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Sample records for psychodynamic group therapy

  1. Predictors of non-responding in short-term psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Selection for psychotherapy may be improved by identifying predictors of non-responding to treatment, but there are only few studies of non-responding in short-term psychodynamic group therapy. We analyzed potential socio-demographic and clinical predictors in a sample of 239 patients in 39...... to explore before selection of patients to short-term time-limited psychodynamic group therapy....... sessions of psychodynamic group psychotherapy, including self-reported symptoms, personality, and extra-therapeutic events. Non-responding was assessed by the Symptom Check List-90-Revised Global Severity Index (SCL-90-R GSI) according to Jacobson and Truax’s Reliable Change Index. Non...

  2. SCL-90-R Symptom Profiles and Outcome of Short-Term Psychodynamic Group Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik L.; Lotz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Psychodynamic group psychotherapy may not be an optimal treatment for anxiety and agoraphobic symptoms. We explore remission of SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and target symptoms in 39 sessions of psychodynamic group therapy. Methods. SCL-90-R ?target symptom? profile and GSI remission according to Danish norms were identified in 239 patients and evaluated according to reliable and clinical significant change. Results. Four major groups of target symptom cases (depression, i...

  3. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Kristensen, Ellids

    Objectives: A recent meta-analysis also concluded that psychotherapeutic approaches are beneficial for adult with a history of CSA and maintained for at least six months follow-up. The results suggest that different characteristics of therapy moderate the therapeutic outcome. We found in a random...

  4. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A recent meta-analysis also concluded that psychotherapeutic approaches are beneficial for adult with a history of CSA and maintained for at least six months follow-up. The results suggest that different characteristics of therapy moderate the therapeutic outcome. We found in a random...

  5. SCL-90-R Symptom Profiles and Outcome of Short-Term Psychodynamic Group Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background. Psychodynamic group psychotherapy may not be an optimal treatment for anxiety and agoraphobic symptoms. We explore remission of SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI) and target symptoms in 39 sessions of psychodynamic group therapy. Methods. SCL-90-R “target symptom” profile...... to phobic anxiety and anxiety patients, patients with interpersonal sensitivity obtained overall the most optimal outcome. The phobic anxiety scale, social network support, and years of school education were independent predictors of GSI remission, and a low anxiety score and absence of phobic anxiety...... and GSI remission according to Danish norms were identified in 239 patients and evaluated according to reliable and clinical significant change. Results. Four major groups of target symptom cases (depression, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, and phobic anxiety) covered 95.7% of the sample. As opposite...

  6. Does Psychodynamic Environmental Therapy Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul; Hansen, Kim Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first Danish prospective outcome study of psychodynamic environmental therapy of children in residential treatment with early, serious traumatisation and extential relational disturbances. The study delves beneath the surface and explores the extent to which the children...

  7. Interpersonal processes in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive behavioral group therapy: a systematic case study of two groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Foot, Meredith; Leite, Catherine; Maxwell, Hilary; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2011-09-01

    This mixed method systematic case study applied an interpersonal stage model of the therapeutic process to examine interpersonal processes among a highly adherent Group Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) therapist and a highly adherent Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) therapist and their groups of binge eating disordered (BED) patients. This is the first case study to apply the interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy to compare GCBT and GPIP methods and the first to apply the model to group therapy. Early-, middle-, and late-stage transcribed video recordings of sequential interactions among therapists and patients in each of these two time-limited group therapies were analyzed with the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). We also provide qualitative presentations of the transcripts from each stage as context for the quantitative analyses. BED patients in both groups achieved positive outcomes for binge eating and depression. Consistent with their treatment model, the GPIP therapist was more autonomy-giving, whereas the GCBT therapist was more controlling/directive. The GPIP therapist and her group had high levels of interpersonal complementary interaction sequences in the early stage followed by lower complementarity in the middle stage. The GCBT therapist and her group showed a high-low-high pattern of complementarity across the three stage of therapy. However, overall the GPIP group had higher levels complementarity than the GCBT group. This mixed method case study of group processes based on an interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy suggested specific therapist behaviors in each modality to maximize positive therapeutic interactions at each stage of group therapy. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christiane; Haase, Laura; Seidel, Dorothea; Bayerl, Martin; Gallinat, Jürgen; Herrmann, Uwe; Dannecker, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic episodes and justify

  9. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Montag

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic

  10. Short-term intensive psychodynamic group therapy versus cognitive-behavioral group therapy in day treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszek, Hubert; Holas, Paweł; Wyrzykowski, Tomasz; Lorentzen, Steinar; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2015-07-29

    Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group therapies are frequently applied in day hospitals for the treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders in Poland and other Eastern European countries. Yet there is not enough evidence as to their effectiveness in this environment; this study addresses this gap. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of these two kinds of day treatment care consisting of intensive, short-term group psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy, for patients with anxiety disorders and/or comorbid depressive or personality disorders. Our objectives are to: 1) show the effectiveness of each treatment in a day-care setting relative to the wait-list control group; 2) demonstrate the relative short- and long-term effectiveness of the two active treatments; 3) carry out a preliminary examination of the predictors and moderators of treatment response; 4) carry out a preliminary examination of the mediators of therapeutic change; and 5) compare the impact of both methods of treatment on the outcome of the measures used in this study. In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 199 patients with anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive and/or personality disorders will be assigned to one of three conditions: 1) psychodynamic group therapy; 2) cognitive-behavioral group therapy; or 3) wait-list control group. The therapy will last 12 weeks. Both treatments will be manualized (the manuals will address comorbidity). Primary outcome measures will include self-reported symptoms of anxiety, observer-rated symptoms of anxiety, global improvement, and recovery rate. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of pathological personality traits, depression, self-esteem, defense mechanisms, beliefs about self and others, interpersonal problems, object relations, parental bonding, meta-cognition, and quality of life. Measures will be taken at baseline, post-treatment, and at six months following

  11. Teaching psychodynamic therapy to hardworking psychiatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    In practice, the classroom teaching of sequentially developing elements of theory and practice in psychodynamic psychiatry to hardworking residents can founder on residents' frequent absences, on-call pages, late arrivals, and early departures. These obstacles can be partially overcome by focusing narrowly on topics that can be explored within the length of a single lecture. Introduction to dynamic psychiatry can be accomplished in this teaching milieu through application of pedagogical techniques of humor, sharply delineated case material, surprise, group participation, demonstrated immediacy of application, theater, and an avoidance of arcane terminology or nuanced theoretical differences.

  12. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  13. The Psychodynamics of Mindlessness and Dissent in Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Michael B.; Gemmill, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Uses psychodynamic perspective to explore tendency of small groups to regress to group mindlessness, where critical thinking is sluggish and individual differences are suppressed. Discusses dynamics of small group mindlessness and the emergence of dissenter role. Suggests ways of enhancing group mindfulness. (Author/TE)

  14. Comparing Treatment Outcome of Guided Imagery and Music and Psychodynamic Imaginative Trauma Therapy for Women with Complex PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Carola

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether the use of recorded music enhances therapy outcome in psychodynamic trauma therapy for women with Complex PTSD, outcome measures of three groups of patients were compared. One group received 50 hours of outpatient trauma therapy with the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery...... and Music (GIM), another group received 50 hours of outpatient trauma therapy with Psychodynamic Imaginative Trauma Therapy (PITT). The third group was a waiting-list control group of women who had to wait at least nine months for therapy. The participants filled out questionnaires measuring symptoms....... Participants treated with GIM showed significantly better outcome in all measurements than participants treated with PITT. This indicates that the use of music is beneficial for women with Complex PTSD treated with psychodynamic trauma therapy....

  15. A case study of psychodynamic group psychotherapy for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jodi M; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of long-term outpatient psychodynamic group psychotherapy for individuals with bipolar disorder who may have psychiatric comorbidity. The Integrative Outpatient Model (IOM) includes psychoeducation regarding illness, illness management, and exploration of dynamic and interpersonal issues. At one-year follow up, group members had significantly less depressive symptomatology and were less likely to be in a mood episode, compared to controls. There were no between-group differences in manic symptoms or global assessments of functioning. For group-treated patients, the number of days well per week improved significantly; there were no significant improvements in the control group. This pilot study indicates that psychodynamic group psychotherapy is feasible as a component of treatment for bipolar disorder diagnoses. The results suggest benefits on depressive, but not manic symptoms. The 73% retention rate suggests that further study of this treatment is warranted, especially in the cases of patients for whom pharmacotherapy alone is not sufficient.

  16. Psychodynamic therapy for depression in women with infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzweil, Sonya

    2012-01-01

    It has long been known that the rate of depression is high among women with infants and young children. In recent research a psychodynamic therapy group was found to be beneficial for a self-selected, postnatal subgroup of women who were of middle socio-economic status (SES), educated and who met DSM-IV criteria for clinical or subclinical depression. The current study sought to replicate these findings with individual psychodynamic therapy and to compare outcomes for three psychodynamic treatment conditions: individual, group, and combined individual and group. Patients began and left treatment from each of the three psychodynamic therapy conditions on a self-determined basis. Pre- and postintervention DSM-IV Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) were obtained by reliable blind raters. A ten-variable, self-administered postintervention outcome questionnaire provided further data. Women (n = 58) in all three therapeutic conditions showed statistically significant improvement in their pre-to-post GAF and large treatment effects. On the questionnaire, they indicated that they were affected positively by all three conditions. Statistically significant differences among treatment conditions favored the individual treatment. Psychodynamic therapy appears well suited for the population of women in this study, especially when administered on an individual basis. The model employed here emphasized receiving and developing empathic emotional attunement, insight into one's relationships and early experiences, and a process for expressing feelings and resolving problems. Compared to group and combination therapies, the individual treatment may afford the greatest opportunity for receiving and developing these features and, thus, the best outcomes.

  17. Early Intervention for Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychodynamic Therapy in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Simone; Cropp, Carola; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) should be understood as a disorder of development (Streeck-Fischer 2008, 2013) that has its first manifestation in late childhood and adolescence. There are only few treatment studies of adolescents meeting the diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder, although early interventions for these patients are urgently needed (see Chanen & McCutcheon 2013). We examined the effectiveness of an inpatient psychodynamic therapy (PDT). Twenty-eight adolescents fulfilling the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder were treated with psychodynamic therapy. The mean duration of treatment was 29.87 weeks (SD = 15.88). Outcomes were remission rates, GAF, GSI, SDQ, IIP and BPI scores. Assessments were made at admission and after treatment. Pre-post comparisons and comparisons with normative data were conducted. At the end of treatment 39.29% of the patients were remitted. We found significant improvements for the GAF, GSI, SDQ, IIP (all p0.001) and the BPI (p = 0.006). These clinically relevant improvements demonstrate the effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy in adolescents with borderline personality disorder and stress the usefulness of an early intervention for these patients.

  18. The association between retrospective outcome evaluations and pre-post-treatment changes in psychodynamic group-psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the present study of 203 patients in psychodynamic group psychotherapy, we explore associations between patient and therapist global retrospective outcome evaluations (ROE), and pre-post-treatment changes on the Symptom Check List 90 Revised (SCL-90-R) and non-symptomatic focus of therapy. The......, and associated with personality factors or domains not captured by standard questionnaires....

  19. Guidelines for Individual and Group Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Persons Diagnosed with Psychosis and/or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Petrović, Branka Restek; Urlić, Ivan; Grah, Majda; Mayer, Nina; Stijačić, Dubravka; Jendričko, Tihana; Martić-Biočina, Sanja

    2017-09-01

    The hereby presented guidelines for the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy are based on references and research in the field of individual and group therapy and they refer to psychotherapy for patients suffering from the first psychotic episode, schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis, bipolar disorder and paranoid psychosis. The aim was to provide an overview of present literature and to give recommendations based on current knowledge. Clinical experience and research of the outcomes of psychodynamic psychotherapy encourage positioning of such treatments among recommendations for treating various mental disorders, as well as in the field of psychotherapy of patients with psychotic disorders (PD).

  20. Therapist-rated outcomes in a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy for major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Van, H.L.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Cuijpers, P.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dekker, J.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of psychodynamic therapy (PDT) for depression is debated due to a paucity of high-quality studies. We compared short psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy (SPSP) to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in a randomized clinical trial. We used therapist-rated outcomes to examine

  1. Differential efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy for major depression : A study of prescriptive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Smits, N.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Cuijpers, P.; Van, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    Minimal efficacy differences have been found between cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapies for depression, but little is known about patient characteristics that might moderate differential treatment effects. We aimed to generate hypotheses regarding such potential

  2. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Jie; Lin, Hua-Zhen; Chen, Yi-He; Pan, Jia-Lin; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Numerous practice guidelines have recommended cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy as a treatment of choice for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, no recent meta-analysis has examined the effects of brief psychotherapy (which includes both CBT and psychodynamic therapy) for adult depression in PD. We decided to conduct such a systematic review and meta-analysis. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of brief psychotherapy compared with control groups, other support nursing, or pharmacotherapy. The quality of included studies was strictly evaluated. Twelve studies including 766 patients met all inclusion criteria. The result showed that brief psychotherapy could evidently improve the HAMD (p depression in PD patients. But one reason to undermine the validity of findings is high clinical heterogeneity and low methodological quality of the included trials.

  3. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioural therapy versus short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy versus no intervention for patients with hypochondriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per; Birket-Smith, M; Wattar, U

    2011-01-01

    Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim...... of this study was to test CBT for hypochondriasis in a centre that was not involved in its development and compare both CBT and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) to a waiting-list control and to each other. CBT was modified by including mindfulness and group therapy sessions, reducing the therapist...

  4. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: An efficacy and partial effectiveness trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Wijts, P.; Oort, F.J.; Sallaerts, S.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Design: Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted

  5. Patterns of Client Emotion in Helpful Sessions of Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Hannah C.; Barkham, Michael; Stiles, William B.; Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2002-01-01

    Whereas cognitive-behavioral (CB) therapy sessions aim to be instructive and encouraging, psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) sessions aim to be exploratory and may be emotionally painful. Raters rated degree of pleasure and arousal in each sentence of client speech in CB and PI sessions (N=18) that therapists had identified as particularly helpful.…

  6. The Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Outpatient Treatment of Major Depression : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Ellen; Van, Henricus L.; Don, Frank J.; Peen, Jaap; Kool, Simone; Westra, Dieuwertje; Hendriksen, Marielle; Schoevers, Robert A.; Cuijpers, Pim; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Dekker, Jack J. M.

    Objective: The efficacy of psychodynamic therapies for depression remains open to debate because of a paucity of high-quality studies. The authors compared the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy with that of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), hypothesizing nonsignificant differences and the

  7. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy in the outpatient treatment of major depression: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Van Henricus, L.; Don, F.J.; Peen, J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Schoevers, R.; Cuijpers, P.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dekker, J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The efficacy of psychodynamic therapies for depression remains open to debate because of a paucity of high-quality studies. The authors compared the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy with that of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), hypothesizing nonsignificant differences and the

  8. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy in the outpatient treatment of major depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Van, H.L.; Don, F.J.; Peen, J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Schoevers, R.A.; Cuijpers, P.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dekker, J.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of psychodynamic therapies for depression remains open to debate because of a paucity of high-quality studies. The authors compared the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy with that of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), hypothesizing nonsignificant differences and the

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Therapy in Female Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefini, Annette; Salzer, Simone; Reich, Günter; Horn, Hildegard; Winkelmann, Klaus; Bents, Hinrich; Rutz, Ursula; Frost, Ulrike; von Boetticher, Antje; Ruhl, Uwe; Specht, Nicole; Kronmüller, Klaus-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The authors compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) in female adolescents. In this randomized controlled trial, 81 female adolescents with BN or partial BN according to the DSM-IV received a mean of 36.6 sessions of manualized disorder-oriented PDT or CBT. Trained psychologists blinded to treatment condition administered the outcome measures at baseline, during treatment, at the end of treatment, and 12 months after treatment. The primary outcome was the rate of remission, defined as a lack of DSM-IV diagnosis for BN or partial BN at the end of therapy. Several secondary outcome measures were evaluated. The remission rates for CBT and PDT were 33.3% and 31.0%, respectively, with no significant differences between them (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.35-2.28, p = .82). The within-group effect sizes were h = 1.22 for CBT and h = 1.18 for PDT. Significant improvements in all secondary outcome measures were found for both CBT (d = 0.51-0.82) and PDT (d = 0.24-1.10). The improvements remained stable at the 12-month follow-up in both groups. There were small between-group effect sizes for binge eating (d = 0.23) and purging (d = 0.26) in favor of CBT and for eating concern (d = -0.35) in favor of PDT. CBT and PDT were effective in promoting recovery from BN in female adolescents. The rates of remission for both therapies were similar to those in other studies evaluating CBT. This trial identified differences with small effects in binge eating, purging, and eating concern. Clinical trial registration information-Treating Bulimia Nervosa in Female Adolescents With Either Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Psychodynamic Therapy (PDT). http://isrctn.com/; ISRCTN14806095. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Manualized supportive-expressive psychotherapy versus nonmanualized community-delivered psychodynamic therapy for patients with personality disorders: bridging efficacy and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnars, Bo; Barber, Jacques P; Norén, Kristina; Gallop, Robert; Weinryb, Robert M

    2005-10-01

    Time-limited manualized dynamic psychotherapy was compared with community-delivered psychodynamic therapy for outpatients with personality disorders. In a stratified randomized clinical trial, 156 patients with any personality disorder diagnosis were randomly assigned either to 40 sessions of supportive-expressive psychotherapy (N=80) or to community-delivered psychodynamic therapy (N=76). Assessments were made at intake and 1 and 2 years after intake. Patients were recruited consecutively from two community mental health centers (CMHCs), assessed with the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders, and included if they had a diagnosis of any DSM-IV personality disorder. The outcome measures included the presence of a personality disorder diagnosis, personality disorder severity index, level of psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), Global Assessment of Functioning Scale score, and number of therapy sessions. General mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess group and time effects. In both treatment conditions, the global level of functioning improved while there were decreases in the prevalence of patients fulfilling criteria for a personality disorder diagnosis, personality disorder severity, and psychiatric symptoms. There was no difference in effect between treatments. During the follow-up period, patients who received supportive-expressive psychotherapy made significantly fewer visits to the CMHCs than the patients who received community-delivered psychodynamic therapy. Manualized supportive-expressive psychotherapy was as effective as nonmanualized community-delivered psychodynamic therapy conducted by experienced dynamic clinicians.

  11. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  12. The therapeutic alliance in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, P J; Goldfried, M R; Barkham, M

    1997-08-01

    The quality of the therapeutic alliance was compared in sessions of psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapy, and the alliance's relationship to various session impacts was investigated. As part of the Sheffield Psychotherapy Project 2 (D. A. Shapiro, M. Barkham, A. Rees, G. E. Hardy, S. Reynolds, & M. Startup, 1994), 57 clients diagnosed with major depression received 16 sessions of either psychodynamic-interpersonal or cognitive-behavioral therapy. Coders used the Working Alliance Inventory to rate 1 high-impact and 1 low-impact session from each client. Results indicated significantly greater alliance scores for cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions on the whole. Also, for the samples as a whole, high-impact sessions were characterized by higher alliance scores than those for low-impact sessions, and alliance was positively related to therapists' ratings of session depth and smoothness and to clients' ratings of mood.

  13. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment...

  14. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  15. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for social phobia: a treatment manual based on supportive-expressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Beutel, Manfred; Leibing, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Social phobia is a very frequent mental disorder characterized by an early onset, a chronic unremitting course, severe psychosocial impairments and high socioeconomic costs. To date, no manual for the psychodynamic treatment of social phobia exists. After a brief description of the disorder, a manual for a short-term psychodynamic treatment of social phobia is presented. The treatment is based on Luborsky s supportive-expressive (SE) therapy, which is complemented by treatment elements specific to social phobia. The treatment includes the characteristic elements of SE therapy, that is, setting goals, focus on the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) associated with the patient s symptoms, interpretive interventions to enhance insight into the CCRT, and supportive interventions, in particular fostering a helping alliance. In order to tailor the treatment more specifically to social phobia, treatment elements have been added, for example informing the patient about the disorder and the treatment, a specific focus on shame and on unrealistic demands, and encouraging the patient to confront anxiety-producing situations. More directive interventions are included as well, such as specific prescriptions to stop persisting self-devaluations. The treatment manual is presently being used in a large-scale randomized controlled multicenter study comparing short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of social phobia.

  16. Dreams and fantasies in psychodynamic group psychotherapy of psychotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restek-Petrović, Branka; Orešković-Krezler, Nataša; Grah, Majda; Mayer, Nina; Bogović, Anamarija; Mihanović, Mate

    2013-09-01

    Work with dreams in the group analysis represents an important part of the analytical work, with insight into unconscious experiences of the individual dreamer, and his transferrential relations with the therapist, other members of the group, and with the group as a whole. The way dreams are addressed varies from one therapist to another, and in line with that, members of the group have varying frequency of dreams. In groups of psychotic patients dreams are generally rarely discussed and interpreted by the group, with analysis mainly resting on the manifested content. This paper describes a long-term group of psychotic patients which, after sharing the dreams of several members and daydreams of one female patient, their interpretation and reception in the group achieved better cohesion and improved communication and interaction, i.e. created a group matrix. Furthermore, through the content of dreams in the group, traumatic war experiences of several of the group members were opened and discussed, which brought with it recollections of the traumatic life situations of other group members. In expressing a daydream, a female member of the group revealed the background for her behaviour which was earlier interpreted as a negative symptom of the illness.

  17. Therapist interventions using the Psychodynamic Interventions Rating Scale (PIRS) in dynamic therapy, psychoanalysis and CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banon, Elisabeth; Perry, John Christopher; Semeniuk, Trent; Bond, Michael; de Roten, Yves; Hersoug, Anne Grete; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    One requirement for psychotherapy research is an accurate assessment of therapeutic interventions across studies. This study compared frequency and depth of therapist interventions from a dynamic perspective across four studies, conducted in four countries, including three treatment arms of psychodynamic psychotherapy, and one each of psychoanalysis and CBT. All studies used the Psychodynamic Intervention Rating Scales (PIRS) to identify 10 interventions from transcribed whole sessions early and later in treatment. The PIRS adequately categorized all interventions, except in CBT (only 91-93% categorized). As hypothesized, interpretations were present in all dynamic therapies and relatively absent in CBT. Proportions of interpretations increased over time. Defense interpretations were more common than transference interpretations, which were most prevalent in psychoanalysis. Depth of interpretations also increased over time. These data can serve as norms for measuring where on the supportive-interpretive continuum a dynamic treatment lies, as well as identify potentially mutative interventions for further process and outcome study.

  18. [Short-Term Psychodynamic Therapy in Depression - An Evidence-Based Unified Protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Christiane; Schauenburg, Henning; Dinger, Ulrike; Leichsenring, Falk

    2016-01-01

    With a lifetime prevalence of about 17% depression is the most common mental disorder. Psychotherapy is efficacious in the treatment of depression, with no significant differences between different forms of psychotherapies. For psychodynamic therapy (PDT) various models proved to be efficacious in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). As a consequence the evidence for PDT is scattered between different forms or orientations of PDT entailing problems regarding psychotherapy training and the transfer of research into clinical practice. Thus, our aim was to develop a unified protocol for the dynamic treatment of depression that is based on those models of PDT that proved efficacious in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). As a first step we conducted a systematic search of RCTs investigating manualized or manual-based individual psychodynamic therapy for depressive disorders in adults that proved to be efficacious compared to comparison conditions. 11 studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. In a second step we systematically reviewed the studies with regard to the treatment concepts they had applied. 7 highly consistent treatment components could be identified. We conceptualized them in the form of 7 interrelated treatment modules which constitute the unified psychodynamic protocol for depression. The protocol may enhance the empirical status of PDT and facilitate both psychotherapy training as well as the transfer of research to clinical practice. Through the focused use of techniques that proofed efficacious it is expected to bring more benefit to depressed patients and therefore also have a positive impact on the health care system. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Interactions between Obsessional Symptoms and Interpersonal Ambivalences in Psychodynamic Therapy: An Empirical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Shana; Desmet, Mattias; Van Nieuwenhove, Kimberly L. H. D.; Meganck, Reitske; Willemsen, Jochem; Inslegers, Ruth; Feyaerts, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    The classical symptom specificity hypothesis (Blatt, 1974) particularly associates obsessional symptoms to interpersonal behavior directed at autonomy and separation from others. Cross-sectional group research, however, has yielded inconsistent findings on this predicted association, and a previous empirical case study (Cornelis et al., in press; see Chapter 2) documented obsessional pathology to be rooted in profound ambivalences between autonomous and dependent interpersonal dynamics. Therefore, in the present empirical case study, concrete operationalizations of the classical symptom specificity hypothesis are contrasted to alternative hypotheses based on the observed complexities in Chapter 2. Dynamic associations between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal functioning is further explored, aiming at further contribution to theory building (i.e., through suggestions for potential hypothesis-refinement; Stiles, 2009). Similar to the first empirical case study (Chapter 1), Consensual Qualitative Research for Case studies is used to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the longitudinal, clinical interplay between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal dynamics throughout the process of supportive-expressive psychodynamic therapy. In line with findings from Chapter 1, findings reveal close associations between obsessions and interpersonal dynamics, and therapist interventions focusing on interpersonal conflicts are documented as related to interpersonal and symptomatic alterations. Observations predominantly accord to the ambivalence-hypothesis rather than to the classical symptom specificity hypothesis. Yet, meaningful differences are observed in concrete manifestations of interpersonal ambivalences within significant relationships. Findings are again discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations; and limitations and future research indications are addressed. PMID:28649214

  20. Interactions between Obsessional Symptoms and Interpersonal Ambivalences in Psychodynamic Therapy: An Empirical Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Shana; Desmet, Mattias; Van Nieuwenhove, Kimberly L H D; Meganck, Reitske; Willemsen, Jochem; Inslegers, Ruth; Feyaerts, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    The classical symptom specificity hypothesis (Blatt, 1974) particularly associates obsessional symptoms to interpersonal behavior directed at autonomy and separation from others. Cross-sectional group research, however, has yielded inconsistent findings on this predicted association, and a previous empirical case study (Cornelis et al., in press; see Chapter 2) documented obsessional pathology to be rooted in profound ambivalences between autonomous and dependent interpersonal dynamics. Therefore, in the present empirical case study, concrete operationalizations of the classical symptom specificity hypothesis are contrasted to alternative hypotheses based on the observed complexities in Chapter 2. Dynamic associations between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal functioning is further explored, aiming at further contribution to theory building (i.e., through suggestions for potential hypothesis-refinement; Stiles, 2009). Similar to the first empirical case study (Chapter 1), Consensual Qualitative Research for Case studies is used to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the longitudinal, clinical interplay between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal dynamics throughout the process of supportive-expressive psychodynamic therapy. In line with findings from Chapter 1, findings reveal close associations between obsessions and interpersonal dynamics, and therapist interventions focusing on interpersonal conflicts are documented as related to interpersonal and symptomatic alterations. Observations predominantly accord to the ambivalence-hypothesis rather than to the classical symptom specificity hypothesis. Yet, meaningful differences are observed in concrete manifestations of interpersonal ambivalences within significant relationships. Findings are again discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations; and limitations and future research indications are addressed.

  1. Interactions between Obsessional Symptoms and Interpersonal Ambivalences in Psychodynamic Therapy: An Empirical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Cornelis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The classical symptom specificity hypothesis (Blatt, 1974 particularly associates obsessional symptoms to interpersonal behavior directed at autonomy and separation from others. Cross-sectional group research, however, has yielded inconsistent findings on this predicted association, and a previous empirical case study (Cornelis et al., in press; see Chapter 2 documented obsessional pathology to be rooted in profound ambivalences between autonomous and dependent interpersonal dynamics. Therefore, in the present empirical case study, concrete operationalizations of the classical symptom specificity hypothesis are contrasted to alternative hypotheses based on the observed complexities in Chapter 2. Dynamic associations between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal functioning is further explored, aiming at further contribution to theory building (i.e., through suggestions for potential hypothesis-refinement; Stiles, 2009. Similar to the first empirical case study (Chapter 1, Consensual Qualitative Research for Case studies is used to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the longitudinal, clinical interplay between obsessional symptoms and interpersonal dynamics throughout the process of supportive-expressive psychodynamic therapy. In line with findings from Chapter 1, findings reveal close associations between obsessions and interpersonal dynamics, and therapist interventions focusing on interpersonal conflicts are documented as related to interpersonal and symptomatic alterations. Observations predominantly accord to the ambivalence-hypothesis rather than to the classical symptom specificity hypothesis. Yet, meaningful differences are observed in concrete manifestations of interpersonal ambivalences within significant relationships. Findings are again discussed in light of conceptual and methodological considerations; and limitations and future research indications are addressed.

  2. Emotional experience and alliance contribute to therapeutic change in psychodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Hadar; Atzil-Slonim, Dana; Bar-Kalifa, Eran; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Peri, Tuvia

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the therapeutic alliance and clients' contact with emotions during therapy sessions can be effective in reducing their suffering outside of sessions. However, the complex associations among these determinants are not yet clear. Using data collected in therapy on a session-by-session basis, this study explored (a) the temporal associations between emotional experience and the therapeutic alliance; (b) the temporal associations between emotional experience and clients' level of functioning; and (c) the direct and indirect associations among emotional experience, the therapeutic alliance, and functioning. Clients (N = 101) undergoing psychodynamic therapy completed a functioning and distress measure prior to each session, and reported on their emotional experience and perceived alliance strength following each session. Longitudinal multilevel models indicated that higher therapeutic alliance scores at the end of 1 session predicted a greater emotional experience in the next session but that emotional experience did not predict subsequent levels of alliance. The results provided evidence of reciprocal prediction in which a previous emotional experience predicted a subsequent change in functioning and vice versa. Finally, the alliance predicted emotional experience, which, in turn, predicted functioning; hence, alliance strength indirectly predicted clients' level of functioning. Findings indicate that emotional experience and the therapeutic alliance are important determinants of the therapeutic process, which contribute to predict clients' improvement in functioning within psychodynamic treatment. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. THE NONLINEAR TRAJECTORY OF CHANGE IN PLAY PROFILES OF THREE CHILDREN IN PSYCHODYNAMIC PLAY THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Halfon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Even though there is substantial evidence that play based therapies produce significant change, the specific play processes in treatment remain unexamined. For that purpose, processes of change in long-term psychodynamic play therapy are assessed through a repeated systematic assessment of three children’s Play Profiles, which reflect patterns of organization among play variables that contribute to play activity in therapy, indicative of the children’s coping strategies, and an expression of their internal world. The main aims of the study are to investigate the kinds of Play Profiles expressed in treatment, and to test whether there is emergence of new and more adaptive Play Profiles using dynamic systems theory as a methodological framework.Methods and Procedures: Each session from the long-term psychodynamic treatment (mean number of sessions = 55 of three 6 year old good outcome cases presenting with Separation Anxiety were recorded, transcribed and coded using items from the Children's Play Therapy Instrument, created to assess the play activity of children in psychotherapy, generating discrete and measurable units of play activity arranged along a continuum of four play profiles: Adaptive, Inhibited, Impulsive, and Disorganized. The play profiles were clustered through K-means Algorithm, generating 7 discrete states characterizing the course of treatment and the transitions between these states were analyzed by Markov Transition Matrix, Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA and odds ratios comparing the first and second halves of psychotherapy.Results: The Markov Transitions between the states scaled almost perfectly and also showed the ergodicity of the system meaning that the child can reach any state or shift to another one in play. The RQA and odds ratios showed two trends of change, first concerning the decrease in the use of less adaptive strategies, second regarding the reduction of play interruptions.Conclusions: The

  4. The Non-linear Trajectory of Change in Play Profiles of Three Children in Psychodynamic Play Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Halfon; Alev Cavdar; Franco Orsucci; Guenter Karl Schiepek; Silvia Andreassi; Alessandro Giuliani; Giulio de Felice

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Even though there is substantial evidence that play based therapies produce significant change, the specific play processes in treatment remain unexamined. For that purpose, processes of change in long-term psychodynamic play therapy are assessed through a repeated systematic assessment of three children’s “play profiles,” which reflect patterns of organization among play variables that contribute to play activity in therapy, indicative of the children’s coping strategies, and an express...

  5. Therapist interventions and client emotional experiencing in expert psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, S; Goldfried, M R

    1998-08-01

    Eighteen sessions of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and 13 sessions of psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy obtained from experienced clinicians in a naturalistic setting were investigated to determine the various therapeutic interventions associated with high and low emotional experiencing (EXP). Clients receiving reflections and acknowledgments, affiliative and noncontrolling interventions, or interventions highlighting nonspecific client content were associated with maintained high EXP. Lengthier interventions and interventions rated as affiliative but moderately controlling were associated with shifts to low EXP. For clients of CB therapists, questions, interventions rated affiliative but controlling, and highlighting minimal emotional content were also associated with shifts to low EXP. Male therapists were associated with clients who maintained high EXP and female therapists were associated with clients who shifted to low EXP.

  6. Psicoterapia psicodinâmica em grupo para fobia social generalizada Psychodynamic group treatment for generalized social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zippin Knijnik

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a efetividade do tratamento psicodinâmico em grupo de pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: 30 pacientes foram incluídos em um estudo randomizado, simples-cego, comparando Terapia Psicodinâmica de Grupo (TPG com um Grupo de Controle Placebo com Credibilidade (CPC. A TPG foi conduzida em 12 sessões de terapia de orientação psicodinâmica em grupo. Os pacientes do grupo controle receberam um pacote de aulas-discussões e tratamento de apoio por 12 semanas, que foi comparado à TPG. Todos os participantes preencheram a Escala de Liebowitz para Ansiedade Social (LSAS, a Escala Hamilton de Ansiedade (HAM-A e a Escala de Impressão Clínica Global (CGI, na entrevista inicial e na 12ª semana de tratamento. Os dados foram analisados com uma ANOVA de medidas repetidas. Pacientes em vigência de tratamento farmacológico ou psicoterápico foram excluídos. RESULTADOS: Ambos os grupos apresentaram melhora na maioria das medidas. Na LSAS, os pacientes da TPG obtiveram melhora superior aos do grupo controle, ao cabo de 12 semanas (F1,28=4.84, p=0.036. Nas medidas basais dos sujeitos que completaram o estudo, não houve diferença entre os grupos em variáveis demográficas e de desfecho. CONCLUSÃO: Neste estudo, a TPG foi superior ao tratamento placebo com credibilidade no tratamento da fobia social generalizada, em um ensaio clínico randomizado, simples-cego, de 12 semanas.OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of psychodynamic group therapy in patients with generalized social phobia. METHODS: Thirty patients were included in a randomized single-blind clinical trial comparing psychodynamic group treatment (PGT with a credible placebo control group (CPC. PGT was carried out within a 12-session psychodynamically-oriented group psychotherapy. Control patients received a treatment package of lecture-discussion and support group for 12 weeks which was compared to PGT

  7. Therapists' thoughts on therapy: clinicians' perceptions of the therapy processes that distinguish schema, cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boterhoven De Haan, Katrina L; Lee, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Debates continue over shared factors in therapy processes between different theoretical orientations. By seeking the opinions of practicing clinicians, this study aimed to elucidate the similarities and differences between cognitive-behavioural (CBT), psychodynamic (PDT), and schema therapy (ST) approaches. Forty-eight practitioners aligning with one of the three approaches were asked to identify crucial processes in their therapy using a modified online version of the Psychotherapy Process Q-set. Distinct differences between each theoretical orientation with few shared common factors were found. A comparison with ratings from previous studies indicated that CBT therapists have not changed over the last 20 years, whereas PDT therapists have changed and the differences appeared consistent with modern PDT theory. The differences between the therapy approaches were consistent with theories underlying each model. PDT therapists valued a neutral relationship, CBT therapists emphasized a didactic interaction, and therapists form a ST orientation placed a greater emphasis on emotional involvement.

  8. Heterogeneity of treatment changes after psychodynamic therapy within a one year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    compared with the other two groups. Early improving patients were less likely to have participated in short-term groups, and only one third participated in additional treatment compared with more than 69% of the other patients. Severe and socially affected psychiatric patients, and patients with anxiety...... and socio-demographic characteristics. Late improvers, as compared with early improvers, were characterized by anxiety symptoms and lack of network support after controlling for GSI at admission. Similarly, deteriorating patients had longer duration of illness and less favourable social characteristics...... and agoraphobic symptoms may be less optimally treated in short-term time limited psychodynamic groups. There is an obvious need for diversity of treatment offers, better integration of psycho-social treatment components, and long-term open ended treatment....

  9. The Effect of Abuse History on Adolescent Patients with Feeding and Eating Disorders Treated through Psychodynamic Therapy: Comorbidities and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangio, Annamaria M; Rinaldi, Lucio; Monniello, Gianluigi; Sisti, Leuconoe Grazia; de Waure, Chiara; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of our study was to compare the characteristics and comorbidities of patients with eating disorders between those who suffered from a childhood abuse and those who did not. Our second aim was to analyze the differences in the outcome of the psychodynamic therapy between abused and not abused patients. Twenty-six adolescent patients with eating disorders were assessed. Adolescent were evaluated by a single expert psychiatrist by checklists and questionnaires: EDI 3, SCL 90, BIS11, Dissociative Experiences Scale, Global Assessment of Functioning, SCID II, and CTQ-Self control (SF). According to the results of CTQ-SF (cut-off ≥ 8), patients were divided into two groups: those who had experienced a history of abuse and those who had not. They underwent a psychodynamic psychotherapy and were assessed again after 12 months. Eleven patients (42.3%) had a history of abuse according to CTQ score. No significant differences were found in abused and not abused patients in their demographic, clinical, and comorbid characteristics (sex, age, type of eating disorder, comorbid impulse control, personality, and addictive disorders). Abused patients showed a significantly higher score in many scale. The psychotherapeutic intervention in patients with a history of abuse resulted only in a significant decrease in symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) psychoticism dimension (p dimensions, the SCL-90 Global Severity Index, the Eating Disorder Inventory-3 interceptive deficits, and the dissociative experience scale. Regarding the first aim of our study, we proved that history of abuse is not significantly related to patient comorbidities. Regarding our second aim, history of abuse was related to patient improvement only for psychotic symptoms; whereas patients who had not experienced an abuse improved in a variety of symptoms. Thus, abuse history can be considered as a negative prognostic factor for patients with eating disorders undergoing dynamic psychotherapy. However

  10. Clinical holistic medicine: avoiding the Freudian trap of sexual transference and countertransference in psychodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-04-14

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an "idealized father" figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem "Freud's Trap". Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient's internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  11. Transference and counter-transference in systems psychodynamic group process consultation: The consultant’s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cilliers

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored consultants’ experiences of transference and counter-transference when conducting group relations training from the systems psychodynamic stance. A phenomenological research design was used with semistructured interviews conducted on a purposive sample of 13 organisational development consultants in a financial institution. The data was analysed by means of content analysis. The results showed that consultants have varied receptiveness in terms of receiving projections and managing transference. These differences involve triggers, characteristics and systemic valence. The consultants experienced counter- transference on five different cognitive and emotional levels. Distinguishing between personal and group emotions, receiving projections and managing transference, all contribute to the complexity of organisational consulting. Opsomming Hierdie studie het ondersoek ingestel na konsultante se ervarings van oordrag en teen-oordrag tydens groepverhoudingsopleiding vanuit die sistemiese psigodinamiese posisie. ’n Fenomenologiese navorsingsontwerp is gebruik met semi-gestruktureerde onderhoude gevoer met ’n doelgerigte steekproef van 13 organisasie ontwikkelingskonsultante in ’n finansiële instelling. Die data is ontleed deur middel van inhoudsontleding. Die resultate het aangetoon dat konsultante uiteenlopende ontvanklikheid het wat betref die ontvangs van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag. Hierdie verskille behels snellers, kenmerke en sistemiese valensie. Die konsultante het teen-oordrag ervaar op vyf verskillende kognitiewe and emosionele vlakke. Om onderskeid te tref tussen persoonlike en groep-emosies, die ontvang van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag, dra alles by tot die kompleksiteit van konsultering.

  12. Changes in implicit and explicit self-esteem following cognitive and psychodynamic therapy in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Viktoria; Leichsenring, Falk; Strauss, Bernhard Michael; Stangier, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is the first to analyse changes in implicit and explicit self-esteem following cognitive therapy (CT) and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) in social anxiety disorder (SAD). We assessed a sub-sample of patients with SAD (n=27 per treatment group, n=12 waitlist condition) in the course of a randomized controlled trial prior to and following individual treatment or wait assessment with an Implicit Association Test and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Both CT and PDT consisted of 25 sessions. Treatments were effective in enhancing implicit and explicit self-esteem. In CT and PDT, changes in explicit self-esteem were associated with SAD symptom change. No such relationships were found in implicit self-esteem. The results seem to indicate that both CT and PDT are effective in establishing a positive implicit and explicit self-esteem in SAD. The differential relationships of changes in implicit and explicit self-esteem to treatment effects on social phobic symptoms are discussed.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM, salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference. This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  14. Empirically supported methods of short-term psychodynamic therapy in depression - towards an evidence-based unified protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Schauenburg, Henning

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence that psychotherapy is helpful in depressive disorders, with no significant differences between psychotherapies. For psychodynamic therapy (PDT) various models prove to be efficacious. Thus, the evidence for PDT is "scattered" between different forms of PDT, also implying problems in training of psychotherapy and in transferring research to clinical practice. A unified protocol based on empirically-supported methods of PDT in depression may contribute to solve these problems Systematic search for randomized controlled trials fulfilling the following criteria: (a) individual psychodynamic therapy (PDT) of depressive disorders, (b) treatment manuals or manual-like guidelines, (c) PDT proved to be efficacious compared to control conditions, (d) reliable measures for diagnosis and outcome, and (f) adult patients. Fourteen RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. By a systematic review of the applied methods of PDT seven treatment components were identified. A high consistency between components was found. The components were conceptualized in the form of seven interrelated treatment modules. A unified psychodynamic protocol for depression may enhance the empirical status of PDT, facilitate both the training in psychotherapy and the transfer of research to clinical practice and may have an impact on the health care system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: an efficacy and partial effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Susan M; Wijts, Paul; Oort, Frans J; Sallaerts, Steph J M

    2014-05-01

    Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted of up to 36 sessions (average PDT 31.4 and CBT 19.8 sessions). Assessments took place at waitlist: pretest, after 12 and 24 weeks for those who received longer treatment: posttest, 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Changes in the main outcome measure self-reported social anxiety composite, as well as in other psychopathology, social skills, negative social beliefs, public self-consciousness, defense mechanisms, personal goals, independent rater's judgments of SAD and general improvement, and approach behavior during an objective test, were analyzed using multilevel analysis. No improvement occurred during waitlist. Treatments were highly efficacious, with large within-subject effect sizes for social anxiety, but no differences between PDT and CBT on general and treatment-specific measures occurred. Remission rates were over 50% and similar for PDT and CBT. Personality disorders did not influence the effects of PDT or CBT. PDT and CBT are both effective approaches for SAD. Further research is needed on the cost-effectiveness of PDT versus CBT, on different lengths PDT, and on patient preferences and their relationship to outcome of PDT versus CBT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The role of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits in matching patients with major depression to cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkert, Martijn J; Driessen, Ellen; Peen, Jaap; Barber, Jacques P; Bockting, Claudi; Schalkwijk, Frans; Dekker, Jeff; Dekker, Jack J M

    2016-11-15

    Barber and Muenz (1996) reported that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was more effective than interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depressed patients with elevated levels of avoidant personality disorder, while IPT was more effective than CBT in patients with elevated levels of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. These findings may have important clinical implications, but have not yet been replicated. We conducted a study using data from a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of CBT and short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of depression. We found no evidence indicating that avoidant patients may benefit more from CBT compared to short-term psychodynamic supportive therapy (SPSP). Our results indicate that treatment effect does not depend on the level of avoidance, or obsessive-compulsiveness personality disorders further examine the influence of personality disorders on the effectiveness of CBT or psychodynamic therapy in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative study of emotional experiencing in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, S; Goldfried, M R

    1993-10-01

    Despite increased interest in the role of emotion in the process of psychotherapy, we currently lack a valid gauge of its importance in the change process. Significant sessions obtained from 13 experienced psychodynamic-interpersonal and 17 experienced cognitive-behavior therapists were examined to determine the extent of affective exploration and therapists' views of these client states. Results indicate that affective experiencing is present in equivalent amounts in the change sessions of these two orientations. However, therapists' clinical views were dissimilar. Psychodynamic-interpersonal therapists viewed portions containing higher affective experiencing as more critical to the change process, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists viewed lower levels of experiencing as being therapeutically more significant. These findings suggest that, with regard to emotional experiencing, psychodynamic-interpersonal therapists may share common ground with experiential therapists, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists appear to have a unique perspective.

  18. Psychodynamic therapy from the perspective of self-organization. a concept of change and a methodological approach for empirical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Antje; Geyer, Michael; Brähler, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Observations from therapeutic practice and a series of empirical findings, for example, those on discontinuous change in psychotherapeutic processes, suggest modelling the therapeutic process as a self-organizing system with stable and critical instable phases and abrupt transitions. Here, a concept of psychotherapeutic change is presented that applies self-organization theory to psychodynamic principles. The authors explain the observations and considerations that form the basis of the concept and present some connections with existing findings and concepts. On the basis of this model, they generated two hypotheses regarding the co-occurrence of instability and discontinuous change and the degree of synchrony between the therapist and patient. A study design to test these hypotheses was developed and applied to a single case (psychodynamic therapy). After each session, patient and therapist rated their interaction. A measure of instability was calculated across the resulting time series. Sequences of destabilization were observed. On the basis of points of extreme instability, the process was divided into phases. Local instability maxima were accompanied by significant discontinuous change. Destabilization was highly synchronous in therapist and patient ratings. The authors discussed the concept and the methodological procedure. The approach enables the operationalization of crises and to empirically assess the significance of critical phases and developments within the therapeutic relationship. We present a concept of change that applies self-organization theory to psychodynamic therapy. We empirically tested the hypotheses formulated in the concept based on an extract of 125 long-term psychodynamic therapy sessions. We continuously monitored the therapeutic interaction and calculated a measure of the instability of the assessments. We identified several sequences of stable and unstable episodes. Episodes of high instability were accompanied by discontinuous

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Short Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of depression: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driesssen, E.; Van Henricus, L.; Schoevers, R.A.; Cuijpers, P.; van Aalst, G.; Don, F.J.; Hendriksen, M.; Kool, S.; Molenaar, P.J.; Peen, J.; Dekker, J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous research has shown that Short Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy (SPSP) is an effective alternative to pharmacotherapy and combined treatment (SPSP and pharmacotherapy) in the treatment of depressed outpatients. The question remains, however, how Short Psychodynamic

  20. The Non-linear Trajectory of Change in Play Profiles of Three Children in Psychodynamic Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, Sibel; Çavdar, Alev; Orsucci, Franco; Schiepek, Gunter K.; Andreassi, Silvia; Giuliani, Alessandro; de Felice, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Even though there is substantial evidence that play based therapies produce significant change, the specific play processes in treatment remain unexamined. For that purpose, processes of change in long-term psychodynamic play therapy are assessed through a repeated systematic assessment of three children’s “play profiles,” which reflect patterns of organization among play variables that contribute to play activity in therapy, indicative of the children’s coping strategies, and an expression of their internal world. The main aims of the study are to investigate the kinds of play profiles expressed in treatment, and to test whether there is emergence of new and more adaptive play profiles using dynamic systems theory as a methodological framework. Methods and Procedures: Each session from the long-term psychodynamic treatment (mean number of sessions = 55) of three 6-year-old good outcome cases presenting with Separation Anxiety were recorded, transcribed and coded using items from the Children’s Play Therapy Instrument (CPTI), created to assess the play activity of children in psychotherapy, generating discrete and measurable units of play activity arranged along a continuum of four play profiles: “Adaptive,” “Inhibited,” “Impulsive,” and “Disorganized.” The play profiles were clustered through K-means Algorithm, generating seven discrete states characterizing the course of treatment and the transitions between these states were analyzed by Markov Transition Matrix, Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) and odds ratios comparing the first and second halves of psychotherapy. Results: The Markov Transitions between the states scaled almost perfectly and also showed the ergodicity of the system, meaning that the child can reach any state or shift to another one in play. The RQA and odds ratios showed two trends of change, first concerning the decrease in the use of “less adaptive” strategies, second regarding the reduction of play

  1. An investigation on the effectiveness of group psychodynamic psychotherapy on the personality dimensions in divorced and non-divorce woman with low marital satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mehryar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Present study is aimed at investigating the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy on the personality characteristics of divorced and non-divorced women with low marital satisfaction. Materials and Methods: This clinical research conducted in the clients referred to Khane Roshan-e-Doost Psychological Studies Institute. They are evaluated clinically through interviews and questionnaires. So, 45 patients selected and divided in three equal groups of divorced women, non-divorced women (married with low marital satisfaction, and control group. Then, the groups of divorced and non-divorced women with low marital satisfaction participated in 24 sessions of psychodynamic psychotherapy. To collect data, Cattel’s 16-item questionnaire and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire were used. Data analyzed through multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results of this study indicated that training of psychodynamic psychotherapy caused a significant change in personality traits in divorced women and in married women with low marital satisfaction. Only in factor B (intelligent - low intelligence and factor Q1 (conservatism there was no significant difference between experimental and control groups. The results of correlation between personality factors and low marital satisfaction pointed that there is a significant relationship between all factors of personality except the factor of conservatism.  Conclusion: Based on the results, psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective in significant improvement of most of personality traits. Therefore, applying this method can be useful in improving marital personality traits, reducing divorce and maintaining mental health.

  2. The efficacy of a brief supportive psychodynamic therapy in treating anxious-depressive disorder in Daily Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajković, Lovorka; Jevtović, Sasa; Bilić, Vedran; Bras, Marijana; Loncar, Zoran

    2009-03-01

    Study objective is to determine the efficacy of brief supportive psychodynamic therapy in treating anxious-depressive disorder in Daily hospital within the Psychological Medicine Clinic. The study comprised a total of 45 male subjects, in which an admission to the Daily Hospital was indicated. On the occasion of the hospital admission, as well as following the completion of a one month-lasting partial hospitalisation within the Daily Hospital, the subjects had undergone testing using a number of psychological instruments. There weren't established statistically significant differences in clinical presentations of the treated patients. A partial, one month-lasting hospitalisation, did not yield any changes in clinical presentation an anxious-depressive disorder. Due to the fact that this psychotherapeutic method should be applied for quite some time in order to yield results, and is not expected to be effective in a close range, a one-month lasting treatment is definitely not long enough to be effective.

