik; Albiez, Verena

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), gender dysphoria (GD) respectively, is considered a multifactorial disease whose etiology is subject to complex bio-psycho-social conditions, each with different weighting. As a result, therapists, who treat children and adolescents with GID/GD, have to deal with a very heterogeneous group with individually varying causes, differing psychopathology and varying disease progression. In addition to general psychiatric aspects of development, particularly psychiatric comorbidity, but also the different individual psychodynamics--i. e. the specific constellation of conflicts and possible ego deficits and structural deficits in the learning history of the person are of differential importance. In regard to the indication for gender reassignment measures this sometimes is relevant for the decision. The difficulties arising for decision making and the usefulness of a systematic evaluation of case reports as a basis for further optimization of the treatment recommendations are illustrated by two case reports. In the course of this, also the disadvantages and potential dangers of too early diagnostic definition and introduction of gender somato-medical and legal measures are shown exemplarily.

  8. Is psychodynamic psychotherapy an effective intervention for individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR of psychosis?: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report a case and to discuss the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PD-P to treat individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR of psychosis. METHODS: An individual at UHR was followed up for 24 months. The baseline evaluation included a psychiatric interview, the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS, the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS, and neuropsychological assessment. He underwent weekly sessions of PD-P for 12 months and was followed up for 12 months after the end of PD-P. The evaluations were at baseline, after 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. No medication was prescribed during the 24-month follow-up. RESULTS: The prodromal symptoms remitted. The initial total score on the SIPS/SOPS was 37 points. After the first 12 months of PD-P, there was a reduction to 12 points on the SIPS/SOPS score, which stabilized in the 24-month follow-up. There was also a slight improvement in his performance on the neuropsychological evaluations. CONCLUSION: This case report suggests that PD-P can reduce prodromal symptoms; nevertheless, a better understanding of the specificity and efficacy of PD-P as an option of treatment for UHR individuals is needed.

  9. The systems psychodynamic experiences of first-year master’s students in industrial and organisational psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2012-03-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to describe the systems psychodynamic experiences of first-year master’s students in Industrial and Organisational Psychology. Motivation for the study: Academic staff members tend to forget their own experiences as master’s students, lose touch with their students’ experiences, lose empathy and treat student groups in mechanistic ways. Although the students’ conscious tasks and roles are relatively clear, very little is known about their unconscious experiences. Research design, approach and method: The researchers used qualitative research involving a case study. They collected the data and conducted their analyses by administering a Listening Post (LP and discourse analysis. Two themes emerged, from which the researchers formulated their working and research hypotheses. Main findings: The themes related to anxiety and basic assumption behaviour. The research hypothesis referred to students’ introjections of emotional incompetence. This resulted in exhaustion. Practical/managerial implications: More focused attention to the students’ emotional experiences, by themselves and by academic staff members, could conserve students’ energy for their academic work and relationships. Contribution/value-add: Being master’s students consumes emotional energy that jeopardises students’ academic work and forming relationships. Being aware of these and managing them could help students to achieve better academically.

  10. What hath freud wrought? Current confusion and controversies about the clinical practice of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the current state of psychoanalysis and the challenges to the fundamental premises of Freud's psychoanalysis by those who have shifted to relationship or so-called two-person psychologies in our field. The author begins by briefly describing a parallel to the recent history of psychoanalysis in the sudden rise and fall of scholastic philosophy in the 14th century. He then focuses on contemporary attacks on Freud's psychoanalysis as a science, based on the contention by two-person psychologists that free association by the patient and evenly hovering attention by the analyst are actually impossible. He reviews Freud's idea of psychoanalysis, discusses psychodynamic psychotherapy, both conceived as scientific treatment procedures, and describes the current assault on their metapsychological and epistemological foundations. Returning to the parallel between what happened to medieval scholasticism and what has happened to psychoanalysis, he examines why this happened, and the resulting fragmentation of psychoanalytic practice. The article concludes with suggestions for the integration of various schools of psychoanalysis, reminding us of Benjamin Franklin's warning: "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately."

  11. Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in patients with "male depression" syndrome, hopelessness, and suicide risk: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Gloria; Pompili, Maurizio; Innamorati, Marco; Santucci, Chiara; Savoja, Valeria; Goldblatt, Mark; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Methods. This was an observational study of the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) in a sample of 35 (30 women and 5 men) patients with moderate-to-severe "male depression" (Gotland Scale for Male Depression (GSMD) ≥ 13) comorbid with unipolar mood disorder (dysthymia and major depression) or anxiety disorder. Outcome measures were GSMD and BHS (Beck Hopelessness Scale) score changes from baseline. Results. Patients had a strong response to STPP on the GSMD (estimated mean score change (± SE) = -9.08 ± 2.74; P < 0.01; partial eta squared = 0.50), but not on the BHS (estimated mean score change (± SE) = -0.92 ± 1.55; P = 0.57; partial eta squared   = 0.03). BHS score changes were significantly associated with GSMD score changes (Pearson's r = 0.56; P < 0.001), even when controlling for the severity of hopelessness at the baseline (partial r = 0.62; P < 0.001). Conclusions. STPP proved to be effective in patients suffering from "male depression" although hopelessness was only marginally reduced by this treatment which points to the need to better understand how STPP can be involved in the reduction of suicide risk.

  12. Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Patients with “Male Depression” Syndrome, Hopelessness, and Suicide Risk: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Angeletti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Methods. This was an observational study of the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP in a sample of 35 (30 women and 5 men patients with moderate-to-severe “male depression” (Gotland Scale for Male Depression (GSMD ≥ 13 comorbid with unipolar mood disorder (dysthymia and major depression or anxiety disorder. Outcome measures were GSMD and BHS (Beck Hopelessness Scale score changes from baseline. Results. Patients had a strong response to STPP on the GSMD (estimated mean score change (± SE=−9.08 ± 2.74;P<0.01; partial eta squared  =0.50, but not on the BHS (estimated mean score change (± SE=−0.92 ± 1.55;P=0.57; partial eta squared  =0.03. BHS score changes were significantly associated with GSMD score changes (Pearson's r=0.56; P<0.001, even when controlling for the severity of hopelessness at the baseline (partial r=0.62; P<0.001. Conclusions. STPP proved to be effective in patients suffering from “male depression” although hopelessness was only marginally reduced by this treatment which points to the need to better understand how STPP can be involved in the reduction of suicide risk.

  13. [Conversion syndromes in neurology. A psychopathological and psychodynamic differentiation of conversion disorder, somatization disorder and factitious disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H P; Dobmeier, P; Mayer, C; Rothenhäusler, H B

    1998-12-01

    Conversion syndromes are frequent among medically unexplained somatic symptoms in neurology. A careful differential diagnosis must be carried out in a psychiatric consultation service. In a prospective study lasting for over four years 169 patients with pseudoneurological signs of conversion were included. From a clinical point of view the following conversion syndromes were presented: astasia/abasia: 27.2%, paresis/plegia: 24.3%, aphonia: 1.8%, hyp-/anaesthesia: 21.9%, blindness: 5.3%, non-epileptic seizures: 19.5%. According to the diagnostic criteria of DSM-III-R three subgroups were differentiated: conversion disorder (n = 132), somatisation disorder (n = 28), factitious disorder (n = 9). Intermittent courses of illness were prevailing in conversion disorder, whereas chronic courses predominated in the other two subgroups. High rates of psychiatric comorbidity were typical signs of somatisation disorder. Frequent autodestructive motives (suicidality, deliberate and covert self-harm, chronic pain, high rate of operations) in illness behaviour had to be registered in somatisation and factitious disorder. Both subgroups were characterised by frequent traumatic events during early development. Important socio-economic aspects of illness behaviour above all in somatisation and factitious disorder were underlined. The results are discussed in terms of psychiatric differential diagnosis and psychiatric comorbidity, psychodynamic evaluation, illness behaviour and therapeutic options in a C/L-service.

  14. Therapists' professional and personal characteristics as predictors of outcome in long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, E; Knekt, P; Jääskeläinen, T; Lindfors, O

    2014-06-01

    Whether long-term psychodynamic therapy (LPP) and psychoanalysis (PA) differ from each other and require different therapist qualities has been debated extensively, but rarely investigated empirically. In a quasi-experimental design, LPP was provided for 128 and PA for 41 outpatients, aged 20-46 years and suffering from mood or anxiety disorder, with a 5-year follow-up from start of treatment. Therapies were provided by 58 experienced therapists. Therapist characteristics, measured pre-treatment, were assessed with the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ). General psychiatric symptoms were assessed as the main outcome measure at baseline and yearly after start of treatment with the Symptom Check List, Global Severity Index (SCL-90-GSI). Professionally less affirming and personally more forceful and less aloof therapists predicted less symptoms in PA than in LPP at the end of the follow-up. A faster symptom reduction in LPP was predicted by a more moderate relational style and work experiences of both skillfulness and difficulties, indicating differences between PA and LPP in the therapy process. Results challenge the benefit of a classically "neutral" psychoanalyst in PA. They also indicate closer examinations of therapy processes within and between the two treatments, which may benefit training and supervision of therapists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Naturalistic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Where nurse education aims to provide an overarching intellectual framework, this paper argues that it should be the framework of naturalism. After an exposition of the chief features of naturalism and its relationship to science and morality, the paper describes naturalistic nursing, contrasting it with some other perspectives. There follows a defence of naturalism and naturalistic nursing against several objections, including those concerning spirituality, religion, meaning, morality, and alternative sources of knowledge. The paper ends with some of the advantages of the naturalistic approach. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Demystifying Nursing Theory: A Christian Nursing Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin; Missal, Bernita

    How does nursing theory apply to nursing practice? Nursing theory can explain the why and how of nursing practice, guide nursing interventions, and provide a framework for measuring outcomes. This article briefly explains nursing theory, provides examples for applying theory to nursing practice, and proposes questions for examining the consistency of nursing theories with Christian perspectives. A helpful table illustrating grand, middle-range, and situation-specific theories and their application to nursing practice and research, along with references, is provided online as supplemental digital content. Three caring theories are analyzed from biblical beliefs.

  17. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changed dramatically over the past several decades. These changes have been driven by government regulations and consumer pressures. Today’s nursing homes are highly regulated, high-quality institutions for ...

  18. Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Allocca Hernandez, Giacomo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Getting old involves a lot of changes in life. Family and social relations change and mobility can decrease. These variations require new settings, and of course special care. A nursing home is a place dedicated to help with this situation. Sometimes nursing homes can be perceived as mere institutions by society, and even by future residents. Inside, senior citizens are suppose to spend the rest of their lives doing the same activities day after day. How can we improve these days? Archite...

  19. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christiane; Haase, Laura; Seidel, Dorothea; Bayerl, Martin; Gallinat, Jürgen; Herrmann, Uwe; Dannecker, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic episodes and justify

  20. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Physical Illness and Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the treatment effect of psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients who presented with physical illness at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen. Psychodynamic short-term therapy was complemented with bodywork (Marion Rosen to help patients confront old emotional pain from childhood trauma(s. Patients were measured with a five-item quality of life and health questionnaire (QOL5, a one-item questionnaire of self-assessed quality of life (QOL1, and four questions on self-rated ability to love and to function sexually, socially, and at work (ability to sustain a full-time job. Most of the patients had chronic pain that could not be alleviated with drugs. Results showed that 31 patients with the experience of being severely physically ill (mostly from chronic pain, in spite of having consulted their own general practitioner, entered the study. The holistic approach and body therapy accelerated the therapy dramatically and no significant side effects were detected. After the intervention, 38.7% did not feel ill (1.73 < NNT < 4.58 (p = 0.05. Psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork can help patients. When the patients responded to the therapy, the self-assessed mental health, relationship with partner, ability to work, self-assessed quality of life, relationships in general, measured QOL (with the validated questionnaire QOL5, and life's total state (mean of health, QOL and ability were significantly improved, statistically and clinically. Most importantly, all aspects of life were improved simultaneously, due to induction of Antonovsky-salutogenesis. The patients received in average 20 sessions over 14 months at a cost of 1600 EURO. For the treatment responders, the treatment seemingly provided lasting benefits.

  1. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Montag

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic

  2. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP for social phobia into clinical practice: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leweke Frank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychodynamic psychotherapy is frequently applied in the treatment of social phobia. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of studies on the transfer of manualized treatments to routine psychodynamic practice. Our study is the first one to examine the effects of additional training in a manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP procedure on outcome in routine psychotherapy for social phobia. This study is an extension to a large multi-site RCT (N = 512 comparing the efficacy of STPP to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT of Social Phobia. Methods/Design The manualized treatment is designed for a time limited approach with 25 individual sessions of STPP over 6 months. Private practitioners will be randomized to training in manualized STPP vs. treatment as usual without a specific training (control condition. We plan to enrol a total of 105 patients (84 completers. Assessments will be conducted before treatment starts, after 8 and 15 weeks, after 25 treatment sessions, at the end of treatment, 6 months and 12 months after termination of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Remission from social phobia is defined scoring with 30 or less points on this scale. Discussion We will investigate how the treatment can be transferred from a controlled trial into the less structured setting of routine clinical care. This question represents Phase IV of psychotherapy research. It combines the benefits of randomized controlled and naturalistic research. The study is genuinely designed to promote faster and more widespread dissemination of effective interventions. It will answer the questions whether manualized STPP can be implemented into routine outpatient care, whether the new methods improve treatment courses and outcomes and whether treatment effects reached in routine psychotherapeutic treatments are comparable to those of the controlled, strictly manualized treatment of the main study

  3. [Charcot, working and 'Male Hysteria': A new approach to the Leçons du mardi (Tuesday Lessons) from the standpoint of psychodynamics of work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of work in Charcot's clinical teaching focusing on cases of male hysteria in The Tuesday's Lessons from 1887 to 1889. Today, we read the work of Charcot in a retrospective way as having ended in a failure: He would have missed the discovery of the sexual unconscious. From the perspective of psychodynamics of work, it appears an alternative way which was present in Charcot, though unfinished, opening on a possible development of a relationship between psychic and body. The role of work in traumatic hysteria has been forgotten by Freud's posterity and this obliteration continues today.

  4. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Secure Retirement 09/18/2017 - 11/27/2017 Fundamentals Of Nurse Staffing: Building An Optimal Staffing Model More Upcoming Events TOP VIEWED ANA/CDC Antibiotic Stewardship White Paper Staffing White Paper #1 2017 ...

  5. Nursing informatics and nursing ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    2013-01-01

    -of-(care)-decision. Increased pressure for translating 'evidence-based' research findings into 'ethically-sound', 'value-based' and 'patient-centered' practice requires rethinking the model implicit in conventional knowledge translation and informatics practice in all disciplines, including nursing. The aim is to aid 'how......All healthcare visions, including that of The TIGER (Technology-Informatics-Guiding-Educational-Reform) Initiative envisage a crucial role for nursing. However, its 7 descriptive pillars do not address the disconnect between Nursing Informatics and Nursing Ethics and their distinct communities...... in the clinical-disciplinary landscape. Each sees itself as providing decision support by way of information inputs and ethical insights, respectively. Both have reasons - ideological, professional, institutional - for their task construction, but this simultaneously disables each from engaging fully in the point...

  6. Nurse migration: the effects on nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P K

    2008-09-01

    This paper is an opinion piece based on experience and supported where possible with literature, which addresses an issue of both national and international interest. It focuses on one aspect of the multifaceted social phenomenon of nurse migration, i.e. nurse education. Much has been written about the direct effects of nurse migration on the nurse migrant, the delivery of health care in the countries that supply the nurses, and the countries that receive them. However, there is little information regarding the direct effects of migration on nurse education within the literature. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the positive and negative effects of nurse migration on nurse education both in the countries that supply nurses and those which receive them. Both scholarly and 'grey' literature is used to support the discussion on the 'real' challenges faced by nurse educators and clinical nurses in those countries that supply or receive nurses. In addition, practical recommendations for nurse educators are presented. Furthermore, the nursing profession is challenged to become politically active, to become involved and to take responsibility for the decisions made about nurse education in order to protect the integrity of nurse education and patient safety. The quality of nurse education in many countries has been undermined as a result of rapid, mass migration. There is an urgent need to take practical steps to maintain the integrity of nurse education and the nurse's preparation for practice in order to protect patients' safety.

  7. Interpersonal processes in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive behavioral group therapy: a systematic case study of two groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Foot, Meredith; Leite, Catherine; Maxwell, Hilary; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2011-09-01

    This mixed method systematic case study applied an interpersonal stage model of the therapeutic process to examine interpersonal processes among a highly adherent Group Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) therapist and a highly adherent Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) therapist and their groups of binge eating disordered (BED) patients. This is the first case study to apply the interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy to compare GCBT and GPIP methods and the first to apply the model to group therapy. Early-, middle-, and late-stage transcribed video recordings of sequential interactions among therapists and patients in each of these two time-limited group therapies were analyzed with the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). We also provide qualitative presentations of the transcripts from each stage as context for the quantitative analyses. BED patients in both groups achieved positive outcomes for binge eating and depression. Consistent with their treatment model, the GPIP therapist was more autonomy-giving, whereas the GCBT therapist was more controlling/directive. The GPIP therapist and her group had high levels of interpersonal complementary interaction sequences in the early stage followed by lower complementarity in the middle stage. The GCBT therapist and her group showed a high-low-high pattern of complementarity across the three stage of therapy. However, overall the GPIP group had higher levels complementarity than the GCBT group. This mixed method case study of group processes based on an interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy suggested specific therapist behaviors in each modality to maximize positive therapeutic interactions at each stage of group therapy. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Severity as a Moderator of Outcome in Psychodynamic and Dialectical Behavior Therapies for Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Zeynep; Vinnars, Bo; Gorman, Bernard S; Wilczek, Alexander; Åsberg, Marie; Barber, Jacques P

    2017-12-14

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of initial level of psychiatric severity on treatment outcome in psychodynamic therapy and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD). It was hypothesized that DBT would lead to better outcome for patients with high psychiatric severity, whereas dynamic treatment would lead to better outcome for patients with lower psychiatric severity. Data from the 5th-year follow-up of the Stockholm City Council's and the Karolinska Institute's Psychotherapy Project were used in the present study. A total of 106 female patients diagnosed with BPD with at least 2 past suicide attempts were randomized into object-relational psychotherapy (ORP; based on transference-focused psychotherapy), DBT, and treatment as usual. Patients' baseline global severity index was used as a moderator. Global Assessment of Functioning (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition [American Psychiatric Association, 1994]) was used to examine outcome. There was a significant 3-way interaction of Time × Treatment × Severity. Post hoc analyses suggested that patients with lower levels of severity had significantly better outcomes in object-relational psychotherapy. For patients with higher severity, the 3 treatments resulted in similar outcomes in terms of level of functioning. Outcome of treatment for BPD might differ significantly for patients depending on their initial levels of overall psychiatric severity. If our findings are replicated for patients with low severity and supported for a high-severity sample, psychiatric severity can be used as a low-cost and effective tool to match patients with BPD to optimal treatments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Interaction among alliance, psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioural techniques in the prediction of post-session change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Hilsenroth, Mark J; Rodolfa, Emil

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the interaction of clients' perceptions of the psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) and cognitive-behavioural (CB) techniques that their therapist utilized in their most recent therapy session and working alliance in the prediction of post-session changes. Seventy-five clients were treated by 25 therapists at a counselling centre in the USA. We posited that alliance would interact with clients' perceptions of their therapists' use of PI and CB techniques in the prediction of post-session changes. The results revealed a three-way interaction between clients' perceptions of the alliance, PI techniques and CB techniques in the prediction of post-session changes. More PI and more CB techniques and more PI but fewer CB techniques were associated with better post-sessions changes in the context of higher alliances. More CB techniques but fewer PI techniques and fewer PI and fewer CB techniques were not significantly associated with post-session changes in the context of higher (or lower) alliances. Clients' perceptions of PI techniques in the context of stronger alliances were most beneficial for post-session outcomes. Thus, a high alliance will likely maximize the impact of PI techniques. Clients who rated their therapist as being relatively inactive reported fewer positive post-session outcomes, suggesting that an idle therapeutic approach is not advantageous. Therapist differences explained two to three times more variation in session outcomes than client ratings of alliance or techniques. Some therapists are better at facilitating positive session outcomes as compared with others, suggesting that a potential key barometer of therapists' effectiveness may be captured by session outcomes. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful,Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP complemented with bodywork improved 31 of 54 patients (57.4%, 95% CI: 43.21–70.77% who rated themselves mentally ill before treatment. Calculated from this we find 1.41 500. Of the 54 patients, 40% had already had traditional treatment that did not help them. Bodywork helped the patients to confront repressed painful feelings from childhood and this seemingly accelerated and improved the therapy. The patients received in average 20 sessions over 14 months at a cost of 1600 EURO. For the treatment responders, all measured aspects of life (on a five point Likert Scale improved significantly, simultaneously, and radically: somatic health (from 2.9 to 2.3, self-esteem/relationship to self (from 3.5 to 2.3, relationship to partner (from 4.7 to 2.9 [no partner was rated as “6”], relationship to friends (from 2.5 to 2.0, ability to love (from 3.8 to 2.4, self-assessed sexual ability (from 3.5 to 2.4, self-assessed social ability (from 3.2 to 2.1, self-assessed working ability (from 3.3 to 2.4, and self-assessed quality of life (from 4.0 to 2.3. Quality of life as measured with QOL5 improved (from 3.6 to 2.3 on a scale from 1 to 5; p < 0.001. This general improvement strongly indicated that the patient had healed existentially, i.e., had experienced what Aaron Antonovsky (1923–1994 called “salutogenesis”, defined as the process exactly the opposite of pathogenesis. For the treatment responders, the treatment provided lasting benefits, without the negative side effects of drugs. A lasting, positive effect might also prevent many different types of problems in the future.

