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Sample records for psychoanalysis qua clinical

  1. Emotional intelligence: the Sine Qua Non for a clinical leadership toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Paul R

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that although IQ and technical skills are important, emotional intelligence is the Sine Qua Non of leadership. According to Goleman [Goleman, D. (1998). What makes a leader? Harvard Business Review, 93-102] "effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of emotional intelligence...and can also be linked to strong performance." The original five dimensions of EIQ are described and applied to both supervisory and clinical scenarios. As a result of reading this work, you will be able to: (1) define and provide an illustration of each of the five components of emotional intelligence (EIQ); (2) outline the relationship of EIQ to success in your profession and your personal life; (3) create a strategic action plan to enhance each dimension of EIQ in your daily life; (4) list at least three real-life experiences that could have resulted a favorable outcome with an improved EIQ; (5) complete a self-evaluation of your EIQ.

  2. Emotional Intelligence: The Sine Qua Non for a Clinical Leadership Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that although IQ and technical skills are important, emotional intelligence is the Sine Qua Non of leadership. According to Goleman [Goleman, D. (1998). What makes a leader? "Harvard Business Review," 93-102] "effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: they all have a high degree of…

  3. [Psychoanalysis: a research method based on clinical practice: contributions to nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Teresa Cristina; Kirschbaum, Débora Isane Ratner

    2008-09-01

    Nursing, in its different fields of practice, is essentially characterized as a clinical practice. In this context, psychoanalysis can make important contributions. This article discusses some basic psychoanalytical concepts and assumptions, proposes psychoanalysis as a research method, and stresses its contributions for nursing. Essential Freudian concepts are identified, as well as the path to be followed by the researcher. As a research method, psychoanalysis can be used as a framework for the studu of human behavior based on unconscious mental processes. In several knowledge areas.

  4. Psychoanalysis of maturescence (definition, metapsychology, and clinical practice).

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    Montero, Mag Guillermo Julio

    2015-12-01

    This article offers an entirely new way of addressing middle age or mid-life. It uses the neologism maturescence to denote this process's metapsychological feature, and it proposes a meta-psychology of maturescence in order to allow a 'direct understanding of maturescence' instead of the 'indirect understanding of maturescence', which psychoanalytic literature generally alludes to. The paper examines somatic processes specific to male and female climacterics and is focused on to the tension between the soma and the body. It examines the drive increase that Freud posed in climacterics and the somatic climacteric imbalance that begets specific drive activity demanding psychic work, with very different pathways depending on the individual's specific working-through activity. It discusses what happens to the individual when he/she is no longer able to procreate and begins to age; why this process is equivalent for individuals who had children and for others who could not or did not. This somatic event provides a universal constant from which it is possible to understand any individual variable. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  5. Child mental hygiene and psychoanalysis at the clinic of conduct, Santiago de Chile, 1936-1938

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    Silvana Vetö

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking stance in a situated perspective, this article looks into one of the first Chilean state initiatives aimed at the study and care of child psyche. This institution that has not yet been explored by specialized literature: the Clinic of Conduct, founded in the city of Santiago in 1936 as part of the Special School of Development, which was created in the context of a the Educational Reform of 1928. The Clinic of Conduct launched a state managed mental hygiene programme that included psychoanalysis as its main reference at a time when psychoanalysis was not yet a regular reference in the local medical world. We are thus interested in analysing context in which this initiatives were created and the ways in which mental hygiene and psychoanalysis were appropriated and used in an institution in which the principal interest was not the defence or legitimation of a singular theory, but the approach to specific social problems such as child delinquency and education. Some characteristics of the history of psy knowledges in Chile emerge from this study, showing how they unfold on the scenario of social problems and how they relate to other disciplines and practices such as criminology and pedagogy.

  6. Approach to the notice of insanity. Symptom - mental health and clinical structures. Psychology and psychoanalysis

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    Jorge Enrique Chacón-Afanador

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work of reflection proposes the approach of the concepts of clinical structures and mental health, starting from the position of psychoanalysis and the question is asked if it is possible to think the madness within them. To do this, it starts from an approach to training and symptom in psychoanalysis and psychology, pointing out the importance of differentiating the psychic from the organic, as well as the psychic from the mental. In this sense, the concept of mental health proposed by WHO is addressed and the place of psychology and psychoanalysis in this concept is questioned. In the same way a reflection is made around the questions: Is it possible to speak of madness in the XXI century, when psychiatry has tried to eradicate this term? To talk about crazy again is to return to a debate that has somehow been left out of the scientific debate? Is it possible to think nowadays the importance of elaborating a nosography that includes Insanity?

  7. MEDITATIVE PSYCHOANALYSIS.

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    Rubin, Jeffrey B

    2016-03-01

    Psychoanalysis and meditation not only compensate for the other's blind spots, but also, when practiced together, can provide a richer experience than either discipline pursued alone. After considering the way meditation cultivates heightened attentiveness, refines sensory clarity, lessens self-criticism, and increases affect tolerance, thereby deepening psychoanalytic listening, I'll examine how psychoanalytic perspectives on unconscious communication and meaning illuminate and transform the nearsightedness of meditation, aiding therapists and clients in understanding troubling thoughts, feelings, and behavior. This helps therapists deepen their capacity to help those people with whom they work. The paper also attempts to illuminate how the therapeutic relationship, conceived of in a freer and more empathic way--as the vehicle for both validating a person's experience and providing opportunities for new forms of relatedness and self-transformation--provides a crucible in which old and dysfunctional ways of caring for oneself and relating to other people emerge and new patterns of self-care and intimacy can be established. In the concluding section, I will delineate meditative psychoanalysis, my own integration of meditation and psychoanalysis. Clinical material will illustrate my theoretical reflections.

  8. Should psychoanalysis become a science?

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    Appelbaum, Jerome

    2011-03-01

    I wish to formulate in broad outline an approach to the conceptualization of psychoanalysis that is divested from theory. This view sees the core of psychoanalysis as a humanistic practice, first and foremost guided by the individuality of the dyadic encounter, rather than as a science. I will not argue for any particular view of psychoanalysis. Instead I marshal a series of considerations from the humanities, to frame a conceptualization of psychoanalysis as a clinically based interpretive discipline having a unique mission. Finally, I will present a futuristic hypothetical scenario whose aim is to show why psychoanalysis will remain a viable enterprise basically as conceived by Freud.

  9. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

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    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  10. Psychoanalysis today

    Science.gov (United States)

    FONAGY, PETER

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the precarious position of psychoanalysis, a therapeutic approach which historically has defined itself by freedom from constraint and counted treatment length not in terms of number of sessions but in terms of years, in today's era of empirically validated treatments and brief structured interventions. The evidence that exists for the effectiveness of psychoanalysis as a treatment for psychological disorder is reviewed. The evidence base is significant and growing, but less than might meet criteria for an empirically based therapy. The author goes on to argue that the absence of evidence may be symptomatic of the epistemic difficulties that psychoanalysis faces in the context of 21st century psychiatry, and examines some of the philosophical problems faced by psychoanalysis as a model of the mind. Finally some changes necessary in order to ensure a future for psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapies within psychiatry are suggested. PMID:16946899

  11. On teaching psychoanalysis.

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    Ogden, Thomas H

    2006-08-01

    Teaching psychoanalysis is no less an art than is the practice of psychoanalysis. As is true of the analytic experience, teaching psychoanalysis involves an effort to create clearances in which fresh forms of thinking and dreaming may emerge, with regard to both psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. Drawing on his experience of leading two ongoing psychoanalytic seminars, each in its 25th year, the author offers observations concerning (1) teaching analytic texts by reading them aloud, line by line, in the seminar setting, with a focus on how the writer is thinking/writing and on how the reader is altered by the experience of reading; (2) treating clinical case presentations as experiences in collective dreaming in which the seminar members make use of their own waking dreaming to assist the presenter in dreaming aspects of his experience with the patient that the analytic pair has not previously been able to dream; (3) reading poetry and fiction as a way of enhancing the capacity of the seminar members to be aware of and alive to the effects created by the patient's and the analyst's use of language; and (4) learning to overcome what one thought one knew about conducting analytic work, i.e. learning to forget what one has learned.

  12. What hath freud wrought? Current confusion and controversies about the clinical practice of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy.

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    Chessick, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the current state of psychoanalysis and the challenges to the fundamental premises of Freud's psychoanalysis by those who have shifted to relationship or so-called two-person psychologies in our field. The author begins by briefly describing a parallel to the recent history of psychoanalysis in the sudden rise and fall of scholastic philosophy in the 14th century. He then focuses on contemporary attacks on Freud's psychoanalysis as a science, based on the contention by two-person psychologists that free association by the patient and evenly hovering attention by the analyst are actually impossible. He reviews Freud's idea of psychoanalysis, discusses psychodynamic psychotherapy, both conceived as scientific treatment procedures, and describes the current assault on their metapsychological and epistemological foundations. Returning to the parallel between what happened to medieval scholasticism and what has happened to psychoanalysis, he examines why this happened, and the resulting fragmentation of psychoanalytic practice. The article concludes with suggestions for the integration of various schools of psychoanalysis, reminding us of Benjamin Franklin's warning: "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately."

  13. Psychoanalysis as a lifeline: a clinical study of a transference perversion.

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    Baker, R

    1994-08-01

    Case material from the analysis of a fetishistic cross-dresser is reported. The evolution of a transference perversion and treatment impasse, in the form of the recalcitrant symptom of anal flatulence, is described. The patient's contrasting needs to cling perversely and addictively to the analyst, on the one hand, and to provoke an acting out of the countertransference, on the other, are placed in the context of his dread of rejection and potentially suicidal reaction. The author argues in favour of offering psychoanalysis as a lifeline, but with the condition that the psychoanalytic setting and boundaries are maintained and that gratifications are denied. Limited but precise interpretive psychoanalytic work in the transference was maintained. The relatively good outcome is explained in terms of the provision of safety, survival of the analyst and avoidance of countertransference acting out, which, in the author's view, represents an implicit and mutative transference interpretation, the specific factor in bringing about psychic change. This enabled the patient to recognise and accept the analyst as a 'new' object and, as a consequence, to question and reject his idealisation of the anal universe that he inhabited.

  14. Beyond Clinical Case Studies in Psychoanalysis: A Review of Psychoanalytic Empirical Single Case Studies Published in ISI-Ranked Journals

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    Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Krivzov, Juri; Notaerts, Liza

    2017-01-01

    Single case studies are at the origin of both theory development and research in the field of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. While clinical case studies are the hallmark of psychoanalytic theory and practice, their scientific value has been strongly criticized. To address problems with the subjective bias of retrospective therapist reports and uncontrollability of clinical case studies, systematic approaches to investigate psychotherapy process and outcome at the level of the single case have been developed. Such empirical case studies are also able to bridge the famous gap between academic research and clinical practice as they provide clinically relevant insights into how psychotherapy works. This study presents a review of psychoanalytic empirical case studies published in ISI-ranked journals and maps the characteristics of the study, therapist, patient en therapies that are investigated. Empirical case studies increased in quantity and quality (amount of information and systematization) over time. While future studies could pay more attention to providing contextual information on therapist characteristics and informed consent considerations, the available literature provides a basis to conduct meta-studies of single cases and as such contribute to knowledge aggregation. PMID:29046660

  15. [Albert Schweitzer and psychoanalysis].

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    Noth, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The correspondence between Albert Schweitzer and Oskar Pfister, published in 2006, reveals Schweitzer's strong interest in psychoanalysis. That Schweitzer, ethicist, theologian and missionary doctor, would show such appreciation for psychoanalysis to which the Zurich pastor had introduced him is not immediately self-evident. This article indicates three points of congruence which may explain the connectivity between Schweitzer's thinking and psychoanalysis.

  16. Linking Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis.

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    Habicht, Manuela H.

    This review discusses the relationship between neuroscience and psychoanalysis and introduces a new scientific method called neuro-psychoanalysis, a combination of the two phenomena. A significant difference between the two is that psychoanalysis has not evolved scientifically since it has not developed objective methods for testing ideas that it…

  17. [On the use and abuse of the history of psychoanalysis for psychoanalysis].

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    Will, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper intends to stimulate reflection about the history and historiography of psychoanalysis. Starting from Nietzsche's distinction of "monumental", "antiquarian" and "critical" historiography, the author discusses typical approaches to the history of psychoanalysis and recommends taking the historian's subjective motivations into account. He discriminates between analysts engaging in historical research alongside their clinical work, and historians of psychoanalysis coming from other disciplines. None of the parties involved can do without self-reflection: Psychoanalysis and its institutions need their history as an agent of self-critical reference; analysts working historically need the disidentification from their clinical convictions; and "external" scholars need an enabling self-confidence that allows for a critical interpretation of the history of psychoanalysis.

  18. Polycystic ovary syndrome: Is obesity a sine qua non? A clinical, hormonal, and metabolic assessment in relation to body mass index

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    Pikee Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine the proportion of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS patients who have normal body mass index (BMI and to compare the clinical, hormonal, and metabolic profile between lean and overweight patients of PCOS. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive infertile women with PCOS were studied and divided into lean (BMI between 18.5 and 23 and overweight (BMI ≥ 23. Metabolic and hormonal profile (serum FSH, LH, testosterone, prolactin, TSH on days 2-3 of menstrual cycle; serum progesterone premenstrually; serum insulin-fasting and 2 hours postglucose, glucose tolerance test, and fasting serum lipid profile was performed along with pelvic sonogropahy; and clinical features, viz. waist hip ratio, hirsutism, acne, acanthosis nigricans, and clitoromegaly were recorded. Results: 42% of the PCOS subjects had normal BMI. Average age, hirsutism (80.9% vs. 89.7%, irregular cycles (92.8% vs. 96.6%, acne (9.5% vs. 15.5%, clitoromegaly (2.3% vs. 3.4%, endometrial thickness >4 mm (9.5% vs. 15.5%, and hormonal profile were similar in the lean and overweight PCOS groups. Family history of diabetes (9.5% vs. 24.1%, abnormal glucose tolerance test (GTT (4.7% vs. 10.3%, deranged lipid profile (14.2% vs. 31%, and 2-hour postprandial insulin levels were higher in the overweight PCOS (P < 0.05. Insulin resistance was observed in 83.3% of lean PCOS but was still lower than 93.1% seen in overweight PCOS (P < 0.05. Conclusion: 42% of the PCOS had normal BMI, but clinical and hormonal profile was similar to PCOS patients with elevated BMI (overweight/obese. However, insulin resistance is observed in 83.3% of lean PCOS. Family history of diabetes, impaired GTT, deranged lipid profile, and insulin resistance were more prevalent in overweight PCOS.

  19. Psychoanalysis, science and the seductive theory of Karl Popper.

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    Grant, Don C; Harari, Edwin

    2005-06-01

    To present a critique of the ideas of Karl Popper, the philosopher of science, whose depiction of psychoanalysis as a pseudoscience is often used to justify attacks on psychoanalysis. Published sources are used to provide a brief intellectual biography of Popper, a summary of his concept of science and a summary of criticisms of Popper's view of science. His depiction of psychoanalysis and Freud's reply are presented. Clinical, experimental and neurobiological research which refutes Popper's view is summarized. There is a vast scholarly published work critical of Popper's falsifiability criterion of science. Less recognized is Popper's misunderstanding and misrepresentation of psychoanalysis; his argument against it is logically flawed and empirically false. Even if Popper's theory of science is accepted, there is considerable clinical, experimental and neurobiological research in psychoanalysis which meets Popper's criterion of science. Attacks on psychoanalysis based on Popper's theory of science are ill-founded and reflect inadequate scholarship.

  20. The translational metaphor in psychoanalysis.

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    Kirshner, Lewis

    2015-02-01

    The translational metaphor in psychoanalysis refers to the traditional method of interpreting or restating the meaning of verbal and behavioral acts of a patient in other, presumably more accurate terms that specify the forces and conflicts underlying symptoms. The analyst translates the clinical phenomenology to explain its true meaning and origin. This model of analytic process has been challenged from different vantage points by authors presenting alternative conceptions of therapeutic action. Although the temptation to find and make interpretations of clinical material is difficult to resist, behaving in this way places the analyst in the position of a teacher or diagnostician, seeking a specific etiology, which has not proven fruitful. Despite its historical appeal, I argue that the translational model is a misleading and anachronistic version of what actually occurs in psychoanalysis. I emphasize instead the capacity of analysis to promote the emergence of new forms of representation, or figuration, from the unconscious, using the work of Lacan, Laplanche, and Modell to exemplify this reformulation, and provide clinical illustrations of how it looks in practice. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  1. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

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    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  2. A HISTORICAL REPRISE: SOME OBSERVATIONS ON PROGRESS IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

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    Axelrod, Steven D

    2015-06-01

    The papers from the American Journal of Psychoanalysis 1956 and 1965 roundtables on what is effective in the therapeutic process are viewed through the lens of psychoanalysis' evolution over the past 50-60 years. With the passage of time, the contributions of the Interpersonal School to mainstream psychoanalysis have become clearer, especially with respect to mutative factors in the patient-analyst relationship. These papers from the 50s and 60s are also products of the internecine battles of the time, in which the different schools of psychoanalysis tried to claim absolute truth and assert hegemony in the field. The author argues that real progress in psychoanalysis has occurred through research and clinical/theoretical discovery, yielding an informed pluralism that mirrors the diversity and complexity of our work with patients.

  3. Lenin, sexuality and psychoanalysis.

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    Chemouni, Jacquy

    2004-01-01

    While Trotsky's relatively favourable adherence to Freudian ideas is well documented, little is known about Lenin's attitude toward psychoanalysis. The author's extensive research shows that, far from being the follower of Freudian ideas depicted by some historians, the father of the October Revolution rejected psychoanalytic theory and, in particular, the perspective he considered "idealistic" and the importance attributed to sexuality. Lenin's prudish personality, the influence of his wife Nadezhda Krupskaya and their ideology resulted in the exclusion of psychoanalysis from the construction of the New Man that Marxism was planning to undertake in Russia.

  4. Direct shoot regeneration via organogenesis in chieh- qua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl6

    2013-11-27

    qua is an Asiatic crop widely farmed throughout southern China and Southeast Asia with a cultivation history of more than 300 years. ... genotype, explant type, seedling age, culture medium, concentration and a combination of ...

  5. Psychoanalysis and the nuclear threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, H.B.; Jacobs, D.; Rubin, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    {ital Psychoanalysis and the Nuclear Threat} provides coverage of the dynamic and clinical considerations that follow from life in the nuclear age. Of special clinical interest are chapters dealing with the developmental consequences of the nuclear threat in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, and those exploring the technical issues raised by the occurrence in analytic and psychotherapeutic hours of material related to the nuclear threat. Additional chapters bring a psychoanalytic perspective to bear on such issues as the need to have enemies, silence as the real crime, love, work, and survival in the nuclear age, the relationship of the nuclear threat to issues of mourning and melancholia, apocalyptic fantasies, the paranoid process, considerations of the possible impact of gender on the nuclear threat, and the application of psychoanalytic thinking to nuclear arms strategy. Finally, the volume includes the first case report in the English language---albeit a brief psychotherapy---involving the treatment of a Hiroshima survivor.

  6. Psychoanalysis as poetry.

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    Vivona, Jeanine M

    2013-12-01

    Like psychoanalysis, poetry is possible because of the nature of verbal language, particularly its potentials to evoke the sensations of lived experience. These potentials are vestiges of the personal relational context in which language is learned, without which there would be no poetry and no psychoanalysis. Such a view of language infuses psychoanalytic writings on poetry, yet has not been fully elaborated. To further that elaboration, a poem by Billy Collins is presented to illustrate the sensorial and imagistic potentials of words, after which the interpersonal processes of language development are explored in an attempt to elucidate the original nature of words as imbued with personal meaning, embodied resonance, and emotion. This view of language and the verbal form allows a fuller understanding of the therapeutic processes of speech and conversation at the heart of psychoanalysis, including the relational potentials of speech between present individuals, which are beyond the reach of poetry. In one sense, the work of the analyst is to create language that mobilizes the experiential, memorial, and relational potentials of words, and in so doing to make a poet out of the patient so that she too can create such language.

  7. Psychoanalysis and the Sexual Difference Device

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    Márcia Arán

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Before the new cartography of gender relationships and sexualities in contemporary culture, we intend to discuss in which way psychoanalysis presents itself as one of the devices of sexuality as conceived by Foucault, which tries to reinstate the traditional model of sexual difference trough the reiteration of the heterosexual norm of male domination. Furthermore, we inquire how psychoanalysis can remain a critical theory and a clinical practice that allow a productive relationship with the new configurations of gender, which disclose the conception of new forms of subjectivity. With this aim, we will analyze the psychoanalytical debate on (1 the displacements of feminine and the positiveness of femininity; (2 the homosexual marriage and the homoparentality; and (3 the clinics of transsexuality.

  8. [Through entomology to psychoanalysis].

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    Amouroux, Rémy

    2007-01-01

    Vues analytiques sur la vie des abeilles et des termites (Analytical perspectives on the life of bees and termites) is a letter from L. R. Delves Broughton to Freud dated the 7th of August, 1927. The letter was translated into French by Marie Bonaparte (1882-1962) for the Revue Française de Psychanalyse (French Review of Psychoanalysis) in 1927. A German translation of the letter was done for the review Imago in 1928. In his letter Delves Broughton develops a captivating connection between Man's libidinal economy and that of certain social insects. His main argument is based on the readings of several works by Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) and Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949). He proposes, as in the bioanalysis project of Sándor Ferenczi (1873-1933), the application of psychoanalytic knowledge on a specific area of the natural sciences: entomology.

  9. Psychoanalysis and the Hindi cinema.

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    Bhugra, Dinesh; Gupta, Susham

    2009-06-01

    Psychoanalysis was developed in nineteenth-century Vienna and led to a major change in thinking about emotions and feelings, and entered common parlance. Psychoanalysis raises notions of individual's growth and development, and defence mechanisms are used to suppress anxiety and stress. Portrayal of psychoanalysis in modern Hindi cinema is rare. In this paper we look at two films released in the late 1960s which dealt directly with psychoanalysis. Using these films we illustrate the relationship between males and females and the interaction between mothers and sons in the Indian context. The role of nurses as nurturing maternal figures and the role of tradition and modernity related to gender and westernization are discussed. These films represent the emergent India and its relationship with modernity and traditional values.

  10. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

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    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. Copyright 2009 L'Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  11. Paul Tillich and psychoanalysis.

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    Hart, Curtis W

    2011-09-01

    Paul Tillich (1886-1965) was one of the leading theologians of the twentieth century. Tillich was born in Germany and received his education and first academic appointments there. Tillich left Germany in 1933 to teach at Union Theological Seminary after having been dismissed from his university position by the National Socialist government for his radical views and political associations. In the United States, he became a highly successful lecturer, preacher, and public intellectual who reached numbers of persons who had departed or who had doubts regarding traditional religious belief and practice. Tillich underwent a series of traumatic losses in the early decades of his life that powerfully shaped his subsequent contributions to religious and cultural discourse. This essay outlines this pattern of loss and speculates about its impact upon his theological work. It lifts up Tillich's perspective of living and working "on the boundary" of disciplines, eras, and cultures, most particularly where psychoanalytic ideas contributed to his "theology of culture." It also stresses Tillich's role in initiating the ongoing dialogue between religion and psychiatry and psychoanalysis. The essay concludes with a summary critique of Tillich's work along with an affirmation of his considerable legacy. This essay was originally a presentation for the Richardson Research Seminar in the History of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College.

  12. Treatment resistance and psychodynamic psychiatry: concepts psychiatry needs from psychoanalysis.

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    Plakun, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 30 years psychiatry and psychoanalysis have moved in substantially divergent directions. Psychiatry has become rich in methodology but conceptually limited, with a drift toward biological reductionism. Psychoanalysis has remained relatively limited in methodology, but conceptually rich. The rich methodology of psychiatry has led to major contributions in discovering gene by environment interactions, the importance of early adversity, and to recognition of the serious problem posed by treatment resistance. However, psychiatry's biologically reductionistic conceptual focus interferes with the development of a nuanced clinical perspective based on emerging knowledge that might help more treatment resistant patients become treatment responders. This article argues that recognition of the problem of treatment resistance in psychiatry creates a need for it to reconnect with the conceptual richness of psychoanalysis in order to improve patient care. Psychodynamic psychiatry is defined as the relevant intersection of psychiatry and psychoanalysis where this reconnection can occur. I will suggest selected aspects of psychoanalysis that are especially relevant to psychiatry in improving outcomes in work with treatment resistant patients.

  13. A cost-utility analysis of psychoanalysis versus psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

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    Berghout, Caspar C; Zevalkink, Jolien; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2010-01-01

    Despite the considerable and growing body of research about the clinical effectiveness of long-term psychoanalytic treatment, relatively little attention has been paid to economic evaluations, particularly with reference to the broader range of societal effects. In this cost-utility study, we examined the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of psychoanalysis versus psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Incremental costs and effects were estimated by means of cross-sectional measurements in a cohort design (psychoanalysis, n = 78; psychoanalytic psychotherapy, n = 104). Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were estimated for each treatment strategy using the SF-6D. Total costs were calculated from a societal perspective (treatment costs plus other societal costs) and discounted at 4 percent. Psychoanalysis was more costly than psychoanalytic psychotherapy, but also more effective from a health-related quality of life perspective. The ICER--that is, the extra costs to gain one additional QALY by delivering psychoanalysis instead of psychoanalytic psychotherapy--was estimated at 52,384 euros per QALY gained. Our findings show that the cost-utility ratio of psychoanalysis relative to psychoanalytic psychotherapy is within an acceptable range. More research is needed to find out whether cost-utility ratios vary with different types of patients. We also encourage cost-utility analyses comparing psychoanalytic treatment to other forms of (long-term) treatment.

  14. Critique and cure: a dream of uniting psychoanalysis and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jamieson

    2013-06-01

    Critical theory, whose aim was to historicize philosophy through integrating it with the social sciences, turned to psychoanalysis to find its way through an accounting of philosophy after the Second World War. Over 50 years after this initial project, the rift between philosophy and psychoanalysis has never been greater. If Jacques Lacan could be considered one of the few psychoanalysts to maintain and foster links to philosophical thought in the latter half of the 20th century, his work has sadly remained marginal in the clinical field throughout America and Europe. Both critical theory and Lacan remain skeptical of the direction taken by psychoanalysis after Freud. Reflecting on the history of these two disciplines, as well as through an examination of Theodor Adorno's posthumously published dream journal, critique and cure emerge as two dialectically intertwined themes that gain momentum in the dream of the unification of the philosophical and psychoanalytic projects.

  15. The Effects of One-Stage Full-Mouth Disinfection and Qua-drant-Wise Scaling and Root Planing on Serum Levels of IL-17 and IL-1β and Clinical Parameters (A randomized Controlled Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adileh Shirmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One-stage full-mouth disinfection technique (FMD has been introduced to avoid cross-contamination between the treated and untreated regions between treatment sessions. Considering the role of inflammatory mediators in periodontitis, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FMD with the quadrant-wise scaling and root planing (Q-SRP on serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis.Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were selected randomly and based on inclusion criteria in each group. In order to evaluate the periodontal status, the clinical parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP, clinical attachment level (CAL, probing depth (PD and modified gingival index (MGI were measured and recorded before treatment and at 2- and 4-month intervals after treatment. Immunologic parameters of the study such as IL-17 and IL-1β serum levels were determined by special laboratory kits at the same intervals. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 statistical software. Statistical significance was defined at p0.05. In the evaluation of periodontal parameters, all parameters exhibited clinical improvements in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between the two study groups (p>0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that both FMD and Q-SRP techniques result in improvements in periodontal indexes and decreases in the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β inflammatory mediators.

  16. Essential Psychoanalysis: Toward a Re-Appraisal of the Relationship between Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Freud stated that any line of investigation which recognizes transference and resistance, regardless of its results, was entitled to call itself psychoanalysis (Freud, 1914a, p. 16). Separately he wrote that psychoanalysis was the science of unconscious mental processes (Freud, 1925, p. 70). Combining these two ideas defines Essential Psychoanalysis: Any line of treatment, theory, or science which recognizes the facts of unconscious, transference, or resistance, and takes them as the starting point of its work, regardless of its results, is psychoanalysis. Freud formulated two conflicting definitions of psychoanalysis: Essential Psychoanalysis, applicable to all analysts regardless of their individuality and Extensive Psychoanalysis, modeled on his individuality. They differ in how psychoanalytic technique is viewed. For Essential Psychoanalysis, flexible recommendations constitute psychoanalytic technique, whereas for Extensive Psychoanalysis, rules constitute a key part of psychoanalytic technique.