  3. Change in Attachment Dimensions in Women with Binge-Eating Disorder Following Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Hilary; Tasca, Giorgio A; Grenon, Renee; Faye, Megan; Ritchie, Kerri; Bissada, Hany; Balfour, Louise

    2017-01-27

    To examine the role of attachment dimensions, including coherence of mind and reflective functioning, in developing and maintaining binge-eating disorder (BED) and in determining group psychotherapy outcomes for women with BED. We hypothesize that higher pre-treatment attachment dimension scores will predict better treatment outcomes for women with BED and will increase at follow-up. Women with BED attended 16 sessions of group therapy and completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) at pre-treatment. Participants completed outcome measures (i.e., binge-eating frequency and symptoms of depression) at pre-, post-, six months, and 12 months post-treatment. Treatment completers completed the AAI at six months post-treatment. Treatment outcomes improved significantly from pre- to 12 months post-treatment. Greater Reflective Functioning scores at pre-treatment were related to greater decreases in binge eating across the four time points, whereas Coherence of Mind scores were not. For treatment completers, there were significant increases in Reflective Functioning at six months post-treatment, and about a third of treatment completers experienced clinically significant increases in both attachment dimensions at six months post-treatment. Greater reflective functioning at the outset is important for improvements in binge eating in the longer term and group psychotherapy can facilitate change in reflective functioning.

  4. The effect of adding psychodynamic therapy to antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Psychodynamic therapy may be a treatment option for depression, but the effects have only been limitedly assessed in systematic reviews.......Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Psychodynamic therapy may be a treatment option for depression, but the effects have only been limitedly assessed in systematic reviews....

  5. Baseline training in cognitive and psychodynamic psychotherapy during a psychologist training program. Exploring client outcomes in therapies of one or two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennhag, Inga; Armelius, Bengt-Åke

    2012-01-01

    This effectiveness study explored the outcomes of 187 clients seen by 187 students undergoing baseline training in psychotherapy. Clients reduced their symptoms (SCL-90) and increased their positive self-image (SASB introject) during the therapy. Multiple regression analyses showed no differences between the cognitive and the psychodynamic training approaches and no differences between one and two semesters duration of the therapies. However, 2-3% of variance in end states was accounted for by the interaction between the variables, indicating a moderating effect of duration in the two approaches. Outcomes for clients in the cognitive training approach were significantly better with two semesters than with one semester, while there was no such difference in the psychodynamic approach. Consequences for baseline training are discussed.

  6. Group therapy in public mental health services: approaches, patients and group therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, S; Ruud, T

    2014-04-01

    Group therapy is used extensively within public mental health services, but more detailed knowledge is needed. All 25 health authorities in Norway were invited to describe their groups: theory, primary tasks, interventions, structure, patients and therapists. Four hundred twenty-six groups, 296 in community mental health centres and 130 in hospitals, were categorized into nine types, based on theoretical background. Psychodynamic groups were most frequent, followed by cognitive-behavioural, psycho-educative, social skills/coping and art/expressive groups. Weekly sessions of 90 min and treatment duration 12 months was most frequent. Main diagnosis for 2391 patients: depression (517), personality disorder (396), schizophrenia/psychosis (313) and social phobia (249). Patients with depression or personality disorder were mostly in psychodynamic groups, psychosis/bipolar disorder in psycho-educative groups. Cognitive-behavioural groups were used across several diagnoses. Most therapists were nurses, only 50% had a formal training in group therapy. There is a plethora of groups, some based on one theoretical school, while others integrate theory from several 'camps'. Patients with similar diagnosis were offered different group approaches, although some trends existed. More research evidence from regular clinical groups is needed, and clinician-researcher networks should be developed. More group therapists with formal training are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Short-Term Group Therapy for Complicated Grief: The Relationship Between Patients' In-Session Reflection and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealy, David; Sierra-Hernandez, Carlos A; Piper, William E; Joyce, Anthony S; Weideman, Rene; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the nature of patients' work in two types of short-term group psychotherapy. The study sought to investigate the relationship between patients' psychodynamic work versus supportive work in group psychotherapy and treatment outcome at termination and at 6-month follow-up. Psychodynamic work refers to reflection regarding intrapsychic motivations, defenses, and relational patterns, and supportive work refers to practical problem solving. Participants were 110 patients who completed two forms of group therapy for complicated grief: interpretive therapy and supportive therapy. Two types of patients' in-session activity-psychodynamic work and supportive work-were rated by group therapists in both treatments. Pre-post and follow-up outcome domains included general symptoms, grief symptoms, and life dissatisfaction/severity of target objectives. There was no significant difference in the nature of patients' therapeutic work between interpretive and supportive groups. Psychodynamic work was associated with pre-post improvement in grief symptoms. Psychodynamic work was also associated with further improvement in grief symptoms at 6-month follow-up, along with improvement in broader symptom domains. Supportive work was not associated with any pre-post or follow-up benefit. The findings provide evidence that psychodynamic work-focused on the development of insight and self-reflection-in group psychotherapy can contribute to further benefit after the completion of treatment. This finding cut across two approaches to short-term group therapy for complicated grief, suggesting that it may reflect a general curative mechanism of group treatments.

  8. Change in interpersonal problems after cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy versus psychodynamic treatment as usual of inpatients with agoraphobia and Cluster C personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Tore; Hoffart, Asle

    2008-04-01

    The aim was to study whether patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia and co-occurring Cluster C traits would respond differently regarding change in interpersonal problems as part of their personality functioning when receiving two different treatment modalities. Two cohorts of patients were followed through three months' in-patient treatment programs and assessed at follow-up one year after end of treatment. The one cohort comprised 18 patients treated with "treatment as usual" according to psychodynamic principles, the second comprised 24 patients treated in a cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy program. Patients in the cognitive condition showed greater improvement in interpersonal problems than patients in the treatment as usual condition. Although this quasi-experimental study has serious limitations, the results may indicate that agoraphobic patients with Cluster C traits should be treated in cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused programs rather than in psychodynamic treatment as usual programs in order to reduce their level of interpersonal problems.

  9. Agoraphobia With and Without Panic Disorder: A 20-Year Follow-up of Integrated Exposure and Psychodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffart, Asle; Hedley, Liv M; Svanøe, Karol; Langkaas, Tomas Formo; Sexton, Harold

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the 20-year outcome in panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD with AG) and agoraphobia without panic disorder (AG without PD) patients after inpatient psychological treatment. Of 53 eligible patients having completed a medication-free integrated exposure and psychodynamic treatment, 38 (71.7%)-25 PD with AG and 13 AG without PD patients-attended 20-year follow-up. AG without PD patients improved less than PD with AG patients did on primary outcome measures. In the PD with AG group, there were large uncontrolled effect sizes (<-2.30). More of the AG without PD patients had avoidant personality disorder at pretreatment, but the presence of this disorder did not predict outcome. The follow-up results support that PD with AG and AG without PD are two different disorders. The results also suggest that the very long-term outcome in PD with AG patients is excellent for this integrated treatment.

  10. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  11. From Couple Therapy 1.0 to a Comprehensive Model: A Roadmap for Sequencing and Integrating Systemic, Psychodynamic, and Behavioral Approaches in Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Arthur C

    2017-09-01

    Couple therapy is a complex undertaking that proceeds best by integrating various schools of thought. Grounded in an in-depth review of the clinical and research literature, and drawing on the author's 40-plus years of experience, this paper presents a comprehensive, flexible, and user-friendly roadmap for conducting couple therapy. It begins by describing "Couple Therapy 1.0," the basic conjoint couple therapy format in which partners talk to each other with the help of the therapist. After noting the limitations of this model, the paper introduces upgrades derived from systemic, psychodynamic, and behavioral/educational approaches, and shows how to combine and sequence them. The most important upgrade is the early focus on the couple's negative interaction cycle, which causes them pain and impedes their ability to address it. Using a clinical case example, the paper shows how all three approaches can improve couple process as a prerequisite for better problem solving. Additional modules and sequencing choice points are also discussed, including discernment counseling and encouraging positive couple experiences. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  12. The ANTOP study: focal psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and treatment-as-usual in outpatients with anorexia nervosa - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauenburg Henning

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder leading to high morbidity and mortality as a result of both malnutrition and suicide. The seriousness of the disorder requires extensive knowledge of effective treatment options. However, evidence for treatment efficacy in this area is remarkably weak. A recent Cochrane review states that there is an urgent need for large, well-designed treatment studies for patients with anorexia nervosa. The aim of this particular multi-centre study is to evaluate the efficacy of two standardized outpatient treatments for patients with anorexia nervosa: focal psychodynamic (FPT and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT. Each therapeutic approach is compared to a "treatment-as-usual" control group. Methods/Design 237 patients meeting eligibility criteria are randomly and evenly assigned to the three groups – two intervention groups (CBT and FPT and one control group. The treatment period for each intervention group is 10 months, consisting of 40 sessions respectively. Body weight, eating disorder related symptoms, and variables of therapeutic alliance are measured during the course of treatment. Psychotherapy sessions are audiotaped for adherence monitoring. The treatment in the control group, both the dosage and type of therapy, is not regulated in the study protocol, but rather reflects the current practice of established outpatient care. The primary outcome measure is the body mass index (BMI at the end of the treatment (10 months after randomization. Discussion The study design surmounts the disadvantages of previous studies in that it provides a randomized controlled design, a large sample size, adequate inclusion criteria, an adequate treatment protocol, and a clear separation of the treatment conditions in order to avoid contamination. Nevertheless, the study has to deal with difficulties specific to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. The treatment protocol allows for dealing with the

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Isack Kandel; Joav Merrick

    2008-01-01

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist ...

  14. A manual-based psychodynamic therapy for treatment-resistant borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert J; Remen, Anna L

    2008-03-01

    The authors introduce a manual-based treatment, labeled dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy, developed for those patients with borderline personality disorder who are most difficult to engage in therapy, such as those having co-occurring substance use disorders. This treatment model is based on the hypothesis that borderline pathology and related behaviors reflect impairment in specific neurocognitive functions, including association, attribution, and alterity that form the basis for a coherent and differentiated self. Dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy aims to activate and remediate neurocognitive self-capacities by facilitating elaboration of affect-laden interpersonal experiences and integration of attributions, as well as providing novel experiences in the patient-therapist relationship that promote self-other differentiation. Treatment involves weekly individual sessions for a predetermined period of time and follows sequential stages. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Constructing a systems psychodynamic wellness model

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchen Henning; Frans Cilliers

    2012-01-01

    Orientation: The researchers constructed a Systems Psychodynamic Wellness Model (SPWM) by merging theory and concepts from systems psychodynamics and positive psychology. They then refined the model for application in organisations during a Listening Post (LP) that comprised experienced subject experts.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to construct and refine the SPWM in order to understand psychological wellness at the individual, group and organisational levels.Motivation fo...

  16. Tracking Functional Brain Changes in Patients with Depression under Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Using Individualized Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswede, Daniel; Taubner, Svenja; Buchheim, Anna; Münte, Thomas F.; Stasch, Michael; Cierpka, Manfred; Kächele, Horst; Roth, Gerhard; Erhard, Peter; Kessler, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurobiological models of depression posit limbic hyperactivity that should normalize after successful treatment. For psychotherapy, though, brain changes in patients with depression show substantial variability. Two critical issues in relevant studies concern the use of unspecific stimulation experiments and relatively short treatment protocols. Therefore changes in brain reactions to individualized stimuli were studied in patients with depression after eight months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Methods 18 unmedicated patients with recurrent major depressive disorder were confronted with individualized and clinically derived content in a functional MRI experiment before (T1) and after eight months (T2) of psychodynamic therapy. A control group of 17 healthy subjects was also tested twice without intervention. The experimental stimuli were sentences describing each participant's dysfunctional interpersonal relationship patterns derived from clinical interviews based on Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD). Results At T1 patients showed enhanced activation compared to controls in several limbic and subcortical regions, including amygdala and basal ganglia, when confronted with OPD sentences. At T2 the differences in brain activity between patients and controls were no longer apparent. Concurrently, patients had improved significantly in depression scores. Conclusions Using ecologically valid stimuli, this study supports the model of limbic hyperactivity in depression that normalizes after treatment. Without a control group of untreated patients measured twice, though, changes in patients' brain activity could also be attributed to other factors than psychodynamic therapy. PMID:25275317

  17. Large-group psychodynamics and massive violence Psicodinâmica da violência de grandes grupos e da violência de massas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamik D. Volkan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with Freud, psychoanalytic theories concerning large groups have mainly focused on individuals' perceptions of what their large groups psychologically mean to them. This chapter examines some aspects of large-group psychology in its own right and studies psychodynamics of ethnic, national, religious or ideological groups, the membership of which originates in childhood. I will compare the mourning process in individuals with the mourning process in large groups to illustrate why we need to study large-group psychology as a subject in itself. As part of this discussion I will also describe signs and symptoms of large-group regression. When there is a threat against a large-group's identity, massive violence may be initiated and this violence in turn, has an obvious impact on public health.A partir de Freud, as teorias psicanalíticas a respeito de grandes grupos focalizam principalmente as percepções e os significados que os indivíduos psicologicamente atribuem a eles. Este texto analisa alguns aspectos sobre a psicologia dos grandes grupos e sua psicodinâmica interna e específica. Toma como referência grupos étnicos, nacionais, religiosos e ideológicos cujo pertencimento dos sujeitos iniciou-se na infância. Faz-se uma comparação entre o processo de luto em indivíduos e o processo de luto em grandes grupos para ilustrar por que é necessário investir no conhecimento da psicologia destes últimos, como um objeto específico. Descreve ainda sinais e sintomas de regressão em grandes grupos. Quando há ameaça à identidade coletiva pode ocorrer um processo de violência de massas que obviamente influencia na sua saúde coletiva.

  18. Psicodinâmica da violência de grandes grupos e da violência de massas Large-group psychodynamics and massive violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamik D. Volkan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de Freud, as teorias psicanalistas sobre grandes grupos focalizam, principalmente, as percepções e os significados que, psicologicamente, os indivíduos atribuem a eles. Este texto analisa alguns aspectos sobre a psicologia dos grandes grupos e sua psicodinâmica interna e específica. Toma como referência grupos étnicos, nacionais, religiosos e ideológicos cujo pertencimento dos sujeitos iniciou-se na infância. O autor faz uma comparação entre o processo de luto em indivíduos e o processo de luto em grandes grupos para ilustrar por que é necessário investir no conhecimento da psicologia destes últimos como um objeto específico. O autor descreve, ainda, sinais e sintomas de regressão em grandes grupos. Quando há ameaça à identidade coletiva, pode ocorrer um processo de violência de massas que obviamente influencia a saúde pública.Beginning with Freud, psychoanalytic theories concerning large groups have mainly focused on individuals' perceptions of what their large groups psychologically mean to them. This text examines some aspects of large-group psychology in its own right and studies psychodynamics of ethnic, national, religious or ideological groups, the membership of which originates in childhood. I will compare the mourning process in individuals with the mourning process in large groups to illustrate why we need to study large-group psychology as a subject in itself. As part of this discussion I will also describe signs and symptoms of large-group regression.When there is a threat against a large-group's identity, massive violence may be initiated and this violence in turn, has an obvious impact on public health.

  19. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of psychological problems is high in prisons. Many prisoners have unmet needs for appropriate treatments. Although previous studies have suggested music therapy to be a successful treatment modality for prisoners, more rigorous evidence is needed. This parallel randomised controlled...... study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  20. [Psychodynamic psychotherapy and the treatment of pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Richard J

    2008-05-01

    The search for empirically based treatments for pathological gambling is in its infancy, with relatively few clinical trials and an absence of naturalistic studies. Treatment retention of gamblers has been a problem; cognitive-behavioral treatment and pharmacotherapy studies report especially high dropout rates. Psychodynamic approaches, with their emphasis on the therapeutic relationship, and the meaning of the patient's self-destructive and seemingly irrational behaviors, and on obstacles to self-forgiveness, might improve outcome. After a description of psychodynamic psychotherapy, the literature on both short-term and longer therapies is reviewed regarding their efficacy for a variety of disorders. With regard to pathological gambling, the author summarizes the early (1914-1970) psychoanalytic literature then reviews the more recent psychodynamic psychotherapy literature on pathological gambling. A review of the recent psychodynamic psychotherapy literature on pathological gambling failed to disclose a single randomized controlled study of treatment efficacy or effectiveness. However, there are eight positive outcome studies described as multi-modal eclectic; half of those seem to utilize psychodynamic approaches. Two of the more successful programs are described. A review of the outcomes literature for psychodynamic psychotherapy demonstrates efficacy for a variety of disorders sufficient to justify a clinical trial for pathological gambling. Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy, with its focus on core issues, may be particularly applicable to the pathological gambler's need to avoid or escape intolerable affects and problems. Longer therapies may be needed to modify an avoidant coping style and defenses.

  1. Time limited psychodynamic group therapy: Predictors of patients seeking additional treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2010-01-01

    for psychological or psychiatric problems; the percentage was 41.6 when further treatment was defined as participating in more than 5 sessions. The majority (94.8 was treated within the public health services. Participation in additional treatment was predicted by improvement on the MCMI Antisocial personality...... disorder scale and a higher SCL-90-R Somatization end-state score. When additional treatment was defined as receiving more than 5 sessions, lack of paid work before treatment (odds ratio 8.0), lack of social network support (odds ratio 2.9), and the Antisocial pre-post difference score (odds ratio 1...

  2. Effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient psychotherapy unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2010-01-01

    ) statistically reliable improvement, and 3) clinical significant change (CSC). METHODS: Pre-post treatment naturalistic design based on 236 outpatients with diagnoses of mood (9.7%), neurotic (50.8%), and personality disorders (39.4%). Symptom change was evaluated on the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI......) and subscales. Analyses were conducted on the total sample and after exclusion of 32 GSI pre-treatment no-cases. RESULTS: The total sample GSI effect size was 0.74 indicating a moderate to large effect size (ranging from 0.67 in depressed to 0.74 in neurotic and personality disorder patients), which increased...... to 1.02 after exclusion of pre-treatment no-cases (ranging from 0.98 to 1.11 in depressed and personality disorder patients, respectively). However, in the GSI pre-treatment case sample, 43.1% were unchanged or deteriorated, 27% reliably improved and 29.9% obtained CSC status (ranging from 23...

  3. The impact of the Art Therapy Large Group, an educational tool in the training of art therapists, on post-qualification professional practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaife, Sally; Jones, Kevin.; Pentaris, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a Likert scale survey that was sent to past graduates of the MA Art Psychotherapy, Goldsmiths, University of London asking them about the relevance of their experience in the Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) to their subsequent employment as art therapists or work in another capacity. The ATLG comprises all the students and staff in a psychodynamically based experiential group that meets six times during the year. Survey questions were drawn from previously ...

  4. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: An Old Friend Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Sergio V.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of children and adolescents with psychotherapy is gradually losing ground to psychopharmacology. The author reviews the value the various forms of psychotherapy have in the treatment of children and the importance of having a clear curriculum for teaching this skill in residency programs. Although the importance of psychodynamic psychotherapy has a long history in the treatment of children, the reluctance some faculty have in recommending this form of therapy may be due to limited experience and limited knowledge of its benefits. The author highlights that a psychodynamic diagnostic evaluation is essential to assess a child’s suitability for psychotherapy. The characteristics of children who will benefit from psychodynamic psychotherapy, their defense mechanisms, and optimal characteristics of their parents are reviewed. The qualifications a psychiatrist needs to succeed in this endeavor are discussed. Two cases illustrate not only the importance in the suitability of the patient, but also the application of psychodynamic theory to practice. PMID:19727254

  5. Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafranske, Edward P

    2009-02-01

    Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy pays particular attention to the roles that religious and spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences play in the psychological life of the client. Contemporary psychoanalytic theorists offer multiple approaches to understand the functions of religious experience. Spirituality provides a means to address existential issues and provide a context to form personal meaning. Religious narratives present schemas of relationship and models of experiences salient to mental health, such as hope. God images or other symbolic representations of the transcendent have the power to evoke emotions, which in turn, influence motivation and behavior. While employing theories and techniques derived from psychodynamic psychotherapy, this therapeutic approach encourages the analysis of the functions religion and spirituality serve, while respecting the client's act of believing in faith. Psychotherapists address a client's spirituality by exploring the psychological meaning of such personal commitments and experiences and refrain from entering into discussion of faith claims. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Changes in Defense Mechanism Functioning During Group Therapy for Binge-Eating Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert; Tasca, Giorgio A; Presniak, Michelle; Francis, Kylie; Palardy, Melissa; Grenon, Renee; Mcquaid, Nancy; Hayden, Genevieve; Gick, Mary; Bissada, Hany

    2015-01-01

    This study examined change in defensive mechanism functioning during group psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy (GPIP) for women with binge-eating disorder (BED). Women with BED (N = 85) received 16 weeks of GPIP. Five group therapy sessions (sessions 1, 3, 8, 12, and 16) from each of the 12 groups were video recorded and transcribed. Participants were rated on an observer-based measure of defensive functioning, the Defense Mechanism Rating Scale (DMRS). Symptom outcomes were assessed pre- and posttreatment. Overall defensive functioning (ODF) scores improved significantly during group treatment, with specific defense level improvements in high adaptive, major image distorting, and action defenses. The linear increase in ODF mediated a decrease in binge-eating episodes and depressive symptoms. Reverse mediation was also noted. A cubic growth curve best modeled ODF data such that ODF improved in the early stage, followed by a slower rate of improvement in the middle stage, and a further increase in rate of improvement at the end of treatment. Change in defense mechanism functioning may be an important aspect of group psychotherapy that is related to improved symptoms for women with BED who receive GPIP. The cubic trend that represented nonlinear growth in ODF is consistent with psychodynamic theory and a stage model of psychotherapy.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and solution-focused therapy in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders during a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljanen, Timo; Paltta, Paivi; Harkanen, Tommi; Virtala, Esa; Lindfors, Olavi; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Knekt, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are characterized by a high and increasing prevalence, they cause a lot of costs and human suffering and there are many treatment options with differing costs. The benefits of identifying the treatments with the most favourable cost-effectiveness ratios can be substantial. However, the number of randomized trials where psychological treatments are compared with each other and where economic aspects, too, are taken into account is still relatively small. To compare the cost-effectiveness of two short-term psychotherapies in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders during a one-year follow-up. In the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study, 198 patients, who were 20--45 years of age and met DSM-IV criteria for anxiety or mood disorder, were randomized to short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) or solution-focused therapy (SFT). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed at baseline and 4 times during the one-year follow-up from the start of therapy using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Symptom Check List Anxiety Scale, and 2 times using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scales and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scales. Both direct costs (therapy sessions, outpatient visits, medication, inpatient care) and indirect costs (production losses due to work absenteeism, value of neglected household work, lost leisure time and unpaid help received) due to mental disorders were measured. Mean total costs were compared and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios analyzed. According to all 4 psychiatric outcome measures, symptoms of depression and anxiety were reduced statistically significantly in both therapy groups during the one-year follow-up. The relative changes were about the same size according to all four outcome measures. In both groups the reductions took place mainly in the first half of the follow-up. The reductions were somewhat greater with SPP, but the differences between the two groups were small and not statistically significant at any

  8. Constructing a systems psychodynamic wellness model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchen Henning

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The researchers constructed a Systems Psychodynamic Wellness Model (SPWM by merging theory and concepts from systems psychodynamics and positive psychology. They then refined the model for application in organisations during a Listening Post (LP that comprised experienced subject experts.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to construct and refine the SPWM in order to understand psychological wellness at the individual, group and organisational levels.Motivation for the study: There is no psychological wellness model that integrates the principles of systems psychodynamics and positive psychology. Systems psychodynamics traditionally focuses on so-called negative behaviour whilst positive psychology tends to idealise positive behaviour. This research tried to merge these views in order to apply them to individual, group and organisational behaviour.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used qualitative, descriptive and conceptual research. They conducted an in-depth literature study to construct the model. They then refined it using the LP.Main findings: The researchers identified 39 themes. They categorised them into three different levels. Three first-level themes emerged as the highest level of integration: identity, hope and love. The nine second-level themes each consisted of three more themes. They were less complex and abstract than the first-level themes. The least complex 27 third-level themes followed.Practical/managerial implications: One can apply the SPWM as a qualitative diagnostic tool for understanding individual, group and organisational wellness and for consulting on systemic wellness.Contribution/value-add: The SPWM offers a model for understanding individual, group and organisational wellness and for consulting on systemic wellness.

  9. Group therapy integrated with CAT: interactive Group therapy integrated with cognitive analytic therapy, understandings and tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ruppert, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated bringing Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT) tools and understandings (Ryle & Kerr, 2002) into a time-limited (16 sessions) interactive, here-and-now, group therapy (Yalom,1985). Group members were not exposed to CAT or individual work with the two facilitators prior to the group. The study investigated the group members’ experience, particularly in respect of the CAT tools; the facilitators’ experience of integrating CAT tools and understandings into the grou...

  10. [Side Effects of Occupational Group Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöge, B; Fay, D; Jöbges, M; Linden, M; Muschalla, B

    2016-12-01

    Background: Occupational therapy is an important co-therapy in psychiatric therapy. It is a common belief that no risks are associated with occupational therapy. Negative effects caused by group therapy, especially occupational therapy, have not been in the focus of research yet. In this study we want to illustrate possible types and intensities of group side effects through occupational therapy. Patients and Methods: Patients of an inpatient rehabilitation facility filled out the Adverse Treatment Reaction Group Checklist. The checklist contains 47 items divided in six dimensions: group size, content, group participants, group outcome and global. The self-rating used a 5-point likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = very much, extremely stressful) and gives information about types and intensities of the side effects. Results: 88.9 % of 45 patients reported negative effects of occupational group therapy. 28.9 % of the patients rated the side effect as at least severe. Discussion: Occupational therapy is associated with side effects as every other group therapy. Possible side effects caused by group therapy should be considered while planning and implementing occupational therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Systems-Psychodynamics in Schools: A Framework for EPs Undertaking Organisational Consultancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloquin, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    This article considers how a framework for understanding group and organisational behaviour, systems-psychodynamics, can be utilised by educational psychologists taking up an organisational consultancy role to work with schools as whole systems. It outlines the three main theories that constitute a systems-psychodynamic perspective and considers…

  12. Group therapy with the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Greaves, C

    1977-04-01

    The authors describe their four-year experience with a therapy group for patients with metastatic carcinoma. Patients in the group are helped by helping one another, by moving out of a morbid self-absorption, and by finding that they have much of value to share and to teach. The most important aspect of the group experience is the "presence" it offers; patients find support and the opportunity to express their needs and fears openly. The authors believe that group therapy is a valuable modality for the treatment of terminally ill patients and that much can be learned from such groups for the everyday therapy of the living.

  13. Poetry and Therapeutic Factors in Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marion

    1989-01-01

    Describes the ways in which the use of poetry in group therapy facilitates therapeutic goals consistent with interpersonal theory. Discusses the relationship between poetic interventions and I. D. Yalom's therapeutic factors, and offers a case example of an in-patient therapy group. (SR)

  14. Inclusion, children's groups, music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2016-01-01

    a delightful build-up of tension or soothes us, and its narrative character gives rise to mental imagery or memories. Music brings people together and helps build communities across languages and common divides. And – not least – music captures children’s immediate attention, so when the music starts, so do...... the children! Initially by rocking in time to the rhythm, and then with dance moves or spontaneous singing. In this chapter, we demonstrate how music and music activities can be used as a means of including vulnerable children in school or preschool settings. Based on experiences from music therapy, we have...

  15. What Works for People with Mental Retardation? Critical Commentary on Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beail, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews what is known about the effectiveness of the more controversial use of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy with people who have mental retardation. It examines self-management approaches (problem solving, anger management, and cognitive therapy) and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The paper concludes that there has…

  16. Borderline personality disorder and group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, N

    1991-06-01

    This study examined the process and outcome of group therapy for community health center clients with borderline personality disorder. The results indicated that group members rated Yalom's curative factors to be increasingly helpful over time, and that universality and existential factors were consistently ranked as very helpful group process variables. The group sessions also were associated with positive outcomes, as evidenced by significant improvement in Goal Attainment Scale scores and the depression and hostility scales of the Brief Symptom Inventory. The results of this study suggest that group therapy is a valued and effective treatment option for people with borderline personality disorder.

  17. Similarities and Differences in Group and Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Max

    1988-01-01

    Examines contextual and process similarities and differences in group and family therapy, with emphasis on Yalom's group therapy and structural, strategic, and symbolic-experiential family therapy. (Author)

  18. Psychoanalytic-Interactional Therapy versus Psychodynamic Therapy by Experts for Personality Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Efficacy-Effectiveness Study in Cluster B Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Masuhr, Oliver; Jaeger, Ulrich; Rabung, Sven; Dally, Andreas; Dümpelmann, Michael; Fricke-Neef, Christian; Steinert, Christiane; Streeck, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    With regard to cluster B personality disorders, most psychotherapeutic treatments focus on borderline personality disorder. Evidence-based treatments for patients with other cluster B personality disorders are not yet available. Psychoanalytic-interactional therapy (PIT) represents a transdiagnostic treatment for severe personality disorders. PIT has been applied in clinical practice for many years and has proven effective in open studies. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared manual-guided PIT to nonmanualized pychodynamic therapy by experts in personality disorders (E-PDT) in patients with cluster B personality disorders. In an inpatient setting, patients with cluster B personality disorders were randomly assigned to manual-guided PIT (n = 64) or nonmanualized E-PDT (n = 58). In addition, a quasi-experimental control condition was used (n = 46) including both patients receiving treatment as usual and patients waiting for treatment. Primary outcomes were level of personality organization and overall psychological distress. As secondary outcomes, depression, anxiety and interpersonal problems were examined. No significant improvements were found in the control patients. Both PIT and E-PDT achieved significant improvements in all outcome measures and were superior to the control condition. No differences were found between PIT and E-PDT in any outcome measure at the end of treatment. The type of cluster B personality disorder had no impact on the results. In an inpatient setting, both PIT and E-PDT proved to be superior to a control condition in cluster B personality disorders. In a head-to-head comparison, both treatments appeared to be equally effective. Further research on the treatment of cluster B personality disorders is required. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Multi-family group therapy in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Multi-family therapy, common group therapy with several families per one index patient, has been gaining popularity recently. This has occasioned an exploratory study of the status of implementation and common factors in all multi-family therapy programs in Germany. In a survey conducted across Germany, all providers of multi-family therapy interventions were requested to give a detailed description of their intervention. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, and verbal data were summarized categorically with qualitative content analysis. Of the 25 intervention programs examined 21 are directed at emotionally disturbed children and young people and their families; mainly with disturbances in social behavior. Over 4,000 families per year are treated in multi-family therapy, and five programs were systematically evaluated. MFT is characterized by systematically oriented group therapy methods. Those surveyed traced the effect of this form of intervention back to activating problems in the group, activating resources, changing perspective, learning models, experiencing self-efficacy, and the therapeutic relationship. Systematic studies of multi-family therapy in evaluations and in random controlled study designs are recommended.

  20. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  1. Group Therapy Training in a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, John

    This document describes a program at the California School of Professional Psychology-Los Angeles that provides a three-semester sequence of group therapy courses to counseling students. In the students' final year, they are required to take an advanced clinical course titled Advanced Group Process. The course synthesizes didactic methods for…

  2. Envy in the group-therapy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, M A

    1998-10-01

    The origins and vicissitudes of envy are discussed from the viewpoints of Boris and the Kleinians. Their ideas, coupled with a relational perspective of the therapeutic process, enrich our understanding and inform our work concerning the emergence, processing, and working through of envy in the therapy group. A variable in the negative therapeutic reaction, envy can be destructive to the therapy process. It is proposed that envy, accompanied by shame and guilt, is likely to enter the group via enactments. They are fueled by projective identification, which, if ignored, impede the continuation of the group process. Four clinical vignettes illustrate how envy enters the group and how the group functions as a container and transformational object as it processes the projective identifications and works through the enactments.

  3. Group behaviour therapy programmes for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Lindsay F; Carroll, Allison J; Lancaster, Tim

    2017-03-31

    Group therapy offers individuals the opportunity to learn behavioural techniques for smoking cessation, and to provide each other with mutual support. To determine the effect of group-delivered behavioural interventions in achieving long-term smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, using the terms 'behavior therapy', 'cognitive therapy', 'psychotherapy' or 'group therapy', in May 2016. Randomized trials that compared group therapy with self-help, individual counselling, another intervention or no intervention (including usual care or a waiting-list control). We also considered trials that compared more than one group programme. We included those trials with a minimum of two group meetings, and follow-up of smoking status at least six months after the start of the programme. We excluded trials in which group therapy was provided to both active therapy and placebo arms of trials of pharmacotherapies, unless they had a factorial design. Two review authors extracted data in duplicate on the participants, the interventions provided to the groups and the controls, including programme length, intensity and main components, the outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in participants smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically-validated rates where available. We analysed participants lost to follow-up as continuing smokers. We expressed effects as a risk ratio for cessation. Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect (Mantel-Haenszel) model. We assessed the quality of evidence within each study and comparison, using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and GRADE criteria. Sixty-six trials met our inclusion criteria for one or more of the comparisons in the review. Thirteen trials compared a group programme with a self

  4. The contemporary psychodynamic developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malberg, Norka T; Mayes, Linda C

    2013-01-01

    Authors address the transformations taking place in the last 25 years in the theory and practice of developmental psychoanalysis. They emphasize the role of attachment theory in this process and its clinical applications to the work with children and families and the social systems supporting them. The article also describes and explores a move toward an integrative and systemic developmental psychodynamic approach and its relevance to today's practitioner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Containers, mental space and psychodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, B; Garfield, D

    1996-12-01

    The concept of the container has a place within cognitive science as well as within psychodynamic theories. Cognitive semantics has shown that many metaphors giving meaning to daily life-events use the container as a basic reference point. Psychoanalytic theory, most notably, Freud's psychosexual developmental model, illustrates how the container of the body results in meaning. Object relations theory in psychoanalysis has shown how patients with borderline personality disorder behave according to the dynamics of container and containment. Both the cognitive and the psychodynamic conceptions of containers are clinically relevant. The fundamental notion of the container leads to an exploration of 'container dynamics' both in cognitive semantics and in psychodynamic work. A model of the cusp may be of help in the description of the dynamics at the border of the container. Furthermore, the descriptions of the patient's communication of emotion and thoughts may involve three interacting dimensions: an effective-perceptual dimension, a phantasy dimension and a socio-interactive dimension. The interaction between these dimensions has implications for dealing with container dynamics and the process of containment.

  6. Psychodynamic Intervention in Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viederman, Milton

    2016-12-31

    This paper presents a framework for brief, intensive psychotherapeutic intervention for acute distress, manifested by feelings of depression, anxiety or anger, isolation and loneliness, that arise when crises provoke unconscious conflict. This therapy uses a technique to develop a "benevolent transference" for symptom relief and as a groundwork for gaining insight. Interventions to facilitate this process will be illustrated with case illustrations.

  7. Group Therapy Graduate Seminar: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Shulamit; Shadach, Eran

    2015-07-01

    Teaching group therapy is an essential aspect of graduate studies within the helping professions. Existing models discuss four basic elements required for such training: experience, observation, supervised practice, and theory. The present paper offers a model for a group therapy seminar based on these four elements and organized along developmental concepts. Clinical observations of 120 psychology students who participated in the seminar were gathered over a five-year period. Teaching techniques included supervised observation, fish-bowl, one-way mirror, and a final paper integrating theory and practice. The seminar enabled students to practice and to theorize about group processes, both as participants and as co-leaders. Seminar outcomes and conclusions are discussed.

  8. The role of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits in matching patients with major depression to cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy : A replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, M. J.; Driessen, E.; Peen, J.; Barber, J. P.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Schalkwijk, F.; Dekker, J.; Dekker, J. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Barber and Muenz (1996) reported that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was more effective than interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depressed patients with elevated levels of avoidant personality disorder, while IPT was more effective than CBT in patients with elevated levels of

  9. Psychodynamic psychotherapy and clomipramine in the treatment of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnand, Yvonne; Andreoli, Antonio; Kolatte, Evelyne; Venturini, Aurora; Rosset, Nicole

    2002-05-01

    The authors compared a combination of clomipramine and psychodynamic psychotherapy with clomipramine alone in a randomized controlled trial among patients with major depression. Seventy-four patients between the ages of 20 and 65 years who were assigned to ten weeks of acute outpatient treatment for major depression were studied. Bipolar disorder, psychotic symptoms, severe substance dependence, organic disorder, past intolerance to clomipramine, and mental retardation were exclusion criteria. Marked improvement was noted in both treatment groups. Combined treatment was associated with less treatment failure and better work adjustment at ten weeks and with better global functioning and lower hospitalization rates at discharge. A cost savings of 2,311 dollars per patient in the combined treatment group, associated with lower rates of hospitalization and fewer lost work days, exceeded the expenditures related to providing psychotherapy. Provision of supplemental psychodynamic psychotherapy to patients with major depression who are receiving antidepressant medication is cost-effective.

  10. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  11. [Systemic-psychodynamic model for family evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, J L; Pérez, M P; Viniegra, L; Armando Barriguete, J; Casillas, J; Valencia, A

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a family evaluation instrument called systemic-psychodynamic family evaluation model is described. Also, the second stage of the validation study of this instrument is presented (which deals with the inter-observers variation). Twenty families were studied. They were assessed always by the same interviewers designated as experts. They are all family therapy specialists and their assessment was used as the evaluation reference standard or "gold standard". The observers were psychiatrists without previous training in family therapy. For the purpose of the interview, both experts and observers were blind to the medical diagnosis of the patients. During the first stage of the validation study the observers did not have a reference guide which resulted in a low concordance rating. For the second stage, a 177 item guide was used and a considerable increase in the concordance rating was observed. Validation studies like the one used here are of considerable value to increase the reliability and further utilisation of evaluation instruments of this type.

  12. Group therapy for kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D C

    1975-01-01

    A short-term, open membership group therapy program for kidney transplant patients and their families is described. The content and process of this group is related to the ten curative factors described by Yalom for psychiatric patients. The primary benefits for the patients seemed to be the opportunity to observe others cope with similar problems and to learn of the adaptive strategies used by others. The patients were able to offer advice to others, to overcome their tendency toward seclusion and in general, experience a feeling of hope for the future. The family members gained more from a sense of group cohesiveness than did the patients. Both family and patients utilized the meetings to ventilate their anger and frustrations associated with chronic illness and to learn more about transplantation. A more realistic expectation of the future was provided. The group did not seem long enough to measurably improve the interpersonal relations between patients and their families nor did the group members comment upon maladaptive behaviors exhibited between family members within the meetings.

  13. Psychodynamic personality profile in first-episode severe mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, J; Karlsson, H; Taiminen, T; Lauerma, H; Ilonen, T; Leinonen, K-M; Wallenius, E; Virtanen, H; Heinimaa, M; Kaljonen, A; Salokangas, R K R

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to relate measures of psychoanalytically derived personality traits to descriptive diagnosis and psychopathology in severe mental disorders. Sixty-one consecutive first-episode patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe major depression were interviewed. Personality traits were assessed with the Karolinska Psychodynamic Profile (KAPP) and compared with the DSM-IV diagnosis and symptom clusters derived from the BPRS. There were no marked differences in personality traits between the three diagnostic groups, between schizophrenia and affective disorders or between psychotic and non-psychotic illness. However, personality traits had significant associations with symptoms, especially with the emotional retardation cluster. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that severe mental disorders would differ from each other in terms of long-standing psychodynamic personality profiles. Certain dysfunctional personality traits may predict especially negative emotional symptoms and possibly also predispose a person to them.

  14. A psychodynamic perspective on elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2010-11-01

    In a democracy, elections are the way in which the collective thought processes of the voters arrive at a decision to direct their government. The author explores how the individual voter assesses and resolves many conflicting internal and external forces to arrive at a vote. The midterm elections of 2010 illustrate the parallel between individual resolution of conflicting forces and the process of a campaign leading to the outcome of an election. The psychodynamic concepts of conflict and compromise, affects, aggression, unconscious forces, mechanisms of defense, superego, and the ego's integrative functions are evident in both the individual voter and the collective electoral process. The author expresses concern about the historical vulnerability of democracies and the unbalancing effect of allowing limitless infusion of anonymous corporate money to pour into campaigns.

  15. The difficult patient: a psychodynamic perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, Craig D

    2007-01-01

    Managing the "difficult" patient is a challenge all dentists face. This paper describes a psychodynamic model that pictures the dentist-patient relationship as a two-way interaction that involves unconscious processes...

  16. The Dream: A Psychodynamically Informative Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Glucksman, Myron L.

    2001-01-01

    The dream is a unique psychodynamically informative instrument for evaluating the subjective correlates of brain activity during REM sleep. These include feelings, percepts, memories, wishes, fantasies, impulses, conflicts, and defenses, as well as images of self and others. Dream analysis can be used in a variety of clinical settings to assist in diagnostic assessment, psychodynamic formulation, evaluation of clinical change, and the management of medically ill patients. Dreams may serve as ...

  17. Redecision Family Therapy: Its Use with Intensive Multiple Family Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadis, Leslie B.; McClendon, Ruth Ann

    1981-01-01

    Describes intensive multiple family group therapy which combines the advantages of group therapy with those of time-limited, goal-oriented approaches. Using the Redecision Family Therapy model further refines the technique by integrating the seemingly disparate methods of intra- psychic and systemic therapy. (Author)

  18. Cognitive Group Therapy for Test Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç ULUSOY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Test anxiety is a major problem that affects students’ academic, vocational and emotional state and several treatment strategies have been developed and applied. Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the efficacious treatments for test anxiety, but we know little about whether cognitive or behavioral techniques (or both are effective. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of cognitive techniques without behavioral interventions. The study was carried out with 38 individual who complained of test anxiety and were divided into four groups. Six 90 min sessions of cognitive group therapy is applied weekly. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Ruminative Thought Style Questionnaire (RTSQ and Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ were given to attendants. There was statistically significant difference between first and last evaluation of mean rank of BAI total and its cognitive and somatic subscales, ATQ and STAI-II. There was no significant difference for mean rank of STAI-I and RTSQ total scores. Statistically significant difference was found between first and last evaluation of total TAI and 3 subscales of TAI which were ‘Others’ opinions’, ‘Worry about future’, ‘Worry about preparation and unspecified test anxiety’. Cognitive techniques are effective for treatment of test anxiety even without behavioral interventions. However, its effect on self-related perception componenet of test anxiety and ruminative response styles is uncertain. Adding behavioral interventions to cognitive techniques may increase the efficacy of treatment for test anxiety. [JCBPR 2016; 5(1.000: 28-37

  19. Group Play Therapy with Sexually Abused Preschool Children: Group Behaviors and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2002-01-01

    Group play therapy is a common treatment modality for children who have been sexually abused. Sexually abused preschoolers exhibit different group play therapy behaviors than do nonabused children. Group workers need to be aware of these differences and know the appropriate group interventions. This article describes group play therapy with…

  20. Treatment of music performance anxiety via psychological approaches: a review of selected CBT and psychodynamic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Julie J

    2010-12-01

    Performance anxiety, or stage fright, is anxiety aroused about potential mishaps in performance that expose feared inadequacies before an audience and which evoke feelings of embarrassment and humilation. For affected musicians, performance anxiety can be emotionally devastating, as their career choice in music may be terminated or severely compromised. This paper focuses on the cognitive and psychodynamic literature about music performance anxiety, with the emphasis that for treatment "one size does not fit all." It reviews the factors underlying performance anxiety and those factors which can exacerbate the condition in musicians. The two major clinical treatment modalities within contemporary psychology, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic treatments, are reviewed. While there are more empirical studies of CBT in various populations in the literature, until recently there was an indifference to empirical research by psychodynamic investigators. However, meta-analyses show strong efficacy for psychodynamic psychotherapy (in various disorders, not specifically music performance anxiety), but also that the benefits of psychodynamic psychotherapy may endure longer and increase with time.

  1. [Group memory therapy in neurologic amnesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, M; Hibert, O; Serclerat, D

    1995-01-01

    The aim of our approach was to improve the memory of head injured memory impaired people without associated intellectual deterioration. Subjects participated in group each weekday during ten weeks. The aim of strategies was to help the patient of recovery learning strategies. Exercises can be repeated to produce the use of learning strategies in the real life. 19 patients (11 subjects with a traumatic brain injury and 8 subjects with a cerebral vascular accident) completed the treatment are measured before and after the rehabilitation. In a clinic study our memory therapy was more satisfactory on visual memory than verbal memory on a French standardised memory test (the Signoret memory battery). But there is no change in the evaluation of everyday memory measured with the AMQ of Van Der Linden. The comparison of the two sub groups has given to show which pathology will benefit the more the method. These first findings suggested that it was useful to reinforce everyday memory and to include the family members more. It will also be interesting to modify the program for the reeducation of the verbal memory. A control study was necessary to evaluate the validity of our approach.

  2. Group Art Therapy with Incarcerated Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Bonnie J.; Young, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Art therapy is often thought of as an adjunct to counseling; however, because of its unique ability to bypass defenses, in some situations, art therapy may be a treatment of choice to allow clients to discover and express feelings that are often difficult to express verbally. Using art as therapy does not require that the therapist or the client…

  3. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention.

  4. Psicoterapia psicodinâmica breve: estratégia terapêutica e mudança no padrão de relacionamento conflituoso Brief psychodynamic therapy: therapeutic strategy and change in the conflictual relationship pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Medici Pizão Yoshida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Examinaram-se possíveis relações entre mudanças no padrão de relacionamento conflituoso de paciente, de 48 anos, submetida a psicoterapia breve psicodinâmica, e a estratégia terapêutica adotada pela terapeuta. Foi também avaliada a "magnitude" da mudança em sintomas psicopatológicos ao final do processo e entrevistas de acompanhamento (3 e 6 meses, com instrumentos de autorrelato: Inventário Beck de Depressão (BDI, Escala de Alexitimia de Toronto (TAS, Escala de Avaliação de Sintomas-40 (EAS-40, Escala Fatorial de Ajustamento Emocional/ Neuroticismo (EFN. A avaliação do padrão relacional baseou-se no Tema Central de Relacionamento Conflituoso - CCRT e a estratégia terapêutica, no grau de "expressividade vs. apoio" das intervenções. Os resultados mostraram melhoras clinicamente significantes nos sintomas e mudança parcial do padrão central de relacionamento. As intervenções terapêuticas foram mais expressivas no início e mais suportivas à medida que mudanças positivas eram observadas. É necessária cautela na generalização dos resultados. A abordagem metodológica permite comparar diferentes indivíduos.This study aimed to evaluate possible association between change in the conflictual relationship pattern of a 48 year-old, woman, assisted on brief psychodynamic therapy, and the therapist's therapeutic strategy. Yet it was evaluated the magnitude of change of psychopathological symptoms at the end and follow-up interviews (3 and 6 months according to self-report measures: Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS, Symptom Assessment Scale40 (EAS-40, Emotional Adjustment/ Neuroticism Factorial Scale (EFN. The relationship pattern was assessed based on the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme - CCRT method and the therapeutic strategy according to the degree of expressiveness vs supportiveness of the therapist's interventions. Results pointed out to clinically significant improvement on symptoms

  5. Hub Group: An Innovative Approach to Group Therapy in a Short-Term Inpatient Adolescent Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Ashley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes Hub Group, a short-term ward-based group therapy program for institutionalized adolescents. Backed by a behaviorally-based privilege system, Hub Group contracting methods facilitate rapid investment in group therapy and promote change. Advantages and disadvantages of including mixed levels of functioning in the same group are discussed.…

  6. Application of adult attachment theory to group member transference and the group therapy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Rayna D; Marmarosh, Cheri

    2010-03-01

    Although clinical researchers have applied attachment theory to client conceptualization and treatment in individual therapy, few researchers have applied this theory to group therapy. The purpose of this article is to begin to apply theory and research on adult dyadic and group attachment styles to our understanding of group dynamics and processes in adult therapy groups. In particular, we set forth theoretical propositions on how group members' attachment styles affect relationships within the group. Specifically, this article offers some predictions on how identifying group member dyadic and group attachment styles could help leaders predict member transference within the therapy group. Implications of group member attachment for the selection and composition of a group and the different group stages are discussed. Recommendations for group clinicians and researchers are offered. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Dynamic psychiatry and the psychodynamic formulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    relation to his very successful brother. The fact that he will soon have to start his career is also an ongoing stressor. Non-dynamic factors. A family history of depression points towards the likely contribution of genetic factors in the etiology of his depression. Psychodynamic explanation. • Personality structure. “P” is a sensitive ...

  8. Dynamic psychiatry and the psychodynamic formulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In her book 'An Unquiet Mind' the psychologist Kay Jamison gives a moving ... Department of Psychiatry, University of Pretoria, Weskoppies Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa. Abstract: This ... psychodynamic formulation is unfortunately seldom incorporated in the psychiatric presentation of patients; guidelines are therefore ...

  9. Parents as change agents: a psychodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacker, J

    1978-10-01

    A treatment model is described by which psychodynamic clinicians can guide parents to become the primary change agents when their child is the identified patient. Three cases are presented where brief treatment, in which guided clinical interventions were largely carried out by the parents, led to sustained improvement in the child. Advantages of the approach and clinical issues regarding tis application are discussed.

  10. Randomized trial of group musi therapy with Chinese prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared...... to standard care. Anxiety (STAI), depression (BDI) and self-esteem (TSBI, RSI) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared to standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition...... decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems...

  11. The impact of a weekend group experience on individual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Bond, G; Bloch, S; Zimmerman, E; Friedman, L

    1977-04-01

    Thirty-three patients in long-term individual therapy were referred to one of three weekend groups: two experimental (affect-arousing, gestalt therapy) groups and one control (meditation-Tai Chi) group. The impact of the weekend group experience (WGE) on individual therapy was examined six and 12 weeks later. At six weeks the patients in the experimental groups showed, on some measures, a significantly greater improvement in their individual therapy than did controls. By 12 weeks, there were no demonstrable differences. The WGE was not without risk: even though the group leaders were highly trained, responsible clinicians, two patients suffered considerable psychological damage. The control (meditation-Tai Chi) group offered a relatively innocuous experience; there was no risk, but few members found the specific procedures useful in their lives. Intense affect arousal in the WGE was not related to positive change in subsequent individual therapy. Those expressing the greatest affect in either experimental group were no more likely to have had a measurable positive impact on their subsequent individual therapy than patients expressing little or no measurable affect.

  12. Group Therapy for Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConachie, Helen; McLaughlin, Eleanor; Grahame, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Honey, Emma; Tavernor, Laura; Rodgers, Jacqui; Freeston, Mark; Hemm, Cahley; Steen, Nick; Le Couteur, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the acceptability and feasibility of adapted group therapy for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder in a pilot randomised controlled trial. Method: A total of 32 children aged 9-13 years were randomised to immediate or delayed therapy using the "Exploring Feelings" manual (Attwood, 2004). Child and parent…

  13. Group Therapy for Adolescents Living With an Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Downey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Group models are commonly used to treat eating disorders; however, research in this area remains largely underdeveloped. Interest in group work is likely to increase due to the demands on the public health system and the cost-effectiveness of group modalities. This scoping review sought to explore the evidence underpinning group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder. A literature search of 10 academic databases and four gray literature databases was undertaken in 2013. Selected Internet resources were searched and the author consulted professionals from Eating Disorders Victoria, the Butterfly Foundation, and the University of Melbourne. A total of 11 peer-reviewed articles published between 2003 and 2013 were included for review. There was an overall lack of research with no randomized-controlled trials available. Six program evaluations and five program descriptions were found, and they reported on a range of eating disorders and group modalities. The program evaluations suggested the utility of group therapy for promoting weight restoration in underweight individuals living with an eating disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy groups were found to be more effective for bulimia nervosa and multifamily group therapy showed promise for anorexia nervosa. More rigorous research is needed to establish the effectiveness of group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder.