  11. Neural activity in relation to clinically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eTaubner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically-derived personality-syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the derived personality syndromes.Method: In the present exploratory study an individually tailored and psychodynamically based fMRI paradigm using dysfunctional relationship patterns was presented to 20 chronically depressed patients. Results from the Shedler-Westen-Assessment-Procedure (SWAP-200 were analyzed by Q-factor analysis to identify clinically relevant subgroups of depression and related brain activation.Results: The principle component analysis of SWAP-200 items from all 20 patients lead to a 2-factor solution: Depressive Personality and Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality. Both factors were used in a whole-brain correlational analysis but only the second factor yielded significant positive correlations in four regions: A large cluster in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left ventral striatum, a small cluster in the left temporal pole and another small cluster in the right middle frontal gyrus. Discussion: The degree to which patients with depression score high on the factor Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality correlated with relatively higher activity in three key areas involved in emotion processing, evaluation of reward/punishment, negative cognitions, depressive pathology and social knowledge (OFC, ventral striatum, temporal pole. Results may contribute to an alternative description of neural correlates of depression showing differential brain activation dependent on the extent of specific personality syndromes in

  12. The relation between prototypical processes and psychological distress in psychodynamic therapy of five inpatients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Geoff; Edwards, Keiha; Chung, Hyewon

    2015-01-01

    Five inpatients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) participated in 6 months of three times per week psychodynamic therapy (PDT). Patients completed a measure of psychological distress every week. A total of 127 sessions were audiotaped and coded using the psychotherapy process Q-set (PQS) and correlated with PQS prototypes of five treatment models-PDT, cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy, transference focused psychotherapy and dialectical behaviour therapy. Prototypical CBT process was most prevalent in three of the five PDT-labelled treatments. Prototypical PDT process significantly decreased over time in three of the five treatments. Prototypical process correlations with time were inversely proportional to prototypical process correlations with distress levels. In a multiple regression model that included all five prototypical process correlations across these three treatments, CBT and transference focused psychotherapy predicted distress reduction, whereas PDT predicted increases in distress. PQS items most negatively correlated with distress included the therapist's emphasis on feelings, empathic attunement and control over the interaction. Discussion of dreams or fantasies and therapist aloofness were most positively correlated with distress. An effective PDT treatment model for severely disturbed BPD inpatients requires technical flexibility to supplement CBT processes such as control over the interaction that can structure intense interpersonal dysregulation and stabilize distress. Practitioners and their patients sense which prototypical processes to increase or decrease over time to reduce patients' distress. An effective PDT treatment model for severely disturbed BPD patients needs to integrate and encourage the emergence of empathically attuned interactions in the context of a highly structured therapy experience. Practitioners need to be flexible enough to change intervention strategies when they seem to be increasing

  13. VARIASI KELUASAN MAKNA TEKSTUAL (KMT DALAM TEKS DWIBAHASA FIVE ON THE TREASURE DAN LIMA SEKAWAN DI PULAU HARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rosmawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan variasi keluasan makna tekstusal (KMT yang direpresentasikan dalam teks Five on The Treasure Island dan Lima Sekawan di Pulau Harta, mendeskripsikan makna variasi KMT tersebut dalam konteks penerjemahan, serta membahas dan menginterpretasikan faktor-faktor kontekstual yang memotivasi terjadinya variasi KMT. Jenis penelitian ini adalah deskriptif-kualitatif yang menerapkan kerangka teoritik Translation Tou dan model komunikasi sematik translational untuk analisis translasi dan model conceptual Halliday untuk analisis makna tekstual. Sumber data yang digunakan adalah dua novel dengan fokus pada satuan-satuan klausa. yang mewujudkan satuan-satuan makna tekstual. Instrumen penelitian ini adalah peneliti sendiri dengan menerapkan konsep Komunikasi Semiotik Translasional (KST dan konsep Halliday tentang makna tekstual. Pengujian keabsahan data dilakukan melalui triangulasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa variasi KMT antara T1 dan T2 cenderung sangat rendah atau T1=T2, hal ini dapat dilihat dari tingkat frekuensi kemunculan terdapat pada variasi nol atau sangat rendah sebesar 552 atau 63,52% (T1=T2. Berdasarkan hasil rerata tingkat keluasannya, T1 lebih luas dari T2. Hal ini dapat dilihat dari kemunculan rerata T1 sejumlah 193 atau sebesar 22,21%. Jenis-jenis tema yang memotivasi terjadinya variasi keluasan makna tekstual yaitu: tema interpersonal, tema tekstual, dan tema topikal. Faktor-faktor kontekstual yang memotivasi terjadinya variasi KMT, yaitu konteks situasi dan konteks budaya. Konteks situasi terdiri dari field, tenor dan mode. Konteks budaya ditunjukkan oleh istilah yang mengacu pada budaya T1 digunakan pada T2. Pada judul yang tampak pada T1 dan T2, mengindikasikan bahwa T2 berintertekstual dengan T1. Kata Kunci: penerjemahan, tema-rema, keluasan makna tekstual.

  14. The origin of the supernumerary subunits and assembly factors of complex I: A treasure trove of pathway evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elurbe, Dei M; Huynen, Martijn A

    2016-07-01

    We review and document the evolutionary origin of all complex I assembly factors and nine supernumerary subunits from protein families. Based on experimental data and the conservation of critical residues we identify a spectrum of protein function conservation between the complex I representatives and their non-complex I homologs. This spectrum ranges from proteins that have retained their molecular function but in which the substrate specificity may have changed or have become more specific, like NDUFAF5, to proteins that have lost their original molecular function and critical catalytic residues like NDUFAF6. In between are proteins that have retained their molecular function, which however appears unrelated to complex I, like ACAD9, or proteins in which amino acids of the active site are conserved but for which no enzymatic activity has been reported, like NDUFA10. We interpret complex I evolution against the background of molecular evolution theory. Complex I supernumerary subunits and assembly factors appear to have been recruited from proteins that are mitochondrial and/or that are expressed when complex I is active. Within the evolution of complex I and its assembly there are many cases of neofunctionalization after gene duplication, like ACAD9 and TMEM126B, one case of subfunctionalization: ACPM1 and ACPM2 in Yarrowia lipolytica, and one case in which a complex I protein itself appears to have been the source of a new protein from another complex: NDUFS6 gave rise to cytochrome c oxidase subunit COX4/COX5b. Complex I and its assembly can therewith be regarded as a treasure trove for pathway evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Recovered Treasure. The Inventory of the Property of Sicilian queens confiscated by Manfredi Alagona in 1393

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoro, Daniela

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Beginning from the discovery, in the “Archivio di Stato” of Palermo, of an inventory containing the belongings confiscated from Manfredi Alagona in 1393, this work reconstructs the story of the treasure of the Sicilian queens (Costanza of Aragon and Maria of Sicily, that had been confiscated from the powerful Alagona family, originally from Aragon, who moved to Sicily. A detailed study of the inventoried movables allows the analysis of several aspects connected to customs and society at the end of the XIVth century, from clothing to utensils, from taste and fashion to care of appearance, from the love of jewels to the workship of relics.



    Partendo dal ritrovamento, presso l’Archivio di Stato di Palermo, di un inventario di beni confiscati a Manfredi Alagona nel 1393, il lavoro ricostruisce il percorso del tesoro delle regine siciliane (Costanza d’Aragona, Maria di Sicilia che era stato incamerato dagli Alagona, potente famiglia di origine aragonese trapiantata in Sicilia. Uno studio dettagliato degli oggetti inventariati permette l’analisi di vari aspetti legati al costume e alla società sul finire del XIV secolo, dall’abbigliamento alla tavola, dal gusto e la moda del tempo alla cura della persona, dalla passione per i gioielli al culto per le reliquie.

  16. The Water our treasure: Environmental Educational Program to the rational use of the hidric resource of Santa Marta, Puriscal, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Vasquez-Obando, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The water our treasure is an environmental education program that promote the rational use and water care among students of I and II cycle of Santa Marta of Puriscal School, Costa Rica. The program was developed from February to May 2011 and it’s characterized by the dynamic of workshops with practical educational activities, which generate theinterest of children toward water sources of their community, realize of its problem and their participation in the transmission of the message of cons...

  17. Essentials of psychoanalytic process and change: How can we investigate the neural effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy in individualized neuro-imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz eBoeker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the essentials of psychoanalytic process and change and the question of how the neural correlates and mechanisms of psychodynamic psychotherapy can be investigated. The psychoanalytic approach aims at enabling the patient to remember, repeat and work through concerning explicit memory. Moreover, the relationship between analyst and patient establishes a new affective configuration which enables a reconstruction of the implicit memory. If psychic change can be achieved it corresponds to neuronal transformation.Individualized neuro-imaging requires controlling and measuring of variables that must be defined. Two main methodological problems can be distinguished: The design problem addresses the issue of how to account for functionally related variables in an experimentally independent way. The translation problem raises the question of how to bridge the gaps between different levels of the concepts presupposed in individualized neuro-imaging (e.g. the personal level of the therapist and the client, the neural level of the brain.An overview of individualized paradigms, which have been used until now is given, including Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD-2 and the Maladaptive Interpersonal Patterns Q-Start (MIPQS. The development of a new paradigm that will be used in fMRI experiments, the Interpersonal Relationship Picture Set (IRPS, is described. Further perspectives and limitations of this new approach concerning the design and the translation problem are discussed.

  18. Essentials of psychoanalytic process and change: how can we investigate the neural effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy in individualized neuro-imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, Heinz; Richter, André; Himmighoffen, Holger; Ernst, Jutta; Bohleber, Laura; Hofmann, Elena; Vetter, Johannes; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the essentials of psychoanalytic process and change and the question of how the neural correlates and mechanisms of psychodynamic psychotherapy can be investigated. The psychoanalytic approach aims at enabling the patient to “remember, repeat, and work through” concerning explicit memory. Moreover, the relationship between analyst and patient establishes a new affective configuration which enables a reconstruction of the implicit memory. If psychic change can be achieved it corresponds to neuronal transformation. Individualized neuro-imaging requires controlling and measuring of variables that must be defined. Two main methodological problems can be distinguished: the design problem addresses the issue of how to account for functionally related variables in an experimentally independent way. The translation problem raises the question of how to bridge the gaps between different levels of the concepts presupposed in individualized neuro-imaging (e.g., the personal level of the therapist and the client, the neural level of the brain). An overview of individualized paradigms, which have been used until now is given, including Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD-2) and the Maladaptive Interpersonal Patterns Q-Start (MIPQS). The development of a new paradigm that will be used in fMRI experiments, the “Interpersonal Relationship Picture Set” (IRPS), is described. Further perspectives and limitations of this new approach concerning the design and the translation problem are discussed. PMID:23935571

  19. Benefits of psychodynamic group therapy on depression, burden and quality of life of family caregivers to Alzheimer’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorli Kamkhagi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family members providing continuous care to demented patients suffer from severe burden that impairs quality of life and often evolves to depression. Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of psychodynamic group psychotherapy (PGT compared to body awareness therapy (BAT on caregiver burden, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among family caregivers to Alzheimer disease (AD patients. Methods Thirty-seven healthy family caregivers were randomly allocated to receive PGT (n = 20 or BAT (n = 17. Interventions were administered in the format of 14 weekly group sessions. Outcome measures were: modification of scores on Zarit Burden Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and WHO-QoL Scale. Results Participants in the PGT group displayed significant reduction on burden (p = 0.01 and depression scores (p = 0.005, and improved quality of life (p = 0.002, whereas those in the BAT group showed improvements in burden of care (p = 0.001 and quality of life (p = 0.01, but not on depressive symptoms (p = 0.13. Discussion Psychodynamic psychotherapy was associated with amelioration of depressive symptoms, but overall benefits on burden of care and quality of life were similar irrespective of the type of intervention, i.e., psychologically-oriented or not. We hypothesize that these interventions can be complementary to improve depression and burden of care among family caregivers of AD patients.

  20. Clinical holistic medicine (mindful, short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy complemented with bodywork) in the treatment of experienced physical illness and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Thegler, Suzette; Andreasen, Tove; Struve, Flemming; Enevoldsen, Lars; Bassaine, Laila; Torp, Margrethe; Merrick, Joav

    2007-03-02

    We investigated the treatment effect of psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients who presented with physical illness at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen. Psychodynamic short-term therapy was complemented with bodywork (Marion Rosen) to help patients confront old emotional pain from childhood trauma(s). Patients were measured with a five-item quality of life and health questionnaire (QOL5), a one-item questionnaire of self-assessed quality of life (QOL1), and four questions on self-rated ability to love and to function sexually, socially, and at work (ability to sustain a full-time job). Most of the patients had chronic pain that could not be alleviated with drugs. Results showed that 31 patients with the experience of being severely physically ill (mostly from chronic pain), in spite of having consulted their own general practitioner, entered the study. The holistic approach and body therapy accelerated the therapy dramatically and no significant side effects were detected. After the intervention, 38.7% did not feel ill (1.73 treatment responders, the treatment seemingly provided lasting benefits.

  1. The effect of adding psychodynamic therapy to antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Psychodynamic therapy may be a treatment option for depression, but the effects have only been limitedly assessed in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology, we compared the benefits and harms of psychodynamic therapy versus 'no intervention' or sham for major depressive disorder. We accepted any co-intervention, including antidepressants, as long as it was delivered similarly in both intervention groups. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, Psyc Info, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Two authors independently extracted data. We evaluated risk of bias to control for systematic errors. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included five trials randomizing a total of 365 participants who all received antidepressants as co-intervention. All trials had high risk of bias. Four trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and one trial 'short psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy'. Meta-analysis showed that psychodynamic therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.01 (95% confidence interval -3.98 to -2.03; Ptherapy to antidepressants might benefit depressed patients, but the possible treatment effect measured on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression is small. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Nurse practitioner's capability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Hsiu; Chen, Shih-Chien

    2007-10-01

    Nurse practitioner development affirms the social value of nursing staff and promotes the professional image of nursing. As the medical environment and doctor-patient relations change, how should a nurse practitioner carry out clinical care? Apart from having foundations in medical knowledge and high-quality nursing techniques, nurse practitioners must have other clinical skills, in order to break out of their former difficult position, promote nursing competitiveness, provide a multi -dimensional service, win the people's acclamation and develop international links.

  3. Conference Report: The Hunt for the Nibelungen Treasure. BVM Conference: "Qualitative Market Research—State of the Art and Prospects"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kühn

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available On March 9th, 2005, a conference entitled "Qualitative Market Research—State of the Art and Prospects" was held in Frankfurt/M., organized by the Association of German Social and Market Researchers (BVM e.V.. Because of the great interest generated by the conference it was repeated on April 20th, 2005. The aim of the conference was to bring together market research professionals from the supply and demand sector to discuss the state of the art of qualitative market research in Germany. Within this report the main topics and discussions from the conference will be summarized and evaluated in relation to their meaning for qualitative market research in Germany. The presentations revealed that qualitative market research in Germany is a diverse enterprise. The conference was an important step to optimize transparency and knowledge-management within qualitative market research. First, the variety of the presented approaches was helpful: After an introduction on essential features of qualitative research that laid a theoretical foundation and a point of reference for the following discussion, qualitative market research was presented in five talks from psychodynamic, cognitive, ethnological and systemic perspectives. Second, the final clients’ forum provided the opportunity for intensive and fruitful discussions between market researchers from business organizations and institutes. In practice, the meaning of qualitative methods within the market research process differs broadly between organizations. It became clear that market researchers frequently combine qualitative and quantitative approaches, but that there is still the need to discuss how this integration of methods can be realized systematically and in the best way. Additionally, it was suggested that further discussion is needed on the importance of qualitative research by itself, e.g. in its meaning for predictions and consultancy needs. Summarizing, the conference illustrated that

  4. Wildlife: a hidden treasure of green places in urbanized societies? : A study into whether and how wildlife contributes to a bond with green places among lay people in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Akke

    2016-01-01

    Wildlife: a hidden treasure of green places in urbanized societies In my thesis, I investigate how wildlife contributes to a bond with green places on different spatial scales among lay people in the Netherlands. The results show that wildlife matters in the bond with green places both near home,

  5. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  7. Psicoterapia psicodinâmica e o tratamento do jogo patológico Psychodynamic psychotherapy and the treatment of pathological gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Rosenthal

    2008-05-01

    ão evitativo de comportamento e defesas psicodinâmicas.OBJECTIVE: The search for empirically based treatments for pathological gambling is in its infancy, with relatively few clinical trials and an absence of naturalistic studies. Treatment retention of gamblers has been a problem; cognitive-behavioral treatment and pharmacotherapy studies report especially high dropout rates. Psychodynamic approaches, with their emphasis on the therapeutic relationship, and the meaning of the patient's self-destructive and seemingly irrational behaviors, and on obstacles to self-forgiveness, might improve outcome. METHOD: After a description of psychodynamic psychotherapy, the literature on both short-term and longer therapies is reviewed regarding their efficacy for a variety of disorders. With regard to pathological gambling, the author summarizes the early (1914-1970 psychoanalytic literature then reviews the more recent psychodynamic psychotherapy literature on pathological gambling. RESULTS: A review of the recent psychodynamic psychotherapy literature on pathological gambling failed to disclose a single randomized controlled study of treatment efficacy or effectiveness. However, there are eight positive outcome studies described as multi-modal eclectic; half of those seem to utilize psychodynamic approaches. Two of the more successful programs are described. CONCLUSIONS: A review of the outcomes literature for psychodynamic psychotherapy demonstrates efficacy for a variety of disorders sufficient to justify a clinical trial for pathological gambling. Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy, with its focus on core issues, may be particularly applicable to the pathological gambler's need to avoid or escape intolerable affects and problems. Longer therapies may be needed to modify an avoidant coping style and defenses.

  8. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  9. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions). Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies on treatment of depression

  10. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambresin Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions. Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies

  11. Proposta de implantação de um Programa Interdisciplinar de Apoio ao Trabalhador de Enfermagem The proposal of an interdisciplinary programme implementation for support nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Lourenço Haddad

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem por objetivos refletir sobre a psicodinâmica do trabalho da enfermagem hospitalar e propor a implantação de um Programa Interdisciplinar de Apoio ao Trabalhador de Enfermagem, com a finalidade de auxiliar esses profissionais na compreensão e resolução dos problemas sociais e administrativos enfrentados no desenvolvimento de seu trabalho.The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the psychodynamic of the nursing work developed in the hospital, and to suggest the implementation of an interdisciplinary programme for support the nursing workers to help them to understand and to solve social and managerial problems faced during the work.