  17. Factors Affecting the Understanding and Use of Psychoanalysis in Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busiol, Diego

    2015-06-01

    The majority of Western psychotherapies are known and practiced in Hong Kong, while psychoanalysis still has little resonance. A recent study finds that psychoanalysis is perceived neither as ineffective nor as necessarily in conflict with Hong Kong Chinese values. Nevertheless, Hong Kong Chinese culture influences how psychoanalysis is received and understood, when compared to Mainland China and Taiwan. It is argued that a better reception in the latter two was possible because of different social and historical backgrounds, different clinical backgrounds of those who receive training, and the more active role of Western psychoanalysts. © 2015 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  18. The case for neuropsychoanalysis: Why a dialogue with neuroscience is necessary but not sufficient for psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovell, Yoram; Solms, Mark; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in the cognitive, affective and social neurosciences have enabled these fields to study aspects of the mind that are central to psychoanalysis. These developments raise a number of possibilities for psychoanalysis. Can it engage the neurosciences in a productive and mutually enriching dialogue without compromising its own integrity and unique perspective? While many analysts welcome interdisciplinary exchanges with the neurosciences, termed neuropsychoanalysis, some have voiced concerns about their potentially deleterious effects on psychoanalytic theory and practice. In this paper we outline the development and aims of neuropsychoanalysis, and consider its reception in psychoanalysis and in the neurosciences. We then discuss some of the concerns raised within psychoanalysis, with particular emphasis on the epistemological foundations of neuropsychoanalysis. While this paper does not attempt to fully address the clinical applications of neuropsychoanalysis, we offer and discuss a brief case illustration in order to demonstrate that neuroscientific research findings can be used to enrich our models of the mind in ways that, in turn, may influence how analysts work with their patients. We will conclude that neuropsychoanalysis is grounded in the history of psychoanalysis, that it is part of the psychoanalytic worldview, and that it is necessary, albeit not sufficient, for the future viability of psychoanalysis. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  19. Is Psychoanalysis a Folk Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Even as the neuro-psychoanalytic field has matured, from a naturalist point of view, the epistemological status of Freudian interpretations still remains problematic at a naturalist point of view. As a result of the resurgence of hermeneutics, the claim has been made that psychoanalysis is an extension of folk psychology. For these “extensionists,” asking psychoanalysis to prove its interpretations would be as absurd as demanding the proofs of the scientific accuracy of folk psychology. I propose to show how Dennett’s theory of the intentional stance allows us to defend an extensionist position while sparing us certain hermeneutic difficulties. In conclusion, I will consider how Shevrin et al. (1996) experiments could turn extensionist conceptual considerations into experimentally testable issues. PMID:23525879

  20. Psychoanalysis And Politics: Historicising Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I compare three different views of the relation between subjectivity and modernity: one proposed by Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, a second by theorists of institutionalised individualisation, and a third by writers in the Foucaultian tradition of studies of the history of governmentalities. The theorists were chosen because they represent very different understandings of the relation between contemporary history and subjectivity. My purpose is to ground psychoanalytic theory about what humans need in history and so to question what it means to talk ahistorically about what humans need in order to thrive psychologically. Only in so doing can one assess the relation between psychoanalysis and progressive politics. I conclude that while psychoanalysis is a discourse of its time, it can also function as a counter-discourse and can help us understand the effects on subjectivity of a more than thirty year history in the West of repudiating dependency needs and denying interdependence. PMID:23678239

  1. [Psychoanalysis and criminology prior to the therapeutic community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    From its very beginning, psychoanalysis dealt with delinquency on a theoretical as well as on a clinical level. This paper deals with pioneer contributions, from Freud to Friedlander and Reiwald in the late 1940's, which stressed traumatic milieus in early childhood and the possibilities to correct this experience in treatment. In terms of clinical practice, they offered casuistic material, but also provided important suggestions for contemporary forensic treatment.

  2. The first interview: Anxieties and research on initiating psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    A qualitative clinical study of preliminary interviews by the Working Party on Initiating Psychoanalysis (WPIP) of the European Psychoanalytic Federation suggests that the unconscious dynamics in first interviews are extraordinarily powerful and that they give rise to deep unconscious anxieties in both patient and analyst, with the corresponding defences against them. Furthermore, the group dynamics observed in the clinical workshops and in the research team doing the study suggest that both the anxieties and the defences are conveyed to these groups in the form of unelaborated 'session residues' provoking renewed anxieties and defences in them. These findings contribute to our understanding of what goes on in first interviews, but also raise interesting questions about the psychoanalytic research process in psychoanalysis and how confrontation with the unknown is dealt with in that context. Rather than as a means to avoid anxiety, method in clinical research can be seen as a way to help the research group to contain its reactions and to tolerate them until the group finds its way to further elaboration. These points are illustrated with a clinical case drawn from the study. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  3. THE DIALOGICAL SELF IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the shift that appears to be taking place in contemporary psychoanalysis, as reflected among intersubjective approaches, from a monological conception of the self to a dialogical one. The monological self emphasizes the separation between mind, body, and external world, focusing on the representational and descriptive/referential function of language. In contrast, the dialogical self emphasizes practices, the permeable nature of relationships between subjects, and the constitutive function of language. This paper attempts to explain the growing emphasis on the dialogical self, understood from a theoretical, metatheoretical, and technical point of view, using contemporary intersubjective approaches to illustrate this shift. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  4. Is Fromm Relevant for Relational Approaches in Psychoanalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Mauricio

    2017-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of how Erich Fromm's work influenced contemporary relational and intersubjective approaches. It stresses Fromm's humanistic and existential sensibility, his explanation of how different socioeconomic and cultural contexts mold different character types, and how his center-to-center relatedness in clinical work all contribute to psychic change. The author shows how these dimensions intersect and add to current interests in relational psychoanalysis.

  5. Cloning and characterization of WRKY gene homologs in Chieh-qua (Benincasa hispida Cogn. var. Chieh-qua How) and their expression in response to fusaric acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yizhou; Jiang, Biao; Peng, Qingwu; Liu, Wenrui; Lin, Yue; Xie, Dasen; He, Xiaoming; Li, Shaoshan

    2017-05-01

    The WRKY transcription factors play an important role in plant resistance for biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study, we cloned 10 WRKY gene homologs (CqWRKY) in Chieh-qua (Benincasa hispida Cogn. var. Chieh-qua) using the rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) or homology-based cloning methods. We characterized the structure of these CqWRKY genes. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences with cucumber homologs suggested possible structural conservation of these genes among cucurbit crops. We examined the expression levels of these genes in response to fusaric acid (FA) treatment between resistant and susceptible Chieh-qua lines with quantitative real-time PCR. All genes could be upregulated upon FA treatment, but four CqWRKY genes exhibited differential expression between resistant and susceptible lines before and after FA application. CqWRKY31 seemed to be a positive regulator while CqWRKY1, CqWRKY23 and CqWRKY53 were negative regulators of fusaric resistance. This is the first report of characterization of WRKY family genes in Chieh-qua. The results may also be useful in breeding Chieh-qua for Fusarium wilt resistance.

  6. Marion Milner, mysticism and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Janet

    2002-02-01

    It is unusual to combine mysticism and psychoanalysis. Marion Milner, however, achieved precisely this. Through her self-analysis and analytic work with children and adults--and using as an illustration her own and others' imaginative ideas, paintings, doodles, drawings and pictures--she drew attention to the potential for health and creativity of undoing the obstacles to mystical experience of oneness with what is beyond or other than the self, which she sometimes called God, the unconscious or the id. This article seeks to explain and highlight this aspect of her contribution to, and continuing importance for, psychoanalytic theory and practice--particularly that associated with Winnicott--through detailing her early life and diary-keeping experiments, some of her psychoanalytic case histories during and after the Second World War, her work as an artist, ending with her travels and her involvement during the 1980s and 1990s with the Squiggle Foundation and British Association of Art Therapists.

  7. The Hofgeismar lectures: a contemporary overview of Horneyan psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, D H

    2001-06-01

    Part I of this paper describes Karen Horney's theory of neurosis. In the 1930s, Horney repudiated Freud's view of female developmental psychology. She argued that cultural factors rather than anatomy or innate biological drives were the primary determinants not only of female development but of personality, as well. When genetic and environmental circumstances together lead to basic anxiety early in life, she believed a deep inner conflict emerges in the individual leading to the need for elaborating layers of rigidified protective defenses. She called this the neurotic process. This process can result in discrete symptoms of mental disorder as well as the more generalized problems of alienation from the person's real self and reliance on neurotic solutions. In Part II, the practical application of Horney's theory to clinical work is demonstrated in a case presentation of a notably timid and perfectionistic man. Part III points up elaborations of Horney's theories by later workers of her school, the American Institute for Psychoanalysis, and provides a history of her school within the broader context of American psychoanalysis. The author's emphasis on postmodern and narrativist elements of Horneyan psychoanalysis are illuminated, as well.

  8. Psychoanalysis and cognitive-evolutionary psychology: an attempt at integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migone, P; Liotti, G

    1998-12-01

    The authors argue that the abandonment of the theory of trauma in 1897 was a trauma for Freud himself, who was led to 'despair', and possibly reacted with an overemphasis on inner fantasies and drive discharge. They suggest that today we are facing a second trauma in the history of psychoanalysis that we might call the 'abandonment of drive theory', i.e. the notion that human beings strive not primarily to reduce sexual and aggressive drives but rather seek objects, assign meanings, test previous beliefs and assimilate new schemes. Our task is to recover as Freud was able to do, giving a new impetus to psychoanalysis. The current challenge is, on the one hand, a revision of the psychoanalytic conception of inherited information, and, on the other, a theory of motivation based on converging evidence from cognitive science, ethology, infant research and psychotherapy research. Many clinical models are current in contemporary psychoanalysis. Only as one example among these models, some concepts used in Weiss & Sampson's 'Control-Mastery Theory' will be discussed in light of cognitive science and evolutionary epistemology within the framework of (a) the 1960 classic, 'Plans and Structure of Behavior' by Miller, Galanter and Pribram (b) Edelman's neurobiological theory and (c) Bowlby's attachment theory.

  9. Changes in Differentiation-Relatedness During Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamaras, Martha R; Reviere, Susan L; Gallagher, Kathryn E; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine (a) if the Differentiation-Relatedness Scale of Self and Object Representations (D-RS), a coding model used with the Object Relations Inventory (Blatt, Wein, Chevron, & Quinlan, 1979 ) could be reliably applied to transcripts of psychoanalyses, and (b) if levels of differentiation-relatedness improve over the course of psychoanalysis. Participants were 4 creative writers who underwent psychoanalysis as part of a longitudinal research project focused on the processes and outcomes of psychoanalysis. Transcripts from the beginning and termination phases of psychoanalysis were coded by 2 independent raters for global, low, and high levels of self and other differentiation-relatedness and compared. There was good interrater agreement, suggesting that, like other forms of narrative material, psychoanalysis transcripts can be reliably rated for levels of object relations. Analysands showed an increase in global levels of differentiation-relatedness from a predominance of emergent ambivalent constancy (M = 6.2) at the beginning of analysis to consolidated, constant representations of self and other (M = 7.5) at the end of analysis. These preliminary findings contribute significantly to the empirical literature with regard to the measurement of self and object representations and change in these representations over the course of psychoanalysis.

  10. The Neuropsychoanalytic Approach: Using Neuroscience as the Basic Science of Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian; Flores Mosri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience was the basic science behind Freud's psychoanalytic theory and technique. He worked as a neurologist for 20 years before being aware that a new approach to understand complex diseases, namely the hysterias, was needed. Solms coined the term neuropsychoanalysis to affirm that neuroscience still belongs in psychoanalysis. The neuropsychoanalytic field has continued Freud's original ideas as stated in 1895. Developments in psychoanalysis that have been created or revised by the neuropsychoanalysis movement include pain/relatedness/opioids, drive, structural model, dreams, cathexis, and dynamic unconscious. Neuroscience has contributed to the development of new psychoanalytic theory, such as Bazan's (2011) description of anxiety driven by unconscious intentions or "phantoms." Results of adopting the "dual aspect monism" approach of idiographic psychoanalytic clinical observation combined with nomothetic investigation of related human phenomena include clarification and revision of theory, restoration of the scientific base of psychoanalysis, and improvement of clinical treatments. By imbricating psychoanalytic thinking with neuroscience, psychoanalysts are also positioned to make contributions to neuroscience research. Freud's original Project for a Scientific Psychology/Psychology for Neurologists can be carried forward in a way that moves psychoanalysis into the twenty-first century as a core contemporary science (Kandel, 1999). Neuroscience as the basic science of psychoanalysis both improves the field, and enhances its scientific and cultural status.

  11. The Neuropsychoanalytic Approach: Using Neuroscience as the Basic Science of Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian; Flores Mosri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience was the basic science behind Freud's psychoanalytic theory and technique. He worked as a neurologist for 20 years before being aware that a new approach to understand complex diseases, namely the hysterias, was needed. Solms coined the term neuropsychoanalysis to affirm that neuroscience still belongs in psychoanalysis. The neuropsychoanalytic field has continued Freud's original ideas as stated in 1895. Developments in psychoanalysis that have been created or revised by the neuropsychoanalysis movement include pain/relatedness/opioids, drive, structural model, dreams, cathexis, and dynamic unconscious. Neuroscience has contributed to the development of new psychoanalytic theory, such as Bazan's (2011) description of anxiety driven by unconscious intentions or “phantoms.” Results of adopting the “dual aspect monism” approach of idiographic psychoanalytic clinical observation combined with nomothetic investigation of related human phenomena include clarification and revision of theory, restoration of the scientific base of psychoanalysis, and improvement of clinical treatments. By imbricating psychoanalytic thinking with neuroscience, psychoanalysts are also positioned to make contributions to neuroscience research. Freud's original Project for a Scientific Psychology/Psychology for Neurologists can be carried forward in a way that moves psychoanalysis into the twenty-first century as a core contemporary science (Kandel, 1999). Neuroscience as the basic science of psychoanalysis both improves the field, and enhances its scientific and cultural status. PMID:27790160

  12. Psychoanalysis, science, and art: aesthetics in the making of a psychoanalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayze-Pereira, João A

    2007-04-01

    This paper critically examines the relationship of psychoanalysis to science and art. Its point of departure is Michael Rustin's theorizing. Specifically, in considering the possibility of a psychoanalyst's having an aesthetic orientation, the author analyses: 1) the difficulty of there being any connection between psychoanalysis and science because science's necessarily presupposed subject-object dichotomy is incompatible with transference, which, beginning with Freud, is basic to psychoanalysis; 2) the complex relationship between psychoanalysis and aesthetics using Maurice Merleau-Ponty's philosophical perspective as well as Luigi Pareyson's theory of aesthetics; 3) the Kantian foundations of the psychoanalytic notion of art as the 'containing form of subjective experience'; 4) intersubjectivity, without which clinical practice would not be possible, especially considering matters of identity, difference, the body, and of sensory experience such as 'expressive form'; 5) the relationship of psychoanalysis and art, keeping in mind their possible convergence and divergence as well as some psychoanalysts' conceptual commitment to classicism and the need for contact with art in a psychoanalyst's mind set.

  13. The contemporary failure of nerve and the crisis in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, R D

    2001-01-01

    The American Academy of Psychoanalysis is undergoing an identity crisis at this time, which is at least to a large extent a function of the whole current identity crisis in the field of psychoanalysis itself. In order to better understand this crisis, in this article I have first reviewed a similar situation which occurred in the history of classical Greece. Plato's famous Academy underwent a progressive deterioration and disintegration and fragmentation, until it ended up merely the handmaiden of another discipline, Christian theology, for a thousand years. I then propose that the identity crisis in psychoanalysis today has to do with our failure of nerve in the teeth of the abusive behavior of insurance companies regarding the payment for psychoanalysis and the current cultural ambience demanding "fast-fast-fast" relief. I call in this article for a return to Freud's basic principles as a focus for our identity. Of course we cannot ignore new discoveries in neurobiology if they are well established, or what we learn from the study of enactments in the here-and-how of the analytic procedure. Certainly the findings of Freud that are contradicted by firmly accepted empirical findings in neurobiology and other disciplines call for revision of some of his ideas, as do his mistaken views on the psychology of women and on certain other topics such as art, religion, and evolutionary biology. But this should not be permitted to blur our continuing focus on the fundamental principles of the clinical practice of psychoanalysis as Freud developed them over his lifetime. In this article I briefly reviewed those basic principles and proposed that we employ them as the basis for our identity as psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychiatrists. It represents a failure of nerve to drift this way and that with current fads and with the continuously deteriorating ambiance of our culture as the world slides into rampant global capitalism. Franz Alexander said years ago that

  14. Privatization and Psychoanalysis: The Impact of Neo-liberalism on Freud's Tool of Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybow, Scott; Eighmey, Jennifer; Fader, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The paper outlines the historical links between psychoanalysis, social progressivism and the political Left. It then details the process by which those links were undone such that today psychoanalysis and mental health services in general are alienated from their radical roots. The paper posits this process of alienation is continued today via the neo-liberal phenomenon of privatization, which has profound implications for clients seeking mental health treatment especially those of minority status or who are economically oppressed. Today, access to effective mental health treatment is linked to one's economic status, and people of all class backgrounds seem less likely to receive mental health interventions that promote awareness of the oppressive political and economic forces they face. The paper includes two clinical vignettes illustrating the inequalities that are inherent to the privatized mental healthcare system. The paper calls for a return to the ideals and practices of the progressive psychoanalysis that defined the inter-war era of the last century.

  15. The body as constitutive element phenomenology and psychoanalysis on our view of ourselves and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjaraz Fuentes, Paulina; Rojas Hernández, María Del Carmen; Santasilia, Stefano; Monjaraz Fuentes, Fernanda

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to highlight that from the phenomenology and psychoanalysis point of view, the meaning of the notion of the body is different from the medical biologicist discourse. In psychoanalysis, the body is an erogenized body. It is constituted as an object for another self. Similarly, in phenomenology, the body is an own body in first instance. It is the body of a self, rather than a living body and a material body. Both positions enable us to understand how this conceptualization of the body is essential in any human field. Especially in the clinic, the position of the subject before the other will lead to a specific form of intervention. From this understanding of the human body, both phenomenology and psychoanalysis confirm that the biologicist understanding of the body, presumed by all psychological and medical practices, is insufficient.

  16. [History and psychoanalysis: the stakes of history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, L; Stengers, I

    1993-01-01

    Freud's definition of the relationship between hypnosis and psychoanalysis is a political one that even then pointed to the paradigmatical sciences as defined by Kuhn. Nevertheless, the historian who applies to psychoanalysis the technique of symetry elaborated for such sciences, runs up against a set of singularities that risk bringing him to a position of denouncer of a "fake science". We emphasize that, if the historian does not limit himself to the positivist position or to the history of ideas, he will inevitably find himself engaged in the history that he is analyzing, but with the responsibility of his mode of engagement. We propose to define hypnosis and psychoanalysis as fields inhabited by the question of science in the modern sense of the term, and raising the issue of pertinence, as far as they are concerned, of the theoretical experimental model that guided them.

  17. [Is it still the "royal way"? The dream as a junction of neurobiology and psychoanalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Some decades ago the dream seemed to be randomly generated by brain stem mechanisms in the cortical and subcortical neuronal networks. However, most recent empirical data, studies on brain lesions and functional neuroimaging results have refuted this theory. Several data support that motivation pathways, memory systems, especially implicit, emotional memory play an important role in dream formation. This essay reviews how the results of neurobiology and cognitive psychology can be fitted into the theoretical frameworks and clinical practice of the psychoanalysis. The main aim is to demonstrate that results of neurobiology and empirical observations of psychoanalysis are complementary rather than contradictory.

  18. Psychoanalysis and the community mental health movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, L M

    1975-01-01

    Psychoanalysis and CMHM were once enemies. Psychoanalysis has made noteworthy advances toward the CMHM idea both in technique changes and in community involvement. It is possible that CMHM may finally reject all psychoanalytic contribution and face its future without a theory. If that takes place, the CMHM some day in its future may turn a corner and find itself face to face with the lonely, individual man, conscious of his past and fearful of the unexplained anxiety within him. It is then that the CMHM will find itself once again studying the works of Herbert Marcuse, Erik Erikson, Sigmund Freud, and the psychoanalytic world.

  19. Hermeneutics versus science in psychoanalysis: a resolution to the controversy over the scientific status of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusella, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The controversy over the scientific status of psychoanalysis is investigated and a resolution is proposed. The positions held by the hermeneuticists, conveyed through the hermeneutic interpretation of psychoanalysis put forth by Jurgen Habermas and Paul Ricoeur, are reviewed. The views of psychoanalysis as a science held by the philosopher of science Adolf Grünbaum and by American psychoanalyst Robert S. Wallerstein are also considered. Psychoanalysis remains relevant today because it has situated itself among the other disciplines as a hybrid science, not quite a pure hermeneutic on the one hand, and not quite a pure science on the other, while at the same time having proven to be both these things-and in doing so has revolutionized the way we think about human nature.

  20. GeoViQua: quality-aware geospatial data discovery and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, L.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualization for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is a recently started FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and evaluation tools, which will be integrated in the GEO-Portal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators, also contributing to the definition of a quality label (GEOLabel). GeoViQua proposed solutions will be assessed in several pilot case studies covering the whole Earth Observation chain, from remote sensing acquisition to data processing, to applications in the main GEOSS Societal Benefit Areas. This work presents the preliminary results of GeoViQua Work Package 4 "Enhanced geo-search tools" (WP4), started in January 2012. Its major anticipated technical innovations are search and evaluation tools that communicate and exploit data quality information from the GCI. In particular, GeoViQua will investigate a graphical search interface featuring a coherent and meaningful aggregation of statistics and metadata summaries (e.g. in the form of tables, charts), thus enabling end users to leverage quality constraints for data discovery and evaluation. Preparatory work on WP4 requirements indicated that users need the "best" data for their purpose, implying a high degree of subjectivity in judgment. This suggests that the GeoViQua system should exploit a combination of provider-generated metadata (objective indicators such as summary statistics), system-generated metadata (contextual

  1. Psychoanalysis in Crisis: The Danger of Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Arnold

    2015-06-01

    Psychoanalysis is in crisis. Its prestige with the public has plummeted, as well as its economic viability and even its population. There are fewer analytic candidates and fewer patients, less insurance coverage, less presence in departments of psychiatry, and less prestige among the traditional academic disciplines. Analysts are getting older, and there are fewer and fewer young ones to replace us. A once-fascinated public now distrusts analysts as unscientific, deluded, authoritarian, reactionary, arrogant, sexist, and/or passé. This paper examines some causes of this decline within psychoanalysis itself as well as possibilities for reform. The status of psychoanalysis as a science is in question, although Freud considered it as an empirical science, and modified his theories to fit new facts. In reality, however, transmission of psychoanalytic knowledge in the training analyst system has led to its perpetuation as an ideology, rather than a science, and to the formation of oligarchies in the structure of psychoanalytic organizations and some institutes. Psychoanalysis is nothing if not an exploratory endeavor, and it thrives in an open environment. Psychoanalytic theory becomes ideology when exploration, testing, and challenge are suppressed. There are many analysts for whom psychoanalysis is neither ideology or theology, but an intellectually stimulating and emotionally rewarding human and humane endeavor, where convention is enlivened by creative challenge, and innovation is disciplined by tradition. In that form, it is too valuable to lose. It is time for us to step back and reclaim our citizenship in the larger intellectual world of curiosity, creativity, and freedom.

  2. LABOUR USE IN SMALL-SCALE YAM PRODUCTION IN QUA'AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... articulate organization of rural labour markets and migrant labour to ensure availability throughout the production season. Key Words: Labour use, Double log (Cobb-Douglas) fuctional form, Marginal analysis, Qua'an Pan Local Government Area, Plateau State. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences Vol.2(2) 2003: 118- ...

  3. This art of psychoanalysis. Dreaming undreamt dreams and interrupted cries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2004-08-01

    It is the art of psychoanalysis in the making, a process inventing itself as it goes, that is the subject of this paper. The author articulates succinctly how he conceives of psychoanalysis, and offers a detailed clinical illustration. He suggests that each analysand unconsciously (and ambivalently) is seeking help in dreaming his 'night terrors' (his undreamt and undreamable dreams) and his 'nightmares' (his dreams that are interrupted when the pain of the emotional experience being dreamt exceeds his capacity for dreaming). Undreamable dreams are understood as manifestations of psychotic and psychically foreclosed aspects of the personality; interrupted dreams are viewed as reflections of neurotic and other non-psychotic parts of the personality. The analyst's task is to generate conditions that may allow the analysand--with the analyst's participation--to dream the patient's previously undreamable and interrupted dreams. A significant part of the analyst's participation in the patient's dreaming takes the form of the analyst's reverie experience. In the course of this conjoint work of dreaming in the analytic setting, the analyst may get to know the analysand sufficiently well for the analyst to be able to say something that is true to what is occurring at an unconscious level in the analytic relationship. The analyst's use of language contributes significantly to the possibility that the patient will be able to make use of what the analyst has said for purposes of dreaming his own experience, thereby dreaming himself more fully into existence.

  4. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) which is part of the GCI. The GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality augmentation Broker (DAB-Q) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. The GeoViQua architecture also includes a Feedback Catalog, a particular service brokered by the DAB-Q which is dedicated to the storage and discovery of user feedbacks. A very important issue

  5. Towards a history of operatic psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the history of the trope of psychoanalytic therapy in musical dramas, from Richard Wagner to Kurt Weill, concluding that psychoanalysis and the musical drama are, in some ways, companions and take cues from each other, beginning in the mid-19th century. In Wagner's music dramas, psychoanalytic themes and situations - specifically concerning the meaning and analysis of dreams - are presaged. In early modernist music dramas by Richard Strauss and Arnold Schoenberg (contemporaries of Freud), tacit representations of the drama of hysteria, its aetiology and "treatment" comprise key elements of the plot and resonate with dissonant musical soundscapes. By the middle of the 20th century, Kurt Weill places the relationship between analyst and patient in the foreground of his musical "Lady in the Dark," thereby making manifest what is latent in a century-spanning chain of musical works whose meaning centres, in part, around representations of psychoanalysis.

  6. Psychoanalysis in modern mental health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakeley, Jessica

    2018-05-01

    Like any discipline, psychoanalysis has evolved considerably since its inception by Freud over a century ago, and a multitude of different psychoanalytic traditions and schools of theory and practice now exist. However, some of Freud's original ideas, such as the dynamic unconscious, a developmental approach, defence mechanisms, and transference and countertransference remain essential tenets of psychoanalytic thinking to this day. This Review outlines several areas within modern mental health practice in which contemporary adaptations and applications of these psychoanalytic concepts might offer helpful insights and improvements in patient care and management, and concludes with an overview of evidence-based psychoanalytically informed treatments and the links between psychoanalysis, attachment research, and neuroscience. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The incommensurability of psychoanalysis and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joan W

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that, although psychoanalysis and history have different conceptions of time and causality, there can be a productive relationship between them. Psychoanalysis can force historians to question their certainty about facts, narrative, and cause; it introduces disturbing notions about unconscious motivation and the effects of fantasy on the making of history. This was not the case with the movement for psychohistory that began in the 1970s. Then the influence of American ego-psychology on history-writing promoted the idea of compatibility between the two disciplines in ways that undercut the critical possibilities of their interaction. The work of the French historian Michel de Certeau provides theoretical insight into the uses of incommensurability, while that of Lyndal Roper demonstrates both its limits and its value for enriching historical understanding.

  8. [Gestalt therapy, extension of psychoanalysis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, A

    1980-01-01

    Gestalt therapy extends considerably psychoanalysis. 1. Transfer in psychoanalysis allows to work on the disturbed relations which the patient transfers onto his analyst, relations created by the parents and repeated now. The extended transfer in a therapeutic group of life allows to work on the fact that the patient recreates here and now the difficulties he encounters in life. 2. The game of the analyst and the encounter show that beyond transfer and projection, a real encounter may take place, a precious means to create life here and now. 3. The difference between individual therapy and group-therapy is about this: the former is centered on illness, the latter on life; the former helps to understand, the latter to live; the individual talks about facts from the past and from elsewhere and the group lives "here and now", which allows to test feelings, a powerful source of life. 4. A session of group-therapy, as developed here, allows to see how one can find a response to a need or avoid to find a response to it. 5. A comparison-table between psycho-analysis and gestalt shows the difference of method, diagnosis, therapeutic process, therapeutist's attitude and of the position of the patient. 6. Psycho-analysis is perhaps a relay after religion? Several elements make us believe this: tension in contacts, ritual, authority, protection, neutrality, guilty making. 7. To contest or contest one-self has helped me to compare the contester with the psycho-analyst: both contest society, but they don't change their behavior. The gestalt-therapeutist is in a way like a hippie: though contesting society, he brings a change to his way of life, while being closer to life.

  9. Psychoanalysis and the transition to democracy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druet, Anne-Cécile

    2017-11-01

    This article studies the links between psychoanalysis and the transition to democracy in Spain. It examines the major changes that characterized the spread of psychoanalysis in the years after Franco's death, in particular the rise of the Lacanian movement, the impact of this phenomenon on the sociocultural sphere and, in broader terms, its role in the re-emergence of psychoanalysis as a cultural object in the country. The article also analyzes factors linked to the history of psychoanalysis during the Franco dictatorship; factors that, together with the arrival of Oscar Masotta and numerous Argentinian analysts in Spain, help explain the new vision of the field that emerged during the transition.

  10. Unbinding critics: psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Dionisio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to discuss the relationship between psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking under the prism of the “unbinding” theory – earlier conceived by the psychoanalyst Andre Green –, linking it to some theories proposed by Hal Foster, art historian and art critic, where we can find the lacanian “real” as the linking concept. One could say, in this linkage made here, that both authors are dealing, in a very particular way, with a question that refers to the theory of the real (as it was conceived by Jacques Lacan, even in the case of Green it is not referred directly; Green’s theory, however, seems to discuss some kind of a regredience that could be linked to the death drive. Accessing the psychoanalytical dispositive, and using it as it is appropriated to the (art object to be interpreted, Foster, for example, advances in both the field of aesthetic reflection and in the more specific field of psychoanalysis. It should be noted that Foster’s reflection refers strictly to the post-pop images, observed mainly in the 1990’s photography. Thus, I think that this intersection between aesthetics and psychoanalysis might allow us to shed some light on a new art reading possibility towards a “non-applied” psychoanalytical paradigm, which, in my opinion, seems to be an appropriate way to understand some of the contemporary art production.