  14. A psychodynamic model of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shear, M K; Cooper, A M; Klerman, G L; Busch, F N; Shapiro, T

    1993-06-01

    Current psychiatric research on panic disorder and its treatment are heavily influenced by neurobiological and cognitive-behavioral models rather than psychodynamic propositions, and psychodynamic treatment is generally considered to be of little benefit in amelioration of symptoms. However, because neither of the current models fully explains the clinical psychopathology, etiology, or pathogenesis of panic disorder, there is a need for further model building. The authors suggest that a psychodynamic approach may add to the understanding of patients with panic disorder. They base their psychodynamic formulation on pilot interviews with nine patients with panic disorder, published reports of psychological characteristics of patients with panic disorder, and data from infant and animal research on temperament. Interview results included the following: 1) all of the patients described themselves as fearful, nervous, or shy as children, 2) they remembered their parents as angry, frightening, critical, or controlling, 3) they frequently indicated discomfort with aggression, 4) most described chronic feelings of low self-esteem, 5) their spouses were characterized as passive, kind, and nonaggressive, and 6) stressors associated with frustration and resentment preceded the onset of panic. The authors propose a model in which inborn neurophysiological irritability predisposes to early fearfulness. Exposure to parental behaviors that augment fearfulness results in disturbances in object relations and persistence of conflicts between dependence and independence, which predispose to fears of feeling trapped, suffocated, and unable to escape and/or feeling alone and unable to get help. Catastrophic fears of helplessness in the face of suffocation or abandonment are easily accessible.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltink, Jörg; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred E.; Ruckes, Christian; Herpertz, Stephan; Joraschky, Peter; Koranyi, Susan; Michal, Matthias; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Strauss, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT). No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA) to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatmen...

  16. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. ?Johanna? was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the p...

  17. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. "Johanna" was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the p...

  18. Perceptions of the significant other of the effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Implications for thinking about psychodynamic and systemic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J

    1996-01-01

    Clinical suggests that partners of psychotherapy patients often have powerful feelings about the therapy and therapist. The repercussions of psychotherapy on those close to the patient are rarely considered. A small exploratory study was therefore conducted. All patients who had completed at least two months of weekly psychodynamic psychotherapy in 1990 at an out-patient unit of a psychiatric hospital (n = 35) and had a partner with whom they were living at the time of starting therapy (n = 23) were contacted. Eight gave permission for their partner to be contacted directly. All eight partners agreed to participate in a semi-structured interview exploring their perceptions of the effects of the therapy on a number of family relationships. The impact of the process of the study was also investigated by means of a questionnaire sent to all partners some weeks after the interview. Considerable changes were perceived to have taken place in association with therapy affecting not only the relationship between the couple but also their parenting relationship, the children, and at time members of the extended family. Partner's views about the direction of such changes seemed to influence other perceptions about the therapy. The repercussions of individual psychotherapy may well spread extensively within a family. This further blurs the boundary between individual and family therapy, both theoretically and clinically. Research procedures are themselves a major intervention and may have a considerable emotional impact on participants.

  19. Multimedia psychodynamic psychotherapy: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Domenico Arturo

    2009-05-01

    Mourning the death of a beloved person is one of life's most stressful events. This psychotherapy case study describes a form of psychodynamic psychotherapy that the author developed in working with a patient who suffered from complicated grief after the death of her father from lung cancer. During sessions, the therapist worked with the patient to collect pictures and organize a "strip of life" of her father's most meaningful moments. The patient then wrote a short text associated with each picture. Finally, she chose music to be added to this "slide show" or "psychodynamic montage" as its soundtrack. The resulting multimedia presentation was finally posted on the Internet on a website to which only the patient and her relatives and friends had access via a password. This therapeutic strategy was effective in helping this patient resolve her symptoms of complicated grief. The author suggests that this new approach to psychodynamic psychotherapy may be a cost-effective and well-received tool for use in institutions such as hospices and general hospitals.

  20. Working with boundaries in systems psychodynamic consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Struwig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The researcher described the systems psychodynamics of boundary management in organisations. The data showed how effective boundary management leads to good holding environments that, in turn, lead to containing difficult emotions.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to produce a set of theoretical assumptions about organisational boundaries and boundary management in organisations and, from these, to develop a set of hypotheses as a thinking framework for practising consulting psychologists when they work with boundaries from a systems psychodynamic stance.Motivation for the study: The researcher used the belief that organisational boundaries reflect the essence of organisations. Consulting to boundary managers could facilitate a deep understanding of organisational dynamics.Research design, approach and method: The researcher followed a case study design. He used systems psychodynamic discourse analysis. It led to six working hypotheses.Main findings: The primary task of boundary management is to hold the polarities of integration and differentiation and not allow the system to become fragmented or overly integrated. Boundary management is a primary task and an ongoing activity of entire organisations.Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should work actively at effective boundary management and at balancing integration and differentiation. Leaders should become aware of how effective boundary management leads to good holding environments that, in turn, lead to containing difficult emotions in organisations.Contribution/value-add: The researcher provided a boundary-consulting framework in order to assist consultants to balance the conceptual with the practical when they consult.

  1. Art therapy focus groups for children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Havlena, Janice; Krezinski, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    Children with epilepsy are at risk for numerous psychological and social challenges. We hypothesized that art therapy focus groups would enhance the self-image of children and adolescents with epilepsy. Sixteen children with epilepsy, ages 7-18 years, were recruited from pediatric neurology clinics at the University of Wisconsin to participate in four art therapy sessions. Pre-group assessments included psychological screens (Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale; Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale; Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale) and art therapy instruments (Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale; Seizure Drawing Task; Levick Emotional and Cognitive Art Therapy Assessment). Developmental levels of drawings were significantly below age-expected standards. Following completion of focus groups, a repeat Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale showed no differences between pre- and post-test scores on any measure of this scale. However, subjects and parents were uniformly positive about their group experiences, suggesting a qualitative benefit from participation in art therapy focus groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ranjbar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is the most prevalent psychotic disorder. In order to cure and prevent the recurrence of this disease, it is necessary to gain more information about remedial methods like Group Cognitive- Behavior Therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the amount of depression on the patients. Methods: This study was experimental and it included both experimental and control group with a pre test. The subjects were selected from patients with mild depression. Their Beck inventory score ranged between 17-20. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. The subjects of experimental group received eight sessions of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. The Beck depression test was completed by the subjects in three phases before the intervention, after the intervention and one month after that. The data was transferred to SPSS program and analyzed. Results: The results indicated a significant difference between the experimental and control group after the intervention at Beck tests (P=0.043. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the experimental group between the depression score in patients before and after the intervention (p=0.033 and the score of patients before and one month after the intervention (p=0.492. Conclusion: Group Cognitive-Behavioral therapy decreases depression in patients who suffer from mild depression.

  3. Interdependent Group Contingencies Decrease Adolescents' Disruptive Behaviors During Group Therapy: A Practitioner's Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Kristen M; Falligant, John Michael; Rapp, John T

    2017-05-01

    Adolescents who have been adjudicated for illegal sexual behavior may receive treatment that requires attending group therapy sessions and classes. For some adolescents, nonsexual problem behavior (e.g., verbal outbursts, noncompliance) interferes with their ability to participate in group treatment. Researchers used a multiple-baseline across groups design with an embedded changing criterion design to evaluate the effects of an interdependent group contingency for decreasing disruptive behavior in adolescents across two therapy groups. Results indicated that the procedure was effective in reducing disruptive behavior emitted by adolescents in group therapy. Measures of social validity indicated that both the therapists and students viewed the overall procedures and outcomes as acceptable. Implications for interdependent group contingencies across diverse populations are discussed.

  4. An Application of General System Theory (GST) to Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Charles O.

    1992-01-01

    Demonstrates the compatibility of General System Theory (GST) with the traditional counseling literature in explicating a therapy group's progression through Tuckman's (1965, 1977) developmental stages (forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning). Description uses both traditional group literature and GST concepts. (Author/NB)

  5. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Group psychotherapy in Obstetric fistula care. African Journal of Reproductive Health March 2014; 18(1): 156. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A. Complementary Recipe for the Accompanying Mental Ill Health. Morbidities? Oladosu A Ojengbede. 1. , Yvonne Baba. 2.

  6. Alcoholics in interactional group therapy: an outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Bloch, S; Bond, G; Zimmerman, E; Qualls, B

    1978-04-01

    Three interactional therapy groups of alcoholic patients (N = 20) were formed, and treatment outcome after eight months and again after 12 months of therapy was compared with the outcome of 17 neurotic patients in comparable therapy. Outcome assessment was obtained from three sources: patient, therapist, and independent judge, using both nomothetic and ideographic measures. The results indicated that although more alcoholic than neurotic patients terminated therapy within the first six sessions, a higher percentage of alcoholic patients remained in therapy for 12 months. At the end of 12 months, both samples had improved along a wide variety of variables, and there were no significant differences between the alcoholic and neurotic population in degree of improvement.

  7. Specificity of psychoanalytic hypotheses regarding the onset of adolescent psychoses: an empirical test of a psychodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, S; Marton, P; Szalai, J; Kennedy, B

    1992-07-01

    The specificity of psychodynamic hypotheses regarding the onset of adolescent psychosis was assessed in a group of rigorously diagnosed psychotic (N = 75) and depressed (N = 53) adolescents. None of the four operationally defined psychodynamic hypotheses purported to be etiologically specific in the onset of adolescent psychotic illness: success and its opportunities; intimacy and its attempts; intent to act autonomously; or involved in insight-oriented psychotherapy was more commonly observed in the psychotic than the depressed group, thereby not supporting the hypotheses. The consequences of this finding are discussed.

  8. Splitting and Projection: Drawing on Psychodynamics in Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Dario W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reflects the author's journey into an area of psychology which is not dominant in Educational Psychology discourse, namely psychodynamic psychology. Two psychodynamic mechanisms, namely splitting and projection are explained, and then the author describes and critiques how these mechanisms have proved useful in his practice. Two case…

  9. Clinical Perspective Psychodynamic aspects of suicidal risk in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases of attempted suicide by adolescents, following the separation from an idealised first sexual partner, are presented to illustrate psychodynamic issues often overlooked in clinical assessment. Absent fathers and father figures and other psychodynamic issues are explored. Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental ...

  10. Dynamic psychiatry and the psychodynamic formulation | Böhmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to describe the difference between descriptive and dynamic psychiatry. As part of the latter every psychiatrist should be able to construct a psychodynamic formulation. A psychodynamic formulation, an indication of psychological mindedness, helps the psychiatrist to recognize the unique, personal aspects ...

  11. Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberg, Trine

    2013-01-01

    Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish...... patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed-up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6...

  12. [A group therapy model in the rehabilitation fo alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittadini, G; Giorgi, I

    1998-01-01

    At present group psychotherapy is one of the most important resources in the treatment of alcoholism. Among the various theoretical orientations present in this setting, the systemic approach has always favoured interventions designed to improve interpersonal relationships. More recently, the concepts of constructivism and "narrative" therapy have laid greater emphasis upon the relational and linguistic aspect of any individual problem. Starting from these premises, a systemic-constructivistic therapy group was created for persons with problems associated with alcohol, as part of an inpatient rehabilitation programme. Given the novelty of this initiative and the particular context, several solutions were adopted that may represent a proposal for the extension of the method. The characteristics and ways in which this particular group might evolve are discussed under four headings: 1) the characteristics of the group, 2) techniques for guiding the group, 3) the role and problems facing the therapist, and 4) the recurrent problems in the life of the group.

  13. Psychological experiences in South African society before the 2010 FIFA World Cup from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Koortzen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The researchers conducted a literature review to analyse the assumptions of systems psychodynamics, the Tavistock model of group relations, object relations theory and the most relevant constructs in the systems psychodynamic perspective. They then described the assumptions and most relevant constructs in the positive psychology perspective in order to analyse theoretically the psychological effect of large-scale sports events on a community or country. The objective of the empirical study was to investigate some of the unconscious emotions, fears, anxieties and conflicts (dynamics that prevailed in South Africa before the 2010 Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA World Cup and some of the positive emotional experiences associated with it.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to analyse and describe the psychological experiences of South Africans before the 2010 FIFA World Cup.Research design, approach and method: The researchers conducted the study from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives. The study comprised a qualitative, explorative and social phenomenological study. The researchers conducted interviews with a wide range of their colleagues and clients.Main findings: The results seemed to indicate that South Africans had had a number of positive and negative experiences before the 2010 FIFA World Cup.Practical/managerial implications: The researchers presented the findings as a number of systems psychodynamic and positive psychology themes.Contribution/value-add: This study presents original research that contributes valuable new knowledge to the positive psychology and systems psychodynamic perspectives.

  14. [Psychodynamic hypothesis about suicidality in elderly men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Reinhard

    2010-08-01

    Old men are overrepresented in the whole of all suicides. In contrast, only very few elderly men find their way to specialised treatment facilities. Elderly accept psychotherapy more rarely than younger persons. Therefore presentations on the psychodynamics of suicidality in old men are rare and mostly casuistical. By means of a stepwise reconstructable qualitative case comparison of five randomly chosen elderly suicidal men with ideal types of suicidal (younger) men concerning biography, suicidal symptoms and transference, psychodynamic hypothesis of suicidality in elderly men are developed. All patients came into psychotherapy in a specialised academic out-patient clinic for psychodynamic treatment of acute and chronic suicidality. The five elderly suicidal men predominantly were living in long-term, conflictuous sexual relationships and also had ambivalent relationships to their children. Suicidality in old age refers to lifelong existing intrapsychic conflicts, concerning (male) identity, self-esteem and a core conflict between fusion and separation wishes. The body gets a central role in suicidal experiences, being a defensive instance modified by age and/or physical illness, which brings up to consciousness aggressive and envious impulses, but also feelings of emptiness and insecurity, which have to be warded off again by projection into the body. In transference relationships there are on the one hand the regular transference, on the other hand an age specific turned around transference, with their counter transference reactions. The chosen methodological approach serves the systematic finding of hypotheses with a higher degree in evidence than hypotheses generated from single case studies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart - New York.

  15. Psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ben; Turner, William

    2013-07-31

    The sexual abuse of children and adolescents is a significant worldwide problem. It is associated with a wide variety of negative psychological, social and physical consequences for the victims. These effects can often be seen immediately following sexual abuse, but they may manifest later on and sometimes only in adult life. There are a number of different interventions aimed at helping children and adolescents who have been sexually abused, and psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy has a long-established tradition of being used for such victims. In this review, we set out to find the evidence for its effectiveness specifically in children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. To assess the effectiveness of psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. We searched the following databases in May 2013: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Social Science and Humanities, LILACS and WorldCat. We also searched three trials registers, checked the reference lists of relevant studies and contacted known experts. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy with treatment as usual or no treatment/waiting list control for children and adolescents up to age of 18 who had experienced sexual abuse at any time prior to the intervention. The review authors (BP and WT) independently screened search results to identify studies that met eligibility criteria. No studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria for this review. There are no randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare psychoanalytic/psychodynamic therapy with treatment as usual, no treatment or waiting list control for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. As a result, we cannot draw any conclusions as to the effectiveness of psychoanalytic/psychodynamic

  16. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, Gordana Mandić

    2013-11-01

    The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original "Synallactic collective image technique" (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.). The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  17. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. Case report. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original “Synallactic collective image technique” (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.. The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Conclusion. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  18. The Social Profiles of Occupational Therapy Students’ Educational Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bonsaksen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s occupational therapy models emphasize that a person’s choice of, satisfaction with, and performance in occupations are markedly influenced by the context. For students undergoing a group-based study module, the group is an important context factor. Until recently, there has been a lack of instruments available for the assessment of functioning and participation at the group level. This mixed methods pilot study aimed to examine occupational therapy students’ perceptions of their group’s level of functioning and course of development during one study module. Methods: The students’ perceptions of their group’s functioning were assessed in two ways: by examining their scores on the Social Profile (SP, a new instrument, and by examining their qualitative descriptions of the groups and how the groups developed over time. The sample consisted of four occupational therapy students. Results: Two students perceived their group functioning as stable over time. One student’s scores indicated an increase in group functioning over time, whereas one student’s showed a decrease. The interview statements showed varying degrees of connectedness with the SP items. Conclusions: Descriptions of stability and change corresponded very well with the students’ SP trajectories, indicating content validity of the assessment as a whole.

  19. Systems psychodynamics: the formative years of an interdisciplinary field at the Tavistock Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Amy L

    2004-02-01

    Systems psychodynamics is an interdisciplinary field amalgamating a triad of influences -the practice of psychoanalysis, the theories and methods of the field of group relations, and the task and boundary awareness of open systems perspectives. Although systems psychodynamics is not a new field of study, there has been a general lack of awareness of its roots, how its formative elements have become intertwined over the years, and the role of the Tavistock Institute in developments in the field. This article provides a synthesis of this history and focuses, in particular,on the intellectual foundations of the Tavistock method of working experientially with groups and the application of this method to the study of organizations.

  20. Treatment Compliance in Group Therapy: Issues and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt Hollenbaugh, Karen Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript, research on treatment compliance and dropout in group therapy is reviewed. A number of variables found to be related to the compliance and dropout are identified including client characteristics, treatment characteristics, and therapist perceptions and behavior. Implications of these results for increasing treatment compliance…

  1. Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

  2. The Use of Dreams in Couples' Group Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Renee

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of Jung's subjective approach to dream interpretation in couples' group therapy to bring unconscious material quickly to the surface. Dreams show the connection between the manifest behavior and the underlying dynamics. They clarify the characteristic behavior of the psychological types. Finally, they aid the therapeutic process.…

  3. Group-Integrated Reality Therapy in a Wilderness Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clagett, Arthur F.

    1992-01-01

    Abridges Glasser's (1975) theory of United States as identity society to explicate causative characteristics of "identity achievers" versus "failures" in U.S. society. Discusses Reality Therapy and therapeutic treatment programs developed by Hope Center Wilderness Camp. Presents evidence to suggest that group-integrated reality…

  4. Treating Social Anxiety in Adolescents: Ten Group Therapy Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Elmer, Alison; McBride, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents and concludes by offering a set of 10 group therapy lesson plans for SAD that therapists can use in their practice. The overview includes a description of social anxiety disorder and highlights various theories of anxiety. The…

  5. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. “Johanna” was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the problem). Johanna's problematic experience manifested itself as severe and excessive criticism towards herself and her study performance. As the group meetings progressed, Johanna found a new kind of tolerance that increased her determination and assertiveness regarding the studies. The dialogical structure of Johanna's problematic experience changed: she found hope and she was more assertive after the process. The results indicated that this kind of psycho-educational group therapy was an effective method for treating depression. The assimilation analysis offered a useful way of analysing the therapy process. PMID:20523883

  6. Therapists' group attachments and their expectations of patients' attitudes about group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L; Franz, Victoria A; Koloi, Mosetsanagape; Majors, Rebekah C; Rahimi, Amanda M; Ronquillo, Jonne G; Somberg, Rachel J; Swope, Jessica S; Zimmer, Katherine

    2006-07-01

    A large body of literature has supported the application of attachment theory to the understanding of psychotherapy. In addition, a more recent social psychological literature is exploring the application of attachment theory to the area of group dynamics and group process. The current study is designed to integrate these two distinct bodies of literature. In a preliminary fashion, we examined the relationship between group therapists' group attachment styles and their assumptions and expectations of their patients' attitudes about group psychotherapy. Seventy-six therapists completed the Smith, Murphy & Coats (1999) measure of group attachment style. They also completed the Revised Group Therapy Survey (Carter, Mitchell, & Krautheim, 2001) from the viewpoint of a typical patient they treat. As hypothesized, therapists with more group attachment anxiety assumed that patients would hold more negative myths and misconceptions about group treatment than therapists with less group attachment anxiety. The utility of a group attachment construct in future research and practice is discussed.

  7. Review of Psychodynamic diagnostics manual (PDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ira

    2008-03-01

    Reviews the book, Psychodynamic diagnostics manual (PDM) by Alliance of Psychoanalytic Organizations (2006). This volume is divided into three major sections, Part 1--Classification of Adult Mental Heath Disorder, Part 2--Classification of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Disorder, and Part 3--Conceptual and Research Foundations for a Psychodynamically Based Classification System for Mental Health Disorders. Unlike the standard DSM which highlights the patient's presenting symptom (Axis I) with secondary consideration given to an underlying personality disorder (Axis II), the major thesis of classification scheme of this volume is that diagnostic evaluation should provide a more patient centered and a more clinically useful picture of the individual by understanding the symptom(s) through the essential dimensions of the patient's personality and mental functions (interpersonal and cognitive capacities). Part 3, which could stand on its own as a separate volume, is a thorough critique of psychotherapy outcome research in which the authors delineate how major design flaws have derived from "favoring what is measurable over what is meaningful." The authors cogently demonstrate that diagnostic assessment is a continuous effort toward providing individualized and clinically relevant evaluations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. A Comparative Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Tamannaeifar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is a new method of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 19 depressive out-patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Twelve therapeutic sessions administered in consulting center of Tehran University twice a week. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS before and after the treatments. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of depression and rumination. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that ACT is an effective treatment, the effectiveness of which appears equivalent to that of CT.

  9. Acupuncture Therapy in a Group Setting for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Nielsen, Arya; Kohrherr, Corinne; Schmid, Tracy; Waltermaurer, Eve; Perez, Elidania; Merrell, Woodson

    2018-02-01

    This project was designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of acupuncture therapy given in a group setting for chronic pain. Nonrandomized, repeated measures quasi-experimental trial. Care was delivered in a primary care clinic waiting area after clinic hours. Included were primary care patients (≥18 years old) with chronic pain of the neck, back, shoulder, or osteoarthritis of any site of at least three months' duration. Subjects received eight weekly acupuncture therapy sessions in a group setting. Acupuncture therapy included a combination of palpation, acupuncture needling, Tui na, Gua sha, and auricular treatment. Baseline pain levels were established in a two- to four-week run-in; assessment of the intervention impact on pain intensity, mood, and functional status were made at the end of the treatment period (eight weeks) and 16 weeks after completion of intervention (24 weeks). Of the total 113 participants recruited for the trial, 96 completed the 24-week protocol. We found a statistically and clinically significant decrease in pain severity, pain interference, and depression in our study population. There were no serious adverse events. Acupuncture therapy offered in the group setting was effective in reducing pain severity, pain interference, and depression in patients with chronic neck, back, or shoulder pain or osteoarthritis. Benefit persisted through the 24-week measure despite no additional treatment. This finding has potentially important implications for improving access to effective acupuncture treatment for patients with limited financial resources.

  10. Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis as an instrument to transfer psychodynamic constructs into neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eKessler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical article makes a contribution to the field of psychoanalytically informed neuroscience. First, central characteristics of psychoanalysis and neuroscience are briefly described leading into three epistemic dichotomies. Neuroscience versus psychoanalysis display almost opposing methodological approaches (reduction vs. expansion, test quality emphases (reliability vs. validity and meaning of results (correlation vs. explanation. The critical point is to reach an intermediate level: in neuroscience an adequate position integrating both aspects – objective and subjective – of dual-aspect monism, and in psychoanalysis the appropriate level for the scientific investigation of its central concepts. As a suggestion to reach that level in both fields the system of Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD; OPD Task Force, 2008 is presented. Combining aspects of both fields, expansion and reduction as well as reliability and validity, OPD could be a fruitful tool to transfer psychodynamic constructs into neuroscience. The article closes with a short description of recent applications of OPD in neuroscience.

  11. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambresin Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions. Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies

  12. [Using focus groups to explore the group music therapy experience of long term care elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Shu-Ling

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the elderly's experience and perceptions of group music therapy. The residents of a long term care institution received group music therapy for one year. Afterwards, three interviews were conducted in focus groups of between six and eight of the elderly. Their ages ranged from 64 to 90. Ninety-five percent of these elderly subjects participated in the therapy for over ten months. The tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Six themes emerged regarding the elderly subjects' experiences and perceptions of group music therapy, as follows: (1) becoming more willing to participate; (2) feeling pain relief and more controlled moods; (3) getting physically better; (4) being more motivated to live; (5) learning positive personal interaction and obedience to the rules of the group; and (6) learning skills to improve personal health. This information might be used as a helpful and valuable reference in nursing education and by administrative organizations involved in the planning of therapeutic programs for the elderly.

  13. Group treatment for trichotillomania: cognitive-behavioral therapy versus supportive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Edson Luiz; De Togni Muniz, Enilde; Brito, Antônio Marcelo Cabrita; de Abreu, Cristiano Nabuco; Tavares, Hermano

    2015-04-01

    Trichotillomania is a psychiatric condition characterized by the chronic pulling and plucking of one's own hair. Cognitive-behavioral therapy shows promise as a treatment for trichotillomania and might be preferable to pharmacotherapy. However, there have been no randomized, controlled studies of the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We evaluated 44 subjects, recruited from April 2009 to May 2010, all of whom met DSM-IV criteria for a diagnosis of trichotillomania. Subjects were randomized to receive 22 sessions of either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group supportive therapy (control). Treatment evaluation was non-blind and used self-report scales. The primary outcome measure was the improvement of hair-plucking behavior as assessed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale. Secondary measures included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report. Both groups showed significant posttreatment improvement in the scores from the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale (F = 23.762, P behavior over time was significantly greater in the study group than in the control group (F = 3.545, P cognitive-behavioral therapy is a valid treatment for trichotillomania. This treatment model should be further revised and expanded to address comorbidities such as anxiety and social maladjustment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01968343. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. A proposed model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Zelda Gillian

    2017-09-01

    Just as Freud used stages of psychosexual development to ground his model of psychoanalysis, it is possible to do the same with Erik Erikson's stages of development with regards to a model of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper proposes an eight-stage model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Various suggestions are offered. One such suggestion is that as each of Erikson's developmental stages is triggered by a crisis, in therapy it is triggered by the client's search. The resolution of the search often leads to the development of another search, which implies that the therapy process comprises a series of searches. This idea of a series of searches and resolutions leads to the understanding that identity is developmental and therapy is a space in which a new sense of identity may emerge. The notion of hope is linked to Erikson's stage of Basic Trust and the proposed model of therapy views hope and trust as essential for the therapy process. Two clinical vignettes are offered to illustrate these ideas. Psychotherapy can be approached as an eight-stage process and linked to Erikson's eight stages model of development. Psychotherapy may be viewed as a series of searches and thus as a developmental stage resolution process, which leads to the understanding that identity is ongoing throughout the life span. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Susan G.; Emma Morrow; Michiel v Vreeswijk; Caroline Reid

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dro...

  16. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Susan G.; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropp...

  17. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Simpson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviours, whilst providing a de-stigmatising and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  18. Group schema therapy for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Susan G; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame, and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post-therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviors, whilst providing a de-stigmatizing and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  19. A Psychodynamic Psychologist in Community Psychiatry: 14 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Roquette

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically review the role of a psychodynamic psychologist integrated in a community outpatient clinic of a Psychiatric Department. It describes the characteristics of a psychodynamic intervention that is complementary to the psychiatric approach while sharing a common goal –the suffering patient – and enhancing the knowledge and understanding of several domains like psychopathology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and integration. Furthermore it describes how the use of Psychological Assessment led to the formulation of specific individual psychotherapies, spanning 14 years of clinical practice. The paper concludes with some considerations regarding the integration of Psychodynamic Psychology in a multidisciplinary mental health team, addressing issues such as the boundaries between technical characteristics, the appropriateness of language to other disciplines and psychodynamic implications of the different features of this clinical setting.

  20. Group therapy compared with individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1994-01-01

    Results of group therapy (GT) for extreme dental anxiety were compared with individual treatment (IT). Scales used measured dental anxiety, beliefs or trust in dentists, and fear of the next dentist after specialist treatment which showed reduced dental anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared...... with a static control group of 45 patients. The 30 GT patients showed no significant difference in dropouts during training compared with the 68 IT patients, but for patients who completed treatment, GT (n = 24) had greater dental anxiety reduction than IT subjects (n = 60). GT patients required fewer therapist...

  1. Public anxiety and health policy: A psychodynamic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Ashby, Michael; Procter, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we explore how the application of organizational psychodynamic theories might improve the understanding of unconscious forces influencing apparently rational and evidence-based processes such as the generation and implementation of health policy. There is a growing body of literature using psychodynamic theories to explore discontinuities in policy-making and the containment of anxiety in organizations. In this article, we focus on the dyadic relationship between policy forma...

  2. Leadership Development From A Systems Psychodynamic Consultancy Stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. De Jager

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to measure the impact of a leadership development programme presented from the systems psychodynamic stance. The aim was to develop psychoanalytically informed change leaders to lead change and transformation in the continuously changing and transforming New Economy network organisation. In order to do this, a group relations training programme was presented for 30 leaders. Qualitative assessment using grounded theory during post-intervention focus groups interviewing indicated the group’s awareness of psychodynamic leadership behaviour such as the regression towards frequent pathological leadership personality characteristics, regression towards unconscious group- and organizational processes such as the basic assumption group, the covert coalition and socially structured defense systems against change and transformation. Insight was also gained in the new leadership role and the taking up of personal authority in the network organisation that needs to function as a systemic whole. Limitations in the study are noted and Recommendations are made to enhance change leader skills for leadership in the New Economy network organisation. OpsommingHierdie navorsing poog om die impak van ‘n leierskapsontwikkelingsprogram wat aangebied is vanuit die sistemiese psigodinamiese perspektief, te evalueer. Die doel was om psigoanalitiese ingeligte leiers te ontwikkel om verandering en transformasie in die gedurige veranderende en transformerende Nuwe Ekonomie netwerk organisasie, te lei. Ten einde dit te bolwerk is. ‘n Groep -verhoudinge-opleidingsprogram is aangebied vir 30 leiers. Kwalitatiewe evaluasie deur van begrondingsteorie gebruik te maak gedurende, die post-intervensie fokus groepe het ‘n groepbewustheid aangedui van psigodinamiese leierskapgedrag soos die regressie na dikwelse patologiese leierskapspersoonlikheidskenmerke, regressie in onbewustelike groep- en organisatoriese prosesse soos die basiese aanname-groep, die

  3. A new model of techniques for concurrent psychodynamic work with parents of child and adolescent psychotherapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kerry Kelly; Novick, Jack

    2013-04-01

    To address the neglect of the importance of parent work in the psychodynamic psychotherapy of children and adolescents, the authors present a model of concurrent dynamic parent work that has demonstrated success with patients of all ages. The model includes dual goals for all therapies, addresses the challenge of confidentiality by differentiating privacy and secrecy, and emphasizes the importance of parent work throughout treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Internal Representations of the Therapeutic Relationship Among Adolescents in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzil-Slonim, Dana; Tishby, Orya; Shefler, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes in adolescents' internal representations of their relationship with their therapist and the extent to which these changes were related to changes in their representations of their relationship with their parents and to treatment outcomes. Thirty adolescents (aged 15-18 years, 70% women) undergoing psychodynamic psychotherapy participated in relationship anecdote paradigms interviews based on the core conflictual relationship theme method and completed outcome measures at the beginning of treatment and a year later. Adolescents' positive representations of their therapists increased throughout the year of treatment, whereas their negative representations did not change. There was an association between the development of the therapeutic relationship and improvement in the perception of the relationship with parents over the course of therapy. Increases in the level of positive representations and decreases in the level of negative representations of the therapist were associated with greater satisfaction with treatment but not with the other outcome measures. These results support the centrality of the therapeutic relationship in the process of change during adolescents' psychodynamic psychotherapy. The finding that positive representations of the therapist increased throughout treatment but that negative representations remained steady suggests that therapists who treat adolescents should expect and be able to hear adolescent clients' positive and negative internal representations of themselves. Therapists need to realize that although adolescents often experience negative emotions and perceptions in therapy as in other significant relationships, this does not necessarily block the development of positive emotions. The finding that changes in the representations of the therapist are associated with changes in the representations of parents is in line with psychodynamic theory, which posits that psychotherapy facilitates new

  5. Mindfulness and acceptance-based group therapy and traditional cognitive behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: Mechanisms of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L; Fleming, Jan E; Hawley, Lance L; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Antony, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated mechanisms of change for two group treatments for social anxiety disorder (SAD): cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) and mindfulness and acceptance-based group therapy (MAGT). Participants were treatment completers (n = 37 for MAGT, n = 32 for CBGT) from a randomized clinical trial. Cognitive reappraisal was the hypothesized mechanism of change for CBGT. Mindfulness and acceptance were hypothesized mechanisms of change for MAGT. Latent difference score (LDS) analysis results demonstrate that cognitive reappraisal coupling (in which cognitive reappraisal is negatively associated with the subsequent rate of change in social anxiety) had a greater impact on social anxiety for CBGT than MAGT. The LDS bidirectional mindfulness model (mindfulness predicts subsequent change in social anxiety; social anxiety predicts subsequent change in mindfulness) was supported for both treatments. Results for acceptance were less clear. Cognitive reappraisal may be a more important mechanism of change for CBGT than MAGT, whereas mindfulness may be an important mechanism of change for both treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The psychodynamic determinants of Moses and Monotheism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, E R

    1977-02-01

    Many writers have commented on the lack of Freud's usual level of logic and powers of persuasion in Moses and Monotheism. The majority attribute it to the significance of dynamic determinants in Freud himself--most notably, identification with Moses. Fromm (1972) says "one must assume that Freud's preoccupation with Moses was rooted in the deep unconscious identification with him" (p. 79). Unfortunately, the situation is much more complex. Although many pertinent observations have been made, what is needed is a detailed dissection of the text, a correlation with elements from Freud's personal life, and an overall psychoanalytic synthesis of the data. This paper makes a beginning in that direction, incorporating the ideas of other investigators with those of the author--but it is hoped that much more detailed analysis and biographical correlation will follow. There is a wealth of information about Freud in Moses and Monotheism and no one paper will exhaust it. In this examination no attempt will be made to evaluate Moses and Monotheism for its literary, psychohistorical, or scientific merit. The focus is on the psychodynamic determinants of Freud's essay.

  7. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for the depressive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, P M

    1989-06-01

    Historical approaches of psychotherapy for depression are contrasted with current psychotherapeutic strategies. Now more strategies are focused, structured, time-limited, observable, testable, researchable and data based. The following depressive syndromes are reviewed in terms of the literature that demonstrates the effectiveness of psychotherapy: major depressive disorder, bipolar depressive disorder, depression associated with medical illness such as cancer, myocardial infarction and stroke, resistant depression post-traumatic stress disorder, grief reactions and depression during adolescence, mid-life and the geriatric period of the life cycle. A conceptual model favoring tripartite focus of intervention is recommended. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression must consider intrapsychic, interpersonal and family dynamics as well as social supports. A model for each population needs to be studied and developed further. Recommendations for current research are suggested. In the individual modification of psychotherapeutic approaches we must consider the varying maturity of ego defenses and the ego strength of the individual patient. Forty well-designed studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of psychotherapy in the depressive syndromes are quoted in this paper.

  8. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) for social anxiety disorder into clinical practice: results from a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltink, Jörg; Ruckes, Christian; Hoyer, Jürgen; Leichsenring, Falk; Joraschky, Peter; Leweke, Frank; Pöhlmann, Karin; Beutel, Manfred E

    2017-03-14

    Despite growing evidence for manualized psychodynamic treatments, there is a lack of studies on their transfer to routine practice. This is the first study to examine the effects of an additional training in manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) on the outcome in routine psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD). The study is an extension to a large RCT comparing STPP to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of SAD. The manualized treatment was designed for a time limited approach with 25 individual sessions of STPP over 6 months. Private practitioners were randomized to training in manualized STPP (mSTPP) vs. treatment as usual without a specific training (tauSTPP). A total of 109 patients were enrolled (105 started treatment; 75 completed at least 20 treatment sessions). Assessments were conducted pre-treatment, after 8 and 15 weeks, after 25 treatment sessions, at the end of treatment, 6 and 12 months after termination of treatment. Remission as primary outcome was defined by the Liebowitz-Social-Anxiety-Scale (LSAS) score ≤30. Secondary outcomes were response (at least 31% reduction in LSAS), treatment duration and number of sessions, changes in social anxiety (LSAS, SPAI), depression (BDI), clinical global impression (CGI), and quality of life (EQ-5D). Remission rates of mSTPP (9%) resp. tauSTPP (16%) and also response rates of 33% resp. 28% were comparable between the two treatment approaches as well as treatment duration and number of sessions. Most of the within-group differences (baseline to 25 sessions) indicated moderate to large improvements in both treatments; within-group differences from baseline to 12 months follow-up (LSAS, SPAI, BDI, CGI) were large ranging from d = -0.605 to d = -2.937. Benefits of mSTPP were limited to single outcomes. Findings are discussed with regard to implementation and dissemination of empirically validated treatments in psychodynamic training and practice. SAD patients with a high comorbidity

  9. Psychodynamics of hypersexuality in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    It has recently become evident that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents. The criteria for making the diagnosis of juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD) are in the process of being proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V). In adults, a criterion for bipolar disorder is excessive involvement in pleasurable activities including hypersexuality. Recently, some clinicians and researchers have suggested that hypersexuality be included as a criterion for JBD as well. Although abnormal sexuality has been reported to be present in some youth thought to have JBD, the reason for this association is not yet clear. Hypersexuality may be primary and intrinsic to bipolar disorder in youth, secondary and associated with it as the result of psychosocial influences or psychodynamic factors, or due to general aggression and disruptive behavior. Not only have developmental psychosocial factors that may influence sexuality in children and adolescence not been fully investigated, but psychodynamic influences have been omitted from modern etiological constructs as well. This report discusses the importance of psychosocial and psychodynamic influences on the sexual experience and activity of bipolar children. It is proposed that a developmental, psychodynamically informed model is helpful in understanding sexuality in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. It is also suggested that assessment of psychosocial and psychodynamic influences on the sexuality of bipolar children is necessary in order to adequately assess whether hypersexuality should be a criterion of bipolar disorder in youth.

  10. [Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Social Anxiety Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chen; Meng, Ya-Jing; Yuan, Min-Lan; Zhu, Hong-Ru; Ren, Zheng-Jia; Qiu, Chang-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) on social anxiety disorders (SAD). A total of 50 patients with SAD were recruited in this study. A survey containing the Liebowitz social anxiety scale (LSAS),the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ),the fear of negative evaluation questionnaire (FNE),the social support rating scale (SSRS),the tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ),and the egna minnen barndoms uppfostran (EMBU) was administered before and (one week) after the GCBT,including in the 50 healthy controls. About 21 patients completed the eight-week GCBT (once a week,2 h a session). Follow-up surveys were conducted on 40 patients (22 patients treated with GCBT and 18 untreated) over a 1-5 year period. Significant differences were found between the SAD patients and healthy controls in thinking mode,personality characteristics,social support,parental rearing styles,and social anxiety symptoms. Significant decrease in social anxiety symptom ( t =4.06, P =0.000) , negative automatic thoughts ( t =4.58, P =0.000) and fear for rejection ( t =3.85, P =0.000) were observed after the GCBT therapy. Such improvement was positively correlated with subjective social support ( r =0.361, P =0.022) ,and negatively correlated with rejection of father ( r =-0.431, P =0.005) . There was also statistical difference between the patients with and without the GCBT therapy ( P =0.033) . GCBT treatment can relieve SAD symptoms by changing the negative cognitive of SAD patients. Social support and rejection of father affects the prognosis of SAD.

  11. The effects of the therapist's disengaged feelings on the in-session process in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulberg, Randi; Amlo, Svein; Hersoug, Anne Grete; Dahl, Hanne-Sofie Johnsen; Høglend, Per

    2014-05-01

    The primary aim of this article was to explore the effects of the therapist's disengaged feelings (i.e., bored, tired of, sleepy, indifferent, aloof) in psychodynamic therapy. The Transference Work Scale was used in combination with the Defense Mechanism Rating Scales and Structural Analyses of Social Behavior to explore the in-session process in 2 therapies with female patients with interpersonal problems. Analyses showed differences in in-session processes (i.e., defense mechanisms; transference work; degree of affiliation and interdependence in the dialogue) and treatment outcome between therapies characterized by a low versus a higher degree of disengaged feelings. Compared to the case with the engaged therapist, the disengaged therapist showed poorer interaction and less response to transference and defense interpretation. When aware of their disengaged feelings, therapists are advised to encourage their patients to discuss the patient-therapist interaction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Psychodynamic psychotherapy as treatment for depression in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nick; Cregeen, Simon; Hughes, Carol; Rustin, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a psychodynamic approach to understanding and treating adolescent depression, based largely on the manual for short-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy (STPP) for adolescents (11-17 years old) with moderate to severe depression, developed for the IMPACT Study from Great Britain. Although the authors make reference to longer-term psychodynamic treatments, the 28-session model (plus 7 sessions of parent/carer work) used in the IMPACT Study informs the psychodynamic approach presented herein. In the course of discussing the analytical framework for depression and the treatment, a single case study is presented throughout to graphically illustrate the clinical course and outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  14. Group therapy for early adolescent girls at the Counseling Room affiliated with the Showa Women's University

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 昌子; 松永, しのぶ; Akiko, SATO; Shinobu, MATSUNAGA; 昭和女子大学生活心理研究所; 昭和女子大学大学院生活機構研究科

    2011-01-01

    The Counseling Room affiliated with the Showa Women's University has been providing group therapy for improving social skills in parallel with individual psychotherapy for early adolescent girls. Group therapy, and other forms of psychological support suitable for early adolescent girls were investigated, and the practice of the group therapy is reported. Clinical psychologists and graduate students in clinical psychology held 15 group therapy sessions over a period of one and a half years. T...

  15. [Relapse prevention group therapy for paedophiles: French adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Petibon, C

    2005-01-01

    Psychotherapy for sex offenders has only very recently started to develop in France. The French law on compulsory treatment for sex offenders was voted in 1998, and many mental health practitioners are not trained to treat such patients yet. In our ambulatory forensic consultation, sex offenders have been treated since 1992 and group psychotherapy has been offered to them since 1994. Our first therapeutic models were the North-American behavioural-cognitive therapy and Pithers' relapse prevention model. Behavioural-cognitive theory describes paedophilia as an acquired sexual preference maintained by positive reinforcement. Pithers (1990) considered that relapse only occurs in high-risk situations, and that high-risk situations always come after offence precursors. In North America, relapse prevention consists in helping paedophiles spot their high-risk situations and offence precursors, and enhance their skills to cope with such situations or to prevent them. Therapy programs were developed according to these models, aiming to help offenders develop such skills, ie empathy, social skills, cognitive restructuring, self-esteem, etc. Trying to apply these therapy programs in France, our team quickly realised that we would have to adapt them to French culture. On the one hand, behavioural-cognitive theory did not seem satisfactory enough in explaining paedophilic behaviour and paedophilic preference. On the other hand, behavioural-cognitive therapy made patients into children too much and increased resistance. Therapy based on programs seemed too rigid for French patients and therapists, and we often felt we were working on an issue that would have been much more accurate to work on a few sessions earlier, when this issue was spontaneously brought up by a patient. We believe change occurs all the more as issues are worked on at the right moment for the patient. Moreover, on a cultural point of view, we also realised the use of programs in psychotherapy was difficult to

  16. Psychodynamic day treatment programme for patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Dynamics and predictors of therapeutic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Ondrej; Bob, Petr; Pec, Jan; Hrubcova, Adela

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a psychodynamically based group psychotherapeutic programme might improve symptoms, social functions, or quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to investigate factors that might predict clinical improvement or dropouts from the programme. A quantitative prospective cohort study. We have investigated 81 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who participated in a 9-month psychodynamically based psychotherapeutic day programme. The patients were assessed at the beginning and end of the programme, and then at 1-year follow-up. The assessment included psychotic manifestations (HoNOS), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), demographic data, and daily doses of medication. 21 patients dropped out from the programme, and 46 patients succeeded in undergoing follow-up assessment. The psychotic manifestations (self-rating version of HoNOS) and quality of life measured with WHOQOL-BREF (domains of social relationships and environment) were significantly improved at the end of the programme and at follow-up. However, the manifestations on the version for external evaluators of HoNOS were improved only at follow-up. Years of psychiatric treatment, number of hospitalizations or suicide attempts, and experience of relationships with a partner were negatively related to clinical improvement, whereas symptom severity, current working, or study activities were related positively. The results show that a group psychodynamic programme may improve the clinical status and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This type of programme is more beneficial for patients with higher pre-treatment symptom severity and the presence of working or study activities. A psychodynamically based group programme improves the clinical status and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Data indicate that changes on the subjective level are detectable by the end of the

  17. The Effects of Therapist Gender on Group Therapy for Eating-Disordered Clients

    OpenAIRE

    Soutor, Todd A.

    1995-01-01

    This present study examined the session-by-session content of group therapy for eating-disordered clients. The main objective of this study was to identify how therapist-client gender match affects group therapy process , regarding the disclosure of important issues relevant to eating-disordered clients. It was hypothesized that the group therapy process for eating-disordered clients would be qualitatively different if therapy was facilitated by a female as opposed to a male therapist. The ev...

  18. Group education sessions and compliance with nasal CPAP therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, L L; Panciera, T M; Erickson, A D; Rounds, S

    1997-05-01

    To determine an effective means of improving compliance with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Retrospective chart review. An outpatient clinic at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Seventy-three patients with OSA. Hour meters on CPAP machines provided documentation of nightly machine use. A 2-h group CPAP clinic, scheduled every 6 months, provided education, support, symptom treatment, and equipment monitoring for all CPAP patients. Twenty-five patients had hour meter readings taken at their first CPAP clinic. In these patients, nightly CPAP use increased from 5.2 +/- 0.6 to 6.3 +/- 0.6 h per night after attendance at one CPAP clinic (p CPAP use increased from 5.2 +/- 0.5 before CPAP clinic to 6.3 +/- 0.6 h per night after attendance at all subsequent CPAP clinics for 34 patients (p CPAP use by at least 2 h, while only 6% decreased by > or = 2 h (p CPAP use prior to CPAP clinic compared to patients not receiving oxygen (p CPAP therapy provided a simple and effective means of improving treatment of OSA.

  19. Termination of psychotherapy: the journey of 10 psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkiadaki, Evangelia; Strauss, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Literature on termination originates mainly from clinical and theoretical accounts as well as practitioners' autobiographical reports. There is, however, a paucity of psychological research on termination. The purpose of this study is to examine the process of termination of therapy based on therapists' narratives of experiences of endings with patients. Grounded Theory methodology has been applied in this study in order to conceptualize the process of termination from the therapist's perspective. Ten psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapists were interviewed for this study. Grounded Theory analysis of the data revealed five central categories: therapist as a person, therapist's awareness of termination, development of therapeutic relationship, working through termination, and the aftermath (post-termination phase). The results offer a Grounded Theory model of the therapist's journey through termination of therapy with patients. Subcategories and their relationships will be explored. Implications for clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research will be discussed. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  20. The psychodynamics and developmental psychology of the borderline patient: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, E R

    1978-11-01

    The author reviews the psychodynamics and developmental psychology of the borderline patient as described in the literature on intensive therapy, early mother-child interaction, and family interaction. Focusing on the borderline patient's characteristic difficulties in intimate relationships, he describes the patient's use of splitting and projective identification as seen in the characteristic transference-countertransference interaction in intensive therapy. These primitive defensive mechanisms, which are also utilized by family members, appear to contribute to a failure of empathic responses both during the child's early development and in the family interactions during his adolescence. The author concludes that conceptual attempts to relate adult and child phenomena, although highly speculative, create new and useful perspectives for the treatment of the borderline patient.

  1. Do therapists' subjective variables impact on psychodynamic psychotherapy outcomes? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingiardi, Vittorio; Muzi, Laura; Tanzilli, Annalisa; Carone, Nicola

    2017-09-05

    Despite growing attention to the general therapist effects in a wide range of clinical settings, little is known about the individual, cross-situational, and therapy-nonspecific variables that impact on the differential effectiveness of clinicians. The current study is a systematic review of the evidence relating to the influence of therapist's subjective characteristics on outcomes of psychodynamic psychotherapies. A multistage and systematic search of articles published between 1987 and 2017 identified 30 relevant studies, which were organized into 6 areas according to the specific therapist's variable considered. Therapists' interpersonal functioning and skills showed the strongest evidence of a direct effect on treatment outcomes. Furthermore, there were preliminary evidence that therapists' attachment styles, their interpersonal history with caregivers, and their self-concept might affect outcomes through interaction effects with other constructs, such as technical interventions, patient's pathology, and therapeutic alliance. The high variability between studies on therapists' overall reflective or introspective abilities and personality characteristics suggested the need for more systematic research in these areas, whereas therapists' values and attitudes showed small effects on therapeutic outcome. The present review clarifies how a deep examination of the contribution of therapists' subjective characteristics can help elucidate the complex association between relational and technical factors related to the outcome of psychodynamic treatments. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A psychodynamic understanding of trauma and adolescence - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... guilt and difficulties with trust, intimacy and safety. This approach highlights the subjective experience of unexpected violence-induced trauma that overwhelms the ego and produces a state of helplessness. Psychodynamic phenomena, such as regression, defenses and the inner world of the adolescent are discussed in ...

  3. Psychodynamics of suicide, with particular reference to the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, H

    1991-09-01

    The article reviews the literature on the psychodynamics of suicide, focusing on factors that will help in evaluating and treating the young suicidal patient. Articles published in refereed journals and books and book chapters based on such articles are the source of most of the material. Articles that first brought a new finding to notice are given preference. Methodological limitations and contradictions with the data of other studies are pointed out. The psychodynamic meaning of suicide for a patient derives from both affective and cognitive components. Rage, hopelessness, despair, and guilt are important affective states in which young patients commit suicide. The meanings of suicide can be usefully organized around the conscious (cognitive) and unconscious meanings given to death by the suicidal patient: death as reunion, death as rebirth, death as retaliatory abandonment, death as revenge, and death as self-punishment or atonement. Knowledge of the psychodynamics helps to distinguish which patients with any given diagnosis are at risk for suicide. Such knowledge is essential to the psychotherapeutic treatment of the young suicidal patient. Topics for future research include the role of anxiety in suicide; the capacity to bear hopelessness, rage, and other unpleasant affects without regression; the use of particular defense mechanisms in distinguishing the risk of either suicidal or violent behavior; and the relation of specific psychodynamic conflicts seen in suicidal patients to particular psychiatric diagnoses.