  12. Singapore - The Nursing Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Doyle

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available In many ways Singapore still bears evidence of the period of British colonialism and the system of nursing service and nursing education is also still greatly influenced by the British system of nursing.

  13. Singapore - The Nursing Scene

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Doyle

    1985-01-01

    In many ways Singapore still bears evidence of the period of British colonialism and the system of nursing service and nursing education is also still greatly influenced by the British system of nursing.

  14. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  15. Nursing specialty and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Laura; Ryan, Carey S; Thomas, Scott; Greenberg, Martin; Rolniak, Susan

    2007-03-01

    We examined the relationship between perceived control and burnout among three nursing specialties: nurse practitioners, nurse managers, and emergency nurses. Survey data were collected from 228 nurses from 30 states. Findings indicated that emergency nurses had the least control and the highest burnout, whereas nurse practitioners had the most control and the least burnout. Mediational analyses showed that expected control, hostility, and stressor frequency explained differences between specialties in burnout. The implications of these findings for interventions that reduce burnout and promote nursing retention are discussed.

  16. [Psychodynamics of Bechterew's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, W

    1981-01-01

    Following earlier psychoanalytical articles on polyarthritic diseases without rheumatism factor, this investigation reports on patients with morbus Bechterew. The psychoanalytically expanded anamneses showed a distinct predominance of hysterical and depressive structures. With their friendly, open nature these patients appear cooperative and tension-free. They have problems when aggressive confrontations occur, especially with good acquaintances, from whom they expect recognition and friendly or loving attention. They try to earn these through a strong readiness to help, which often reaches a point of exhaustion. The causing situations appear especially characteristic: Before the disease started, most patients were able to sow their wild oats in all directions for a pretty long time. The disease breaks out when this lax style of living is given up, for the partner's sake, in a marriage or other firm kind of relationship. In their new life situation the patients cannot fully live their aggressive as well as their sexual needs in the accustomed way. A heightened muscular tension, as the physical correlate of this affective restraint, is postulated, which, as one of the factors, plays a role in the origin of morbus Bechterew.

  17. Freud, Psychodynamics, and Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Alvin

    1987-01-01

    Distills the essence of Freud's thinking about incest, placing it within the context of childhood sexuality. Discusses clinical and research implications concerning the relationship between sexual trauma and emotional disturbances. Raises questions requiring further investigation. (NH)

  18. Junk Yard Treasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Len

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a project that she developed as a challenge for her students and ended up with some fantastic student paintings. The author told her group of reluctant art students they must first research on the Internet for old, junky cars. The older and more junky the cars, the better. Once a vehicle is selected, it is driven into Adobe…

  19. Trash or Treasure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Donna

    2007-01-01

    Most children know they should not pollute but have never considered why. One elementary school teacher creates a lesson for third- through fifth-grade students that makes the connection concrete. In the lesson, students consider the possible effects a trash item would have on an animal and its habitat, identifying ways in which the piece of trash…

  20. Trash or Treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Adele; Petri, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In June 2000, the National Trust for Historic Preservation added historic neighborhood schools to its annual list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. Although there has been a surge in renovating school facilities for adaptive reuses such as office space or lofts, thousands of historic schools are in danger of demolition. Renovating…

  1. Treasured Texas Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  2. Forests: a planetary treasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, N

    1996-01-01

    This article explores the real nature of tropical forests and outlines some of the damaging consequences of grand-scale deforestation. Forests are the main home of Earth's species. They cover only 6% of the planet's land surface, and 50% of them are tropical forests inhabited by possibly 70% and conceivably 90% of all species. Aside from their being a habitat, these forests contain plants that have been known to contribute to our health. Analgesics, antibiotics, contraceptives are some of the few byproducts of plants in tropical forests. In addition, tropical forests contribute environmental services even more valuable than the material goods they produce. Most significant of these are watershed services, wherein deforestation of upland catchments can lead to disruption of hydrological systems, causing year-round water flows in downstream areas to give way to flood-and-drought regimes. Moreover, forests have a role in carbon sinking and hence in mitigating global warming. Depletion of forests through deforestation as well as forest fires could lead to an increased rate of die-off in remaining forests in other parts of the world, plus a decline of biomass in other ecological zones such as grasslands.

  3. Subject description of non-fiction literature for adults: expert-theoretical basis for the realisation of the »Hidden Treasure« research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Pogorelec

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Library users searching through non-fiction library material by subject in online OPACs, expect to be able to search fiction by subject as well. The research project Skriti zaklad (Hidden Treasure was launched in 2002 and was aimed at improving the current subject description of non-juvenile literary works in Slovenian libraries. An overview of the current practice of fiction subject description in Slovenian libraries revealed that Universal Decimal Classification class numbers are usually assigned, while subject headings or abstracts are scarce. The article presents a model designed for subject description of fiction, with special emphasis on subject headings, for the Bežigrad High School Library and the Bežigrad Public Library (both in Ljubljana.

  4. Nurse Bullying: Impact on Nurses' Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Penny A; McCoy, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    Workplace bullying has been experienced by 27% to 80% of nurses who have participated in studies. Bullying behaviors negatively impact the health of nurses. This study examined whether nurses' resilience had an impact on the effects of bullying on the nurse's health. This cross-sectional descriptive study surveyed licensed registered nurses in one state. The sample ( N = 345) was predominately female (89%) and Caucasian (84%), with an average age of 46.6 years. In this sample, 40% of nurses were bullied. Higher incidence of bullying was associated with lower physical health scores ( p = .002) and lower mental health scores ( p = .036). Nurses who are bullied at work experience lower physical and mental health, which can decrease the nurses' quality of life and impede their ability to deliver safe, effective patient care.

  5. Iranian nursing students’ experiences of nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment. PMID:23833591

  6. Nursing's Scientific Quest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean

    1981-01-01

    Examines nursing's changing research practices. Discusses changes in the philosophy of science, dichotomies within nursing, and nursing's changing research tradition. Concludes that a new research tradition can provide nursing with the scientific and social freedom and openness to solve both conceptual and empirical problems. (CT)

  7. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  8. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  9. Nursing education in telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gerri S; Shea, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Many nurses around the world provide expert nursing care through distance technologies but few undergraduate programmes expose nursing students to the full range of technologies available. Nursing education in telehealth needs to reflect the roles, responsibilities and capacity for knowledge building and innovation of the various constituencies within the profession. Registered nurses and advanced practice nurses will need complementary but different knowledge and skills than nurse administrators. The former will need technical proficiency in using common telehealth modalities and the ability to integrate telehealth in their practices.

  10. The aging nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simone M; Burns, Candace M

    2010-10-01

    With the aging of the current nursing work force, nursing leaders must develop strategies to maintain current employment levels and improve availability of nurses to care for patients. One way to maintain current levels is to retain older nurses at the bedside by adapting the current working environment to meet the needs and the limitations associated with aging. This article includes a review of literature on the effects of aging on the human body, cognitively, physically, and psychosocially; current trends in the aging population; the advantages and disadvantages of employing aging nurses; retention strategies to keep aging nurses at the bedside; methods to adapt the work environment to aging nurses' needs; policies that address the needs of aging nurses; and implications for occupational health nursing practice. This article is limited to aging as it relates to nurses employed in hospitals. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Molecular Biomarkers, Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy and Computed Tomography as New Methodologies Applied in TREASURE Project to Predict the Quality of Pork and Pork Products from Local Pig Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Lebret, Bénédicte; Pugliese, Carolina; Bozzi, Riccardo; Font-I-Furnols, Maria; Prevolnik Povše, Maja; Tomažin, Urška; Čandek-Potokar, Marjeta

    2017-01-01

    Emerging non-destructive technologies are of interest in meat sector science and industry since they allow the characterization of products and quality control throughout processing. Three diff erent new technologies described in this paper will be considered in the TREASURE project for the evaluation and prediction of quality of pork and processed products: molecular biomarkers, near-infra red spectroscopy (NIRS), and computed tomography (CT). Molecular biomarkers are single genes, or a set ...

  12. Transdiagnostic, Psychodynamic Web-Based Self-Help Intervention Following Inpatient Psychotherapy: Results of a Feasibility Study and Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Robert; Frederick, Ronald J; Andersson, Gerhard; Beutel, Manfred E

    2017-01-01

    Background Mental disorders have become a major health issue, and a substantial number of afflicted individuals do not get appropriate treatment. Web-based interventions are promising supplementary tools for improving health care for patients with mental disorders, as they can be delivered at low costs and used independently of time and location. Although psychodynamic treatments are used frequently in the face-to-face setting, there has been a paucity of studies on psychodynamic Web-based self-help interventions. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a transdiagnostic affect-focused psychodynamic Web-based self-help intervention designed to increase emotional competence of patients with mental disorders. Methods A total of 82 psychotherapy inpatients with mixed diagnoses were randomized into two groups. Following discharge, the intervention group (IG) got access to a guided version of the intervention for 10 weeks. After a waiting period of 10 weeks, the wait-list control group (WLCG) got access to an unguided version of the intervention. We reported the assessments at the beginning (T0) and at the end of the intervention, resp. the waiting period (T1). The primary outcome was satisfaction with the treatment at T1. Secondary outcome measures included emotional competence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Statistical analyses were performed with descriptive statistics (primary outcome) and analysis of covariance; a repeated measurement analysis of variance was used for the secondary outcomes. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohen d and data were analyzed as per protocol, as well as intention-to-treat (ITT). Results Patients were chronically ill, diagnosed with multiple diagnoses, most frequently with depression (84%, 58/69), anxiety (68%, 47/69), personality disorder (38%, 26/69), and depersonalization-derealization disorder (22%, 15/69). A majority of the patients (86%, 36/42) logged into the

  13. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  14. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  15. Nursing leadership and autonomous professional practice of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Paré, M

    1998-01-01

    Autonomous professional practice continues to be elusive for registered nurses. Autonomous professional practice implies that nurses would be free to determine the procedures for carrying out their nursing work. In other works, they would be able to make independent decisions about their own nursing practice. This article reports research that describes the nature of nursing leadership that supports autonomous professional practice of registered nurses.

  16. Scholarship in nursing: Degree-prepared nurses versus diploma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The nursing profession needs nurses with a higher level of education and not merely more nurses to enhance patient outcomes. To improve quality patient care the nursing discipline needs to be advanced through theory development and knowledge generation, thus graduate nurses. Nursing scholarship ...

  17. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  18. Perspectives on nursing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T

    1992-01-01

    On May 19, 1991, in Tokyo, Japan, four nurse theorists participated in a panel discussion at Discovery International, Inc.'s Biennial Nurse Theorist Conference. The participants were Imogene M. King, Hildegard E. Peplau, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, and Martha E. Rogers. The goal of the conference was to present the latest views on nursing knowledge of these nurse leaders. The panel discussion provided the nurse theorists with an opportunity to engage in dialogue regarding issues of concern to the audience. The panel moderator was Hiroko Minami of St. Luke's College of Nursing in Tokyo.

  19. DISCUSSING NURSING DIAGNOSIS APPLIED BY NURSING STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    K. M. H. Cavalcante; M. L. Botelho; P. P. Cavalcanti; F. M. P. Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Aimed to identify and discuss nursing diagnosis present in 50 Case Studies developed by students of graduation nursing of Federal University of Mato Grosso - Campus of Sinop, in a unit of clinical medical. Documentary research that addressed quantitatively the nursing diagnosis proposed using the Taxonomy II of NANDA-I (2009-2011). It was documented 82 different diagnosis, and covered all the 13 domains. The involvement of all the domains and the large variability of diagnoses identified sug...

  20. What GUIDES Your NURSING PRACTICE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountras, Stacy C

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' personal belief systems or philosophies about nursing and people guides their nursing care, especially in difficult situations. Defining and articulating a personal philosophy helps the nurse better understand the motivation and reasoning behind his or her work. In this article, a nurse shares her philosophy of nursing, underlying beliefs, and discusses how this guides her practice. Questions to help nurses articulate their own personal philosophy of nursing are included.

  1. Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Shin, Eun Hee; Mather, Carey; Hovenga, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the rapid rise in the adoption of electronic health records and the use of technology to support nursing processes, there is a requirement for nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing educators to embrace nursing informatics. Whilst nursing informatics has been taught at post graduate levels for many years, the integration of it into undergraduate studies for entry level nurses has been slow. This is made more complex by the lack of explicit nursing informatics competencies in many countries. Australia has now mandated the inclusion of nursing informatics into all undergraduate nursing curricula but there continues to be an absence of a relevant set of agreed nursing competencies. There is a resulting lack of consistency in nursing curricula content nationally. This paper describes the process used by one Australian university to integrate nursing informatics throughout the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum to ensure entry level nurses have a basic level of skills in the use of informatics.

  2. QUALITY OF NURSING CARE BASED ON ANALYSIS OF NURSING PERFORMANCE AND NURSE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nurses who frequently often contact to patients and most of their time serve patients in 24 hours, have an important role in caring for the patient. Patient satisfaction as quality indicator is the key success for competitiveness of service in hospital. The aim of this research was to develop nursing service quality model based on the nursing performance, nurse and patient satisfaction. Method: The research method used cross sectional study, at 14 wards of Gresik Hospital. Research factors were namely: oganization characteristic (organization culture and leadership, work factors (feedback and variety of nurses work, nurse characteristics (motivation, attitude, commitment and mental model, nursing practice, interpersonal communication, nurse and patient satisfaction. Statistical analysis of study data was analyzed by Partial Least Square (PLS. Results: The results of nursing performance revealed that nurse characteristic were not affected by organization culture and leadership style, nurse characteristics were affected by work factors, nurse characteristics affected nursing quality service (nursing practice, nursing professional, nurse and patient satisfaction, nurse satisfaction did not affect nursing professionals. Discussion: Based on the overall results of the development of nursing care model that was originally only emphasizes the process of nursing care only, should be consider the input factor of organizational characteristics, job characteristics, and characteristics of individual nurses and consider the process factors of nursing care standards and professional performance of nurses and to consider the outcome factors nurse and patient satisfaction. So in general the development model of quality of existing nursing care refers to a comprehensive system of quality.

  3. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  4. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  5. Ageism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Sarah H; Melendez-Torres, G J

    2015-07-01

    Ageism in health care delivery and nursing poses a fundamental threat to health and society. In this commentary, implications of age discrimination are presented to generate an agenda for action in nursing management. In nations like the United States and the United Kingdom, nursing is an ageing profession caring for an ageing society where age discrimination takes many forms and has broad impact. This commentary critically synthesizes the literature on ageism and relevant data on ageing societies for nurse managers and other leaders. Investigations of ageism suggest that discrimination negatively affects health and results in poor health care experiences. Age discrimination is present in nursing, exacerbating workforce shortages and limiting the use of expertise within the profession. Nursing faces a future for which understanding ageing societies and ageism is essential. An agenda for the future is proposed. Nurse managers possess the power to enact an agenda for combating ageism in health care and nursing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A nursing bioethics program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrizio, M A; Ozuna, J; Mattheis, R; Saunders, J

    1992-01-01

    In 1985 the Seattle Veterans' Administration Medical Center nursing service implemented a nursing program for bioethics with three goals: (1) to expand the nurse's knowledge of bioethical principles, (2) to develop the nurse's ability and confidence in analyzing bioethical dilemmas, and (3) to increase bioethical application at the bedside. Two psychosocial clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) led this highly successful nursing program that prepared nurses to more actively and responsibly participate in bioethical decision making within the medical center. The program offers an annual workshop for new members, holds a monthly discussion group, conducts a yearly enrichment program, and completes an annual evaluation report. This article describes nursing service bioethics program from planning through evaluation and the role of the CNS as program coordinator, facilitator, and educator in the expanding field of bioethics.

  7. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  8. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  9. An investigation of client mood in the initial and final sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclintock, Andrew S; Stiles, William B; Himawan, Lina; Anderson, Timothy; Barkham, Michael; Hardy, Gillian E

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to examine client mood in the initial and final sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy (PIT) and to determine how client mood is related to therapy outcomes. Hierarchical linear modeling was applied to data from a clinical trial comparing CBT with PIT. In this trial, client mood was assessed before and after sessions with the Session Evaluation Questionnaire-Positivity Subscale (SEQ-P). In the initial sessions, CBT clients had higher pre-session and post-session SEQ-P ratings and greater pre-to-post session mood change than did clients in PIT. In the final sessions, these pre, post, and change scores were generally equivalent across CBT and PIT. CBT outcome was predicted by pre- and post-session SEQ-P ratings from both the initial sessions and the final sessions of CBT. However, PIT outcome was predicted by pre- and post-session SEQ-P ratings from the final sessions only. Pre-to-post session mood change was unrelated to outcome in both treatments. These results suggest different change processes are at work in CBT and PIT.

  10. Patterns of Change in Interpersonal Problems During and After Short-term and Long-term Psychodynamic Group Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldstad, Anette; Høglend, Per; Lorentzen, Steinar

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we compared the patterns of change in interpersonal problems between short-term and long-term psychodynamic group therapy. A total of 167 outpatients with mixed diagnoses were randomized to 20 or 80 weekly sessions of group therapy. Interpersonal problems were assessed with the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems at six time points during the 3-year study period. Using linear mixed models, change was linearly modelled in two steps. Earlier (within the first 6 months) and later (during the last 2.5 years) changes in five subscales were estimated. Contrary to what we expected, short-term therapy induced a significantly larger early change than long-term therapy on the cold subscale and there was a trend on the socially avoidant subscale, using a Bonferroni-adjusted alpha. There was no significant difference between short-term and long-term group therapy for improving problems in the areas cold, socially avoidant, nonassertive, exploitable, and overly nurturant over the 3 years.

  11. Unique and shared techniques in cognitive-behavioural and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy: a content analysis of randomised trials on depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Jürgen; Michlig, Nadja; Munder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapeutic interventions assume that specific techniques are used in treatments, which are responsible for changes in the client's symptoms. This assumption also holds true for meta-analyses, where evidence for specific interventions and techniques is compiled. However, it has also been argued that different treatments share important techniques and that an upcoming consensus about useful treatment strategies is leading to a greater integration of treatments. This makes assumptions about the effectiveness of specific interventions ingredients questionable if the shared (common) techniques are more often used in interventions than are the unique techniques. This study investigated the unique or shared techniques in RCTs of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP). Psychotherapeutic techniques were coded from 42 masked treatment descriptions of RCTs in the field of depression (1979–2010). CBT techniques were often used in studies identified as either CBT or STPP. However, STPP techniques were only used in STPP-identified studies. Empirical clustering of treatment descriptions did not confirm the original distinction of CBT versus STPP, but instead showed substantial heterogeneity within both approaches. Extraction of psychotherapeutic techniques from the treatment descriptions is feasible and could be used as a content-based approach to classify treatments in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:25750827

  12. A 12-month comparison of brief psychodynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy treatment in subjects with generalised anxiety disorders in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Andrea; Pierò, Andrea; Fassina, Simona; Massola, Tiziana; Lanteri, Antonello; Daga, Giovanni Abbate; Fassino, Secondo

    2007-11-01

    Little information is available on the use of brief psychotherapy among subjects with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) within community mental health services. This study compared results among subjects treated with brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy (B-APP), those treated with medication (MED), or those who experienced combined treatment (COM). Symptomatology and occupational functioning were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scales (HAM-A; HAM-D), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) at intake (T1) and at 3, 6, and 12 months later (T3, T6, T12). The study sample included 87 patients with GAD (B-APP 34; MED 33; COM 20), and an ANOVA was applied for analysing repeated measures while controlling for personality disorder. After 6 months, CGI, HAM-A, HAM-D, and SOFAS scores significantly improved independently from the type of treatment. Subjects with personality disorders treated with B-APP exhibited superior results to those treated using other methods only in SOFAS scores at T6. These results were generally maintained at T12. Remission rates among subjects (HAM-A scores APP) at T6 and between 63% (MED) and 78% (COM) at T12; no significant differences appeared between the three treatment groups. A logistic regression model predicted anxiety remission only by CGI at T1. This paper discusses these results in relation to the use of brief psychotherapy within community mental health services.