  11. Quo Vadis? The Future of Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Mauricio

    2016-12-01

    Although contemporary psychoanalysis is split into different schools and traditions, there is growing support for some of the main tenets of contemporary psychodynamic thinking from attachment theory, infant research, developmental psychopathology, new models of motivation, the neuroscience of emotions and emotional regulation, and the discovery of different implicit and explicit memory systems. These tenets, which psychodynamic clinicians of all stripes encounter in their daily work with clients, are the following: (1) that large footprints are left over from infancy and childhood which involved insensitive, intrusive, frightening, or shaming care; (2) the carryover of these relational experiences into adulthood are expressed as unconscious expectations and attributions we make of others (transference and countertransference; (3) defensive processes and emotional regulation and deregulatory patterns develop to cope with these unhealthy relations. Many findings from infant research, attachment theory, and new models of motivation and neuroscience have developed alongside the intersubjective and relational turn in psychoanalysis in the last sixty years. To different degrees this new developmental science has been incorporated into the relational field. This essay is a plea to incorporate this new science in the teaching of psychodynamic psychotherapy in order to create a dialogue among different relational and intersubjective traditions in psychoanalysis that could reduce the splintering and support efforts toward integration.

  12. A dangerous movie? Hollywood does psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Donald R; Silverman, Martin A

    2014-12-01

    After the appearance of David Cronenberg's film A Dangerous Method in 2011, dealing with the relationships of Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung and Sabina Spielrein, Dr. Donald Ferrell published: A Dangerous Method, A Film Directed by David Cronenberg: An Extended Review (Ferrell 2012) in the Journal of Religion and Health. Upon its publication, Dr. Ferrell's article was nominated for a Gradiva Award by the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis. On November 1, 2013, the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society held its annual conference at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. Dr. Billie Pivnick, a member at large of the Board of Directors of the APCS and also on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Religion and Health, persuaded the 2013 Conference Program Committee that Cronenberg's film would make an interesting subject for discussion for conference participants. To that end, Dr. Pivnick invited Dr. Ferrell, C. G. Jung Institute of New York, Dr. Steven Reisner, Coalition for an Ethical Psychology, and Dr. Martin Silverman, Training and Supervising Analyst and Supervising Child Analyst at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Education, NYU College of Medicine, Training and Supervising Analyst at the Center for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis of New Jersey, and Associate Editor of The Psychoanalytic Quarterly to serve as panel members to discuss: A Dangerous Movie? Hollywood does Psychoanalysis. Presentations on Cronenberg's film and the early history of psychoanalysis were given by Drs. Ferrell and Reisner, followed by a response to their presentations by Dr. Silverman. Dr. Pivnick chaired the session. The articles presented here were given originally at the APCS conference by Dr. Ferrell and Dr. Silverman. Dr. Reisner declined the invitation to submit his presentation for publication. Dr. Silverman's remarks were based not only on the presentation given by Dr. Ferrell at the session on A Dangerous Movie?, but also on his close and

  13. The dual impact of Freud's death and Freud's death instinct theory on the history of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Martin S

    2011-10-01

    Since I have ranged over a rather large territory in this presentation I will summarize my main points. I claim that the very way Freud created psychoanalysis made it impossible for it to continue to grow and develop as a unified movement after his death. Unlike other sciences, psychoanalysis had no way of differentiating its basic findings from what is yet to be discovered. I then reintroduced my differentiation between heretics, modifiers, and extenders, claiming that after Freud’s death there was less opportunity for heretics and more space for modifiers. I assigned a crucial role to the fact that Anna Freud did not succeed in expelling the Kleinians. In the second part of the paper I presented the view of those who made use of Freud’s death instinct theory and those who opposed it. Many analysts preferred to ignore dealing with it rather than state their opposition. My presentation was biased in favor of those who chose to work with the death instinct as a clinical reality,highlighting Ferenczi’s construction. I made the claim, so far as I know never made before, that Freud’s death instinct theory had a traumatic impact on the psychoanalytic movement because it greatly limited the belief in the curative power of our therapeutic work. After his announcement of the dual-instinct theory Freud withdrew his interest in psychoanalysis as a method of cure. By doing so he inflicted a narcissistic wound on psychoanalysis. I believe that the creativity of psychoanalysis will improve if we face this difficult chapter in our history.

  14. PsiQuaSP-A library for efficient computation of symmetric open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegg, Michael; Richter, Marten

    2017-11-24

    In a recent publication we showed that permutation symmetry reduces the numerical complexity of Lindblad quantum master equations for identical multi-level systems from exponential to polynomial scaling. This is important for open system dynamics including realistic system bath interactions and dephasing in, for instance, the Dicke model, multi-Λ system setups etc. Here we present an object-oriented C++ library that allows to setup and solve arbitrary quantum optical Lindblad master equations, especially those that are permutationally symmetric in the multi-level systems. PsiQuaSP (Permutation symmetry for identical Quantum Systems Package) uses the PETSc package for sparse linear algebra methods and differential equations as basis. The aim of PsiQuaSP is to provide flexible, storage efficient and scalable code while being as user friendly as possible. It is easily applied to many quantum optical or quantum information systems with more than one multi-level system. We first review the basics of the permutation symmetry for multi-level systems in quantum master equations. The application of PsiQuaSP to quantum dynamical problems is illustrated with several typical, simple examples of open quantum optical systems.

  15. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hua Tung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins.

  16. BETWEEN PSYCHOANALYSIS AND TESTIMONIAL SPACE: THE ANALYST AS A WITNESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondar, Jô

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this article is to think of the place of the witness as a third place that the analyst, in the clinical space of trauma, is able to sustain. According to Ferenczi, in traumatic dreams a third is already being summoned. It is not the witness of the realm of law, nor the place of the father or the symbolic law. This is a third space that can be called potential, interstitial space, indeterminate and formless, where something that at first would be incommunicable circulates and gradually takes shape. This space allows and supports the literalness of a testimonial narrative, its hesitations, paradoxes and silences. More than a trauma theory, the notion of a potential space would be the great contribution of psychoanalysis to the treatment of trauma survivors, establishing the difference between the task of a psychoanalyst and the one of a truth commission.

  17. Medical semiotics; its influence on art, psychoanalysis and Sherlock Holmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-McCann, Brenda

    2016-11-01

    Semiotics is the analysis and interpretation of signs and the basis of medicine since antiquity. It is suggested that the growth of technology has led to the virtual eclipse of the clinical examination with consequent loss of skill, empathy and patient trust. This paper views the value of medical semiotics through the method of the 19th century Italian doctor, Giovanni Morelli, which has had a significant but little recognised impact on the early development of psychoanalysis, the detective novel and art connoisseurship. Semiotics and, specifically, the linguistic semiotics of Ferdinand Saussure have been influential in the fields of the visual arts, literature and the social sciences since the 20th century. With its roots in the medical treatises of antiquity, medical semiotics should again be brought to the forefront of medical practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. [Jervis and Timpanaro on psychoanalysis and materialism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnini, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Jervis and Timpanaro have been two influential figures of the Italian culture in the second half of the Twentieth Century. They never met, although they talked to each other regularly at a distance, as they shared many interests, in particular on the topics of the scientific status of psychoanalysis and on a coherent definition of materialism. Their epistemological and ontological views are clearly connected to Italian '60s and '70s philosophical climate dominated by the discussion on Marxism, and for this reason they might seem obsolete. However, especially from Jervis' views, one can draw important suggestions for the philosophy of human sciences, in the direction of a non-reductionist "scientism".

  19. Can homeopathy learn something from psychoanalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hootegem, H

    2007-04-01

    This paper attempts to demonstrate how some insights from psychoanalysis can be useful in homeopathic treatment. I discuss three concepts: I illustrate these concepts with the case of a 23-year-old woman with chronic fatigue syndrome. (1) The working alliance: comparing medical alliance with a psychodynamic alliance. (2) The dream-function: serious somatic disorders can be the result of a blocked dream function, the restoration of the capacity to dream may lead to the disappearance of these disorders, homeopathy can help in this process. (3) The transgenerational influence: some traumatic, concealed events from the lives of ancestors can influence their descendants.

  20. Revisioning the Clinical Relationship: Heinz Kohut and the Viewpoint of Self-Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, Robert J.

    Psychoanalysis is undergoing rapid and remarkable changes in its basic metapsychology, theoretical reflections, and concrete, clinical interventions. Through self-psychology, Heinz Kohut's alternative views on the clinical relationship have contributed to this restructuring of psychoanalysis. Traditionally, mainstream psychoanalysis has viewed the…

  1. Psychoanalysis and analytic psychotherapy in the NHS--a problem for medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, G

    1986-01-01

    I question the place of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy in the National Health Service (NHS), with reference to published material; and, particularly, in relation to primary care, health economics and medical ethics. I argue that there are pressing clinical, research, economic, and ethical reasons in support of the contention that an urgent review of the extent and impact of psychoanalytic practices in the health service is called for. PMID:3735363

  2. Some thoughts on psychoanalysis and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpilka, Jaime

    2002-10-01

    The author attempts to establish a framework for understanding the contribution of psychoanalysis to ethics through examining the work of certain philosophers, especially Kant. After reviewing the development of Freudian thought and going beyond the 'psychoanalysis and/or psychiatry?' question, he asserts that the space of the psychoanalytical cure revolves around an ethical problem. Thus, the limits of analysis should be determined by the subject's capacity for developing a structure of belief in the unconscious, with the concomitant capacity to go beyond equivocation in respect of an ethical conflict that underlies all cases where psychical suffering is manifested. Indeed, only human beings are called upon to deal with an ethical paradox-equally a logical one-which could be stated thus: there is Good in Evil and Evil in Good. This ethical paradox is the consequence of human subjection to the constituent laws of the Oedipus complex, which distances the human being, in his/her dealings with Evil and with Good, from any naturalist stance. In respect of the cure, then, we must take into account that Evil does not proceed from any particular drive-based characteristic, but is rather the expression of specific subjection to an unconscious Other, towards which it directs its affects. Finally, the author proposes a principle that emerges from the preceding discussion: let us not impute to or place in the Other our own subjective splitting or pain at existing.

  3. Psychoanalysis: the sacred and the profane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Allan

    2014-06-01

    Colleagues from a variety of perspectives have written about the propensity to enshrine psychoanalytic theory. The meaning of the word "enshrine" is to cherish as sacred an idea or philosophy and protect it from change. In other words, the way we view psychoanalysis, our theories of mind and technique, become holy writ and we have divided the world of theory into the sacred and the profane. This is the kiss of death for theory, which must constantly evolve and change, but comforting for the analyst who believes he is on the side of the right, the sacred. In this paper I will discuss how our propensity to enshrine theory has had a debilitating effect on the development of psychoanalysis and, in particular, as a treatment for the most vulnerable people who seek our help. I also address the idea that movement away from enshrined positions allows us to construct different versions of reality. In this context, the notion of "action at a distance" is presented along with the attendant idea of psychoanalytic entanglement.

  4. Circumcising the Void: (de)contextualising in Complex Lacanian Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grave, Dieter

    In contemporary psychoanalysis, the true origin of the science seems to be put aside to get it in vogue with the rest of the scientific framework and psychoanalytical thinking. Although this is a defendable position from which to approach psychoanalysis, it robs it of its core. In this paper, we take the hard-core themes of psychoanalysis such as death and sex, to heart and show how they can be linked to the other sciences, such as the theory of complexity, without censoring or rephrasing the concepts or the language itself.

  5. The Interaction among Microbiota, Immunity, and Genetic and Dietary Factors Is the Condicio Sine Qua Non Celiac Disease Can Develop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pagliari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. This is a complex disorder involving both environmental and immune-genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is determined by HLA-DQ genes. Dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune systems can conceivably cause impairment of mucosal barrier function and development of localized or systemic inflammatory and autoimmune processes. Exposure to gluten is the main environmental trigger responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Thus, both genetic determination and environmental exposure to gluten are necessary for the full manifestation of CD; neither of them is sufficient alone. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that other environmental factors, including infections, alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition, and early feeding practices, might also play a role in disease development. Thus, this interaction is the condicio sine qua non celiac disease can develop. The breakdown of the interaction among microbiota, innate immunity, and genetic and dietary factors leads to disruption of homeostasis and inflammation; and tissue damage occurs. Focusing attention on this interaction and its breakdown may allow a better understanding of the CD pathogenesis and lead to novel translational avenues for preventing and treating this widespread disease.

  6. The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment in non-Astro 101 Courses II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Thomas W.; Jensen, Ellen

    2017-06-01

    The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment[1] aims to measure the pre-algebra mathematical skills that are often part of "general education" science courses like Astro 101. In four majors STEM classes, we report comparisons between QuaRCS metrics, ACT math, GPAO, and the course grade. In three of four classes QuaRCS QR score and ACT math were statistically significantly correlated (with r˜.6), however in the fourth course —a senior-level microbiology course— there was no statistically significantly correlation (in fact, rPhysics courses showed fractional sigma gains in QR, self-estimated math fluency and math importance, but not all of those increases were statistically significant. Using a QuaRCS map relating the questions to skill areas, we found graph reading, percentages, and proportional reasoning to be the most misunderstood skills in all four courses.[1] QuaRCS, Follette, et al.,2015, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1936-4660.8.2.2

  7. A history of homosexuality and organized psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Today the Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry welcomes its gay and lesbian members. Yet at the time of its 1956 founding, organized psychoanalytic attitudes toward homosexuality could be reasonably characterized as hostile. First there was a transition from Freud's early views of homosexuality as immature to later neofreudian theories that pathologized same-sex attractions and behavior. Following the 1973 decision of the American Psychiatric Association to remove homosexuality from the DSM, homosexuality is now more commonly regarded as a normal variant of human sexuality. The history of psychoanalytic attitudes toward homosexuality reinforces the impression that psychoanalytic theories cannot be divorced from the political, cultural, and personal contexts in which they are formulated. This history also shows that analysts can take positions that either facilitate or obstruct tolerance and acceptance.

  8. Weaving child psychoanalysis: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinich, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Using the metaphor of a fabric woven from many threads, this paper describes nine of the many conceptual strands that have contributed to the development of child psychoanalysis over its first century. It notes the unfortunate isolation (sometimes self-imposed) of child analysis from related fields (including adult analysis) and argues that we must recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of our psychoanalytic tools if we are to collaborate with and profit from the work of nonanalytic colleagues. It closes with the suggestion that the continued weaving of child analysis will require the creation of new looms, structures that are able to support a new generation of child analysts and the continued elaboration of the field.

  9. Psychoanalysis traumatized: the legacy of the Holocaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Psychoanalysis is a survivor of the Holocaust. It was founded and flourished in central European centers that would be destroyed by the Nazis. A core group of refugees who lived through persecution and exile were instrumental in rebuilding their movement on alien shores. They had no opportunity to mourn the loss of their culture or their leader, Freud, whose death was overshadowed by the cataclysmic upheaval around them. Though its trauma has been dissociated, it is represented in psychoanalytic ideas and enacted in institutions within the context of delayed or incomplete mourning. For example, authoritarianism in psychoanalytic institutions will be explored as a reliving of the trauma of both fascism and exile, and not merely typical group psychology. Further evidence of the impact of dissociated trauma includes the astonishing scotoma for actual events in treatment of Holocaust survivors; the extreme privileging of infantile fantasy over reality, and attention to childhood neurosis at the expense of adult catastrophic events.

  10. The dream between neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, M

    2004-07-01

    The dream is tackled sometimes from the neurobiological viewpoint, sometimes from the neuropsychological angle, or from the positions of experimental and psychoanalytical psychology. Interest in dreams started with psychoanalysis in 1900, and 53 years later the discovery of REM sleep by Aserinski and Kleitman, and subsequent psychophysiological findings took the dream into the realm of biology. The dichotomous model of REM and non-REM sleep is described, as a basis for thought-like activity (non-REM sleep) and dreaming (REM sleep). This led to Hobson and McCarley's theory of activation-synthesis, suggesting that the mind while dreaming is simply the brain self-activated in REM sleep. Psychophysiological research has shown that people dream in all phases of sleep, from falling asleep to waking, but that the characteristics of the dreams may differ in the different phases. Bio-imaging studies indicate that during REM sleep there is activation of the pons, the amygdala bilaterally, and the anterior cingulate cortex, and disactivation of the posterior cingulate cortex and the prefrontal cortex. The images suggest there is a neuroanatomical frame within which dreams can be generated and then forgotten. Psychoanalysis studies the dream from a completely different angle. Freud believed it was the expression of hallucinatory satisfaction of repressed desires. Today it is interpreted as the expression of a representation of the transference in the hic et nunc of the session. At the same time it also has symbol-generating functions which provide an outlet by which affective experiences and fantasies and defences stored as parts of an unrepressed unconscious in the implicit memory can be represented in pictorial terms, then thought and rendered verbally. From the psychoanalytical point of view, the dream transcends neurobiological knowledge, and looks like a process of internal activation that is only apparently chaotic, but is actually rich in meanings, arising from the

  11. Present study of dreaming : Comparing brain science with psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 修平; 岡本, 祐子

    2013-01-01

    Dream has been brought the stage of scientific research from Freud. After the discovery of REM sleep, The research of dream is shifted from the psychoanalysistic stage to the stage of the view of brain science. Hobson thought there is no sense that interpret dream from the view of brain science, so, he criticized the way of Fruedian's psychoanalysis. However, Solms tried to reexamine the psychoanalysis from the view of brain science. Now, the research of dream recall frequency is done by the ...

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  13. FAROESTE CABOCLO: PSYCHOANALYSIS INTERPRETATION OF THE SONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Teixeira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to integrate the psychoanalytic concepts of discontent, violence, aggressiveness and enemy with the acclaimed song “Faroeste Caboclo”, an important legacy of Brazilian Pop-Rock from the 1980s. The song narrates the saga of João de Santo Cristo, an orphan whose life story was characterized by uneasiness, racial discrimination, and difficulty to deal with authority figures, which turned him into a renowned drug dealer. With an ending marked by passional tragedy, culminating with the death of all the main characters, the plot is traversed by violence, aggressiveness and hate. This demonstrates how the story unfolds to the field of alterity through the emergence of friendship and enmity, allowing a thorough discussion and comprehension of João de Santo Cristo’s story. Assuming that music is both an individual form of expression and a form of apprehension and description of social reality, this study sought to comprehend the psychic dimensions demonstrated in the lyrics, which narrate a story that is very similar to real life stories of many adolescents involved in violent criminality in Brazil. The main objective was to discuss the possible meanings of these lyrics, hence promoting a constructive dialog between psychoanalysis and culture.

  14. Paediatrics and psychoanalysis--Miss Anna Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Miss Anna Freud died during the winter at the age of 86. She had been a pioneer in the understanding of children through psychoanalysis and a great champion of the rights of children. Her life began in Vienna as the youngest child of Sigmund Freud, and her early work with children was in Austria. In 1938, because of the Nazi régime and even though she was nursing her father during his terminal illness, she had to escape with him to London. Her work with homeless children and with those in residential nurseries in London during the second world war is well known, as is her work on child development and psychopathology in the postwar years. But one less well known aspect of her life that was of immense importance to a few fortunate British paediatricians was the 'paediatric group' that she ran for over a quarter of a century and which Dr Christine Cooper recalled at the memorial meeting in London earlier this year. PMID:6344806

  15. Residue behavior and risk assessment of mixed formulation of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr in chieh-qua under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian Xiang; Liu, Cong Yun; Lu, Da Hai; Chen, Jia Jia; Deng, Yi Cai; Wang, Fu Hua

    2015-10-01

    A simple and rapid method based on high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr residues in chieh-qua. Field trials were designed to investigate the dissipation and terminal residue behavior of the mixed formulation of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr in chieh-qua in Guangzhou and Nanning areas. Risk assessment was performed by calculating the risk quotient (RQ) values. The developed analytical method exhibited recoveries of 89.9-110.3% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.8-12.5% at the spiked levels of 0.01, 0.10, and 1.00 mg/kg. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.003 mg/kg, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.01 mg/kg for both imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr. It was found that the half-lives of imidacloprid in chieh-qua under field conditions were 3.3 and 3.5 days in Guangzhou and Nanning at a dose of 180 g ai/ha, while the half-lives of chlorfenapyr were 3.3 and 2.6 days, respectively. The terminal residues of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr were from 0.01 to 0.21 mg/kg and from 0.01 to 0.46 mg/kg, respectively. Results of dietary exposure assessment showed that the RQ values were much lower than 1, indicating that the risk of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr applied in chieh-qua was negligible to human health under recommended dosage and good agricultural practices. The proposed study would provide guidance for safe and reasonable use of imidacloprid and chlorfenapyr in chieh-qua cultivation in China.

  16. Psychoanalysis and Humanism: A Review and Critical Examination of Integrationist Efforts with Some Proposed Resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James T.

    2000-01-01

    Critically reviews efforts at theoretical integration of psychoanalysis and humanism along the lines of F. Pine's (1990) four psychologies of psychoanalysis. Concludes that psychoanalysis and humanism have certain compatible features, but that they generally represent opposing vantage points in the study of subjectivity. Provides recommendations…

  17. Further thoughts on dualism, science, and the use of medication in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoiskin, M H

    2001-01-01

    In response to Deborah Cabaniss's article, "Beyond Dualism: Psychoanalysis and Medication in the 21st Century," the author further considers the differences between the aims of symptom reduction and psychic integration, the concept of mind-body dualism, and the nature of scientific inquiry as they pertain to the use of medication in psychoanalytic therapies. He warns against the collapsing of concepts, aided by a misapplication of science, with respect to how we listen to, organize, and respond to clinical material. He argues that only when such scrutiny occurs can the important and challenging questions pertaining to the use of medication in psychoanalytic therapies be meaningfully considered.

  18. The aim of psychoanalysis in theory and in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J

    1996-12-01

    The aims of psychoanalysis are reviewed in terms of theories of mental function and structure. The theory of mental conflict remains the central theory of classical psychoanalysis but has been deepened and supplemented by newer theories. In particular the theory of projective identification has radically altered our view of mental structure and function and has allowed us to reformulate the aims of psychoanalysis in terms of the re-acquisition and re-integration of projected parts of the self. The central role of mourning in this process is discussed, and some of the obstacles to progress are reviewed. It is suggested that oedipal resentments may play a central role in the creation of impasse.

  19. [Psychoanalysis and Psychiatrie-Enquete: expert interviews and document analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhner, Felicitas Petra; Fangerau, Heiner; Becker, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to analyse the perception of the role of psychoanalysis and psychoanalysts in the coming about of the Psychiatrie-Enquete in the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany). Methods We performed a qualitative content analysis of expert interviews with persons involved in the Enquete (or witnessing the events as mental health professionals active at the time), a selective literature review and an analysis of documents on the Enquete process. Results Expert interviews, relevant literature and documents point to a role of psychoanalysis in the Enquete process. Psychoanalysts were considered to have been effective in the run-up to the Enquete and the work of the commission. Conclusion Psychoanalysis and a small number of psychoanalysts were perceived as being relevant in the overall process of the Psychiatrie-Enquete in West Germany. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Freud's Jewish identity and psychoanalysis as a science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Arnold D

    2014-12-01

    Ludwik Fleck, the Polish philosopher of science, maintained that scientific discovery is influenced by social, political, historical, psychological, and personal factors. The determinants of Freud's Jewish identity are examined from this Fleckian perspective, as is the impact of that complex identity on his creation of psychoanalysis as a science. Three strands contributing to his Jewish identity are identified and explored: his commitment to the ideal of Bildung, the anti-Semitism of the times, and his "godlessness." Finally, the question is addressed of what it means that psychoanalysis was founded by a Jew. For Freud, psychoanalysis was a kind of liberation philosophy, an attempt to break free of his ethnic and religious inheritance. Yet it represented at the same time his ineradicable relationship with that inheritance. It encapsulated both the ambivalence of his Jewish identity and the creativity of his efforts to resolve it. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  1. The bridge between two worlds: psychoanalysis and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Stefano; Di Tizio, Laura; Dezi, Sira; Armuzzi, Silvia; Pelaccia, Simona; Valchera, Alessandro; Sepede, Gianna; Girinelli, Gabriella; De Berardis, Domenico; Martinotti, Giovanni; Gambi, Francesco; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, a connection between psychoanalysis and neuroscience has been sought. The meeting point between these two branches is represented by neuropsychoanalysis. The goal of the relationship between psychoanalysis and neuroscience is to test psychoanalytic hypotheses in the human brain, using a scientific method. A literature search was conducted on May 2015. PubMed and Scopus databases were used to find studies for the inclusion in the systematic review. Common results of the studies investigated are represented by a reduction, a modulation, or a normalization of the activation patterns found after the psychoanalytic therapy. New findings in the possible and useful relationship between psychoanalysis and neuroscience could change the modalities of relating to patients for psychoanalysts and the way in which neuroscientists plan their research. Researchers should keep in mind that in any scientific research that has to do with people, neuroscience and a scientific method cannot avoid subjective interpretation.

  2. Ensuring consistency and persistence to the Quality Information Model - The role of the GeoViQua Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. The project will also contribute to the definition of a quality label, the GEOLabel, reflecting scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs. The concept of Quality Information is very broad. When talking about the quality of a product, this is not limited to geophysical quality but also includes concepts like mission quality (e.g. data coverage with respect to planning). In general, it provides an indication of the overall fitness for use of a specific type of product. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). A very important issue concerns the association between the quality reports and the affected products that are target of the report. This association is usually achieved by means of a Product Identifier (PID), but actually just

  3. Dante, psychoanalysis, and the (erotic) meaning of meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, E R

    1990-01-01

    The author observes a resemblance between (1) the "polysemous" technique of imputing meaning to reality practiced in medieval biblical studies and in Dante's writing and (2) the technique of interpretation in contemporary psychoanalysis. She explores the roots of this resemblance in the development of intellectual history and provides examples of polysemous meanings in Dante's Divine Comedy, which is in part an autobiographical journey of self-reflection and self-realization (like psychoanalysis). She then suggests some implications of this resemblance for contemporary psychiatry.

  4. Less Citation, Less Dissemination: The Case of French Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Potier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We contribute to inquiries about the visibility of globalized psychoanalytic research in the digital era (cf. Stepansky 2009 by adopting a comparative perspective on a specific geographic area of historical importance for psychoanalysis: France. The largely digital globalized psychoanalytic research field relies on standard bibliometric measures of journal quality (Impact Factor, SJR, etc.,which depend on the number and type of academic cites received by a journal. Thus, citing shapes academic publishing space by differentially valuing its component journals. Conversely, not to cite practically means not to engage with the field. Hence, we took citedness rate as a proxy for global visibility.By drawing on an original database created by one of us, we determined the global citational visibility of French vs. Anglo- American psychoanalytic productions (respective global outreach; and we related it to a first look at French vs. Anglo-American citation practices (geographic breakdown of article cites.We found that,on a 15 - year period,the global outreach(citedness rate of French articles is ten times smaller than that of Anglo - American articles;and that French articles are cited in Anglo - American journals five times more than Anglo - American articles in French journals– which in turn don’ t seem to cite their French peers very often.These specific French citation practices could be explained by the implicit modes of reference at work in clinical settings shaped by rich theoretical and clinical local legacies.We conclude by considering that this situation presents French psychoanalytic research with a formidable opportunityfor increased citational visibility.

  5. Geborgenheid as ’n sine qua non vir opvoedende onderwys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Oosthuizen

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Security as a sine qua non for education Learner security is an imperative for education. Whereas an environment of security is conducive to learning, the absence of it is destructive of effective learning. Some of the factors that are to be taken into account in order to create a sound environment of security for the learner are the following: • the physical well-being of the learner; • the mental well-being of the learner liberated from anxiety and fear and • the competence and proficiency of the teacher. In many respects contemporary South African education is characterised by an absence of security and surity. Some of the reasons for this situation are instances of physical and mental insecurity such as a prevailing culture of physical violence, drug abuse and an alarming rise of contagious diseases in schools. This article focuses on these and other factors responsible for instances of an insecure learning environment in South African education. This article also seeks to find possible solutions towards securing the learning environment of the learner.

  6. Parity violation constraints using cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from 2006 and 2007 observations by the QUaD polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E Y S; Ade, P; Bock, J; Bowden, M; Brown, M L; Cahill, G; Castro, P G; Church, S; Culverhouse, T; Friedman, R B; Ganga, K; Gear, W K; Gupta, S; Hinderks, J; Kovac, J; Lange, A E; Leitch, E; Melhuish, S J; Memari, Y; Murphy, J A; Orlando, A; Piccirillo, L; Pryke, C; Rajguru, N; Rusholme, B; Schwarz, R; O'Sullivan, C; Taylor, A N; Thompson, K L; Turner, A H; Zemcov, M

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 degrees +/-0.82 degrees (random) +/-0.5 degrees (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200

  7. Luella Cole, Sidney Pressey, and Educational Psychoanalysis, 1921-1931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrina, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    In addition to contemporary boundaries and identities of educational psychology is the historiography of progressive education. Historians have too readily played into the hands of practitioners, accepting antagonisms between Freud and Thorndike, psychoanalysis and behaviorism, liberty and discipline. In its final analysis, this article embraces…

  8. Between Psychoanalysis and Pedagogy: Scenes of Rapprochement and Alienation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzman, Deborah P.