  4. A service dog in group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  5. Group physical therapy during inpatient rehabilitation for acute spinal cord injury: findings from the SCIRehab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Jeanne M; Natale, Audrey; Labarbera, Jacqueline; Schroeder, Sally Taylor; Gassaway, Julie; Backus, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation for spinal cord injury (SCI) includes the use of both individual and group physical therapy sessions. A greater understanding of group physical therapy use will help in the evaluation of the appropriateness of its use and contribute to the development of standards of practice. This report describes the extent to which group physical therapy is being used in inpatient rehabilitation for SCI, identifies group physical therapy interventions being delivered, and examines patterns in the types of activities being used for people with different levels and completeness of injury (ie, injury groups). The SCIRehab Study is a 5-year, multicenter investigation that uses practice-based evidence research methodology. Data on characteristics of participants and treatments provided were collected through detailed chart review and customized research documentation completed by clinicians at the point of care. The analyses described here included data from 600 participants enrolled during the first year of the project. Most of the participants (549/600) spent time in group physical therapy, and 23% of all documented physical therapy time was spent in group sessions. The most common group physical therapy activities were strengthening, manual wheelchair mobility, gait training, endurance activities, and range of motion/stretching. Time spent in group physical therapy and the nature of activities performed varied among the injury groups. Physical therapy use patterns observed in the 6 participating centers may not represent all facilities providing inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Research documentation did not include all factors that may affect group physical therapy use, and some sessions were not documented. The majority of physical therapy was provided in individual sessions, but group physical therapy contributed significantly to total physical therapy time. Group physical therapy time and activities differed among the injury groups in patterns

  6. Phonological/Traditional Approaches to Articulation Therapy: A Retrospective Group Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Edward S.

    1996-01-01

    A study of 36 children (ages 3-5) compared traditional and phonological treatment of 36 children with multiple articulation disorders. Results found that the response of children in the traditional therapy group was substantially inferior; the children in the phonological therapy group showed more improvement with fewer therapy sessions. (CR)

  7. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Treatments for Academic Procrastination: A Randomized Controlled Group Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Shi; Ran, Li-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), compared with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), in alleviating academic procrastination. Method: A total of 60 (53.3% male) undergraduates suffering from academic procrastination were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (ACT and CBT) and a control group.…

  8. Group Metacognitive Therapy vs. Mindfulness Meditation Therapy in a Transdiagnostic Patient Sample: A Randomised Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Lora; Reeves, David; Morrison, Anthony P; Wells, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Two transdiagnostic therapies for treating psychological disorder are Metacognitive Therapy (MCT) and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). These two approaches have yet to be compared and therefore the current study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a study of group MCT and MBSR in treating anxiety and depression. A feasibility trial with 40 participants (aged 19-56) was conducted. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either eight weeks of group MCT or MBSR. The primary outcome was feasibility which included recruitment rates, retention and treatment acceptability. The primary symptom outcome was the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) total score, which provided an overall measure of distress. Both treatments were found to be acceptable with low attrition and similar ratings of acceptability. Changes in outcomes were analyzed based on the intention-to-treat principle using mixed effect models. Preliminary analyses revealed that MCT was more effective in treating anxiety and depression in comparison to MBSR, and in reducing both positive and negative metacognitive beliefs. Reliable improvement rates favoured MCT at post-treatment and 6-month follow up. Both treatments appeared to be feasible and acceptable in treating transdiagnostic samples; however, a larger, definitive trial is required. The limitations and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychodynamic experience enhances recognition of hidden childhood trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cohen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental psychology has only recently provided supporting evidence for Freud's and Janet's description of unconscious phenomena. Here, we aimed to assess whether specific abilities, such as personal psychodynamic experience, enhance the ability to recognize unconscious phenomena in peers - in other words, to better detect implicit knowledge related to individual self-experience. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we collected 14 videos from seven healthy adults who had experienced a sibling's cancer during childhood and seven matched controls. Subjects and controls were asked to give a 5-minute spontaneous free-associating speech following specific instructions created in order to activate a buffer zone between fantasy and reality. Then, 18 raters (three psychoanalysts, six medical students, three oncologists, three cognitive behavioral therapists and three individuals with the same experience of trauma were randomly shown the videos and asked to blindly classify them according to whether the speaker had a sibling with cancer using a Likert scale. Using a permutation test, we found a significant association between group and recognition score (ANOVA: p = .0006. Psychoanalysts were able to recognize, above chance levels, healthy adults who had experienced sibling cancer during childhood without explicit knowledge of this history (Power = 88%; p = .002. In contrast, medical students, oncologists, cognitive behavioral therapists and individuals who had the same history of a sibling's cancer were unable to do so. CONCLUSION: This experiment supports the view that implicit recognition of a subject's history depends on the rater's specific abilities. In the case of subjects who did have a sibling with cancer during childhood, psychoanalysts appear better able to recognize this particular history.

  10. Exploring the meaning of trauma in the South African Police Service: A systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This study explores individual stories of trauma and their dissonance with the official, dominant discourse on trauma in the South African Police Service (SAPS from a systems psychodynamic perspective.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was, firstly, to explore how trauma experienced by South African Police Service members is constructed or ‘talked about’ and made sense of. Questions and issues that are considered relevant to the primary purpose are: which aspects of the working environment do members consider to be the most stressful, traumatic and difficult to cope with, and what is the effect of the change and transition processes on members’ working experiences?Motivation for the study: The authors set out to explore the role of systems psychodynamics in the experience of trauma and stress in the SAPS.Research design, approach and method: Through this qualitative, explorative, social phenomenological study, contributing circumstances and processes are included as additional discourses in an attempt to deepen understanding. The epistemology viewpoint of the study is found in the social constructionism and the data comprise 15 essays by members of the SAPS, all of which have been analysed from the perspective of systems psychodynamics.Main findings: Although the effect of trauma on police officers can never be negated, the way in which they deal with trauma seems to be different from what was initially believed. Further, their experience of stress is not solely the result of traumatic experiences but rather the result of traumatic experiences and systems psychodynamics operating within their organisation – which includes both organisational stressors or dynamics and transformation dynamics.Practical/managerial implications: The history of psychological trauma indicates that constructions of traumatic stress are strongly related to cultural, social and political circumstances. Current psychoanalytic thinking

  11. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  12. Active versus receptive group music therapy for major depressive disorder-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiwannapat, Penchaya; Thaipisuttikul, Papan; Poopityastaporn, Patchawan; Katekaew, Wanwisa

    2016-06-01

    To compare the effects of 1) active group music therapy and 2) receptive group music therapy to group counseling in treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). On top of standard care, 14 MDD outpatients were randomly assigned to receive 1) active group music therapy (n=5), 2) receptive group music therapy (n=5), or 3) group counseling (n=4). There were 12 one-hour weekly group sessions in each arm. Participants were assessed at baseline, 1 month (after 4 sessions), 3 months (end of interventions), and 6 months. Primary outcomes were depressive scores measured by Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) Thai version. Secondary outcomes were self-rated depression score and quality of life. At 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, both therapy groups showed statistically non-significant reduction in MADRS Thai scores when compared with the control group (group counseling). The reduction was slightly greater in the active group than the receptive group. Although there were trend toward better outcomes on self-report depression and quality of life, the differences were not statistically significant. Group music therapy, either active or receptive, is an interesting adjunctive treatment option for outpatients with MDD. The receptive group may reach peak therapeutic effect faster, but the active group may have higher peak effect. Group music therapy deserves further comprehensive studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  14. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  15. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kacar Basaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that evaluate effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for treatment for panic disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in the national and international databases. The articles that were not therapy effectiveness studies, and group therapies that not based on cognitive behavioral approach were eliminated. The remaining 19 studies that were met the criteria were introduced in terms of method, therapy characteristics and results. The results of the studies showed that cognitive behavioral group therapies have similar efficacy with individual cognitive behavioral therapy on panic disorder symptoms (panic attacks frequency, the level of agoraphobia etc. and comorbid disorders (depression, anxiety sensitivity. However, cognitive behavioral group therapy is more cost-effective. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 79-94

  16. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial with internet therapy, group therapy and a waiting list condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. Design: A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment

  17. Gesture and Naming Therapy for People with Severe Aphasia: A Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jane; Best, Wendy; Cocks, Naomi; Cruice, Madeline; Pring, Tim; Bulcock, Gemma; Creek, Gemma; Eales, Nancy; Mummery, Alice Lockhart; Matthews, Niina; Caute, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors (a) investigated whether a group of people with severe aphasia could learn a vocabulary of pantomime gestures through therapy and (b) compared their learning of gestures with their learning of words. The authors also examined whether gesture therapy cued word production and whether naming therapy cued gestures.…

  18. Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L.; Fleming, Jan E.; Rector, Neil A.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy (MAGT) for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is based largely on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes et al., 1999), with enhanced mindfulness mostly from Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; Segal et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and initial…

  19. Psychodynamic treatment, training, and supervision using internet-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishkin, Ralph; Fishkin, Lana; Leli, Ubaldo; Katz, Barbara; Snyder, Elise

    2011-01-01

    For several years, the China American Psychoanalytic Alliance (CAPA) has provided treatment, training, and supervision to Chinese mental health professionals over the Internet. The lack of Chinese analysts and mentors has created an intense demand for psychodynamic psychotherapy training and treatment that CAPA is addressing using Skype™ and other distance communication technologies. This article describes the project, its history, scope, and activities, and the experiences of CAPA teachers and clinicians in exploring and developing the usefulness and power of this very new teaching method. Some particular characteristics of Chinese culture have become apparent as a result of the teaching experience. Aspects of the transference and countertransference that are shaped by the virtual nature of the technology are discussed, using case material. Our hope is that, in helping to train our Chinese students in psychodynamic psychotherapy, they will go on to train future generations of clinicians. This model of teaching and training could also be applied in other underserved areas.

  20. Autoethnography and Psychodynamics in Interrelational Spaces of the Research Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina; Hansson, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    be made accessible methodologically and methodically by combining a psychodynamic approach with an autoethnographic approach. The methodical question is therefore how the researcher can conduct introspection and at the same time reflect upon and analyse the central object of investigation. The approach......This article takes the stance that the subjectivity of the researcher is an integral part of the research process. It should be studied as a key to understanding the interrelational processes of meaning in an interview situation. The article demonstrates how the subjectivity of the researcher can...... is psychoanalytically informed, but autoethnography became the actual vehicle for moving beyond reflections on the psychodynamics represented in the texts. The researcher ventured into an introspection of not only the texts, but also her own feelings, fantasies, and bodily experiences at the time of the interview...

  1. Viewing the Disney Movie Frozen through a Psychodynamic Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christopher; Bhalla, Ruchi

    2015-10-14

    The Disney movie Frozen is the fifth highest grossing movie of all time. In order to better understand this phenomenon and to hypothesize as to why the movie resonated so strongly with audiences, we have interpreted the movie using psychodynamic theory. We pay particular attention to the themes of puberty, adolescence and sibling relationships and discuss examples of ego defenses that are employed by the lead character in relation to these concepts.

  2. Empathy deficit in antisocial personality disorder: a psychodynamic formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malancharuvil, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    Empathic difficulty is a highly consequential characteristic of antisocial personality structure. The origin, maintenance, and possible resolution of this profound deficit are not very clear. While reconstructing empathic ability is of primary importance in the treatment of antisocial personality, not many proven procedures are in evidence. In this article, the author offers a psychodynamic formulation of the origin, character, and maintenance of the empathic deficiency in antisocial personality. The author discusses some of the treatment implications from this dynamic formulation.

  3. Influencing and moderating factors analyzed in the group art therapy of two schizophrenic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Chieh; Ku, Yung-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Art therapy has been considered a guideline treatment for schizophrenia. Due to difficulty in the outcome measurement, the research is difficult and controversial. Here, we presented two schizophrenic patients receiving the regular art group therapy. We compared their characteristics and different outcome. Art therapy is difficult to quantify. However, we could qualify the improvement from the individual case. Further study might be focus on how to make appropriate qualification of art therapy and individualized difference instead of enrollment of huge data bank.

  4. Randomized clinical trial: group counseling based on tinnitus retraining therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, James A; Loovis, Carl; Montero, Melissa; Kaelin, Christine; Anselmi, Kathryn-Anne; Coombs, Rebecca; Hensley, June; James, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    .... We conducted a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that group educational counseling based on TRT principles would effectively treat veterans who have clinically significant tinnitus...

  5. Effects of Active Versus Passive Group Music Therapy on Preadolescents with Emotional, Learning, and Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montello; Coons

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to compare the behavioral effects of active, rhythm-based group music therapy vs. those of passive, listening-based group music therapy on preadolescents with emotional, learning, and behavioral disorders. It was hypothesized that preadolescents who participated in active music therapy would more significantly improve target behaviors than those involved in passive music therapy. Achenbach's Teacher Report Form (TRF) was used to confirm changes among subjects in attention, motivation, and hostility as rated by homeroom teachers. Twelve music therapy sessions were conducted over a 4-month period with three different groups of subjects (n = 16), with two groups participating in active music therapy and the other receiving passive music therapy. Results indicate that subjects improved significantly after receiving both music therapy interventions. The most significant change in subjects was found on the aggression/hostility scale. These results suggest that group music therapy can facilitate the process of serf-expression in emotionally disturbed/learning disabled adolescents and provide a channel for transforming frustration, anger, and aggression into the experience of creativity and self-mastery. Discussion of results also includes recommendations for chousing one music therapy approach over another based on personality types and/or clinical diagnoses of subjects.

  6. [The Therapy Process of Accompanying Mothers in Multiple Family Therapy Groups: Evidence from a German Child Psychiatric Setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Lippe, Holger; Radloff, Josefine; Schadow, Jeanette; Röttger, Ulrike; Flechtner, Hans-Henning

    2016-10-01

    The Therapy Process of Accompanying Mothers in Multiple Family Therapy Groups: Evidence from a German Child Psychiatric Setting This study provides an empirical contribution to the understanding of parents that accompany their children in psychiatric multiple family therapy settings (MFT). To this end, we conducted qualitative interviews with mothers that had successfully participated, with their diagnosed children (ages 3 to 9), in disorder-independent, age-homogeneous, and open family groups (the "Magdeburg Model") for several months. We performed a theoretical coding approach to the extensive interview material (n = 6 interviews, duration = 70 to 100 minutes each) according to Grounded Theory and extracted seven main and 29 sub-categories. These categories yield a coherent, complete, and specific subjective therapy model for this setting. One of the central findings is a profound understanding of to what extent and by which means the family group as a social arena paves and supports the arrival of the mothers in the group, their engagement into the therapy process, and their motivational and volitional steps during therapy. Another relevant result is a reconstruction of what we termed Arriving Home, which is the epitome of the positive cognitive, affective, and behavioral therapeutic development that mothers perceive. Conclusions for clinical practice as well as for qualitative and mixed methods therapy research are discussed.

  7. Design of an international multicentre RCT on group schema therapy for borderline personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzelaer, P.; Farrell, J.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Jacob, G.A.; Lee, C.W.; Brand, O.; van Breukelen, G.; Fassbinder, E.; Fretwell, H.; Harper, R.P.; Lavender, A.; Lockwood, G.; Malogiannis, I.A.; Schweiger, U.; Startup, H.; Stevenson, T.; Zarbock, G.; Arntz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe and highly prevalent mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST) has been found effective in the treatment of BPD and is commonly delivered through an individual format. A group format (group schema therapy, GST) has also been developed. GST has

  8. The Effects of Group Art Therapy on Mothers of Children with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sau-Lai; Peng, Maria Sau-Chi

    2017-01-01

    In this study we explored the effects of group art therapy on the emotional well-being and parental empathy of mothers of children with special educational needs. Eleven mothers of children who were diagnosed with at least 1 kind of special educational need participated in a 16-week program. We hypothesized that the art therapy group would help…

  9. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  10. Participants' Perceptions of "Curative Factors" in Therapy and Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Michael; Bartels, Bryan D.

    1975-01-01

    Yalom's Q-sort questionnaire was administered to 13 groups and then item analized. Factor analysis identified seven major "curative" factors. Analysis of variance and correlation techniques showed that part of the variation in curative factor perception is related to characteristics of groups and/or their participants. (SE)

  11. Transference patterns and working alliance during the early phase of psychodynamic psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardžić Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Working alliance, as a collaborative part of the therapeutic relationship has been proven to be one of the most powerful therapeutic factors in psychotherapy in general, regardless many technical differences between numerous psychotherapeutic modalities. On the other hand, transference is the basic concept of psychodynamic psychotherapy, and, according to the psychoanalytic theory and practice, it forms a major part of the therapeutic relationship. The aim of our paper was to determine the differences between the groups of patients with low, middle, and high working alliance scores and the dropout group in transference patterns, sociodemographic and clinical parameters, during the early phase of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Methods. Our sample consisted of 61 non-psychotic patients, randomly selected by the method of consecutive admissions and treated with psychoanalytic psychotherapy in the outpatient clinical setting. The patients were prospectively followed during 5 initial sessions of the therapeutic process. The working alliance inventory and Core conflictual relationship theme method were used for the estimation of working alliance and transference patterns, respectively. According to the Working Alliance Inventory scores, four groups of patients were formed and than compared. Results. Our results show a significant difference between the groups of patients with low, middle, and high working alliance inventory scores and the dropout group on the variable - transference patterns in the therapeutic relationship. Conclusion. Disharmonious transference patterns are more frequent in patients who form poor quality working alliance in the early phase of psychotherapy, or early dropout psychotherapy. It is of great importance to recognize transference patterns of a patient at the beginning of the psychotherapeutic process, because of their potentially harmful influence on the quality of working alliance.

  12. Therapeutic factors and language patterns in group therapy application of computer-assisted text analysis to the examination of microprocesses in group therapy: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontao, Maria Isabel; Mergenthaler, Erhard

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this single-case-design study was to examine the relationships between therapeutic factors in group therapy and the language features of the group dialogue. Forty-two transcripts from a group treatment were investigated. Emotion-abstraction patterns (EAPs) were identified for the group as a whole using computer-assisted text analysis, and therapeutic factors were rated by external judges using the Kiel Group Psychotherapy Process Scale. Significant positive relationships were found between insight and the EAP connecting and between catharsis and the EAP experiencing. Interpersonal learning-output, catharsis, and self-disclosure showed higher scores in connection with the therapeutic cycle, which, according to the therapeutic cycle model, represents a sequence of EAP related to a successful therapeutic process. The current findings show that the use of EAPs allows the identification of key moments in a group therapy process.

  13. Group Versus Individual Physical Therapy for Veterans With Knee Osteoarthritis: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Hoenig, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Efficient approaches are needed for delivering nonpharmacological interventions for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This trial compared group-based versus individual physical therapy interventions for management of knee OA. Three hundred twenty patients with knee OA at the VA Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (mean age=60 years, 88% male, 58% nonwhite) were randomly assigned to receive either the group intervention (group physical therapy; six 1-hour sessions, typically 8 participants per group) or the individual intervention (individual physical therapy; two 1-hour sessions). Both programs included instruction in home exercise, joint protection techniques, and individual physical therapist evaluation. The primary outcome measure was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; range=0-96, higher scores indicate worse symptoms), measured at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. The secondary outcome measure was the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range=0-12, higher scores indicate better performance), measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Linear mixed models assessed the difference in WOMAC scores between arms. At 12 weeks, WOMAC scores were 2.7 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% confidence interval [CI]=-5.9, 0.5; P=.10), indicating no between-group difference. At 24 weeks, WOMAC scores were 1.3 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-4.6, 2.0; P=.44), indicating no significant between-group difference. At 12 weeks, SPPB scores were 0.1 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-0.5, 0.2; P=.53), indicating no difference between groups. This study was conducted in one VA medical center. Outcome assessors were blinded, but participants and physical therapists were not blinded. Group physical therapy was not more effective

  14. United States National Will: A Psychodynamic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    requires active preservation of the group which can be effected in three general ways: dependence, pairing, and fight or flight . At any time 1 7Ibid...these ways. A group in such a state as a basic assumption group is labeled "Ba" with a letter - "V" (dependent) or "P" (pairing) or "F" ( fight or flight ) appended...The BZAF ( fight or flight ) group makes decisions in an aura of the need to protect the group from outside threats. The decisions are in terms of

  15. Negotiation of identity in group therapy for aphasia: the Aphasia Café.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Elman, Roberta J

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in ensuring that aphasia intervention includes attention to the negotiation of a robust identity after the life-altering changes that often accompany the onset of aphasia. But how does one go about simultaneously improving communication and positive identity development within aphasia therapy? Socially oriented group therapy for aphasia has been touted as one means of addressing both psychosocial and communicative goals in aphasia. This article describes the results of a sociolinguistic analysis of group therapy for aphasia in which positive personal and group identity are skilfully negotiated. Sociolinguistic microanalysis of discourse in a group therapy session was undertaken. The session, described as group conversation therapy, included eight adults with aphasia, a speech-language pathologist and an assistant. The session was videotaped and transcribed, and the data were analysed to identify 'indices of identity' within the discourse. This included discourse that exposed members' roles, values or beliefs about themselves or others. The data were further analysed to identify 'patterns' of discourse associated with identity. The result is a detailed description of identity-enhancing discourse within group therapy for aphasia. The findings included several categories associated with the negotiation of identity in therapy including: (1) discourse demonstrating that group members were 'being heard', (2) that the competence of group members was assumed, (3) that 'solidarity' existed in the group, (4) that saving face and promoting positive personal identity was important, and (5) that markers of group identity were made visible via discourse that referenced both member inclusion as well as non-member exclusion. The results suggest that it is possible to create identity-enhancing interactions as part of therapy for aphasia; the analysis demonstrates the potential role of the group leader/clinician in managing identity negotiation in

  16. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person�s wholeness. This includes the body, the person�s philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the same extent as it addresses the emotional psyche and sexuality, and it is thus much broader than traditional psychotherapy.Where existential psychotherapy is rather depressing concerning the fundamental human condition, existential holistic therapy conceives life to be basically good. The fundamentals in existential holistic therapy are that everybody has the potential for healing themselves to become loving, joyful, sexually attractive, strong, and gifted, which is a message that most patients welcome. While the patient is suffering and fighting to get through life, the most important job for the holistic therapist is to keep a positive perspective of life. In accordance with these fundamentals, many participants in holistic group therapy will have positive emotional experiences, often of an unknown intensity, and these experiences appear to transform their lives within only a few days or weeks of therapy.An important idea of the course is Bohm�s concept of �holo-movement� in the group, resulting from intense coherence between the group members. When the group comes together, the individual will be linked to the totality and the great movement forward towards love, consciousness, and happiness will happen collectively � if it happens at all. This gives the individual the feeling that everything that happens is right, important, and valuable for all the participants at the same time. Native Americans and other premodern people refer to this

  17. Token Reinforcement Therapy: A Comparison of Matched Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, Glenn D.; Zeidberg, Zeena

    1971-01-01

    A token economy program established for psychiatric patients compared them to a control group on ward behavior, rating scales, participation in instrumental role activities, self care behavior and extra hospital visits. Results indicated improvement on ward behavior rating scales and greater participation in instrumental role activities for…

  18. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy versus group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Andri S; Bidwell, L Cinnamon; Brosse, Alisha L; Carey, Gregory; Hauser, Monika; Mackiewicz Seghete, Kristen L; Schulz-Heik, R Jay; Weatherley, Donald; Erwin, Brigette A; Craighead, W Edward

    2011-11-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was compared to group psychotherapy (GPT), a credible, structurally equivalent control condition that included only nonspecific factors of group treatment (such as group dynamics). Participants were 45 college students at the University of Colorado with a primary diagnosis of SAD. Each treatment condition comprised eight group sessions lasting 2 hr each. Independent assessors (blind to treatment assignment) assessed participants at baseline and posttreatment with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Both treatments were found to be equally credible. There were five noncompleters in the CBGT condition (21.7%) and only one in the GPT condition (4.3%). There were no statistically significant differences posttreatment (controlling for pretreatment scores) between the two treatment conditions, and both treatments were found to be efficacious. Effect sizes for CBGT were similar to earlier studies, and adherence ratings revealed excellent adherence. Treatment of SAD appears to be moving toward individual CBT, partly because of high attrition rates and underutilization of group dynamics in group CBT. However, group therapy has unique therapeutic ingredients, and it may be too early to give up on group treatment altogether. Discussion of these findings included future directions with this treatment modality, especially whether these two types of group treatment could be combined and whether such combination might serve to decrease attrition, enhance efficacy, and facilitate dissemination. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The impact of group therapy training on social communications of Afghan immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Musavi, Tayebeh; Ghazavi, Zahra; Zandieh, Zahra; Zamani, Ahmadreza

    2011-01-01

    Mental training considers sharing of mental health care information as the primary objective. The secondary objectives include facilitating dialogue about feelings such as isolation, sadness, labeling, loneliness and possible strategies for confronting with these feelings. Group therapy trainings have supportive functioning in accepting the environment so that the members are able to be part of the indigenous groups. However, no study has been ever done on the impact of this educational method on the communication problems of this group. This study aimed to determine the impact of group therapy training on the communication problems of Afghan immigrants. This was a clinical trial study. Eighty-eight Afghan men were investigated. Sampling method was simple sampling method. Thereafter, the study subjects were divided randomly into two groups of test and control based on the inclusion criteria. Data collection tool was a self-made questionnaire about the social problems. For analyzing the data, software SPSS, independent t-test and paired t-test were used. Reviewing the data indicated lower mean score of the social problems after implementing the group therapy training in social communication compared with before implementing the group therapy training. Paired t-test showed a significant difference between mean scores of the social communication problems before and after the implementation of group therapy training. Given the effectiveness of the intervention, group therapy training on social problems in social communication of Afghan immigrants is recommended. This program should be part of continuous education and training of the Afghan immigrants.

  20. Psychodynamics of the Ku Klux Klan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmony, Steven E.; Smoke, Richard

    The Ku Klux Klan (KKK), characterized by disguises, secrecy, bigotry, and terror, came into power in the South after the Civil War. In some parts of the country the KKK, an extreme example of pathological group process, appears as strong and violent today as ever. Fromm (1941) noted that the basis of group psychology is the individual personality…

  1. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Zwerenz

    Full Text Available Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress.In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG. The control group (CG received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE, and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months and at follow-up (12 months. We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group.N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74% and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG.Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  2. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Becker, Jan; Gerzymisch, Katharina; Siepmann, Martin; Holme, Martin; Kiwus, Ulrich; Spörl-Dönch, Sieglinde; Beutel, Manfred E

    2017-01-01

    Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress. In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG). The control group (CG) received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE), and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints) were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months) and at follow-up (12 months). We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group. N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74%) and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG. Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  3. Group cognitive behavioral therapy for children and adolescents with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Luzia Flavia; Barbosa, Deise Lima Fernandes; Rizzutti, Sueli; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo; Miranda, Monica Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The present study analyzed the use of group CBT protocol to treat ADHD by comparing two types of treatment, unimodal (medication only) and multimodal (medication combined with CBT), in terms of their effects on cognitive and behavioral domains, social skills, and type of treatment effect by ADHD subtype. Participants were 60 children with ADHD, subtypes inattentive and combined, aged 7 to 14, 48 boys. Combined treatment included 20 CBT sessions while all children were given Ritalin L...

  4. Effects of a music therapy group intervention on enhancing social skills in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGasse, A Blythe

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that music therapy can improve social behaviors and joint attention in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); however, more research on the use of music therapy interventions for social skills is needed to determine the impact of group music therapy. To examine the effects of a music therapy group intervention on eye gaze, joint attention, and communication in children with ASD. Seventeen children, ages 6 to 9, with a diagnosis of ASD were randomly assigned to the music therapy group (MTG) or the no-music social skills group (SSG). Children participated in ten 50-minute group sessions over a period of 5 weeks. All group sessions were designed to target social skills. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), and video analysis of sessions were used to evaluate changes in social behavior. There were significant between-group differences for joint attention with peers and eye gaze towards persons, with participants in the MTG demonstrating greater gains. There were no significant between-group differences for initiation of communication, response to communication, or social withdraw/behaviors. There was a significant interaction between time and group for SRS scores, with improvements for the MTG but not the SSG. Scores on the ATEC did not differ over time between the MTG and SSG. The results of this study support further research on the use of music therapy group interventions for social skills in children with ASD. Statistical results demonstrate initial support for the use of music therapy social groups to develop joint attention. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Perceptions of group music therapy among elderly nursing home residents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Jane, Sui-Whi

    2009-08-01

    To explore the perceptions of group music therapy among elderly nursing home residents in Taiwan. Focus group methodology was used to explore the perceptions of elderly participants about their experience of group music therapy. Verbatim transcripts of audiotaped interviews were analysed by content analysis. In total, 3 focus groups were held with 17 wheelchair-bound elderly residents. Analysis of participants' perceptions of group music therapy revealed two major themes: (1) strength derived from the group dynamic and (2) enhanced quality of life. The first theme included three subthemes: (1) sense of energy, (2) distraction from suffering, and (3) confirmation as a person. The second major theme included four subthemes: (1) variety added to life, (2) motivation to exercise, (3) learning positive behaviour, and (4) greater life satisfaction. Elderly, wheelchair-bound residents of a nursing home in Taiwan positively viewed their experiences with our group music therapy programme, particularly its active component. The findings of this study suggest that healthcare providers should consider integrating group music therapy into their programmes for elderly nursing home residents and design the therapy to add variety to their life, give them a sense of autonomy by having them choose their preferred musical activities, and improve their cognitive function.

  6. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Tokgunaydin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for the treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in national and international databases. The articles that were gathered by the search have been read and the ones that were not therapy effectiveness studies, cognitive behavioral group therapies and that included posttraumatic stress disorder comorbid with alcohol/substance abuse, personality disorders and psychotic disorders were eliminated. The remaining 13 studies that fulfiilrf research criteria were introduced in the context of method and therapy characteristics. It can be seen that the cognitive behavioral group therapies are effective in decreasing the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and/or comorbid disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 95-107

  7. Five-Year Follow-Up of Supportive Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Susanne; Køster, Anne; Valbak, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The long-term outcomes of several approaches to intervention targeting social functioning in schizophrenia are not well documented. Contemporary supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) aims to improve social functioning. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long...... up for 5 years (N = 269). The SPP targeted interpersonal relationships, emotion regulation, social cognition, and self-coherence. RESULTS: Significant between-group effects in favor of SPP+ST on social functioning, overall symptoms, and positive psychotic symptoms were found during the period...... of active SPP intervention. These differential effects, however, were not sustained after end of additional SPP at 5-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: The findings are in line with results from other approaches targeting social functioning in schizophrenia and support SPP as a valuable treatment. Further research...

  8. Followership's experiences of organisational leadership: A systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Greyvenstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Followers’ experiences of leadership in their organisations were qualitatively explored and described from a systems psychodynamic perspective. The findings revealed a very negative view on how leadership treats followership, and that leadership is seen as inconsistent.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to describe followership’s experiences of organisational leadership from a systems psychodynamic perspective.Motivation for the study: Organisational leadership is under tremendous pressure to perform and often under attack, especially if they do not appear to be caring and supportive. The research was planned to better understand the unconscious nature of this phenomenon.Research design, approach and method: Qualitative, descriptive research was used. Data was collected through psychodynamic Listening Posts and analysed using discourse analysis. Working hypotheses were formulated per theme and integrated into the research hypothesis.Main findings: Six themes manifested, namely a negative leadership view; idealisation of the past and blaming the present; obsession with race and gender; constantly changing identity; unfinished business and the future; and cope and hope.Practical/managerial implications: Leadership seem to focus more on business than followership issues which leads to followers feeling disregarded and de-authorised. As a result followers withhold authorisation from leadership which may be instrumental in leaderships’ difficulties to manage change and transformation effectively. Leadership development needs to incorporate the self-authorisation of leaders as well as the invitation of authorisation by leaders.Contribution/value-add: The data would be useful to leadership towards understanding, repairing and optimising their relationships and organisational impact through people.

  9. Executive coaching in diversity from the systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerato Motsoaledi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The researcher applied role analysis from the systems psychodynamic perspective to executives in state departments to improve their awareness of the unconscious diversity dynamics that affect their roles.Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to describe the application of systems psychodynamic role analysis and to determine its trustworthiness in assisting executives to work effectively with conscious and unconscious diversity dynamics in their organisations.Motivation for the study: Executives generally struggle to understand the deeper meaning of diversity behaviour that manifests inside and around them, leading to conflict. Without understanding the unconscious meaning of the behaviour, organisations founder easily. Awareness of below-the-surface behaviour leads to insight and taking responsibility for diversity-related behaviours.Research design, approach and method: The researcher coached six executives in South African state departments over a period of 10 months. The coaching addressed and analysed the executives’ organisational roles. She analysed the data using discourse analysis.Main findings: Themes relating to the diversity dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity, authority, disability, language, age, de-authorisation of diversity work and the coaching process emerged. The coaching assisted the executives to gain insights into below-the-surface diversity dynamics, to address diversity in a sustained manner and to take up their organisational roles more effectively.Practical/managerial implications: Coached executives will have a more objective and dynamic experience of diversity issues that manifest in organisations, between colleagues and within themselves.Contribution/value-add: Executive coaching from a systems psychodynamic perspective displays trustworthiness in improving participants’ diversity awareness, especially with regard to gender, race, ethnicity and authorisation.

  10. Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

  11. Development of curative therapies for Ewing sarcomas by interdisciplinary cooperative groups in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bölling, T.; Braun-Munzinger, G.; Burdach, S.; Calaminus, G.; Craft, A.; Delattre, O.; Deley, M.-C. L.; Dirksen, U.; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B.; Dunst, J.; Engel, S.; Faldum, A.; Fröhlich, B.; Gadner, H.; Göbel, U.; Gosheger, G.; Hardes, J.; Hawkins, D. S.; Hjorth, L.; Hoffmann, C.; Kovar, H.; Kruseova, J.; Ladenstein, R.; Leuschner, I.; Lewis, I. J.; Oberlin, O.; Paulussen, M.; Potratz, J.; Ranft, A.; Rössig, C.; Rübe, C.; Sauer, R.; Schober, O.; Schuck, A.; Timmermann, B.; Tirode, F.; van den Berg, H.; van Valen, F.; Vieth, V.; Willich, N.; Winkelmann, W.; Whelan, J.; Womer, R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Curative therapies for Ewing sarcoma have been developed within cooperative groups. Consecutive clinical trials have systematically assessed the impact and timing of local therapy and the activity of cytotoxic drugs and their combinations. They have led to an increase of long-term disease-free

  12. Small Group versus Individual Speech Therapy with Hearing-Impaired Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of individual speech therapy (8 students) versus small group therapy (18 students) was evaluated with hearing impaired young adults who had articulation problems. Articulation skill mastery, improvement in speech intelligibility, and quantity and type of utterances were examined. Only quantity of utterances distinguished…

  13. Exploring the development of an organisational culture of control and dependency from a systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Eeden

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Globalisation and accelerating rates of change characterise the work environment.Research purpose: The aim of this research was to study the impact of the change process at a plant of a South African production company.Motivations for the study: Problems were experienced in terms of production and a need for transformation at different levels was expressed. Co-dependence in the environment necessitated exploration of intra-organisational dynamics.Research design, approach and method: The study focused on the management team at a specifc plant, but by applying the systems psychodynamic perspective it was possible to also explore the mutual effect of relationships with other systems in the organisation, the company as a whole and the environment. Respondents included the directors of manufacturing and of human resources, the general manager, an 11-member management team and staff representatives. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews, group interviews and a group consultation session were held.Main findings: Hypotheses were formulated regarding the change experienced in the company, the overemphasis of control in the various systems, efforts to move from dependency to interdependence, personal authority as a requirement for interdependent functioning and problems with interrelatedness.Practical/managerial implications: The study illustrates the application of the systems psychodynamic approach in exploring the interaction between and mutual infuence of various organisational systems, especially in times of change.Contribution/value add: At a broader level, the study contributes to the understanding of the application of the theory as well as suggesting the use of a methodology. Recommendations for an intervention of this nature were also made.

  14. Psychogenic voice disorders in performers: a psychodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, John S; Greenberg, Maurice

    2002-12-01

    Psychogenic voice disorders are not infrequently encountered in the busy voice clinic. A clinician-friendly psychodynamic model and a multidisciplinary management approach are presented which have proven helpful for our voice team and our patients. In essence the formulation revolves around an "event" occurring, which may be either organic or psychological in nature. The ensuing dysphonia then leads to emotional consequences which in turn have physical consequences on the vocal tract. The situation can become reinforcing and illness behaviors develop. Elucidating this event/process to the patient improves the likelihood of a successful long-term outcome. The diagnostic and management roles of the various team members are discussed.

  15. Psychodynamic Factors Behind Online Social Networking and its Excessive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas Cheuk Wing

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the psychodynamic factors behind the popularity of one form of Internet activity, online social networking (SN). It views online SN as an extension of the social self, organized in a way that is more controllable than real life relating. The SN platforms reward its users with reassuring surfaces and novel self-object experiences while at the same time induces much anxiety. The addictive quality of online SN is understood in the context of collapse of dialectical space and the defensive use of this technology.

  16. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for complex trauma: targets, focus, applications, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spermon, Deborah; Darlington, Yvonne; Gibney, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Complex trauma describes that category of severe, chronic interpersonal trauma usually originating in the formative years of a child. In the adult, this can result in global dissociative difficulties across areas of cognitive, affective, somatic, and behavioral functions. Targeting this field of traumatic pathology, this article reviews the contributions and developments within one broad approach: psychodynamic theory and practice. Brief descriptions of aspects of analytical, Jungian, relational, object relations, and attachment therapeutic approaches are given, along with understandings of pathology and the formulation of therapeutic goals. Major practices within client sessions are canvassed and the issues of researching treatment outcomes are discussed.

  17. Thematic analysis of the experience of group music therapy for people with chronic quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Grocke, Denise; Berlowitz, David J

    2014-01-01

    People living with quadriplegia are at risk for social isolation and depression. Research with other marginalized groups has indicated that music therapy can have a positive effect on mood and social interaction. To gather descriptions of participants' experience of 2 types of group music therapy - therapeutic singing or music appreciation and relaxation - and to determine commonalities and differences between participants' experience of these 2 methods. We interviewed 20 people with quadriplegia about their experience of participating in 12 weeks of therapeutic singing (n = 10) or music appreciation and relaxation (n = 10). These methods of group music therapy were the interventions tested in a previously reported randomized controlled trial. The interview data were subjected to an inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were generated from the interview data. Four of these were shared themes and indicated that both types of group music therapy had a positive effect on mood/mental state and physical state, encouraged social engagement, and reconnected participants with their music identity or relationship with music. In addition, the participants who participated in the singing groups found singing to be challenging and confronting, but experienced a general increase in motivation. Group music therapy was experienced as an enjoyable and accessible activity that reconnected participants with their own music. Participants frequently described positive shifts in mood and energy levels, and social interaction was stimulated both within and beyond the music therapy groups.

  18. Thematic Analysis of the Experience of Group Music Therapy for People with Chronic Quadriplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity A.; Grocke, Denise; Berlowitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People living with quadriplegia are at risk for social isolation and depression. Research with other marginalized groups has indicated that music therapy can have a positive effect on mood and social interaction. Objective: To gather descriptions of participants’ experience of 2 types of group music therapy – therapeutic singing or music appreciation and relaxation – and to determine commonalities and differences between participants’ experience of these 2 methods. Methods: We interviewed 20 people with quadriplegia about their experience of participating in 12 weeks of therapeutic singing (n = 10) or music appreciation and relaxation (n = 10). These methods of group music therapy were the interventions tested in a previously reported randomized controlled trial. The interview data were subjected to an inductive thematic analysis. Results: Six main themes were generated from the interview data. Four of these were shared themes and indicated that both types of group music therapy had a positive effect on mood/mental state and physical state, encouraged social engagement, and reconnected participants with their music identity or relationship with music. In addition, the participants who participated in the singing groups found singing to be challenging and confronting, but experienced a general increase in motivation. Conclusions: Group music therapy was experienced as an enjoyable and accessible activity that reconnected participants with their own music. Participants frequently described positive shifts in mood and energy levels, and social interaction was stimulated both within and beyond the music therapy groups. PMID:25484569

  19. Turning the Tides: Coping with Trauma and Addiction through Residential Adolescent Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougard, Katherine Gardner; Laupola, Tina Marie Truncellito; Parker-Dias, Joan; Creekmore, Jeremy; Stangland, Stacey

    2016-11-01

    Evidence-based group therapy in an inpatient setting that provides an integrated treatment approach for both trauma and addiction in female adolescents. The purpose of this evidence-based practice (EBP) project was to implement and assess the impact of an integrated group therapy approach for both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) in adolescent females as part of a residential treatment program. The Iowa Model of EBP guided this EBP project. Judith Herman's three-stage model of trauma recovery and the Skills Training in Affective and Interpersonal Regulation (STAIR) model served as the theoretical framework for the group therapy curriculum. Two programs, Seeking Safety, by Lisa Najavits and VOICES, by Stephanie Covington, provided a guide for group topics and activities. Patients that participated in Turning the Tides© group therapy curriculum reported a decrease in overall PTSD symptoms and decreased functional impairment scores, based on the Child PTSD Symptoms Scale. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the use of as needed medications following the completion of group therapy. Postgroup evaluations from patients indicated a genuine desire to engage in the group therapy as well as an increased sense of trust with facilitators. Implications for psychiatric nursing include the delivery of safe, quality patient care as evidenced by positive improvement in patient outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dreaming of you: client and therapist dreams about each other during psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Knox, Sarah; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E; Hess, Shirley A; Miles, Joe; Spangler, Patricia T; Pudasaini, Sakar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to describe the frequency of therapists' dreams about their clients and clients' dreams about their therapists, to determine how therapists and clients who had such dreams differed from those who did not have such dreams, whether therapy process and outcome differed for those who had and did not have such dreams, and to describe the content and consequences of these dreams. Thirteen doctoral student therapists conducted psychodynamic psychotherapy with 63 clients in a community clinic. Therapists who had dreams about clients had higher estimated and actual dream recall than did therapists who did not dream about clients. Qualitative analyses indicated that therapists' dreams yielded insights about the therapist, clients, and therapy; therapists used insights in their work with the clients. Among the clients, only two (who were particularly high in attachment anxiety and who feared abandonment from their therapists) reported dreams that were manifestly about their therapists. Therapists-in-training dreamed more about their clients than their clients dreamed about them. Dreams about clients can be used by therapists to understand themselves, clients, and the dynamics of the therapy relationship.

  1. Karl Marx and Group Therapy: An Old Warning about a New Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Terry D.

    1984-01-01

    Uses Marx's classic critique of religion to explore the social function of therapy groups. Investigates the manner in which groups conserve the status quo and argues that the Marxist critique can help promote a more realistic social awareness and a more effective perception of groups. (Author/JAC)

  2. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  3. Impact of Group Sandtray Therapy on the Self-Esteem of Young Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Pei; Armstrong, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of group sandtray therapy was examined using a pretest-posttest control group design with young adolescent girls (n = 37) identified as having low self-esteem. A split-plot analysis of variance (SPANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences between participants in the treatment and control groups in self-esteem on five…

  4. A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Psychoeducational Group for Chinese People with Chronic Illnesses: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Ip, Priscilla S. Y.; Lee, Kim Man

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) psychoeducational group for Chinese people with chronic illness in Hong Kong. It adopted a single group design, and 52 participants joined the group. A questionnaire with three outcome measures, measuring general mental health, quality of life…

  5. Advantages of Group Therapy for Adolescent Participants in the Same Gang Rape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgar, Talia; Prager, Keren Ganot

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the issue of including in the same therapeutic group in a prison setting two (or more) young people who participated in the same gang rape. We provide a background for group therapy with adolescent sex offenders and point out the characteristics of group rape. In addition, we describe the uniqueness of working in a prison as…

  6. Nonrenal indications for continuous renal replacement therapy: A report from the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Geoffrey M; Walters, Scott; Goldstein, Stuart L; Alexander, Steven R; Baum, Michelle A; Blowey, Douglas L; Bunchman, Timothy E; Chua, Annabelle N; Fletcher, Sarah A; Flores, Francisco X; Fortenberry, James D; Hackbarth, Richard; McBryde, Kevin; Somers, Michael J G; Symons, Jordan M; Brophy, Patrick D

    2012-09-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy is the most often implemented dialysis modality in the pediatric intensive care unit setting for patients with acute kidney injury. However, it also has a role in the management of patients with nonrenal indications such as clearance of drugs and intermediates of disordered cellular metabolism. Using data from the multicenter Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry, we report a cohort of pediatric patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy for nonrenal indications. Nonrenal indications were obtained from the combination of "other" category for continuous renal replacement therapy initiation and patient diagnosis (both primary and secondary). This cohort was further divided into three subgroups: inborn errors of metabolism, drug toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. From 2000 to 2005, a total of 50 continuous renal replacement therapy events with nonrenal indications for therapy were included in the Prospective Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Registry. Indication-specific survival of the subgroups was 62% (inborn errors of metabolism), 82% (tumor lysis syndrome), and 95% (drug toxicity). The median small solute dose delivered among the subgroups ranged from 2125 to 8213 mL/1.73 m/hr, with 54%-59% receiving solely diffusion-based clearance as continuous venovenous hemodialysis. No association was established between survival and dose delivered, modality of continuous renal replacement therapy, or use of intermittent hemodialysis prior to continuous renal replacement therapy. Pediatric patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy for nonrenal indications are a distinct cohort within the population receiving renal replacement therapy with little published experience of outcomes for this group. Survival within this cohort varies by indication for continuous renal replacement therapy and is not associated with continuous renal replacement therapy modality. Additionally

  7. Study on occupational therapy groups for caregivers of families with schizophrenia patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Angélica da Silva Araujo; Leonardo Martins Kebbe

    2014-01-01

    .... Data was collected through audio-recording in occupational therapy groups which counted on the participation of 10 family-caregivers of schizophrenic patients with follow-up treatment at this ambulatory...

  8. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders With Personality Disorders in Day Clinic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holas, Pawel; Suszek, Hubert; Szaniawska, Monika; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Short-term group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) with weekly homogeneous group sessions for treating specific anxiety disorders is relatively well developed and recognized. However, 12 weeks of intensive daily therapy for mixed anxiety and personality disorders is not. The current article aims to fill this gap by presenting the method of intensive transdiagnostic GCBT for anxiety disorders with comorbid personality disorders in a day hospital setting. Preliminary studies showed that participants exhibited significant improvement during this type of treatment. This article reviews the advantages of group therapy that is transdiagnostic over the homogeneous group and individual therapy formats. The detailed description of the current therapeutical program may facilitate the development of similar programs in day clinic settings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Long-term course in female survivors of childhood abuse after psychodynamically oriented, trauma-specific inpatient treatment: a naturalistic two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Astrid; Hofmann, Peter; Gast, Ursula; Reddemann, Luise; Schüßler, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the long-term course of 43 female survivors of childhood abuse after receiving inpatient treatment based on psychodynamic-orientated trauma therapy. Data on symptom load was assessed at admission, discharge and two-year follow-up. Further information on post-discharge treatment and life events in the follow-up period was collected. At two-year follow-up global symptom load (GSI), PTSD, depression (d = 0.43-0.57) and self-soothing ability (d = 0.72) were significantly improved compared to the admission status with no change in dissociative symptoms. 40% of the sample showed good long-term outcome (clinical significant change, GSI) with a significant reduction in depressive, dissociative and by trend in PTSD symptoms. There were no group differences in the amount of stressful life-events and treatment in the follow-up period. Patients with good outcome showed more previous inpatient treatment. Inpatient treatment leads to a significant symptom reduction in women with severe childhood abuse. The treatment effects remain stable for two years under further outpatient psychotherapy.

  10. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Group Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblinger, Esther; Pollio, Elisabeth; Dorsey, Shannon

    2016-02-01

    Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), a well-established, evidence-based treatment for children who have experienced trauma, has been increasingly utilized in a group format. Group therapy formats are appealing because they can be highly effective and have the potential to reach larger numbers of clients. Moreover, TF-CBT group delivery may be particularly valuable in reducing the feelings of shame, isolation, and stigma experienced by youth and their caregivers in the aftermath of traumatic experiences. This article reviews the group TF-CBT research, discusses the therapeutic benefits of TF-CBT therapy groups, and provides clinical and logistical guidance for implementing TF-CBT in group format, including a session-by-session protocol. Future directions for research and clinical work in this area are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Effectiveness of cognitive Existential Group therapy on quality of life of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jalili Nikoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim: With an aging population, considering the factors affecting the quality of life more than ever is necessary. The aim of current research was to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive existential therapy on quality of life of elderly people. Methods: The current research is semi experimental with pre and post test with control group. Statistical population of research consists of all elderly people in Kahrizak nursing homes. In the first phase, the participants were selected through purposive sampling method and after responding to the quality of life questionnaire and obtaining score for enter to research they were divided in two groups of experimental and control (N = 12 per group using random sampling method.  The experimental group participated in 10 sessions of group counseling based on cognitive- existential approach and control group received no intervention. The gathered data were analyzed using covariance analysis. Results: There was no difference between pre-test and control groups, but the mean scores of post-test experimental and control groups were statistically significant. and cognitive group therapy improves quality of life is (p=0.001. Therefore it seems that cognitive-existential group therapy increase quality of life of elderly people. Conclusion: Cognitive Existential Group therapy utilizes concepts such as death, meaning, cognitive distortions and responsibility could increase the level ofquality of life of elderly people. Thus interventions based on this approach could be useful in improving the quality of life.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Physical Illness and Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the treatment effect of psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients who presented with physical illness at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen. Psychodynamic short-term therapy was complemented with bodywork (Marion Rosen to help patients confront old emotional pain from childhood trauma(s. Patients were measured with a five-item quality of life and health questionnaire (QOL5, a one-item questionnaire of self-assessed quality of life (QOL1, and four questions on self-rated ability to love and to function sexually, socially, and at work (ability to sustain a full-time job. Most of the patients had chronic pain that could not be alleviated with drugs. Results showed that 31 patients with the experience of being severely physically ill (mostly from chronic pain, in spite of having consulted their own general practitioner, entered the study. The holistic approach and body therapy accelerated the therapy dramatically and no significant side effects were detected. After the intervention, 38.7% did not feel ill (1.73 < NNT < 4.58 (p = 0.05. Psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork can help patients. When the patients responded to the therapy, the self-assessed mental health, relationship with partner, ability to work, self-assessed quality of life, relationships in general, measured QOL (with the validated questionnaire QOL5, and life's total state (mean of health, QOL and ability were significantly improved, statistically and clinically. Most importantly, all aspects of life were improved simultaneously, due to induction of Antonovsky-salutogenesis. The patients received in average 20 sessions over 14 months at a cost of 1600 EURO. For the treatment responders, the treatment seemingly provided lasting benefits.

  14. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  15. Expressive remix therapy: using digital media art in therapeutic group sessions children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Stories play a significant role in how we feel about and interact with the world. Narrative therapy and expressive arts therapy are major influences on the creation of expressive remix therapy, a new form of engagement with clients. This article is an exposition of this particular mental health modality. The use of digital media art in therapy in group settings will be discussed, and examples of how to use digital media art and technology in group therapy sessions are provided. The intention of this article is to promote a renewed appreciation for stories as the backdrop for all narrative work; it also seeks to inspire people to look at the practice of mental health differently, particularly the tools used to positively impact clients.