  13. From Couple Therapy 1.0 to a Comprehensive Model: A Roadmap for Sequencing and Integrating Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Behavioral Approaches in Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Arthur C

    2017-09-01

    Couple therapy is a complex undertaking that proceeds best by integrating various schools of thought. Grounded in an in-depth review of the clinical and research literature, and drawing on the author's 40-plus years of experience, this paper presents a comprehensive, flexible, and user-friendly roadmap for conducting couple therapy. It begins by describing "Couple Therapy 1.0," the basic conjoint couple therapy format in which partners talk to each other with the help of the therapist. After noting the limitations of this model, the paper introduces upgrades derived from systemic, psychodynamic, and behavioral/educational approaches, and shows how to combine and sequence them. The most important upgrade is the early focus on the couple's negative interaction cycle, which causes them pain and impedes their ability to address it. Using a clinical case example, the paper shows how all three approaches can improve couple process as a prerequisite for better problem solving. Additional modules and sequencing choice points are also discussed, including discernment counseling and encouraging positive couple experiences. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  14. Assertiveness among professional nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkus, S P

    1993-08-01

    Assertiveness is considered healthy behaviour for all people that, when present, mitigates against personal powerlessness and results in personal empowerment. Nursing has determined that assertive behaviour among its practitioners is an invaluable component for successful professional practice. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine assertiveness levels of a population of professional nurses and to determine if assertiveness levels are related to selected demographic factors including age, gender, years of nursing experience, basic nursing education, clinical nursing specialty, type of employer, highest educational level and prior assertiveness training. The sample was composed of 500 registered nurses (64% response rate), chosen randomly from the list of active licensees registered with the Minnesota (USA) State Board of Nursing, who completed and returned an assertiveness questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS) and a personal/professional data form. Data analysis included descriptive as well as inferential statistics. The results revealed that this group of nurses was more assertive than any other group of nurses or non-nurses reported in the literature using the RAS. The oldest group of nurses (60-76 years) was significantly less assertive than any of the younger groups of nurses. Nurses practising with a diploma as the highest level of education were significantly less assertive than nurses having a baccalaureate or above. And there was a significant difference in assertiveness between groups of nurses practising in different clinical specialties based on the ANOVA. It appears that the majority of nurses in this study are assertive. They believe in themselves and their abilities. It is hoped that the self-assertion generated by this belief will eventually lead to further personal and professional empowerment.

  15. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  16. District nursing in Dominica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, PME; Luteijn, AJ; Nasiiro, RS; Bruney, [No Value; Smith, RJA; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1998-01-01

    District nurses constitute the basis of the primary health care services in Dominica. All encounters of three district nurses were registered using the international classification of primary care. Information on other aspects of district nursing was collected by participating observation and the

  17. Nursing students and Haiku.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, M L

    1998-01-01

    The emphasis in nursing education is frequently on facts, details, and linear issues. Students need more encouragement to use the creative abilities which exist in each of them. The use of haiku, a simple unrhymed Japanese verse, is one method which stimulates nursing students to use their creativity. A haiku exercise worked well in encouraging a group of nursing students to express their feelings.

  18. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  19. nurse managers ' perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... non-nursing jobs which offer better salaries, more job satisfaction and better working hours (Ehlers. 2003:81) further ..... had advantages. Older nurses brought the human touch, while the younger nurses completed tasks expeditiously. Some of the responses that attest to these standpoints are: 'The older ...

  20. Gaps in nurse staffng and nursing home resident needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Unruh, Lynn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2013-01-01

    Trends in nurse staffing levels in nursing homes from 1997 to 2011 varied across the category of nurse and the type of nursing home. The gaps found in this study are important to consider because nurses may become overworked and this may negatively affect the quality of services and jeopardize resident safety. Nursing home administrators should consider improving staffing strategically. Staffing should be based not only on the number of resident days, but also allocated according to particular resident needs. As the demand for nursing home care grows, bridging the gap between nurse staffing and resident nursing care needs will be especially important in light of the evidence linking nurse staffing to the quality of nursing home care. Until more efficient nursing care delivery exits, there may be no other way to safeguard quality except to increase nurse staffing in nursing homes.

  1. Nursing rituals: doing ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Z R

    1993-08-01

    Types of nursing rituals identified in this study include therapeutic and occupational rituals. Therapeutic rituals (Douglas, 1963, 1966, 1975; Turner, 1957, 1967, 1969) are identified as symbolic healing actions that improve the condition of patients. Occupational rituals or rituals of socialization include symbolic actions that facilitate the transition of professional neophytes into their professional role (Bosk, 1980; Fox, 1979; Zerubavel, 1979). Nursing rituals fulfill an important although not highly visible function in a nursing unit of a modern American hospital. They enable nurses to carry out caring activities for patients who are acutely or chronically ill, old, and dying. Rituals help to reaffirm values and beliefs of nurses. Explication of the implicit meanings of nursing rituals illuminates nursing for nurses and others who seek to understand nursing services. Descriptive analyses of nursing rituals direct attention to the hidden work of the hospital staff nurse, work sometimes taken for granted by professionals and the public who fail to see the many difficult, intimate, and risky aspects of nursing work and how certain ritual behavior promotes its accomplishment. Other studies on nursing ritual are needed to expand the theory of nursing ritual in this descriptive analysis, and to move it from descriptive to explanatory theory. For example, the transmission of the beliefs, rules of conduct, and customs that take place during change-of-shift report has not been extensively investigated. Neither have the more practical aspects of shift report been studied, including the types of information exchanged or the influence of shift report on planning and priority setting for the nurses who work during the ensuing shift. Also, few empirical studies examine the effects of bathing on patient outcomes, such as skin integrity, cardiac function, and comfort levels, and patient bathing preferences. This is surprising, because the bath is such an essential ritual

  2. Rehabilitation Nursing: Applications for Rehabilitation Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegül Koç

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation nursing is a specialist form of rehabilitation requiring specialist nursing. Furthermore, as in many areas ofnursing, nurses in this field recognize that there is a need to increase the quality of and provide the most up-to-date carefor their patients and patients’ families. To achieve high levels of competence, neurological rehabilitation nurses need tobe aware of the existing body of research in this field. Effective hospital and community rehabilitation services areincreasingly recognised as a means of meeting the changing pattern of health and social care requirements. This reviewaims to validate the existing knowledge base in this area by identifying and critically analysing research conducted in thearea of neurological rehabilitation nursing.

  3. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel.

  4. Selected Publications of the Division of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Div. of Nursing.

    Publications are organized under the following topics: (1) Division of Nursing Program, (2) Nurse Training Act of 1964, (3) Nursing (general interest), (4) Nursing Manpower, (5) Nursing Services in Hospitals, (6) Public Health Nursing, (7) Nursing Education, (8) Nursing Research and Research Training, and (9) Nurse Training Manuals. Single copies…

  5. The art of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S D

    1998-09-01

    This article discusses the question of whether, as is often claimed, nursing is properly described as an art. Following critical remarks on the claims of Carper, Chinn and Watson, and Johnson, the account of art provided by RG Collingwood is described, with particular reference to his influential distinction between art and craft. The question of whether nursing is best described as an art or a craft is then discussed. The conclusion is advanced that nursing cannot properly be described as an art, given acceptance of Collingwood's influential definition of art. Moreover, it is shown that, due to difficulties inherent in specifying the 'ends' of nursing, nursing is only problematically described as a craft.

  6. Nurses' shift reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Hoeck, Bente; Hamilton, Bridget Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    practices were described as highly conventionalised and locally situated, but with occasional opportunities for improvisation and negotiation between nurses. Finally, shift reports were described as multifunctional meetings, with individual and social effects for nurses and teams. CONCLUSION: Innovations...... of nurses' shift reports. BACKGROUND: Nurses' shift reports are routine occurrences in healthcare organisations that are viewed as crucial for patient outcomes, patient safety and continuity of care. Studies of communication between nurses attend primarily to 1:1 communication and analyse the adequacy...... and negotiate care....

  7. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leadership styles in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  9. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  10. Iranian nurses self-perception -- factors influencing nursing image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaei, Shokoh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perspectives of Iranian nurses regarding factors influencing nursing image. Nursing image is closely tied to the nurse's role and identity, influencing clinical performance, job satisfaction and quality of care. Images of nursing and nurses are closely linked to the cultural context in which nursing is practised, hence, this study explores how Iranian nurses perceive the factors that influence their own image. A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted with 220 baccalaureate qualified nurses working in four teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. A Nursing Image Questionnaire was used and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. In the domains of 'characteristics required for entry to work', 'social role characteristics of nursing' and 'prestige, economic and social status, and self image' the nurses had negative images. 'Reward' and 'opportunity for creativity and originality' were factors that least influenced choosing nursing as a career. The presence of a nurse in the family and working in the hospital had the greatest impact on the establishment of nurses' nursing image. Improving the nursing profession's prestige and social position as well as providing the opportunity for creativity and originality in nursing practice will change the self-image of Iranian nurses, facilitating effective and lasting changes in nursing's image. Nurse managers are well-placed to influence nurses' perceptions of nursing's image. Given the finding that thinking about leaving a job positively correlates with holding a negative nursing image, nurse managers need to consider how they can work effectively with their staff to enhance morale and nurses' experience of their job. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Rural nurse job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, D L; Monserud, M A

    2008-01-01

    The lack of rural nursing studies makes it impossible to know whether rural and urban nurses perceive personal and organizational factors of job satisfaction similarly. Few reports of rural nurse job satisfaction are available. Since the unprecedented shortage of qualified rural nurses requires a greater understanding of what factors are important to retention, studies are needed. An analysis of the literature indicates job satisfaction is studied as both an independent and dependent variable. In this study, the concept is used to examine the intention to remain employed by measuring individual and organizational characteristics; thus, job satisfaction is used as a dependent variable. One hundred and three rural hospital nurses, from hospitals throughout the Northwest region of the United States were recruited for the study. Only nurses employed for more than one year were accepted. The sample completed surveys online. The McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale, the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale, and two open-ended job satisfaction questions were completed. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions identified themes which were then used to support the quantitative findings. Overall alphas were 0.89 for the McCloskey/Mueller Scale and 0.96 for the Gerber Control Over Practice Scale. Rural nurses indicate a preference for rural lifestyles and the incorporation of rural values in organizational practices. Nurses preferred the generalist role with its job variability, and patient variety. Most participants intended to remain employed. The majority of nurses planning to leave employment were unmarried, without children at home, and stated no preference for a rural lifestyle. The least overall satisfied nurses in the sample were employed from 1 to 3 years. Several new findings inform the literature while others support previous workforce studies. Data suggest some job satisfaction elements can be altered by addressing organizational characteristics and by

  12. The early impact of therapeutic alliance in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy O impacto inicial da aliança terapêutica em psicoterapia psicodinâmica breve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alvaro Marques Marcolino

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODCTION: Therapeutic alliance is a key component of the psychotherapeutic process. This study estimated the impact of the therapeutic alliance as measured by CALPAS-P in an individual brief psychodynamic psychotherapy program. METHODS: To study the impact of the therapeutic alliance patients in psychotherapy answered to the CALPAS-P at the first and third session and to the Self-report Questionnaire (SRQ-20, to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and to the Hamilton Anxiety Scale at the beginning and at the end of psychotherapy. RESULTS: The study of the impact of the therapeutic alliance in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy showed that higher TUI scores in the first session were significantly associated to the improvement on the BDI. Patients with best scores in the working alliance, measured at the third PWC session had also significant symptomatic changes. DISCUSSION: The study of the impact of the therapeutic alliance in brief psychotherapy indicated that patients who perceived that their therapists had the best capability to understand and to be involved in their issues had best results in reducing depressive symptoms and patients with higher capability to form the working alliance reached the best psychotherapy outcomes.INTRODUÇÃO: A aliança terapêutica é um conceito central do processo psicoterápico. Este estudo avaliou o impacto da aliança terapêutica em um programa de psicoterapia individual psicodinâmica breve. MÉTODO: Para o estudo do impacto da aliança, pacientes em psicoterapia responderam, ao início e ao final de cada psicoterapia, ao Questionário de auto-avaliação (SRQ-20, ao Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI e à Escala de Ansiedade de Hamilton. Responderam também a CALPAS-P ao término da primeira e da terceira sessão. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que os pacientes com uma pontuação mais alta da TUI na primeira sessão tiveram um impacto significativo sobre a mudança da sintomatologia medida

  13. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  14. Promotion or marketing of the nursing profession by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, I; Biran, E; Telem, L; Steinovitz, N; Alboer, D; Ovadia, K L; Melnikov, S

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested all over the world in nurse recruitment and retention. Issues arising in this context are low job satisfaction, the poor public image of nursing and the reluctance of nurses to promote or market their profession. This study aimed to examine factors explaining the marketing of the nursing profession by nurses working at a general tertiary medical centre in Israel. One hundred sixty-nine registered nurses and midwives from five clinical care units completed a structured self-administered questionnaire, measuring (a) professional self-image, (b) job satisfaction, (c) nursing promotional and marketing activity questionnaire, and (d) demographic data. The mean scores for the promotion of nursing were low. Nurses working in an intensive cardiac care unit demonstrated higher levels of promotional behaviour than nurses from other nursing wards in our study. Nurse managers reported higher levels of nursing promotion activity compared with first-line staff nurses. There was a strong significant correlation between job satisfaction and marketing behaviour. Multiple regression analysis shows that 15% of the variance of promoting the nursing profession was explained by job satisfaction and job position. Nurses are not inclined to promote or market their profession to the public or to other professions. The policy on the marketing of nursing is inadequate. A three-level (individual, organizational and national) nursing marketing programme is proposed for implementation by nurse leadership and policy makers. Among proposed steps to improve marketing of the nursing profession are promotion of the image of nursing by the individual nurse in the course of her or his daily activities, formulation and implementation of policies and programmes to promote the image of nursing at the organizational level and drawing up of a long-term programme for promoting or marketing the professional status of nursing at the national level. © 2015

  15. Moderating Effects of Alexithymia on Associations between the Therapeutic Alliance and the Outcome of Brief Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Multisomatoform Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Probst

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This secondary analysis of a trial on brief psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy (PIT for patients with multisomatoform disorder investigated whether alexithymia moderates the associations between the therapeutic alliance and the outcome of PIT and whether moderating effects of alexithymia remain significant when controlling for depression. Eighty-three patients with multisomatoform disorder receiving PIT were statistically analyzed. Moderation analyses were performed with the SPSS macro PROCESS. The primary outcome (Y, self-reported physical quality of life at 9-month after the end of PIT, was measured with the physical component summary (PCS of the SF-36 Health Survey. The potential moderator (M alexithymia was operationalized with the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20 at pre-treatment and the predictor (X the therapeutic alliance was rated by both patients and therapists via the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ at the end of PIT. Moreover, the PCS at pre-treatment functioned as covariate in all moderation models. When the patients’ alliance ratings were analyzed, alexithymia did not moderate associations between the alliance and the outcome. When the therapists’ alliance ratings were evaluated, alexithymia moderated the relationship between the alliance and the outcome (p < 0.05: a stronger alliance in the therapists’ perspective was beneficial for the outcome only for patients scoring above 61 on the TAS-20. This moderating effect of alexithymia was, however, not statistically significant anymore when adding the pre-treatment depression scores (PHQ-9 as a covariate to the moderation model. The results underline the importance of a good therapists’ view of the alliance when treating alexithymic patients and highlight the complex interaction between alexithymia and depression. Future studies are needed to extend the scope of research regarding which psychotherapeutic mechanisms of change are beneficial for which patients.

  16. Which patients benefit specifically from short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression? Study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Ellen; Abbass, Allan A; Barber, Jacques P; Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth; Dekker, Jack J M; Fokkema, Marjolein; Fonagy, Peter; Hollon, Steven D; Jansma, Elise P; de Maat, Saskia C M; Town, Joel M; Twisk, Jos W R; Van, Henricus L; Weitz, Erica; Cuijpers, Pim

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an empirically supported treatment that is often used to treat depression. However, it is largely unclear if certain subgroups of depressed patients can benefit specifically from this treatment method. We describe the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) aimed at identifying predictors and moderators of STPP for depression efficacy. Method and analysis We will conduct a systematic literature search in multiple bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase.com, Web of Science and Cochrane’s Central Register of Controlled Trials), ‘grey literature’ databases (GLIN and UMI ProQuest) and a prospective trial register (http://www.controlled-trials.com). We will include studies reporting (a) outcomes on standardised measures of (b) depressed (c) adult patients (d) receiving STPP. We will next invite the authors of these studies to share the participant-level data of their trials and combine these data to conduct IPD meta-analyses. The primary outcome for this study is post-treatment efficacy as assessed by a continuous depression measure. Potential predictors and moderators include all sociodemographic variables, clinical variables and psychological patient characteristics that are measured before the start of treatment and are assessed consistently across studies. One-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted using mixed-effects models. Ethics and dissemination Institutional review board approval is not required for this study. We intend to submit reports of the outcomes of this study for publication to international peer-reviewed journals in the fields of psychiatry or clinical psychology. We also intend to present the outcomes at international scientific conferences aimed at psychotherapy researchers and clinicians. The findings of this study can have important clinical implications, as they can inform expectations of STPP efficacy for individual

  17. Psicodinâmica da violência de grandes grupos e da violência de massas Large-group psychodynamics and massive violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamik D. Volkan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de Freud, as teorias psicanalistas sobre grandes grupos focalizam, principalmente, as percepções e os significados que, psicologicamente, os indivíduos atribuem a eles. Este texto analisa alguns aspectos sobre a psicologia dos grandes grupos e sua psicodinâmica interna e específica. Toma como referência grupos étnicos, nacionais, religiosos e ideológicos cujo pertencimento dos sujeitos iniciou-se na infância. O autor faz uma comparação entre o processo de luto em indivíduos e o processo de luto em grandes grupos para ilustrar por que é necessário investir no conhecimento da psicologia destes últimos como um objeto específico. O autor descreve, ainda, sinais e sintomas de regressão em grandes grupos. Quando há ameaça à identidade coletiva, pode ocorrer um processo de violência de massas que obviamente influencia a saúde pública.Beginning with Freud, psychoanalytic theories concerning large groups have mainly focused on individuals' perceptions of what their large groups psychologically mean to them. This text examines some aspects of large-group psychology in its own right and studies psychodynamics of ethnic, national, religious or ideological groups, the membership of which originates in childhood. I will compare the mourning process in individuals with the mourning process in large groups to illustrate why we need to study large-group psychology as a subject in itself. As part of this discussion I will also describe signs and symptoms of large-group regression.When there is a threat against a large-group's identity, massive violence may be initiated and this violence in turn, has an obvious impact on public health.

  18. Large-group psychodynamics and massive violence Psicodinâmica da violência de grandes grupos e da violência de massas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamik D. Volkan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with Freud, psychoanalytic theories concerning large groups have mainly focused on individuals' perceptions of what their large groups psychologically mean to them. This chapter examines some aspects of large-group psychology in its own right and studies psychodynamics of ethnic, national, religious or ideological groups, the membership of which originates in childhood. I will compare the mourning process in individuals with the mourning process in large groups to illustrate why we need to study large-group psychology as a subject in itself. As part of this discussion I will also describe signs and symptoms of large-group regression. When there is a threat against a large-group's identity, massive violence may be initiated and this violence in turn, has an obvious impact on public health.A partir de Freud, as teorias psicanalíticas a respeito de grandes grupos focalizam principalmente as percepções e os significados que os indivíduos psicologicamente atribuem a eles. Este texto analisa alguns aspectos sobre a psicologia dos grandes grupos e sua psicodinâmica interna e específica. Toma como referência grupos étnicos, nacionais, religiosos e ideológicos cujo pertencimento dos sujeitos iniciou-se na infância. Faz-se uma comparação entre o processo de luto em indivíduos e o processo de luto em grandes grupos para ilustrar por que é necessário investir no conhecimento da psicologia destes últimos, como um objeto específico. Descreve ainda sinais e sintomas de regressão em grandes grupos. Quando há ameaça à identidade coletiva pode ocorrer um processo de violência de massas que obviamente influencia na sua saúde coletiva.