    2013-01-01

    With the question of what is between psychoanalysis and pedagogy, this essay presents a psychoanalytic frame for thinking about the study of uncertainty in teaching and learning from the vantage of the education of the author and her notion of "difficult knowledge." I review my body of research through these dilemmas to picture a theory of…

  9. What Is Protest? Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Methods of Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that feminism has recognised psychoanalysis to be a theory with direct application to the understanding of sexism for over 50 years, the application of psychoanalytic thinking to feminist activism has yet to be significantly realised. Using the work of Julia Kristeva, sexism is described as a symptom of an intolerable situation…

  10. Freudian Notion of Psychoanalysis: Its Implications in Contemporary Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Muhammad Afzal

    2017-01-01

    The author has engaged in a critical review of Frued's notion of psychoanalysis and its vitality in teaching. Illustrating from Freud's own assertions and through the interpretations of the later critics, the author has pointed out certain noticeable pitfalls and, or incapacities of contemporary teaching practices. The forces of aggression and sex…

  11. A historical perspective on the collaboration between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvagnat, François; Wiss, Matthias; Clément, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present and discuss the connections between psychoanalysis and neuroscience from a historical viewpoint. We start by examining how Sigmund Freud can be viewed as a pioneer in the interaction between these two fields. Freud was himself a neurologist and had maintained an interest in biology as he developed the key concepts of psychoanalysis. His ideas regarding psychosomatics are described. We will also explore how the concept of drive is essential to the connection between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. Then, we describe several key actors and historical events and characters at the interface of these two fields, namely Sándor Radó Lawrence S. Kubie and Mc Culloch, the debates that took place during the Macy conferences, as well as the positions of Jacques Lacan, George L. Engel, and Eric Kandel. Finally, we present a synthesis of the main fields in which the connections between psychoanalysis and neuroscience are already fruitful, and those where they should be developed: the classification of mental diseases, the link between the scientific and psychic dimensions, therapeutics, the organization of the body, intersubjectivity, the subjective division and ambivalence, as well as transferential effects like such as the placebo and nocebo effects. In the conclusion, we advocate several strategic alliances and underscore the complementarity between rigorous scientific experimentation and the individualized psychoanalytic approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How Oedipus falsifies Popper: psychoanalysis as a normative science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, M L

    1983-05-01

    The scientific status of psychoanalysis has been the subject of continual debate. Influential philosophers of science have challenged the form of its theories and the nature of the evidence offered on their behalf. Some have concluded that the theories are beyond testing--i.e., they can neither be confirmed nor refuted, and psychoanalysis is thus intrinsically unscientific, akin to pseudosciences such as astrology. From that body of criticism, I have chosen for examination and rebuttal the issue of falsifiability. I refute the charge that psychoanalysis is not scientific because its theories are not "falsifiable." On the contrary, I show that psychoanalysis contains theories which make strong and unequivocal statements that are subject to the test of possible falsification. This capacity has been concealed and the falsifiability criticism rendered plausible because of the normative judgments which are latent in discussions of human development and human society. In explicating these judgments, I will move from the philosophy of science to the anthropology and sociology of science (and of the professions). The normative character of psychoanalytic science reinforces the ethical code of the therapeutic profession, a combination which imposes a disciplinary rigidity of the theoretical system.

  13. Anomalous experiences, trauma and symbolization processes at the frontier between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eRabeyron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during or after traumatic situations.

  14. Anomalous Experiences, Trauma, and Symbolization Processes at the Frontiers between Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeyron, Thomas; Loose, Tianna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during, or after traumatic situations. PMID:26732646

  15. Some thoughts on the diffusion of psychoanalysis: the group dimension, ethics and the sense of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, Albert

    2011-12-01

    In this paper the author questions some of the ways in which psychoanalysis is passed on to the wider public, one of which is sometimes evocative of the sales promotion of a consumer product in contemporary society. This methodology does not give sufficiently deep prior thought to the eventual consequences of side effects. The detailed exposition of clinical cases, for example, raises sensitive ethical issues, even when anonymity is preserved. Although it is true that making information about Freud's theories more widely available may indeed encourage people to think about training as psychoanalysts, it is noticeable that this process is sometimes considered to be a form of training in itself. Some participants feel that acquiring a psychoanalytical vocabulary and reading clinical reports form a sufficient basis for practising thereafter as psychotherapists, both in institutional contexts and in private practice. The absence of group work on the part of the organizers might explain why closer study is not made of the methodologies of transmission and the different levels that it involves. This is sometimes due to the absence of a common object, formed within and by the group, and to the emergence of manic defences in the group. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. Tractable flux-driven temperature, density, and rotation profile evolution with the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Casson, F. J.; Angioni, C.; Bonanomi, N.; Camenen, Y.; Garbet, X.; Garzotti, L.; Görler, T.; Gürcan, O.; Koechl, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Linder, O.; van de Plassche, K.; Strand, P.; Szepesi, G.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Quasilinear turbulent transport models are a successful tool for prediction of core tokamak plasma profiles in many regimes. Their success hinges on the reproduction of local nonlinear gyrokinetic fluxes. We focus on significant progress in the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 014036), which employs an approximated solution of the mode structures to significantly speed up computation time compared to full linear gyrokinetic solvers. Optimisation of the dispersion relation solution algorithm within integrated modelling applications leads to flux calculations × {10}6-7 faster than local nonlinear simulations. This allows tractable simulation of flux-driven dynamic profile evolution including all transport channels: ion and electron heat, main particles, impurities, and momentum. Furthermore, QuaLiKiz now includes the impact of rotation and temperature anisotropy induced poloidal asymmetry on heavy impurity transport, important for W-transport applications. Application within the JETTO integrated modelling code results in 1 s of JET plasma simulation within 10 h using 10 CPUs. Simultaneous predictions of core density, temperature, and toroidal rotation profiles for both JET hybrid and baseline experiments are presented, covering both ion and electron turbulence scales. The simulations are successfully compared to measured profiles, with agreement mostly in the 5%-25% range according to standard figures of merit. QuaLiKiz is now open source and available at www.qualikiz.com.

  17. [Psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic oriented psychotherapy: differences and similarities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler-Schülein, Hemma; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    Psychoanalysis as well as Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy derived from Psychoanalysis are efficient methods offered by the Austrian health care system in the treatment for anxiety, depression, personality disorders, neurotic and somatoform disorders. In both methods similar basic treatment techniques are applied. Therefore differentiation between both treatment options often is made pragmatically by the frequency of sessions or the use of the couch and seems to be vague in the light of empirical studies. This overview focuses a potential differentiation-the objective and subjective dimensions of the indication process. Concerning the latter it is to investigate, if reflective functioning and ego-integration can be enhanced in the patient during the interaction process between patient and psychoanalyst. Empirical data underline the necessity to investigate to which extent externalizing defence processes are used and to integrate such factors into the decision and indication process. Differing treatment aims display another possibility to differentiate psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy aims for example more at circumscribed problem-foci, the capability for self-reflexion is one of the most prominent treatment effects in psychoanalysis that results in on-going symptom reduction and resilience. The most prominent differentiation lies in the utilization of technical neutrality. Within Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy neutrality has sometimes to be suspended in order to stop severe acting out. Empirical evidence is given concerning the differentiation between psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy, that treatment efficacy is not correlated with the duration of the treatment, but with the frequency of sessions. Results give support to the assumption that the dosage of specific and appropriate psychoanalytic techniques facilitates sustained therapeutic change.

  18. [Psychoanalysis is a precious thread, fragile but precious": Vittorio Benussi and the Inventory of psychoanalysis (1926-1927)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizzino, Antonino

    2008-01-01

    The lessons of psychoanalysis held by Vittorio Benussi in Padua between 1926 and 1927 reveal the other aspect of his interests: that which regards psychoanalysis and its method. These unpublished lessons, which we are printing here for the first time, are preserved in the historical Archives of Italian psychology of the Università di Milano-Bicocca. I have assigned to them the title of Inventario di psicanalisi (Inventory of Psychoanalysis) for their character, unprecedented in the Italy of the 1920s, of a first record of the lexical and theoretical world of psychoanalysis. Since they were not intended for publication, the lessons were written without the urgency of ordering facts and interpretations, and without resorting to the rhetoric of linguistic conventions. A reading of them makes evident how the Benussian attempt to integrate experimental psychology and analytic method is still unresolved. In these pages everything is shown in an incipient stage, in a contracted and intricate prose; while things are complicated by the hermetism of the style, the terminological oscillations, the theoretical density; and yet, these unpublished notes should be read like a palimpsest in which each word has been written, erased, and rewritten, in a work that remains unique in twentieth-century European psychology.

  19. Further evidence for the case against neuropsychoanalysis: How Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou's response to our critique confirms the irrelevance and harmfulness to psychoanalysis of the contemporary neuroscientific trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Rachel B; Carmeli, Zvi

    2015-12-01

    In their paper "The case for neuropsychoanalysis" Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou (2015) respond to our critique of neuropsychoanalysis (Blass & Carmeli, 2007), setting forth evidence and arguments which, they claim, demonstrate why neuroscience is relevant and important for psychoanalysis and hence why dialogue between the fields is necessary. In the present paper we carefully examine their evidence and arguments and demonstrate how and why their claim is completely mistaken. In fact, Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou's paper only confirms our position on the irrelevance and harmfulness to psychoanalysis of the contemporary neuroscientific trend. We show how this trend perverts the essential nature of psychoanalysis and of how it is practiced. The clinical impact and its detrimental nature is highlighted by discussion of clinical material presented by Yovell et al (2015). In the light of this we argue that the debate over neuropsychoanalysis should be of interest to all psychoanalysts, not only those concerned with biology or interdisciplinary dialogue. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  20. Re-reading "Little Hans": Freud's case study and the question of competing paradigms in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Psychoanalysts have long recognized the complex interaction between clinical data and formal psychoanalytic theories. While clinical data are often used to provide "evidence" for psychoanalytic paradigms, the theoretical model used by the analyst also structures what can and cannot be seen in the data. This delicate interaction between theory and clinical data can be seen in the history of interpretations of Freud's "Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy" ("Little Hans"). Freud's himself revised his reading of the case in 1926, after which a number of psychoanalysts--including Melanie Klein, Jacques Lacan, and John Bowlby--reinterpreted the case in the light of their particular models of the mind. These analysts each found "evidence" for their theoretical model within this classic case study, and in doing so they illuminated aspects of the case that had previously been obscured, while also revealing a great deal about the shifting preoccupations of psychoanalysis as a field.

  1. Interface between psychoanalysis and speech language and hearing sciences: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinalva Neves Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to verify the Brazilian and international scientific productions by correlating Speech Language and Hearing Sciences and Psychoanalysis. A literature review was performed using the databases BVS, Scielo, Scopus and PubMed. The used descriptors were “Fonoaudiologia”, “Psicanálise”, “Comunicação”, “Speech Therapy”, “Psychoanalysis” and “Communication”, identifying 65 full articles between the years 1980 and 2015. The analysis was performed using a “Protocol for article classification”. It was verified that Original Articles are the most published type, SCOPUS and BVS being the most common databases. There is a predominance of articles in the Portuguese language, followed by English, French and German. Several specialties of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences presented interface with Psychoanalysis, especially Language and Neuropsychology. The studies were published mainly in Psychology journals, also found in the area of audiology and interdisciplinary area. This review showed the psychoanalytic interference in speech language and hearing clinic, highlighting the need for further studies correlating both areas that may contribute to the work of these professionals and, consequently, enable an improvement in the quality of life of psychic subjects.

  2. Some key features in the evolution of self psychology and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosshage, James L

    2009-04-01

    Psychoanalysis, as every science and its application, has continued to evolve over the past century, especially accelerating over the last 30 years. Self psychology has played a constitutive role in that evolution and has continued to change itself. These movements have been supported and augmented by a wide range of emergent research and theory, especially that of cognitive psychology, infant and attachment research, rapid eye movement and dream research, psychotherapy research, and neuroscience. I present schematically some of what I consider to be the key features of the evolution of self psychology and their interconnection with that of psychoanalysis at large, including the revolutionary paradigm changes, the new epistemology, listening/experiencing perspectives, from narcissism to the development of the self, the new organization model of transference, the new organization model of dreams, and the implicit and explicit dimensions of analytic work. I conclude with a focus on the radical ongoing extension of the analyst's participation in the analytic relationship, using, as an example, the co-creation of analytic love, and providing several brief clinical illustrations. The leading edge question guiding my discussion is "How does analytic change occur?"

  3. The gap between: being and knowing in Zen Buddhism and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P C

    2001-12-01

    The author discusses various relationships derived from the image of gap, precipice, and abyss with specific emphasis on interacting dynamics between being and knowing as explicated in the Zen Buddhist teachings of Hui-neng and in the psychoanalytic writings of Wilfred Bion. While of significant value to psychoanalysis, it is argued that symbolic meanings can occlude the actuality of the analysand's or of the spiritual seeker's affective experiencing, particularly concerning the human tendency to concretize experiential states engendered through meditation and/or the psychoanalytic encounter. The author draws from Matte-Blanco's explication of symmetrical and asymmetrical perceptual modalities to discuss the fluid nature of spiritual experiencing, paradoxical coexistence of ultimate and relative realities and reciprocal dynamics and identities between states of experiencing that might otherwise appear opposed. The primacy of experiencing for both disciplines, particularly concerning the experiencing subject's momentary state of consciousness, forms a central theme for both Zen and psychoanalysis. Brief clinical vignettes support and illuminate the author's points.

  4. Foucault and the 'Anti-Oedipus movement': psychoanalysis as disciplinary power.

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    Basaure, Mauro

    2009-09-01

    What psychiatry was for the anti-psychiatry movement, psychoanalysis was for the French 'Anti-Oedipus movement' represented by Robert Castel, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. Until now, the contribution of Foucault to this critical movement has been little known. In this paper I reconstruct in a systematic and exhaustive way Foucault's critique of psychoanalysis and, in particular, of the Oedipus-complex theory. I demonstrate that this critique presupposes a very specific epistemology and social theory. On an epistemological level, Foucault focuses on the power effects of psychoanalysis as a discourse of subjectivity. On a social-theoretical level, Foucault assumes a functionalist conception of society. These two aspects of Foucault's critique of psychoanalysis have not been adequately recognized in the discussion about his relationship to psychoanalysis (Derrida, Miller, Whitebook, among others). I argue that a fruitful dialogue between a Foucault-inspired critical social theory and psychoanalysis can take place only if these two distinct aspects are taken into account.

  5. Psychoanalysis and homosexuality: do we need a new theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchincloss, E L; Vaughan, S C

    2001-01-01

    No need exists, it is argued, for a new psychoanalytic theory of homosexuality. Certainly psychoanalysis should not be expected to generate such a theory using its own methodology alone. The preoccupation with producing such a theory avoids more important questions about psychoanalytic theory building raised by an examination of the long relationship between psychoanalysis and homosexuality. These questions concern the problems related to using psychoanalytic methodology (1) to construct categories (including the categories normal and abnormal), (2) to construct causal theory (the problems include the limitations of psychoanalytic developmental theory and a long-standing confusion between psychoanalytic developmental theory, psychoanalytic genetic reconstruction, and psychodynamics), and (3) to identify "bedrock." Finally, the question is addressed of what might be needed that is new in the psychoanalytic approach to homosexuality.

  6. [Dynamic psychology and psychoanalysis in Giovanni Jervis' thought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Nino

    2012-01-01

    As against the background of an unconditioned reception of Darwinian theory and its developments, mainly in the field of ethology, a reflection deploys itself on complex theoretical themes, such as identity, consciousness and motivation. This leads Jervis to deal not only and not as much with psychoanalysis, as with a broader theoretical framework, labelled as "dynamic psychology". Contributions from different fields of contemporary psychological knowledge, particularly from cognitive sciences, personality and social psychology and developmental observations converge into this new framework. A proposal is made that is characterized by a peculiar critical sensitivity and is open to future developments. It is in this new light that Jervis was able to carry out a retrospective recognition of the century of Psychoanalysis.

  7. Films from the Couch: Film Theory and Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sangro Colón

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available   Different disciplines have contributed to weaving a theory of psychoanalysis in the cinema: ranging from the loans from anthropology and experimental psychology, to proposals belonging to the specific sphere of film theory, such as Filmology, Text Analysis or Feminist Theory in films. In all cases, the aim is to establish a relationship between the significance structure that governs the cinema and psychology, so as to confirm that the cinema’s system of representation is modelled on our unconscious psychological apparatus, as was explained by the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan, among others. The arrival of psychoanalysis in film thought forges the idea that considers the cinema as an auxiliary psychological device capable of making us subjects and submerging us in the emotions in play in the conflicts proposed by any audiovisual story.

  8. Defenses and morality: Adam Smith, Sigmund Freud, and contemporary psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrinetti, Paul A; Özler, Sule

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we follow the development and transmission of moral learning from Adam Smith's impartial spectator to Sigmund Freud's superego and then to contemporary psychoanalysis. We argue that defenses are an integral component in the acquisition of any moral system. Elaborating on this argument, we assert that there is a progression from defensive systems that are "closed" to defensive systems that are "open," as defined in a recent work by Novick and Novick. The former system is "static, avoids reality, and is characterized by power dynamics, sadomasochism, and omnipotent defense." The latter, on the other hand, is a system that allows for "joy, creativity, spontaneity, love and it is attuned to reality." Furthermore, while Smith and Freud's systems are more one-person systems of defense, contemporary psychoanalysis has moved to more of a two-person system.

  9. Trauma and Contemporary Forms of Subjectivity: Contributions of Argentine Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volnovich, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    This paper offers arguments to justify the relevance of psychoanalysis-psychoanalyses-in present-day Argentina and reflects on the stance taken by psychoanalysts with different theoretical perspectives in the face of the havoc wreaked by state terror (1976-1983). To this end, the author focuses on the pioneers' traits, the significance of the Argentine Psychoanalytic Association in the 1950s and 1960s, and the impact of the departure of the Plataforma Group in 1971. The establishment of the latter opened the way for the development of a psychoanalysis tied to popular movements, sensitive to social conflict, and close to human rights organizations. The author explores both on psychoanalysts' intervention to address the social trauma resulting from the theft of babies during the dictatorship, and on their relationship with Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo.

  10. Japanese psychoanalysis and Buddhism: the making of a relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    This article explores the making of a relationship between Japanese psychoanalysis and Buddhism, in the life and work of Kosawa Heisaku. Kosawa did not work out the compatibility of psychoanalysis with Buddhism in abstract, theoretical terms; rather, he understood them as two different articulations of the same practical approach to living well. He saw this approach in action in the lives of Freud and Shinran, the latter a thirteenth-century Japanese Buddhist reformer. For Kosawa, both individuals exemplified the 'true religious state of mind', at the achievement of which Kosawa understood psychoanalytic psychotherapy as ideally aiming. This article uses newly available documentary and interview material to examine the historical dynamics both of Kosawa's work in this area and of the broader 'religion-psy dialogue' of which it is an early example. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Enemies of the Unconscious: Modernist Resistances to Psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Beauchamp, Tamara Armande

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation addresses and hopes to complicate the reception history of modernist literary productions as wholly positive reactions to Freudian psychoanalysis. Through close readings of fictional, poetic, epistolary, and expository texts, historical analysis, and an examination of the iterative development of psychoanalytic and other critical theories, these chapters expose a much more complicated counter-narrative of mutual resistance and ambivalence between the discourses of psychoanal...

  12. Letter to Freud: on the plight of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Dinah M

    2011-12-01

    In the form of a letter, the writer communicates to Freud her appreciation for the incomparable richness and complexity of the psychoanalytic enterprise in its century-long evolution from classical, Freudian origins to new developments in theory and technique. At the same time, concern is expressed about the continuity and survival of psychoanalysis in a cultural milieu that has absorbed its once radical ideas about sexuality and unconscious motivation while resisting its viability as a method of treatment.

  13. Psychoanalysis on the couch: can neuroscience provide the answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelli, Andrea

    2010-12-01

    Over a century after Freud's attempt to establish psychoanalysis as a natural science, there is renewed interest in the integration of psychoanalytic and neuroscientific findings within a single theoretical and experimental framework. However, it is important that any intellectual exchange is not motivated only by declining confidence in psychoanalytic theory and practice or awareness of the rising fortunes of the brain sciences. The present paper considers three possible ways in which psychoanalysis and neuroscience might be integrated. These include the investigation of the neurological organisation of psychoanalytically defined phenomena; the evaluation of psychoanalytic theories based on their neurobiological evidence; and the use of neuroimaging techniques to assess the progress and outcome of psychoanalytic treatment. The author argues that these exercises are unlikely to provide psychoanalysis with the "unlimited opportunities for overcoming its uncertainties and doubts" that some have anticipated. For instance, the argument that mapping psychoanalytically defined phenomena in the brain may provide biological validity to these phenomena should be considered an expression of logical confusion; the evaluation of psychoanalytic theories based on their biological evidence is critically dependent on speculative interpretation of what the theories predict at neuronal level; and the supposedly objective evaluation of the progress and outcome of psychoanalytic treatment on the basis of neurobiological data relies on the subjective reports of the patient and analyst. In light of this conclusion, there are a number of outstanding questions which remain to be addressed, including whether psychoanalysis should adhere to scientific canons and whether this would necessarily require an experimental methodology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Contribution of psychoanalysis to geriatric care for institutionalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charazac, Pierre-Marie

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of psychoanalysis to geriatric care in nursing home is discussed in three directions: its conception of care, specially on its negative sides; its implication in geriatric units, in their conception and in the analysis of their management of care; the holding of care-givers and nurses by making clear what we call transference and conter-transference and their reflection on their function.

  15. Reconsidering the Nature of the Unconscious: A Question on Psychoanalysis in Literary Studies

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    L. Suharjanto, SJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoanalysis has been used invariably in literary studies, as it helps literary interpretation to touch the often-puzzling-dimension of motives and feelings in literary works. The domination of psychoanalysis in the twentieth century, however, has been questioned with the new awareness that the unconscious mind is not innate but constructed. Such a disposition challenges not only the practice of using psychoanalysis in literary studies but also the validity of psychoanalysis itself.   DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2012.150104

  16. Jacques Lacan and the Other Side of Psychoanalysis: Reflections on Seminar XVII (Book Review

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    Lizzy Newman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of Justin Clemens and Russell Grigg (eds., Jacques Lacan and the Other Side of Psychoanalysis: Reflections on Seminar XVII, Duke University Press, 2006. ISBN: 0-8223-3719-3.A new book that brings together 16 essays, mostly all commentaries upon Lacan''s Seminar XVII, known as 'The other Side of Psychoanalysis'. Topics include the four discourses, the relation between psychoanalysis and contemporary social discourses, the question of social change, the relationship between psychoanalysis and politics, and the structuring function of the Oedipus complex.

  17. Jacques Lacan and the Other Side of Psychoanalysis: Reflections on Seminar XVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzy Newman

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available pA review of Justin Clemens and Russell Grigg (eds., Jacques Lacan and the Other Side of Psychoanalysis: Reflections on Seminar XVII, Duke University Press, 2006. ISBN: 0-8223-3719-3./ppA new book that brings together 16 essays, mostly all commentaries upon Lacan#39;#39;s Seminar XVII, known as #39;The other Side of Psychoanalysis#39;. Topics include the four discourses, the relation between psychoanalysis and contemporary social discourses, the question of social change, the relationship between psychoanalysis and politics, and the structuring function of the Oedipus complex. /p

  18. What is medical about psychoanalysis--and what is psychoanalytic about medicine?

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    Clemens, Norman A

    2014-07-01

    Despite the birth of psychoanalysis in neurology, modern psychoanalysis and modern medicine seem to have drifted apart. The author explores how and why this has taken place and what its effects may be. Yet the core principles of both medicine and psychoanalysis remain intertwined and vital to both, and the future holds the promise of new possibilities. As American medicine and American psychoanalysis both confront critical stages in their existence, both professions would be well advised to be mindful of their common foundations in science and the ethical, professional bond with the patient.

  19. Impact of Psychoanalysis in Nigeria: A Case Study

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    Ebigbo Peter Onyekwere

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors set out to examine the impact of Psychoanalysis in Nigeria. In doing this they selected a significant stakeholder, who trained in Germany and returned to Nigeria as a case study. Examining the activities as he set out to indigenize psychotherapy in Nigeria, it was found that psychoanalytic thinking helped in the psychodynamic observations on the frequent somatic complaints of psychological origin which helped to make treatment possible. Family therapy based on psychoanalysis was modeled to treat patients classified as traditional, mixed and westernized. Dream analysis and hypnosis were also used for treatment in Nigeria with good results. Finally the harmony restoration theory was put forward whereby the African is healthy when he is at peace with his world of relationship (cosmos comprising endocosmos – mind body relationship, mesocosmos relationship with significant others and exocosmos relationship with spirits, ancestors, deities, gods, God. He/she is sick when there is a distortion in the person’s world of relationship. Treatment is restoration of harmony. In every one there is a yearning to reach out to others (cosmic expansion drive and an inclination to be interested in the self (cosmic reduction drive at the various levels of the cosmos. Eight personality types were worked out of the combination of expansion and reduction drives. The conclusion was that psychoanalysis has come to stay in Nigeria.

  20. GEORG GRODDECK: "THE PINCH OF PEPPER" OF PSYCHOANALYSIS(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, Mark F; Hristeva, Galina; Giefer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The life and works of Georg Groddeck are reviewed and placed in historical context as a physician and a pioneer of psychoanalysis, psychosomatic medicine, and an epistolary style of writing. His Das Es concept stimulated Freud to construct his tripartite model of the mind. Groddeck, however, used Das Es to facilitate receptivity to unconscious communication with his patients. His "maternal turn" transformed his treatment approach from an authoritarian position to a dialectical process. Groddeck was a generative influence on the development of Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, Erich Fromm, and Karen Horney. He was also the mid-wife of the late-life burst of creativity of his friend and patient Sándor Ferenczi. Together, Groddeck and Ferenczi provided the impetus for a paradigm shift in psychoanalysis that emphasized the maternal transference, child-like creativity, and a dialogue of the unconscious that foreshadowed contemporary interest in intersubjectivity and field theory. They were progenitors of the relational turn and tradition in psychoanalysis. Growing interest in interpsychic communication and field theory is bringing about a convergence of theorizing among pluralistic psychoanalytic schools that date back to 1923 when Freud appropriated Groddeck's Das Es and radically altered its meaning and use.

  1. QuaDoSta - a freely configurable system which facilitates multi-centric data collection for healthcare and medical research

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    Albrecht, Ulrike

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes QuaDoSta (quality assurance, documentation and statistics, a flexible documentation system as well as a data collection and networking platform for medical facilities. The user can freely define the required documentation masks which are easily expandable and can be adapted to individual requirements without the need for additional programming. To avoid duplication, data transfer interfaces can be configured flexibly to external sources such as patient management systems used in surgeries or hospital information systems. The projects EvaMed (Evaluation Anthroposophical Medicine and the Network Oncology are two scientific research projects which have been successfully established as nationally active networks on the basis of QuaDoSta. The EvaMed-Network serves as a modern pharmacovigilance project for the documentation of adverse drug events. All prescription data are electronically recorded to assess the relative risk of drugs. The Network Oncology was set up as a documentation system in four hospitals and seven specialist oncology practices where a complete record of all oncological therapies is being carried out to uniform standards on the basis of the ‘basic documentation for tumour patients’ (BDT developed by the German Cancer Society. The QuaDoSta solution system made it possible to cater for the specific requirements of the presented projects. The following features of the system proved to be highly advantageous: flexible setup of catalogues and user friendly customisation and extensions, complete dissociation of system setup and documentation content, multi-centre networkability, and configurable data transfer interfaces.

  2. Procedimentos, colocação em cena da dupla ("Enactment" e validação clínica em psicoterapia psicanalítica e psicanálise Psicoanálisis y psicoterapia psicoanalítica: procedimientos, validación clínica y el modelo de "colocación en escena" ("enactment" Procedures, enactment and clinical validation in psychoanalytical psychotherapy and psychoanalysis

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    Roosevelt M. Smeke Cassorla

    2003-12-01

    Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy are shown as to procedures and objectives. The "enactment" model is presented and its value in the clinical validation process is discussed as related to the treatment objectives. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the paper are to describe and discuss ways to validate procedures in psychoanalysis clinically and relate them to the objectives of Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. METHOD: Clinical-psychoanalytical, illustrated with a patient with OCD. RESULTS-CLINICAL MATERIAL: The dynamics involved in parts of two analytical sessions is presented. It shows that the analyst's failure turned out to be productive when its effect was evaluated (clinical validation, resulting in extending the patient's thinking capacity, the theoretical model used. DISCUSSION: Two items are discussed. 1. Validation, "enactment" and countertransference: showing the need for the analyst to be part of the "scene" and use the derivatives of his/her countertransference to understand the "enactment". 2. Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: showing how clear objectives are a condition for their proper validation. CONCLUSIONS: Because psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy deal with complex variables, which are impossible to isolate and control, they need continuous intra-clinical validation, and clear objectives are essential. The "enactment" model associated with the Bion thinking theory is demonstrated as a basis for this validation.