  16. [Attainment of generic therapy goals in a specialized group psychotherapy for phobic outpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsel, Manuel; Itten, Simon; Stauffer, Barbara; Holtforth, Martin Grosse; Hofer, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Individual therapy goals of psychotherapy patients either focus on symptom relief (disorder specific) or on improvements also in other functional areas (generic). The present study with 62 outpatients in a cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy (CBGT) investigated whether patients attain their disorder specific goals better than their generic therapy goals. Results indicated that patients reached disorder specific goals to a higher degree than the generic goals, although the group treatment specifically targeted the disorder specific goals. Implications of the results for the assessment and therapy of phobic patients are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The use of control groups in music therapy research: a content analysis of articles in the Journal of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer D

    2006-01-01

    The use of a control group is fundamental to experimental research design, though the use with clinical populations must be carefully considered. The purpose of this research was to examine the use of control groups in research with clinical and nonclinical populations published in Journal of Musical Therapy from 1964 through 2004. Criteria for inclusion were music or music therapy as an independent variable applied to one or more groups and at least one control group that did not receive a music treatment. Control groups were qualified as alternative treatment, placebo, no contact, and treatment as usual. Of the 692 articles, 94 met these criteria, 62 clinical and 32 nonclinical, representing 13.5% of the publications. Results indicated that research with clinical populations involved a mean of 38.1 subjects typically divided into two groups, an experimental and a control group. The pretest-posttest design was the most common (55%) as was a treatment as usual control group (45%). These design methods maximized the impact of the experimental music treatment on outcome. Experimental music groups significantly improved over control groups in the vast majority of studies identified. Undoubtedly, the foundation for evidence-based clinical practice is firm.

  18. A Group-Based Yoga Therapy Intervention for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alison J.; Jenny, Hillary E.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. Methods We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (N=10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a waitlist control group (N=9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed by 7-day voiding diaries. Results Mean (±SD) age was 61.4 (±8.2) years, and mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (±1.3) episodes/day. After 6 weeks, total incontinence frequency decreased by 66% (1.8 [±0.9] fewer episodes/day) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [±1.7] fewer episodes/day) in the control group (P=0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average 85% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [±0.8] fewer episodes/day) compared to a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [± 1.1] more episodes/day) (P=0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [±1.0] versus 0.5 [±0.5] fewer episodes/day, P=0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women. PMID:24763156

  19. Hypnosis-based psychodynamic treatment in ALS: a longitudinal study on patients and their caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbub, Johann R.; Palmieri, Arianna; Broggio, Alice; Pagnini, Francesco; Benelli, Enrico; Sambin, Marco; Sorarù, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence of psychological treatment efficacy is strongly needed in ALS, particularly regarding long-term effects. Methods: Fifteen patients participated in a hypnosis treatment and self-hypnosis training protocol after an in-depth psychological and neurological evaluation. Patients' primary caregivers and 15 one-by-one matched control patients were considered in the study. Measurements of anxiety, depression and quality of life (QoL) were collected at the baseline, post-treatment, and after 3 and 6 months from the intervention. Bayesian linear mixed-models were used to evaluate the impact of treatment and defense style on patients' anxiety, depression, QoL, and functional impairment (ALSFRS-r), as well as on caregivers' anxiety and depression. Results: The statistical analyses revealed an improvement in psychological variables' scores immediately after the treatment. Amelioration in patients' and caregivers' anxiety as well as caregivers' depression, were found to persist at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. The observed massive use of primitive defense mechanisms was found to have a reliable and constant buffer effect on psychopathological symptoms in both patients and caregivers. Notably, treated patients decline in ALSFRS-r score was observed to be slower than that of control group's patients. Discussion: Our brief psychodynamic hypnosis-based treatment showed efficacy both at psychological and physical levels in patients with ALS, and was indirectly associated to long-lasting benefits in caregivers. The implications of peculiar psychodynamic factors and mind-body techniques are discussed. Future directions should be oriented toward a convergence of our results and further psychological interventions, in order to delineate clinical best practices for ALS. PMID:26136710

  20. Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy: review of recent process and outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Dennerstein, Michelle; Gibbs, Petah M

    2008-06-01

    Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is a widely practised form of psychological intervention. Given that the Roth and Fonagy (1996) review concluded that there was a lack of confirming evidence for STPP, the current review is focused on studies published between 1996 and 2006 that evaluate the efficacy of STPP. As a result of a systematic literature review, 18 studies were found that met inclusion criteria consistent with those used by Roth and Fonagy (1996) for selection of studies, patient groupings and definition of therapeutic method. In general these studies add to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that STPP can be an effective psychological treatment for individuals experiencing mental health problems. Specifically, for depression STPP can be equal in effects to other psychological treatments and is significantly better than no treatment in the short term. Furthermore, emerging process data indicate that there is a significant relationship between the use of specific psychodynamic therapeutic techniques and the alleviation of depressive symptoms. Increasing evidence has emerged to support STPP as a treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder and some personality disorders. There remains limited evidence for the use of STPP treatment for patients with anxiety disorders that relate more to stress. Very limited and inconclusive evidence currently exists to support STPP as a treatment for bipolar disorder, eating disorders and drug dependency. Future research needs to include broader assessment measures, long-term follow up, studies that maintain an identifiable focus, and research that includes a focus on psychotherapy process variables as they interact with outcomes.

  1. Effectiveness of Gestalt Group Therapy on Loneliness of Women Caregivers of Alzheimer Patients at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemn Saadati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Loneliness is a common experience of people, regardless of gender, age, socio economic and cultural experience in the course of its life. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Gestalt group therapy on the loneliness of Alzheimer’s caregivers. Methods: In an experimental study with a pre-post test design and control group, women participants were selected from Alzheimer Association of Iran. Total number of 50 women members was evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria. 28 participants selected and were divided into two equal groups randomly. Loneliness Scale was administered to both groups at the beginning. Gestalt therapy sessions were applied to the intervention group, each session 90 minutes weekly and continued for 12 successive weeks. The post-test data collected after the last session by administering Loneliness Scale. Data was analyzed by using t-test for independent group. Results: The results showed that the mean differences between the two groups were significant and gestalt therapy decreased the loneliness of member of intervention group significantly. Loneliness scores of intervention group in two sub-scales were also significantly lower in post-test compared to control group. Discussion: Gestalt therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and decreasing loneliness in Alzheimer caregivers which is one of the hardest emotions that these women threatens reduced and the introduction of enhanced quality of life of the caregivers and hence increase the quality of care for patients increased.

  2. Group cognitive remediation therapy for chronic schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuping; Zou, Yizhuang; Wykes, Til; Reeder, Clare; Zhu, Xiaolin; Yang, Fude; Zhao, Yanli; Tan, Yunlong; Fan, Fengmei; Zhou, Dongfeng

    2016-07-28

    Individual-level cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) has been shown to be effective for cognitive improvement and social function amelioration. Here, we aimed to test the efficacy of group-based CRT in Chinese subjects with schizophrenia. One-hundred and four inpatients were randomly assigned to either 40 sessions of small-group CRT therapy or therapeutic contact-matched Musical and Dancing Therapy (MDT). Cognitive and social functioning, as well as clinical symptoms, were evaluated over the course of treatment. Specifically, cognitive function was evaluated using a battery of cognitive measurements, clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and social function was evaluated using the Nurse's Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation-30. All patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment. Forty-four individuals in the CRT group and 46 in the MDT group completed all of the planned treatments and analyses. Cognitive functions, especially cognitive flexibility and memory, showed significant improvement in the CRT group over the course of the study. The MDT group also showed improvement in several cognitive flexibility assessments, but the degree of improvement was significantly greater in the CRT group. Several social-function factors exhibited a significant improvement in the CRT group, but not in the MDT group. Cognitive function improvement correlated positively with social function without predicting social function change. We conclude that group-based CRT is an effective and promising therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Commentary: Coming Full Circle--Psychoanalysis, Psychodynamics, and Forensic Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    Drs. Simopoulos and Cohen argue that knowledge of one's unconscious processes improves the forensic psychiatrist's capacity to manage complex forensic situations and to generate forensic formulations and opinions that are demonstrably more valid and reliable, much like competence in cultural assessment and formulation. In practice, the challenges posed by the application of these principles in forensic settings are far outweighed by the potential benefit. Forensic practice is informed by many specialties. Forensic psychiatrists do not have to complete full training in these disciplines to make use of the knowledge and perspectives they offer. The same may not be true of psychodynamic assessment and formulation. Although much can be learned from supervision, case seminars, conferences, and reading, such knowledge does little to foster awareness of one's unconscious processes that by definition operate outside awareness and thus contribute to the vitiating effect of bias. To date, the only method whereby psychiatrists can effectively come to appreciate their own unconscious processes in action is arguably through their own analysis conducted in the course of training in analysis or psychodynamic psychotherapy. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  4. A systems psychodynamic description of organisational bullying experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisational bullying experiences manifest themselves as an intense unconscious systemic dynamic involving the bully, the victim and the organisational culture. The relatedness between the objects is characterised by valences and mutual defence mechanisms such as splitting, projection and projective identification.Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to describe organisational bullying experiences from the system psychodynamic perspective.Motivation for the study: Individual psychology tends to simplify organisational bullying by focussing on the bully’s symptomatic behaviour. Systems psychodynamic thinking focuses on the behavioural dynamics in the relationship between the bully and victim, and the relatedness of both with the organisational system.Research design, approach and method: Qualitative and descriptive research, using six participants as case studies, was undertaken. Data was gathered through Free Association Narrative Interviewing and analysed using discourse analysis.Main findings: Three themes manifested themselves, namely, snakes and hyenas, a complex interconnected dyad, and the institutionalisation of bullying. The research hypothesis integrating these three themes was presented.Practical/managerial implications: In resolving organisational bullying Industrial Organisational psychologists need to pursue this phenomenon not only in terms of its symptoms, but in a holistic, systemic and role related manner addressing all of its parts.Contribution/value-add: The systemic understanding of organisational bullying implies the complexity of studying the behaviour of all parts – the bully, the victim, their dyadic relationship as well as how bullying is institutionalised in the organisational setting, climate and culture.

  5. The systems psychodynamic experiences of organisational transformation amongst support staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Steyn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The unconscious impact of organisational transformation is often neglected and even denied. This research revealed the manifestation and impact of high levels and different forms of anxiety experienced by employees during transformation.Research objective: The objective was to study and describe the manifesting systems psychodynamic behaviour amongst support staff during organisational transformation.Motivation for the study: Organisational transformation is mostly researched from a leadership viewpoint. Little research data are available on the experiences of support staff on the receiving end of decisions about and implementation of transformation.Research design, approach and method: A qualitative approach within the phenomenological hermeneutic interpretive stance was used. The research was set in a government organisation. A semi-structured interview with four conveniently and purposefully chosen support staff members was thematically analysed using systems psychodynamics as theoretical paradigm.Main findings: Four themes manifested, namely de-authorisation and detachment, being bullied and seduced by leadership, the organisation in the mind as incompetent, and a dangerous and persecutory system. In the discussion, the basic assumptions and relevant constructs are interpreted.Practical implications: Understanding the transformation experiences of support staff could assist the industrial psychologist to facilitate appropriate support in coaching more junior staff towards increasing wellness and work performance.Contribution: Organisational transformation is highlighted as an anxiety provoking experience especially on the lower levels of the organisation. Its potentially deep and complex psychological impact could possibly derail parts of the system if not managed in a psychologically contained manner.

  6. Eating disorders and attachment: a contemporary psychodynamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Balfour, Louise

    2014-06-01

    A contemporary psychodynamic framework can add much to our understanding of eating disorders. Eating disorders are associated with complex comorbidities, high levels of mortality, and therapist countertransferences that can complicate psychological treatments. Mainstream models currently focus on cognitive, biological, or cultural factors to the near exclusion of attachment functioning, and the individual's dynamics. As such, standard models appear to exclude person-centred and developmental considerations when providing treatments. In this article, we describe a contemporary psychodynamic model that understands eating disorder symptoms as a consequence of vulnerability to social pressures to be thin and biological predispositions to body weight. Individual vulnerabilities are rooted in unmet attachment needs causing negative affect, and subsequent maladaptive defenses and eating disorder symptoms as a means of coping. We describe how this model can inform transdiagnostic eating disorder treatment that focuses on symptoms as well as specific attachment functions including: interpersonal style, affect regulation, reflective functioning, and coherence of mind. Two clinical examples are presented to illustrate case formulations and psychological treatments informed by these conceptualizations.

  7. [THE MANIC DEPRESSIVE DISEASE: PSYCHODYNAMICS ASPECTS AND AFFECTIVE SYNTONY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widakowich, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In a time when manic-depressive disease became bipolar disorder, and it is conceptualized and treated almost as a fully medical illness, such as epilepsy, we found worth returning to some psychodynamic aspects underlying this condition. Conventionally, we depart from the concept of melancholy, to introduce in a second time, the mania, as a liberating solution of the depression. To Abraham (1912), mania is the liberation from suffering imposed by the reality principle For Freud (1915), mania becomes a leak from the ego face a tyrannical superego (the encounter of ego and the ego ideal). Klein (1934) explains that the mania serves to counter the depressive position and thus avoid the guilt inside of ego. For Racamier (1979), mania is clearly a frantic negation of the anguish and emotional suffering. Today, some authors as Chabot and Husain try to define the manic depression organization, with the help of projective tests. This personality structure would be between psychosis and borderline. An axial element of this structure is the research for an affective symbiosis with each other. These concept, strongly resemble the "syntony", from Bleuler. We trace the evolution of manic depression from a psychodynamic and structural point of view, with particular interesting in the concept of syntony.

  8. The effect of group play therapy on social-emotional skills in pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinekesh, Ahdieh; Kamalian, Mehrnoush; Eltemasi, Masoumeh; Chinekesh, Shirin; Alavi, Manijeh

    2013-12-24

    Childhood is important and critical period in human life. The foundation of ego is shaped in childhood. Play therapy is one of the successful strategies to help children with inner conflicts problems. This method of psychotherapy is base on the normal learning processes of children, provides solutions to relieve feelings of stress, and expands self-expression. Group play therapy can enhance the self-awareness, self- regulation, social communication, empathy and adoptability in children. Present study investigated the effects of play therapy on relational and emotional skills of pre-school children. For this purpose, the total numbers of 372 pre-school children were randomly selected, and divided into two equal groups (case and control). In next step, the BUSSE-SR methodology was used for evaluation and comparison of self-awareness, self-regulation, social interaction, empathy, adoptability, and control groups. Pre-test were performed for both groups and case group was involved in-group play therapy. According to the results of post-test, correlation of variables between case-control groups was examined by multivariate analysis of covariance. Frequency of boys and girls in our sample were 51.3 and 48.7 percent, respectively. The mean age of children was 5.1±0.6 year. According to the results of present study, play therapy significantly enhanced the social-emotional skills (Pchildren learn problem-solving skills and communicate with others.

  9. The effect of Group Hope Therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Ataie Moghanloo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women and men afflicted with HIV bear specific physical, mental and social problems. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of group hope therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients. Methods: The present study was a randomized clinical trial research with a pretest-posttest and control group. The study population included all the people infected with AIDS virus (HIV+ who referred to counseling and treatment center of behavioral disorders in Tabriz. The samples were selected through convenience sampling method. Total of 30 participants with the criteria for inclusion in the study were selected and randomly placed in one of the two groups (control and experimental groups. The research tools consisted of Reef Psychological Wellbeing Scale and acceptance and focus on thinking subscales of Emotion Regulation Strategies Questionnaire. The experimental group received 8 sessions of group hope therapy (independent variable. Data were analyzed by SPSS-19 software using multivariable covariance analysis (MANCOVA. Results: Results of multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA showed that group hope therapy positively affected the subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients (P<0.001. Conclusion: It seems hope therapy could be useful as a new treatment in domains of supportive psychological therapies in patients infected with HIV.

  10. Accreditation and quality assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: Multicenter clinical trials using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Robert; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeff; Straube, William; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Martin, Elizabeth; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Swann, Suzanne; Fowler, Jack; Choy, Hak

    2006-01-01

    Starting in 2002, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in North America began the process of developing multicenter prospective trials in lung cancer using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Much of the work was based on the prospective single institution trials from Indiana University that had been presented and published. In late 2004, RTOG 0236 using SBRT for medically inoperable patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was activated for accrual. Prior to activation, representatives from the Lung, Image-Guided Therapy, Physics, and Radiobiology Committees met on regular occasions to design the multicenter study and quality assurance measures. SBRT is not a black box, and the essence of the therapy had to be distilled via guidelines. Issues related to patient selection, method of dosimetry construction, equipment requirements, motion assessments and control, site accreditation, data exchange, and follow-up policies were worked out by compromise and consensus. RTOG 0236 has nearly completed its accrual. The Lung Committee has initiated the development of several other trials, each building on the last, to investigate the therapy in central tumors, in combinations with systemic therapy, in operable patients, and in lung metastases patients. The guidelines developed for RTOG 0236 will be refined to take advantage of more modern innovations including heterogeneity corrections and intensity modulation when appropriate. The development of RTOG 0618 using SBRT in operable patients with early stage NSCLC is a testament to both the enthusiasm from already published works and prospective multicenter clinical testing using SBRT techniques.

  11. Myofascial Release Therapy in the Treatment of Occupational Mechanical Neck Pain: A Randomized Parallel Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Iván; De Toro, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Meijide-Faílde, Rosa; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac Manuel

    2016-07-01

    As myofascial release therapy is currently under development, the objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy with manual therapy for treating occupational mechanical neck pain. A randomized, single-blind parallel group study was developed. The sample (n = 59) was divided into GI, treated with manual therapy, and GII, treated with myofascial release therapy. Variables studied were intensity of neck pain, cervical disability, quality of life, craniovertebral angle, and ranges of cervical motion. At five sessions, clinical significance was observed in both groups for all the variables studied, except for flexion in GI. At this time point, an intergroup statistical difference was observed, which showed that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.014), flexion (P = 0.021), extension (P = 0.003), right side bending (P = 0.001), and right rotation (P = 0.031). A comparative analysis between therapies after intervention showed statistical differences indicating that GII had better craniovertebral angle (P = 0.000), right (P = 0.000) and left (P = 0.009) side bending, right (P = 0.024) and left (P = 0.046) rotations, and quality of life. The treatment of occupational mechanical neck pain by myofascial release therapy seems to be more effective than manual therapy for correcting the advanced position of the head, recovering range of motion in side bending and rotation, and improving quality of life.

  12. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial (MATISSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M J; Killaspy, H; Barnes, T R; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Clayton, K; Dinsmore, J; Floyd, S; Hoadley, A; Johnson, T; Kalaitzaki, E; King, M; Leurent, B; Maratos, A; O'Neill, F A; Osborn, D; Patterson, S; Soteriou, T; Tyrer, P; Waller, D

    2012-01-01

    To examine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of referral to group art therapy plus standard care, compared with referral to an activity group plus standard care and standard care alone, among people with schizophrenia. A three-arm, parallel group, single-blind, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted blocks, stratified by study centre. Study participants were recruited from secondary care mental health and social services in four UK centres. Potential participants were aged 18 years or over, had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes, and provided written informed consent. We excluded those who were unable to speak sufficient English to complete the baseline assessment, those with severe cognitive impairment and those already receiving arts therapy. Group art therapy was delivered by registered art therapists according to nationally agreed standards. Groups had up to eight members, lasted for 90 minutes and ran for 12 months. Members were given access to a range of art materials and encouraged to use these to express themselves freely. Activity groups were designed to control for the non-specific effects of group art therapy. Group facilitators offered various activities and encouraged participants to collectively select those they wanted to pursue. Standard care involved follow-up from secondary care mental health services and the option of referral to other services, except arts therapies, as required. Our co-primary outcomes were global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale - GAF) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - PANSS) at 24 months. The main secondary outcomes were level of group attendance, social functioning, well-being, health-related quality of life, service utilisation and other costs measured 12 and 24 months

  13. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) ‎.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Keyvanloo, Sodabe; Lashkardoost, Hossein; Arki, Mina; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh

    2016-01-01

    Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls' dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences. In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the students Results: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012). Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012).‎ Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎.

  14. Supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy versus treatment as usual for first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne; Knudsen, Per

    2012-01-01

    During recent decades, the field of treatment of schizophrenia has lacked empirical, systematic outcome studies that support psychodynamic psychotherapy as an evidence-based intervention for patients with schizophrenia. The Danish schizophrenia project (DNS) compared psychodynamic psychotherapy f.......000) and GAF(symptom) (p = 0.010) significantly favored SPP in combination with TaU over TaU alone. In spite of limitations, this study speaks in favor of including supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment for patients with schizophrenic first-episode psychoses....

  15. Becoming a Client, Becoming a Practitioner: Student Narratives of a Dance Movement Therapy Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents one of several themes arising from a larger research study which invited trainees' views on their experience in a weekly, 2 year, dance movement therapy (DMT) personal development group. This group formed part of their post-graduate training. The study used a phenomenological, grounded theory and collaborative methodology…

  16. Group Outpatient Physical and Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavioral (BT) or physical therapy (PT) for treating chronic low back pain (CLBP), for 13 BT patients and 12 PT patients. Treatments were conducted in a group outpatient setting. Posttreatment results showed general improvement for patients in both groups, but few treatment-specific differences in outcome measures.…

  17. Using the Sweat Lodge Ceremony as Group Therapy for Navajo Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the sweat lodge ceremony used at a residential treatment center located on the Navajo Nation and compares the ceremony to modern group work identifying Yalom's (1995) 11 therapeutic factors of group therapy within the ceremony. Considers widespread use of the ceremony with Native Americans and nonnative Americans as well as…

  18. Therapeutic Factors Experienced by Members of an Out-Patient Therapy Group for Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, John

    1993-01-01

    The Yalom curative factors Q-sort was administered to eight members of an outpatient therapy group for older women, who were also interviewed on the group experiences they had viewed as helpful. Results indicated that Existential Awareness was seen as the most helpful mechanism, in contrast to other studies in which interpersonal factors have been…

  19. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Depressive Mothers of Children with Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hye Ha, Eun

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBT) for depressed mothers of children between 5-12 years old, with behavior problems and to examine the effectiveness of the program. The CBT group met 8 times in total (2-hour weekly sessions for 8 weeks), followed by a booster session 3 months after the program was…

  20. A study of group reminiscence therapy and emotional intelligence among elderly members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Bazooband

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effects of group reminiscence therapy on elderly’s emotional intelligence. A quasi-experimental research with a pre-test-post-test control group was conducted in July 2015, with a sample of 40 elderly members referring to an (anonymous Community Center in the city of Shiraz, Iran. A predesigned instrument, i.e., the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire developed by Schering, was applied to collect data. SPSS Statistics v. 22.0 (Released 2013; IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA was used to analyze data, with a 95% confidence level and a measurement error of α=0.05. Hypothesis tests were mainly conducted to examine whether group reminiscence therapy correlates with emotional intelligence among the respondents. Findings revealed that the applied intervention i.e., group reminiscence therapy significantly associates with various dimensions of emotional intelligence including self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, empathy and social skills in the older adults within the experiment group; i.e., the mean scores of the variables for the post-test administered on the experimental group were significantly higher than those on the control group. Group reminiscence therapy has the potential to enhance emotional intelligence in the elderly by helping them control their thoughts and emotions and learn problem-solving skills.

  1. Intensive Versus Distributed Aphasia Therapy: A Nonrandomized, Parallel-Group, Dosage-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Jade; Copland, David; McKinnon, Eril; Burfein, Penni; O'Brien, Kate; Farrell, Anna; Rodriguez, Amy D

    2015-08-01

    Most studies comparing different levels of aphasia treatment intensity have not controlled the dosage of therapy provided. Consequently, the true effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation remains unknown. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy is an intensive, comprehensive aphasia program. We investigated the efficacy of a dosage-controlled trial of Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy, when delivered in an intensive versus distributed therapy schedule, on communication outcomes in participants with chronic aphasia. Thirty-four adults with chronic, poststroke aphasia were recruited to participate in an intensive (n=16; 16 hours per week; 3 weeks) versus distributed (n=18; 6 hours per week; 8 weeks) therapy program. Treatment included 48 hours of impairment, functional, computer, and group-based aphasia therapy. Distributed therapy resulted in significantly greater improvements on the Boston Naming Test when compared with intensive therapy immediately post therapy (P=0.04) and at 1-month follow-up (P=0.002). We found comparable gains on measures of participants' communicative effectiveness, communication confidence, and communication-related quality of life for the intensive and distributed treatment conditions at post-therapy and 1-month follow-up. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy resulted in superior clinical outcomes on measures of language impairment when delivered in a distributed versus intensive schedule. The therapy progam had a positive effect on participants' functional communication and communication-related quality of life, regardless of treatment intensity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation and have important clinical implications for service delivery models. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Approaches to chemical dependency: chemical dependency and interactive group therapy--a synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, R A; Yalom, I D

    1991-07-01

    Though the focus on interpersonal interaction is a powerful therapeutic factor in group therapy, traditional chemical dependency therapy groups generally fail to employ the interactional group orientation. An interactional approach can be effectively applied to alcoholics if the following guidelines are observed: (1) recovery is always accorded priority, (2) the patient accepts identification as an alcoholic, (3) anxiety is carefully modulated, (4) the proper distinction is made between what the alcoholic is and is not responsible for, (5) the therapist is thoroughly familiar with Alcoholics Anonymous language, steps, and traditions. It is important that therapists not permit misperceptions of A.A. to be used as therapy resistance and that they be able to harness the wisdom of A.A. for psychotherapeutic ends. Group therapists must also be prepared to deal with common themes arising in the treatment of the alcoholic patient: idealization, devaluation, externalization, defiance, grandiosity, conning, and avoidance.

  3. The effect of affective bibliotherapy on clients' functioning in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Zipora; Nir-Shfrir, Rivka

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The effect of affective group bibliotherapy (GB) was compared to affective group therapy (GT) on patients' functioning in therapy and their session impression. Three small groups totaling twenty-five in-patients in a hospital in Israel participated in the study. Clients concurrently participated in both group types, undergoing three sessions in each condition. In-therapy behaviors were assessed through the Client Behavior System (CBS; Hill & O'Brien, 1999). Results indicated that in the GB condition compared to the GT condition, clients showed less resistance, used simple responses less frequently, and expressed greater affective exploration. The Session Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ; Stiles et al., 1994) was used to measure clients' impressions of the sessions. Results indicated that patients evaluated the two treatment conditions equally. Overall, the results support earlier findings, suggesting that affective bibliotherapy can be an effective method of treatment.

  4. Kibel groups and their dynamic perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Torben

    2010-01-01

    authors look the state of research on therapeutic groupwork in inpatient settings, and suggest how the evidence base might be strengthened. The book will be of great value to any mental health professional, whether qualified or in training. Although reflecting experience in British clinical settings...... the uncontainable: A role for staff support groups. Ian Simpson Groupwork: The evidence base. Chris Evans et al The working alliance in groupwork on acute psychiatric wards. Oded Manor Part 2: Specific Therapeutic Applications Specific Therapeutic Applications. Inpatient group therapy based on the Yalom...... wards into therapeutic communities? Leonard Fagin The relevance of the entire team to practicing groupwork on the ward. Bob Harris Acute wards: Context, pressures and satisfactions. Frank Holloway Reflections on the psychodynamics of an acute ward: Bion’s work in practice. Richard Duggins Containing...

  5. Effect of Group Cognitive Behavioral Couples Therapy on Couple Burnout and Divorce Tendency in Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Couple burnout is one of the phenomena which involve many couples, it is among the main causes of emotional divorce, and without proper management and treatment, and it can lay the ground for formal divorce among couples. Cognitive behavioral couple therapy is one of the existing approaches in the couple therapy field, the efficiency of which has been established for resolving many marital problems. The present study was designed by the aim of investigating the effect of group cognitive behavioral couple therapy on couple burnout and divorce tendency in couples.   Methods: The present research was of applied research type. The research method was semi-empirical with a pretest-posttest with control group design. The research population included all the couples with marital conflict and problems who, after a recall announcement of the researcher, visited the counseling and psychological services center located in Gorgan city in 2014. By using the available sampling method, 20 couples were selected among the volunteer and qualified couples for the research, and they were assigned into experiment and control groups (10 couples per group by random assignment. In the present research, the Pines burnout questionnaire (1996 and divorce tendency scale of Rouswelt, Johnson, and Mouro (1986 were used for gathering the data. After taking the pretest, the group cognitive behavioral couple therapy based on the couple therapy model of Baucom  and colleagues (2008 was held in 10 2-hour weekly sessions for the experiment group couples, while the control group couples received no intervention. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics method and multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA in SPSS v.20. Results: The multivariate covariance analysis results for couple burnout (F= 28.80 and divorce tendency (F= 51.25 suggested that there was a significant difference between the couples of experiment and control groups (P< 0

  6. Multistimulation Group Therapy in Alzheimer’s Disease Promotes Changes in Brain Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Baglio, Francesca; Griffanti, Ludovica; Saibene, Francesca Lea; Ricci, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing social emergency represented by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the lack of medical treatments able to modify the disease course have kindled the interest in nonpharmacological therapies. Objective We introduced a novel nonpharmacological approach for people with AD (PWA) named Multidimensional Stimulation group Therapy (MST) to improve PWA condition in different disease domains: cognition, behavior, and motor functioning. Methods. Enrolling 60 PWA in a mild to mo...

  7. Combat-Related Multifaceted Trauma-Focused Group Therapy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Ofir; Wald, Ilan; Svetlitsky, Vlad; Zusmanovitz, Sergei; Parasha, Eli; Shoval-Zuckerman, Yael; Afik, Gal; Haikin, Gal; Fruchter, Eyal

    2017-02-01

    The efficacy of combat-related trauma-focused group therapy (TFGT) was tested using a unique technique that combines principles from prolonged exposure, cognitive processing therapy, and art therapy. Eighty Israeli male veterans exposed to traumatic events participated in the study. They were divided into eight therapeutic groups led by four pairs of trained therapists. Posttraumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms and levels of functioning were taken at pretherapy, end of therapy, and 6 months posttherapy. Analyses found that therapy helped in reducing posttraumatic and depressive symptoms at the end of therapy and at 6 months follow-up. It also showed that patients' functioning had significantly improved by the end of therapy and at 6 months follow-up. A significant clinical change in each parameter over time was also observed. In conclusion, the study provides preliminary evidence that combat-related TFGT may be efficacious in reducing psychological suffering and enhancing actual functioning. Follow-up randomized controlled trials to determine treatment efficacy are needed.

  8. Group play therapy for improving mental coping ability in children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the role of group play therapy in the improvement of mental coping ability in children with asthma. Methods Forty-four asthmatic children with behavior problems were randomly divided into experimental group (n=25 and control group (n=19. All children received two tests. The tools in this research were Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL and Coping with a Disease Questionnaire (CODI. Before intervention, both groups received pretest. Members from the experimental group were provided with counseling for 3 months, once every two weeks for a total of 6 times, while during this period the members of the control group had not any experimental intervention.After intervention, the two groups received posttest. Five patients dropped out, and 39 went through this research (20 in experimental group and 19 in control group. The effects of group play therapy on behavior problems and coping strategy of children with asthma were evaluated. Results There was no statistically significant differences in the general information (age, sex, education, parents' marriage status and family structure and basic score of CBCL and CODI between the two groups (P > 0.05. After intervention, the scores of social problems, social withdrawal, depression, compulsive behavior, aggressive behavior and immature and total behavior problem score dropped significantly in experimental group (P < 0.05 while there were no significant changes in control group. And the scores of acceptance, avoidance and emotional reaction increased significantly in experimental group (P < 0.05 while there were no significant changes in control group. Conclusions Group play therapy can improve the children's confidence and interpersonal adaptability and emotion management capacity, thus correcting deviant behavior, ameliorate coping strategy, improving mental coping capability, and promote the development of mental health in children with asthma.

  9. The MATISSE study: a randomised trial of group art therapy for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Killaspy, Helen; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Patterson, Sue; Soteriou, Tony; O'Neill, Francis A; Clayton, Katie; Maratos, Anna; Barnes, Thomas R; Osborn, David; Johnson, Tony; King, Michael; Tyrer, Peter; Waller, Diana

    2010-08-27

    Art Therapy has been promoted as a means of helping people who may find it difficult to express themselves verbally engage in psychological treatment. Group Art Therapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia but there have been few attempts to examine its effects and cost effectiveness has not been examined. The MATISSE study aims to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of group Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. The MATISSE study is a three-arm, parallel group, pragmatic, randomised, controlled trial of referral to group Art Therapy plus standard care, referral to an attention control 'activity' group plus standard care, or standard care alone. Study participants were recruited from inpatient and community-based mental health and social care services at four centres in England and Northern Ireland. Participants were aged over 18 years with a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes using operationalised criteria. Participants were then randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted stacked blocks, stratified by site. Art Therapy and activity groups were made available to participants once a week for up to 12 months. Outcome measures were assessed by researchers masked to allocation status at 12 and 24 months after randomisation. Participants and care givers were aware which arm of the trial participants were allocated to. The primary outcomes for the study are global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning scale) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) assessed at 24 months. Secondary outcomes were assessed at 12 and 24 months and comprise levels of group attendance, social function, satisfaction with care, mental wellbeing, and costs. We believe that this is the first large scale pragmatic trial of Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. Current Controlled

  10. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The enduring effects of psychodynamic treatments vis-a-vis alternative treatments: A multilevel longitudinal meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, D. Martin, III

    Although evidence suggests that the benefits of psychodynamic treatments are sustained over time, presently it is unclear whether these sustained benefits are superior to non-psychodynamic treatments. Additionally, the extant literature comparing the sustained benefits of psychodynamic treatments compared to alternative treatments is limited with methodological shortcomings. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a rigorous test of the growth of the benefits of psychodynamic treatments relative to alternative treatments across distinct domains of change (i.e., all outcome measures, targeted outcome measures, non-targeted outcome measures, and personality outcome measures). To do so, the study employed strict inclusion criteria to identify randomized clinical trials that directly compared at least one bona fide psychodynamic treatment and one bona fide non-psychodynamic treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling (Raudenbush, Bryk, Cheong & Congdon, du Toit, 2011) was used to longitudinally model the impact of psychodynamic treatments compared to non-psychodynamic treatments at post-treatment and to compare the growth (i.e., slope) of effects beyond treatment completion. Findings from the present meta-analysis indicated that psychodynamic treatments and non-psychodynamic treatments were equally efficacious at post-treatment and at follow-up for combined outcomes ( k = 20), targeted outcomes (k =19), non-targeted outcomes (k =17), and personality outcomes (k =6). Clinical implications, directions for future research, and limitations are discussed.

  12. A plea for greater recognition and appreciation of our group members' courage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Jerome S

    2005-10-01

    Courage-a mental act that involves a decision to face and deal with emotional pain as honestly as possible without any guarantee of a positive outcome-resides at the heart of the therapeutic alliance and the work of psychodynamic group therapy. The author's experience suggests that group therapists tend to take for granted or underestimate the courage required to join and participate in a psychodynamic therapy group. Written from the perspective of self-psychology, this article provides a theoretical rationale for courage recognition as a central and crucial leadership function. Examples of courage are presented and contrasted with behaviors that appear courageous but are not. A detailed case example discusses the courage it takes for dyads to work through reciprocal negative transferences. Suggestions are offered to assist the group therapist in recognizing and calling attention to courageous behaviors. The author discusses some of the pitfalls of our profession's preference for value-free language and then shows how and why the occasional and judicious use of non-neutral language, courage being an example, can facilitate and deepen group work.

  13. Compare the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy in Reducing Depression in Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Depression is on the top list of mental disorders which account for about 25 percent of patients referred to health centers in your world. So, is presented in different ways to treat it. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy in reducing depression in mothers of children with disabilities Materials and Methods: This study is quasi-experimental and consists of experimental and control groups. This study population was mothers referred to mobility, occupational therapy and physiotherapy centers who had depressive symptoms. 8 patients in each group were selected by convenience sampling. The research instrument were the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders and the revised Beck Depression Inventory form (1996. Dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive behavior therapy groups were instructured for 2 months (8 sessions of 2 to 2.5 hours. But the control group did not receive intervention. Results: The results showed that there were significant differences between the mean depression scores of dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive therapy group with control group (p<0.001. Also, there is a significant difference between the mean depression scores of dialectical behavior therapy with cognitive therapy (p<0.001. Conclusion: In the area of treatment and working with depressed people and those who are in crisis mode, it seems that dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive therapy group in view of its nature is very efficient and promising.

  14. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-08-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronisation in group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris Tijmen Van Vugt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony.Aim. The present study explored the potential of synchronised music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronised playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood.Method. Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no previous musical background were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children’s songs on the piano for ten sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group. To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS.Results. Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analogue scale.Conclusions. Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation.

  16. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Floris T; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation.

  17. Assessing psychopathology from a structural perspective: A psychodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimboli, Frank; Marshall, Rycke L; Keenan, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a guide for conceptualizing psychological difficulties across the broad spectrum of personality and symptom disorders. A psychodynamic model is used to organize these disorders along a structural continuum of severity. The authors propose that seven key indices of personality functioning be evaluated: cognition, affect, self-object relations, interpersonal relations, defenses, superego functioning, and primary dynamics. The results are then employed to determine where the patient should be placed along a continuum of nine diagnostic categories of ego development and their associated disorders. These include "normal," neurotic trait, and neurotic symptom organization; high-, mid-, and low-level borderline organization; and affective, cognitive-affective, and cognitive psychotic organization. An accurate evaluation of the seven variables will permit a more precise formulation of the nature and severity of the patient's difficulties, which will hopefully result in more accurate and appropriate treatment planning. Examples of the application of this model to a common symptom complaint are provided.

  18. [Psychodynamic consequences of a family history with psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwkamp, C G; den Berg, M P Lambregtse-Van; Kievit, A J A; Kushner, S A

    A positive family history for psychiatric disorders is the most important risk indicator for developing psychopathology. Often, the psychological consequences of a positive family history are insufficiently acknowledged. AIM: To provide insight into the psychodynamics of children who grow up in a family with psychopathology, such as psychosis, to demonstrate how these effects can last a lifetime, and to suggest ways in which such effects might be prevented. METHOD: We review the relevant literature, discuss theoretical concepts, and make clinical recommendations. RESULTS: Parental psychopathology, including psychosis, can have a strong and lasting influence on the child's identity and sense of self. CONCLUSION: A positive family history for psychiatric disorders has the potential to seriously disrupt the normal development of identity and sense of self. Various types of psychosocial interventions might be able to reduce these harmful effects.

  19. Clinical Case Studies in Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Jochem; Della Rosa, Elena; Kegerreis, Sue

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript provides a review of the clinical case study within the field of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic treatment. The method has been contested for methodological reasons and because it would contribute to theoretical pluralism in the field. We summarize how the case study method is being applied in different schools of psychoanalysis, and we clarify the unique strengths of this method and areas for improvement. Finally, based on the literature and on our own experience with case study research, we come to formulate nine guidelines for future case study authors: (1) basic information to include, (2) clarification of the motivation to select a particular patient, (3) information about informed consent and disguise, (4) patient background and context of referral or self-referral, (5) patient's narrative, therapist's observations and interpretations, (6) interpretative heuristics, (7) reflexivity and counter-transference, (8) leaving room for interpretation, and (9) answering the research question, and comparison with other cases. PMID:28210235

  20. Driven sexual behavior in bipolar spectrum patients: psychodynamic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Jennifer I

    2011-01-01

    Recent psychiatric attention to the bipolar spectrum conditions (Bipolar I, Bipolar II, and Bipolar NOS Disorders in the DSM-IV-TR) has revealed that many more individuals are affected by bipolar disorder (BD) than was earlier appreciated. Increased sexual thoughts, impulses, and risk-taking sexual behavior are recognized symptoms of the bipolar conditions when individuals are manic or hypomanic. There is little scientific information on the prevalence of symptoms of driven sexuality in individuals with the less severe forms of BD as well as those individuals with severer forms of the disorder who are recovering or have recovered from an episode of mania or hypomania. This article discusses the use of developmentally oriented psychotherapy for an individual with a bipolar spectrum condition whose symptoms were well controlled on medications except for her driven sexuality. Current concepts in psychodynamic psychotherapy offer a way to understand and treat sexual symptoms in many individuals with less severe or partially treated BD.

  1. Expanded risk groups help determine which prostate radiotherapy sub-group may benefit from adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether an expanded (five level risk stratification system can be used to identify the sub-group of intermediate risk patients with prostate cancer who benefit from combining androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and methods Using a previously validated 5-risk group schema, a prospective non-randomized data set of 1423 men treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency was assessed for the primary end point of biochemical control (bNED with the RTOG-ASTRO "Phoenix" definition (lowest PSA to date + 2 ng/mL, both with and without adjuvant ADT. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results There was no bNED benefit for ADT in the low or low intermediate groups but there was a statistically significant bNED benefit in the high intermediate, high and extreme risk groups. The 5-year bNED rates with and without ADT were 70% and 73% respectively for the low intermediate group (p = non-significant and 72% and 58% respectively for the high intermediate group (p = 0.002. Conclusion There appears to be no advantage to ADT where the Gleason score is 6 or less and PSA is 15 or less. ADT is beneficial in patients treated to standard dose radiation with Gleason 6 disease and a PSA greater than 15 or where the Gleason score is 7 or higher.

  2. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljé, Astrid; Greeven, Anja; van Giezen, Anne; Korrelboom, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud; Spinhoven, Philip

    2016-10-08

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders advise offering prolonged cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently there is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder and cluster C personality disorders. Since ST addresses underlying personality characteristics and maladaptive coping strategies developed in childhood, this treatment might be particularly effective for patients with SAD and comorbid APD. To our knowledge, there are no studies comparing CBT with ST in this particular group of patients. This superiority trial aims at comparing the effectiveness of these treatments. As an additional goal, predictors and underlying mechanisms of change will be explored. The design of the study is a multicentre two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the treatment effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) will be compared to that of group schema therapy (GST) in a semi-open group format. A total of 128 patients aged 18-65 years old will be enrolled. Patients will receive 30 sessions of GCBT or GST during a period of approximately 9 months. Primary outcome measures are the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report (LSAS-SR) for social anxiety disorder and the newly developed Avoidant Personality Disorder Severity Index (AVPDSI) for avoidant personality disorder. Secondary outcome measures are the MINI section SAD, the SCID-II section APD, the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI-2), the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Acceptance and Action

  3. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: multicentre pragmatic randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Killaspy, Helen; Barnes, Thomas R E; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Clayton, Katie; Dinsmore, John; Floyd, Siobhan; Hoadley, Angela; Johnson, Tony; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; King, Michael; Leurent, Baptiste; Maratos, Anna; O'Neill, Francis A; Osborn, David P; Patterson, Sue; Soteriou, Tony; Tyrer, Peter; Waller, Diane

    2012-02-28

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of group art therapy for people with schizophrenia and to test whether any benefits exceed those of an active control treatment. Three arm, rater blinded, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Secondary care services across 15 sites in the United Kingdom. 417 people aged 18 or over, who had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and provided written informed consent to take part in the study. Participants, stratified by site, were randomised to 12 months of weekly group art therapy plus standard care, 12 months of weekly activity groups plus standard care, or standard care alone. Art therapy and activity groups had up to eight members and lasted for 90 minutes. In art therapy, members were given access to a range of art materials and encouraged to use these to express themselves freely. Members of activity groups were offered various activities that did not involve use of art or craft materials and were encouraged to collectively select those they wanted to pursue. The primary outcomes were global functioning, measured using the global assessment of functioning scale, and mental health symptoms, measured using the positive and negative syndrome scale, 24 months after randomisation. Main secondary outcomes were levels of group attendance, social functioning, and satisfaction with care at 12 and 24 months. 417 participants were assigned to either art therapy (n=140), activity groups (n=140), or standard care alone (n=137). Primary outcomes between the three study arms did not differ. The adjusted mean difference between art therapy and standard care at 24 months on the global assessment of functioning scale was -0.9 (95% confidence interval -3.8 to 2.1), and on the positive and negative syndrome scale was 0.7 (-3.1 to 4.6). Secondary outcomes did not differ between those referred to art therapy or those referred to standard care at 12 or 24 months. Referring people with established schizophrenia to group art therapy as delivered in this

  4. Control group design: enhancing rigor in research of mind-body therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Patricia Anne; Robins, Jo Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Although a growing body of research suggests that mind-body therapies may be appropriate to integrate into the treatment of depression, studies consistently lack methodological sophistication particularly in the area of control groups. In order to better understand the relationship between control group selection and methodological rigor, we provide a brief review of the literature on control group design in yoga and tai chi studies for depression, and we discuss challenges we have faced in the design of control groups for our recent clinical trials of these mind-body complementary therapies for women with depression. To address the multiple challenges of research about mind-body therapies, we suggest that researchers should consider 4 key questions: whether the study design matches the research question; whether the control group addresses performance, expectation, and detection bias; whether the control group is ethical, feasible, and attractive; and whether the control group is designed to adequately control for nonspecific intervention effects. Based on these questions, we provide specific recommendations about control group design with the goal of minimizing bias and maximizing validity in future research.

  5. The relationship between transformational leadership psychodynamic attributes, behaviour and effectiveness: towards authentic leadership

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Comm. The globalisation of the South African economy since 1994 has emphasised the need for a new form of leadership, with specific emphasis on authentic and transformational leadership. By understanding the psychodynamic aspects that drive the transformational leader organisations will be able to identify and develop transformational leaders. A real need exists to understand the psychodynamic attributes of transformational leaders and how these attributes affect their behaviour and effe...

  6. The effect of educational group therapy plan on self–esteem rate in adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Turkashvand

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a period of major changes in various aspects of physical, mental and social caracters they may get. There are new requirements for the changes have been occurred. Attention to these needs, in turn, are faster and better compatibility and increase self-esteem. Self-esteem is the basic factor of personality development in adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of educational group therapy on self-esteem of adolescent girls.Materials and Method: This is a quasi- experimental study. Seventy-one adolescent girls of 13-15 years old were selected cluster-randomly from guidance school and divided in two groups of experimental and control (35 cases, 36 controls. Self-esteem of adolescents in two groups measured using Pop test. Then the educational group therapy plan was utilized based on promotion of adolescent’s self- esteem at 10 sessions for case group. Self-esteem rate was measured just after the performance of planned session and were analyzed with SPSS-14 software.Results: The results of the study indicated that performing educational group therapy session can increase the mean self-esteem score for case group (84.74 comparing to control group (74.05. Independent t-test shows significant difference between self-esteem score in case and control groups.Conclusion: According to our results the authors suggest that using educational group therapy plan is an effective approach in increasing self-esteem in adolescent girls and may improve mental health. Therefore, we suggest this plan for increasing self-esteem of adolescents in the schools

  7. Patient groups in art therapies: A case study of the health care field in Latvia

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    Vende K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to introduce the reader with an example of the arts therapies work in a children hospital in Latvia in order to describe art therapies work similarities and differences in three different specializations. Comparison will take place of patient groups in the work of art therapists in each specialization (art therapy, dance movement therapy and music therapy. The question of the research is: with which patient groups’ a specialist from a particular arts therapies specialization has worked within a year in VSIA BKUS children hospital “Gaiļezers” during the time period from 05.2009 to 05.2010?The results were gained by comparing patient groups at the age from 2,5 to 17 years in the children hospital and they showed that the art therapists and dance movement therapist most frequently were working with patients who have behaviour and emotional disorders. However music therapists are working more frequently with patients who have mental retardation.

  8. TU-EF-210-04: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, K. [National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  9. Effect of Cognitive-behavioral Group Therapy on Anxiety and Depression Hemodialysis Patients in Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadvand A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Hemodialysis as a treatment manner in chronic renal failure is a stressful process and has several various psycho-cognitive and social complications. The present study evaluated effect of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on anxiety and depression in hemodialysis patients. Methods: This research was a clinical trial study. Samples were young adults who were 18-45 years old. The Participants were divided into two groups (case & control. The Beck depression & anxiety inventories were used as a measure of psychological symptoms at pretest and posttest and Cognitive-behavioral group therapy as intervention was done at week12. Data Were analyzed with SPSS-16 and t-test, chi square. A p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: In this study, there was not a significant difference in the demographic characteristics between the two groups. Before of intervention, mean Anxiety score of the experimental group was 25.72±5.87, and in the case group it was 25.22±7.56 as well as mean Depression score in the two groups was 35.44±14.97, 33.11±9.2 respectively. The difference of the two groups in anxiety and depression scores was not significant. After the intervention, the mean anxiety score of experimental group was 15.94±6.23, and in the case group it was 28.05±10.04 (p<0.05. Mean of depression score in the experimental group was 22.27±13.32, and in the case group it was 33.94±9.46 (p<0.01.Conclusion: This research showed that group therapy (cognitive-behavioral decreased depression and anxiety remarkably in dialysis patients. Therefore, it is suggested that in addition to the prescription of medication, psychological interventions be done for such patients.

  10. The effects of group music therapy on mood states and cohesiveness in adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, E G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the efficacy of a music therapy protocol on mood states and levels of group cohesiveness in adult oncology patients. Eleven oncology patients in 2 groups (ages 30 to 84 years) took part in the study over a 10-week period of time (10 participants completed the study). During that period, participants took part in 8 music therapy sessions consisting of 2 types of interventions: (a) 4 "music making" sessions (where the mechanism for change included the process of making music) and (b) 4 "music responding" sessions (where the mechanism included the process of responding to music). The two types of music therapy sessions and their effectiveness on improving mood states and group cohesiveness were examined. The Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF) was used to assess changes in participants' mood states. A content analysis, attendance records, and a questionnaire were used to assess levels of group cohesiveness. Results showed significant improvement in mood state scores (from presession levels to postsessions levels) after involvement in all music therapy sessions. Similar significant findings were found within each of the "music making" and "music responding" conditions but no differences were found when comparisons were made between those conditions. No statistically significant effects were found with respect to group cohesiveness measures. Study implications and future research directions are discussed.

  11. Manual Physical Therapy Versus Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Fahandezh-Saddi Díaz, Homid; Martínez-Martín, Javier; Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado-Pérez, Maria L

    2015-11-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of surgery compared with physical therapy consisting of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The setting was a public hospital and 2 physical therapy practices in Madrid, Spain. One hundred twenty women with CTS were enrolled between February 2013 and January 2014, with 1-year follow-up completed in January 2015. Interventions consisted of 3 sessions of manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system (physical therapy group, n = 60) or decompression/release of the carpal tunnel (surgical group, n = 60). The primary outcome was pain intensity (mean pain and the worst pain), and secondary outcomes included functional status and symptoms severity subscales of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and the self-perceived improvement. They were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months by a blinded assessor. Analysis was by intention to treat. At 12 months, 111 (92%) women completed the follow-up (55/60 physical therapy, 56/60 surgery). Adjusted analyses showed an advantage (all, P physical therapy at 1 and 3 months in mean pain (Δ -2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.8 to -1.2]/-1.3 [95% CI -2.1 to -.6]), the worst pain (Δ -2.9 [-4.0 to -2.0]/-2.0 [-3.0 to -.9]), and function (Δ -.8 [-1.0 to -.6]/-.3 [-.5 to -.1]), respectively. Changes in pain and function were similar between the groups at 6 and 12 months. The 2 groups had similar improvements in the symptoms severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at all follow-ups. In women with CTS, physical therapy may result in similar outcomes on pain and function to surgery. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01789645. This study found that surgery and physical manual therapies including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system were similarly effective at medium-term and long-term follow-ups for improving pain and

  12. Occupational Therapy in the practice of therapeutic groups and workshops with mental health patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Bussola Montrezor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of occupational therapy to patients with mental disorders through therapy groups in an intensive inpatient unit. The following treatment groups were performed: focus groups, operative groups, drawing workshops, and arts workshops. The study included 280 patients (46.07% with ICD F20-29, 23.57% with ICD F30-39, and 14.28% with ICD F19. Of all the patients studied (n = 280, 54.00% participated in the operative groups, 52.85% in the focus groups, 46.80% in the drawing workshops, and 45.70% in the art workshops. In all groups, the participation of the ICD F20-29 group was higher (focus group with 49.25%, 54.00% in the operative group, 51.00% in the workshops of drawing, and 66.00% in art workshops, followed by the ICD F30-39 group with 24.25% in the focus group, 27.00% in the operative group, and 22.00% in the drawing workshops; the ICD F19 group stood out in the arts workshops. Patients with schizophrenia, psychoses, bipolar disorders, among others (ICD F20-20 and ICD F30-39 were the most active in the therapeutic groups, which discussed contents such as joy, anger, fear, thoughts of death, etc. The ICD F19 group presented the greatest participation in the art workshops, a fact that can be explained by the profile of these patients, because many have been in prison and/or admitted to long-stays in hospitals where they learned to perform manual tasks for subsequent survival in society. We concluded that therapeutic groups are effective in treating mental health patients because they contribute to hospital discharge and improve patients’ conditions.