  19. Psychodynamic Leadership Approach and Leader-Member Exchange (LMX): A Psychiatric Perspective on Two Leadership Theories and Implications for Training Future Psychiatrist Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakiotis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    An increased emphasis in recent years on psychiatrists as healthcare leaders has not only drawn attention to the skills they can bring to this role but has also raised questions about how to best train and prepare them to assume leadership responsibilities. Such training should not be conducted in isolation from, and oblivious to, the wide-ranging expertise in human behaviour and relationships that psychiatrists can bring to the leadership arena. The aim of this theoretical paper is to draw attention to how psychiatrists can use their existing knowledge and skill set to inform their understanding of leadership theory and practice. In particular, the Psychodynamic Leadership Approach and Leader-Member Exchange theory are compared and contrasted to illustrate this point. The former represents a less well-known approach to leadership theory and practice whereas the latter is a widely familiar, conventional theory that is regularly taught in leadership courses. Both are underpinned by their emphasis on leader-follower relationships-and human relationships more broadly-and are intuitively appealing to psychiatrists endeavouring to understand aspects of organisational behaviour in the healthcare settings in which they work and lead. The application of these theories to assist reflection on and understanding of professional and personal leadership behaviours through leadership-oriented Balint-style groups and 360-degree appraisal is proposed. It is hoped that this paper will serve to stimulate thought and discussion about how leadership training for future psychiatrists can be tailored to better harness their existing competencies, thereby developing richer formative learning experiences and, ultimately, achieving superior leadership outcomes.

  20. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork Improves Quality of Life, Health, and Ability by Induction of Antonovsky-Salutogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We had a success rate of treating low, self-assessed, global quality of life (measured by QOL1: How would you assess the quality of your life now? with clinical holistic medicine of 56.4% (95% CI: 42.3–69.7% and calculated from this the Number Needed to Treat (NNT as 1.43–2.36. We found that during treatment, (in average 20 sessions of psychodynamic psychotherapy complemented with bodywork at a cost of 1600 EURO, the patients entered a state of Antonovsky-salutogenesis (holistic, existential healing, which also improved their self-assessed health and general ability one whole step up a 5-point Likert Scale. The treatment responders radically improved their self-assessed physical health (0.6 step, self-assessed mental health (1.6 step, their relation to self (1.2 step, friends (0.3 step, and partner (2.1 step on a 6-step scale, and their ability to love (1.2 step and work (0.8 step, and to function socially (1.0 step and sexually (0.8 step. It seems that treatment with clinical holistic medicine is the cure of choice when the patients (1 present the triad of low quality of life, poor self-assessed physical and/or mental health, and poor ability to function; and (2 are willing to suffer during the therapy by confronting and integrating old emotional problems and trauma(s from the past. For these patients, the treatment provided lasting benefits, without the negative side effects of drugs. A lasting, positive effect might also prevent many different types of problems in the future. The therapy was “mindful” in its focus on existential and spiritual issues.

  1. Nursing reality as reflected in nurses' poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiler, C

    1983-01-01

    In this discussion, the author has described a technique used in a pilot study where the research aim was to enhance understanding of nurses and their experiences--an understanding achieved from attention to nurses' expressions in poetry. There is a growing interest in qualitative approaches to the study of nursing phenomena and the development of nursing theory (Simms, 1981; Munhall, 1982; Oiler, 1982; Omery, 1983; Swanson and Chenitz, 1982). In fact, many of the techniques and strategies used by helping professionals to know their clients can be adapted in qualitative research procedures. For persons in the helping professions, a qualitative approach is consistent with the therapeutic process of coming to know a client. Human behavior is understood to be an expression of how individuals interpret their worlds. The task of the qualitative researcher is to capture this very process of interpretation in the subject's words, gestures, expressions, acts, and creations.

  2. Vehicle-based road dust emission measurement (III):. effect of speed, traffic volume, location, and season on PM 10 road dust emissions in the Treasure Valley, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etyemezian, V.; Kuhns, H.; Gillies, J.; Chow, J.; Hendrickson, K.; McGown, M.; Pitchford, M.

    The testing re-entrained aerosol kinetic emissions from roads (TRAKER) road dust measurement system was used to survey more than 400 km of paved roads in southwestern Idaho during 3-week sampling campaigns in winter and summer, 2001. Each data point, consisting of a 1-s measurement of particle light scattering sampled behind the front tire, was associated with a link (section of road) in the traffic demand model network for the Treasure Valley, ID. Each link was in turn associated with a number of characteristics including posted speed limit, vehicle kilometers traveled (vkt), road class (local/residential, collector, arterial, and interstate), county, and land use (urban vs. rural). Overall, the TRAKER-based emission factors based on location, setting, season, and speed spanned a narrow range from 3.6 to 8.0 g/vkt. Emission factors were higher in winter compared to summer, higher in urban areas compared to rural, and lower for roads with fast travel speeds compared to slower roads. The inherent covariance between traffic volume and traffic speed obscured the assessment of the effect of traffic volume on emission potentials. Distance-based emission factors expressed in grams per kilometer traveled (g/vkt) for roads with low travel speeds (˜11 m/s residential roads) compared to those with high travel speeds (˜25 m/s interstates) were higher (5.2 vs. 3.0 g/vkt in summer and 5.9 vs. 4.9 g/vkt in winter). However, emission potentials which characterize the amount of suspendable material on a road were substantially higher on roads with low travel speeds (0.71 vs. 0.13 g/vkt/(m/s) in summer and 0.78 vs. 0.21 g/vkt/(m/s) in winter). This suggested that while high speed roads are much cleaner (factor of 5.4 in summer), on a vehicle kilometer traveled basis, emissions from high and low speed roads are of the same order. Emission inventories based on the TRAKER method, silt loadings obtained during the field study, and US EPA's AP-42 default values of silt loading were

  3. Motivational incentives of nurses and nursing leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Bakola H.; Zyga S.; Panoutsopoulos G.; Alikari V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In the health sector which is characterized much more as a "labor intensive" rather than as "capital intensive" human capital is the core for improving efficiency, enhancing productivity and maximizing the quality of service. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need for motivating nurses, presenting a realistic framework of incentives as well as the role of nursing leadership in this. Method: Literature review was carried out based on research and ...

  4. Americanizing Canadian Nursing: Nursing Regulation Drift

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen MacMillan; Judith Oulton; Rachel Bard; Wendy Nicklin

    2017-01-01

    Recent regulatory changes mean Canadian nurses are writing a US-based entry to practice exam and a US company is assessing credentials of internationally educated nurses (IENs) for Canadian registration. This paper asserts that this policy direction has significant consequences for Canadian content and integrity of education programs, francophone parity in testing, and the future of primary health care and health system reform. Furthermore, writing a US exam means Canada is at risk of losin...

  5. Advanced practice nursing and conceptual models of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline; Newman, Diana M L; McAllister, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    This column focuses on advanced practice nursing. A definition and central competency of advanced practice are given and four roles assumed by advanced practice nurses are identified. Questions related primarily to the advanced practice role of nurse practitioner are raised. Two nurse scholars who teach and practice discuss their experiences as advanced practice nurses, with an emphasis on the importance of using a conceptual model of nursing as a guide for their practice.

  6. Actual Nursing Competency among Nurses in Hospital in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Do Thi Ha; Khanitta Nuntaboot

    2016-01-01

    Background: Competency of nurses is vital to safe nursing practice as well as essential component to drive quality of nursing services. There exists little up to date information concerning actual competency among Vietnamese nurses. Purposes: The purpose of this study is to identify the actual nursing competency among nurses in clinical settings in Vietnam. Methods: A qualitative study, ethnographic method, comprised of the participant-observation, in-depth interview, and focus group discussi...

  7. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  8. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  9. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  10. NURSING REMUNERATION INDEX

    OpenAIRE

    Suprajitno Suprajitno

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses have some variables, which can be used as basic of the remuneration. The aim of the study was to develop nursing remuneration index in the hospital of Ngudi Waluyo Wlingi using statistics approach. Methods: Research design was descriptive, study that is divided into two levels. The fi rst level was surveying and focus group discussion and the second level was assessing the remuneration index formula by simulation. The subject for surveying was the whole nurses who have st...

  11. Concept caring in nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Lenka Drahošová; Darja Jarošová

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this literature review was to search for qualitative studies focusing on the concept of caring in nursing, to analyse them and to synthesize knowledge that concerns the definition of the concept of caring in nursing from the point of view of nurses and patients. Design: Review. Methods: Qualitative studies were searched for systematically in the electronic databases Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), CINAHL, Medline, Science Direct, and the Wiley Library Online, according to se...

  12. Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Michele J.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

  13. [Nurses' professional satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cura, M L; Rodrigues, A R

    1999-10-01

    We carried out a study with 91 nurses, trying to find out about the feelings of these professionals regarding their satisfaction at work. We used the Work Satisfaction Assessment Questionnaire (WSAQ), drawn up and validated by Siqueira (1978) and adapted with the analysis of seven factors: General Satisfaction; Physical and Psychological Stress; "Status" of the Job; Location of the Company; Compensating Benefits; Recognition and Personal Development. Data showed nurses satisfied with their work, in its intrinsic aspects (Accomplishment, Recognition and Autonomy). The psychiatric nurses were the most mature, most experienced, showing a higher satisfaction level, whereas the pediatric nurses were the youngest, most inexperienced and presenting the highest level of dissatisfaction at work.

  14. Films and nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María GABRIELA FELIPPA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide some ideas about the importance of film, with it’s audiovisual narrative, in the nursing education. The use of films during teaching gives the posibility to increase the construction of a professional view.The nursing carreer of Isalud University of Argentina is founded a sistematic work with cinematographic support. In this case are presented different ways of work with cinematographic support in a curricular space of Fundamentals of Nursing of the career of a professional Nurse of the Isalud University.

  15. Nurses? Creativity: Advantage or Disadvantage

    OpenAIRE

    Shahsavari Isfahani, Sara; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, global nursing experts have been aggressively encouraging nurses to pursue creativity and innovation in nursing to improve nursing outcomes. Nurses? creativity plays a significant role in health and well-being. In most health systems across the world, nurses provide up to 80% of the primary health care; therefore, they are critically positioned to provide creative solutions for current and future global health challenges. Objectives The purpose of this study was to explor...

  16. Regulating the nursing associate profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Alan

    2017-11-23

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, University of Southampton, discusses the Government's consultation on changes to the Nursing and Midwifery Order 2001 and the legislation to regulate nursing associates.

  17. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  18. Convergence: How Nursing Unions and Magnet are Advancing Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joyce E; Billingsley, Molley

    2014-01-01

    Historically, unions and professional associations such as the American Nurses Association have been adversaries in the fight to represent the best interests of the nursing profession. We reviewed the literature on the evolution of nursing unions, nursing's historical unease about unions, the Magnet designation in nursing, the tensions between the unions and Magnet, the core values and commonalities they share, and the obligations of nursing as a profession. Refocusing on the advancement of our profession provides a positive pathway in which the collective efforts of nursing unions and professional initiatives such as the Magnet designation converge during these turbulent times for our profession. The single, central organizing idea of nursing-where nursing unions and Magnet converge-is the pivotal role of nurses in delivering high-quality patient care. The often-maligned dialectic between unions and Magnet has advanced and not hindered the nursing profession. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nurse manager engagement: what it means to nurse managers and staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Linda R; Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    To describe what nurse manager engagement means to nurse managers and staff nurses by incorporating an organizational dashboard to document engagement outcomes. Retaining engaged nurse managers is crucial for individual performance and organizational outcomes. However, nurse manager engagement is currently underreported in the literature. Existing data from the 2010 Employee Opinion Survey at the Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, were used to measure staff engagement among 28 nurse managers and 1497 staff nurses. The data showed a 21% gap between manager and staff nurse engagement levels, with managers showing higher engagement levels than staff. No clear depiction of nurse manager engagement emerged. Consequently, an expanded definition of nurse manager engagement was developed alongside a beginning dashboard of engagement outcomes. The findings have implications for overcoming barriers that affect staff nurse engagement, improving outcomes, and creating definitions of nurse manager engagement.

  20. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siela, Debra; Twibell, K Renee; Keller, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Nurses are needed more than ever to support the healthcare needs of every American. Nurses make up the greatest single component of hospital staff. In 2004, of the almost 3 million nurses in the United States, 83% were employed in nursing, and 58% of those were employed full-time. However, a severe shortage of nurses exists nationwide, putting the safe, effective healthcare of Americans in jeopardy. The concurrent shortage of nursing faculty has significant impact on the potential for admitting and graduating sufficient numbers of nursing students to address the shortage of prepared nurses. A close examination of the demographics of the 3 million nurses provides a context for an in-depth discussion of strategies that critical care nurses can employ to help alleviate the nursing and nurse faculty shortages.

  1. Nurse moral disengagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Roberta; Tramontano, Carlo; Paciello, Marinella; Kangasniemi, Mari; Sili, Alessandro; Bobbio, Andrea; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Ethics is a founding component of the nursing profession; however, nurses sometimes find it difficult to constantly adhere to the required ethical standards. There is limited knowledge about the factors that cause a committed nurse to violate standards; moral disengagement, originally developed by Bandura, is an essential variable to consider. This study aimed at developing and validating a nursing moral disengagement scale and investigated how moral disengagement is associated with counterproductive and citizenship behaviour at work. The research comprised a qualitative study and a quantitative study, combining a cross-validation approach and a structural equation model. A total of 60 Italian nurses (63% female) involved in clinical work and enrolled as students in a postgraduate master's programme took part in the qualitative study. In 2012, the researchers recruited 434 nurses (76% female) from different Italian hospitals using a convenience sampling method to take part in the quantitative study. All the organisations involved and the university gave ethical approval; all respondents participated on a voluntary basis and did not receive any form of compensation. The nursing moral disengagement scale comprised a total of 22 items. Results attested the mono-dimensionality of the scale and its good psychometric properties. In addition, results highlighted a significant association between moral disengagement and both counterproductive and citizenship behaviours. Results showed that nurses sometimes resort to moral disengagement in their daily practice, bypassing moral and ethical codes that would normally prevent them from enacting behaviours that violate their norms and protocols. The nursing moral disengagement scale can complement personnel monitoring and assessment procedures already in place and provide additional information to nursing management for designing interventions aimed at increasing compliance with ethical codes by improving the quality of the

  2. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. [Clinical trials in nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Paola; Campagna, Sara; Dimonte, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are pivotal for the development of nursing knowledge. To describe the clinical trials published in nursing journals in the last two years and propose some general reflections on nursing research. A search with the key-word trial was done on PubMed (2009-2013) on Cancer Nursing, European Journal of Oncology Nursing, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Nursing Research. Of 228 trials identified, 104 (45.8%) were published in the last 2 years. Nurses from Asian countries published the larger number of trials. Educational and supportive interventions were the most studied (61/104 trials), followed by clinical interventions (33/104). Samples were limited and most trials are monocentric. A growing number of trials is published, on issues relevant for the nursing profession, however larger samples and multicentric studies would be necessary.

  4. Nursing activities score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, DR; Nap, R; de Rijk, A; Schaufeli, W; Lapichino, G

    Objectives. The instruments used for measuring nursing workload in the intensive care unit (e.g., Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28) are based on therapeutic interventions related to severity of illness. Many nursing activities are not necessarily related to severity of illness, and

  5. School Nurse Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  6. Nursing Informatics Competency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Currently, C Hospital lacks a standardized nursing informatics competency program to validate nurses' skills and knowledge in using electronic medical records (EMRs). At the study locale, the organization is about to embark on the implementation of a new, more comprehensive EMR system. All departments will be required to use the new EMR, unlike…

  7. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Springs 2018! Wednesday, May 16, 2018 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research that is ...

  8. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses.

  9. Leadership in school nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshberger, Lorri A; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2009-03-01

    Whether you are new to school nursing or have been practicing for years, you must be aware that the title of school nurse puts you in a position of leadership. You lead students, faculty and staff in your school; you lead the community in which you live and work. You guide people toward health. They request information when faced with a health crisis. You take control in emergencies. School nurses are at the forefront of developing school health policies and procedures. Do you have the qualities of a leader? "The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader" (Maxwell, 1999) expounds the characteristics of a good leader. This book helps the school nurse in the quest toward leadership. The following is a discussion of the main points of this book and their application to school nursing.

  10. Nursing and nursing education in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Richard M; Berryman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Haiti has long had the largest proportion of people living in poverty and the highest mortality level of any country in the Americas. On January 12, 2010, the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in 200 years struck. Before the earthquake, half of all Haitians lacked any access to modern medical care services. Health care professionals in Haiti number around one-fourth of the world average and about one-tenth the ratio present in North America. The establishment of new primary care services in a country where half of the people had no access to modern health care prior to the earthquake requires advanced practice roles for nurses and midwives. With a high burden of infectious, parasitic, and nutritional conditions, Haiti especially needs mid-level community health workers and nurses who can train and supervise them for public health programs. As in many other developing countries, organized nursing lacks many of the management and planning skills needed to move its agenda forward. The public schools prepare 3-year diploma graduates. These programs have upgraded the curriculum little in decades and have mainly trained for hospital service. Primary care, public health program management, and patient education had often not been stressed. Specializations in midwifery and HIV care exist, while only informal programs of specialization exist in administration, surgery, and pediatrics. An advanced practice role, nonetheless, is not yet well established. Nursing has much to contribute to the recovery of Haiti and the revitalization if its health system. Professional nurses are needed in clinics and hospitals throughout the country to care for patients, including thousands in need of rehabilitation and mental health services. Haitian nursing colleagues in North America have key roles in strengthening their profession. Ways of supporting our Haitian colleagues are detailed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The ANTOP study: focal psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and treatment-as-usual in outpatients with anorexia nervosa - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauenburg Henning

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder leading to high morbidity and mortality as a result of both malnutrition and suicide. The seriousness of the disorder requires extensive knowledge of effective treatment options. However, evidence for treatment efficacy in this area is remarkably weak. A recent Cochrane review states that there is an urgent need for large, well-designed treatment studies for patients with anorexia nervosa. The aim of this particular multi-centre study is to evaluate the efficacy of two standardized outpatient treatments for patients with anorexia nervosa: focal psychodynamic (FPT and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT. Each therapeutic approach is compared to a "treatment-as-usual" control group. Methods/Design 237 patients meeting eligibility criteria are randomly and evenly assigned to the three groups – two intervention groups (CBT and FPT and one control group. The treatment period for each intervention group is 10 months, consisting of 40 sessions respectively. Body weight, eating disorder related symptoms, and variables of therapeutic alliance are measured during the course of treatment. Psychotherapy sessions are audiotaped for adherence monitoring. The treatment in the control group, both the dosage and type of therapy, is not regulated in the study protocol, but rather reflects the current practice of established outpatient care. The primary outcome measure is the body mass index (BMI at the end of the treatment (10 months after randomization. Discussion The study design surmounts the disadvantages of previous studies in that it provides a randomized controlled design, a large sample size, adequate inclusion criteria, an adequate treatment protocol, and a clear separation of the treatment conditions in order to avoid contamination. Nevertheless, the study has to deal with difficulties specific to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. The treatment protocol allows for dealing with the

  12. Which patients benefit specifically from short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression? Study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Ellen; Abbass, Allan A; Barber, Jacques P; Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth; Dekker, Jack J M; Fokkema, Marjolein; Fonagy, Peter; Hollon, Steven D; Jansma, Elise P; de Maat, Saskia C M; Town, Joel M; Twisk, Jos W R; Van, Henricus L; Weitz, Erica; Cuijpers, Pim

    2018-02-20

    Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an empirically supported treatment that is often used to treat depression. However, it is largely unclear if certain subgroups of depressed patients can benefit specifically from this treatment method. We describe the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) aimed at identifying predictors and moderators of STPP for depression efficacy. We will conduct a systematic literature search in multiple bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase.com, Web of Science and Cochrane's Central Register of Controlled Trials), 'grey literature' databases (GLIN and UMI ProQuest) and a prospective trial register (http://www.controlled-trials.com). We will include studies reporting (a) outcomes on standardised measures of (b) depressed (c) adult patients (d) receiving STPP. We will next invite the authors of these studies to share the participant-level data of their trials and combine these data to conduct IPD meta-analyses. The primary outcome for this study is post-treatment efficacy as assessed by a continuous depression measure. Potential predictors and moderators include all sociodemographic variables, clinical variables and psychological patient characteristics that are measured before the start of treatment and are assessed consistently across studies. One-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted using mixed-effects models. Institutional review board approval is not required for this study. We intend to submit reports of the outcomes of this study for publication to international peer-reviewed journals in the fields of psychiatry or clinical psychology. We also intend to present the outcomes at international scientific conferences aimed at psychotherapy researchers and clinicians. The findings of this study can have important clinical implications, as they can inform expectations of STPP efficacy for individual patients, and help to make an informed choice concerning the best

  13. Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Mentalization-Based Techniques in Major Depressive Disorder patients: Relationship among alexithymia, reflective functioning, and outcome variables - A Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressi, Cinzia; Fronza, Silvia; Minacapelli, Eleonora; Nocito, Emanuela Paola; Dipasquale, Elisabetta; Magri, Lorenzo; Lionetti, Francesca; Barone, Lavinia

    2017-09-01

    In depressed patients, recent advances have highlighted impairment in mentalizing: identifying and interpreting one's own or other's mental states. Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) has proven to be effective in reducing symptoms and improving relational/functional abilities in these subjects. Therefore, the first aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of STPP with Mentalization-Based Techniques (STMBP) on their clinical outcomes and the second, to investigate Reflective Functioning and alexithymia concerning treatment outcomes in depressed subjects. A baseline evaluation of reflective functioning, alexithymia and depression was conducted before an STMBP treatment. Patients were re-tested successively after 40 weeks (T1) and in a follow-up after 1 year at the end of the treatment (T2). A total of 24 patients principally diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) underwent a STMBP conducted by two expert therapists. Global Assessment Functioning (GAF), Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) data were collected at the baseline (T0) by two clinical therapists, along with RF scores rated by two trained raters. HAM-D, TAS-20 and GAF follow-ups were conducted at the end of the treatment after 40 weeks (T1) and after 1-year follow-up (T2). Results highlighted an improvement of both HAM-D and TAS-20 scores in our sample. Moreover, a negative correlation between RF and TAS-20 was found. Both HAM-D and RF at T0 influenced depressive outcomes at the end of the treatment. Results confirmed the effectiveness of STMBP in MDD, suggesting also an inverse association between RF and alexithymia. Our study demonstrates how STMBP could be effective in MDD even after 40 sessions, maintaining its effect in a 1-year follow-up. STMBP improves subjective capability of reflecting on the mental states of oneself and others. Our intervention allows patients to orientate thoughts from inside to outside, reducing negative

  14. Nursing Supervisors Perception on quality of Nursing Care in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afcor Jupitor

    assess (a) any nursing imbalance and shortage and (b) the quality of nursing education and nursing care in Ethiopia. Methods: ... policy and planning. Key Words: Perception, Nursing image & status, imbalance & shortage, education, quality of care. ..... For Public Sector Health Care Services. For Private Sector Health Care ...