  3. The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment: Emerging Themes from 5 Years of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follette, Katherine; Dokter, Erin; Buxner, Sanlyn

    2018-01-01

    The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment is a validated assessment instrument that was designed to measure changes in students' quantitative reasoning skills, attitudes toward mathematics, and ability to accurately assess their own quantitative abilities. It has been administered to more than 5,000 students at a variety of institutions at the start and end of a semester of general education college science instruction. I will begin by briefly summarizing our published work surrounding validation of the instrument and identification of underlying attitudinal factors (composite variables identified via factor analysis) that predict 50% of the variation in students' scores on the assessment. I will then discuss more recent unpublished work, including: (1) Development and validation of an abbreviated version of the assessment (The QuaRCS Light), which results in marked improvements in students' ability to maintain a high effort level throughout the assessment and has broad implications for quantitative reasoning assessments in general, and (2) Our efforts to revise the attitudinal portion of the assessment to better assess math anxiety level, another key factor in student performance on numerical assessments.

  4. Fear and decision-making in narcissistic personality disorder-a link between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningstam, Elsa; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R

    2013-06-01

    Linking psychoanalytic studies with neuroscience has proven increasingly productive for identifying and understanding personality functioning. This article focuses on pathological narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), with the aim of exploring two clinically relevant aspects of narcissistic functioning also recognized in psychoanalysis: fear and decision-making. Evidence from neuroscientific studies of related conditions, such as psychopathy, suggests links between affective and cognitive functioning that can influence the sense of self-agency and narcissistic self-regulation. Attention can play a crucial role in moderating fear and self-regulatory deficits, and the interaction between experience and emotion can be central for decision-making. In this review we will explore fear as a motivating factor in narcissistic personality functioning, and the impact fear may have on decision-making in people with pathological narcissism and NPD. Understanding the processes and neurological underpinnings of fear and decision-making can potentially influence both the diagnosis and treatment of NPD.

  5. From archaic narcissism to empathy for the self: the evolution of new capacities in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrie, Mark J

    2011-04-01

    The concept of the selfobject was central to Heinz Kohut's psychology of the self. With an eye to studying the development of narcissism and its implications for the growth of new psychic structure, this concept is reviewed and reassessed. Post-Kohutian complexities regarding its definition and use extend our consideration of the development of narcissism beyond archaic configurations toward further evolution of the self and the nature of mature narcissism. The hypothesis is offered that developing narcissism and the growth of self-regulation impact the acquisition of new structure and new capacities through the emergence of newly potentiated aspects of the self. The implications of these emergent qualities of the self are examined in the context of our understanding of self-esteem regulation, the state of the self, and the goals of psychoanalysis. A clinical example illustrates how technique and process in an analysis may be organized around the development of such new capacities.

  6. Fear and decision-making in narcissistic personality disorder—a link between psychoanalysis and neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningstam, Elsa; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.

    2013-01-01

    Linking psychoanalytic studies with neuroscience has proven increasingly productive for identifying and understanding personality functioning. This article focuses on pathological narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), with the aim of exploring two clinically relevant aspects of narcissistic functioning also recognized in psychoanalysis: fear and decision-making. Evidence from neuroscientific studies of related conditions, such as psychopathy, suggests links between affective and cognitive functioning that can influence the sense of self-agency and narcissistic self-regulation. Attention can play a crucial role in moderating fear and self-regulatory deficits, and the interaction between experience and emotion can be central for decision-making. In this review we will explore fear as a motivating factor in narcissistic personality functioning, and the impact fear may have on decision-making in people with pathological narcissism and NPD. Understanding the processes and neurological underpinnings of fear and decision-making can potentially influence both the diagnosis and treatment of NPD. PMID:24174893

  7. [Habermas, Freud and rationality. Psychoanalysis as a focus of the theory of communicative interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, R

    1991-07-01

    In his Theory of Communicative Action (1981) Jürgen Habermas attempted to base the critique of society on a universalized pragmatics. Heim attempts to derive a new metatheory of psychoanalysis from the theory of communicative action. In doing so he concentrates on the actual models of interpretation in psychoanalysis (Lacan, Marcuse, Lorenzer).

  8. Freud in the media: A proposal for exploration of cinematic conception of Psychoanalysis

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    Carlos Antonio Ramírez Muñoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing the meetings and divergences between the Cinema and Psychoanalysis, then develop some notions of audiovisual analysis of film texts, a brief itinerary of Psychoanalysts and practices performed throughout the history of the film industry. Finally, a methodological and research proposal, designed to relieve some theory on mass media arises what would Psychoanalysis, through the study of film reconstruction of this.

  9. The Berlin tradition in Chicago: Franz Alexander and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.

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    Schmidt, Erika S

    2010-01-01

    Freud considered Franz Alexander, the first graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute and an assistant in the Berlin Polyclinic, to be "one of our strongest hopes for the future." Alexander went on to become the first director of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis in 1932 and modeled some of the Chicago Institute's mission on his Berlin experiences. He was also a researcher in psychosomatic medicine, a prolific writer about psychoanalysis and prominent in psychoanalytic organizations. As he proposed modifications in psychoanalytic technique, he became a controversial figure, especially in the elaboration of his ideas about brief therapy and the corrective emotional experience. This paper puts Alexander's achievements in historical context, draws connections between the Berlin and Chicago Institutes and suggests that, despite his quarrels with traditional psychoanalysis, Alexander's legacy may be in his attitude towards psychoanalysis, characterized by a commitment to scientific study, a willingness to experiment, and a conviction about the role of psychoanalysis within the larger culture.

  10. Freud, psychoanalysis, and the therapeutic effect of agapic love.

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    Koprowski, Eugene J

    2014-04-01

    Last year, when reading Freud's letters to Jung, I came across a most interesting passage in which Freud claimed that the "talking cure" (i.e., psychoanalysis) was the result of love--not transference, counter-transference, or another neologism of psychiatry. That is, Freud said to Jung, the cure in psychoanalysis is affected by love (McGuire, 1974 ). I meditated on this for a long while: It is interesting that Freud--whose wife was a bat kohen, daughter of a priest/rabbi--and Jung, the son and grandson of Protestant Christian ministers, would have such a soteriological dialog at the beginning of the psychoanalytic era. This remark on love was not just a one-off observation, either. The minutes of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society affirm this line of thinking: "Our cures are cures of love" (Haynal, 1994, p. 24). Clearly, Freud and his contemporaries were talking about agape, the kind of love God has for humanity, not eros, a physical desire for another person. There is much written in contemporary psychiatric literature about fears of boundary crossing in mental health (Gabbard, 1995 ); Jung's documented erotic relationship with medical student and patient, Sabina Spielrein, may be the causa causans of this concern. But, these fears--correct concerns about untoward involvement in sexual relationships with patients--have obscured the real importance of what Freud and Jung were talking about back in the beginning of their movement. More than 100 years later, it may well be time to revisit the early dialogue of the founders of psychoanalysis and hear them in their own words once again.

  11. Theory and practice in psychoanalysis: psychoanalytic praxis. 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleger, José

    2012-08-01

    The author systematises and examines the relation between theory and practice in psychoanalysis in three directions: one, eminently epistemological, which is only mentioned because it pertains not only to psychoanalysis but to all the sciences; another, the relation between theory and technique; and the third, the relation between theory and the institutional organisation of psychoanalysis and psychoanalysts. All the problems described, especially the second and third points, together define psychoanalytic praxis. With regard to contradictions between theory and technique, the author points out that psychoanalytic theory is constructed fundamentally on the basis of an approach that is historico-genetic, dynamic and consistent with formal logic, whereas psychoanalytic practice occurs within a transference–countertransference relation, in a situation configured as an analytic field, a ‘here and now’, within a dramatic explanation and in a dialectic process. This triple diagnosis involves naturalistic and phenomenological approaches, the problem of objectivity and the role given to sexuality as a privileged parameter in psychoanalytic theory. In relation to the third direction mentioned above,the author refers briefly to the problem of psychoanalytic organisations, in the sense that they come into conflict with the development of psychoanalytic theory and the deepening of investigation. In reference to the latter, the author emphasises the need to widen the perspective of what constitutes psychoanalytic praxis. He points out that praxis is always replete with contradictions and that it is not a question of ignoring,denying or impeding these contradictions themselves (which would in any case be totally ineffective), but that by taking them into account, scientific development could be managed in a more planned way, less blindly; that is to say, less abandoned to spontaneity.

  12. Psychopathia sexualis: sexuality in old and new psychoanalysis.

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    Breger, Louis

    2014-02-01

    The different conceptions of sexuality in classical and contemporary psychoanalysis are explored. Freud's misguided theories of sexual or libidinal drives and the Oedipus complex are shown to be defenses against his own traumatic attachment history. The evidence for this is found in a review of his childhood and self-analysis, and further illustrated with the cases reported in the Studies on Hysteria and elsewhere. Modern views of sex turn these old theories on their heads, demonstrating that sexual fantasies and actions are phenomena, unique to each individual, that are themselves in need of explanation. These radically different conceptions of sexuality are illustrated with 3 case histories. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Psychoanalysis, Democracy, and Dialogism / Psicanálise, democracia e dialogismo

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    Clive Thomson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Psychoanalysis (theory and practice is alive and well in some parts of the world like France, Brazil, and Argentina, but in countries like Canada and the United States it struggles to surviveas it competes with other kinds of therapies. Psychoanalysts in these latter countries have been seeking to understand why psychoanalysis is "under siege" and to invent new, more relevant clinical and theoretical approaches. "What kind of psychoanalysis contributes best to the creation of a democratic mind?" is a (political question asked by some contemporary relational psychoanalysts. The objective of my article is to suggest some answers to this kind of question byexploring the lessons we might learn from the work of a few key thinkers: the members of the Bakhtin Circle, Freud, Derrida, and some relational psychoanalysts of today. Two underlying assumptions of my article are: 1 an agreement with Stephen Mitchell that the practice and theory of psychoanalysis should provide a better understanding of "the relational matrix that makes our individual consciousness possible"; 2 that the dialogic principle (as developed by Bakhtin, Tzvetan Todorov, and others can help achieve this goal. RESUMO: A Psicanálise (teoria e prática está viva e bem em algumas partes do mundo como, por exemplo, na França, Brasil e Argentina, mas em países tais como o Canadá e os Estados Unidos ela tem lutado para sobreviver uma vez que compete com outros tipos de terapias. Psicanalistas nesses últimos países têm procurado entender o porquê de a psicanálise encontrar-se 'sitiada' enquanto buscam formas novas e mais relevantes de abordagens clínicas e teóricas. "Que tipo de psicanálise contribui melhor para a criação de uma mente democrática?" é uma questão(política indagada por alguns psicanalistas relacionais contemporâneos. O objetivo do meuartigo é sugerir algumas respostas para este tipo de questão, através da exploração das lições que n

  14. Capitalist Discourse, Subjectivity and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies how subjectivity in capitalist culture can be characterized. Building on Lacan's later seminars XVI, XVII, XVIII, and XIX, the author first outlines Lacan's general discourse theory, which includes four characteristic discourses: the discourse of the master, the discourse of the university, the discourse of the hysteric and the discourse of the analyst. Next, the author explores the subjectivity and the mode of dealing with jouissance and semblance, which is entailed in a fifth type of discourse, the capitalist discourse, discussed by Lacan (1972). Indeed, like the other discourses that Lacan discerns, the discourse of the capitalist can be thought of as a mode of dealing with the sexual non-rapport. It is argued that in the case of neurosis the discourse of the capitalist functions as an attempt to ignore the sexual non-rapport and the dimension of the unconscious. Psychosis, by contrast, is marked by an a priori exclusion from discourse. In that case, consumerist ways of relating to the other might offer a semblance, and thus the possibility of inventing a mode of relating to the other. Two clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate this perspective: one concerning the neurotic structure and one concerning the psychotic structure. PMID:28018280

  15. Se Faire Voir with Jung and the Ethics of Psychoanalysis

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    Matthew Gildersleeve

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is an important addition to my previous work of integrating Jungian and Lacanian psychoanalysis (see Complexes Tickling the $ubject. A main focus of this article is to use Zizek’s interpretation of Lacan’s writing on desire and drive in relation to my Heideggerian interpretation of Jung. As a result, this article is an important contribution to the literature because it shows the importance of the transcendent function; complexes and the Rosarium Philosophorum to elucidate the ethics of desire and drive. This article shows how Heidegger’s work in Being and Time and his interpretation of Nietzsche is important to detail the process of Lacanian psychoanalysis. Nietzsche’s books; Human All Too Human and The Gay Science will also be discussed as well as Sartre’s Being and Nothingness and Zizek’s writing on the cunning of reason; Kantian ethics; beyond the pleasure principle; Kierkegaard; Sisyphus; anxiety; Hitchcock; Gelassenheit; the Gospel of Matthew and error as a fundamental passage to truth.

  16. La inclusión del psicoanálisis en el Hospicio de las Mercedes y la Colonia Nacional de Alienados a través de los registros formales de documentación (historias clínicas y publicación de casos-(1920-1954 The inclusion of psychoanalysis in the Hospicio de las Mercedes and the Colonia Nacional de Alienados through formal documentation records (clinical records and publication of cases - (1920-1954

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    Magalí Jardon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone dar cuenta de qué manera la praxis psicoanalítica ha sido documentada. Se focalizará en los registros formales de las instituciones de asistencia pública (historias clínicas, y en los registros realizados por fuera del documento institucional (publicaciones. Se procederá al relevamiento y análisis de fuentes primarias; a su vez, se tendrá en cuenta el relevamiento de material de archivo de las instituciones seleccionadas. Se denomina registros formales a la manera de documentar el encuentro entre el paciente y el médico. En este caso, abordaremos a Gorriti, Thénon y Pichon-Rivière; los tres tenían inserción en hospitales públicos y en su producción escrita dan cuenta de la práctica psicoanalítica dentro y fuera del ámbito hospitalario.This paper aims to explain the manner in which the practice of psychoanalysis has been documented. It will focus on the formal records of public assistance institutions (clinical record, in turn, it will compared with records made out of the institutional document (publications. To do this we will proceed to the survey and analysis of primary sources, in turn, it will take into account the survey of footage of selected institutions. It is called formal records to the way of documenting the meeting between patient and doctor. In this case we will address three doctors who had worked in public hospitals -Gorriti, Thénon, Pichon-Rivière- and in their writings they realize of psychoanalytic practice. It is specialy interesting to track the registration modalities within and outside the institution.

  17. Burial and resurgence of projective identification in French psychoanalysis.

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    Widlöcher, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Curiously enough, the concept of projective identification was ignored, and even rejected in France for at least two decades after the publication of the founding texts of Melanie Klein and Herbert Rosenfeld. This rejection was due to a critique from child psychoanalysts close to Anna Freud and also from the teaching of Lacan: the first took the real mother-child relation extensively into account, while the latter only saw the internal object as a signifier. The fact that during this period the countertransference was a concept reduced to its negative content no doubt explains this deliberate ignorance. With the dissemination of a broader and more positive conception of the countertransference, a renewal of interest could be observed in the 1980s with references to empathic listening and to the effects of thought-induction. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  18. Toward integrating psyche and soma: psychoanalysis and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, J; Taylor, G

    1981-02-01

    The brain is the "key organ" for understanding mind/body/illness relationships. During the past two decades neurobiological research has generated a plethora of new data and concepts which have increased tremendously our knowledge of the functioning brain. As a result the psychoanalytic view of the relationship between mind and brain may seem at risk of becoming outmoded. Yet while psychoanalytic theory may no longer be wholly tenable, psychoanalysis continues to offer interesting and heuristically valuable isomorphic models of cortical function. On the other hand neurobiology provides a corrective influence on psychoanalytic concept-building, causing theory to be refined as it is tested against the results of research. One possible result of interdisciplinary cross-fertilization is that a revised theory of the function of dreams and fantasy may throw light on the vicissitudes of somatic experience, and the pathogenesis of psychophysiological disorder.

  19. [Mauro Mancia: the dream between psychoanalysis and neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagli, Vito

    2009-01-01

    "Dreaming, in any case, remains a mental activity and not a physiological process, even though it springs from this process". This sentence of Mauro Mancia encapsulates the entire significance of his studies on sleeping/dreaming. A totality of observations and reflections grounded in neurophysiology and psychoanalysis which led him to study and to "see" the two faces of a problem that has engaged man's attention since the remotest antiquity. Mancia has thus given us the resources to see the dream-and not only the dream-with the marvelled eye of the artist who seeks and finds a sense in things and at the same time with the cold eye of the scientist who demands of things only their how and wherefore.

  20. Beyond pluralism: psychoanalysis and the workings of mind.

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    Pine, Fred

    2011-10-01

    Subjects that Freud excluded or incompletely explored have been sites of theoretical expansion in over a century of observation: the role of the other, the self, the preoedipal period, action, the countertransference, limits to neutrality/anonymity/abstinence, the loci of the analytic drama, effects beyond interpretation, agency, and basic needs (versus wishes). These developments have led to conflicting theories and sect-like groupings within the field. Group psychological processes underlying this are discussed; and a broad and inclusive view of psychoanalysis is proposed under the heading of the study of the workings of mind. Additionally, substantial integrative proposals are offered with respect to the central tasks of individual development, theories of mind, the relational turn, and aspects of technique.

  1. Conflicts and missed signals in psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and Gestalt psychology.

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    Murray, David J; Kilgour, Andrea R; Wasylkiw, Louise

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, European psychologists found themselves in conflict situations with respect to the role that private mental states should play in a scientific psychology. Out of this conflict arose 3 of the best-known schools of the 20th century: psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and Gestalt psychology. Each of these schools is discussed with respect to two characteristics. First, the authors discuss the attitude of each school on the meaning of the word unconscious as it was understood around 1900. Second, the authors discuss the influence of each school on the reception accorded to books written around 1900 espousing viewpoints that did not cohere with the school's beliefs. Such books may be considered "missed signals" in the history of psychology. "Hits" associated with each school are also highlighted.

  2. Psychoanalysis as a science: a response to the new challenges.

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    Wallerstein, R S

    1986-07-01

    Few theoretical issues in psychoanalysis have been more constantly argued than the status of our discipline as a science. For long the attack has been from the logical positivists and the extensions of their argument by Karl Popper. Over recent decades the debate about the place of our metapsychology has intensified the concerns about our scientific status. In this paper I respond briefly to the logical positivist, the Popperian, and the information-processing systems theory arguments and then develop at greater length a response to the two current, most widespread philosophy-of-science assaults upon our credibility as science, that of the hermeneuticists (Ricoeur, Habermas, Gadamer, and others), and the newest, that of the philosopher, Adolf Grünbaum.

  3. The Logic of Appearance: Dennett, Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis

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    Feyaerts, Jasper; Vanheule, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    In the present essay, we aim to develop and contrast three different positions toward Sellars’ distinction between the manifest and scientific images of man: Dennett’s philosophical reconstruction of neurocognitive science, contemporary phenomenology and psychoanalysis. We will suggest that these respective traditions and the substantial differences between them can be understood in terms of a ‘logic of appearance.’ Related to this are differing ideas about the rights and limits of the first-person perspective, the relation between conscious experience and belief, and the issue of naturalization. In the final part, we will try to specify, on the basis of a detailed reading of the disagreement between Dennett and phenomenology, in what way psychoanalytic theory could respond to these different issues. PMID:28878725

  4. What Psychoanalysis, Culture And Society Mean To Me

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    Layton, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews some ways that the social and psychic have been understood in psychoanalysis and argues that a model for understanding the relation between the psychic and the social must account both for the ways that we internalize oppressive norms as well as the ways we resist them. The author proposes that we build our identities in relation to other identities circulating in our culture and that cultural hierarchies of sexism, racism, classism push us to split off part of what it means to be human, thereby creating painful individual and relational repetition compulsions. These “normative unconscious processes” replicate the unjust social norms that cause psychic pain in the first place. The paper concludes with thoughts about contemporary US culture, in which the government has abdicated responsibility toward its most vulnerable citizens and has thus rendered vulnerability and dependence shameful states. PMID:22058628

  5. PSYCHOANALYSIS AND THE ARTS: THE SLIPPERY GROUND OF APPLIED ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The ways in which today's psychoanalysts approach art closely follow the avenues opened by Freud a hundred years ago. Drawing mainly on Freud's studies on Jensen's Gradiva (1907) and on Leonardo da Vinci (1910a), the author examines the main paradigms he used in discussing artistic activity, including his doubts and hesitations. Present-day approaches to art are then examined via a discussion of the advantages and pitfalls of psychobiography, of the case study, and of textual approaches. The author makes a case for the type of interdisciplinary dialogue in which the goal is to establish a cross-fertilization between psychoanalysis and other fields of knowledge while striving to avoid hypersaturation of a work of art in order to foster expansion of the mind. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  6. The influence of Cervantes on the future creator of psychoanalysis.

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    Grinberg, L; Rodríguez, J F

    1984-01-01

    Our work is intended to recreate the origins of the 'future creator of psychoanalysis'. Cervantes had a decisive influence on Freud. Don Quixote occupied a central place during a period which we consider to be crucial in the creation of psychoanalysis; we refer to the summer of 1883 during which Freud confessed to Martha that he had become more interested in this book than in brain anatomy. In this work, Cervantes delves in-depth into problems which he had set out in The Colloquy of the Dogs, read by Freud in his adolescence when he was learning Spanish and which confronted some of the great psychoanalytic themes such as reality-fantasy, language, instinct and reason, traumatic situations, 'family romance', etc. These themes appear in a psychoanalytically structured dialogue in which one of the dogs, Berganza, tells his life story (in the form of catharsis) to the other dog, Cipión, with whom Freud identified himself. Basically, it is the psychotherapeutic model that Freud used with his own hysterical patients. Another dialogue which was essential for Freud was that of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, due to the following major reasons (as well as others): For the clear discrimination between reality and fantasy as well as their interplay. Because madness is presented as a complex phenomenon, but intelligible in terms of human motives. For the penetrating description of the transition in Don Quixote from mania to depression. Because at that moment of his life, Freud himself was living through a personal conflict between his dreams of carrying out some scientific feat and the demands of attending to his mundane necessities.

  7. The Logic of Sense – Deleuze’s introduction to psychoanalysis

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    Michał Gusin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles Deleuze is well known as a philosopher who had a profound debatwith psychoanalysis. This debate cannot be reduced to a critic of psychoanalysisalone because the universe in which Deleuze thinks and writes is heterogeneousand plural. In Logic of Sense, Freud’s project, enriched by Melanie Klein or JacquesLacan, is to point a metaphysical potentiality in the concepts of psychoanalysis.Psychoanalysis is called a “science of events” to create a net of connections betweenvarious series of the psychoanalytical insights. In my paper, I have tried to showhow Deleuze determined the introduction to the debate with psychoanalysis. Thekey concept for his introduction is the notion of “phantasm” that is also rooted inthe philosophical tradition.

  8. Why did Sigmund Freud refuse to see Pierre Janet? Origins of psychoanalysis: Janet, Freud or both?

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    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Pierre Janet and Joseph Breuer were the true originators of psychoanalysis. Freud greatly elaborated on their findings. Freud initially admitted these facts but denied them in later life. Janet discovered the concept transference before Freud.

  9. The dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience: what does philosophy of mind say?

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    Elie Cheniaux

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To briefly review how the main monist and dualist currents of philosophy of mind approach the mind-body problem and to describe their association with arguments for and against a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.Methods: The literature was reviewed for studies in the fields of psychology, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind.Results: Some currents are incompatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neurosciences: interactionism and psychophysical parallelism, because they do not account for current knowledge about the brain; epiphenomenalism, which claims that the mind is a mere byproduct of the brain; and analytical behaviorism, eliminative materialism, reductive materialism and functionalism, because they ignore subjective experiences. In contrast, emergentism claims that mental states are dependent on brain states, but have properties that go beyond the field of neurobiology.Conclusions: Only emergentism is compatible with a closer dialog between psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

  10. The idea of a moral psychology: the impact of psychoanalysis on philosophy in Britain.

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    Lear, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the author addresses the question of the significance of psychoanalysis for moral psychology via a more specific question: the impact of psychoanalysis on British philosophy in the twentieth century. He argues that there has been no influence of any real significance, and offers intellectual reasons why not. However, he also argues that there has recently emerged the possibility for a future engagement between psychoanalysis and philosophy, and he offers a history of the emergence of this possibility. In particular, the author discusses how the emerging interest within philosophy to work out a satisfying approach to naturalist moral psychology leads it to a concern with internal mental structure and, most importantly, to transformations of intrapsychic structures. He believes that this will lead philosophy to take a greater interest in psychoanalysis.

  11. THE EPISTEMOLOGY BEHIND THE CURTAIN: THOUGHTS ON THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOANALYSIS.

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    Clarke, Brett H

    2017-07-01

    This essay is concerned with the epistemological complications of the interface between psychoanalysis and "scientific" disciplines and methodologies-in particular, with respect to theories of knowledge and conceptualizations of subjectivity appropriate to psychoanalysis. The author suggests that there is in such interface the potential for an untheorized scientism in empiricist prescriptions for the reform and rescue of psychoanalysis, and revisits the notion that subjectivity as conceived psychoanalytically, grounded in lived experience, is irreducible in ways that are unique and existentially abiding. The author explores the problem through the lens of philosophical hermeneutics and cautions against merging psychoanalysis, under the guise of a salutary pluralism, with disciplines guided by a systematized empiricism and its attendant epistemological commitments. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  12. "A disease of our time": The Catholic Church's condemnation and absolution of psychoanalysis (1924-1975).

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    Foschi, Renato; Innamorati, Marco; Taradel, Ruggero

    2018-03-01

    The present paper is focused on the evolution of the position of the Catholic Church toward psychoanalysis. Even before Freud's The Future of an Illusion (1927), psychoanalysis was criticized by Catholic theologians. Psychoanalysis was viewed with either contempt or with indifference, but nonpsychoanalytic psychotherapy was accepted, especially for pastoral use. Freudian theory remained for most Catholics a delicate and dangerous subject for a long time. From the center to the periphery of the Vatican, Catholic positions against psychoanalysis have varied in the way that theological stances have varied. In the middle decades of the twentieth century, some Catholics changed their attitudes and even practiced psychoanalysis, challenging the interdict of the Holy Office, which prohibited psychoanalytic practice until 1961. During the Cold War, psychoanalysis progressively became more and more relevant within Catholic culture for two main reasons: changes in psychoanalytic doctrine (which began to stress sexuality to a lesser degree) and the increasing number of Catholic psychoanalysts, even among priests. Between the 1960s and the 1970s, psychoanalysis was eventually accepted and became the main topic of a famous speech by Pope Paul VI. This paper illustrates how this acceptance was a sort of unofficial endorsement of a movement that had already won acceptance within the Church. The situation was fostered by people like Maryse Choisy or Leonardo Ancona, who had advocated within the Church for a sui generis use of psychoanalysis (e.g., proposing a desexualized version of Freudian theories), despite warnings and prohibitions from the hierarchies of the Church. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Linking psychoanalysis with neuroscience: the concept of ego.

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    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Semi, Antonio Alberto; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena

    2014-03-01

    Through his whole life Marc Jeannerod was fascinated by Freud's thinking. His interest in Freud is witnessed by several of his writings in which he expresses interest in building a bridge between psychoanalysis and cognitive neuroscience. Following Jeannerod's ideas we discuss here a fundamental point of Freud's construction, the concept of ego, from a neurophysiological point of view. We maintain that, in order both to act coherently and to have a basic, first person, understanding of the behavior of others, it is necessary to posit the existence of a neurophysiological "motor" ego similar to the "rider" of the Freudian metaphor. We review then a series of neurophysiological findings showing that the systems underlying the organization of action and conscious perception are both mediated by a cortical motor network formed by parieto-frontal circuits. In conclusion, we show that the activity of this network has strong similarities to that postulated by Freud for the conscious part of ego. We also propose that the default-mode network might represent that part of ego that is mostly involved in unconscious processes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Psychoanalysis and the neurosciences: a topical debate on dreams.

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    Mancia, M

    1999-12-01

    The author begins by pointing out that, whereas Freud first turned his attention to dreams in 1895, they became an object of neuroscientific interest only in the 1950s, after the discovery of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and the observation that a subject woken in an REM phase could remember and narrate them. He discusses the various brain structures found by the neuroscientists to be implicated in dreaming and the associated hypotheses about their involvement in the processes of remembering dreams, their spatial construction and semantic organisation, and the dreamer's emotional participation in and narration of dreams. Attention is drawn to recent psychophysiological research findings indicating that dreaming occurs in all sleep phases and not only in REM episodes. The cognitivist contribution is also discussed. The author goes on to demonstrate the difference between the neuroscientific and psychoanalytic approaches to dreams. Whereas the neuroscientists are interested in the structures involved in dream production and in dream organisation and narratability, psychoanalysis concentrates on the meaning of dreams and on placing them in the context of the analytic relationship in accordance with the affective history of the dreamer and the transference. The brain structures and functions of interest to the neurosciences, while constituting the physical and biological substrate of these aspects, are stated to be irrelevant to their psychoanalytic understanding.

  15. Mimicry, Ekphrasis, Construction. «Reading» in Freudian Psychoanalysis

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    Markus Klammer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The essay explores the concept of interpretation in Freudian psychoanalysis as an act of reading. Freud understands the appearance of dreams and unconscious phantasies in analogy to the structure of perceptual images. On the one hand, he conceives of the patients’ verbal accounts of those images as a specific kind of ekphrasis. On the other hand, the images themselves are regarded as distorted versions of an underlying »dream text« rendering the fundamental desire that the images express and conceal at the same time. The essay shows that the complex system of translations between different layers of text and image in Freud is based on the assumption that the dream images themselves can be analyzed as texts only mimicking the »natural« appearance of perceptions. Freud’s notion of the »rebus« is central to this discussion. The final part examines Freud’s reading of Michelangelo’s Moses statue in the church San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome. It demonstrates how the Freudian method of interpretation itself reduces the sculpture to a set of signs, making it perform a mimicry of textual systems.