  13. [Changes in OPD-CA Axis Structure During Inpatient Psychodynamic Treatment of Adolescents Suffering from Comorbid Disorders of Conduct and Emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Carola; Salzer, Simone; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) we evaluated an inpatient psychodynamic treatment for adolescents suffering from mixed disorders of conduct and emotions. The sample consisted of severely impaired adolescents with remarkable deficits regarding psychic structure. The current study wanted to examine if the manualized treatment did not only reduce symptoms but also enhance the structural level of the patients. The axis structure of the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics in Childhood and Adolescence (OPD-CA) was used to assess the structural level of N = 46 adolescent inpatients. To examine differences between the patients‘ structural level at the beginning and at the end of inpatient treatment we conducted a repeated measures ANOVA. The overall score as well as the three subscores of the axis structure improved significantly during inpatient treatment. The corresponding effect sizes were large (η(2) = .29 to .47). The inpatient psychodynamic treatment led to significant improvements regarding symptomatology as well as psychic structure. However, further studies with larger sample size and control group data should be conducted to confirm these results.

  14. Therapeutic alliance and binge-eating outcomes in a group therapy context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Compare, Angelo; Zarbo, Cristina; Brugnera, Agostino

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic alliance in individual and group psychotherapy is associated with treatment outcomes for a variety of disorders. However, debate persists about the centrality of the alliance in determining positive outcomes. We examined the alliance-outcome relationship across 20 sessions of emotionally focused group therapy (EFGT) for binge-eating disorder (BED). We hypothesized that (1) previous session alliance increase will predict lower subsequent session binge eating level while controlling for previous session binge eating level; and (2) previous session binge eating decline will predict higher subsequent session alliance level while controlling previous session alliance level. Participants were 118 individuals with BED who received 20 sessions of EFGT in 8 groups. Levels of binge eating and therapeutic alliance to the therapist were measured weekly. Linear growth in alliance during group therapy was associated with reduced binge eating at 6 months' posttreatment. We also found that the group's and the individual's alliance scores and binge-eating episodes were significantly associated across treatment, suggesting a mutual influence of the group's and individual's experience of the alliance with the therapist. Regarding the first hypothesis, previous session alliance increase was significantly associated with lower subsequent session binge eating. Regarding the second hypothesis, previous session binge-eating decline was not significantly related to higher subsequent session alliance. The findings provide evidence in a group therapy context for a model in which alliance change influences subsequent symptom levels, but not the other way around. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Is training effective? A study of counseling psychology doctoral trainees in a psychodynamic/interpersonal training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Baumann, Ellen; Shafran, Naama; Gupta, Shudarshana; Morrison, Ashley; Rojas, Andrés E Pérez; Spangler, Patricia T; Griffin, Shauna; Pappa, Laura; Gelso, Charles J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated changes over 12 to 42 months in 23 predoctoral trainees during their externship training in a psychodynamic/interpersonal psychotherapy clinic. Over time, trainees increased in client-rated working alliance and real relationship, therapist-rated working alliance, client-rated interpersonal functioning, ability to use helping skills (e.g., challenges, immediacy), higher-order functioning (e.g., conceptualization ability, countertransference management), feelings about themselves as therapists (e.g., more authentic, more self-aware), and understanding about being a therapist (e.g., theoretical orientation, curiosity about client dynamics). In contrast, trainees did not change in engaging clients (return after intake or for at least 8 sessions), judge-rated psychodynamic techniques in third and ninth sessions across clients (although trainees used more cognitive-behavioral techniques over time in third but not ninth sessions), or changes in client-rated symptomatology. Trainees primarily attributed changes to graduate training, individual and group supervision, research participation, and working with clients. Implications for training and research are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltink, Jörg; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred E.; Ruckes, Christian; Herpertz, Stephan; Joraschky, Peter; Koranyi, Susan; Michal, Matthias; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Strauss, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT). No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder. Research Design and Methods In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA) to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems) and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions. Results Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems) with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent), while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not. Conclusions We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication) in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394 PMID:26785255

  17. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Wiltink

    Full Text Available Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT. No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder.In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions.Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent, while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not.We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research.Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394.

  18. Do Patient Characteristics Predict Outcome of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltink, Jörg; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred E; Ruckes, Christian; Herpertz, Stephan; Joraschky, Peter; Koranyi, Susan; Michal, Matthias; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Strauss, Bernhard; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about patient characteristics as predictors for outcome in manualized short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT). No study has addressed which patient variables predict outcome of PDT for social anxiety disorder. In the largest multicenter trial on psychotherapy of social anxiety (SA) to date comparing cognitive therapy, PDT and wait list condition N = 230 patients were assigned to receive PDT, of which N = 166 completed treatment. Treatment outcome was assessed based on diverse parameters such as endstate functioning, remission, response, and drop-out. The relationship between patient characteristics (demographic variables, mental co-morbidity, personality, interpersonal problems) and outcome was analysed using logistic and linear regressions. Pre-treatment SA predicted up to 39 percent of variance of outcome. Only few additional baseline characteristics predicted better treatment outcome (namely, lower comorbidity and interpersonal problems) with a limited proportion of incremental variance (5.5 to 10 percent), while, e.g., shame, self-esteem or harm avoidance did not. We argue that the central importance of pre-treatment symptom severity for predicting outcomes should advocate alternative treatment strategies (e.g. longer treatments, combination of psychotherapy and medication) in those who are most disturbed. Given the relatively small amount of variance explained by the other patient characteristics, process variables and patient-therapist interaction should additionally be taken into account in future research. Controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN53517394.

  19. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Integrative Group Therapy for Children With Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Belin, Peter; Li, Tan; Babocsai, Lysett; Humphrey, Hugh; Pariseau, Meaghan E.; Babinski, Dara E.; Hoffman, Martin T.; Haak, Jenifer L.; Mazzant, Jessica A.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Fallahazad, Negar; Pelham, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Non-episodic irritability is a common and impairing problem, leading to the development of the diagnoses severe mood dysregulation (SMD) and disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). No psychosocial therapies have been formally evaluated for either, with medication being the most common treatment. This study examined the feasibility and efficacy of a joint parent–child intervention for SMD. Method Sixty-eight particpants ages 7–12 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and SMD were randomly assigned to the 11-week therapy or community-based psychosocial treatment. All participants were first stabilized on psychostimulant medication by study physicians. Fifty-six still manifested impairing SMD symptoms and entered the therapy phase. Masked evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint, with therapy participants reassessed 6 weeks later. Results All but two therapy participants attended the majority of sessions (n=29), with families reporting high levels of satisfaction. The primary outcome of change in mood symptoms using the Mood Severity Index (MSI) did not reach significance except in the subset attending the majority of sessions (effect size [ES]=0.53). Therapy was associated with significantly greater improvement in parent-rated irritability (ES=0.63). Treatment effects for irritability but not MSI diminished after therapy stopped. Little impact on ADHD symptoms was seen. Results may not be generalizable to youth with SMD and different comorbidities than seen in this sample of children with ADHD and are limited by the lack of a gold standard for measuring change in SMD symptoms. Conclusion While failing to significantly improve mood symptoms versus community treatment, the integrative therapy was found to be a feasible and efficacious treatment for irritability in participants with SMD and ADHD. Clinical trial registration information Group-Based Behavioral Therapy Combined With Stimulant Medication for

  20. Observing mentalizing art therapy groups for people diagnosed with\\ud borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Springham, N.; Camic, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes video-based observation of three mentalization-based treatment (MBT) art therapy groups in services for people who have received a diagnosis of personality disorder.Four focus groups (service user researchers, MBT trained psychologists, MBT trained art therapists, and the three art therapists who submitted videos) developed descriptions of the\\ud practice they observed on video. A grounded theory method was used to develop a proposition that if the art therapist uses ar...

  1. The effect of Group Hope Therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients

    OpenAIRE

    Roghayeh Ataie Moghanloo; Vahid Ataie Moghanloo; Jalil Babapour -Kheiroddin; Hamid Poursharifi; Maliheh Pishvaei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Women and men afflicted with HIV bear specific physical, mental and social problems. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of group hope therapy on subjective wellbeing, acceptance and rumination in HIV+ patients. Methods: The present study was a randomized clinical trial research with a pretest-posttest and control group. The study population included all the people infected with AIDS virus (HIV+) who referred to counseling and treatment center of behavioral di...

  2. Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jonathan Max; Hills, Susan; Rife, Mary Lou

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) presents an overview of the role and efficacy of group therapy in substance abuse treatment. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel…

  3. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a VA Mental Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Lawrence M.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Earnheart, Kristie L.; Gorman, Ashley A.; Shirley, Katherine G.

    2008-01-01

    Effective cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia have been developed over the past 2 decades, but they have not been systematically evaluated in some clinical settings. While insomnia is common among veterans with mental health problems, the availability of effective treatments is limited. We report on the group application of a…

  4. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosen, M.A.; Safer, D.; Adler, S.; Cebolla, A.; Strien, T. van

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DIVE for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters

  5. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosen, M A; Safer, D; Adler, S.N.; Cebolla, A.; van Strien, T

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DBT for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters

  6. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  7. First empirical evaluation of outcomes for mentalization-based group therapy for adolescents with BPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Sune; Sharp, Carla; Beck, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a devastating disorder, and it is essential to identify and treat the disorder in its early course. A total of 34 female Danish adolescents between 15 and 18 years old participated in 1 year of structured mentalization-based group therapy. Twent...... with borderline traits. (PsycINFO Database RecordCopyright (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)....

  8. Within-Group Effect-Size Benchmarks for Problem-Solving Therapy for Depression in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Allen; Yu, Miao

    2017-01-01

    This article provides benchmark data on within-group effect sizes from published randomized clinical trials that supported the efficacy of problem-solving therapy (PST) for depression among adults. Benchmarks are broken down by type of depression (major or minor), type of outcome measure (interview or self-report scale), whether PST was provided…

  9. Coming Together to Calm the Hunger: Group Therapy Program for Adults Diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponech, Heather; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice. There is a remarkable lack of research on the efficacy of treatment designed for individuals diagnosed with anorexia…

  10. Dysfunctional beliefs in group and individual cognitive behavioral therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben; Bennedsen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate dysfunctional beliefs in the form of inflated responsibility (IR) and thought action fusion (TAF) as predictive and mediating variables in Individual (n = 33) and Group (n = 37) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD...

  11. Blessings in Disguise: Idiomatic Expression as a Stimulus in Group Art Therapy with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on therapeutic outcomes resulting from use of idiomatic expression in group art therapy with children with Attention Deficit Disorder or Hyperactivity and related disorders who are in the latency stage. Major issues emerged related to self-concept, peer socialization, and family relations. Idioms were shown to stimulate affective-laden…

  12. The Creative Journey: A Model for Short-Term Group Art Therapy with Posttreatment Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto, Paola; Gabriel, Bonnie

    2000-01-01

    Cancer patients who have completed medical treatment are often left with unresolved psychological issues. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York offers a group art therapy program for cancer patients to help them regain their self-confidence and readjust their self-identity. The response of 70 participants has been positive and has…

  13. Impact Evaluation of a Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Model in Brazilian Sexually Abused Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habigzang, Luisa Fernanda; Damasio, Bruno Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral group therapy model in Brazilian girls who had experienced sexual abuse. The effect of the waiting period before treatment and the enduring effectiveness of the treatment after six and 12 months were also evaluated. Forty-nine female sexual abuse victims between the ages of 9 and 16…

  14. Effectively Utilizing the "Behavioral" in Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy of Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Deming, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is touted as the predominant approach in sex offender-specific group treatment, a review of the field shows that the "behavioral" part of CBT has become minimal in relation to that which is cognitive. The authors show how a revitalized "behavioral sensibility" may help to enhance…

  15. Deconstructing the Mirror's Reflection: Narrative Therapy Groups for Women Dissatisfied with Their Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duba, Jill D.; Kindsvatter, Aaron; Priddy, Constance J.

    2010-01-01

    Women facing middle age and beyond are pressured by a cultural ideal of slimness. The authors review literature pertaining to the factors affecting the societal perceptions of body image and address relevant counseling interventions, specifically, group therapy based on narrative theory, that are aimed at this population.

  16. Effectiveness of Group-Delivered Cognitive Therapy and Treatment Length in Women Veterans with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane T. Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and length of group-delivered cognitive treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD was examined in a sample of women veterans. The sample included 271 primarily non-Hispanic white (61% and Hispanic (25% women veterans treated in 8-, 10-, or 12-group length sessions with manualized cognitive therapy for PTSD. Outcome was measured with the PTSD Symptom Checklist (PCL in an intention-to-treat analysis (N = 271, in completer subjects (n = 172, and with group as the unit of analysis (n = 47 groups. Significant decreases in PTSD were found in the full sample (effect size [ES] range = 0.27 to 0.38, completers (ES range = 0.37 to 0.54, and group as the unit of analysis (ES range = 0.71 to 0.92, suggesting effectiveness of cognitive group treatment for PTSD. PCL scores significantly improved in the 8, 10, and 12 group lengths, with no differences between each. Clinical improvement showed a third decreasing 10 or more PCL points and 22% no longer meeting PTSD diagnostic criteria, with the best results in the 10-session group. The results suggest group-delivered cognitive therapy is an effective, efficient, time-limited treatment for PTSD.

  17. Prazer e sofrimento no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem: reflexão à luz da psicodinâmica Dejouriana Placer e sufrimiento en el trabajo del equipo de enfermería: reflexión bajo la visión de la psicodinamica Dejouriana Pleasure and suffering in the nursing group: reflection to the light of Dejour psychodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Trevisan Martins

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é uma reflexão teórica com o objetivo de refletir sobre as questões de vivências de prazer e sofrimento no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem, sob a ótica da psicodinâmica dejourina do trabalho. Esta reflexão contribui para elucidar a importância dos processos organizativos no trabalho da equipe de enfermagem, em especial por considerar os aspectos relacionados à intersubjetividade e à história singular de cada ser humano. Diagnosticar as situações cotidianas no ambiente de trabalho é importante para intervenções nas formas de organização do processo de trabalho, bem como em outras situações que forem necessárias, contribuindo, assim, para a melhoria da qualidade de vida no ambiente laboral e na vida privada.El presente trabajo es un ensayo teórico que tuvo como objetivo reflexionar sobre las cuestiones de experiencia de placer y sufrimiento en el trabajo del equipo de enfermería bajo la óptica de la psicodinámica dejouriana del trabajo. Esta reflexión contribuye a elucidar la importancia de los procesos organizativos del trabajo del equipo de enfermería, en especial por considerar los aspectos relacionados a la intersubjetividad y a la historia singular de cada ser humano. Diagnosticar las situaciones cotidianas en el ambiente de trabajo es importante para intervenciones en los modos de organización del proceso de trabajo, así como en otras situaciones en que fuera necesario hacerlo, contribuyendo de tal modo en la mejora de la calidad de vida en el propio ambiente laboral y, consecuentemente, en la vida privada.The present study is a theoretical reflection which approaches the feelings of pleasure and suffering in the nursing team work in the perspective of the psychodynamic under Dejour optics. This reflection contributes to elucidate the importance of the organization processes of nursing team work, in special for considering the aspects related to the intersubjectivity and the singular history

  18. Preliminary Study on the Effectiveness of Short Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) on Indonesian Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, Dharmayati Utoyo; Jaya, Edo Sebastian; Arjadi, Retha; Hanum, Lathifah; Astri, Kresna; Putri, Maha Decha Dwi

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to develop evidence based affordable psychological therapy for Indonesian older adults. An affordable psychological therapy is important as there is virtually no managed care or health insurance that covers psychological therapy in Indonesia. Multicomponent group cognitive behavior therapy (GCBGT) was chosen as a starting point due to its extensive evidence, short sessions, and success for a wide range of psychological problems. The group format was chosen to address both the economic and the cultural context of Indonesia. Then, the developed treatment is tested to common psychological problems in older adults' population (anxiety, chronic pain, depression, and insomnia). The treatment consists of 8 sessions with twice a week meetings for 2.5 hours. There are similarities and differences among the techniques used in the treatment for the different psychological problems. The final participants are 38 older adults that are divided into the treatment groups; 8 participants joined the anxiety treatment, 10 participants for the chronic pain treatment, 10 participants for depression treatment, and lastly, 10 participants joined the insomnia treatment. The research design is pre-test post-test with within group analysis. We used principal outcome measure that is specific for each treatment group, as well as additional outcome measures. Overall, the result shows statistical significance change with large effect size for the principal outcome measure. In addition, the result for the additional measures varies from slight improvement with small effect size to statistically significant improvement with large effect size. The result indicates that short multicomponent GCBT is effective in alleviating various common psychological problems in Indonesian older adults. Therefore, multicomponent GCBT may be a good starting point to develop an effective and affordable psychological therapy for Indonesian older adults. Lastly, this result adds to the accumulating

  19. Preliminary study on the effectiveness of short group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT on Indonesian older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmayati Bambang Utoyo

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop evidence based affordable psychological therapy for Indonesian older adults. An affordable psychological therapy is important as there is virtually no managed care or health insurance that covers psychological therapy in Indonesia. Multicomponent group cognitive behavior therapy (GCBGT was chosen as a starting point due to its extensive evidence, short sessions, and success for a wide range of psychological problems. The group format was chosen to address both the economic and the cultural context of Indonesia. Then, the developed treatment is tested to common psychological problems in older adults' population (anxiety, chronic pain, depression, and insomnia. The treatment consists of 8 sessions with twice a week meetings for 2.5 hours. There are similarities and differences among the techniques used in the treatment for the different psychological problems. The final participants are 38 older adults that are divided into the treatment groups; 8 participants joined the anxiety treatment, 10 participants for the chronic pain treatment, 10 participants for depression treatment, and lastly, 10 participants joined the insomnia treatment. The research design is pre-test post-test with within group analysis. We used principal outcome measure that is specific for each treatment group, as well as additional outcome measures. Overall, the result shows statistical significance change with large effect size for the principal outcome measure. In addition, the result for the additional measures varies from slight improvement with small effect size to statistically significant improvement with large effect size. The result indicates that short multicomponent GCBT is effective in alleviating various common psychological problems in Indonesian older adults. Therefore, multicomponent GCBT may be a good starting point to develop an effective and affordable psychological therapy for Indonesian older adults. Lastly, this result adds to

  20. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy for girls victims of sexual violence in Brazil: Are there differences in effectiveness when applied by different groups of psychologists?: effectiveness of group therapy for girls victims of sexual violence

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    Luisa Fernanda Habigzang

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy model for the treatment of girls victims of sexual violence (SV was investigated when applied by different groups of practitioners: researchers/psychologists who developed it (G1 and psychologists from the public social care network trained by the first group (G2. A quasi-experimental study was carried out, in which the group therapy model was applied by the two groups. A total of 103 girls victims of sexual violence (SV, aged between seven and 16 years (M=11.76 years, SD=2.02 years were included, with 49 attended by G1, and 54 by G2. The results indicated a significant reduction in the symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD. The comparison between the results obtained by the two groups of practitioners in the application of the model indicated no significant differences in the rates of improvement of the participants. These results indicate the effectiveness of the cognitive-behavioral group therapy model evaluated and the possibility of it being used as a care strategy by psychology practitioners working in public services.

  1. Effectiveness of group music therapy on agitatedbehaviors in elderlies with Alzheimer's disease

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    S. Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a proper medium for the treatment interventions, music, which, as a non-invasive tool, is not expensive, can be used alongside other nursing cares. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of group music-therapy on the rate of the agitated behavior in the elderly women with Alzheimer. Materials & Methods: In the controlled semi-experimental study with a pretest-posttest plan, 20 female patients with Alzheimer, aged between 65 and 75 years, were studied in Shiraz Islamic Azad University in 2015. The patients were residents of Farzanegan Nursing Home in Shiraz Township. The subjects, selected via available sampling method, were randomly divided into two groups including experimental (n=10 and control (n=10 groups. Data was collected using 10-question brief cognitive test questionnaire and Cohen-Mansfield agitation questionnaire. Experimental group received 4-week group music-therapy consisted of three 30- to 45-minute sessions per week. There was no intervention in control group. Data was collected in both pretest and posttest stages. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using covariance analysis test. Findings: At the pretest stage, mean rates of the agitated behaviors in experimental and control groups were not significantly different (p>0.05. Nevertheless, mean rate of the agitated behaviors in experimental group was significantly reduced at the posttest stage than both the pretest stage and control group (p0.05. Conclusion: The group music-therapy is an effective tool to reduce the agitated behaviors in the elderly women with Alzheimer.

  2. The impact of group music therapy on depression and cognition in elderly persons with dementia: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Lin, Yu; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lee, Tso-Ying; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effectiveness of group music therapy for improving depression and delaying the deterioration of cognitive functions in elderly persons with dementia. The study had a prospective, parallel-group design with permuted-block randomization. Older persons with dementia (N = 104) were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. The experimental group received 12 sessions of group music therapy (two 30-min sessions per week for 6 weeks), and the control group received usual care. Data were collected 4 times: (1) 1 week before the intervention, (2) the 6th session of the intervention, (3) the 12th session of the intervention, and (4) 1 month after the final session. Group music therapy reduced depression in persons with dementia. Improvements in depression occurred immediately after music therapy and were apparent throughout the course of therapy. The cortisol level did not significantly decrease after the group music therapy. Cognitive function significantly improved slightly at the 6th session, the 12th session, and 1 month after the sessions ended; in particular, short-term recall function improved. The group music therapy intervention had the greatest impact in subjects with mild and moderate dementia. The group music intervention is a noninvasive and inexpensive therapy that appeared to reduce elders' depression. It also delayed the deterioration of cognitive functions, particularly short-term recall function. Group music therapy may be an appropriate intervention among elderly persons with mild and moderate dementia.

  3. The use of the self in group leadership: a relational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F

    2000-04-01

    This article, written from a relational perspective, describes a shift that is taking place in the thinking of many psychodynamically oriented psychotherapists regarding the practice of therapy and the implications it has for group therapists. The shift, from one-person to two-person and multi-person theory, has particular importance for group leaders since it recommends making the subjective involvement of the therapist in the interactional field of the group much more a part of the treatment process. Theory and research on the use of countertransference, non-interpretive interventions, humor, and spontaneity by the leader are reviewed and vignettes are presented to illustrate the application of these ideas. Guidelines regarding the application of such ideas in group therapy are also discussed.

  4. The Comparison of the Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Methadone Maintenance Therapy on Changing Beliefs Related to Substance and Relapse Prevention

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    Taherh Ghorbani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was aimed to compare of the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy and methadone maintenance therapy on changing beliefs toward substance abuse among addicted people. Method: The research method was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest with witness group. 30 addicted people who were referred to the addiction treatment centers selected by available sampling, and they randomly assigned to three groups namely: cognitive-behavioral therapy, methadone maintenance therapy and witness groups. Substance abuse beliefs questionnaire was administered among all participants before and after intervention. Results: Results showed that in both experimental groups, beliefs toward drug was reduced significantly in comparison with witness group. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be changed on cognitive mediator variables, like beliefs toward substance therefore, it can reduce the risk of relapse. However, the programs of treatment of substance abuse should be targeted this type of intermediate variables.

  5. Effectiveness of Group Play Therapy on Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Among Children

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    Narges Morshed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: With regard to the prevalence of Oppositional-Defiant Disorder in children and converting to the other disorders, if left untreated, this research aims to investigate the effectiveness of group play therapy on oppositional-defiant disorder symptoms among children. Materials and Methods: This study is interventional and quasi-experimental research. In this study based on cluster sampling method, 30 participants were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. The tools discussed here included Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL, Raven's Progressive Matrixes, Teacher Report Form (TRF as well as a clinical interview with parents. Play therapy was provided weekly by group for the participants, in sixty-minute eight sessions. Participants were assessed in three stages of pre- interference post- interference and after two month intervals from completing sessions. SPSS18 and multi-variables covariance analysis method were used for analyzing data. Results: The results obtained by Mancova analysis showed that there was a significant decrease in oppositional defiant-disorder symptoms in comparison with control group reporting by parents and teacher (P < 0.001. In addition, the results indicated the same effect after two months. Conclusions: The results indicated the efficiency of group play therapy on decrease of oppositional defiant disorder symptoms among children. Accordingly using this treatment method on children was recommended to the therapists.

  6. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) ?

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Maddineshat; Sodabe Keyvanloo; Hossein Lashkardoost; Mina Arki; Mahbubeh Tabatabaeichehr‎

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls’ dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences.Method: In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery...

  7. Yoga Plus Talk Therapy for Depression: A Case Study of a Six Week Group

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    Kelli Foulkrod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoga is increasingly becoming a popular method of addressing mental health symptoms. While there is research to support the use of yoga for depression, there is limited literature examining yoga in combination with talk therapy groups as a treatment for depression. The results of this case study series (n=4 provide support for the clinical efficacy of yoga in combination with talk therapy. Treatment consisted of 6 weeks of group sessions (90-min sessions each week with weekly home practice. Each group consisted of yoga, meditation, breathwork, and emotional processing. Decreases in depressive symptoms and increases in self-compassion were found. The findings of the case study are relevant because growing numbers of clients are presenting with depression and seeking alternative treatments.

  8. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Noroozi, Alireza; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT) compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU).Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS) were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy) and control groups (the Usual Treatment).The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program. The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI) were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  9. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Noroozi, Alireza; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT) compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU).Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS) were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy) and control groups (the Usual Treatment).The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program. Methods: The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI) were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. Results: The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. Conclusion: The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders. PMID:26877751

  10. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment

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    Saeed Imani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU.Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy and control groups (the Usual Treatment.The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program.  Methods:The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. Results:The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. Conclusion:The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  11. The systems psychodynamic leadership coaching experiences of nursing managers

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    Landa Terblanche

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The mostly linear and mechanistic nature of the nursing manager role is rapidly becoming more dynamic and systemic. The change involves task and people management within a constantly changing organisational identity, taking up multiple leadership roles, having to authorise oneself and others in a complex matrix system, and managing conscious and unconscious psychological boundaries within and between conflicting systems. The aim of this study was to describe the systems psychodynamic learning experiences of nursing managers during leadership coaching. The coaching task was to provide learning opportunities to the individual leader, towards gaining insight into conscious and unconscious leadership dynamics in terms of anxiety, task, role, authorisation, boundaries and identity. A qualitative research design was used. Six nursing managers attended ten leadership coaching sessions over ten weeks. Field notes and reflective essays were analysed using systems psychodynamic discourse analysis. The findings indicated clarity and authorisation in the participants’ primary task and normative roles; anxiety and de-authorisation in their experiential and phenomenal roles; anxiety in boundary management related to the misuse of power by others; and the continuous exploration of their leadership role identity towards achieving integration. Participants’ learning experiences were evaluated in terms of criteria for organisational learning, after which a general hypothesis was formulated.

    Opsomming

    Die meestal liniêre en meganistiese aard van die verpleegbestuursrol is vinnig besig om na ’n meer dinamiese en sistemiese rol te verander. Die verandering behels taak- en mensbestuur binne 'n steeds veranderende organisasie-identiteit, waar 'n verskeidenheid rolle opgeneem word, die self en ander in 'n komplekse matrikssisteem bemagtig word, en waartydens bewuste en onbewuste sielkundige grense in en tussen botsende sisteme bestuur

  12. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Impaired Sexual Functioning

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical follow-up study, we examined the effect of clinical holistic medicine (psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients with poor self-assessed sexual functioning and found that this problem could be solved in 41.67% of the patients ((95% CI: 27.61–56.7%; 1.75 < NNT < 3.62, p = 0.05. The bodywork was inspired by the Marion Rosen method and helped the patients to confront painful emotions from childhood trauma(s, and thus accelerated and deepened the therapy. The goal of therapy was the healing of the whole life of the patient through Antonovsky-salutogenesis. In this process, rehabilitation of the character and purpose of life of the patient was essential, and assisted the patient to recover his or her sense of coherence (existential coherence. We conclude that clinical holistic medicine is the treatment of choice if the patient is ready to explore and assume responsibility for his or her existence (true self, and willing to struggle emotionally in the therapy to reach this important goal. When the patient heals existentially, quality of life, health, and ability to function in general are improved at the same time. The therapy was “mindful” in its focus on existential and spiritual issues. The patients received in average 14.8 sessions at the cost of 1,188 EURO.

  13. [Music therapy for chronic headaches. Evaluation of music therapeutic groups for patients suffering from chronic headaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, M; Scherg, H; Verres, R

    2001-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach to music therapeutic treatments. We developed a short time treatment ( 8 group sessions) for patients suffering from chronic headaches. The multimodal concept of this headache treatment and particularly the effect of a sound trance on headache patients are explained and evaluated in this paper. An evaluation study was done with 34 patients, who belonged to four therapy groups. In order to evaluate this treatment the patients were interviewed and had to fill out several self-rating scales about pain and some psychological variables (e. g. depression) before, directly after and 6-12 months after the treatment. This treatment group (n=26) was compared to a small waiting group (n=9). A case study elucidated the psycho-social anamnesis, and the process and outcome of the music therapy. The case study shows that the sound trance caused a loss of the affect control or at least reduced it. This experience enabled the patients to develop creative solutions, which resulted in a pain relief 6-12 month later. The comparison of the statistic means directly before and after the treatment did not reveal many therapeutic effects. Yet, 6-12 months later many patients reported less days at which they suffered from headaches; and they also significantly improved their ability of pain control. The results indicate that music therapy groups are more successful than a waiting group. The study's results agree with numerous other psychological evaluation studies and shows once more that music therapists working with patients suffering from chronic headaches are able to achieve successful results particularly long-dated. Thus, creative therapeutic approaches supplement the medical treatment, as they help the patients to develop an adaptive way of coping their pain. Yet, it will need further research to confirm the benefit of music therapy for patients suffering from chronic pain.

  14. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  15. Tratamento do transtorno de pânico com terapia psicodramática de grupo Treatment for panic disorder with psychodramatic group therapy

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    Albina R Torres

    2001-09-01

    elaboração destes, que passam a ser integrados significativamente no contexto existencial.INTRODUCTION: There are few published articles on group psychotherapy for patients with panic disorder (PD and usually they are restricted to the cognitive-behavioral approach. OBJECTIVE: To describe an experience of group psychodramatic therapy for PD patients, started in 1996 at Botucatu Medical School - UNESP, and discuss psychodynamic aspects of the panic disorder. METHODS: Two-hour monthly psychodramatic sessions, with an average of 8 to10 patients were carried out. The patients were usually receiving concomitantly psychopharmacological treatment. The subjects to be discussed were freely chosen, ranging from issues directly related to PD (most common symptoms, hurdles to get to a diagnosis, hypochondriac concerns, limitations and dependency, family reactions, strategies of exposure and coping, and effects of drug treatment to individual conflicts and problems. RESULTS: The psychodramatic approach favors the identification and elaboration of psychodynamic aspects. The most common feelings observed were helplessness and other related ones, such as: insecurity; vulnerability and fear; anger and guilt; isolation and difficulty in identifying and expressing emotions (which manifested physically; and difficulty in assuming the role of caretaker and other responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS: Valuable aspects for the treatment of PD, such as mutual support, partnership, confidence, modeling and encouragement, are favored in a group setting, where sharing experiences and sufferings helped to improve the participants' self-esteem, their ability to express emotions and to play different social roles. Besides the clinical improvement, the symptoms could be better understood and elaborated, and meaningfully integrated into their life context.

  16. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W K Alfred; Ballman, Karla V; Boyett, James M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Degroot, John F; Huse, Jason T; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S; O'Neill, Brian P; Prados, Michael D; Sarkaria, Jann N; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L; Berry, Donald A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Adolescent adherence to oral therapy for leukemia: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbasa, Tara; Kodish, Eric; Santacroce, Sheila Judge

    2007-01-01

    This secondary qualitative analysis of extant focus group data was performed to develop an understanding of suboptimal adherence to 6-mercaptopurine therapy in adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six participants, aged 16 to 23 years at the time of data collection, were interviewed about their adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy during their treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The primary aim of the study was to understand the role of adolescent development in adolescents' perception of adherence to therapy. The secondary aim was to understand how factors other than development, including the features of the disease such as its chronic nature and family involvement, can affect treatment adherence to 6-mercaptopurine. Four broad themes emerged as critical elements in adolescent adherence to oral maintenance therapy: a desire for normalcy, egocentrism, concrete thinking, and parental involvement. Incorporation of these themes into clinical practice with adolescents may help increase adherence and improve clinical outcomes.

  18. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a clinical trial

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    Cordioli Aristides V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol and to verify its efficacy to reduce obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Methods: An open clinical trial with 32 obsessive-compulsive patients was performed, in which a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol of 12 weekly sessions of two hours, in 5 consecutive groups, was applied. The severity of symptoms was rated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive (Y-BOCS, Hamilton Anxiety (HAM A and Hamilton Depression (HAM D scales. The patients were followed up for 3 months after the end of the treatment. Results: There was a significant reduction in the scores of Y-BOCS, HAM A and HAM D scales with the treatment regardless the use of anti-obsessive medications. The rate of improved patients (decrease of > or = 35% in Y-BOCS was 78.1%. Two patients (6.25% dropped out from the study. The effect size calculated for the Y-BOCS scale was 1.75. Conclusions: This study suggests that cognitive-behavioral group therapy reduces obsessive-compulsive symptoms. In addition, patients presented good compliance.

  19. Self-focused attention and safety behaviors across group therapies for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, Amanda J; Kocovski, Nancy L; Fleming, Jan E; Antony, Martin M

    2017-07-01

    Self-focused attention (SFA) and safety behaviors are two variables implicated in the maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study examined SFA and safety behaviors across two therapies for SAD, cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) and mindfulness and acceptance-based group therapy (MAGT). Participants with symptoms meeting criteria for SAD (N = 137) were randomly assigned to the 12-week-treatment groups (n = 53 for each condition) or a waitlist control (n = 31). Variables were assessed at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, and a 3-month follow-up. Both treatment conditions reported significantly lower SFA and safety behaviors compared to control, but did not differ from one another at posttreatment. Mediation analyses supported the following models: (1) safety behaviors mediating the relationship between SFA and social anxiety, and (2) SFA mediating the relationship between safety behaviors and social anxiety. These models were supported for both treatment groups. Both treatments may have the potential to reduce the SFA and safety behaviors that serve to maintain SAD.

  20. On the Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Aggression in Addicts

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    mahmood najafy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available : This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy on aggression among addicts. Method: A quasi-experimental design along with pre-posttest stages, control group, and follow-up was employed for the conduct of this study. The number of 24 addicts referring to rehabilitation clinics in Tehran was selected as the sample size of this study via convenience sampling method in accordance with the inclusion criteria. These participants were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. In this study, Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire was used for data collection purposes. Results: Data analysis showed that group cognitive-behavioral therapy reduces verbal and physical aggression, anger, and hostility in addicted people. However, this therapy only led to the reduction of verbal aggression, anger, and hostility in addicted people. Conclusion: Since aggression has a high comorbidity with substance abuse, this factor can be as an obstacle to withdrawal. Therefore, it must be considered in addiction treatment.

  1. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewes, Sally A.; Samson, Rachel A.; Simpson, Susan G.; van Vreeswijk, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group schema therapy (ST-g) with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder) and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioral, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at 6-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the Global Symptom Index (GSI). For the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI) maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up, 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants' psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing inhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the

  2. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Ann Skewes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group Schema Therapy (ST-g with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioural, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at six-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the GSI. For the SMI maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants’ psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing disinhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the small sample size and lack

  3. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewes, Sally A; Samson, Rachel A; Simpson, Susan G; van Vreeswijk, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group schema therapy (ST-g) with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder) and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioral, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at 6-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the Global Symptom Index (GSI). For the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI) maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up, 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants' psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing inhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the

  4. Change in attachment insecurity is related to improved outcomes 1-year post group therapy in women with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Hilary; Tasca, Giorgio A; Ritchie, Kerri; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2014-03-01

    An interpersonal model of Binge Eating Disorder (BED) posits that difficulties with social functioning precipitate negative affect, which in turn causes binge eating as a means of coping. Thus, long-term decreases in attachment insecurity may be important for women with BED. No research has assessed if long-term change in attachment insecurity is associated with sustained change in other outcomes. In the current study, we hypothesized that changes in attachment anxiety and avoidance will decrease at posttreatment and will be maintained up to 12 months after Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP). We further hypothesized that long-term stability of these changes in attachment insecurity will be related to other long-term outcomes. Women with BED (N = 102) attended 16 sessions of GPIP. Measures were completed pretreatment, posttreatment, at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance, and the other outcome variables decreased significantly at 12 months posttreatment. Reductions in attachment anxiety and avoidance were significantly related to decreases in interpersonal problems up to 12 months posttreatment, and reduction in attachment anxiety was significantly related to decreases in depressive symptoms 12 months posttreatment. Further, the significant relationship between reduced attachment avoidance and decreased interpersonal problems strengthened over the long term. This is the first study to show an association between change in attachment insecurity and change in other outcomes in the long term, and to show an adaptive spiral in which greater reduction in attachment avoidance is increasingly associated with ongoing improvement of interpersonal problems. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Psychosomatic regularities of psychotic disorders of women in involution (pathogenesis, clinics, psychodynamic psychotherapy

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    М. М. Pustovoyt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of psychotic disorders with onset in the age of involution from broader perspective, guided by modern multidimensional paradigm, was never discussed before. Involutional psychosis is considered as a constellation of the biological changes that are irrefutable in this age period. Certain personality traits and coping strategies can be predisposing to psychotic response, as well as typical features of the “life curve” and external stressors that can run a psychotic reaction. The paper presents the result of our study. This study pays much attention to study of premorbid personality, with emphasis on characteristic features, peculiarities of the emotional reaction and motivation-behavioral area, which completely coincided with characteristics of the narcissistic personality disorder listed in DSM-V (2013. Aim: To explore the psychosomatic pathogenetic connections inherent involutionary psychosis, given pathogenic and pathoplastic impact of premorbid personality structure their syndromic form and dynamics, determine their place on the psychosomatic continuum and develop adequate and pathogenetic justified method of therapy. Methods. Data obtained by the clinical method were confirmed by the results of experimental psychological and neuropsychological researches. Results. Clinical characteristics of psychotic disorders in the patient population showed in the structure of psychosis the existence of two oppositely directed continuums: affective (depressive and delusional. This allows to allocate four main clinical forms of psychosis and their tendency to unite in two clusters that differed each other by the features, and also by their response to therapy and, therefore, by the prognosis. Conclusions: The psychodynamic approach to understanding the involutional psychosis, that was introduced by the author, got natural development in the proposed method of treatment that included complex medication and psychotherapy. The schemes of

  6. A systematic review of the effectiveness of CBT/ERP group therapy of OCD: A meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben; Bennedsen, Birgit

    BACKGROUND: Individual Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is considered an empirically supported treatment for OCD. Group therapy has been proposed in the treatment of OCD, but it is still uncertain whether it is as effective as individual therapy. Most outcome researchers of individual therapy...... reported within effect sizes of individual treatment studies. A second objective was to compute a between group effect size, relying solely on randomised studies comparing group therapy to waitlist control. METHOD A systematic literature search was conducted and included studies were divided into three.......05 and 1.25 respectively, with an overall combined pooled within effect size across the categories at 1.18. Finally a between effect sizes of the four studies comparing group therapy to waitlist control group was reported at.1.12 CONCLUSION The reported within effect sizes in this meta-analysis (range 1...

  7. Atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo Speech therapy group care

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    Manuela Luchesi Brazil Araújo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Tema: atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo na área da Fonoaudiologia. Para sua realização, visitou-se os textos publicados em revistas científicas da área, nos últimos 15 anos, e os capítulos de livros e dissertações que se detiveram em tematizar o atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo. Objetivo: identificar, entender e discutir: 1 os princípios teóricos que justificam a indicação do atendimento em grupo, que o estruturam e o sustentam de maneira a explicitar como a dinâmica do grupo age sobre os sintomas ; 2 os critérios para a composição e formação dos grupos e, principalmente, 3 a intervenção do fonoaudiólogo e a possibilidade de eficácia de sua terapêutica. Conclusão: o levantamento bibliográfico identificou diferentes práticas fonoaudiológicas em grupo, atreladas a diversas perspectivas teóricas. No que diz respeito aos critérios de formação, à função do fonoaudiólogo no grupo, à prevalência do atendimento em grupo em relação ao individual, houve divergências de opiniões, dado que os textos visitados, não (corresponderam com a consistência teórica esperada. Tal resultado se deve ao fato de haver uma certa adoção irrefletida de conceitos de outras áreas, sem argumentação e sem a reestruturação que sua transposição para a clínica fonoaudiológica, exigiria. Sugere-se que estas incoerências ocorrem porque não se evidencia a preocupação em articular os estudos teóricos aos elementos que configuram a clínica fonoaudiológica, a saber: a semiologia, a etiologia, a diagnóstica e a terapêutica.Background: the theme of this literature review is the group therapy in the Speech Therapy area. To perform it, we studied the texts published in scientific journals of the field, in the last 15 years, in the form of articles, book chapters and dissertations, which were focused on the group therapy. Purpose: the goal is to identify, understand and discuss, the following themes: 1 the theoretical

  8. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Internet Therapy, Group Therapy and A Waiting List Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Eduard J; Bögels, Susan M; Oort, Frans J; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment (post-test), and at 2 months follow-up. Diagnostic interviews were held at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam. Treatment for GT occurred at the mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. One hundred sixteen adolescents (mean age = 15.6 y, SD = 1.6 y, 25% males) meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia, were randomized to IT, GT, or WL. CBTI of 6 weekly sessions, consisted of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT was conducted in groups of 6 to 8 adolescents, guided by 2 trained sleep therapists. IT was applied through an online guided self-help website with programmed instructions and written feedback from a trained sleep therapist. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and sleep logs for 7 consecutive days. Symptoms of insomnia and chronic sleep reduction were measured with questionnaires. Results showed that adolescents in both IT and GT, compared to WL, improved significantly on sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and total sleep time at post-test, and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Most of these improvements were found in both objective and subjective measures. Furthermore, insomnia complaints and symptoms of chronic sleep reduction also decreased significantly in both treatment conditions compared to WL. Effect sizes for improvements ranged from medium to large. A greater proportion of participants from the treatment conditions showed high end-state functioning and clinically significant improvement after treatment and at follow-up compared to WL. This study is the first randomized

  9. Cohesion and alliance between clinic and research, in a time-limited group for young adults in a mental health center: A study of clinical efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Gargano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the clinical efficacy of psychodynamic group psychotherapy, is still poorly studied. Also some process variables, such as cohesion and alliance, are poorly investigated, despite the group-setting is widely used in italian public health system. Hence a progressive separation between the scientific work of empirical research and clinical practice conducted in the italian public health system. Starting from these premises, a single-case research was realized, whose results are described in the following article. The focus will we put on the first six months of a weekly group therapy. Outcome and process results are presented. The patients (young adults, were offered a psychodynamic therapy with a group theoretic background, in a Mental Health Centre. Research has shown that treatment was effective, after 6 months, for those patients without severe personality disorders. Furthermore, the empirical assessment of group cohesion and group alliance levels was a certain correspondence with the equipe clinical assessment. This agreement furthered a reflection on the therapeutic work, helping the clinician not dwell on self-defensive positions. A discussion of the results is finally presented. Keywords: Cohesion, alliance, clinical efficacy, group psychotherapy, public health service

  10. Use of movies for group therapy of psychiatric inpatients: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Esra; Ulus, Fuat; Selvitop, Rabia; Yazici, Ahmet Bülent; Aydin, Nazan

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of cinema therapy at a psychiatry clinic for inpatients. The program, "Watching Cinema Group Therapy," was used with over 500 inpatients over the course of one year. We found that using movies for group psychotherapy sessions encouraged the patients to talk about their beliefs, thoughts, and feelings while discussing the characters and stories. We also used the movies as a reward for patients who had developed a therapeutic alliance. It motivated the patients to be active instead of simply remaining in their rooms. As a follow-up to full-length films, it was more useful to show short scenes to patients who had been administered high doses of drugs. Movies can be an important, positive, and productive means of treatment and teaching.

  11. SINGLE-CASE INVESTIGATION OF AN EMOTION-FOCUSED THERAPY GROUP FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

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    Adèle Lafrance Robinson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotion-focused therapy (EFT is an evidence-based treatment for depression and trauma and has shown promise for other presentations including anxiety. Minimal research exists investigating the outcomes of emotion-focused therapy in a group setting. The current research presents a mixed-method single-case study of one client’s experiences and outcomes following a nine-week EFT group for depression and anxiety. Weekly measures of session-feelings evaluations were collected. Follow-up measures, including a qualitative interview, were administered one year post-treatment. Pre-, post-, and follow-up measures assessed depression, anxiety, and emotional regulation. Results showed clinically significant improvements in anxiety, depression, and emotional regulation over time. Indirect and direct evidence of client change were detected. Five super-ordinate themes with sub-themes emerged from the qualitative analysis.

  12. Treatment resistance and psychodynamic psychiatry: concepts psychiatry needs from psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 30 years psychiatry and psychoanalysis have moved in substantially divergent directions. Psychiatry has become rich in methodology but conceptually limited, with a drift toward biological reductionism. Psychoanalysis has remained relatively limited in methodology, but conceptually rich. The rich methodology of psychiatry has led to major contributions in discovering gene by environment interactions, the importance of early adversity, and to recognition of the serious problem posed by treatment resistance. However, psychiatry's biologically reductionistic conceptual focus interferes with the development of a nuanced clinical perspective based on emerging knowledge that might help more treatment resistant patients become treatment responders. This article argues that recognition of the problem of treatment resistance in psychiatry creates a need for it to reconnect with the conceptual richness of psychoanalysis in order to improve patient care. Psychodynamic psychiatry is defined as the relevant intersection of psychiatry and psychoanalysis where this reconnection can occur. I will suggest selected aspects of psychoanalysis that are especially relevant to psychiatry in improving outcomes in work with treatment resistant patients.

  13. A developmental-psychodynamic model for diabetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viederman, M; Hymowitz, P

    1988-01-01

    This paper elaborates a psychodynamic-developmental model as a framework for understanding the wide range of adaptive and maladaptive responses to the self-care requirements of diabetes. Early life experience participates with other factors in influencing the ease with which diabetics implement diabetic control. This model emphasizes the importance of the mother-child interaction during the second phase of development, the toddler phase, at which time the child begins to establish a sense of autonomy and control over his own body and its functions, with bowel training viewed as a paradigm for body control. It is postulated that certain types of mothers such as controlling-intrusive mothers, overprotective mothers, or guilty, indifferent, or rejecting mothers create problems for the child related to the development of autonomy and the sense of comfortable and pleasurable control over his bodily functions. Conflicts generated during this period are reactivated with the onset of diabetes and lead to difficulty in implementing control. In some situations where conflicts with the caretaker figure were predominantly limited to aspects of control, trusting relations acted as a substrate for change and improvement in control in a supportive medical environment. Specific management recommendations based upon this model are presented.

  14. The effectiveness of the Brief Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy in occurrence symptoms of social anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Ghasemi; Razieh Najar; Robabeh Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Social anxiety disorder is one of the most common mental disorders which makes several problems for patients with restricting their abilities. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the Brief Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy in reducing symptoms of social anxiety.Materials and Methods: 20 participants of secondary school female students in Karaj among students with significant social anxiety scores (resulting from the administering the Spin questi...