  15. [Nurses and research: an analysis of two international nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Julita; Marucci, Anna Rita; Comerci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    The intent of the article, dedicated to a series (Prof Inf, 4,2005:229-235 e 236-245) of what nurses write, two European Nursing journals are analysed by categorizing nursing research and non research articles comparing with two Italian refereed Nursing Journals. Results show a tendency of a prevalence of nursing research articles (quantitative and qualitative methods) for all categories in those European (J. Nurs Manag and J Adv Nurs) compared with a prevalence of non research articles in the two Italian refereed Nursing journals. Results sustain the necessity of a national scientific debate and more production of research for the scientificity of nursing and to better care.

  16. Characterization of the lapis lazuli from the Egyptian treasure of Tôd and its alteration using external μ-PIXE and μ-IBIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.; Pierrat-Bonnefois, G.; Campos, P. de; Re, A.; Angelici, D.

    2014-01-01

    Lapis lazuli is among the earliest and most priced ornamental stone worked to produce carvings, beads and inlays as early as the 4th millennium BC. It is an heterogeneous rock composed of blue lazurite Na 3 Ca(Si 3 Al 3 O 12 )S mixed with other minerals like calcite, diopside and pyrite. The historical source of lapis lazuli in antiquity is supposedly located in Afghanistan, in the Sar-e-Sang district, while other sources are known in Tajikistan and Russia (Baïkal area). This work focuses on the lapis-lazuli of the Egyptian treasure of Tôd dated from Middle Kingdom (20th c. BC). Deposited in four copper boxes, it consists of thousands of blocks of raw lapis lazuli, minute fragments, beads and carvings stylistically dated to various periods. This discovery raises the question of the use of lapis lazuli in ancient Egypt because there is no source of lapis in this country. In addition, most of the lapis lazuli artefacts are strongly weathered. The aim of this work is to understand the alteration process and to verify if its provenance can still be determined. A few artefacts were analysed using the new external microbeam line of the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF. The mineral phases were identified and corresponding trace elements (e.g. Ti, As, Ni, Ba) were ascribed using the quantitative PIXE elemental maps collected on the entire artefacts or on cross-sections. In parallel, the IBIL spectrum recorded for each point in the image provided an additional fingerprint of the luminescent phases, notably mineral species belonging to the cancrinite group. Most alteration products appeared to derive from the oxidation of the pyrite FeS 2 . It was observed that the alteration process extends to the core of most investigated artefacts. Despite such a strong alteration state, the chemical fingerprints recorded on the studied artefacts proved to be consistent with that of lapis lazuli from historical deposit of Badakshan, Afghanistan, previously investigated using the same

  17. Nurses across borders: foregrounding international migration in nursing history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Catherine Ceniza

    2010-01-01

    Although the international migration of nurses has played a formative role in increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care labor force, nursing historians have paid very little attention to the theme of international migration and the experiences of foreign-trained nurses, A focus on international migration complements two new approaches in nursing history: the agenda to internationalize its frameworks, and the call to move away from "great women, great events" and toward the experiences of "ordinary" nurses. This article undertakes a close reading of the life and work of Filipino American nurse Ines Cayaban to reconceptualize nursing biography in an international framework that is attentive to issues of migration, race, gender, and colonialism. It was a Hannah keynote lecture delivered by the author on June 5, 2008, as part of the CAHN/ACHN (Canadian Association for the History of Nursing/Association Canadienne pour l'Histoire du Nursing) International Nursing History Conference.

  18. The 'F.E.E.L.' good factors in nursing leadership at board level through work-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this commentary is to raise awareness about the apparent lack of formal activities and the paucity of published papers in nursing leadership development at the board level in the United Kingdom (UK). The paper suggests a way forward. The author has been serving at a board level, within and outside of nursing, locally, nationally and internationally since 1988. His current experience as an active board member and honorary treasurer of a leading charity organization in the Southeast of England and participation on a Board Leadership Development programme in the United States of America (USA) led to the need to write this commentary. Leadership at the board level is different because the board is the governing body of an organization. The board has overall responsibility for running the organization. The overall duty is to manage less and LEAD more. The need for this type of leadership is on the increase because these are turbulent days in the healthcare industry. This growing trend witnesses increasing and greater demand from key stakeholders for nursing and healthcare services: rising exposure to liability and litigation; a demand for stronger accountability and questioning of the nature and delivery of nursing and healthcare services. Effective and successful leadership judgment is made based on both numbers [efficient resources utilization (RU)] and stories [effective client/patient satisfaction (CS)]. Nurses and others in the healthcare industry need to guide against the leadership myths that: 'everyone can be a leader'; 'leaders deliver business (service) results'; 'people who get to the top are leaders'; and 'that leaders are great coaches'. This commentary demonstrates these myths could be converted to become realities through developing and possessing most if not all the knowledge, skills and attitudes implicated in the Effective Board Leadership Capabilities Development Profile presented in this paper. Possessing board level leadership

  19. Nursing in Modern Japan and its Significance: The Kyoto Training School for Nurses and the Kyoto Nursing School

    OpenAIRE

    小野, 尚香

    2003-01-01

    Nursing by Buddhist during Meiji Japan was stimulated by the visiting nursing program conducted by nurses connected with the Kyoto Training School for Nurses. Why were Buddhist priests attracted to the visiting nursing. what did they try to adopt and what kind of nursing activities did they try to organize? As the first step to answer these questions. in this paper I considered the specialty. the sociality. and the nursing spirit of the home nursing and district nursing provided by the ...

  20. Clinical Wisdom among Proficient Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Hall, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    This paperexamines clinical wisdom which has emerged from a broader study anout nurse managers´influence on proficient registered nurse turnover and retention. The purpose of the study was to increase understanding of proficient nurses´experience and clinical practice by giving voice to the nurses...

  1. Nursing in transition in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnazarova, Guljahan; Schlickau, Jane

    2010-07-01

    Nursing practice and nursing education in Kyrgyzstan are described in this article. Since the breakup of the Soviet Union and the establishment of independence in 1991, health care in Kyrgyzstan has deteriorated. In response to the Manas Health Care Reform program initiated in 1996, nursing education is being upgraded and nurses are being retrained throughout the country.Comparisons of nursing education in Kyrgyzstan with the U.S. and Soviet programs are discussed. Challenges in upgrading nursing education to meet international standards and in obtaining an advanced degree in nursing are explained.

  2. Mapping Nursing Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Birks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Articulated education pathways between the vocational education training sector and universities provide opportunities for students wishing to progress to higher qualifications. Enrolled nurses seeking to advance their career in nursing can choose to enter baccalaureate degree programs through such alternative entry routes. Awarding of credit for prior studies is dependent on accurate assessment of the existing qualification against that which is sought. This study employed a modified Delphi method to inform the development of an evidence-based, structured approach to mapping the pathway from the nationally consistent training package of the Diploma of Nursing to the diversity of baccalaureate nursing programs across Australia. The findings of this study reflect the practical nature of the role of the enrolled nurse, particularly the greater emphasis placed on direct care activities as opposed to those related to professional development and the generation and use of evidence. These findings provide a valuable summative overview of the relationship between the Diploma of Nursing and the expectations of the registered nurse role.

  3. Hospice nursing: the specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D J

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and delineate what experienced hospice nurses perceive as the knowledge and skills base essential to their practice of hospice nursing as a specialty. Little of this specialty is taught in basic nursing programs, so another purpose was to determine the methods hospice nurses use for knowledge and skills acquisition. The qualitative study method of focused ethnography was used. This method allowed the researcher to examine hospice nurses in the context of their own community-based agency, enter the research arena with specific questions, describe the topic from the viewpoint of the participants, use multiple data sources, and begin data analysis concurrently with data collection, which continued until saturation was reached. During data analysis, 11 categories emerged. Four of these categories involved skills: (a) assessment skills, (b) communication skills, (c) technical skills, and (d) management skills; and seven categories primarily involved knowledge: (a) end-stage disease process, (b) signs of impending death, (c) palliative therapeutics, (d) collaboration between disciplines, (e) advocacy, (f) philosophy and ethics of hospice care, and (g) family dynamics. Of these 11 categories, the one discussed and observed most often was that of assessment skills. It was found that the hospice nurses learned their specialty by doing it. However, the need for graduate education in hospice nursing became apparent.

  4. Some Thoughts on Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Sapountzi-Krepia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of nursing is care; although caring is a universal concept and a component of the philosophies guiding the practice of all health and caring professions. Human beings learn to care bybeing cared by other people. In primitive societies there was not a clear distinction between healer and carer. However, caring, healing, and curing include a meaning of getting control over and expressing power upon people who are receiving care. That was a crucial point for the separation of caring from healing and curing. Nursing evolved from the mother's role and is frequently identified in people's perception more as a woman's duty than a job. Nursing continues to struggle to overcome the stereotypes held for centuries. However, as nursing is maturing as a science, an emphasis on the meaning of care and the approach of nursing as a purely caring science is apparent in many scientific nursing books and papers. Caring is evolving as a new paradigm for nursing, as the profession seeks its rightful place in the modern societies.

  5. Traffic control: nursing practice calendar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Linda; Cheesebro, Kathy; Nagra, Erica; Neff, Alaina

    2013-01-01

    Educating nurses on the multitude of new and updated best practices, changes in regulatory standards, new equipment, and enhanced technology creates an "information traffic jam." Multiple practice changes occurring simultaneously pose challenges for nurses to retain information to practice safely and effectively. An absence of coordination between various nursing and allied health teaching initiatives compounds this problem. A nursing practice calendar was developed to facilitate the prioritization, communication, and education of hospital-wide initiatives affecting nursing practice.

  6. Nursing and the next millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel.

  7. Danish Perioperative Nurses' Documentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Susanne Friis; Lorentzen, Vibeke; Sørensen, Erik E

    2017-01-01

    special demands on electronic health records (EHRs). The purpose of this study was to explore how the use of an EHR tailored to perioperative practice affects Danish perioperative nurses' documentation practices. This study was a follow-up to a baseline study from 2014. For three months in the winter...... of 2015 to 2016, six participants tested an EHR containing a Danish edition of a selected section of the Perioperative Nursing Data Set. This study relied on realistic evaluation and participant observations to generate data. We found that nursing leadership was essential for improving perioperative...

  8. Presentation skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  9. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern

    2013-01-01

    a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... theory. Method: The data comprised sessions of qualitative participant observation during the treatment of 21 patients with non-invasive ventilation that included informal conversations with the nurses and semi-structured interviews with 11 patients after treatment completion. Data were collected...

  10. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  11. Classification systems in nursing : Formalizing nursing knowledge and implications for nursing information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, WTF; Epping, PJMM; Abraham, IL

    The development of nursing information systems (NIS) is often hampered by the fact that nursing lacks a unified nursing terminology and classification system. Currently there exist various initiatives in this area. We address the question as to how current initiatives in the development of nursing

  12. Short-term intensive psychodynamic group therapy versus cognitive-behavioral group therapy in day treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszek, Hubert; Holas, Paweł; Wyrzykowski, Tomasz; Lorentzen, Steinar; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2015-07-29

    Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group therapies are frequently applied in day hospitals for the treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders in Poland and other Eastern European countries. Yet there is not enough evidence as to their effectiveness in this environment; this study addresses this gap. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of these two kinds of day treatment care consisting of intensive, short-term group psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy, for patients with anxiety disorders and/or comorbid depressive or personality disorders. Our objectives are to: 1) show the effectiveness of each treatment in a day-care setting relative to the wait-list control group; 2) demonstrate the relative short- and long-term effectiveness of the two active treatments; 3) carry out a preliminary examination of the predictors and moderators of treatment response; 4) carry out a preliminary examination of the mediators of therapeutic change; and 5) compare the impact of both methods of treatment on the outcome of the measures used in this study. In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 199 patients with anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive and/or personality disorders will be assigned to one of three conditions: 1) psychodynamic group therapy; 2) cognitive-behavioral group therapy; or 3) wait-list control group. The therapy will last 12 weeks. Both treatments will be manualized (the manuals will address comorbidity). Primary outcome measures will include self-reported symptoms of anxiety, observer-rated symptoms of anxiety, global improvement, and recovery rate. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of pathological personality traits, depression, self-esteem, defense mechanisms, beliefs about self and others, interpersonal problems, object relations, parental bonding, meta-cognition, and quality of life. Measures will be taken at baseline, post-treatment, and at six months following

  13. Psicoterapias breves psicodinâmicas: características da produção científica nacional e estrangeira (1980/2003 Brief psychodynamic psychotherapies: Characteristics of national and foreign scientific production (1980/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Medici Pizão Yoshida

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta o levantamento de algumas características formais da produção científica para saber quem, onde e o que tem sido indexado nas bases de dados eletrônicas, sob os verbetes: "psicoterapias breves psicodinâmicas" e "psicoterapias psicodinâmicas de tempo limitado". As produções estrangeira e nacional foram cotejadas e críticas apresentadas. A amostra de 534 resumos (1980 a 2003, publicados em bases nacionais e internacionais, indicou que a produção estrangeira foi quantitativamente superior quanto ao número de referências, periódicos científicos e autores. No entanto, a nacional equipara-se em aspectos tais como: média de referência por autor, predomínio de autoria única e adoção de psicoterapias integrativas, em que influências de outras abordagens, que não a psicodinâmica, são identificadas. Nas duas realidades predominaram, ainda, publicações sobre psicoterapias individuais de adultos, veiculadas por periódicos psiquiátricos. Espera-se que com a expansão das bases de dados da psicologia, esta última característica venha a se reverter, ao menos no Brasil.It presents a survey of some formal characteristics of the scientific production with the aim of knowing whom, where, and what have been indexed in electronic databases, under the entry: "brief psychodynamic psychotherapy" and "time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy". Foreign and national productions were checked and critiques were presented. The sample of 534 abstracts (1980 to 2003, published in Brazil and abroad, indicated that the foreign production was quantitatively superior concerning the number of references, journals and authors. However, the national production compares in some aspects such as: reference average by author, predominance of unique authorship and adoption of integrative psychotherapy, in which influences of other approaches, rather than the psychodynamic, are identified. In the two realities there was a predominance of publications

  14. Comparing nurse managers and nurses' perceptions of nurses' self-leadership during capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Karien; Cairns, Lindi

    2014-05-01

    This paper compares the perceptions of nurse managers and nurses about self-leadership of professional nurses while taking ownership of capacity building during unit management. The Nursing Strategy for South Africa states that the competency of nurses is dependent upon factors that lead to capacity building. A quantitative design was followed by conducting a survey. The target population included nurse managers and professional nurses working at an academic public hospital in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. The findings indicate shortcomings in relation to advising professional nurses about self-direction while taking ownership of their daily pressures and stresses associated with unit management. Professional nurses should develop their confidence by focusing on their self-leadership strengths when managing a unit. Recommendations are made to promote self-leadership while taking ownership of nurses during capacity building of unit management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Can nurses trust nurses in recovery reentering the workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Lisa M

    2013-03-01

    To examine the ability of working direct care nurses to trust nurses in recovery from substance use (or abuse) disorders (SUDs) reentering the workplace. A researcher-designed quantitative survey was used to gather data. Nurses said that they've worked with a nurse with SUD at some time in their career. Nurses are willing to trust their recovering colleagues and strongly agree that nurses in recovery should be allowed to return to the healthcare profession. Many nurses don't know how to provide help or where to locate support such as assistance programs or alternative-to-discipline programs for their impaired colleagues. This study adds to the body of knowledge in the crucial issue of addiction in nursing. Healthcare institutions struggle with best practices in assisting nurses in recovery. By examining underlying issues such as trust, a better understanding of how to implement educational programs may emerge.

  16. A qualitative exploration of nurses leaving nursing practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junhong; Rodgers, Sheila; Melia, Kath M

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports a theoretical understanding of nurses leaving nursing practice by exploring the processes of decision-making by registered nurses in China on exiting clinical care. The loss of nurses through their voluntarily leaving nursing practice has not attracted much attention in China. There is a lack of an effective way to understand and communicate nursing workforce mobility in China and worldwide. This qualitative study draws on the constant comparative method following a grounded theory approach. In-depth interviews with 19 nurses who had left nursing practice were theoretically sampled from one provincial capital city in China during August 2009-March 2010. The core category 'Mismatching Expectations: Individual vs. Organizational' emerged from leavers' accounts of their leaving. By illuminating the interrelationship between the core category and the main category 'Individual Perception of Power,' four nursing behaviour patterns were identified: (1) Voluntary leaving; (2) Passive staying; (3) Adaptive staying and (4) Active staying.