  16. Freud's dreams of reason: the Kantian structure of psychoanalysis.

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    Tauber, Alfred I

    2009-10-01

    Freud (and later commentators) have failed to explain how the origins of psychoanalytical theory began with a positivist investment without recognizing a dual epistemological commitment: simply, Freud engaged positivism because he believed it generally equated with empiricism, which he valued, and he rejected "philosophy," and, more specifically, Kantianism, because of the associated transcendental qualities of its epistemology. But this simple dismissal belies a deep investment in Kant's formulation of human reason, in which rationality escapes natural cause and thereby bestows humans with cognitive and moral autonomy. Freud also segregated human rationality: he divided the mind between (1) an unconscious grounded in the biological and thus subject to its own laws, and (2) a faculty of autonomous reason, lodged in consciousness and free of natural forces to become the repository of interpretation and free will. Psychoanalysis thus rests upon a basic Kantian construction, whereby reason, through the aid of analytic techniques, provides a detached scrutiny of the natural world, i.e. the unconscious mental domain. Further, sovereign reason becomes the instrument of self-knowing in the pursuit of human perfection. Herein lies the philosophical foundation of psychoanalytic theory, a beguiling paradox in which natural cause and autonomous reason - determinism and freedom - are conjoined despite their apparent logical exclusion.

  17. Psychoanalysis and the brain - why did freud abandon neuroscience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, "Project of a Scientific Psychology," in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic processes. However, he was not so much focused on the actual psychological functions themselves which though were the prime focus of the neuroscience at his time and also in current Cognitive Neuroscience. Instead, he probably would have been more interested in the brain's resting state and its constitution of a spatiotemporal structure. I here assume that the resting state activity constitutes a statistically based virtual structure extending and linking the different discrete points in time and space within the brain. That in turn may serve as template, schemata, or grid for all subsequent neural processing during stimulus-induced activity. As such the resting state' spatiotemporal structure may serve as the neural predisposition of what Freud described as "psychological structure." Hence, Freud and also current neuropsychoanalysis may want to focus more on neural predispositions, the necessary non-sufficient conditions, rather than the neural correlates, i.e., sufficient, conditions of psychodynamic processes.

  18. Psychoanalysis and the Brain - Why did Freud abandon Neuroscience

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    Georg eNorthoff

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, ‘Project of a Scientific Psychology’, in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic processes. However, he was not so much focused on the actual psychological functions themselves which though were the prime focus of the neuroscience at his time and also in current Cognitive Neuroscience. Instead, he probably would have been more interested in the brain’s resting state and its constitution of spatiotemporal structures which may be regarded as the neural predisposition of what Freud described as ‘psychological structure‘. Hence, Freud and also current neuropsychoanalysis may want to focus more on neural predispositions, the necessary non-sufficient conditions, rather than the neural correlates, i.e., sufficient, conditions of psychodynamic processes.

  19. Hans Loewald, psychoanalysis, and the project of autonomy.

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    Whitebook, Joel

    2008-12-01

    For some time psychoanalysts have tended to view Freud's cultural writings--concerning modernity, secularism, science, and religion--disparagingly, seeing them as the unscientific speculations of a misguided genius. But the questions Freud explored in those works are pressing topics that deserve serious attention. Just as fascism provided the historical context in which the critical theorists of the Frankfurt School developed a psychoanalytic social theory in the 1930s and 1940s, so the rise of fundamentalism demands a similar effort today. The "project of autonomy" conceptualized by the psychoanalyst-philosopher Castoriadis can be used to situate psychoanalysis in its broader historical context, as part of the emancipatory movement of modernity, and to elucidate fundamentalism as an attempt to turn back that project and reinstate the values of premodern traditional societies. Because the widespread aversion to secularism today is in no small degree the responsibility of secularists themselves--Freud's relatively crude and simplistic disregard of some of the deepest yearnings of humankind is a case in point--it is time to formulate, using the work of Hans Loewald, a more sensitive and sophisticated psychoanalytic view of religion. Yet psychoanalytic secularists must avoid overcompensating for past mistakes by giving too much ground to antisecularists. The legitimate desire to do justice to religion must not trump the need to advance the project of autonomy as a first priority.

  20. Psychoanalysis and the Brain – Why Did Freud Abandon Neuroscience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, “Project of a Scientific Psychology,” in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic processes. However, he was not so much focused on the actual psychological functions themselves which though were the prime focus of the neuroscience at his time and also in current Cognitive Neuroscience. Instead, he probably would have been more interested in the brain’s resting state and its constitution of a spatiotemporal structure. I here assume that the resting state activity constitutes a statistically based virtual structure extending and linking the different discrete points in time and space within the brain. That in turn may serve as template, schemata, or grid for all subsequent neural processing during stimulus-induced activity. As such the resting state’ spatiotemporal structure may serve as the neural predisposition of what Freud described as “psychological structure.” Hence, Freud and also current neuropsychoanalysis may want to focus more on neural predispositions, the necessary non-sufficient conditions, rather than the neural correlates, i.e., sufficient, conditions of psychodynamic processes. PMID:22485098

  1. Psychoanalysis and bioethics: a Lacanian approach to bioethical discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2016-12-01

    This article aims to develop a Lacanian approach to bioethics. Point of departure is the fact that both psychoanalysis and bioethics are practices of language, combining diagnostics with therapy. Subsequently, I will point out how Lacanian linguistics may help us to elucidate the dynamics of both psychoanalytical and bioethical discourse, using the movie One flew over the Cuckoo's Nest and Sophocles' tragedy Antigone as key examples. Next, I will explain the 'topology' of the bioethical landscape with the help of Lacan's three dimensions: the imaginary, the symbolical and the real. This will culminate in an assessment of the dynamics of bioethical discourse with the help of Lacan's theorem of the four discourses. Bioethics, I will argue, is not a homogeneous discourse. Rather, four modalities of bioethical discourse can be distinguished, all of them displaying specific weaknesses and strengths, opportunities and threats. This will be elucidated with the help of two case studies, namely the debates on human reproductive technologies and on the use of animals as biomedical research models.

  2. Organisational and educational internal impediments of psychoanalysis: contemporary challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Guerrero, César

    2002-12-01

    Our psychoanalytic discipline originated, has evolved and is still located within a congregational network that blends and binds together, in an inextricable and contradictory way, the missionary mandates and commendations of a 'movement' and a 'cause' with the inherent prerogatives and functions of academic professions and sciences. In this paper the author explores the consequential past and present impedimenta of this organisational and educational syncretism, for six fundamental dimensions of action for psychoanalysis. Subsequently, the nature of a proposition is delineated, suggesting a reorganisation, local and international, to address what the author visualises as five of our most pressing contemporary challenges: a) an autonomous university educational model, freed from regressive societal-political inertias, enabling us to abandon our seclusive monasticism; b) the consolidation of an epistemological frame of reference, idiographic and nomothetically substantiated against our cumulative inductivism, which is the seedbed of our sectarianism, cross-sterilisation and pseudo-ecumenism; c) local and external educational and professional systems of accreditation and certification, independent from affiliation and membership privileges of our supraordinate ecclesia; d) social relevance and community presence, moving away from our meaningless organisational and educational cloistering; and e) a local and international functional and interdependent reorganisation, in the context of sovereignty and integrity, in contrast to our prevalently crusading and indoctrinating homogamous pathological co-dependency. The author concludes that only a harmonisation of objectives and administrative structure might loosen the talons of faith that keep us retrogressively tied to our past.

  3. Linking neuroscience and psychoanalysis from a developmental perspective: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouss-Ryngaert, Lisa; Golse, Bernard

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims to develop the rational to support why and how we should link neuroscience and psychoanalysis. Many of these points are derived from child development and child psychiatry. Neuroscience investigates developmental questions in a different way than psychoanalysis, while psychoanalysis itself has shifted towards new developmental paradigms. The rapprochement between neuroscience and psychoanalysis allows a new understanding of some concepts, including embodiment of mind, consciousness and attachment. The "double reading" paradigm allows a better understanding of symptomatic configurations. Linking neuroscience and psychoanalysis may improve treatments and result in new experimental neuroscientific paradigms involving changing the research object, changing the state of the research object, and investigating the structural changes in the brain following psychotherapy. The last aim is to create an epistemology of the articulation between the theoretical frameworks through phenomenology, "complementarism" and neuropsychoanalysis. We argue that it is necessary for clinicians to be aware of the advancements in each field. This is not only an epistemological question; we assume that new findings in neuroscience will change the way psychoanalysts think and approach treatment of their patients. We hope the present research will contribute to change the way that neuroscientists think and will provide new options to their set of experimental paradigms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 'Freud's speculations in ethnology': A reflection on anthropology's encounter with psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patrick S

    2017-06-01

    In the early 20th century, many analysts - Freud and Ernest Jones in particular - were confident that cultural anthropologists would demonstrate the universal nature of the Oedipus complex and other unconscious phenomena. Collaboration between the two disciplines, however, was undermined by a series of controversies surrounding the relationship between psychology and culture. This paper re-examines the three episodes that framed anthropology's early encounter with psychoanalysis, emphasizing the important works and their critical reception. Freud's Totem and Taboo began the interdisciplinary dialogue, but it was Bronislaw Malinowski's embrace of psychoanalysis - a development anticipated through a close reading of his personal diaries - that marked a turning point in relations between the two disciplines. Malinowski argued that an avuncular (rather than an Oedipal) complex existed in the Trobriand Islands. Ernest Jones' critical dismissal of this theory alienated Malinowski from psychoanalysis and ended ethnographers' serious exploration of Freudian thought. A subsequent ethnographic movement, 'culture and personality,' was erroneously seen by many anthropologists as a product of Freudian theory. When 'culture and personality' was abandoned, anthropologists believed that psychoanalysis had been discredited as well - a narrative that still informs the historiography of the discipline and its rejection of psychoanalytical theory. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  5. A psicanálise e o dispositivo diferença sexual Psychoanalysis and the sexual difference device

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    Márcia Arán

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Diante da nova cartografia das relações entre gêneros e das sexualidades na cultura contemporânea, pretendemos discutir em que medida a psicanálise se apresenta como mais um dispositivo da sexualidade tal como concebido por Foucault, o qual procura reinstaurar o modelo tradicional da diferença sexual, através da reiteração da norma heterossexual da dominação masculina. Além disso, indagamos ainda em que medida a psicanálise pode permanecer como uma teoria crítica e uma prática clínica que permita uma relação produtiva com as novas configurações de gênero no contemporâneo, abrindo brechas para a concepção de novas formas de subjetivação. Com esse objetivo analisaremos o debate psicanalítico sobre 1 os deslocamentos do feminino e a positivação da feminilidade; 2 o casamento homossexual e a homoparentalidade e 3 a clínica da transexualidadeBefore the new cartography of gender relationships and sexualities in contemporary culture, we intend to discuss in which way psychoanalysis presents itself as one of the devices of sexuality as conceived by Foucault, which tries to reinstate the traditional model of sexual difference trough the reiteration of the heterosexual norm of male domination. Furthermore, we inquire how psychoanalysis can remain a critical theory and a clinical practice that allow a productive relationship with the new configurations of gender, which disclose the conception of new forms of subjectivity. With this aim, we will analyze the psychoanalytical debate on (1 the displacements of feminine and the positiveness of femininity; (2 the homosexual marriage and the homoparentality; and (3 the clinics of transsexuality

  6. Cognitive science, psychoanalysis and neuroscience: A Brief History of a current trend (Part II

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    Antonio Imbasciati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For decades, cognitive sciences and psychoanalysis have been ignored each other for a mutual distrust, producing in scholars of both disciplines a progressive mutual ignorance and misunderstanding about their developments. The latest studies of cognitive sciences on the role of emotions have allowed a partial approach to psychoanalysis. But above all, recent studies in neuroscience on the emotional basis of all mental processes, about the formation of the subjectivity, about identity and sense of self (neuro psychoanalysis, are opening up a horizon of integration between the three different sciences. In this perspective the epigenetics is playing a fundamental role, that the Author hopes will produce significant developments from a social and anthropological point of view. 

  7. Cognitive science, psychoanalysis and neuroscience: A Brief History of a current trend (Part I

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    Antonio Imbasciati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, cognitive sciences and psychoanalysis have been ignored each other for a mutual distrust, producing in scholars of both disciplines a progressive mutual ignorance and misunderstanding about their developments. The latest studies of cognitive sciences on the role of emotions have allowed a partial approach to psychoanalysis. But above all, recent studies in neuroscience on the emotional basis of all mental processes, about the formation of the subjectivity, about identity and sense of self (neuro psychoanalysis, are opening up a horizon of integration between the three different sciences. In this perspective the epigenetics is playing a fundamental role, that the Author hopes will produce significant developments from a social and anthropological point of view. 

  8. The canary in the mind: on the fate of dreams in psychoanalysis and in contemporary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Dreams have been central in the birth and evolution of psychoanalysis. This paper explores the remarkable story of the relationship between dreams and psychoanalysis as a modern version of the long history of dreams in most healing traditions. But psychoanalysis seems to have turned away from dreams as central inspiration in a way parallel to the general culture's turn away from dreams and the reality of inner life. Yet modern postindustrial culture is transfixed by a version of "dream life" in ways just beginning to be understood (e.g., in the transformation of ancient interest in the inner screen to the external screen). Working with dreams in psychoanalytic psychotherapy was a creative and revolutionary act for our forebears. It is even more so today, in ways that are discussed in this paper.

  9. On psychobiology in psychoanalysis - salivary cortisol and secretory IgA as psychoanalytic process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Sebastian; Schimpf, Heinrich; Hennig, Jürgen; Brosig, Burkhard

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the psychobiological impact of psychoanalysis in its four-hour setting. During a period of five weeks, 20 subsequent hours of psychoanalysis were evaluated, involving two patients and their analysts. Before and after each session, saliva samples were taken and analysed for cortisol (sCortisol) and secretory immunoglobuline A (sIgA). Four time-series (n=80 observations) resulted and were evaluated by "Pooled Time Series Analysis" (PTSA) for significant level changes and setting-mediated rhythms. Over all sessions, sCortisol levels were reduced and sIgA secretion augmented parallel to the analytic work. In one analytic dyad a significant rhythm within the four-hour setting was observed with an increase of sCortisol in sessions 2 and 3 of the week. Psychoanalysis may, therefore, have some psychobiological impact on patients and analysts alike and may modulate immunological and endocrinological processes. PMID:19742067

  10. CONTEXTUAL APPROACH TO LITERARY CRITICISM: DOSTOEVSKY AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

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    V. G. Kalashnikov

    2016-01-01

    of socio-cultural influences, and also macrocontext of perception and interpretation of works in culture and science. The critical view of psychoanalysis as the literary criticism tool in the Russian culture is presented. Through the systematization of complementary contexts and psychoanalytic interpretation the myth about F. M. Dostoyevsky’s epilepsy as a source of his creativity is discredited; though by recognition of the writer, personal problems and neuroses nevertheless were reflected in his works. The hypothesis of the opposite influence of creativity of F. M. Dostoyevsky on S. Freud’s concept, i.e. formation of psychoanalysis under impact of art creativity is made.Scientific novelty. Methods of engaging of an intertextual and socio-cultural environment are known in linguistics and literary criticism long ago. However, diverse environments of existence of the personality and works of the artist as the unified system of contexts psychological in essence have not been considered yet. The novelty of the proposed way of a research consists in systematicity of formation of a complex of contexts of the studied phenomenon that makes it possible to correlate the diversified information through its origin. As a result, the researcher receives a number of complementary descriptions in the spirit of «the principle of a complementarity» by N. Bohr that provides dimensions and completeness of perception of the studied phenomenon.Practical significance of the work lies in the hard proof of the prospects of the contextual approach to interdisciplinary psychological and literary research.

  11. Sigmund Freud and hysteria: the etiology of psychoanalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Dieguez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Sigmund Freud developed a specific interest in hysteria after his stay with Professor Jean-Martin Charcot during the winter of 1885-1886, although his previous activity mainly consisted of neuropathology and general medical practice. Most of his initial studies on hysteria (hysteria in men, influence of subconscious ideas, role of traumas, and psychological and sexual factors) were indeed 'borrowed' from Charcot and his immediate followers, such as Pierre Janet and Paul Richer. Subsequently, Freud developed with Breuer a theory of hysteria which encompassed a mixture of Janet's 'fixed subconscious ideas' with the 'pathological secret' concept of Moriz Benedikt. After their book Studies on Hysteria (1895), Freud interrupted his collaboration with Breuer and developed the concept of conversion of psychological problems into somatic manifestations, with a strong 'sexualization' of hysteria. Firstly, he believed that actual abuses had occurred in these patients (the 'seduction' theory), but then blamed them for having deceived him on that issue, so that he subsequently launched a 'fantasy' theory to explain the development of hysterical symptoms without the necessity of actual abuses. Like many of his contemporaries, and contrary to his claims, Freud did not follow a scientific process of verified experiments, but rather adapted his theories to the evolution of his own beliefs on psychological conditions, selectively emphasizing the aspects of his 'therapies' with patients which supported his emerging ideas, with often abrupt changes in theoretical interpretations. While it remains difficult to get a clear, synthetic vision of what was Freud's definite theory of hysteria, it is obvious that hysteria really was the origin of what would become Freud's psychoanalytical theory. Indeed, psychoanalysis appears to have been initially developed by him largely in order to absorb and explain his many changes in the interpretation of hysterical manifestations.

  12. On the Plagiarism in the Humanities, the Psychoanalysis and the Social exclusion in the Research

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    Tommaso Fratini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article carries some considerations on the problem of plagiarism and the social exclusion in the research in the humanities. The article highlights the contradictions around these issues, focusing in particular on the influence of pressure implicit in research by neoliberal policy in the western countries, and on the delicate issue of communication and transmission of knowledge in psychoanalysis. The article strongly supports a position on the role of psychoanalysis in favor of a defense honesty of his positions, that concern, in the world of today and in the current research field, more depth than with the original of wich an author can express and support.

  13. An Italian peculiarity? Psychoanalysis, modernization and the sociology of consumption in 1960s Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    Psychoanalysis experienced a remarkable boom in 1960s Italy. One of the areas where psychoanalytic theory disseminated was the world of marketing and the sociology of consumption. Based on the case of the sociologist Francesco Alberoni, we can examine the impact of the theories of Melanie Klein for understanding the behavior of consumers. Similarly, Alberoni's work shows the concerns and uncertainties on the social modernization of Italy, and also raises questions on the specificities of the growing importance of psychoanalysis in Italy in the 1960s.

  14. [Child psychoanalysis and child psychiatry in Russia, from Lenin to the present day].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchalov, Pavel V; Makouchkine, Eugène V; Potapova, Victoria A; Gourevitch, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Russian child psychiatry and psychoanalysis painfully recover after being brought under the subjection of "paedology", a synthetic so-called science, and enslaved to the utopian Soviet expectation of building a "new man" in 1920-1930. Later on, in 1940-1980, under the precarious shelter of Soviet social work, they could indulge in the psychodynamic viewpoint. Liberated in 1985-1991, Russian child psychiatry and psychoanalysis take up again with Western science to answer the urgent demand for care for the psychic sufferings of young Russians.

  15. Empathy in Psychoanalysis and Medical Education - what can we learn from each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler-Stastka, Henriette; Datz, Felicitas; Parth, Karoline; Preusche, Ingrid; Bukowski, Xenia; Seidman, Charles

    2017-05-02

    Several research areas, including medical education (ME), focus on empathy as an important topic in interpersonal relationships. This focus is central to the use of communication skills related to empathy and even more crucial to provide information in a way that makes patients feel more involved in the treatment process. Psychoanalysis (PA) provides its initial concept of empathy based on affective aspects including findings from neuroscience and brain research. Enhancing cooperation between ME and PA can help to integrate both aspects of empathy into a longitudinal training program. The condition of psychoanalytic empathy definitions is the understanding of unconscious processes. It is important to primarily attend especially the dominant affects towards the patient before interpreting his or her behaviour, since in explaining the emerging affects, the analyst has to empathize with the patient to understand the (unconscious) reasons for its behaviour. A strong consideration of nonverbal communication, clinical perceptions, intuitive interaction, contagion-like processes and their implementation and empowerment in medical and therapeutic curricula is one way of beneficially using interdisciplinary approaches to yield empathy in clinical interaction. Established methods of PA, like training of containment, reflective functioning, affective holding and giving meaningful interpretations in accordance with countertransferential and transferential aspects may help to put a focus on the clinican-patient-interaction and the preservation of the physicians' (mental) health. In consequence of the discussion of various training methods that take the theoretical and practical concepts of empathy into account, we aim for an implementation of the named methods in the medical curricula.

  16. The opposition to nuclear energy: spychology, sociology, ethnology and psychoanalysis: four convergent approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timbal-Duclaux, Louis

    1979-01-01

    After tracing the psychological and social history of nuclear energy, the author analyzes the diverse approaches used by the social sciences to study the psychosocial repercussions of nuclear achievement. Psychology, sociology, ethnology and psychoanalysis, the four approaches cited, are complementary, not exclusive [fr

  17. Disavowed Knowledge: Psychoanalysis, Education and Teaching. Studies in Curriculum Theory Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Peter Maas

    2011-01-01

    This is the first and only book to detail the history of the century-long relationship between education and psychoanalysis. Relying on primary and secondary sources, it provides not only a historical context but also a psychoanalytically informed analysis. In considering what it means to think about teaching from a psychoanalytic perspective and…

  18. Why did Freud do it? A puzzling episode in the history of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitrin, Arthur

    2012-12-01

    This article is about the Freud-Frink-Brill relationship, certain events in the history of psychoanalysis in the United States in the years 1919 to 1925, and some speculative explanations for these events. It is not a critique of psychoanalytic theory or practice.

  19. Psychoanalysis--on its way down a dead-end street? A concerned commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses the problems when psychoanalysis not only neglects socio-critical issues, diversifies its concepts and sets about to define their common ground with the help of brain research findings and/or of infant observation, but also ignores the implications of attempts to legitimate its scientific status by verifying the outcome of its treatments via nomological and/or qualitative study designs. It is argued that if we reduce psychoanalysis to a mere psychotherapeutic measure we displace the factors essential to neurotic disorders into the blind spot of our field of vision, thus rendering psychoanalysis to be a pseudoscience based on appearances alone. Conceptual clarity, it is argued, cannot be gained from the findings of infant observation or those of brain research. Neither can psychoanalytic treatments be investigated in these manners as long as our current understanding of technical concepts remains highly contradictory. In the author's view present-day psychoanalysis gambles Freud's inheritance away and with it, probably, its own future.

  20. PSYCHOANALYSIS IN CHINA: AN ESSAY ON THE RECENT LITERATURE IN ENGLISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, David E

    2016-10-01

    Using extensive quotation, the author reviews the introduction and current state of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy in China from the vantage point of recent publications in English. Psychoanalysis was briefly introduced to China before the Communist era, then forbidden, and has experienced an accelerated reintroduction since the late 1980s. The author briefly summarizes the cultural and historical background of China relevant to the introduction of psychoanalysis, the traumatic history of China, and the deep structure of thought and philosophical differences from Western culture that challenge a simple imposition of psychoanalytic ideas and practice, and some psychological effects of rapid cultural change throughout China. Training programs in China, the general enthusiasm for analysis among the Chinese, and a number of notable contributions by Western and Chinese authors are discussed. Also surveyed are the use of distance technology for training and treatment, the personal experience of Chinese senior and junior colleagues, and ongoing challenges to the continuing growth of psychoanalysis and analytic psychotherapy in China. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  1. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

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    Peng Gao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The balance between carbon (C and nitrogen (N nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N, the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90 and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1 are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  2. 'BioQuaRT' project: design of a novel in situ protocol for the simultaneous visualisation of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei after irradiation at microbeam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrono, C.; Testa, A.; Monteiro Gil, O.; Giesen, U.; Langner, F.; Rabus, H.; Pinto, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the 'BioQuaRT' (Biologically weighted Quantities in Radiotherapy) project is to develop measurement techniques for characterising charged particle track structure on different length scales, and to correlate at the cellular level the track structure properties with the biological effects of radiation. This multi-scale approach will allow characterisation of the radiation qualities used in radiotherapy and the related biological effects. Charged-particle microbeam facilities were chosen as the platforms for all radiobiology experiments in the 'BioQuaRT' project, because they allow targeting single cells (or compartments of a cell) with a predefined number of ionising particles and correlating the cell-by-cell induced damage with type and energy of the radiation and with the number of ions per cell. Within this project, a novel in situ protocol was developed for the analysis of the mis-repaired and/or unrepaired chromosome damage induced by charged-particle irradiations at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) ion microbeam facility. Among the cytogenetic biomarkers to detect and estimate radiation-induced DNA damage in radiobiology, chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei were chosen. The characteristics of the PTB irradiation system required the design of a special in situ assay: specific irradiation dishes with a base made from a bio-foil 25-μm thick and only 3000-4000 cells seeded and irradiated per dish. This method was developed on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, one of the most commonly used cell lines in radiobiology in vitro experiments. The present protocol allows the simultaneous scoring of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei on the same irradiated dish. Thanks to its versatility, this method could also be extended to other radiobiological applications besides the single-ion microbeam irradiations. (authors)

  3. Attachment theory and psychoanalysis: some remarks from an epistemological and from a Freudian viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried

    2006-12-01

    The author examines Bowlby's attachment theory and more recent versions of it from an epistemological viewpoint and subjects it to questioning on whether they are in line with central concepts of Freudian psychoanalysis. He argues that Bowlby's basic tenets regarding attachment theory, which later attachment theorists never seriously questioned, do not conform to scientific standards, and that psychoanalytic issues such as the dynamic unconscious, internal conflicts, interaction of drive wishes and the role of defence in establishing substitutive formations are either ignored or not treated in sufficient depth. In the light of this, Fonagy's assertion that psychoanalytic criticism of attachment theory arose from mutual misunderstandings and ought nowadays to be seen as outdated is reversed: psychoanalytic criticism can only be regarded as outdated if either basic tenets of Freudian psychoanalysis, or attachment theory or both are misunderstood.

  4. The fraternal complex between psychoanalysis and myth A literary example: Strange Shores

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    Marco Liotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of siblings relationship, initially considered in psychoanalysis mostly in its interaction with the oedipal dynamics, knows today important developments so that the "fraternal complex" has achieved its own independence. The paper aims to investigate the “fraternal complex” both in psychoanalytic area , from the Freudian perspective to contemporary authors, and in myth and literature. It is traced the birth and development of this concept showing how its different facets had been largely anticipated by the myth, especially Jewish myth. The second part of the article focuses on a literary example, “Strange Shores" by A. Indriðason, that offers many ideas to explore some of the dynamics of the fraternal complex in its intersection with fundamental issues in the field of psychoanalysis as the symbol, the double, the shadow, the guilt and the mourning.  

  5. From the EEL to the EGO: psychoanalysis and the remnants of Freud's early scientific practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Martin

    2013-01-01

    While numerous historiographical works have been written to shed light on Freud's early theoretical education in biology, physiology, and medicine and on the influence of that education on psychoanalysis, this paper approaches Freud's basic comprehension of science and methodology by focusing on his early research practice in physiology and neuranatomy. This practice, taking place in the specific context of Ernst Brücke's physiological laboratory in Vienna, was deeply concerned with problems of visuality and the revelation of hidden organic structures by use of proper preparation techniques and optical instruments. The paper explores the connection between such visualizing practices, shaped by a physiological context as they were, and Freud's later convictions of the scientific status of psychoanalysis and the function of its method as means to unveil the concealed structure of the "psychical apparatus". © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The historiography of psychoanalysis in Brazil: the case of Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Cristiana; De Castro, Rafael Dias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze the background of the historiography of psychoanalysis in Rio de Janeiro. Three different phases and approaches are analyzed, based on the viewpoints of different groups of authors. The first group features authors who displayed an early interest in the subject, in the 1920's-1930's. The second refers to psychiatrists/psychoanalysts who worked with mental health institutes and societies between the 1940's and 1970's, while the third perspective comes from the academic/university environment, from the end of the 70's to the present. This distinction was made not only to better define the timeframe of the arrival and dissemination of psychoanalysis in Rio de Janeiro, but also to provide a better understanding of the relation between the specific professional and intellectual interests of each group and the respective historical context.

  7. [From psychotherapy to psychoanalysis: Max Levy-Suhl (1876-1947)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Ludger M; Schröter, Michael; Stroeken, Harry

    2014-01-01

    From psychotherapy to psychoanalysis: Max Levy-Suhl (1876-1947). Levy-Suhl can be considered one of the great practising psychotherapists in early 20th century Berlin. He was active in various fields, including ophthalmology, forensic adolescent psychiatry and hypnosis. Prominent among his publications were two handbooks of psychotherapeutic methods. His attitude towards psychoanalysis shifted from initial criticism to acceptance. Ca. 1930 he experienced some kind of conversion, resulting in his training at the Berlin Institute and becoming a member of the German Psychoanalytic Society. As a Jew being forced to emigrate in 1933, Levy-Suhl turned to the Netherlands where he had a psychoanalytic children's home in Amersfoort, followed by an analyst's practice in Amsterdam. He survived the German occupation, but apparently as a broken man. After the war he committed suicide.--The paper is complemented by an appendix, containing documents and an extensive bibliography.