  15. [Efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy in patients with fear of blushing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobjoie, C; Pélissolo, A

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown to be effective in the treatment of social anxiety disorders (SAD). However, fear of social blushing is almost never measured as a therapeutic outcome variable, even though some data suggest that this dimension constitutes a specific syndrome in social anxiety spectrum, justifying specific therapeutic strategies. For these reasons, we developed a group therapy program including a combination of task concentration training (TCT) and other CBT strategies targeting fear of blushing. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of this program in an open trial conducted in 55 patients suffering from SAD (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV criteria) with fear of blushing. Throughout a program including eleven weekly sessions, systematic measurements of fear of blushing and other anxiety and personality dimensions were performed at inclusion, at the end of the therapy and 3 months later, in order to explore the therapeutic effects of the program on fear of blushing, social anxiety, and other dimensions (Liebowitz social anxiety scale, blushing propensity questionnaire, Rathus assertiveness scale, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, Hospital anxiety and depression scale, Sheehan disability scale). The statistical analyses compared the scores of all measurements at inclusion, at the end of the therapy, and 6 months later. We also calculated the effect size obtained after treatment, and performed a logistic regression to determine the factors associated with a remission of fear of blushing after therapy. The main outcome criterion - the Salpêtrière fear of blushing questionnaire (SFBQ) score - was significantly reduced after treatment (Pdepression and disability showed significant improvement after treatment and reductions remained stable at 3-month follow-up. To be a female and to have a low SFBQ score at inclusion appeared as two independent predictors of good improvement. Despite the preliminary nature of this study

  16. Therapists' professional and personal characteristics as predictors of outcome in long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, E; Knekt, P; Jääskeläinen, T; Lindfors, O

    2014-06-01

    Whether long-term psychodynamic therapy (LPP) and psychoanalysis (PA) differ from each other and require different therapist qualities has been debated extensively, but rarely investigated empirically. In a quasi-experimental design, LPP was provided for 128 and PA for 41 outpatients, aged 20-46 years and suffering from mood or anxiety disorder, with a 5-year follow-up from start of treatment. Therapies were provided by 58 experienced therapists. Therapist characteristics, measured pre-treatment, were assessed with the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ). General psychiatric symptoms were assessed as the main outcome measure at baseline and yearly after start of treatment with the Symptom Check List, Global Severity Index (SCL-90-GSI). Professionally less affirming and personally more forceful and less aloof therapists predicted less symptoms in PA than in LPP at the end of the follow-up. A faster symptom reduction in LPP was predicted by a more moderate relational style and work experiences of both skillfulness and difficulties, indicating differences between PA and LPP in the therapy process. Results challenge the benefit of a classically "neutral" psychoanalyst in PA. They also indicate closer examinations of therapy processes within and between the two treatments, which may benefit training and supervision of therapists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy in Infertility: A Systematic Review

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    Ezgi Gocek Yorulmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to make a systematic review the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group therapy which is designed to decrease psychological distress of individuals with infertility problem. The articles published between 2000 and 2015 (February were screened in the certain national and international scientific databases. Eleven studies that met the research criteria of inclusion and exclusion were evaluated in terms of the method, psychotherapeutic techniques and results. The findings of the current studies revealed that the cognitive behavioral group therapy designed for psychological distress in individuals with infertility is effective to reduce stress, anxiety, depression and relevant psychological problems. Moreover, this approach seems to be lead an increase in use of more adaptive ways of coping, optimism and resilience. In sum, it can be concluded that cognitive behavioral group therapy for infertile individuals has a positive impact on psychological well-being of those people. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 144-156

  18. Interpersonal Circumplex Profiles Of Persistent Depression: Goals, Self-Efficacy, Problems, And Effects Of Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Kenneth D; Sayegh, Liliane; Penberthy, J Kim; Weber, Charlotte; Haentjens, Katherine; Turecki, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    We assessed severely and persistently depressed patients' interpersonal self-efficacy, problems, and goals, plus changes in interpersonal functioning and depression during 20 weeks of group therapy. Outpatients (32 female, 26 male, mean age = 45 years) completed interpersonal circumplex measures of goals, efficacy, and problems before completing 20 weeks of manualized group therapy, during which we regularly assessed depression and interpersonal style. Compared to normative samples, patients lacked interpersonal agency, including less self-efficacy for expressive/assertive actions; stronger motives to avoid conflict, scorn, and humiliation; and more problems with being too submissive, inhibited, and accommodating. Behavioral Activation and especially Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy interventions produced improvements in depression and interpersonal agency, with increases in "agentic and communal" efficacy predicting subsequent decreases in depression. While severely and persistently depressed patients were prone to express maladaptive interpersonal dispositions, over the course of group therapy, they showed increasingly agentic and beneficial patterns of cognitions, motives, and behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Psycho-educational coping-oriented group therapy for schizophrenia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Christina; Andres, Karl; Hofer, Alex; Hummer, Martina; Gutweniger, Sarah; Kemmler, Georg; Pfammatter, Mario; Meise, Ullrich

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational, coping-oriented therapy programme for patients with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. Controlled, prospective study design. In the experimental group the Therapy Manual for Psycho-education and Coping with Illness (PKB) was used, providing targeted information on the illness, medical treatment, prodromal symptoms, and health behaviour. Controls participated in supportive dialogues or in an occupational rehabilitation programme. Psychopathology, re-hospitalisations, knowledge, functional outcome and coping strategies were assessed before, directly after and 12 months post therapy. 82 patients participated. In both groups (experimental, control) a significant improvement in psychopathology and general functioning level were observed. Specific advantages for patients of the experimental group were limited to a few aspects, including rehospitalizations in the first year and certain coping strategies. In the treatment of schizophrenia different forms of psycho-social intervention (experimental, control) can be effective. Identification of subgroups profiting specially from certain types of intervention should be subject of future research.

  20. Leader and team behaviour during organisational change: A systems psychodynamic stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to explore the dynamic nature of leader and team behaviour during organizational change, using five different organisational constellations or neurotic personality styles, namely the paranoid, schizoid, depressive, compulsive and histrionic styles. Qualitative research was conducted, comprising of two focus groups with eight psychologists consulting regularly to organisational change. The data was content analysed and interpreted from the systems psychodynamic stance. Each style’s leader and team behavioural manifestations are discussed. The findings and recommendations can be used by consulting psychologists towards understanding and implementing organisational change dynamics. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie navorsing was om die dinamiese aard van leier- en spangedrag tydens organisasieverandering te eksploreer, deur gebruik te maak van vyf verskillende organisasie konstelasies of neurotiese persoonlikheids style, naamlik die paranoide, skisoide, depressiewe, kompulsiewe en histrioniese style. Kwalitatiewe navorsing is uitgevoer, bestaande uit twee fokusgroepe met agt sielkundiges wat gereeld konsulteer in die veld van organisasieverandering. Die data is aan inhoudsanalise onderwerp en geinterpreteer vanuit die sisteem-psigodinamiese benadering. Elke styl se leier en span gedrag word bespreek. Die bevindinge en aanbevelings kan gebruik word deur sielkundiges in konsultasies ten einde organisasieveranderingsdinamika te verstaan en te implementeer.

  1. THE CHALLENGE OF WORKING WITH TEENAGERS IN CONFLICT WITH THE LAW: PSYCHODYNAMIC WORK INTERVENTION

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    Jéssica Emanoeli Moreira da Costa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Socio-educational Reintegration Workers play a role in the custody, safety and monitoring of teenagers, complying with socio-educational measures for having infringed the law according to Brazil’s Child and Teenager Statute. This study in terms of public policies has to do with education and sanction. Further, it discusses collective defense strategies from social reintegration workers, who deal on a daily basis with teenagers in conflict with the law. The methodology applied is based upon Work Psychodynamics.  The study concludes that given their strong unity, social reintegration workers protect themselves from work-related pathologies given that they preserve themselves from isolation by inserting themselves in a space of intersubjective relations that support their work and keep them from fear and anxiety. Collective strength comes through cooperation built around the almost prison-like discipline shown towards teenagers deprived of their freedom. This discipline disguises a collective defense strategy that denies the fact that teenagers in conflict with the law are in a vulnerable psychosocial situation. This collective defense strategy serves under current work conditions to protect social reintegration workers from the fear of building a close relationship with teenagers given the certainty that this relationship will leave the first group at risk and unprotected.

  2. Clinical and research implications of the evaluation of women's group therapy for anorgasmia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriansky, J B; Sharpe, L

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some important clinical and research implications of studies which have evaluated the effectiveness of short-term behavioral group therapy for anorgasmia. Though formal research data on curative factors is very sparse, the experience of sharing within a group, and the focus on arousal seem consistent with treatment outcome; however, the emphasis on assertiveness and the woman-only approach may have countertherapeutic as well as therapeutic effects. A potentially important intervening variable is the woman's level of ego development. The use of certain assessment scales and criteria for success of treatment are critiqued, and recommendations made for further study.

  3. Study of the Effect of Group Therapy on Depression Following Myocardial Infarction

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    F. Sheikholeslami

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available People experience psychological distress after cardiac events such as acute myocardial infarction . Approximately 65 percent of patients with acute MI report experiencing symptom of depression . Symptom of depression predict poor quality of life and reduce return to work and increase risk of mortality . Therefore patients experiencing depression after acute MI should be identified and given targeted psychological interventions.This research was a quasi experimental and clinical trial study and consisted of two groups and three stages. The samples included 22 patients with MI that were randomly put into two equal groups (experimental & control . The objective of this study was to determine the effect of group therapy on patients with MI before , after and one month after the intervention. Depression were assessed using the Beck depression inventory. The data were analyzed with paired T-test and T _ student using SPSS soft ware.The results showed a significant difference between depression of groups before , after and one month after intervention (P < 0.001 .Not only group therapy had distinguishable effects on the level of depression in patients but also its effects were even noticed one month after intervention. This method is highly recommended for all level of prevention and treatment in MI patients and other patients.

  4. Humanistic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Moore, Theresa HM; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different humanistic therapy models (person-centred, gestalt, process-experiential, transactional analysis, existential and non-directive therapies) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression. PMID:25278809

  5. Design of an international multicentre RCT on group schema therapy for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzelaer, Pim; Farrell, Joan; Evers, Silvia M A A; Jacob, Gitta A; Lee, Christopher W; Brand, Odette; van Breukelen, Gerard; Fassbinder, Eva; Fretwell, Heather; Harper, R Patrick; Lavender, Anna; Lockwood, George; Malogiannis, Ioannis A; Schweiger, Ulrich; Startup, Helen; Stevenson, Teresa; Zarbock, Gerhard; Arntz, Arnoud

    2014-11-18

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe and highly prevalent mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST) has been found effective in the treatment of BPD and is commonly delivered through an individual format. A group format (group schema therapy, GST) has also been developed. GST has been found to speed up and amplify the treatment effects found for individual ST. Delivery in a group format may lead to improved cost-effectiveness. An important question is how GST compares to treatment as usual (TAU) and what format for delivery of schema therapy (format A; intensive group therapy only, or format B; a combination of group and individual therapy) produces the best outcomes. An international, multicentre randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted with a minimum of fourteen participating centres. Each centre will recruit multiple cohorts of at least sixteen patients. GST formats as well as the orders in which they are delivered to successive cohorts will be balanced. Within countries that contribute an uneven number of sites, the orders of GST formats will be balanced within a difference of one. The RCT is designed to include a minimum of 448 patients with BPD. The primary clinical outcome measure will be BPD severity. Secondary clinical outcome measures will include measures of BPD and general psychiatric symptoms, schemas and schema modes, social functioning and quality of life. Furthermore, an economic evaluation that consists of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses will be performed using a societal perspective. Lastly, additional investigations will be carried out that include an assessment of the integrity of GST, a qualitative study on patients' and therapists' experiences with GST, and studies on variables that might influence the effectiveness of GST. This trial will compare GST to TAU for patients with BPD as well as two different formats for the delivery of GST. By combining an evaluation of clinical effectiveness, an economic evaluation

  6. Sudden gains in exposure-focused cognitive-behavioral group therapy for panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Arjona, Raquel; Santacana, Martí; Montoro, María; Rosado, Silvia; Guillamat, Roser; Vallès, Vicenç; Fullana, Miquel A

    2017-11-01

    In the context of psychological treatment, a sudden gain is a large and enduring improvement in symptom severity that occurs between two single therapy sessions. The influence of sudden gains on long-term outcomes and functional impairment in anxiety disorders is not well understood, and little is known with regard to panic disorder in particular. In addition, previous research on patients with anxiety disorders has produced inconsistent results regarding the relationship between sudden gains and cognitive change. We examined the incidence of sudden gains in a large sample (n = 116) of panic disorder patients undergoing exposure-focused cognitive-behavioral group therapy, and compared panic severity, functional impairment, and cognitive change in patients with and without sudden gains at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up. Participants who experienced sudden gains displayed lower levels of panic severity and functional impairment at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up than those who did not experience sudden gains. However, we observed no difference in cognitive changes between groups, either at posttreatment or at follow-up. Our results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of sudden gains on therapeutic outcomes not only extend to long-term and functional outcome measures but are also evident in less cognitive (i.e., exposure-focused) forms of psychological treatment. Sudden gains are common in panic disorder patients undergoing exposure-based cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Sudden gains during exposure-focused therapy are linked to greater improvement in panic disorder severity and functional impairment. The positive impact of sudden gains on panic disorder severity and functional impairment is maintained in the long term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A Preliminary Report of Short-Term Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Inpatients With Personality Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    SPRINGER, TAMAR; LOHR, NAOMI E.; BUCHTEL, HENRY A.; SILK, KENNETH R.

    1996-01-01

    A randomized, controlled study evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral therapy group, based on Linehan’s dialectical behavior therapy, for inpatients with personality disorders. The treatment, a problem-solving skills group focused on parasuicidality, was compared with a discussion control group. Change was assessed by self-report measures and behavioral observations on the unit. Subjects in both groups improved significantly on most change measures, alth...

  8. Effectiveness of Life Review Group Therapy on Psychological Well-Being and the Life Expectancy of Elderly Women

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    Esmaeil Sadri Damirchi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that life review group therapy could significantly enhance the psychological well-being and life expectancy in elderly women. With the rapid increase in the number of elderly, life review group therapy is highly recommended.

  9. [Active music therapy for chronic pain: a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Busch, H C; Hoffmann, P

    1997-04-18

    There are only few publications about the effect of music therapy on pain relief. The intention of this prospective study is to demonstrate the influence of the Nordoff/Robbins method of active music therapy in a group of 12 patients with fibromyalgia, myofascial pain syndromes and polyarthritis on pain reduction, life quality and coping. The clinical parameters of each patient were related to the observations in the audio- and video-documented music therapy settings and to the self-reported changes in pain intensity and pain behaviour. There was a significant reduction of pain intensity and pain-related disability in the music group compared to a control group, but no change in the depression and anxiety score. The influence of music therapy could be even better demonstrated in the systematic analysis of the single cases by individual profiles. Active music therapy affects especially the communicative and emotional dimension of chronic pain. Psychophysiological and psychodynamic models are presented to explain the effectiveness of music therapy on pain reduction. Clinical studies on music therapy as well as on other "art therapies" should relate the analysis of clinical parameters to the descriptive-phenomenological documentation of the therapeutic process to demonstrate systematically the influence of music and art in the individual case.

  10. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia: a meta-analysis

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    Beatriz Navarro-Bravo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder in the general population and in clinical practice. Although pharmacological treatment is the most widespread choice, psychological treatment appears to have longer lasting effects. The main objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the cognitive-behavioural group therapy treatment for insomnia. Method: a systematic search for cognitive-behavioural therapy clinical trials in Pubmed, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Scielo, WOK, Cochrane, Scopus and Embase. 153 articles were reviewed, of which 9 met inclusion criteria for the metaanalysis. Adding up the data from all 9 trials, a total of 699 people completed the post-test phase. Results: after finishing cognitive-behavioural therapy, significant improvements regarding insomnia were found according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Insomnia Severity Index, sleep latency, wake after sleep onset and sleep efficiency. There were no significant improvements in total sleep time. Conclusions: the results from experimental studies on cognitive-behavioural therapy as an insomnia treatment clearly suggest a positive impact on symptoms, as assessed using both validated scales and sleep diaries.

  11. Occupational therapy with people with depression: using nominal group technique to collate clinician opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Taylor, Michelle; Pepin, Genevieve

    2015-05-01

    This aim of this study was to obtain a consensus from clinicians regarding occupational therapy for people with depression, for the assessments and practices they use that are not currently supported by research evidence directly related to functional performance. The study also aimed to discover how many of these assessments and practices were currently supported by research evidence. Following a previously reported systematic review of assessments and practices used in occupational therapy for people with depression, a modified nominal group technique was used to discover which assessments and practices occupational therapists currently utilize. Three online surveys gathered initial data on therapeutic options (survey 1), which were then ranked (survey 2) and re-ranked (survey 3) to gain the final consensus. Twelve therapists completed the first survey, whilst 10 clinicians completed both the second and third surveys. Only 30% of the assessments and practices identified by the clinicians were supported by research evidence. A consensus was obtained on a total of 35 other assessments and interventions. These included both occupational-therapy-specific and generic assessments and interventions. Principle conclusion. Very few of the assessments and interventions identified were supported by research evidence directly related to functional performance. While a large number of options were generated, the majority of these were not occupational therapy specific.

  12. The effective comparison between emotion-focused cognitive behavioral group therapy and cognitive behavioral group therapy in children with separation anxiety disorder

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    Afrooz Afshari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT is a new form of CBT with emotion regulation components. This form of treatment is suggested to be employed to improve dysregulation of anxiety and other kind of emotions in anxious children. This study observed and compared the effectiveness of CBT and ECBT on anxiety symptoms; sadness and anger management; and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 30 children from 9 to 13-years-old (15 girls and 15 boys with diagnosis of SAD, being randomly assigned to CBT, ECBT, and control groups (five girls and five boys in each group. Subject children in CBT group participated in 10-h weekly sessions within Coping Cat manual; whereas, subject children in ECBT group contributed in 12-h weekly sessions within ECBT. The control group received no treatment. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED; child and parent forms, Children′s Emotion Management Scale (CEMS; anger and sadness forms, and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ tests administered to all subjects in pretest, posttest, and the follow-up measurement (3 months later. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA repeated measure and Kruskal-Wallis were applied to analyze data by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software package (v. 20. Results: CBT and ECBT; demonstrated no significant difference in reducing separation anxiety and total anxiety symptoms from parent and children′s reports. ECBT effectively increased anger coping and decreased negative cognitive strategies and dysregulation of anger in children, both in posttest and follow-up. Also, ECBT reduced sadness dysregulation and increased sadness coping, though these significant advantages were lost in 3 months later follow-up. CBT reduced negative cognitive strategies in follow-up and increased sadness coping

  13. Symptom fluctuations, self-esteem, and cohesion during group cognitive behaviour therapy for early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Leclerc, Claude; Wykes, Til

    2018-03-01

    Group cohesion has been linked to positive changes in self-esteem and in symptoms during group psychotherapy in people with psychosis. These changes may be linked to changes in symptoms as fluctuations in self-esteem have been linked to symptom fluctuations. We aimed to determine the relationship between these three factors - group cohesion, self-esteem, and symptoms - during group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (GCBTp). We hypothesized that group cohesion would precede changes in symptoms and self-esteem and that improvements in self-esteem would precede improvements in symptoms. This is an uncontrolled longitudinal study recruiting from a convenience sample within two early psychosis clinics. Sixty-six individuals from first episode of psychosis treatment programmes participated in this study and received 24 sessions of a validated GCBTp protocol. Participants answered a brief questionnaire at the end of each session, measuring their group cohesion, self-esteem, and perception of their symptoms as worse, same, or better than usual. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts for time effects were estimated with a mixed model for repeated measures with a random cluster effect and revealed a quartic trend regarding changes in symptoms over the 24 sessions. Self-esteem, symptoms, and group cohesion were strongly linked during a given session. Also, self-esteem changes predicted changes in symptoms up to two sessions later, and symptoms changes predicted self-esteem changes at the next session. Group cohesion preceded improvements in both self-esteem and symptoms; self-esteem also predicted improvements in group cohesion. These results suggest that self-esteem and symptoms influence each other during therapy, with improvements in one leading to improvements in the other. Group cohesion also appears to be an essential prerequisite to positive changes in self-esteem and symptoms during GCBTp. This study emphasizes the interrelation between self-esteem improvements and

  14. Guía terapéutica del Dispositivo Grupos de Terapia Focalizada- GTF para adolescentes violentos Therapeutic guide of the Focalised Therapy Group device - FTG for violent adolescents

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    Susana Quiroga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En el Programa de Psicología Clínica para Adolescentes, Sede Regional Sur, UBA se creó un dispositivo diagnóstico-terapéutico denominado Grupo de Terapia Focalizada-GTF. Este dispositivo consiste en la conformación de grupos cerrados, con temática focalizada y orientación psicodinámica que constan de diez sesiones de una vez por semana de una hora y media de duración. En este trabajo presentaremos: 1- la importancia del desarrollo de guías clínicas a nivel internacional, 2- la caracterización intrapsíquica e intersubjetiva de los adolescentes violentos y las dificultades que presentan para los abordajes terapéuticos psicodinámicos clásicos. 3- las características del dispositivo GTF, 4- la guía terapéutica del dispositivo GTF que incluye los objetivos específicos, el desarrollo de los mismos y la técnica específica para cada una de las sesiones. Esta guía terapéutica fue aplicada a 9 GTF para adolescentes tempranos violentos. El Análisis de Resultados y Proceso Terapéutico de esta muestra a la que se aplicó la guía permite pensar que este dispositivo con objetivos predeterminados y con actividades específicas para cada una de las sesiones, constituye un marco de contención estable en contrasposición a la realidad disruptiva, cambiante y con alto riesgo psicosocial en la que viven estos adolescentes.Within the framework of the Program of Clinical Psychology for Adolescents, Southern Branch of the School of Psychology, UBA, a diagnostic-therapeutic device called Focalised Therapy Group- FTG has been created. This device involves forming closed groups with focalised topics and psychodynamic orientation, which consists of ten sessions that last an hour and a half each and are held once a week. In this research work we will present: 1- the importance of developing a clinic guide at an international level; 2- the intrapsychic and intersubjective description of the violent adolescents and the dificulties they have to be

  15. Prospective matching of alcoholic clients to cognitive-behavioral or interactional group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadden, R M; Litt, M D; Cooney, N L; Kabela, E; Getter, H

    2001-05-01

    In earlier work, client sociopathy and global psychopathology were effective variables for treatment matching: clients low on both sociopathy and severity of psychopathology were likely to benefit from interactional group therapy, whereas those scoring high on either of these dimensions benefited more from a coping skills intervention. The present study assessed whether outcomes improve further when clients are assigned to group treatments prospectively based on a matching strategy derived from the previous findings. All participants (N = 250, 66% men) met criteria for alcohol dependence or abuse. About half were prospectively assigned to either cognitive-behavioral (CB) coping skills training or interactional therapy, those with higher levels of psychiatric severity or sociopathy were given CB and those who were low on both dimensions were given interactional therapy. The other half were randomly assigned to those treatments, replicating the procedure of the earlier study. Outcome data were collected at the conclusion of treatment and at 3-month intervals for 1 year following. Prospective matching of clients to treatment did not produce superior drinking outcomes compared to random treatment assignment. Randomly assigned clients were more likely to be abstinent at the end of treatment, but this effect disappeared at later follow-ups. Prospectively matched clients had fewer negative consequences of drinking than did those assigned randomly (unmatched). Neither sociopathy nor psychiatric severity was particularly effective for matching. The matching effects from our previous study were not replicated. Nevertheless, prospective matching did reduce the negative consequences of drinking, consistent with our previous results.

  16. Assessing women's sexuality after cancer therapy: checking assumptions with the focus group technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, D W; Boyd, C P

    1999-12-01

    Cancer and cancer therapies impair sexual health in a multitude of ways. The promotion of sexual health is therefore vital for preserving quality of life and is an integral part of total or holistic cancer management. Nursing, to provide holistic care, requires research that is meaningful to patients as well as the profession to develop educational and interventional studies to promote sexual health and coping. To obtain meaningful research data instruments that are reliable, valid, and pertinent to patients' needs are required. Several sexual functioning instruments were reviewed for this study and found to be lacking in either a conceptual foundation or psychometric validation. Without a defined conceptual framework, authors of the instruments must have made certain assumptions regarding what women undergoing cancer therapy experience and what they perceive as important. To check these assumptions before assessing women's sexuality after cancer therapies in a larger study, a pilot study was designed to compare what women experience and perceive as important regarding their sexuality with what is assessed in several currently available research instruments, using the focus group technique. Based on the focus group findings, current sexual functioning questionnaires may be lacking in pertinent areas of concern for women treated for breast or gynecologic malignancies. Better conceptual foundations may help future questionnaire design. Self-regulation theory may provide an acceptable conceptual framework from which to develop a sexual functioning questionnaire.

  17. The therapeutic focus in significant sessions of master therapists: a comparison of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic-interpersonal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfried, M R; Raue, P J; Castonguay, L G

    1998-10-01

    Using the Coding System of Therapeutic Focus, this exploratory study was a comparative process analysis of clinically significant sessions obtained from 22 master cognitive-behavior and 14 master psychodynamic-interpersonal therapists. Therapists were nominated by experts in each of these orientations, and clients were seen in a naturalistic setting for problems with anxiety, depression, or both. Relatively few between-groups differences emerged with this master therapist sample. However, regardless of theoretical orientation, several differences were found between those portions of the session labeled by therapists as being clinically significant and those viewed as less significant. As these findings are different from those obtained in a previous study of the therapeutic focus in interventions carried out within the context of a controlled clinical trial, some of the possible factors contributing to these differences are noted.

  18. Increasing Availability of Exposure Therapy Through Intensive Group Treatment for Childhood Anxiety and OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Stephen P H; Dammann, Julie E; Tiede, Michael S; Biggs, Bridget K; Hillson Jensen, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Archival data were used to examine the feasibility of a 5-day, clinic-based, intensive exposure-based cognitive-behavioral group therapy for childhood anxiety disorders (CADs) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Participants were 143 children (82 girls) aged 6 to 19 years ( M = 13.93 years, SD = 2.9 years) with CADs or OCD (or both) in 28 consecutive groups. Repeated-measures ANOVA in the subsample ( n = 57) with complete treatment data indicated positive change on all variables from pretreatment to posttreatment with few differences between CADs and OCD patients. Effect sizes were moderate to large for anxiety symptoms (parent reported = 0.74, child reported = 0.65) and impairment (parent reported = 1.02, child reported = 0.69). The intensive group protocol required fewer sessions and 36% fewer therapist-hours per patient than the individually administered protocol. The program increased treatment availability for families from diverse geographic areas ( M distance traveled to clinic = 407 miles, SD = 786.4 miles). These findings support further, well-controlled examination of the 5-day intensive group treatment protocol's efficacy and potential to increase availability of evidence-based exposure therapy.

  19. Multi-family group therapy for adolescent Internet addiction: exploring the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Yi; Yan, Ni; Zhou, Zong-Kui; Yuan, Xiao-Jiao; Lan, Jing; Liu, Chao-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Internet addiction is one of the most common problems among adolescents and effective treatment is needed. This research aims to test the effectiveness and underlying mechanism of multi-family group therapy (MFGT) to reduce Internet addiction among adolescents. A total of 92 participants consisting of 46 adolescents with Internet addiction, aged 12-18years, and 46 their parents, aged 35-46years, were assigned to the experimental group (six-session MFGT intervention) or a waiting-list control. Structured questionnaires were administered at pre-intervention (T1), post-intervention (T2) and a three-month follow-up (T3). There was a significant difference in the decline both in the average score and proportion of adolescents with Internet addiction in MFGT group at post-intervention (MT1=3.40, MT2=2.46, pInternet use was partially explained by the satisfaction of their psychological needs and improved parent-adolescent communication and closeness. The six-session multi-family group therapy was effective in reducing Internet addiction behaviors among adolescents and could be implemented as part of routine primary care clinic services in similar populations. As family support system is critical in maintaining the intervention effect, fostering positive parent-adolescent interaction and addressing adolescents' psychological needs should be included in preventive programs for Internet addiction in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Cognitive Therapy in Reducing Depression and Obsessive Rumination among Women under Methadone Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S taimory

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was an attempt to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group cognitive therapy in reducing depression and obsessive rumination among women under methadone treatment. Method: A quasi-experimental research design along with pretest-posttest design and a control group were employed to conduct this study. Considering inclusion criteria, a total of 24 female substance abusers who were under methadone treatment were selected from Omide Farda and Javeneh Sabz clinics in Mashhad via purposive sampling method. The experimental group received eight training sessions of mindfulness-based group cognitive therapy, while the control group did not receive any intervention. Two scales, namely obsessive rumination scale and Beck’s depression questionnaire were used for data collection purposes. Results: Results of analysis of covariance showed that mindfulness-based group cognitive therapy has reduced obsessive rumination and depression scores. Conclusion: Mindfulness-based group cognitive therapy can be included in intervention programs for substance abusers.

  1. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP for social phobia into clinical practice: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

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    Leweke Frank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychodynamic psychotherapy is frequently applied in the treatment of social phobia. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of studies on the transfer of manualized treatments to routine psychodynamic practice. Our study is the first one to examine the effects of additional training in a manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP procedure on outcome in routine psychotherapy for social phobia. This study is an extension to a large multi-site RCT (N = 512 comparing the efficacy of STPP to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT of Social Phobia. Methods/Design The manualized treatment is designed for a time limited approach with 25 individual sessions of STPP over 6 months. Private practitioners will be randomized to training in manualized STPP vs. treatment as usual without a specific training (control condition. We plan to enrol a total of 105 patients (84 completers. Assessments will be conducted before treatment starts, after 8 and 15 weeks, after 25 treatment sessions, at the end of treatment, 6 months and 12 months after termination of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Remission from social phobia is defined scoring with 30 or less points on this scale. Discussion We will investigate how the treatment can be transferred from a controlled trial into the less structured setting of routine clinical care. This question represents Phase IV of psychotherapy research. It combines the benefits of randomized controlled and naturalistic research. The study is genuinely designed to promote faster and more widespread dissemination of effective interventions. It will answer the questions whether manualized STPP can be implemented into routine outpatient care, whether the new methods improve treatment courses and outcomes and whether treatment effects reached in routine psychotherapeutic treatments are comparable to those of the controlled, strictly manualized treatment of the main study

  2. Group music therapy for severe mental illness: a randomized embedded-experimental mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocke, D; Bloch, S; Castle, D; Thompson, G; Newton, R; Stewart, S; Gold, C

    2014-08-01

    Music therapy is an innovative approach to support people with severe mental illness (SMI). The aim of the study was to determine whether group music therapy (GMT) positively impacted on quality of life (QoL), social enrichment, self-esteem, spirituality and psychiatric symptoms of participants with SMI and how they experienced the intervention. The primary outcome was QoL; secondary measures assessed social enrichment, self-esteem, spirituality and psychiatric symptoms. The 13-week intervention comprised singing familiar songs and composing original songs recorded in a professional studio. Qualitative data were generated from focus group interviews and song lyric analysis. Ninety-nine adults (57 female) were recruited, with an initial cohort (n = 75) randomized to either: weekly GMT followed by standard care (SC) or SC followed by GMT. Crossover occurred after 13 weeks. Measures were conducted at baseline, 13, 26 and 39 weeks. A second cohort (n = 24) could not be randomized and were assigned to GMT followed by SC. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant difference between GMT and SC on QoL and spirituality. This was robust to different assumptions about missing data (listwise deletion, last observation carried forward or multiple imputation). Per-protocol analysis suggested greater benefit for those receiving more sessions. Focus group interview and song lyric analyses suggested that GMT was enjoyable; self-esteem was enhanced; participants appreciated therapists and peers; and although challenges were experienced, the programme was recommended to others. Group music therapy may enhance QoL and spirituality of persons with SMI. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Interleukin-5-producing group 2 innate lymphoid cells control eosinophilia induced by interleukin-2 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, Frédéric; Molofsky, Ari B; Morar, Malika M; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Liang, Hong-Erh; Klatzmann, David; Locksley, Richard M; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-04

    Interleukin (IL)-2 promotes regulatory T-cell development and function, and treatment with IL-2 is being tested as therapy for some autoimmune diseases. However, patients receiving IL-2 treatment also experience eosinophilia due to an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that patients receiving low-dose IL-2 have elevated levels of serum IL-5, and this correlates with their degree of eosinophilia. In mice, low-dose IL-2-anti-IL-2 antibody complexes drove group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) to produce IL-5 and proliferate. Using genetic approaches in mice, we demonstrate that activation of ILC2 was responsible for the eosinophilia observed with IL-2 therapy. These observations reveal a novel cellular network that is activated during IL-2 treatment. A better understanding of the cross talk between these cell populations may lead to more effective targeting of IL-2 to treat autoimmune disease. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Prediction and moderation of improvement in cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic psychotherapy for panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara; Porter, Eliora; Gallop, Robert; McCarthy, Kevin S; Graf, Elizabeth; Rudden, Marie; Sharpless, Brian A; Barber, Jacques P

    2017-08-01

    To identify variables predicting psychotherapy outcome for panic disorder or indicating which of 2 very different forms of psychotherapy-panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy (PFPP) or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)-would be more effective for particular patients. Data were from 161 adults participating in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) including these psychotherapies. Patients included 104 women; 118 patients were White, 33 were Black, and 10 were of other races; 24 were Latino(a). Predictors/moderators measured at baseline or by Session 2 of treatment were used to predict change on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS). Higher expectancy for treatment gains (Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire d = -1.05, CI95% [-1.50, -0.60]), and later age of onset (d = -0.65, CI95% [-0.98, -0.32]) were predictive of greater change. Both variables were also significant moderators: patients with low expectancy of improvement improved significantly less in PFPP than their counterparts in CBT, whereas this was not the case for patients with average or high levels of expectancy. When patients had an onset of panic disorder later in life (≥27.5 years old), they fared as well in PFPP as CBT. In contrast, at low and mean levels of onset age, CBT was the more effective treatment. Predictive variables suggest possibly fruitful foci for improvement of treatment outcome. In terms of moderation, CBT was the more consistently effective treatment, but moderators identified some patients who would do as well in PFPP as in CBT, thereby widening empirically supported options for treatment of this disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The empirical status of psychodynamic psychotherapy - an update: Bambi's alive and kicking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Leweke, Frank; Klein, Susanne; Steinert, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures proposed rigorous criteria to define empirically supported psychotherapies. According to these criteria, 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) showing efficacy are required for a treatment to be designated as 'efficacious' and 1 RCT for a designation as 'possibly efficacious'. Applying these criteria modified by Chambless and Hollon, this article presents an update on the evidence for psychodynamic therapy (PDT) in specific mental disorders. A systematic search was performed using the criteria by Chambless and Hollon for study selection, as follows: (1) RCT of PDT in adults, (2) use of reliable and valid measures for diagnosis and outcome, (3) use of treatment manuals or manual-like guidelines, (4) adult population treated for specific problems and (5) PDT superior to no treatment, placebo or alternative treatment or equivalent to an established treatment. A total of 39 RCTs were included. Following Chambless and Hollon, PDT can presently be designated as efficacious in major depressive disorder (MDD), social anxiety disorder, borderline and heterogeneous personality disorders, somatoform pain disorder, and anorexia nervosa. For MDD, this also applies to the combination with pharmacotherapy. PDT can be considered as possibly efficacious in dysthymia, complicated grief, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and substance abuse/dependence. Evidence is lacking for obsessive-compulsive, posttraumatic stress, bipolar and schizophrenia spectrum disorder(s). Evidence has emerged that PDT is efficacious or possibly efficacious in a wide range of common mental disorders. Further research is required for those disorders for which sufficient evidence does not yet exist.

  6. Bridging the gap between neuroscientific and psychodynamic models in child and adolescent psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopescu, Xenia; Gerber, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a selective review of the neuroscience and child-psychoanalytic literature, focusing on areas of significant overlap and emphasizing comprehensive theories in developmental neuroscience and child psychoanalysis with testable mechanisms of action. Topics include molecular biology and genetics findings relevant to psychotherapy research, neuroimaging findings relevant to psychotherapy, brain regions of interest for psychotherapy, neurobiologic changes caused by psychotherapy, use of neuroimaging to predict treatment outcome, and schemas as a bridging concept between psychodynamic and cognitive neuroscience models. The combined efforts of neuroscientists and psychodynamic clinicians and theorists are needed to unravel the mechanisms of human mental functioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on occupational therapy groups for caregivers of families with schizophrenia patients

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    Angélica da Silva Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the main aspects featuring the experience of caring for a family member who is schizophrenic and discuss the possible therapeutic benefits which arise from the participation of caregivers in occupational therapy groups. Methodological procedures: Qualitative-descriptive study, performed in a mental health ambulatory at a general hospital in the state of São Paulo. Data was collected through audio-recording in occupational therapy groups which counted on the participation of 10 family-caregivers of schizophrenic patients with follow-up treatment at this ambulatory. The data were analyzed through the thematic content analysis of Lawrence Bardin. Results: Caregivers of schizophrenic patients face daily difficulties arising from living together with their beloved ones and coping with their behaviors. These caregivers stress the importance of groups as a possible opportunity to have contact with other experiences of people under similar conditions, which not only enables them to clear doubts concerning the illness and the provided care, but also to reflect on the importance of taking care of themselves. Conclusions: There is great need for new studies that address this issue and develop continuous therapeutic interventions that offer caregivers the possibility to be heard about their experiences and to share information, aiming to prepare them to offer a more effective care for the schizophrenic family member and others with mental disorders. The importance of evaluating such interventions is therefore highlighted.

  8. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT among children with anxiety disorders

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    Nilgun Ongider-Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Anxiety levels were reduced significantly after CBGT sessions and also differences between therapy and the comparation groups were important. Therefore it was interpreted that CBGT was effective for reducing anxiety levels in children. Anxiety levels of parents were reduced after their children’s CBGT sessions; it is showed that whole family is playing an important role in anxiety treatment. Many research in the literature highlights that parents play crucial role in emerging anxiety sympoms of their children. [JCBPR 2015; 4(1.000: 26-37

  9. The treatment of anorgasmia: long-term effectiveness of a short-term behavioral group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriansky, J B; Sharpe, L; O'Connor, D

    1982-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of 19 women who participated in short-term group therapy for anorgasmia using masturbation and assertiveness training showed that the majority of women maintained treatment gains and progressed further in orgasm response and other aspects of sexual functioning, including assertiveness and liberalness of sexual attitudes. However, several women regressed, and four additional women who dropped out of treatment also improved dramatically in orgasm response, suggesting that other patient characteristics and factors affect apparent treatment outcome. Independent evaluations, standardized assessment scales, long-term, in-person follow-ups and multidimensional assessment are useful in evaluating treatment effectiveness.

  10. Psychosocial functioning in patients with treatment-resistant depression after group cognitive behavioral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisato Yoshihiko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients with Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD often have impaired social functioning, few studies have investigated the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment for these patients. We examined whether adding group cognitive behavioral therapy (group-CBT to medication would improve both the depressive symptoms and the social functioning of patient with mild TRD, and whether any improvements would be maintained over one year. Methods Forty-three patients with TRD were treated with 12 weekly sessions of group-CBT. Patients were assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF, the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD, the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire-Revised (ATQ-R at baseline, at the termination of treatment, and at the 12-month follow-up. Results Thirty-eight patients completed treatment; five dropped out. For the patients who completed treatment, post-treatment scores on the GAF and SF-36 were significantly higher than baseline scores. Scores on the HRSD, DAS, and ATQ-R were significantly lower after the treatment. Thus patients improved on all measurements of psychosocial functioning and mood symptoms. Twenty patients participated in the 12-month follow-up. Their improvements for psychosocial functioning, depressive symptoms, and dysfunctional cognitions were sustained at 12 months following the completion of group-CBT. Conclusions These findings suggest a positive effect that the addition of cognitive behavioural group therapy to medication on depressive symptoms and social functioning of mildly depressed patients, showing treatment resistance.

  11. The Feasibility of a Culturally Informed Group Therapy for Patients With Schizophrenia and Their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maura, Jessica; Weisman de Mamani, Amy

    2017-06-29

    Research suggests that group-based psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia provide benefits to patients and family members alike. However, few existing treatments consider cultural factors that may enhance their efficacy with diverse populations. The current study examined the feasibility of a culturally informed group therapy for schizophrenia (CIGT-S), which incorporates collectivistic principles and spiritual coping into the treatment protocol. The feasibility of the group protocol was tested by examining differences in patient symptom severity and patient and family member depression, anxiety, and stress after completion of the group program. Within-groups analyses were conducted comparing baseline data to group termination data from 12 patients and 11 family members. Additionally, between-groups analyses were conducted comparing waitlist termination data from 20 patients and 13 family members to group termination data from 12 patients and 11 family members. Finally, we examined participant satisfaction with the group protocol, including qualitative reports on components of the protocol that participants deemed most valuable. Results indicated that patients demonstrated lower levels of symptom severity upon completion of the CIGT-S program; however, no other significant effects were found. Results examining overall patient and family member satisfaction with the treatment protocol indicated that patients and family members both reported being highly satisfied by the treatment program. This was also represented in participant's open-ended responses to our satisfaction questionnaire. These findings indicate that CIGT-S may represent a feasible, cost-effective approach that can be flexibly used with patients and family members of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. A PILOT METHOD FOR MULTIMODAL GROUP THERAPY FOR ADULTS WITH ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Marin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The management of ADHD across the lifespan is a topic of scientific and public debate, with much discussion centering on optimal treatments. Increasing empirical evidence suggests that successful management of ADHD involves a combination of stimulant medication and psychosocial interventions. This article describes an original approach combining multiple psychotherapeutic modalities that addresses the complex treatment requirements of adult patients with ADHD, through a structured, integrative, psychosocial therapeutic model that holistically encompasses problematic aspects of life for the adult with ADHD. This model integrates a range of methods, including, problem-solving therapy, mindfulness, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and family therapy. Each of these methods have previously been empirically proven to be effective for this patient population, but have never been integrated into a coherent intervention comprised of group work designed for problem identification, positive reinforcement and modeling, peer discussions aimed to facilitate anger expression, communication and assertiveness training, and mindfulness and CBT exercises for increased awareness and organization, and to support new solutions for identified problems. Patients are also encouraged to identify trans-generational interaction patterns, reflect on how these patterns impact their emotional difficulties, and eventually achieve enhanced self-acceptance.

  13. Acceptance and commitment therapy for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders: development of an inpatient group intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacquisti, Alexa; Cohen, Matthew J; Schiller, Crystal Edler

    2017-06-10

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for childbearing women. Current treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, have demonstrated modest success in addressing perinatal psychiatric symptoms; however, additional treatment options are needed to address the limitations of current approaches, particularly for women experiencing moderate to severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum. We discuss the use of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a promising treatment approach that may be uniquely suited for perinatal women due to its emphasis of values, mindfulness, and acceptance; these psychological constructs notably address the significant psychiatric and behavioral health condition comorbidity, somatic symptoms, and stigma associated with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. In addition, we describe the development of a four-session ACT-based group intervention at the Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sessions focus on core ACT processes of acceptance, cognitive defusion, present-moment awareness, value identification, and goal setting, and we describe how each of these processes is relevant to the perinatal population. Implications for future clinical applications and research investigations are discussed.

  14. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    than 250 per cubic millimeter and then the use of therapy until the CD4+ count increased to more than 350 per cubic millimeter. The primary end point was the development of an opportunistic disease or death from any cause. An important secondary end point was major cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic......+ count, as used in our study, significantly increased the risk of opportunistic disease or death from any cause, as compared with continuous antiretroviral therapy, largely as a consequence of lowering the CD4+ cell count and increasing the viral load. Episodic antiretroviral therapy does not reduce...... had a CD4+ cell count of more than 350 per cubic millimeter to the continuous use of antiretroviral therapy (the viral suppression group) or the episodic use of antiretroviral therapy (the drug conservation group). Episodic use involved the deferral of therapy until the CD4+ count decreased to less...

  15. Group Development in a High School Adjustment Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Nubra Elaine

    1989-01-01

    Directed seminar concerning academic difficulty for ninth-grade Afro-American students (N=5) to observe group dynamics in relation to Bion's concept of psychodynamic group process and Bennis and Shepard's theory of group development. Observed changes in life of group that suggest phasic development. Noted group resistance to Black female…

  16. Smoking cessation in workplace settings: quit rates and determinants in a group behaviour therapy programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausherr, Yann; Quinto, Carlos; Grize, Leticia; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2017-09-25

    To capitalise on the opportunities that the smoking ban legislation in Switzerland offers for the prevention of tobacco-related diseases, a smoking cessation programme in a workplace setting was developed and implemented in companies across the language and cultural regions of Switzerland. Our goal was to identify factors associated with relapse into smoking that may be overcome during training sessions or that should be considered for the optimisation of future interventions. Between 2006 and 2012, 1287 smokers aged 16 to 68 years voluntarily attended smoking cessation training at their workplace. The intervention was based on a cognitive behavioural group therapy combined with individual proactive telephone counselling. The evaluation consisted of three anonymised questionnaires (pre- and postintervention, and 12-month follow-up). In this prospective cohort study, we investigated the association of smoking quit rates with training and participant characteristics, including withdrawal symptoms, by use of multilevel logistic regression analysis with a random intercept for training courses. The self-reported abstinence rate was 72.4% at the end of the training, and 18.6% 1 year later. The risk of relapse during the training was positively associated with the number of years and daily cigarettes smoked, and negatively with increased appetite, sleeping troubles and satisfaction with learned techniques. Failed abstinence within the first year was associated with younger age, higher numbers of daily smoked cigarettes and unsuccessful recent quit attempts. Our evaluation suggests that younger and more addicted smokers attending smoking cessation trainings may need additional support to achieve long lasting abstinence rates. Offering smoking cessation training in a workplace setting can achieve reasonable long-term quit rates, but a subset of employees needs additional support at the group or personal level. Group behaviour therapy could be an effective method to achieve

  17. Combined group and individual schema therapy for borderline personality disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhaut, Veronique; Arntz, Arnoud

    2014-06-01

    Schema Therapy (ST) is a highly effective treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). In a group format, delivery costs could be reduced and recovery processes catalyzed by specific use of group processes. As patients may also need individual attention, we piloted the combination of individual and group-ST. Two cohorts of BPD patients (N = 8, N = 10) received a combination of weekly group-ST and individual ST for 2 years, with 6 months extra individual ST if indicated. Therapists were experienced in individual ST but not in group-ST. The second cohort of therapists was trained in group-ST by specialists. This made it possible to explore the training effects. Assessments of BPD manifestations and secondary measures took place every 6 months up to 2.5 years. Change over time and differences between cohorts were analyzed with mixed regression. Dropout from treatment was 33.3% in Year 1, and 5.6% in Year 2, without cohort differences. BPD manifestations reduced significantly, with large effect sizes, and 77% recovery at 30 months. Large improvements were also found on general psychopathological symptoms, schema (mode) measures, quality of life, and happiness. Cohort-2 tended to improve faster, but there were no differences between cohorts in the long term. The study was uncontrolled, training effects might have been non-specific, and the sample size was relatively small. Combined group-individual ST can be an effective treatment, but dropout might be higher than from individual ST. Addition of specialized group-ST seems to speed up recovery compared to only individual ST. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypnosis compared with group therapy and individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Abrahamsen, Randi; Brødsgaard, I

    1996-01-01

    experimental groups were demographically comparable and showed reduced anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared with 51 control patients. The 25 HT patients did not differ significantly in numbers of dropouts during training compared with the 30 GT patients or 68 SD patients. For patients completing...... treatment, HT (n = 22) reduced dental anxiety to the same degree as GT (n = 24) and SD (n = 60). HT and SD patients required more therapist hours per patient than did GT, but total dropouts at 1 yr after specialist treatment were significantly greater in HT (13/ 25) than for SD rehearsals (5/34) or SD video......Effects of hypnotherapy (HT) and self-hypnosis training on extreme dental anxiety in adults aged 19-65 years were compared with group therapy (GT) and individual desensitization (SD) using scales of dental anxiety, dental beliefs, and fear of a next dentist (after specialist treatment). All...

  19. Examining Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Externalizing and Internalizing Disorders in Urban Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J; Schwartz, Billie S; Keiffer, Jackie N; McCurdy, Barry L; Mathen, Manju; Jawad, Abbas F

    2016-07-01

    This article presents outcome data of the implementation of three group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) interventions for children with externalizing behavior problems, anxiety, and depression. School counselors and graduate students co-led the groups in two low-income urban schools. Data were analyzed to assess pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in diagnostic severity level. Results of the exploratory study indicated that all three GCBT protocols were effective at reducing diagnostic severity level for children who had a primary diagnosis of an externalizing disorder, anxiety disorder, or depressive disorder at the clinical or intermediate (at-risk) level. All three GCBT protocols were implemented with relatively high levels of fidelity. Data on the effectiveness of the interventions for reducing diagnostic severity level for externalizing and internalizing spectrum disorders and for specific disorders are presented. A discussion of implementation of mental health evidence-based interventions in urban schools is provided. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Intensive non-avoidance group therapy with stutterer adults: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Dobrinka

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and document the use and efficacy of intensive non-avoidance group treatment for Bulgarian adults who stutter (AWS), to specify that changes are adopted in different speech situations (in the stabilization phase), and to demonstrate that changes are maintained after intensive therapy. Participants were AWS (n=15, 12 males) with an average age of 25.2 years) Bulgarian native-speakers. Twelve participants were University students and three were clients with tertiary education in different areas. All participants were enrolled in First (overall effect) and Second (interim effect) Stages of Intensive Non-Avoidance Treatment for Stuttering. Van Riper's stuttering modification therapy approach was employed; the latter considers a non-avoidance treatment for stuttering. The treatment was conducted in participants' native Bulgarian language. AWS, as a group (n=15), significantly decreased the number of stuttered utterances after intensive treatment; findings were consistent for participants with moderate as well as severe stuttering. Likewise, there was a significant decrease in duration (in seconds) of disfluencies after treatment; findings were consistent for participants with moderate as well as severe stuttering. Eighty percent of AWS used cancellation immediately and six months after treatment, 65% mastered preparatory sets immediately and six months after treatment, 35% exhibited pull-outs immediately after treatment and 55%, six months post-treatment. These preliminary findings were taken to suggest that intensive non-avoidance treatment for stuttering can be successfully employed with Bulgarian adults who stutter. Special focus was on the positive fluency changes that occurred during the course of therapy regarding the duration of disfluencies in seconds, and index of disfluencies.

  1. The relationship between interpersonal problems, therapeutic alliance, and outcomes following group and individual cognitive behaviour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Peter M; Burgess, Melissa M; Nathan, Paula

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is efficacious, but there remains individual variability in outcomes. Patient's interpersonal problems may affect treatment outcomes, either directly or through a relationship mediated by helping alliance. Interpersonal problems may affect alliance and outcomes differentially in individual and group (CBGT) treatments. The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between interpersonal problems, alliance, dropout and outcomes for a clinical sample receiving either individual or group CBT for anxiety or depression in a community clinic. Patients receiving individual CBT (N=84) or CBGT (N=115) completed measures of interpersonal problems, alliance, and disorder specific symptoms at the commencement and completion of CBT. In CBGT higher pre-treatment interpersonal problems were associated with increased risk of dropout and poorer outcomes. This relationship was not mediated by alliance. In individual CBT those who reported higher alliance were more likely to complete treatment, although alliance was not associated with symptom change, and interpersonal problems were not related to attrition or outcome. Allocation to group and individual therapy was non-random, so selection bias may have influenced these results. Some analyses were only powered to detect large effects. Helping alliance ratings were high, so range restriction may have obscured the relationship between helping alliance, attrition and outcomes. Pre-treatment interpersonal problems increase risk of dropout and predict poorer outcomes in CBGT, but not in individual CBT, and this relationship is not mediated by helping alliance. Stronger alliance is associated with treatment completion in individual, but not group CBT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Group cognitive behavior therapy for Japanese patients with social anxiety disorder: preliminary outcomes and their predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Norio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have provided strong evidence for the use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT in the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD. However, all of the previous reports were from Europe and North America and it is unknown whether Western psychological therapies are effective for SAD in non-Western cultures. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate CBT program for SAD which was originally developed for Western patients, among Japanese patients. Methods Fifty-seven outpatients who participated in group CBT for SAD were evaluated using eight self-reported and one clinician-administered questionnaires to measure various aspects of SAD symptomatology at the beginning and at the end of the program. Pre- and post-treatment scores were compared and the magnitude of treatment effect was quantified as well based once on the intention-to-treat (ITT and once among the completers only. We also examined baseline predictors of the CBT outcomes. Results Seven patients (12% did not complete the program. For the ITT sample, the percentage of reduction was 20% to 30% and the pre to post treatment effect sizes ranged from 0.37 to 1.01. Among the completers, the respective figures were 20% to 33% and 0.41 to 1.19. We found no significant pretreatment predictor of the outcomes. Conclusion Group CBT for SAD is acceptable and can bring about a similar degree of symptom reduction among Japanese patients with SAD as among Western patients.