  17. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  18. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparison of the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses: implications for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Yang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2016-11-01

    To compare the respective views of nursing students and registered nurses on caring behaviours. Research has indicated that nursing includes not only technical skills and professional knowledge but also the expression of care. In addition to nursing care, nurses demonstrate the acts of supporting, negotiating, reinforcing and transforming. However, little research simultaneously investigates the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 657 subjects participated in this study. The research tool was a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, t-test and chi-square test. The results showed that the most important caring behaviour is 'knowing the patient', while the least is 'advocating for the patient', which includes caring behaviours to respect the patient's and family's best interests, and voicing for them, possibly because this behaviour is more difficult for nurses to practice in the Taiwanese culture. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the caring behaviours between nursing students and registered nurses. However, age was found to be a significant difference in the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. Caring behaviour is essential in clinical practice. Based on the results, this study suggested that role models should be provided to nursing students to develop proper caring behaviours. Nursing faculty can boost nursing students' interests in learning caring behaviours by incorporating diverse teaching strategies to enhance the effectiveness of caring behaviours. Much attention should be focused on education about awareness of caring behaviour for both nursing students and nursing staff. This study addressed that nursing administrators and faculty members should emphasise the importance of the essence of caring. Consequently, nursing curricula and training of nurses need to be

  20. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  1. Nursing education and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild Stølen, Karen Marie

    Background: Learning professional skills in the clinic is central to the acquisition of professional competences for future nurses. There are no clear vision of how learning takes place in the clinic and the question is how education in the clinic may lead to the professional skills that enable...... future nurses to take care for patients. Design and setting: The project Learning in Practice was accomplished from 2011 to early 2013, in collaboration between educations of nursing and educational theory educations at UCC North Zealand. The results in this paper is related to the examination...... of the nurse education only. The examination is based on four non-participating observations, four participating observations and three focus group interviews, respectively, four students, four clinical supervisors and four teachers . The clinical context was local hospitals. The data were analyzed...

  2. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  3. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  4. On becoming a Nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Lars

    , ph.d. cand.cur., RN, both Research Unit of Nursing, Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark; Adjunct, ph.d., cand.mag. Nina Bonnerup Dohn, Institute for Language, Communication and Information Sciences, University of Southern Denmark; Professor, ph.......d., mag.art. Steen Wackerhausen, Department of Philosophy , Institute of Philosophy and History of Ideas, University of Aarhus   Institute: Institute of Clinical Research   Research Unit: Research Unit of Nursing   Aim The aim of the Study is to gain insight into the experiences of final year nursing...... students transitioning into their new roles as Registered Nurses, and how their interactions with other health personnel affect their experiences.   Background It is important to gain more knowledge about what characterizes this transition in order to better understand and counteract the current decline...

  5. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  6. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The term "clinical ladder" refers to a "grading structure which facilitates career progression and associated differentiation of ... 20-1589538 Copyright © 2006 - 2014 International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS). No materials, including graphics, may be reused, ...

  7. Nursing and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care.

  8. Emergency Nurses Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases Opioid Crisis Behavioral Health Infection Control Human Trafficking Membership Join Renew Membership Options Member Benefits Get ... to Train Emergency Nurses to Help Victims of Human Trafficking! MISSION ZERO Act for ZERO Preventable Deaths Support ...

  9. The drama of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient.

  10. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  11. Nurse-patient communication barriers in Iranian nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosheh, M; Zarkhah, S; Faghihzadeh, S; Vaismoradi, M

    2009-06-01

    Providing effective communication with patients is an essential aspect of nursing care. Understanding the barriers that inhibit nurse-patient communication can provide an opportunity to eliminate them. To investigate nurse-patient and environment-related communication barriers perceived by patients and nurses in Iranian nursing. A descriptive survey was carried out in three randomly selected educational hospitals in a large urban city in Iran. Data were collected by questionnaire; the study sample consisted of 61 patients and 75 nurses. Participants were asked to rate the importance of each communication barriers item. Finally, data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and to compare the perceived importance of communication barriers between patients and nurses, item means were calculated and the t-test for independent samples was applied. Similarities and differences between the two groups were identified. According to nurses' views, 'heavy nursing workload', 'hard nursing tasks' and 'lack of welfare facilities for nurses' were the main communication barriers. From patients' views, 'unfamiliarity of nurses with dialect', 'having contagious diseases' and 'sex differences between nurses and patients' were determined as the main communication barriers. The shared communication barriers were 'age difference', 'social class difference' and 'having contagious diseases'. It can be concluded that nursing managers and healthcare system planners should focus on eliminating or modifying the barriers stated by the two groups, particularly the shared ones. It is suggested that understanding the cultural aspects of nurse-patient communication barriers in various contexts can help nurses. The study relied on self-report by a limited sample of nurses and patients. The responses should now be tested by a larger sample and then by empirical research into actual practice in order to test whether the nurses' and patients' perceived ideas of communication barriers are

  12. Nursing Telehealth Applications Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    explore all the possibilities of furnishing the new lab to create optimal usage of the setting (operating room, emergency room, trauma, ICU /CCU, NICU...2004). High Fidelity Simulation-Based Training in Neonatal Nursing. Advances in Neonatal Care, 4, 326-331. The Impact of Mannequin Simulator...Training in Neonatal Nursing. Advances in Neonatal Care, 4, 326-331. Simulation Study # 2 Radiography Simulation Learning Protocol Background

  13. [Nursing care in prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Nurses and burnout syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarema Obradović

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The work of nurses is human. They help people in protection against diseases. Nurses are the largest group of health workers and all problems that appear in the health system are first recognized among them. Burnout syndrome appears among nurses very frequently. We present the leading factors for burnout among nurses in RMC „Dr Safet Mujic“ in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: It is a cross sectional descriptive study. We used an anonymous questionnaire with 20 questions. Our sample was random with 30% of all nurses which were working in this Medical Center in January-February 2012.Results: In our study 77.9% nurses work in the hospital. 52% have over 16 years of work experience. 34.6% of examinees are satisfi ed with interpersonal relationships, 31.7 % are satisfi ed with relationships with the superior. Motivation for work have 51% of examinees, a big number comes unwilling on work.For 83.7% overtime work is the reason for dissatisfaction 71.2% examinees think that they can't make progress on work. A high percentage of examinees doesn't think about problems related to work outside working hours, a good sleep have 38.5% and 56.7% wakes up tired. Many of examinees are not satisfiedwith workplace, and 58.7% would like to change it.Conclusion: Nurses employed in RMC „Dr Safet Mujic“ Mostar are exposed to many factors during work which can cause the burnout syndrome. It is necessary to expand the study on a larger group of nurses and to implement the measures for reducing risks of burnout syndrome.

  15. The future of nursing: understanding who nurses are.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, David A

    2013-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health highlights the need for more information about the nursing workforce. Without attention to the problem, OR nursing is likely to continue to experience the nursing shortage more acutely than other practice areas. By changing how they acquire and use nursing data, and by advocating for improved exchange of data between federal and state governments and nursing schools, facilities can be better prepared for future workforce challenges. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  17. Why history matters to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Annie

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes that poor knowledge and understanding of the history of nursing particularly in the UK influences the media and public analysis of nursing practice. Comparing reports of current poor practice with a 'golden age' of nursing in the past undermines public confidence in today's nursing and nurse education and has the potential to lead to simplistic and flawed policy decisions in response. The lack of detailed knowledge of past nursing practice, experience and values suggests the need for more historical research in this field. A greater critical understanding of nursing history could strengthen and enrich nursing identity and further develop critical thinking skills in nursing students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nurses' creativity: advantage or disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari Isfahani, Sara; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-02-01

    Recently, global nursing experts have been aggressively encouraging nurses to pursue creativity and innovation in nursing to improve nursing outcomes. Nurses' creativity plays a significant role in health and well-being. In most health systems across the world, nurses provide up to 80% of the primary health care; therefore, they are critically positioned to provide creative solutions for current and future global health challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian nurses' perceptions and experiences toward the expression of creativity in clinical settings and the outcomes of their creativity for health care organizations. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews with 14 nurses who were involved in the creative process in educational hospitals affiliated to Jahrom and Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Four themes emerged from the data analysis, including a) Improvement in quality of patient care, b) Improvement in nurses' quality of work, personal and social life, c) Promotion of organization, and d) Unpleasant outcomes. The findings indicated that nurses' creativity in health care organizations can lead to major changes of nursing practice, improvement of care and organizational performance. Therefore, policymakers, nurse educators, nursing and hospital managers should provide a nurturing environment that is conducive to creative thinking, giving the nurses opportunity for flexibility, creativity, support for change, and risk taking.

  19. Psychodynamic treatment of depressed adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemporad, J R

    1988-09-01

    Depression may be conceptualized as the response to the loss of meaning or satisfaction sufficient to affect the individual's optimal view of the self. At each stage of the life cycle, the failure to achieve developmental tasks threatens the concept of the self, producing a phase-specific vulnerability to depression. Adolescence presents particular stresses by forcing the youngster to relinquish the relative familiarity and security of a childhood psychosocial role and create a sense of self independent of family, without childhood denial mechanisms, and of value to a new peer culture. Most individuals experience a sense of loss, confusion, apprehension, and dysphoria during this difficult period of transition. Many who seek psychotherapy require only a secure holding environment that will support their self-esteem as they create new avenues of worth and satisfaction. A few, however, are so hampered by psychosocial limitations that they cannot master this developmental passage without more extensive therapeutic assistance.

  20. Psychodynamic Perspective of Organizational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabasz Adela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complex processes and phenomena that are taking place in the contemporary world require new and adequate methods of acting also in the area of management. This means the need for a fresh approach to the process of organization development and change. This paper presents the key concepts stemming from the psychoanalytic approach to organization and management. Its main aim is to discuss the major categories (concepts derived from psychoanalytic theories, which pertain to the issues related to organizational change. Theoretical considerations are complemented by presentation of the data collected during interviews with managers from the examined organization and identification of the defence mechanisms of representatives of the organization’s management.

  1. Nursing as concrete philosophy, Part I: Risjord on nursing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, Kyriakos

    2018-04-01

    This essay addresses the problem of the essentiality of nursing knowledge and what kind of theory, if any, is essential to nursing practice. The overarching aim of the essay was to argue for the thesis that nursing may be described as a kind of philosophical activity, and, consequently, that philosophy is the kind of "theory" that is essential to nursing practice and to the nursing discipline at large. The essay consists of two papers. The present paper, Part I, is a critical examination of Mark Risjord's discussion of the problem of the theory-practice gap in his Nursing Knowledge: Practice, Science, Philosophy, from 2010. According to Risjord, the cause of the theory-practice gap originates in an erroneous conception of science (logical positivism) which had a decisive influence upon the way nursing scholars appropriated theoretical frameworks for the nursing discipline. This philosophical influence is considered in effect to have generated the theory-practice gap. In order to bridge the gap, Risjord suggests, the nursing discipline needs to adopt a standpoint epistemology conjoined with a postpositivist conception of scientific theory. In this way, a legitimate brand of nursing science may be developed and the theory-practice gap overcome. I will argue that neither Risjord's diagnosis of the problem, nor his recommended cure, may succeed in rescuing the nursing discipline from the theory-practice gap. Rather, the real cause of the theory-practice gap, I will claim, derives from an erroneous conception of nursing (not of science), namely the conception of nursing as a kind of science (roughly speaking). On my view, to overcome the gap, the nursing discipline needs to make salient the inherently philosophical character of nursing. In the second paper (Part II), I will continue the discussion of nursing knowledge and delineate the thesis of nursing as a kind of concrete philosophy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Assessing Nursing Students’ Need to Improve Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sharif

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Undergraduate education presents a period of transition and growth and requires the ability to adapt to many life changes. Many applicants admitted to a nursing program, but high rates of attrition have been experienced. This study is an attempt to assess the nursing students’ need on their nursing education.Methods: Focus groups were used to investigate nursing student’s perceptions and views on nursing education. The sample consisted of 120 nursing students selected randomly. They were arranged in 12 groups of 10 students. The data analysis of recorded and observed data reached five major themes.Results: Five major themes emerged from data. The quality of clinical nursing instruction, confidence development in nursing practice and training, Iranian social perception of nursing profession, professional socialization through role development and improved clinical expectation and improved study skills.Conclusion: The result of this study helped to identify nursing students’ perception and determined their educational needs.Key words: NURSING EDUCATION, CLINICAL NURSING, NURSING PROFESSION, SOCIAL PERCEPTION

  3. Inactive nurses: a source for alleviating the nursing shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kimberly A; Stotts, R Craig; Jacob, Susan R; Stegbauer, Cheryl C; Roussel, Linda; Carter, Donna

    2006-04-01

    This study seeks to provide an understanding of why inactive registered nurses chose to become inactive and what they would require for them to return to nursing. In 2000, a shortage of 110,000 (6%) registered nurses existed in the United States. If the current trends continue, the shortage is projected to grow to 29% by 2020. One solution to the nursing shortage may be attracting nurses with inactive licenses back into employment. This study used a quantitative, cross-sectional survey design. Data analysis included descriptive and inferential statistics. Inactive nurses (N = 428) younger than 60 years in 1 Southern state were surveyed. A major portion (27.6%) of these nurses left nursing because of a conflict between parenting duties and scheduling requirements (13.5%) at work and indicated that they would return to nursing if given the opportunity to work part-time, especially if shifts were flexible and shorter. Although the group of registered nurses younger than 60 years do not constitute a large percentage of nurses in this country, they are a potential source of alleviating, to some extent, the critical nursing shortage. Employers can encourage many of these nurses to return to work by providing more flexible work schedules, including part-time and shorter shifts, as well as decreased workloads.

  4. Student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, S L; Raj, L; Prater, L S; Putturaj, M

    2014-09-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India. Increasingly nursing students in India are opting to migrate to practise nursing abroad upon graduation. Perceptions and attitudes about nursing are shaped during student experiences. The purpose in conducting this research was to illuminate student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India. This study took place at a hospital-based, private mission non-profit school of nursing in Bengaluru, India. Purposive sampling of nursing students yielded 14 participants. Photovoice, a qualitative participatory action research methodology, was used. Data were collected between August 2013 and January 2014. A strong international collaboration between researchers resulted in qualitative thematic interpretation of photographs, critical group dialogue transcripts, individual journal entries and detailed field notes. Two main themes were identified including the perceived challenges of a hierarchal system and challenges related to limited nursing workforce capacity. Subcategories of a hierarchal system included challenges related to image, safety, salary and balance. Subcategories of limited workforce capacity were migration, work overload, physical demand, incongruence between theory and practice, and knowledge. Nursing as a profession in India is still in its infancy when measured against standard criteria. Change in health policy is needed to improve salary, safety for nurses, and nurse to patient ratios to address hierarchal and workforce capacity challenges in India. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Nuclear treasure island [superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Soon after the experiments at Dubna, which synthesized element 114 and made the first footprints on the beach of the "island of nuclear stability", two new superheavy elements have been discovered at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Element 118 and its immediate decay product, element 116, were manufactured at Berkeley's 88 inch cyclotron by fusing targets of lead-208 with an intense beam of 449 MeV krypton-86 ions. Although both new nuclei almost instantly decay into lighter ones, the decay sequence is consistent with theories that have long predicted the island of stability for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184 neutrons. Theorist Robert Smolanczuk, visiting from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Poland, had calculated that this reaction should have particularly favourable production rates. Now that this route has been signposted, similar reactions could be possible: new elements and isotopes, tests of nuclear stability and mass models, and a new under...

  6. EDITORIAL THE TREASURE CALLED ANTIBIOTICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to the beginning of the 20th Century, infectious diseases accounted for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. The average life expectancy at birth was. 47 years (46 and 48 years for men and women respectively) even in the industrialized world. Infectious diseases such as smallpox, cholera, diphtheria, pneumonia ...

  7. A Framework for Advanced Practice Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sarah Jo

    1998-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing is defined as professional health care focused on clinical services, using a nursing orientation and based on competencies from graduate nursing education. AP nurses are involved in clinical practice, systems management, and health care discourse. (SK)

  8. The bath: a nursing ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Z R

    1993-06-01

    This article examines the bath as a nursing ritual, using examples from the literature from the 1880s to the present time. Selections from nursing periodicals and other literature are used to support the connections between past and present nursing practices in relation to bathing and hygienic care. The bath represents part of the essential character of nursing and is rooted in the beliefs, art, and science of the profession. It is a channel for many other nursing activities and responses, and as such, occupies a necessary part of nursing's repertoire and identity.

  9. Furthering caring through nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D van der Wal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The nursing students’ main quest is for self actualization by attributing meaning to life through caring. To assist student nurses in this quest, the nurse educator needs to plan educational interventions according to an anthropological model that posits care and caring as innate human attributes. Further, the structural essence of what professional nursing caring entails should also be posited as a point of departure for curriculum planning. The author proposes such models. The main implications include that the nursing curriculum must increasingly attend to the emotional needs of nursing students. Curricular content and teaching strategies toward this goal are suggested.

  10. Social responsibility of nursing: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Nicholas, Patrice K; Corless, Inge B; Barry, Donna M; Hoyt, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Davis, Sheila M

    2009-05-01

    This study addresses social responsibility in the discipline of nursing and implications for global health. The concept of social responsibility is explicated and its relevance for nursing is examined, grounded in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics. Social justice, human rights, nurse migration, and approaches to nursing education are discussed within the framework of nursing's social responsibility. Strategies for addressing nursing workforce issues and education within a framework of social responsibility are explored.

  11. Characteristics that perinatal nurse managers desire in new nurse hires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Emily; Hensel, Desiree

    2012-04-01

    Nursing leaders have proposed that nurses must have the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies to work in complex health care systems. Using the QSEN framework, this study explored what characteristics perinatal nurse managers desired most in new nurses. This study used a survey design and a convenience sample of perinatal nurse managers working in Indiana hospitals (N = 46). Managers were more likely to hire nurses with experience, positive references, and excellent attendance. Of the QSEN competencies, managers looked most for teamwork and collaboration, followed by safety and patient-centered care. In addition to the traditional qualities desired in new nurses, the QSEN competencies are gaining importance among perinatal managers. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda. Patricia Moreland, Isabelle Soule, Linda Vanhook, Linda Baxter, Claire McKinley Yoder, Michael V Relf ...

  13. Rewards in Nursing: The Case of Nurse Preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Ellie

    1983-01-01

    Using nursing preceptorship programs as an example, the author illustrates how nursing administrators can develop and implement specific reward mechanisms that increase role satisfaction for preceptors and benefit both the service and the institution. (Author/SK)

  14. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Nursing Administrator Recognition of Practical Ability in Acute Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    岩田, 浩子

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify nursing administrator recognition of proficiency in acute stage nursing. Method: Semi-structured interviews were used for this study. The participants of the study were 7 nursing administrators in the surgical wards of 3 general hospitals. Results: Identified were the following ten recognition categories: "consciousness of profession," "assessment ability," "fundamental practical ability at acute stage," "promptness and professional assessment ability," "nursing practice i...

  16. General and professional values of student nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Karosas, Laima; Kaseliene, Snieguole

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and compare the self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators in Lithuania. Contemporary nursing requires strong moral motivation and clear values as nurses confront many ethical dilemas in their practice. Students acquire essential values of the nursing profession through the appropriate role modelling of their educators. Nursing students seek to become capable in providing ethical and professional patient care while their educators attempt to model desired behaviours. A national cross-sectional comparative study was carried out in March 2011. Four-hundred eight respondents participated: 316 undergraduate nursing students and 92 nurse educators. A 57-item questionnaire was delivered to nursing programs at three universities and six colleges. Permission to conduct the study was granted by The Center on Bioethics. Student nurses and their educators rated the general value of altruism equally. Educators, in comparison with students, ranked honesty and intellectualism significantly higher and more often admired truth-telling in any circumstance. Students were more likely to avoid intellectual challenges in reading and placed lower importance on academic qualifications for career advancement. The professional nursing values of honesty, intellectualism and authority were ranked significantly higher by nurse educators than student nurses. The study revealed differences in self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators. The values of nurse educators were not always stronger than those of students. Positive relationships between particular general and professional values in both students and educators confirmed the link between professional and personal values. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The continuing quest for parity: HBCU nursing students' perspectives on nursing and nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Costellia; Talley, Henry; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2016-08-01

    The benefits of a diverse nursing workforce are well-recognized, yet, the attainment of a sustainable, competent and diverse nursing workforce continues to be a global challenge. In this qualitative study, we describe nursing students' perceptions on nursing and nursing education at a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Focus groups were conducted with 16 graduate and undergraduate nursing students. Four themes emerged: communication, lack of resources, support systems and professional socialization. Mentoring and civility were identified as factors important to enhance a diverse workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Concept analysis: nurse-to-nurse lateral violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Jennifer L; White, Ann H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of nurse-to-nurse lateral violence (LV). Published literature--LV among nurses is significant and results in social, psychological, and physical consequences, negative patient and nursing outcomes, and damaged relationships. An extensive review of literature through Health Source, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ProQuest health, and Medical Complete was used to determine agreement and disagreement across disciplines and emerging trends. This concept analysis demonstrates that nurse-to-nurse LV is nurse-to-nurse aggression with overtly or covertly directing dissatisfaction toward another. Origins include role issues, oppression, strict hierarchy, disenfranchising work practices, low self-esteem, powerlessness perception, anger, and circuits of power. The result of this analysis provides guidance for further conceptual and empirical research as well as for clinical practice. Organizations must learn how to eliminate antecedents and provide nurses with skills and techniques to eradicate LV to improve the nursing work environment, patient care outcomes, and nurse retention.