  8. Turism and Psychology studies: genesis of pleasure in classical Freudian psychoanalysis

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    Maximiliano Korstanje

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we intend to demonstrate the different treatments which the Psychology has made about the pleasure as well as the contributions or limitations that the psychoanalysis demonstrates in the matter. The pleasure is configured like a discharge generated by the encounter between the instincts of life (Eros and of death (Thanatos in conjunction with the exogenous excitement. In consequence, the principle of the transfer explains the displacement (tourist like a form of psychic balance.

  9. Trauma, dream, and psychic change in psychoanalyses: a dialog between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fischmann, Tamara; Russ, Michael O.; Leuzinger-Bohleber, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    To many psychoanalysts dreams are a central source of knowledge of the unconscious-the specific research object of psychoanalysis. The dialog with the neurosciences, devoted to the testing of hypotheses on human behavior and neurophysiology with objective methods, has added to psychoanalytic conceptualizations on emotion, memory, sleep and dreams, conflict and trauma. To psychoanalysts as well as neuroscientists, the neurological basis of psychic functioning, particularly concerning trauma, i...

  10. How Does Psychoanalysis Help in Reconstructing Political Thought? An Exercise of Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam Chandran

    2011-01-01

    The significance of psychology in studying politics is embedded in philosophical issues as well as behavioural pursuits. For the former is often associated with Sigmund Freud and his followers. The latter is inspired by the writings of Harold Lasswell. Political psychology or psychopolitics has its own impression on political thought ever since it deciphers the concept of human nature and political propaganda. More importantly, psychoanalysis views political thought as a ...

  11. Extinction phenomena: A biologic perspective on how and why psychoanalysis works

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    Linda A.W. Brakel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the view that much of the success of classical psychoanalysis is centrally predicated on its biological potency; focusing not on neuropsychology, but on the biology of conditioning. The argument suggests that features of classic psychoanalytic technique--the couch, meetings several times per week with both parties present, and free association--uniquely facilitate intense transferences of various sorts, and that these in turn constitute the multiple and diverse extinction trials necessary to best approximate extinction.

  12. ‘Like kings in their kingdoms’: Conservatism in Brazilian psychoanalysis during the dictatorship

    OpenAIRE

    Frosh, Stephen; Mandelbaum, B.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine some aspects of the fate of Brazilian psychoanalysis during the 1964-1985 civil-military dictatorship. Presenting data from interviews with Brazilian psychoanalysts, and focusing on the activities of the Brazilian Psychoanalytic Society of São Paulo, we argue that the external political situation was paralleled by conservatism within the Society, with some dangerous consequences. We attend especially to tensions between right- and left-wing psychoanalysts, denunciati...

  13. A Historical Review of Diachrony and Semantic Dimensions of Trace in Neurosciences and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Escobar, Carolina

    2017-06-23

    Experience leaves a trace in the nervous system through plasticity. However, the exact meaning of the mnesic trace is poorly defined in current literature. This article provides a historical review of the term trace in neuroscience and psychoanalysis literature, to highlight two relevant aspects: the diachronic and the semantic dimensions. There has been a general interest in diachrony, or a form of evolution of the trace, but its indissociable semantic dimension remains partially disregarded. Although frequently implied, the diachronic and semantic dimensions of the trace are rarely clearly articulated. We situate this discussion into the classical opposition of syntax, or rules of inscription of the trace in the nervous system, and semantics, or the content of the trace, which takes into consideration the attempt of the human being to build coherence. A general observation is that the study of the term trace follows trends of the thought of the given epoch. This historical analysis also reveals the decay of the idea that the trace is reliable to the experience. From the articulation between neurosciences and psychoanalysis in a historical perspective, this review shows that the trend is to consider trace as a production of the subject, resulting in a permanent rewriting in an attempt to give meaning to the experience. This trend is becoming increasingly evident in light of recent research in neurosciences and psychoanalysis.

  14. Trauma, dream, and psychic change in psychoanalyses: a dialog between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischmann, Tamara; Russ, Michael O; Leuzinger-Bohleber, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    To many psychoanalysts dreams are a central source of knowledge of the unconscious-the specific research object of psychoanalysis. The dialog with the neurosciences, devoted to the testing of hypotheses on human behavior and neurophysiology with objective methods, has added to psychoanalytic conceptualizations on emotion, memory, sleep and dreams, conflict and trauma. To psychoanalysts as well as neuroscientists, the neurological basis of psychic functioning, particularly concerning trauma, is of special interest. In this article, an attempt is made to bridge the gap between psychoanalytic findings and neuroscientific findings on trauma. We then attempt to merge both approaches in one experimental study devoted to the investigation of the neurophysiological changes (fMRI) associated with psychoanalytic treatment in chronically depressed patients. We also report on an attempt to quantify psychoanalysis-induced transformation in the manifest content of dreams. To do so, we used two independent methods. First, dreams reported during the cure of chronic depressed analysands were assessed by the treating psychoanalyst. Second, dreams reported in an experimental context were analyzed by an independent evaluator using a standardized method to quantify changes in dream content (Moser method). Single cases are presented. Preliminary results suggest that psychoanalysis-induced transformation can be assessed in an objective way.

  15. Trauma, dream and psychic change in psychoanalyses: a dialogue between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eFischmann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To many psychoanalysts dreams are a central source of knowledge of the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis. The dialogue with the neurosciences, devoted to the testing of hypotheses on human behaviour and neurophysiology with objective methods, has added to psychoanalytic conceptualizations on emotion, memory, sleep and dreams, conflict and trauma. To psychoanalysts as well as neuroscientists, the neurological basis of psychic functioning, particularly concerning trauma, is of special interest. In this article, an attempt is made to bridge the gap between psychoanalytic findings and neuroscientific findings on trauma. We then attempt to merge both approaches in one experimental study devoted to the investigation of the neurophysiological changes (fMRI associated with psychoanalytic treatment in chronically depressed patients. We also report on an attempt to quantify psychoanalysis-induced transformation in the manifest content of dreams. To do so, we used two independent methods. First, dreams reported during the cure of chronic depressed analysands were assessed by the treating psychoanalyst. Second, dreams reported in an experimental context were analysed by an independent evaluator using a standardized method to quantify changes in dream content (Moser method. Single cases are presented. Preliminary results suggest that psychoanalysis-induced transformation can be assessed in an objective way.

  16. Trauma, dream, and psychic change in psychoanalyses: a dialog between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischmann, Tamara; Russ, Michael O.; Leuzinger-Bohleber, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    To many psychoanalysts dreams are a central source of knowledge of the unconscious—the specific research object of psychoanalysis. The dialog with the neurosciences, devoted to the testing of hypotheses on human behavior and neurophysiology with objective methods, has added to psychoanalytic conceptualizations on emotion, memory, sleep and dreams, conflict and trauma. To psychoanalysts as well as neuroscientists, the neurological basis of psychic functioning, particularly concerning trauma, is of special interest. In this article, an attempt is made to bridge the gap between psychoanalytic findings and neuroscientific findings on trauma. We then attempt to merge both approaches in one experimental study devoted to the investigation of the neurophysiological changes (fMRI) associated with psychoanalytic treatment in chronically depressed patients. We also report on an attempt to quantify psychoanalysis-induced transformation in the manifest content of dreams. To do so, we used two independent methods. First, dreams reported during the cure of chronic depressed analysands were assessed by the treating psychoanalyst. Second, dreams reported in an experimental context were analyzed by an independent evaluator using a standardized method to quantify changes in dream content (Moser method). Single cases are presented. Preliminary results suggest that psychoanalysis-induced transformation can be assessed in an objective way. PMID:24381554

  17. A Historical Review of Diachrony and Semantic Dimensions of Trace in Neurosciences and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

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    Carolina Escobar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Experience leaves a trace in the nervous system through plasticity. However, the exact meaning of the mnesic trace is poorly defined in current literature. This article provides a historical review of the term trace in neuroscience and psychoanalysis literature, to highlight two relevant aspects: the diachronic and the semantic dimensions. There has been a general interest in diachrony, or a form of evolution of the trace, but its indissociable semantic dimension remains partially disregarded. Although frequently implied, the diachronic and semantic dimensions of the trace are rarely clearly articulated. We situate this discussion into the classical opposition of syntax, or rules of inscription of the trace in the nervous system, and semantics, or the content of the trace, which takes into consideration the attempt of the human being to build coherence. A general observation is that the study of the term trace follows trends of the thought of the given epoch. This historical analysis also reveals the decay of the idea that the trace is reliable to the experience. From the articulation between neurosciences and psychoanalysis in a historical perspective, this review shows that the trend is to consider trace as a production of the subject, resulting in a permanent rewriting in an attempt to give meaning to the experience. This trend is becoming increasingly evident in light of recent research in neurosciences and psychoanalysis.

  18. Arte, escritura y psicoanálisis. // Art, writing, and psychoanalysis.

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    Boris Gonzales Ceja.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This text is addressed to those interested in psychoanalysis and its intertextual relation: psychoanalysis, in theory or into practice, in communication with literature. Basically, the aim is the identification of problems between the psychoanalysis and its transference. For this, I deal with the literature of Julio Cortázar and the Letter of Lacan as the paradigm of these problems, since they facilitate the reading of the psychoanalytic knowledge. // Este texto está dirigido a los interesados en el psicoanálisis y su relación intertextual: psicoanálisis en su teoría o en su práctica en dialogo con la literatura. Básicamente, se intenta una problematización entre el psicoanálisis y su transmisión. Para ello, abordo como paradigma de esta problemática a la literatura de Julio Cortazar y la Letra de Jacques Lacan, por facilitar la lectura del saber del psicoanálisis.

  19. A Historical Review of Diachrony and Semantic Dimensions of Trace in Neurosciences and Lacanian Psychoanalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Escobar, Carolina; Ansermet, Franç ois; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2017-01-01

    Experience leaves a trace in the nervous system through plasticity. However, the exact meaning of the mnesic trace is poorly defined in current literature. This article provides a historical review of the term trace in neuroscience and psychoanalysis literature, to highlight two relevant aspects: the diachronic and the semantic dimensions. There has been a general interest in diachrony, or a form of evolution of the trace, but its indissociable semantic dimension remains partially disregarded. Although frequently implied, the diachronic and semantic dimensions of the trace are rarely clearly articulated. We situate this discussion into the classical opposition of syntax, or rules of inscription of the trace in the nervous system, and semantics, or the content of the trace, which takes into consideration the attempt of the human being to build coherence. A general observation is that the study of the term trace follows trends of the thought of the given epoch. This historical analysis also reveals the decay of the idea that the trace is reliable to the experience. From the articulation between neurosciences and psychoanalysis in a historical perspective, this review shows that the trend is to consider trace as a production of the subject, resulting in a permanent rewriting in an attempt to give meaning to the experience. This trend is becoming increasingly evident in light of recent research in neurosciences and psychoanalysis.

  20. [Psychoanalysis in the advanced vocational training of social workers, Berlin 1930-1933 (Verein Jugendheim)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Verein Jugendheim in Berlin-Charlottenburg was a holding organisation of welfare institutions and of training facilities for members of the caring professions. In 1928 it founded a Soziales Institute that offered various courses for advanced vocational training. In those courses depth psychology - mainly represented by the Adlerians, least by the Jungians and increasingly by the Freudians - had a prominent place. The role of the Freudian school was supported by the fact that two staff members of the Jugendheim (Hildegard Buder-Schenck, Ursula Graf [Laessig]) started their analytic training at that time. The main teachers of psychoanalysis at the Institute were Siegfried Bernfeld, Edith Jacobson and Steffi Bornstein; notes take by a student at one of Jacobson's seminars are documented in this paper. In general, in the psychoanalytic courses there seems to have been a shift from academic teaching of theory to case oriented supervision. The presence of psychoanalysis in the training program of the Jugendheim indicates the beginning of an institutional rapprochement between pedagogy or social work and psychoanalysis in Berlin, analogous to earlier developments in Vienna. The rise of the Nazis put a stop to this promising, yet hitherto completely unknown, chapter of history.

  1. The partnership of psychoanalysis and psychiatry in the treatment of psychosis and borderline states: its evolution in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothane, Zvi

    2011-01-01

    The history of psychiatry is about two hundred years old and that of psychoanalysis more than a hundred, with an important anniversary of the latter in 2011. Freud renewed and humanized psychiatry by enriching its static descriptive method with the new dynamic and interpretive discoveries of psychoanalysis. Freud's innovations, while developed in Europe, were integrated into psychiatry briefly by the Swiss School but mainly in the United States. After many years of fruitful collaboration psychiatry and psychoanalysis seemed to part company in the U.S. in the last few decades. However, the tradition of combining psychiatric care with dynamic principles is still considered valid in the treatment of psychoses and severe personality disorders.

  2. The fate of the dream in contemporary psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loden, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Freud's metapsychology of dream formation has implicitly been discarded, as indicated in a brief review of trends in psychoanalytic thinking about dreams, with a focus on the relationship of the dream process to ego capacities. The current bias toward exclusive emphasis on the exploration of the analytic relationship and the transference has evolved at the expense of classical, in-depth dream interpretation, and, by extension, at the expense of strengthening the patient's capacity for self-inquiry. This trend is shown to be especially evident in the treatment of borderline patients, who today are believed by many analysts to misuse the dream in the analytic situation. An extended clinical example of a borderline patient with whom an unmodified Freudian associative technique of dream interpretation is used with good outcome illustrates the author's contrary conviction. In clinical practice, we should neglect neither the uniqueness of the dream as a central intrapsychic event nor the Freudian art of total dream analysis.

  3. Psicanálise, saber e conhecimento Psychoanalysis, acquaintance and knowledge

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    Ana Cabral Rodrigues

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Em fins do século XIX ocorre, no plano da construção de conhecimentos, uma revolução: Freud, Marx e Nietzsche equivocam a certeza. Posteriormente, Göedel demonstra que, num sistema lógico, existe a possibilidade de contradição, um furo. A partir disto, este trabalho estuda as condições de produção do conhecimento em psicanálise, propondo uma dupla visada: lançar um olhar epistemológico sobre a psicanálise e pensar uma epistemologia a partir do que aquela possui de mais próprio e radical o Inconsciente. Acreditamos que o estudo desta relação é uma importante questão epistemológica, relevante para a compreensão da atividade científica como um todo.Towards the end of 19th century, a revolution takes place in the field of knowledge production: Freud, Marx and Nietzsche introduce the idea of a not totally guaranteed certainty. Afterwards, Gödel demonstrates the possibility of contradiction in a given logical system. Parting from these premises, this assay studies the knowledge production conditions in psychoanalysis and proposes a two way analysis: thinking psychoanalysis from an epistemological point of view, as well as thinking the contribution of psychoanalysis theory of Inconscient to an epistemology. We believe that the study of this relation is an important epistemological question, relevant to the comprehension of scientific activity as a whole.

  4. "Freud for all:" psychoanalysis and mass culture in Chile, 1920-1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperthuz Honorato, Mariano

    2017-11-01

    This article deals with the circulation and early spread of Freudianism in mass culture in Chilean society at the turn of the twentieth century. It documents the first references to Sigmund Freud in the Chilean media, the announcement of Freudian-style self-help classes, the appearance of psychoanalysts as characters in some fantasy novels, and the open lectures on psychoanalysis given by the first juvenile court judge in Santiago, the lawyer Samuel Gajardo Contreras. It explores the expectations projected onto Freudianism by the Chilean elite, and how Freud's theories contributed to a rethinking of childhood, the family and emotional life in Chile from 1920-1950.

  5. The Self-Organizing Psyche: Nonlinear and Neurobiological Contributions to Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. H.

    Sigmund Freud attempted to align nineteenth century biology (and the dynamically conservative, continuous, Newtonian mechanics that underlie it) with discontinuous conscious experience. His tactics both set the future course for psychoanalytic development and introduced seemingly intractable complications into its metapsychology. In large part, these arose from what we now recognize were biological errors and dynamical oversimplifications amid his physical assumptions. Their correction, brought about by integrating nonlinear dynamics and neuro-biological research findings with W. Bion's reading of metapsychology, fundamentally supports a psychoanalysis based upon D. W. Winnicott's ideas surrounding play within transitional space.

  6. Psychoanalysis as a Philosophical Revolution: Freud's Divergence From the Philosophy of Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jason

    2016-08-01

    In his classic, The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche described a philosophical worldview that has many similarities to Freudian metapsychology. This paper uses Freud's theories to analyze The Birth of Tragedy, discussing the similarities and differences between Nietzsche's philosophy and Freudian metapsychology. The author suggests that while psychoanalysis was born from the spirit of German philosophy, in that it based itself on a similar concept of the unconscious, Freud diverged from his predecessors to create a new worldview, based on the acceptance and integration of unconscious desire. This revolutionary theory provided a new approach to humanity's moral and existential issues.

  7. Constance Pascal's Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (1935): a French psychiatrist's views on psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Felicia

    2015-03-01

    In 1935 Constance Pascal (1877-1937), France's first woman psychiatrist, published Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (The Sorrows of Love and Psychosis). My analysis of her monograph will consider: her major article leading up to Chagrins; Pascal's debts to her predecessors, particularly Morel and Kretschmer; her relationship to the French psychoanalytic movement; her co-option of psychoanalysis as a tool in her own therapeutic work with patients in the state psychiatric system; and her social/cultural interpretations of her woman patients. The literary and philosophic aspects of her work are emphasized as well as her contribution to French psychiatry. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The tragic and the metaphysical in philosophy and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolorow, Robert D; Atwood, George E

    2013-06-01

    This article elaborates a claim, first introduced by Wilhelm Dilthey, that metaphysics represents an illusory flight from the tragedy of human finitude. Metaphysics, of which psychoanalytic metapsychologies are a form, transforms the unbearable fragility and transience of all things human into an enduring, permanent, changeless reality, an illusory world of eternal truths. Three "clinical cases" illustrate this thesis in the work and lives of a philosopher and two psychoanalytic theorists: Friedrich Nietzsche and his metaphysical doctrine of the eternal return of the same, Sigmund Freud and his dual instinct theory, and Heinz Kohut and his theoretical language of the self. It is contended that the best safeguard against the pitfalls of metaphysical illusion lies in a shared commitment to reflection on the constitutive contexts of all our theoretical ideas.

  9. Dante's Divine Comedy revisited: what can modern psychoanalysts learn from a medieval "psychoanalysis"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, R D

    2001-01-01

    I realize after having gone over this material that I have done a sort of deconstruction of Dante's Divine Comedy which putatively attempts to raise the human vision to transcendent heights and to focus love on the love of God, but which along the way indulges in the very human aspects of pity, compassion, music, poetry, and the other arts, as well as reason and puzzlement. In this sense the poem is also an exposition of the value of the higher human faculties, which contrasts at times rather vividly with the apparently harsh autocratic fates that are assigned to some characters--who do not seem quite deserving of what is inflicted upon them. Here we have a collision between absolute faith in the judgment of God and human reason and compassion which sometimes seems to be unable to justify these judgments. In spite of the fact that Dante is trying to adhere to orthodox theology throughout, it is clear that his poetic soul has great difficulty in avoiding the depiction of characters for whom he has a secret sympathy. The central point of this study of The Divine Comedy is to emphasize how Dante, almost in spite of himself, expressed empathy and understanding for a variety of unfortunates either in the Inferno or in the Purgatorio. Virgil even scolds him for his compassion, arguing that God's justice is always correct and if God is angry at someone and punishes him or her, Dante should also be angry and not compassionate. Dante tries, but he cannot quite manage to do it. Translated into modern terminology, we can learn from this report of a medieval "psychoanalysis" an important lesson in our clinical work. Rigid adherence to rules such as those Freud himself proclaimed (although he never followed them), for instance in his famous demand that one be always opaque to the patient, and/or rigid adherence to one or another psychoanalytic theory, must be understood as a form of countertransference, a character flaw in the analyst. Each case demands its own approach and its

  10. Problems of collegial learning in psychoanalysis: narcissism and curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Warren S

    2009-04-01

    Despite clinical sensitivity when listening to patients, analysts have not fared well in hearing and talking to each other with respectful open-mindedness. Underlying factors are considered with particular focus on the interplay between self-aimed forces of narcissism and outward-aimed forces of curiosity. Included in examination of problems of collegial communication are limitations structurally inherent to the human mind (such as the need to abstract aspects of experience in order to focus attention plus the mind's tendency to categorical thinking), those derived from individual psychology (such as vulnerability of self-esteem), and those related to group dynamics (such as the problems attendant to new ideas and the allegiances they stir, parochialism and the development of radical schools, the competitiveness between schools). The contribution of cultural influences and the multiply determined uses of language are also highlighted. The core sense of smallness in the strangeness of the universe and in the presence of others is seen as a common thread.

  11. The termination phase of psychoanalysis in a narcissistic personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, H

    This paper describes a patient whose termination phase of analysis activated an intense mourning reaction that helped to overcome the stalemate of therapy. After I attempted to demonstrate how her narcissistic armouring yielded when the termination of analysis was agreed upon, the psychological reenactment of a split off (disavowed) trauma of an early loss (her father) and the failure of essential attributes in maternal care became manifested behind her narcissistic defenses. The reconstruction of these events was possible during the process of mourning. At the termination phase she behaved as if she "had lost the war"; from the point of view of her masochism it was a Pyrrhic victory, "a victory through defeat". Contrary to mother, I let her go but then she refused to go, which created a situation that activated a profound mourning reaction leading to important structural changes. A review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature on termination along with clinical material derived from the termination phase of a patient with a narcissistic personality is presented.

  12. Interpersonal rivalries, gender and the intellectual and scientific making of psychoanalysis in 1940s Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Michal

    2017-05-01

    This article examines the 1940s debates regarding the status and professional orthodoxy of psychoanalysis following Sigmund Freud's death, by exploring the Anna Freud-Melanie Klein Controversial Discussions in the British Psychoanalytical Society. Focusing on the work of now-forgotten analysts Melitta Schmideberg and Edward Glover, and on their relationship with Klein and her supporters, the article reveals how these neglected, yet important, debates were complicated by interpersonal and professional ties, processes of the professionalization, and changing gender norms. Although historians of psychoanalysis have not ignored the jealousies, resentments, and complex relationships between psychoanalysts, these scholars often continue to view these as separate from the processes of creating science. Here, instead, I view the personal and the intellectual in tandem, thus challenging the divide between scientific reason and affect. Rather than imposing a separation between the scientific and the personal, I suggest that we should explore how historical actors negotiated the divide themselves. Indeed, I demonstrate that the study of interpersonal contexts is an invaluable tool for understanding the development of psychological disciplines. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. DESIRE AND PLEASURE IN THE BRANDED REALITY SHOW AS A DISCURSIVE PSYCHOANALYSIS

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    Bambang Sukma Wijaya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of branded reality show is still very limited, especially in the perspective of discursive psychoanalysis. In fact, the phenomenon of reality show is currently growing in the television industry, so brands are inspired to create similar programs. This paper aims to analyze the desire and pleasure of success are presented and disclosed by branded reality show ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ on a national TV channel in Indonesia. Using discursive psychoanalysis method in the Lacanian perspective, author found that participants in the ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ saw competitors (other participants as ‘other’ in imaginary phase which is the object of desire in having the pleasure of success, while the audience used the praticipants as reflection of their desire and pleasure of success. There are two tendencies of the spectatorship style in responding to the discourse. In one hand the audiences tend to be more emphatic and figural, while on the other hand they tend to be more logic and systematic. In addition, the desire and pleasure of success in the ‘Diplomat Success Challenge’ becomes a powerful discourse that alienated negative issues related to the Diplomat as a tobacco product brand. Thus, the politics of reality through a discourse of success in the branded reality show has successfully infiltrated into the subconscious and control the public consciousness.

  14. Toward an ethics of psychoanalysis: a critical reading of Lacan's ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Lewis A

    2012-12-01

    Lacan's seminar The Ethics of Psychoanalysis (1959-1960) pursues, from a Freudian perspective, a fundamental philosophical question classically addressed by Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics: How is human life best lived and fulfilled? Is there is an ethic of this type intrinsic to psychoanalysis? Lacan placed the problem of desire at the center of his Ethics. His notorious self-authorized freedom from convention and probable crossing of limits (see Roudinesco 1993) may have led mainstream analysts to ignore his admonition: "At every moment we need to know what our effective relationship is to the desire to do good, to the desire to cure" (Lacan 1959-1960, p. 219). This means that the analyst's desire, as well as the patient's, is always in play in his attempt to sustain an ethical position. An examination of Lacan's seminar highlights this link, but also points to a number of unresolved issues. The patient's desire is a complex matter, readily entangled in neurotic compromise, defense, and transference, and the analyst's commitment to it is also problematic because of the inevitable co-presence of his own desire. Lacan suggested that more emphasis be placed in training on the desire of the analyst, but beyond that a proposal is advanced for the institutionalization of a "third" as reviewer and interlocutor in routine analytic practice. Analysis may not be a discipline that can be limited to a dyadic treatment relationship.

  15. [Psychoanalysis and facism: two incompatible approaches. The difficult role of Edoardo Weiss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accerboni, A M

    1988-01-01

    Edoardo Weiss, the only direct disciple of Freud in Italy, returned to Trieste, his native town, in 1919 after a long period of psychoanalitical studies in Vienna. An enthusiastic acceptance of Freud's ideas in the cultural, mainly Jewish, circles in Trieste was parallel to a sort of distrust of the Fascist ideology. In 1930 Weiss decided to move to Rome where he hoped to be able to found an Italian psychoanalytical movement. The Catholic Church, Fascist Ideology, philosophical Idealism and scientific Positivism were all factors hampering the spread of psychoanalysis in Italy. In 1932 Weiss founded the Italian Psychoanalytical Society in Rome with a very small number of followers. The relations between Weiss' newborn Society and the dictatorship were going to be quite troublesome. Ernst Jones was drastically accused by Weiss of misrepresenting his entrée with Mussolini. Thanks to Weiss' efforts the Italian society was acknowledged by the I.P.A. Finally, mention will be made of Weiss' forced move to America as a result of the racial laws, and of the consequences for the future of Psychoanalysis in Italy.

  16. The interface between neuroscience and neuro-psychoanalysis: focus on brain connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolia eSalone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, the advent of advanced techniques has significantly enhanced our knowledge on the brain. Yet, our understanding of the physiological and pathological functioning of the mind is still far from being exhaustive. Both the localizationist and the reductionist neuroscientific approaches to psychiatric disorders have proven to be largely unsatisfactory and are outdated. Accruing evidence suggests that psychoanalysis can engage the neurosciences in a productive and mutually enriching dialogue that may further our understanding of psychiatric disorders. In particular, advances in brain connectivity research have provided evidence supporting the convergence of neuroscientific findings and psychoanalysis and helped characterize the circuitry and mechanisms that underlie higher brain functions. In the present paper we discuss how knowledge on brain connectivity can impact neuropsychoanalysis, with a particular focus on schizophrenia. Brain connectivity studies in schizophrenic patients indicate complex alterations in brain functioning and circuitry, with particular emphasis on the role of cortical midline structures and the default mode network. These networks seem to represent neural correlates of psychodynamic concepts central to the understanding of schizophrenia and of core psychopathological alterations of this disorder (i.e. ego disturbances and impaired primary process thinking.

  17. [Psychoanalysis during the Nazi era. Contemporary consequences of a historical controversy: the Wilhelm Reich "case"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzschke, B

    1999-01-01

    The paper sheds light on the extent of collaboration between the pre-World War II German Psychoanalytic Society (DPG) and the Nazi regime. This is shown by the story of the expulsion of Wilhelm Reich from membership in the DPG, at Freud's own bid. A leading German psychoanalyst, Carl Müller-Braunschweig, published the paper "Psychoanalysis and Weltanschauung" in the fanatically "national" (so-called "völkisch") Nazi propaganda organ Reichswart in 1993 following consultations with officials of the International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA) who endorsed these policies. This paper by Müller-Braunschweig was used both to prevent the possible outlawing of psychoanalysis by the Nazis and to deny official DPG support to Wilhelm Reich and the group of leftist-oriented IPA analysts who joined forces with him in opposing Nazi ideology. The paper concludes with examples from post-1945 historiography showing how the exclusion of Reich and the related DPG/IPA compromise and "appeasement" policy were either ignored or disclaimed.

  18. Between Marxism and psychoanalysis: antifascism and antihomosexuality in the Frankfurt School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, R

    1995-01-01

    In their efforts to utilize individualist psychoanalysis as a tool for understanding mass behavior, the social theorists associated with the Frankfurt School increasingly came to rely on a static, essentializing construction of sexuality which ultimately led to an equation of fascism and homosexuality. Heretofore unexamined in studies of the Frankfurt School, this equation will here serve as the starting point for a fundamental critique of the concept of sexuality developed by this influential circle of Marxist thinkers. While directed at the concept of sexuality, such a critique more importantly opens up the underlying understanding of the social and psychological realms advanced by Critical Theory. Attending to the equation of homosexuality and fascism as the central point of concern, this essay will first trace the introduction of psychoanalysis into Critical Theory through Erich Fromm and then investigate the extent of Fromm's influence on the concept of sexuality propounded by his colleagues, especially Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno. Finally, it will take up a frequently overlooked essay by Herbert Marcuse which promoted a vision of sexuality radically different from that of his associates.