  3. Group Music Therapy as a Preventive Intervention for Young People at Risk: Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Saarikallio, Suvi; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; McFerran, Katrina Skewes

    2017-07-01

    Music forms an important part of the lives and identities of adolescents and may have positive or negative mental health implications. Music therapy can be effective for mental disorders such as depression, but its preventive potential is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether group music therapy (GMT) is an effective intervention for young people who may be at risk of developing mental health problems, as indicated via unhealthy music use. The main question was whether GMT can reduce unhealthy uses of music and increase potentials for healthy uses of music, compared to self-directed music listening (SDML). We were also interested in effects of GMT on depressive symptoms, psychosocial well-being, rumination, and reflection. In an exploratory cluster-randomized trial in Australian schools, 100 students with self-reported unhealthy music use were invited to GMT (weekly sessions over 8 weeks) or SDML. Changes in the Healthy-Unhealthy Music Scale (HUMS) and mental health outcomes were measured over 3 months. Both interventions were well accepted. No effects were found between GMT and SDML (all p > 0.05); both groups tended to show small improvements over time. Younger participants benefited more from GMT, and older ones more from SDML (p = 0.018). GMT was associated with similar changes as SDML. Further research is needed to improve the processes of selecting participants for targeted interventions; to determine optimal dosage; and to provide more reliable evidence of effects of music-based interventions for adolescents.

  4. Supervised group-exercise therapy versus home-based exercise therapy: Their effects on Quality of Life and cardiovascular risk factors in women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadgostar, Haleh; Firouzinezhad, Sahar; Ansari, Majid; Younespour, Shima; Mahmoudpour, Azam; Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is an integral part of diabetes care. In Iranian women with type II diabetes, we compared the effects of supervised group exercise therapy with the effects of home-based exercise therapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), anthropometric parameters, glycaemic control and lipid profile. One hundred and two diabetic women were randomised to supervised and home-based groups. Over 12 weeks, participants received supervised group-exercise therapy or a home-based exercise-therapy program. During the intervention, they were assessed three times: at baseline, and at weeks 6 and 12. Generalized Estimating Equation models were used to examine the associations between the type of exercise-therapy program and changes over time in anthropometric and biochemical outcomes, and in HRQOL scales of SF36 questionnaire. Relative to home-based group, supervised group improved significantly regarding role-physical, general health, mean body weight and body mass index from baseline to week 12 (p=0.01). Their reduction in mean body-fat mass from baseline to week 6 (p=0.04) was greater. Similarly, their role-physical, general health and role-emotional improved significantly during the intervention (pwomen. However, home-based exercise therapy also produced significant improvements in glycaemic control, body composition and lipid profile. Whether in a supervised or home-based setting, the exercise intervention can therefore be effective in improving health outcomes in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychoanalytic/Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Sexually Abused Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ben; Turner, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of psychoanalytic/psychodynamic psychotherapy for children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. Method: The Cochrane Collaboration's criteria for data synthesis and study quality assessment were used. Electronic bibliographic databases and web searches were used to identify randomized and…

  6. Exploring Responses to Transformative Group Therapy for Orphaned Children in the Context of Mass Orphaning in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamuku, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    In the context of AIDS, the Botswana Government has adopted a group therapy program to help large numbers of orphaned children cope with bereavement. This study explores the effectiveness of the therapy and examines how it interacts with cultural attitudes and practices concerning death. Ten orphaned children were involved in five rounds of data…

  7. Outcomes and Experiences of an Adapted Dialectic Behaviour Therapy Skills Training Group for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Tom; Hewitt, Olivia; Walden, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Background: A growing body of evidence supports the use of Dialectic Behaviour Therapy with people with an intellectual disability. Various adaptation have been used in studies exploring the efficacy of this intervention. Method: A Dialectic Behaviour Therapy DBT skills training group was attended by people with an intellectual disability and…

  8. [Art therapy to support autistic people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Lysiane

    2014-01-01

    Art therapy, the result of a psychodynamic approach with mediation, can help autistic children and adults to express themselves and communicate. A one-to-one session gives rise to a therapeutic encounter which uses both analytical and educationaI approaches.

  9. Patients' pre-treatment interpersonal problems as predictors of therapeutic alliance in long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Pekka; Knekt, Paul; Heinonen, Erkki; Lindfors, Olavi

    2016-07-30

    Information on how the patient's interpersonal problems predict alliance development during long-term therapy is lacking. The aim of this study was to explore how the patient's pre-treatment interpersonal problems predict the development of alliance in long-term psychotherapy. Altogether 128 adult outpatients experiencing mood or anxiety disorder were assigned to long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) total score and the eight octant scores, assessed at baseline, were used as predictors. The trajectories of change in patient- and therapist-rated Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) were used as outcome measures at 7, 12, and 36 months of follow-up after baseline. Study of the changes by time showed that the patient-rated alliance was significantly improved by the 36-month follow-up, i.e. the most usual end-point of therapy, in persons with higher pre-treatment level of the IIP total score. Low total IIP score and low to moderate level of hostile type problems showed no slope of improvement of patient-rated alliance during follow-up. The therapist-rated alliance showed a similar course as the patient-rated alliance with the exception of a faster improvement for higher IIP scores. In conclusion, a higher level of patients' interpersonal problems predicted favorable alliance development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pilot randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training for ADHD among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Andrew P; McMahon, Robert J; Moran, Lyndsey R; Peterson, A Paige; Dreessen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    ADHD affects between 2% and 8% of college students and is associated with broad functional impairment. No prior randomized controlled trials with this population have been published. The present study is a pilot randomized controlled trial evaluating dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training adapted for college students with ADHD. Thirty-three undergraduates with ADHD between ages 18 and 24 were randomized to receive either DBT group skills training or skills handouts during an 8-week intervention phase. ADHD symptoms, executive functioning (EF), and related outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants receiving DBT group skills training showed greater treatment response rates (59-65% vs. 19-25%) and clinical recovery rates (53-59% vs. 6-13%) on ADHD symptoms and EF, and greater improvements in quality of life. DBT group skills training may be efficacious, acceptable, and feasible for treating ADHD among college students. A larger randomized trial is needed for further evaluation. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  11. Feldenkrais® therapy as group treatment for chronic pain--a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Ann; Aström, Lena; Malmgren-Olsson, Eva-Britt

    2011-04-01

    This qualitative study describes and analyses the experiences and self-reported effects of those participating in a Feldenkrais group intervention. Fourteen women with non-specific neck and shoulder pain participated in a group treatment design using the Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement (ATM) method. Data were collected in two ways: diary notes directly after the sessions and thematic interviews 4-6 months after the intervention. Data were analysed with a Grounded Theory approach. One core category and two sub-categories emerged. The core category "Feldenkrais is wholesome, but difficult" represents the participants' major opinions about the group intervention. The sub-categories "More erect without effort", and "Extended space for myself", represent participants' descriptions of effects of the movement therapy. The women described changes in posture and balance, a feeling of release and increased self-confidence. Some ambivalence about the method was expressed, especially regarding the difficulty to continue the exercises at home. The women feelings of improved body awareness remained after 4-6 months. They were also more aware of their attitudes towards activities in daily life. This resulted in them not "sacrificing themselves" as they did before. In addition, the bodily and psychological changes and the concept of empowerment are discussed. Positive experiences from the Feldenkrais group treatment were reported, especially concerning movement ability and body awareness. The exercises were however regarded as difficult to perform as self-training on a daily basis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy on Depression, Hope and Adjustment in Patients with Hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Shareh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a serious global health problem. There is a high prevalence of depression among patients with hepatitis B. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on depression, hope and adjustment in patients with hepatitis B (HB. Methods In an experimental study with a pretest-posttest control group design, 28 patients with hepatitis B were selected through convenience sampling method from the Association for the Study of Liver Diseases in Mashhad and were randomly assigned to two experimental and control groups, each containing 14 individuals. The experimental group received cognitive behavioral group therapy in 10 weeks (2 h weekly sessions and the control group received no treatment. Both groups of participants were evaluated on Beck depression inventory-second edition (BDI-II, adult hope scale (AHS and bell adjustment inventory (BAI before and after the intervention. For data analysis, ANCOVA (one-way analysis of covariance in SPSS version 22 was performed. Results Results indicated that cognitive behavioral group therapy significantly leads to increased hope (P < 0.001 and adjustment (P < 0.001 compared to the control group. Compared to control group, the experimental group showed greater improvement in reducing depression rate at the end of the intervention. However there were no statistically significant differences between them (P = 1. Conclusions Cognitive behavioral group therapy sessions substantially contributed to the improvement of hope and adjustment in patients with hepatitis B.

  13. Effectiveness of Dialectical Group Behavior Therapy on Perceived Stress and Depression in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Azizi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Depression and perceived stress are considered among the most common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Dialectical behavior therapy was presented as one of the most effective treatment of many disorders in the past decade. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of dialectical group behavior therapy on perceived stress and depression in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome. Methods: The research method was an experimental pretest-posttest control group design with random assignment. Of all the patients referred to medical centers in Tabriz during 1393 SH, 30 patients selected with irritable bowel syndrome and Rome-III diagnostic criteria after using the interview, completed perceived stress questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. The subjects were selected and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups (n=15 per group. After completing dialectical behavior therapy in the experimental group, the questionnaire was administered in both groups. Data were analyzed using multivariate analysis with SPSS-20 software. Results: Dialectical group behavior therapy was significantly effective in reducing perceived stress (p= 0.004, F= 9.91 and depression (p= 0.005, F= 9.60 in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in experimental group, so that after the intervention the perceived stress and depression scores decreased in experimental group. Conclusion: It seems that dialectical behavior therapy is effective in reducing perceived stress and depression in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome and can be helpful in improving the symptoms of perceived stress and depression in these patients.

  14. Group Therapy for Repeated Deliberate Self-Harm in Adolescents: Failure of Replication of a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Philip L.; Martin, Graham; McGill, Katherine; Kay, Tracey; Wood, Alison; Trainor, Gemma; Harrington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A study revealing the superiority of group therapy to routine care in preventing the recurrence of self-harming behavior among adolescents is unsuccessfully replicated. The study's findings contradicted those of the original study.

  15. Differential outcomes of skill training, group counseling, and individual cognitive therapy for persons with acquired visual impairment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Tsuda, Akira

    2013-01-01

    As part of the L iving S kills T raining P rogram, group counseling and individual cognitive therapy were implemented to decrease psychological distress for adults with acquired visual impairment. This quasi...

  16. Videogame-based group therapy to improve self-awareness and social skills after traumatic brain injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Llorens, Roberto; Noé, Enrique; Ferri, Joan; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    This study determines the feasibility of different approaches to integrative videogame-based group therapy for improving self-awareness, social skills, and behaviors among traumatic brain injury (TBI...

  17. PERCEPTION STIMULATION GROUP ACTIVITY THERAPY INCREASES E CHILDREN SELF ESTEEM AT PRISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah. Yusuf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prison is societal implementer unit which accommodate care and develop the delinquent children. It was recorded that 57% of children at Blitar Child Prison undergo some self concept problems such as low self esteem. This was caused by some factors such as society’s stigmatization toward criminals, development pattern and education, and less support from family. If the self esteem problem is not being overcome soon, the children may  fell useless, disable to control their self and recrime when they are back to society. The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of  GAT (Group Activity Therapy perception stimulation in increasing the children  self esteem at prison. Method:  A quasy experimental pre post control design was used in this study. Samples were recruited by using total sampling and there were 22 samples as on inclusion criteria. The independent variable was GAT perception stimulation and the dependent variable was increasing self esteem of these childen. Data were collected by using questionnare and analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test and Mann Whitney U Test with the significance level α≤0.05.Result:  The result showed that controlled group has significance level was p=0.654, it is mean there was no self esteem change before and after GAT perception stimulation was given. Whereas treatment group has significance level was p=0.001, it revealed that  there was self esteem change before and after GAT perception stimulation was given. The result of Mann Whitney U Test showed p=0.000 which means was accepted. Discussion: It can be concluded that perception stimulation can increase the children self esteem at prison. Further studies are recommended to study the effect of GAT perception stimulation modified by skill therapy in increasing children self esteem in prison.

  18. Group physical therapy for veterans with knee osteoarthritis: study design and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Walker, Tessa A; Bartle, John; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Hansen, Gloria; Jennings, Caroline; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Senick, Margaret J; Sizemore, John C; St John, Jamie; Hoenig, Helen

    2013-03-01

    Physical therapy (PT) is a key component of treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA) and can decrease pain and improve function. Given the expected rise in prevalence of knee OA and the associated demand for treatment, there is a need for models of care that cost-effectively extend PT services for patients with this condition. This manuscript describes a randomized clinical trial of a group-based physical therapy program that can potentially extend services to more patients with knee OA, providing a greater number of sessions per patient, at lower staffing costs compared to traditional individual PT. Participants with symptomatic knee OA (n = 376) are randomized to either a 12-week group-based PT program (six 1 h sessions, eight patients per group, led by a physical therapist and physical therapist assistant) or usual PT care (two individual visits with a physical therapist). Participants in both PT arms receive instruction in an exercise program, information on joint care and protection, and individual consultations with a physical therapist to address specific functional and therapeutic needs. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and the secondary outcome is the Short Physical Performance Test Protocol (objective physical function). Outcomes are assessed at baseline and 12-week follow-up, and the primary outcome is also assessed via telephone at 24-week follow-up to examine sustainability of effects. Linear mixed models will be used to compare outcomes for the two study arms. An economic cost analysis of the PT interventions will also be conducted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Han; Jeon, Yo-Han; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Won

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33) who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28) on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV), Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  20. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33 who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28 on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV, Natural Killer cell (NK cell activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS, depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  1. A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Group Intervention for Hypersexual Disorder: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Jonas; Kaldo, Viktor; Arver, Stefan; Dhejne, Cecilia; Öberg, Katarina Görts

    2017-07-01

    The proposed criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition for hypersexual disorder (HD) included symptoms reported by patients seeking help for excessive and out-of-control non-paraphilic sexual behavior, including sexual behaviors in response to dysphoric mood states, impulsivity, and risk taking. Although no prior studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of HD have been performed, CBT has been found effective for dysphoric mood states and impulsivity. To investigate the feasibility of a CBT manual developed for HD explored through symptom decrease, treatment attendance, and clients' treatment satisfaction. Ten men with a diagnosis of HD took part in the CBT group program. Measurements were taken before, during, and at the end of treatment and 3 and 6 months after treatment. The primary outcome was the Hypersexual Disorder: Current Assessment Scale (HD:CAS) score that measured the severity of problematic hypersexual symptoms and secondary outcomes were the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) score, the proportion of attended sessions, and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) score. Main results were significant decreases of HD symptoms from before to after treatment on HD:CAS and HDSI scores and a decrease in the number of problematic sexual behaviors during the course of therapy. A high attendance rate of 93% and a high treatment satisfaction score on CSQ-8 also were found. The CBT program seemed to ameliorate the symptoms of HD and therefore might be a feasible treatment option. This study provides data from a CBT program for the treatment of the specific proposed criteria of HD. Because of the small sample and lack of a control group, the results can be considered only preliminary. Although participants reported decreased HD symptoms after attending the CBT program, future studies should evaluate the treatment program with a larger sample and a randomized controlled procedure

  2. The effects of group reminiscence therapy on depression, self esteem, and life satisfaction of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Hsing-Yuan; Wu, Chiu-Yen; Jin, Suh-Fen; Chu, Tsung-Lan; Huang, Tzu-Shin; Clark, Mary Jo

    2006-03-01

    The need to provide quality mental health care for elders in nursing home settings has been a critical issue, as the aging population grows rapidly and institutional care becomes a necessity for some elders. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to describe the effect of participation in reminiscence group therapy on older nursing home residents' depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants who met the study criteria. Residents of one ward were assigned to the reminiscence therapy group intervention, while residents of the other ward served as controls. Nine weekly one-hour sessions were designed to elicit reminiscence as group therapy for 12 elders in the experimental group. Another 12 elders were recruited for a control group matched to experimental subjects on relevant criteria. Depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were measured one week before and after the therapy. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 10.0) was used to analyze data. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy significantly improved self-esteem, although effects on depression and life satisfaction were not significant. Reminiscence groups could enhance elders' social interaction with one another in nursing home settings and become support groups for participants. The model we created here can serve as a reference for future application in institutional care.

  3. [Evidence-based therapy guideline of the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, A; Kunze, D; Wabitsch, M

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in childhood and adolescence has increased worldwide in recent years. A consensus guideline (S2) for treating obesity in childhood and adolescence in Germany was first published by the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence (AGA) in 2000. The intention is to gradually replace this consensus-based (S2) guideline with an evidence-based (S3) guideline. Following a systematic literature search, 21 recommendations were predominantly approved with "strong consensus" (agreement >95%). Body weight and body fat mass can be significantly influenced by conventional behavior-based measures and also by the currently available drug therapies. However, the extent of the achieved weight reduction is small. Surgical measures (unproven, experimental therapy) to reduce body weight, in contrast, are very successful. In addition to the long version of this evidence-based guideline, an abbreviated version exists and a practice guideline is planned. This guideline should be further developed within the competence network on obesity of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The guideline will be published in the scholarly journals of the professional associations concerned, will be available via the Internet, and will also be distributed through periodicals, congress events, and information at facilities.

  4. A group therapy approach to treating combat posttraumatic stress disorder: interpersonal reconnection through letter writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Melinda J; Lumley, Vicki A; Schneider, Robert B

    2014-12-01

    Many who have served in a war zone carry deep emotional wounds that go beyond the typical symptom clusters of reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyperarousal that comprise a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Specifically, many combatants experience unresolved grief, guilt, and shame caused by losses and traumatic experiences suffered in war, called "moral injury" by some clinicians and researchers (e.g., Litz et al., 2009; Shay, 1994). We describe the aspects of human attachment that set the stage for grief, guilt, and shame, and outline the 3-phase group therapy model we have implemented in a clinical setting to foster the reconnection of severed human bonds. Special attention is paid to killing and related phenomena that are unique to combat PTSD. The program phases include psychoeducation, trauma-focused therapy, and aftercare, which focuses on assisting the veterans in reconnecting with their families and communities. The use of letter writing as an intervention is illustrated through case examples, and clinical outcomes are anecdotally described.

  5. Multi-Family Pediatric Pain Group Therapy: Capturing Acceptance and Cultivating Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha E. Huestis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral health interventions for pediatric chronic pain include cognitive-behavioral (CBT, acceptance and commitment (ACT, and family-based therapies, though literature regarding multi-family therapy (MFT is sparse. This investigation examined the utility and outcomes of the Courage to Act with Pain: Teens Identifying Values, Acceptance, and Treatment Effects (CAPTIVATE program, which included all three modalities (CBT, ACT, MFT for youth with chronic pain and their parents. Program utility, engagement, and satisfaction were evaluated via quantitative and qualitative feedback. Pain-specific psychological, behavioral, and interpersonal processes were examined along with outcomes related to disability, quality of life, pain interference, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Participants indicated that CAPTIVATE was constructive, engaging, and helpful for social and family systems. Clinical and statistical improvements with large effect sizes were captured for pain catastrophizing, acceptance, and protective parenting but not family functioning. Similar effects were found for functional disability, pain interference, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Given the importance of targeting multiple systems in the management of pediatric chronic pain, preliminary findings suggest a potential new group-based treatment option for youth and families. Next steps involve evaluating the differential effect of the program over treatment as usual, as well as specific CBT, ACT, and MFT components and processes that may affect outcomes.

  6. Effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy in reducing self-stigma in Japanese psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Horikawa, Naoshi; Emura, Rina; Ishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Ayako; Ogata, Akiko; Hiejima, Shigeto; Hosomi, Jun

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that the stigma surrounding mental illness may be greater in Japan than elsewhere. However, few Japanese studies have focused on self-stigma (the internalization of social stigma), and few interventions to reduce self-stigma exist. To remedy this deficiency, we evaluated the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing self-stigma and examined the relationship between cognitive restructuring and self-stigma. We administered a 10-session group CBT program to 46 Japanese outpatients with anxiety and depressive symptoms (36 men, 10 women; mean age=38.57 years, SD=8.33; 20 diagnosed with mood disorders; 24 with neurotic, stress-related, or somatoform disorders; and 2 with other disorders). A pretest-posttest design was used to examine the relationship between cognitive restructuring and self-stigma. Outcomes were measured using the Japanese versions of the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale, Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory State-Form, and Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scale. Participants exhibited significant improvements in depression, anxiety, and maladjusted cognitive bias and reductions in self-stigma. Cognitive bias was significantly correlated with self-stigma. Group CBT is effective in improving both emotional symptoms and self-stigma in outpatients with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Reduction in self-stigma plays a mediating role in alleviating emotional symptoms and improving cognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictors of response to individual and group cognitive behaviour therapy of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtberg, Ewa; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Increased knowledge of factors that predict treatment outcome is important for planning and individualizing of treatment. This study analysed predictors of response to individual cognitive therapy (ICT), and intensive (3-week) group cognitive treatment (IGCT) for social phobia. Participants (n = 54) met diagnostic criteria for social phobia within a randomized controlled trial. Predictors assessed were fear of negative evaluation, anticipatory worry, self-directedness (SD) and cluster C personality disorder. Results were analysed by means of multiple regression analyses with both groups combined, and for each of the treatment groups. Anticipatory worry, an aspect of a harm-avoidance personality trait, was the strongest negative predictor of outcome in ICT and IGCT both at post-treatment and 1-year follow-up. Whereas low SD, signs of cluster C personality disorder and fear of negative evaluation were negative predictors of post-treatment outcome in ICT, the corresponding pattern of results was not to be found in IGCT. Anticipatory worry appears to be a particularly important trait for explaining variance in the outcome of social phobia. The finding is consistent with the assumed stability of such personality traits over time. Further studies are warranted to replicate the finding. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) for health anxiety: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilenberg, T; Fink, P; Jensen, J S; Rief, W; Frostholm, L

    2016-01-01

    Severe health anxiety is frequent and costly, yet rarely diagnosed or treated. Earlier treatment studies show problems with recruitment, dropout and recovery. In the current study, the authors aimed to test the effect of acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) compared to waitlist in patients with severe health anxiety. During March 2010 to April 2012, 126 consecutively referred patients meeting research criteria for severe health anxiety were block-randomized (1:1) to ACT-G or a 10 months' waitlist (Clinicaltrials.gov, no. NCT01158430). Patients allocated to ACT-G were treated in seven groups of nine patients between December 2010 and October 2012 and received nine weekly 3-h group sessions and a booster session consisting of ACT techniques. The primary outcome was decided a priori as the mean change in self-reported illness worry on the Whiteley-7 Index (WI) from baseline to 10 months' follow-up. Secondary outcomes were improvement in emotional distress and health-related quality of life at 10 months' follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a statistically significant mean difference of 20.5 points [95% confidence interval (CI) 11.7-29.4, p accepted by the patients. ACT-G seems feasible, acceptable and effective in treating severe health anxiety.

  9. Acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) for health anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberg, T; Fink, P; Jensen, J S

    2016-01-01

    Cohen's d = 0.89, 95% CI 0.50-1.29). The number needed to treat was 2.4 (95% CI 1.4-3.4, p G seems feasible......BACKGROUND: Severe health anxiety is frequent and costly, yet rarely diagnosed or treated. Earlier treatment studies show problems with recruitment, dropout and recovery. In the current study, the authors aimed to test the effect of acceptance and commitment group therapy (ACT-G) compared...... to waitlist in patients with severe health anxiety. METHOD: During March 2010 to April 2012, 126 consecutively referred patients meeting research criteria for severe health anxiety were block-randomized (1:1) to ACT-G or a 10 months' waitlist (Clinicaltrials.gov, no. NCT01158430). Patients allocated to ACT-G...

  10. Group purchasing organizations: optimizing cardiac device selection, therapy delivery, and fiscal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweesy, Mark W; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Smith, Kerry W; Holland, James L

    2006-12-01

    Group purchasing organizations (GPOs) have played a major role in supporting health care delivery in recent years as the healthcare industry has faced stronger economic pressures. Consequently, a position statement was drafted to act as a guideline for a GPO in creating a fiscally responsible, yet unrestricted environment for physicians to select the most appropriate cardiac device for their patients. This cardiac device selection guideline is to be implemented in hundreds of member hospitals but may be of use in non-member hospitals as well. The guideline will only be effective when the physicians or cardiac device caregivers have the knowledge and skills to optimally program and match device therapies and algorithms to individual patient needs.

  11. Effectiveness of behavioral-cognitive group therapy on depression, anxiety, and stress of patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, M; Samkhaniyan, E; Mahdavi, A; Faraji, J; Roshandel, Z

    2015-01-01

    Objective. An appropriate psychological intervention to promote the level of mental health of patients with a coronary heart has a great importance. The existing investigation aimed to study the effectiveness of the behavioral-cognitive group therapy on depression, anxiety, and stress of patients with coronary heart disease. Methodology. The current study was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest that used a control group. Hence, 30 of the patients with coronary heart disease in Shahid Rajaee heart center in Tehran chose to use the convenience sampling method and were put in an experimental group and a control group. Both groups were pretested by using a demographic questionnaire, and scale of depression, anxiety, and stress DASS-42. Afterwards, the experimental group was trained for eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral club therapy and the control society gained no intervention. Later, both groups were post-tested, and the acquired information were analyzed by using inferential and descriptive statistical methods accompanied by SPSS 21 software. Findings. The results indicated that the cognitive-behavioral group therapy training significantly reduced depression, anxiety, and stress in patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusion. What should be understood from this study is that the cognitive-behavioral group therapy training had a great positive impact on the decrease of depression, anxiety, and tension in patients with coronary heart disease, since it had an economic cost and a great acceptability by the cases, especially when it was performed in a group.

  12. Observation of Interactions in Adolescent Group Therapy: A Mixed Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulàlia Arias-Pujol

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group psychotherapy is a useful clinical practice for adolescents with mental health issues. Groups typically consist of young people of similar ages but with different personalities, and this results in a complex communication network. The goal of group psychoanalytic psychotherapy is to improve participants' mentalization abilities, facilitating interactions between peers and their therapist in a safe, containing environment. The main aim of this study was to analyze conversation turn-taking between a lead therapist, a co-therapist, and six adolescents over the course of 24 treatment sessions divided into four blocks over 8 months. We employed a mixed-methods design based on systematic observation, which we consider to be a mixed method itself, as the qualitative data collected in the initial observation phase is transformed into quantitative data and subsequently interpreted qualitatively with the aid of clinical vignettes. The observational methodology design was nomothetic, follow-up, and multidimensional. The choice of methodology is justified as we used an ad-hoc observation instrument combining a field format and a category system. Interobserver agreement was analyzed quantitatively by Cohen's kappa using the free QSEQ5 software program. Once we had confirmed the reliability of the data, these were analyzed by polar coordinate analysis, which is a powerful data reduction technique that provides a vector representation of relationships between categories. The results show significant relationships between the therapist and (1 the activation of turn-taking by the participants and the co-therapist and silence and (2 conversation-facilitating interventions and interventions designed to improve mentalization abilities. Detailed analysis of questions demonstrating interest in others showed how the communication changed from radial interactions stemming from the therapist at the beginning of therapy to circular interactions half way through

  13. Effect of the Group Music Therapy on Brain Wave, Behavior, and Cognitive Function among Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Myoungjin; Gang, Moonhee; Oh, Kyongok

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of group music therapy on brain waves, behavior, and cognitive function among patients with chronic schizophrenia. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used with nonequivalent control group. The potential participants were recruited from inpatients in a psychiatric facility in a metropolitan city, assigned either to the experimental group (n = 28) or to the control group (n = 27) according to their wards to avoid treatment contamination. The experimental group participated in the group music therapy for 13 sessions over 7 weeks while continuing their standard treatment. The control group only received a standard treatment provided in the hospitals. The outcome measures include brain wave by electroencephalography, behavior by Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation, and cognitive function by Mini-Mental State Examination. After participating in 13 sessions of the group music therapy, alpha waves measured from eight different sites were consistently present for the experimental group (p = .006-.045) than the control group, revealing that the participants in the music therapy may have experienced more joyful emotions throughout the sessions. The experimental group also showed improved cognitive function (F = 13.46, p = .001) and positive behavior (social competence, social interest & personal neatness) while their negative behaviors was significantly less than those of the control group (F = 24.04, p group music therapy used in this study was an effective intervention for improving emotional relaxation, cognitive processing abilities along with positive behavioral changes in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Our results can be useful for establishing intervention strategies toward psychiatric rehabilitation for those who suffer from chronic mental illnesses. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. [Psychodynamic and forensic approach of constitutional mythomania: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Thabet, J; Zouari, N; Charfeddine, F; Zouari, L; Maâlej, M

    2012-12-01

    Constitutional mythomania presents several diagnostic, aetiopathogenic and forensic problems for the doctor. We have discussed these aspects through the analysis of a case report. The case report relates to a 43 year-old man, who was subjected to a penal expertise following the emission of cheques without provision. During the examination, he pretended being both a doctor and a lawyer at the same time. He was in charge, among other things, of sale contracts dealing sometimes with high value transactions, obviously without following the required legal procedure. He was pursued subsequently for many other affairs of swindle. Data collected from his medical file indicated that he was the only boy of his family. Since his father had suffered from psychotic episodes, his grandfather had reared him; which he did it in a strictly religious way. He spent his childhood isolated. He was 15 years old when his grandfather died. He had then expressed religious and megalomaniac ideas that had motivated psychiatric management. Later on, he expressed imaginative ideas evoking unsystematized delusion (he pretended to have made a trip to America and to have seen a fish flying and turning into a woman). From a psychodynamic point of view, constitutional mythomania is considered as a borderline personality. It reflects an important narcissisic cleavage. The deceitfulness of the mythomaniac allows him to keep in touch with reality and to avoid mental disintegration. The recognition, by others, of these delusions allows the mythomaniac to have access to his proper level of existence. For a while, to the experts our patient appeared to be suffering from schizophrenia. Therefore, we can apply the Maleval theory to him, which identifies four periods as delusion structuring levels in psychosis : P0 (consequence of the phallic signification deficiency, it includes anxiety, annihilation, perplexity, interrogative attitude), P1 (stage of paranoid delusion), P2 (stage of paranoiac delusion

  15. Cancer patients' preferences for therapy decisions can be grouped into categories and separated by demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnholdt, Jana; Haier, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Shared decision-making is based on comparable understanding of decision criteria on both sides that requires knowledge about preferences, reception/prioritization of benefits and covariates influencing these criteria. We addressed identification of cancer patients' preferences for treatment decisions and covariates for preference patterns in certain patient cohorts. Using preference surveys ordinal ranking of decisional preferences in life (PL) and during therapy (PT) were obtained and aggregated by factorial analysis. Demographic and clinical data enabled clustering of patient groups including non-malignant control group with distinct preference patterns. Covariates for these patterns were determined by multivariate ANOVA. 1777 cancer and 367 non-oncological patients (≥18 years) were evaluable (response 56.0%). Patient-reported PT was grouped into distinctive categories: immediate treatment effectivity, long-term effects and survival, empathy, easy treatment and employability/healing. Gender, parenthood, family status, age and educational level mainly determine importance of PL (52.1% variance) and PT (55.1% variance) enabling discrimination of specific preference patterns in patients: older males, non-single, younger males, non-single female with children and young, single patients without children that mainly significantly differed from non-cancer patients (p groups. If patients recognize direct social responsibility, immediate treatment effects gain importance accompanied by reduced impact of employability, rehabilitation and financial security. For young and independent patients empathy has similar impact as treatment effects. Consequently, clinical research should consider age-specific endpoints and distinct decisional preferences to match patients' perspective by specific evidence.

  16. [Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with and without agoraphobia: an effectiveness study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrocinque, Concettina; De Wet, Daniel; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of both individual and group cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy (CBT), many authors have questioned the translation of these interventions into routine clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of group CBT in patients diagnosed with panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, in routine clinical practice. The study involved 96 patients diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Treatment consisted of 10 psychotherapy sessions of 2 hours each in a local health authority. A battery of psychometric instruments was used to assess variables including psychological symptoms, subjective well-being and psychosocial functioning before and after therapy. In addition to the evaluation of treatment outcome, final scores were compared to population norms and benchmarked against similar studies. Almost all scores of the clinical scales used improved significantly. Only 42% of patients who were initially above the clinical cut-off on the CORE-OM showed clinically significant changes, and 20% of patients were below the clinical cut-off after treatment. Post-treatment CORE-OM scores were not significantly different from the values observed in the general population. These findings are consistent with those of comparable studies. Group CBT is effective in routine clinical practice. In addition to reducing anxiety symptoms, treatment also results in an improvement of other related variables such as subjective well-being. Owing to its better patient-therapist ratio, group CBT should be considered as an alternative to individual CBT in routine clinical care in public services.

  17. How does tele-mental health affect group therapy process? Secondary analysis of a noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Carolyn J; Morland, Leslie A; Macdonald, Alexandra; Frueh, B Christopher; Grubbs, Kathleen M; Rosen, Craig S

    2010-10-01

    Video teleconferencing (VTC) is used for mental health treatment delivery to geographically remote, underserved populations. However, few studies have examined how VTC affects individual or group psychotherapy processes. This study compares process variables such as therapeutic alliance and attrition among participants receiving anger management group therapy either through traditional face-to-face delivery or by VTC. The current study represents secondary analyses of a randomized noninferiority trial (Morland et al., in press) in which clinical effectiveness of VTC delivery proved noninferior to in-person delivery. Participants were male veterans (N = 112) with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and moderate to severe anger problems. The present study examined potential differences in process variables, including therapeutic alliance, satisfaction, treatment credibility, attendance, homework completion, and attrition. No significant differences were found between the two modalities on most process variables. However, individuals in the VTC condition exhibited lower alliance with the group leader than those in the in-person condition. Mean self-leader alliance scores were 4.2 (SD = 0.8) and 4.5 (SD = 0.4), respectively, where 5 represents strongly agree and 4 represents agree with positive statements about the relationship, suggesting that participants in both conditions felt reasonably strong alliance in absolute terms. Individuals who had stronger alliance tended to have better anger outcomes, yet the effect was not strong enough to result in the VTC condition producing inferior aggregate outcomes. Our findings suggest that even if group psychotherapy via VTC differs in subtle ways from in-person delivery, VTC is a viable and effective means of delivering psychotherapy. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. A multidisciplinary weight-loss program: the importance of psychological group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Duarte Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract In addition to dietary factors and sedentary habits, there is a relationship between obesity and psychological variables, even without a clear distinction between cause, effect, and correlation. Despite this relationship, weight-loss programs are limited to a combination of nutrition and physical education, leaving psychological intervention out of the treatment plan. Self-esteem issues, depression, and anxiety are just some of the emotional conditions related to obesity. However, there is no information in the literature about the importance of psychological counseling in a multidisciplinary program for weight-loss in adults. In this context, the main objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy in groups (CBTG combined with nutrition and physical education within a multidisciplinary approach to treat obesity. 46 individuals (7 men and 39 women were divided into two groups: control (GC and psychology (GP. Baseline and intervention measures were obtained prior to intervention and before the final meeting, including physical capacity tests and the administering the International Physical Activities Questionnaire (IPAQ. Both groups attended weekly lectures given by a nutritionist and two physical education professionals for 12 weeks. In addition, the GP participated in weekly sessions of CBTG for the same period. After the program, there were significant changes in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and strength of the lower limbs in both groups. In addition to these changes, the GP also showed improvements in diastolic blood pressure and IPAQ scores, being the only one that increased its time of weekly physical activity. Thus, it was concluded that the psychological treatment might play an important role in a multidisciplinary weight-loss program.

  19. The influence of individual, group, and relative self-esteem on outcome for patients undergoing group cognitive-behavioural therapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Thomas J; Page, Andrew C; Hooke, Geoff R

    2013-11-01

    Despite a strong association between individual self-esteem and treatment outcome in group cognitive-behavioural therapy (GCBT), no study has investigated how patient outcomes might be influenced by an individual's self-esteem relative to other group members. The study comprised a retrospective examination of patients' data and used a multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of treatment outcome. Patients' pre-treatment self-esteem scores were assessed on a continuum and assigned to be low, medium, or high. Therapy groups were assigned to be either low, balanced or high self-esteem groups based on averaged self-esteem scores of participants. In this study, 3,878 patients who had completed a 10-day intensive cognitive behavioural group therapy programme at a private psychiatric facility were included in the study. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem measure was chosen to assess self-esteem. The three subscales of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales were used as the outcome measures. Patient outcomes were influenced by pre-treatment self-esteem scores, such that higher initial self-esteem was associated with better treatment outcomes. Low group self-esteem was predictive of significantly better outcomes for depression, relative to higher self-esteem groups. Additionally, the combined influence of high individual self-esteem and low group self-esteem was associated with significantly enhanced depression improvement. High self-esteem patients perform better on outcome measures following completion of GCBT. Low self-esteem groups show greater improvement in depression symptoms. Similar results for depression are achieved when patients with high self-esteem complete treatment in low self-esteem groups. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Predicting group cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome of binge eating disorder using empirical classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Engel, Scott

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use empirical classification based on Latent Profile Analysis to identify subgroups of binge eating disorder (BED) and to evaluate the extent to which these subgroups were predictive of treatment outcome in group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report were administered to 259 participants at baseline in a 15-session CBT trial (190 of whom received active treatment). The best fitting model included three profiles: dietary restraint only (DRO; n = 96; 51%); low dietary restraint (LDR; n = 52; 27%); and dietary restraint plus psychopathology (DRP; n = 42; 22%). Regression analyses revealed that after controlling for baseline score and treatment condition, EDE Global scores were lower for the DRO compared to the LDR profile at one year follow-up (p = .047). Class assignment was not predictive of EDE binge eating frequency or abstinence at end of treatment or follow-up. These results suggest that meaningful empirical classes based on eating disorder symptoms, psychopathology, dietary restraint, and BMI can be identified in BED and that these classes may be useful in predicting long-term group CBT outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effectiveness of Cognitive –Behavioral Group Therapy on the Depression Rate of Imprisoned Women in Ghaen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shokhmgar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current research is aimed at the assessment of the effectiveness of cognitive- behavioral group therapy on the depression rate of imprisoned women.Materials and method: In this experimental research, depression in 14 imprisoned women were diagnosed using Beck depression test. Individuals were randomly classified into two groups. Then ten therapeutic sessions of 90 minutes were programmed for experimental group. At the end of this period both experimental and control groups were asked to respond Beck depression questionnaire for the second time.Results: The results showed the significant decrease (p<0/05 of depression rate of experimental group (0.912 as compared to the control group (1.469.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that cognitive-behavioral group therapy is an effective way to decrease the depression rates of the imprisoned women

  2. Effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy ‎on ‎symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS ‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maddineshat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls’ dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences.Method: In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the studentsResults: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012. Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012.‎Conclusion: Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎

  3. Within-Group Effect-Size Benchmarks for Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Allen; Washburn, Micki; Schieszler, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides benchmark data on within-group effect sizes from published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) supporting the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) for traumatized children. Methods: Within-group effect-size benchmarks for symptoms of trauma, anxiety, and depression were calculated via the…

  4. A cognitive behavioural group therapy for patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and their significant others: feasibility and preliminary results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-Weyn Banningh, L.W.A.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Geleijns-Lanting, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and present preliminary results of a cognitive behavioural group therapy for patients with mild cognitive impairment and their significant others. Design: One group pretest-posttest design. Subjects: Twenty-two patients with mild cognitive impairment and their

  5. A cognitive behavioural group therapy for patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and their significant others: feasibility and preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-Weyn Banningh, E.W.A.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Geleijns-Lanting, C.E.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and present preliminary results of a cognitive behavioural group therapy for patients with mild cognitive impairment and their significant others. DESIGN: One group pretest-posttest design. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two patients with mild cognitive impairment and their

  6. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  7. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for a Heterogeneous Group of Treatment-Resistant Clients: A Treatment Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sue; Kingston, Jessica; Wilson, Kelly G.; Bolderston, Helen; Remington, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has been shown to have broad applicability to different diagnostic groups, and there are theoretical reasons to consider its use with clients with chronic mental health problems. We report an innovative treatment development evaluation of ACT for a heterogeneous group of "treatment-resistant clients" (N =…

  8. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and weight regain after diet in type 2 diabetes: results from the randomised controlled POWER trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A.C. Berk (Kirsten); H. Buijks (Hanneke); A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); Mulder, M.T. (Monique T.); B. Özcan (Behiye); van ’T Spijker, A. (Adriaan); R. Timman (Reinier); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAims/hypothesis: Weight-loss programmes for adults with type 2 diabetes are less effective in the long term owing to regain of weight. Our aim was to determine the 2 year effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group therapy (group-CBT) programme in weight maintenance after diet-induced

  9. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Group Treatment for Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder: A Public Sector Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jane; Snowdon, Sharon; Gopold, Michelle; Guymer, Elise

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study of a brief group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention (12 two-hour sessions) was conducted with clients of public mental health services meeting four or more criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Participants were randomly assigned to receive the ACT group intervention in addition to their current…

  10. The effect of group integrative reminiscence therapy on mental health among older women living in Iranian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musavi, Motahareh; Mohammadian, Sara; Mohammadinezhad, Bahar

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine the impact of group integrative reminiscence therapy on mental health of older women living in Iranian nursing home in 2016. A quasi-experimental design pre- and post-test was used in the present study. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants who met the study criteria. The statistical population included 60 older women living in nursing home, among whom 46 having the inclusion criteria were selected as the sample. After completing the Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire, the older people were divided into intervention (N = 23) and control (N = 23) group by using block randomization method. The intervention groups were trained by integrative reminiscence therapy for 60-90 min 10 sessions, twice a week. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used for data analysis by SPSS software. The results indicated that group integrative reminiscence therapy significantly affected general mental health and physical dimensions, anxiety and insomnia, social functions and depression.

  11. The relationship between interpersonal problems, negative cognitions, and outcomes from cognitive behavioral group therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Peter M; Burgess, Melissa M; Nathan, Paula

    2013-09-05

    Interpersonal functioning is a key determinant of psychological well-being, and interpersonal problems (IPs) are common among individuals with psychiatric disorders. However, IPs are rarely formally assessed in clinical practice or within cognitive behavior therapy research trials as predictors of treatment attrition and outcome. The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between IPs, depressogenic cognitions, and treatment outcome in a large clinical sample receiving cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for depression in a community clinic. Patients (N=144) referred for treatment completed measures of IPs, negative cognitions, depression symptoms, and quality of life (QoL) before and at the completion of a 12-week manualized CBGT protocol. Two IPs at pre-treatment, 'finding it hard to be supportive of others' and 'not being open about problems,' were associated with higher attrition. Pre-treatment IPs also predicted higher post-treatment depression symptoms (but not QoL) after controlling for pre-treatment symptoms, negative cognitions, demographics, and comorbidity. In particular, 'difficulty being assertive' and a 'tendency to subjugate one's needs' were associated with higher post-treatment depression symptoms. Changes in IPs did not predict post-treatment depression symptoms or QoL when controlling for changes in negative cognitions, pre-treatment symptoms, demographics, and comorbidity. In contrast, changes in negative cognitions predicted both post-treatment depression and QoL, even after controlling for changes in IPs and the other covariates. Correlational design, potential attrition bias, generalizability to other disorders and treatments needs to be evaluated. Pre-treatment IPs may increase risk of dropout and predict poorer outcomes, but changes in negative cognitions during treatment were most strongly associated with improvement in symptoms and QoL during CBGT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive Therapy and Task Concentration Training Applied as Intensified Group Therapies for Social Anxiety Disorder with Fear of Blushing-A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtling, Samia; Klotsche, Jens; Heinrich, Anke; Hoyer, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    The current study examines the efficacy of intensified group therapy for social anxiety disorder with fear of blushing. Task concentration training (TCT) and cognitive therapy (CT) were applied during one weekend and compared with a waiting list condition in a randomized controlled trial including 82 patients. On a second weekend, another intervention was added (resulting in TCT-CT and CT-TCT sequences) to examine order effects. Task concentration training and CT were both superior to the waiting list and equally effective after the first therapy weekend. Also, no differences were found between the sequences TCT-CT and CT-TCT at post-assessment. At 6- and 12-month follow-up, effects remained stable or further improved. At the 6-month follow-up, remission rates in completers, established by diagnostic status, were between 69% and 73%. Intensified group therapy is highly effective in treating social anxiety disorder with fear of blushing. Group formats for patients sharing a common primary concern may contribute to the dissemination of cognitive-behavioural therapy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message: This study focuses on blushing from fearful individuals within the SAD spectrum to improve evidence for treatment efficacy in those whose social fears are centred around observable bodily sensations. This study integrates task concentration training into the SAD model of Clark and Wells to combine two evidence-based treatments for SAD under one treatment model. This study uses an innovative format of brief, intensified group therapy, conducted on two full-day weekend group sessions delivered over two weekends, with strong observed effect sizes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The efficacy of long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy, fluoxetine and their combination in the outpatient treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Andre Goettems; Guimaraes, Luciano Santos Pinto; Trentini, Clarissa Marceli

    2015-01-01

    There are few randomized controlled trials examining the efficacy of long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (LTPP) in depression treatment. LTPP was compared with fluoxetine treatment and their combination; 272 depressed patients (aged 26-34, 72% with a first episode of depression) were randomized to receive LTPP (one session/week), fluoxetine treatment (20-60 mg/day) or their combination for 24 months. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was the outcome measure. The psychotherapy was not manualized and the treatment took place under real-life conditions in an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated that all the treatments were associated with significant reductions in the BDI scores (mean reduction of 18.88 BDI points). Furthermore, LTPP and combination therapy were more effective in reducing BDI scores than fluoxetine alone (22.08 and 22.04 vs. 12.53 BDI points). LTPP, pharmacological treatment with fluoxetine and their combination are effective in reducing symptoms of patients with moderate depression. LTPP and combined treatment were more effective compared to fluoxetine alone. These findings have implications for patients with depression who may benefit from long-term psychotherapy or combined treatment, or for depressed patients who do not wish to take medications such as fluoxetine.

  14. The effects of group reminiscence therapy on depression, self-esteem, and affect balance of Chinese community-dwelling elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; He, Guoping; Gao, Jing; Yuan, Qun; Feng, Hui; Zhang, Clarence K

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of group reminiscence therapy on depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and affect balance among community dwelling elderly. Eight communities were randomly selected from 372 eligible communities in Changsha city. They were randomly divided into four experimental groups and four control group. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used to screen entire 478 older adults living in these 8 communities. One hundred and sixty five of them had a GDS score between 11 and 25; among them, 125 participated in the study finally. The elderly group who were in the control group received health education, while the intervention group received both health education and group reminiscence therapy for 6 weeks. Both groups were assessed with the GDS, Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Affect Balance Scale (ABS) before and after the 6-week-intervention. The results were analyzed using a mixed effect model with fixed effect of the intervention and random effect of the community, incorporating the structured randomness at the community level. After 6 weeks' therapy, the GDS scores in the intervention group decreased significantly compared to those in the control group (pcommunity-dwelling elderly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dosimetric analysis of radiation therapy oncology group 0321: the importance of urethral dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I-Chow; Hunt, Daniel; Straube, William; Pouliot, Jean; Cunha, Adam; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Sandler, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0321 is the first multi-institutional cooperative group high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy trial with complete digital brachytherapy dosimetry data. This is a descriptive report of the data and an analysis of toxicity. Patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy at 45 Gy and 1 HDR implant with 19 Gy in 2 fractions. Implants are done with transrectal ultrasound guidance, and computed tomography (CT)-compatible nonmetallic catheters. HDR planning is done on ≤3-mm-thick CT slices. The "mean DVH" (dose-volume histogram) of the planning target volume (PTV), implanted volume (IP), and organs at risk are calculated. This includes the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the volume at 10-percentage-point intervals from 10% to 200% of the prescribed dose. The conformal index (COIN), homogeneity index (HI), catheters per implant, and patients per institution are calculated. Multivariate analysis and hazard ratios calculation of all the variables against reported grade ≥2 (G2+) genitourinary (GU) adverse events (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3) are performed. Dosimetry data are based on 122 eligible patients from 14 institutions. The mean of PTV, IP, catheters per implant, and patients per institution are 54 cc, 63 cc, 19 and 9, respectively. The mean of %V100PTV, V80Bladder, V80Rectum, and V120Urethra were 94%, 0.40 cc, 0.15 cc, and 0.25 cc, respectively. There are too few G2+ gastrointestinal adverse event (GI AE) for correlative analysis; thus, the analysis has been performed on the more common G2+ GU AE. There are positive correlations noted between both acute and late G2+ GU AE and urethral dose at multiple levels. Positive correlations with late AE are seen with PTV and IP at high-dose levels. A negative correlation is seen between HI and acute AE. A higher patient accrual rate is associated with a lower rate of G2+ acute and late AE. Higher urethral dose, larger high-dose volumes, and

  16. The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy on Depression and Body Image in Women with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Bahareh Gholamhoseini; Anahita Khodabakhshi Koolaee; Davoud Taghvaee

    2016-01-01

    AbstractBackground and Objective: From the perspective of psychology, obesity can lead to the negative attitude, stress and the increasing the risks of psychological disorders. From the viewpoint of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), psychological disorders are due to the fusion of psychological and cognitive inflexibility. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment group therapy on improving the depression and body image among female with obesity.Ma...

  17. Three-dimensional, task-specific robot therapy of the arm after stroke: a multicentre, parallel-group randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Blanco, Javier; Campen, Katrin; Curt, Armin; Dietz, Volker; Ettlin, Thierry; Felder, Morena; Fellinghauer, Bernd; Guidali, Marco; Kollmar, Anja; Luft, Andreas; Nef, Tobias; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Stahel, Werner; Riener, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Arm hemiparesis secondary to stroke is common and disabling. We aimed to assess whether robotic training of an affected arm with ARMin--an exoskeleton robot that allows task-specific training in three dimensions-reduces motor impairment more effectively than does conventional therapy. In a prospective, multicentre, parallel-group randomised trial, we enrolled patients who had had motor impairment for more than 6 months and moderate-to-severe arm paresis after a cerebrovascular accident who met our eligibility criteria from four centres in Switzerland. Eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive robotic or conventional therapy using a centre-stratified randomisation procedure. For both groups, therapy was given for at least 45 min three times a week for 8 weeks (total 24 sessions). The primary outcome was change in score on the arm (upper extremity) section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA-UE). Assessors tested patients immediately before therapy, after 4 weeks of therapy, at the end of therapy, and 16 weeks and 34 weeks after start of therapy. Assessors were masked to treatment allocation, but patients, therapists, and data analysts were unmasked. Analyses were by modified intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00719433. Between May 4, 2009, and Sept 3, 2012, 143 individuals were tested for eligibility, of whom 77 were eligible and agreed to participate. 38 patients assigned to robotic therapy and 35 assigned to conventional therapy were included in analyses. Patients assigned to robotic therapy had significantly greater improvements in motor function in the affected arm over the course of the study as measured by FMA-UE than did those assigned to conventional therapy (F=4.1, p=0.041; mean difference in score 0.78 points, 95% CI 0.03-1.53). No serious adverse events related to the study occurred. Neurorehabilitation therapy including task-oriented training with an exoskeleton robot can enhance improvement of

  18. Randomized Trial of Group Music Therapy With Chinese Prisoners: Impact on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two-hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared with standard care. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory [TSBI], Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory [RSI]) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program, and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared with standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition decreased sig