  19. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-12-01

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Why do student nurses want to be nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Paula; Perkinton, Louise; Davies, Fiona

    Nursing became an all graduate entry profession in September 2013; this move and the publication of the Francis report have brought the debate around nurse education and nurses' capacity to care into sharper focus. There is much debate over what makes a good nurse and whether graduate nurses lack care and compassion. We asked a cohort of pre-registration student nurses on the first day of their course about their motivations to join the profession, what being a nurse meant to them and which aspects of nursing they valued most. The demographics of the degree student group were similar to those of diploma students. Reasons cited for entering the profession and views on the nurse's role showed that students' motivations and perceptions focused on nursing as a caring rather than a technical profession. The characteristics of the degree students, their strong motivation to care and perception of nursing in altruistic terms contradict the media image of student nurses as being primarily academically, technically and career driven.

  1. Factors influencing disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2017-10-01

    Emergency nurses are expected to provide required nursing services by using their professional expertise to reduce the risk posed by disasters. Thus, emergency nurses' disaster nursing core competencies are essential for coping with disasters. The purpose of the study reported here was to identify factors influencing the disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses. A survey was conducted among 231 emergency nurses working in 12 hospitals in South Korea. Data were collected on disaster-related experience, attitude, knowledge, and disaster nursing core competencies by means of a questionnaire. In multiple regression analysis, disaster-related experience exerted the strongest influence on disaster nursing core competencies, followed by disaster-related knowledge. The explanatory power of these factors was 25.6%, which was statistically significant (F=12.189, pcompetencies of emergency nurses could be improved through education and training programs that enhance their disaster preparedness. The nursing profession needs to participate actively in the development of disaster nursing education and training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Registered nurses' (RNS) perception of the nursing profession and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background A healthy work environment has tremendous benefits on organizational performance, health service delivery, health worker performance and patient outcome. In 2009, International Council of Nurses (ICN) undertook a global survey which sought for nurses' opinion on the nursing profession and their work ...

  3. Authentication of Nursing 2: Reflective Processes in Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Cox, Helen

    This material has been reproduced and communicated on behalf of Deakin University pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968. It is studymaterials produced for HNN706, Authentication of Nursing 2: Reflective Processes in Nursing, which is one of the units offered by the School of Nursing...

  4. Nursing Information System (NIS): A Tool for Qualitative Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing health care cost, nurse shortages, high patient acuity and the need for more accuracy in care create the need for an effective Nursing Information System. This paper therefore highlights the relevance of NIS in enhancing professional growth and efficiency in nursing practice. It also opens up the anticipated ...

  5. Application of a smartphone nurse call system for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Ting; Liu, Yi-Fang; Fu, Zi-Xuan; Liu, Kuang-Chung; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Lon; Lin, Pi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, a patient presses the nurse call button and alerts the central nursing station. This system cannot reach the primary care nurse directly. The aim of this study was to apply a new smartphone system through the cloud system and information technology that linked a smartphone and a mobile nursing station for nursing care service. A smartphone and mobile nursing station were integrated into a smartphone nurse call system through the cloud and information technology for better nursing care. Waiting time for a patient to contact the most responsible nurse was reduced from 3.8 min to 6 s. The average time for pharmacists to locate the nurse for medication problem was reduced from 4.2 min to 1.8 min by the new system. After implementation of the smartphone nurse call system, patients received a more rapid response. This improved patients' satisfaction and reduced the number of complaints about longer waiting time due to the shortage of nurses.

  6. Changes in Students' Orientations to Nursing during Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhansen, Liisa; Janhonen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    At the beginning and end of their studies, 19 Finnish student nurses were interviewed about their orientations to nursing (caring, nursing expertise, or life-career). Pre-education orientations typically remained the same. Contradictions between theory and practice were revealed. The educational system did not give much support for managing life…

  7. The relationship experiences of professional nurses with nurse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    method described by Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:155). Results revealed that professional nurses experience a breakdown in their relationships with nurse managers and that the professional nurses' expectations relating to the work environment are not being met. The experiences manifested in feelings of anger, pain and ...

  8. Supplementary nurse prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alison; Bradley, Eleanor; Nolan, Peter

    To explore the attitudes of multidisciplinary team members to nurse prescribing and to establish its perceived advantages and disadvantages. Five focus groups were conducted with a range of healthcare professionals in one trust. A total of 46 participants took part in the study A structured schedule was used during each discussion to elicit group members' views on supplementary nurse prescribing. The data were analysed thematically and key themes and concepts were identified. These are summarised under five main headings: what is supplementary prescribing?; why introduce supplementary prescribing?; perceived benefits of supplementary prescribing; concerns about supplementary prescribing; and skills necessary for supplementary prescribing. Analysis of the data suggests that although teams were generally supportive of nurse prescribing they are largely confused about what is being recommended and why. There was concern about how nurse prescribing will be implemented and its potential to disrupt team functioning. A considerable amount of preparation will be required to ensure that nurse prescribers have the organisational and team support to adapt to their new roles.

  9. Sexual harassment in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, I; Bender, M P; Finnis, S J

    1997-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a problem faced by women in the workplace which can lead to adverse psychological consequences as well as impaired work performance. Sexual harassment is about the abuse of power and status rather then merely being about sex per se and has to be viewed in the context of institutionalized male power. Although there is a relative dearth of research, there is increasing evidence that sexual harassment of nurses is common and that it can have adverse effects on nurses physical and psychological health as well as a direct impact on patient care. Nursing, by its very nature of having to care for patients bodily needs, transgresses normal social rules regarding bodily contact. This is exploited by the perpetrator who relies on nurses' caring attitude to be able to harass. A descriptive model of the processes involved in harassment is presented which offers the possibility of being able to intervene at a number of points in the process. Interventions need to be aimed at both individual and organizational levels if there is to be a prospect of reducing a major occupational stressor for nurses.

  10. Nursing and human freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risjord, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Debates over how to conceptualize the nursing role were prominent in the nursing literature during the latter part of the twentieth century. There were, broadly, two schools of thought. Writers like Henderson and Orem used the idea of a self-care deficit to understand the nurse as doing for the patient what he or she could not do alone. Later writers found this paternalistic and emphasized the importance of the patient's free will. This essay uses the ideas of positive and negative freedom to explore the differing conceptions of autonomy which are implicit in this debate. The notion of positive freedom has often been criticized as paternalistic, and the criticisms of self-care in the nursing literature echo criticisms from political philosophy. Recent work on relational autonomy and on the relationship between autonomy and identity are used to address these objections. This essay argues for a more nuanced conception of the obligation to support autonomy that includes both positive (freedom to) and negative (freedom from) dimensions. This conception of autonomy provides a moral foundation for conceptualizing nursing in something like Henderson's terms: as involving the duty to expand the patient's capacities. The essay concludes by generalizing the lesson. Respect for autonomy on the part of any health care provider requires both respect for the patient's choices and a commitment to expand the patient's ability to actualize their choices. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Occupational stressors in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nikpeyma

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsNursing provides a wide range of potential workplace stressors as it is  a profession that requires a high level of skill, teamworking in a variety of situations and provision  of 24-hour delivery of care .Occupational stress is a major factor of Staff sickness an  absenteeism.This study investigates the main occupational stressors in nursing profession in the  hope of identification and reducing it.MethodsIn this study a questionnaire consisting of three parts:demoghraphic data,the nurses  background and questions about occupational stress from Revised index fulfilled by 140 nurses.ResultsLack of reward for work well done(48/6%, Heavy workload(46/4% ,lack of Participation in decisions (39/3% , poor Control of work place(38/4%and lack of job  development (36/4% have been the main sources of Occupational stress for nurses.chronic  diseases, Night Shift working and working hours were positively associated with occupstional  stress.Conclusion Analysis indicated that effects of work factors on occupational stress are more than demoghraphic data. The findings of this study can assist health service organisations to provide an attractive working climate in order to decrease side effects and consequences of occupational stress. Furthermore, understanding this situation can help to develop coping strategies in order to reduce work-related stress.

  12. National Institute of Nursing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Resources Precision Medicine at NINR Research Highlights Data Science and Nursing Research Spotlight on End-of-Life ... Management Resources Precision Medicine at NINR Research Highlights Data Science and Nursing Research Spotlight on End-of-Life ...

  13. Nurses' perceptions of patient rounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Kathleen; Lake, Kristen; LeMunyon, Danielle; Paul, Darilyn; Whitmore, Karen

    2012-02-01

    This descriptive pilot study explored hospital staff nurses' perceptions toward the practice of patient rounding. Rounding has re-emerged as a standard practice initiative among nurses in hospitals and has been associated with a decrease in call lights and falls, increased patient satisfaction and safety, and quieter nursing units. Regardless of these outcomes, controversy exists among nurses regarding rounding. The Nurses' Perception of Patient Rounding Scale (K. Neville, unpublished manuscript, 2010) was developed to gain an understanding of nurses' perceptions of rounding. Nurses identified rounding as valuable and perceived hourly rounding to be beneficial to patients and families but significantly less beneficial to their own professional practice. Challenges to rounding as a practice include issues of documentation, patient ratios, and skill mix. Findings support the need for further research to address the challenges of patient rounding for nursing.

  14. Again, What Is Nursing Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Elizabeth Ann Manhart

    2017-04-01

    This article again asks, What is nursing science? Who knows? Who cares? The author describes the threat to the survival of nursing science grounded in nursing frameworks and theories. This threat is magnified by the proposal of the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science (CANS) to change the curricula of PhD education. The aim of CANS is to prepare nurse scientists for lifelong competitive careers in interdisciplinary research, often focused on funding priorities of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). Curricula would include preparation for conducting research in topics such as omics, e-science, translation science, biobehavioral science, symptom science, and team science. How can this be nursing science? It is argued that this focus might obliterate nursing's discipline-specific phenomenon of concern, the human-universe-health process.

  15. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  16. [Prevention levels in occupational nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Maria Jacyra de Campos

    1982-12-01

    The autor, based in nursing functions concepts of HENDERSON and of HORTA, and in the prevention levels of LEAVELL & CLARK, write about the of the occupational health nursing personnel in Brasil and describes their actions and activities.

  17. The Importance of Nursing Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tingen, Martha S.; Burnett, Anna H.; Murchison, Rachel B.; Zhu, Haidong

    2009-01-01

    Nursing research has a tremendous influence on current and future professional nursing practice, thus rendering it an essential component of the educational process. This article chronicles the learning experiences of two undergraduate nursing students who were provided with the opportunity to become team members in a study funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research. The application process, the various learning opportunities and responsibilities performed by the students, and the b...

  18. Advocacy in perioperative nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, K

    2000-06-01

    Advocacy describes the act of pleading for, supporting, and active espousal. It implies taking action to achieve a goal on behalf of oneself or another. In nursing, the patient's wishes often serve as the impetus for advocacy. Perioperative nurses function as advocates and accept responsibility to safe-guard the rights of surgical patients. This article describes historical aspects of and conceptual problems in nursing advocacy, and it presents case studies that demonstrate advocacy by the perioperative nurse.

  19. Future directions for nursing administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, M A

    1984-03-01

    As the age of centralization wanes, nurse executives must look ahead. The author, noting a terrain obscured by the increasing complexity of nursing practice, points out the advantages of decentralizing decision making and of providing a distinctive nursing stamp to research and administration theory. Nurse executives, trained in management from early in their professional formation, can provide enlightened direction and flexible support for tomorrow's opportunities.

  20. The ethical enterprise of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmark, P

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the ethical nature of nursing. Examples are taken from coronary care units. A critical view is taken whereby it is felt that nursing models do not truly reflect this nature. It is suggested that nurses make most ethical decisions without dilemma using intuition. The traditions behind using this intuition are examined. Such normative traditions may be summarized as teleological, deontological and axiological. Lastly, it is suggested that nurses would benefit in several ways from some education in ethics.

  1. Marketing in nursing organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of chapter 3 is to provide a conceptual framework for understanding marketing. Although it is often considered to be, marketing is not really a new activity for nursing organizations. What is perhaps new to most nursing organizations is the conduct of marketing activities as a series of interrelated events that are part of a strategic marketing process. The increasingly volatile nursing environment requires a comprehensive approach to marketing. This chapter presents definitions of marketing, the marketing mix, the characteristics of nonprofit marketing, the relationship of strategic planning and strategic marketing, portfolio analysis, and a detailed description of the strategic marketing process. While this chapter focuses on marketing concepts, essential components, and presentation of the strategic marketing process, chapter 4 presents specific methods and techniques for implementing the strategic marketing process.

  2. The Nursing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hammond

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the nursing process can be summed up in this quotation by Sir Francis Bacon: “Human knowledge and human powers meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced.” Arriving at a concise, accurate definition of the nursing process was, for me, an impossible task. It is altogether too vast and too personal a topic to contract down into a niftylooking, we-pay-lip-service-to-it cliché. So what I propose to do is to present my understanding of the nursing process throughout this essay, and then to leave the reader with some overall, general impression of what it all entails.

  3. Drawing in nursing PBL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-08-01

    The implementation of art education in nursing is said to have positive effects on nursing students. Most studies applied visual art dialogues or object design, whereas the effectiveness of drawing as a teaching and learning method is rarely examined and discussed. This paper aimed to discuss the potential and effectiveness of drawing as a learning and teaching method. Four drawings which were created by Hong Kong nursing students are demonstrated and the students' perspectives of how drawing enhanced learning are shown in this paper. Topics on drawing as a fun teaching and learning method and the way it can enhance critical thinking and creativity are also discussed. In conclusion, the activity was a great success, and students enjoyed the learning process and reflected positive comments. However, we cannot conclude that drawing is an effective teaching and learning method based on a single paper, therefore more similar studies should be conducted to investigate this method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... staff. You are also more likely to notice changes in the nursing home staff that could affect quality of care. ... NURSING STATION OFTEN You should stop at the nursing station each time you ... any changes in medications, diet, behavior, sleep or exercise. You ...

  5. Whistleblowers: troublemakers or virtuous nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Vicki D

    2008-10-01

    Whistleblowing is the action taken by a nurse who goes outside the organization for the public's best interest when it is unresponsive to reporting the danger through the organization's proper channels. As a professional, every nurse needs to champion whistleblowing rather than ostracizing nurses with the moral courage to speak out on unethical practices.

  6. Being Human: Transdisciplinarity in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Edgley, Alison; Meal, Andy; Narayanasamy, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Nursing as an academic discipline typically draws on a wide range of other disciplines. There is debate about whether this is a sound basis for the discipline, or whether nursing needs to develop a distinctive body of knowledge. The concept of transdisciplinarity, though little discussed in nursing, is of considerable value in understanding…

  7. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  8. Confronting moral distress in Nursing: recognizing nurses as moral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco A. Carnevale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of moral distress has brought forth a substantively different way of understanding some of the difficulties confronted by nurses in their practice. This concept highlights that nurses' distress can be an indication of nurses' conscientious moral engagement with their professional practice that has confronted practices or an environment that impedes them from acting according to their own ethical standards. Moral distress can be an indicator of problems in nurses' practice environments. This concept is described and related to moral agency in nursing practice. Selected research on moral distress is reviewed, followed by a discussion of recommendations for addressing this problem.

  9. [The nursing shortage and nursing retention strategies in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Huang, Chung-I; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Meei-Shiow

    2013-06-01

    A chronic shortage of working nurses has led hospitals in Taiwan to close wards and reduce bed numbers. Work overload and job stress are major causes of this shortage. The purpose of this study is to propose a solution to improve the nursing workload situation. We reviewed literature articles and conference presentations to synthesize relevant measures, which included reforming the current care model; using innovation to simplify nursing practice; and creating a culture of workplace respect and inter-team cooperation. Based on this, we proposed our nursing retention strategy after reviewing national Department of Health development policies on nursing manpower.

  10. Enhancing cancer nursing education through school of nursing partnerships: the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Carla P; Conner, April L; Mundt, Mary H

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the Cancer Nursing Faculty Fellows Program, an innovative program designed to provide nurse educators with state-of-the-art cancer knowledge to enhance their ability to teach cancer content. The Faculty Fellows Program was developed at the University of Louisville School of Nursing and was part of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve cancer nursing education. This intervention included comprehensive curriculum reviews, conferences with national consultants, cancer-specific faculty seminars, and funded instructional projects. The Faculty Fellows Program consisted of a mentored experience attending the Oncology Nursing Society Congress and a month-long intensive program to provide faculty with exposure to cancer experts, researchers, and clinical and community resources. By providing a forum for nurse educators to obtain this knowledge and provide the resources they need to change the way they educate nursing students, the program can significantly affect cancer-related nursing education and, ultimately, the care of patients with cancer and survivors.

  11. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  13. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  14. The future of Turkish nursing 2050: perceptions of nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodur, G; Kaya, H

    2017-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of nurses and nurse educators regarding the future of nursing by the year 2050 in Turkey. Social changes, rapid population growth, globalization and worldwide environmental problems will cause greater changes in the field of health and health care in the near future than they have in the past. Undoubtedly, these changes will directly affect nursing. It is important that nurses and nurse educators forecast and direct the future and nursing to benefit from the effects of the changes that will occur in the future. A qualitative descriptive study which employed the use of individual in-depth interviews. The study's sample participants were 21 hospital nurses and 16 nurse educators from universities in Istanbul, Turkey. They undertook individual in-depth interviews during July 2013-July 2014. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. The study revealed that the participants' perceptions were based on the ideas that the future of nursing will be shaped in accordance with changes in humanity, environment and healthcare system, as well as worldwide future trends. Results indicated that participants were aware of the factors that will affect future of nursing and nursing education. Research showed that participants had focused on the near future; they were not forecasting distance future. Also research found that not only future scenarios are needed for nurses, but also three kinds of scenarios are required related to factor such as humanity, environment and healthcare system those effect nurses. Futurists, health policymakers and nurse educators should work collaboratively with each other. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hee Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%, nosocomial infections (51.7%, pressure sores (42.6% and medication errors (33.3%. Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events.

  16. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  17. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative.

  18. Nursing practice. Developing a philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, C

    1989-01-01

    The application of nursing models has been a recent theme in British nursing. Part of this process is the development of a nursing philosophy which underpins the model. Nurses at clinical level are often required to define their philosophy to meet clinical, educational and managerial objectives. The first part of this two-part article explores the significance of nursing philosophy to practice. In the second part, a case study is used to illustrate how clinical nurses can set about defining a philosophy of nursing for themselves. Dickoff et al (1) indicate that a philosophy is significant in the generation of theory. By identifying the nature of practice, theoretical relationships become apparent. It is also significant as Johnson (2) states in nursing's development as a profession. Johnson further asserts that nurses should use their beliefs to build a conceptual system of the person to be served and an abstract model for practice which allows such purpose to be fulfilled. However a nurse's beliefs and values about nursing may have no theoretical substance to them. They may be purely intuitive in nature. Writing a philosophy legitimates intuition. Kitson (3) considers that nurse theorists who believe that only developing a knowledge base through a scientific approach are at risk of throwing away the intuitive sources of knowledge within nursing. Yet gut reactions have been shown to be critical in the development of excellence in nursing (4). Kitson believes that intuitions can lead to developing 'grassroots standards of care' and a clearer definition of what nursing is.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarre, L.; Vanderwee, K.; Defloor, T.; Verhaeghe, S.; Schoonhoven, L.; Beeckman, D.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: There is a

  20. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…