  19. [Hedonism and revolution. The reception of psychoanalysis in the Berlin student movement in the 1960s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The article takes hedonism and revolution as a vantage point to discuss the Kommune 2, an experiment in collective living, the anti-authoritarian kindergardens for the under-fives, and, last but not least, a speech in 1968 that spurred the women's movement in Western Germany. The author's interest is on the materials documenting how the Berlin student movement saw psychoanalysis: One point was that the pleasure principle should replace the reality principle for the sake of humankind, another that the authoritarian character structure has its roots in the denial of sexuality. Kindergarden children supposedly need "de-individualized identification" to develop ego-strength, when boys and girls differ in their superego organization. An important accomplishment was a group analysis conducted without an analyst, an experiment that worked amazingly well in the Kommune 2. In all, these various experiments in emancipation, with psychoanalysis a guide to interpersonal understanding, may be deemed spectacular when their aftereffects on everyday life in Germany have been tremendous.

  20. The Interface between Neuroscience and Neuro-Psychoanalysis: Focus on Brain Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salone, Anatolia; Di Giacinto, Alessandra; Lai, Carlo; De Berardis, Domenico; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Risio, Luisa; Santacroce, Rita; Martinotti, Giovanni; Giannantonio, Massimo Di

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the advent of advanced techniques has significantly enhanced our knowledge on the brain. Yet, our understanding of the physiological and pathological functioning of the mind is still far from being exhaustive. Both the localizationist and the reductionist neuroscientific approaches to psychiatric disorders have proven to be largely unsatisfactory and are outdated. Accruing evidence suggests that psychoanalysis can engage the neurosciences in a productive and mutually enriching dialogue that may further our understanding of psychiatric disorders. In particular, advances in brain connectivity research have provided evidence supporting the convergence of neuroscientific findings and psychoanalysis and helped characterize the circuitry and mechanisms that underlie higher brain functions. In the present paper we discuss how knowledge on brain connectivity can impact neuropsychoanalysis, with a particular focus on schizophrenia. Brain connectivity studies in schizophrenic patients indicate complex alterations in brain functioning and circuitry, with particular emphasis on the role of cortical midline structures (CMS) and the default mode network (DMN). These networks seem to represent neural correlates of psychodynamic concepts central to the understanding of schizophrenia and of core psychopathological alterations of this disorder (i.e., ego disturbances and impaired primary process thinking). PMID:26869904

  1. Linguagem como alternativa ao aspecto quantitativo em psicanálise Language as alternative for the quantitative aspects in psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldir Beividas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo faz parte de uma pesquisa mais ampla que visa explorar as conseqüências intrínsecas à hipótese do inconsciente estruturado como linguagem se levada à sua radicalidade. Para tanto, focamos a problemática que envolve os conceitos referentes à energética freudiana, especialmente o de afeto, e os eventuais riscos de apropriações por projetos de agregação da psicanálise às neurociências. Ou seja, ao invés de adentrarmos nos meandros do regime quantitativo presente desde a obra freudiana e decorrentes aproximações com temas neurocientíficos, buscamos percorrer a outra possibilidade de abordagem dos fenômenos clínicos e psicopatológicos igualmente latentes no método psicanalítico, a saber, a exploração da linguagem e do sentido.The following article is included in a larger range research program that intents to explore the inner consequences of the hypothesis of the unconscious structured as a language if taken into account radically. This way, we highlight the problematics that involves the Freudian energetic concepts, specially the affect concept, and the risks that surround them and may lead to eventual undertaken projects of the psychoanalysis by the neurocientific theories. Therefore, instead of entering in the quantitative regime core presents since the beginning of the Freudian works and consequent nearings with neurocientific issues, we'll search to delimit the other approach possibility for the clinical and psychopathological events equally concernent to the psychoanalitic method: the exploration of language and meaning exploration.

  2. Dr Jekels' health resort in Bystra near Bielsko: the first treatment centre which adopted psychoanalysis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembińska, Edyta; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-29

    The paper sets out to present the history of a health resort and hydrotherapy centre in Bystra near Bielsko from 1898 to 1912. At that time Dr Ludwik Jekels, one of the Polish psychoanalysis forerunners, was the owner of the centre. Initially, Dr Jekels was very enthusiastic about climatic treatment and hydrotherapy, until 1905 when he got interested in psychoanalysis. Shortly afterwards he became its staunch supporter and adopted it as a curative procedure in his health resort. That was the first documented case of psychoanalysis use in Poland. This paper presents the development of the therapeutic centre in Bystra and the characteristic of typical patients receiving treatment there. It also briefly reports on medical histories of the conditions of patients who received psychoanalytic treatment. The paper also focuses on another significant area of Dr Jekels'contact with Sigmund Freud ranging from an accidental meeting in Vienna around 1898, through the summer of 1910 when Jekels looked after Freud's daughters in his spa, to 1912 which saw Jekels'receiving psychoanalytic treatment from Freud. It also presents a detailed analysis of hypotheses why Jekels decided to sell the health resort and move to Vienna. Finally, the significance of Jekels'currently underrated therapeutic work for the development of the Polish psychoanalysis is reiterated.

  3. Pichon Rivière's psychoanalytic contributions: Some comparisons with object relations and modern developments in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, David E; Losso, Roberto; Setton, Lea

    2017-02-01

    Enrique Pichon Rivière's work, fundamental to Latin American and European psychoanalytic development, is largely unknown in English-language psychoanalysis. Pichon's central contribution, the link (el vinculo), describes relational bonds in all dimensions. People are born into, live in, and relate through links. Psychic structure is built of links that then influence external interaction. Links, expressed in mind, body and external action, continuously join internal and external worlds. Links have two axes: vertical axis links connect generations through unconscious transgenerational transmission; horizontal axis links connect persons to life partners, family, community and society. For Pichon, treatment constitutes a spiral process through which interpretation disrupts existent structures, promoting new emergent organizations at successively deeper levels. Psychic and link structures evolve over time unless repetitive cycles stunt growth. For Pichon, transference is constituted in the here-and-now-with-me because of the analytic link. Pichon also undertook family and group psychoanalysis where individuals become spokespersons for unconscious links and family secrets. He developed operative groups that apply psychoanalysis to both analytic and non-analytic tasks. After describing Pichon's major contributions, the paper compares Pichon Rivière's ideas with those of Klein, Fairbairn, Bion, Winnicott and Bowlby, and contemporary writers including Ogden, Kaës, and Ferro whose works echo Pichon Rivière's thought. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  4. Therapy and ideology: psychoanalysis and its vicissitudes in pre-state Israel (including some hitherto unpublished letters by Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolnik, Eran J

    2010-12-01

    Few chapters in the historiography of psychoanalysis are as densely packed with trans-cultural, ideological, institutional, and moral issues as the coming of psychoanalysis to Jewish Palestine--a geopolitical space which bears some of the deepest scars of twentieth-century European, and in particular German, history. From the historical as well as the critical perspective, this article reconstructs the intricate connections between migration, separation and loss, continuity and new beginning which resonate in the formative years of psychoanalysis in pre-state Israel.

  5. A Non-oedipal Psychoanalysis? Clinical Anthropology of Hysteria in the works of Freud and Lacan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haute, P.I.M.M. van; Geyskens, T.A.L.

    2012-01-01

    The different psychopathologic syndromes show in an exaggerated and caricatural manner the basic structures of human existence. These structures not only characterize psychopathology, but they also determine the highest forms of culture. This is the credo of Freud's anthropology. This anthropology

  6. 'In good times and in bad': boundary relations of psychoanalysis in post-war USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, José; Ophir, Orna

    2011-06-01

    This paper suggests writing the history of psychoanalysis by focusing on the manifold ways in which its practitioners may relate to the boundaries dividing it from its neighbouring professions. This approach is illustrated by two loosely interrelated examples: the 1950s debate among leading US psychoanalysts on whether borderline patients can be analysed, and the 1990s responses of psychoanalysts to psychopharmacological treatments of schizophrenia. A close reading of psychoanalysts' journal publications reveals in each instance multiplicity (of voices), instability (of boundaries), duality (of defence and dialogue) and simultaneity (of internal and external addressees). At the same time, a common rhetorical stance emerged in each period, serving as a shared discursive frame while allowing a plurality of boundary relations.

  7. Existential analysis and psychoanalysis: specific differences and personal relationship between Ludwig Binswanger and Sigmund Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Karl-Ernst

    2004-01-01

    The concise curriculum vitae of the founder of existential analysis is followed by an exact comparison of the polarity (homo natura versus homo cultura) between Binswanger and Freud. Then the five stages in the development of (Existential Daseinsanalysis Analysis) are described: the stage of learning, of practice, of criticism, of the alternative to psychoanalysis, and of reconciliation. The criticism is aimed especially at Freud's naturalism and at the concept of drive. These concepts are opposed by ontoanalytic doctrines derived from Heidegger's ontoanalysis. The differences are further exemplified by the comparison of the existentialanalytical and the psychoanalytical view of the unconscious. A presentation of the treatment of a "hysterical phobia," which is first explained in psychoanalytic terms and later in existentialanalytic terminology (mainly concerning the world-projects) makes the difference between the two schools of thought explicit.

  8. Silence in the Communication or Communicating through Silence: Silence in Psychoanalysis

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    Rita Marta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a reflection upon the meaning and importance of silence in the psychoanalytical relationship. Beginning with the silence in the “normal” relationship between people, we show how silence can be experienced as confortable or unconfortable, and how it can be used to achieve a bigger proximity or distance in the relationship with others. We show these same aspects in the psychoanalytical relationship, and the evolution of the regard towards silence along the development of psychoanalysis. We end, presenting the Nacht’s thinking about silence, who emphasizes its integrative and fundamental role in the psychoanalytical relationship. Thus, only through silence certain affects can be born, and silence allows the patient to internalize the analyst.

  9. The child as a traumatic self-component in Ferenczi's later psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókay, Antal

    2015-03-01

    In the Ferenczi renaissance of the last few decades it has become more and more important to elaborate and reconstruct the general shape, the "Weltanschauung", of his psychoanalysis. The construct of his "psychoanalytic anthropology" is based on the relational nature of individual existence. Relationality pervades the life narrative through the concept and role of the trauma and is crucial to the understanding of Ferenczi's self-concept. He understood the human individual as essentially fragmented in a "preprimal" way, in which the split self contains the child, as an active, always present infantile component. Through powerful allegories like the "Orpha" or the "wise baby," Ferenczi suggested an essentially post-modern idea of self that can be connected and differentiated from Winnicott's True and False Self.

  10. Psychoanalysis, religion and enculturation: reflections through the life of mother Teresa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Kaif

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores the question of whether psychoanalysis can help those who adhere to a worldview that is non-psychoanalytic or even anti-psychoanalytic. It answers this question by comparing the psychoanalytic understanding of suffering with that of the Catholic faith, through the latter's idea of the 'dark night of the soul'. The life of Mother Teresa is taken as an illustration of the dark night and how it may be responded to by the faithful. Similarities and differences between the two approaches are pointed out. Finally, it is suggested that psychoanalytic perspectives may enrich the inner lives of those living by a religious worldview, without necessarily diluting that worldview. Further, religious counsellors too may benefit from an understanding of psychoanalytic perspectives.

  11. O social e suas vicissitudes na psicanálise lacaniana The social and its vicissitudes in Lacanian psychoanalysis

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    Nilton Ken Ota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O deslocamento das interpretações do legado teórico de Jacques Lacan promovido pela Associação Mundial de Psicanálise (AMP tem incorporado cada vez mais o social em suas elaborações clínicas e nas propostas de intervenção fora do setting clássico. A principal delas, a chamada "psicanálise aplicada à terapêutica", consolida esse deslocamento e fornece as chaves para a unificação diagnóstica entre sintomas individuais e fenômenos culturais, notadamente por meio da amenização da influência do estruturalismo na trama conceitual da obra de Lacan. A consequente destituição do "simbólico" em favor de uma "clínica do real" aplicada ao social expressa a intensificação da conversão da teoria lacaniana em discurso e dispositivo de controle, sendo este o verdadeiro significado da emergência das questões políticas e culturais da sociedade no núcleo do lacanismo hegemônico.The shift in the interpretations of Jacques Lacan's theoretical legacy promoted by the International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA has increasingly incorporated the social into its clinical formulations and proposals for therapeutic intervention beyond the classical setting. The main such proposal, dubbed 'applied psychoanalysis,' consolidates this shift and provides the theoretical means for the diagnostic unification of individual symptoms and cultural phenomena, notably by reducing the influence of structuralism on the conceptual framework of Lacan's work. The resulting displacement of the 'symbolic' in favour of a 'clinical practice of the real,' as applied to the social, expresses an intensification in the process of converting Lacanian theory into a discourse and device for social control, the latter being the true significance of the emergence of political and cultural issues relating to society at the core of hegemonic Lacanianism.

  12. Cyclones, bi-cycles, and psychoanalysis: the witch-of-us? complex and The Wizard of Oz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Works of applied psychoanalysis normally use psychoanalytic theory to reveal the secret meanings of works of art. An attempt is made to reverse the directionality of such analyses and see whether a work of art, The Wizard of Oz, has something to teach psychoanalysis about adolescent female psychosexual development. The author argues that the popularity and importance of the film is an effect of its symbolic representation of a girl's entry into menarche, and the meaning of this milestone for herself and for her mother. He addresses ideas about feminine castration fears (or what more recently have been called fears of genital injury), issues about menopause, and fantasies--both surprising and violent--around the meanings of menarche for both mother and daughter.

  13. Observaciones sobre el factor electivo y su agente en psicoanálisis Observations on the elective factor and its agent in psychoanalysis

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    Arturo Frydman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de la pregunta "¿Qué instancia psíquica es la responsable de las elecciones que suponemos en la producción de la neurosis como manifestación patológica, e incluso en la elección de la neurosis o la psicosis como tipo clínico?" el trabajo se propone pesquisar en las referencias bibliográficas clásicas de Freud y Lacan en relación al factor electivo en psicoanálisis, aquellos indicadores que permitan dar cuenta del agente de las elecciones, o bien de la ambigüedad respecto de tal lugar.The work takes as the starting point the question: What psychic instance is the responsible for the elections that we suppose in the neurosis production as a pathological manifestation, and even in the election of the neurosis or the psychosis as a clinical type? This works sets out to investigate in the classical bibliographical references of Freud and Lacan, in relation to the elective factor in psychoanalysis, those indicators that would allow us to look for the agent of the elections, or of the ambiguity with regard to that place.

  14. 'Speaking Kleinian': Susan Isaacs as Ursula Wise and the Inter-War Popularisation of Psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Michal

    2017-10-01

    How did the complex concepts of psychoanalysis become popular in early twentieth-century Britain? This article examines the contribution of educator and psychoanalyst Susan Isaacs (1885-1948) to this process, as well as her role as a female expert in the intellectual and medical history of this period. Isaacs was one of the most influential British psychologists of the inter-war era, yet historical research on her work is still limited. The article focuses on her writing as 'Ursula Wise', answering the questions of parents and nursery nurses in the popular journal Nursery World, from 1929 to 1936. Researched in depth for the first time, Isaacs' important magazine columns reveal that her writing was instrumental in disseminating the work of psychoanalyst Melanie Klein in Britain. Moreover, Isaacs' powerful rebuttals to behaviourist, disciplinarian parenting methods helped shift the focus of caregivers to the child's perspective, encouraging them to acknowledge children as independent subjects and future democratic citizens. Like other early psychoanalysts, Isaacs was not an elitist; she was in fact committed to disseminating her ideas as broadly as possible. Isaacs taught British parents and child caregivers to 'speak Kleinian', translating Klein's intellectual ideas into ordinary language and thus enabling their swift integration into popular discourse.

  15. THE GRAMMAR OF PSYCHOANALYSIS A GRAMÁTICA DA PSICANÁLISE

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    João José Rodrigues Lima de Almeida

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is a defense of a philosophy of psychoanalysis with no interference whatever in the autonomy of the analyzed discipline. To comply with this objective, the Wittgensteinian philosophical method and its related concepts of grammar, grammatical description, and therapy, are being proposed. Such therapeutical objects of comparison are then applied to a case of use of psychoanalytic concepts in a text from Lacan's Seminar XV, to show a practical example of the kind of philosophy that we favor.    Este artigo faz a defesa de uma filosofia da psicanálise que não interfira na autonomia da disciplina que analisa. Para tanto, propõe o método filosófico wittgensteiniano e faz uma breve exposição dos conceitos de gramática, descrição gramatical e terapia em seu contexto literário original. A seguir, esses conceitos terapêuticos são aplicados a um caso de uso de conceitos psicanalíticos num texto do Seminário XV, de Lacan, para servir como exemplo prático para a proposta de um projeto de investigação filosófica do corpus textual lacaniano.

  16. Forerunner of the Science of Psychoanalysis? An Essay on the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The inquisitions in Spain and Portugual were state organs, rather than church-run enterprises; their purpose to modernize disparate jurisdictions during the final stages of Reconquista (return of Moorish areas to Christian administration) to ensure security and loyalty. So many Jews converted (under duress or willingly for strategic reasons) and inter-married with middle-class and aristocratic families, that their sincerity and loyalty was suspected, This meant going beyond traditional monitoring of ritual acts and social behaviour; there was a need to look below the surface, to interpret ambiguity, and to break codes of duplicity. Inquisitors developed techniques of a form of psychoanalysis before the discoveries of Freud: methods of questioning to bring out repressed beliefs and motivations, unriddling equivocational performance and speech-acts, and integrating fragments of information from family members, business associates and neighbours collected over many years. Torture, more threatened than actual, and lengthy incarceration punctuated by periods of exile and re-arrest after years quiet, provoked desperate confessions and specious denunciations, all of which had to be subject to intense scrutiny and analysis. The assumption was modern: a person's self was no longer equivalent to their words and actions; instead, a deep dark and traumatized inner self to be revealed.

  17. Enrique Pichon Rivière's conception of reality in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbiser, Samuel

    2017-02-01

    The author places the subject of his paper in the context of the original views of a school of Argentinian psychoanalysts that differed from traditional conceptions of man and his relationship with the sociocultural context - that is, with reality. These were the analysts who followed Enrique Pichon Rivière and further developed his ideas - namely, Madeleine and Willy Baranger, José Bleger, and David Liberman. The author begins his exposition with a discussion of Pichon Rivière and culture. He then offers an outline of Pichon Rivière's particular conception of man, followed by a section on the Internal Group as the nexus between the psyche and reality. Further sections address the idea of reality in the analytic situation as a dynamic field and the operative definition of the transference; the distinction between perceptual reality and the reading of reality, with a consideration of the notion of 'critical judgement'; and lastly the issue of health and illness in terms of adaptation to reality. In addition, on the basis of a quotation from Antonio Damasio, the author draws a parallel between these psychoanalytic thinkers' 'psychosocial' approach to man and the findings of contemporary neuroscience as presented by one of its paradigmatic protagonists. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  18. The Receding Animal: Theorizing Anxiety and Attachment in Psychoanalysis from Freud to Imre Hermann.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Lydia; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Argument Animals played an important role in the formation of psychoanalysis as a theoretical and therapeutic enterprise. They are at the core of texts such as Freud's famous case histories of Little Hans, the Rat Man, or the Wolf Man. The infantile anxiety triggered by animals provided the essential link between the psychology of individual neuroses and the ambivalent status of the "totem" animal in so-called primitive societies in Freud's attempt to construct an anthropological basis for the Oedipus complex in Totem and Taboo. In the following, we attempt to track the status of animals as objects of indirect observation as they appear in Freud's classical texts, and in later revisionist accounts such as Otto Rank's Trauma of Birth and Imre Hermann's work on the clinging instinct. In the 1920s and 1930s, the Freudian conception of patients' animal phobias is substantially revised within Hermann's original psychoanalytic theory of instincts which draws heavily upon ethological observations of primates. Although such a reformulation remains grounded in the idea of "archaic" animal models for human development, it allows to a certain extent to empiricize the speculative elements of Freud's later instinct theory (notably the death instinct) and to come to a more embodied account of psychoanalytic practice.

  19. O mal-estar na modernidade e a psicanálise: a psicanálise à prova do social The discontent in modernity and psychoanalysis: social-proof psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Birman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo tem a intenção de indicar a presença de dois discursos teóricos opostos em Freud, no que concerne às relações entre sujeito e modernidade. Pretende-se demonstrar que na sua segunda versão, desenvolvida em Mal-estar na civilização, o discurso psicanalítico realizou uma crítica sistemática de sua versão inicial, esboçada em "Moral sexual 'civilizada' e a doença nervosa dos tempos modernos". Pela construção dos conceitos de desamparo e de mal-estar, o discurso freudiano colocou então a psicanálise à prova do social. Além disso, indica que aquela pôde construir uma leitura sobre a modernidade, ao lado das que foram realizadas por Weber e Heidegger. Finalmente, esse percurso tem ainda a finalidade de pensar a crise da psicanálise na atualidade, nas novas condições do mal-estar na modernidade.The article aims at showing the presence of two opposing theoretical discourses in Freud, in what concerns the relationship between the subject and modemity. It intends to demonstrate that in its second version, developed in Malaise dansia civilisation, the analytical discourse achieved a systematic critical review of its initial version outlined in "La morale sexuelle 'civilisée' et la maladie nerveuse des temps modemes". Through constructing the concepts of discontent and distress, the Freudian discourse thus made psychoanalysis social-proof. ln addition, it indicates that psychoanalysis was able to build a reading of modemity other than those made by Weber and Heidegger. Finally, this joumey also aims at thinking over the present crisis of psychoanalysis within the new conditions of discontent in modemity.

  20. [The "return of the repressed": the role of sexuality in the reception of psychoanalysis in Chilean medical circles, 1910-1940].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato, Mariano Ruperthuz

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the reception of psychoanalysis in Chilean medical circles from the decade of 1910 onwards. The findings make it possible to reconstruct how Freudianism was initially rejected by the incipient local psychiatric milieu, accusing it of being pansexualist. In the 1930s, this situation changed, and a reassessment of psychoanalysis was made at a local level, describing it precisely as a branch of knowledge specialized in sexuality. The highlighting of the "sublimation" mechanism, esteemed for its ability to transmute the danger of the "id" into culturally accepted products, is a milestone that marked this "return of the repressed" of the sexual factor of psychoanalysis in Chile. The possible social, political and economic variables that influenced this phenomenon are duly discussed.

  1. Estudo eletromiográfico dos músculos adutor longo e vasto medial (fibras oblíquas), durante exercícios de agachamento com e sem a adução do quadril

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio de Faro Passos

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: os músculos adutor longo (ADL) e vasto medial (VM), incluindo suas fibras oblíquas (VMO), possuem relações anatômicas e funcionais. O músculo VMO é estabilizador da patela, portanto inúmeros trabalhos EMG procuram determinar exercícios que aumentem a atividade deste músculo. Este estudo teve como objetivo relacionar a atividade do músculo VMO com a adução do quadril e com a contração do músculo ADL em exercícios de agachamento com e sem apoio dorsal para ambos os sexos. CASUÍSTICA...

  2. [Anxiety, nostalgia and melancholy. A few remarks on psychoanalysis and tango].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Jorge; Capello, Osvaldo Jorge; Caso de Leveratto, Beatriz; Neuman, Vera; Retondano, Rafael Alberto; Silvani de Capello, Stella Maris; Etchegoyen, R Horacio

    2004-01-01

    Our work is based on the application of psychoanalytic techniques, in order to unveil this cultural phenomenon called tango, related with sexuality and unconscious processes. As a way of introduction, it deals with a brief theory of the birth of tango, the possible terminological source of its name, its main creators and interpreters, as well as the chronological classification into the first wave tangos, Guardia Vieja, and the newer wave tangos, Guardia Nueva. The former ones were awash with festive themes of the centennial years, expressed in behaviors that denote sexuality and love, whereas the latter ones, expose the great bewilderment of the thirties' crisis, due to the imminent downfall of the country, the denunciation of materialism, the crumbling of ideas; which led up to feelings of utter pessimism, loneliness and abandonment. From this point onwards, through the use of techniques provided by psychoanalysis applied to tango lyrics, we are able to unravel the unconscious processes of the drama of its characters; the immigrant, hopeful and at same time nostalgic for the loss of his mother country; the porteno -urban man from Buenos Aires city- who, overwhelmed by immigrants, has to give way to the new compatriots; the inland inhabitant, who was dragged to the city because of the new conditions of rural work; and finally the conventillo, tenement house, as a melting pot that fulfilled the integration of these groups. Like in a painter's palette, which contains various colors and shades, the interpretations about nostalgia, grief and loneliness become apparent, along with the father-son rivalry, the conflict with the absent mother, the relationship between sexes, male chauvinism, infatuation, identity, the fear of death, the rebirth to a new life, the passage from gaucho to guapo, from a shrewd horseman to a daring, bullying braggart.

  3. Framework for a new dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences: is the combined neuro-psychoanalytic approach the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaslamatzis Grigoris

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Freud's legacy deriving from his work The project for a scientific psychology (1895 could give a new impetus to the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences. A rapproachment phase is warrented. Based on the work of psychoanalysts who are themselves neuroscientists (such as Mauro Mancia, Martha Koukkou and Harold Shevrin or have a long term dialogue with neuroscientists (Arnold Modell, three points of epistemological congruence are described: 1. dualism is no longer a satisfactory solution 2. cautions for the centrality of interpretation (hermeneutics 3. the self-criticism of neuroscientists

  4. History and Psychology—Oral History and Psychoanalysis. Development of a Problematic Relationship. Outline and Literature Survey

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    Alexander von Plato

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the relationship between two scientific fields—history and psychology—with a focus on their connections during the last 150 years and about the meaning of subjectivity in history. It addresses possibilities of cooperation, taking as an example the relationship of oral history and psychoanalysis. The article emphasizes the problems regarding unconscious elements in history as well as the perception and "digestion" of history by the individual and the collective memory. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0401181

  5. Love and/in psychoanalysis: a commentary on Lacan's reading of Plato's Symposium in Seminar VIII: Transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    What is love and what part does it play in psychoanalysis? Where are the analyst and the analysand situated in relation to the roles defined as those of the "lover" and the "beloved"? Jacques Lacan explores these and other questions in his soon-to-be-published Seminar VIII: Transference by providing an extensive commentary on Plato's most famous dialogue on love, the Symposium. This paper outlines some of the major points about love that grow out of Lacan's reading of the dialogue and examines their relevance to the analytic setting. Can the analyst be characterized as a sort of modern-day Socrates?

  6. The saga of psychoanalysis in Eastern Europe: repression and rebirth in Hungary, and in former Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia

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    Judit Mészáros

    Full Text Available Abstract The paper shortly presents the early roles of Budapest, Prague, and Belgrade in the development of psychoanalytic movement in Central-Europe before the Second World War. Mapping this historical heritage, it suggests how psychoanalysts of former Soviet Bloc countries could restore their own psychoanalytic communities. The study investigates the consequences of these dictatorial and authoritarian regimes for psychoanalysis and for psychoanalysts focusing on similarities and differences in Hungary, in former Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia. Furthermore, it emphasizes the contribution of the international professional organizations - the International Psychoanalytic Association, and the European Psychoanalytic Federation - for reintegration of Budapest, Prague, and Belgrade to the international psychoanalytic community.

  7. Framework for a new dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences: is the combined neuro-psychoanalytic approach the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaslamatzis, Grigoris

    2007-01-01

    Freud's legacy deriving from his work The project for a scientific psychology (1895) could give a new impetus to the dialogue between psychoanalysis and neurosciences. A rapproachment phase is warrented. Based on the work of psychoanalysts who are themselves neuroscientists (such as Mauro Mancia, Martha Koukkou and Harold Shevrin) or have a long term dialogue with neuroscientists (Arnold Modell), three points of epistemological congruence are described: 1. dualism is no longer a satisfactory solution 2. cautions for the centrality of interpretation (hermeneutics) 3. the self-criticism of neuroscientists PMID:17976245

  8. Narrativa interativa e psicanálise Narrativa interactiva y psicoanálisis Interactive narrative and psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Mara Marques Granato

    2011-03-01

    elaboración de un conflicto materno, seguida de la narrativa de uno de los participantes de un grupo-piloto.Since its beginning Psychoanalysis works with patients’ narratives, who weave their lives into stories, recognizing in this expressive genre of the human drama as the source of its investigations. Furthermore, the psychoanalysts also elaborate transferencial narratives in order to communicate their clinical experiences to the scientific community, contributing to the production of knowledge in that field. The organic relationship that unites narration to living authorizes us to conceive the narrative as a means to elaborate affective-emotional experiences. Following the route that leads us from the patient’s narrative to the psychoanalyst’s narrative, we arrive to interactive narratives as a methodological procedure that rescues the heuristic potentiality of storytelling, and restore the interlocution as the locus of knowledge construction in Human Sciences. By way of illustration we present one of the interactive narratives created as an invitation to elaborate a maternal conflict, followed by a participant’s narrative of our pilot sample.

  9. Anna Freud: the Hampstead War Nurseries and the role of the direct observation of children for psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nick

    2007-08-01

    The psychoanalytic tradition of direct observation of children has a long history, going back to the early 20th century, when psychoanalysis and the emerging field of 'child studies' came into fruitful contact in Freud's Vienna. As a leading figure in the attempted integration of direct observation with the new psychoanalytic knowledge emerging from the consulting room, Anna Freud played a crucial role in the emergence of this field. But her major contribution to the theory and practice of observing children came during the Second World War, when she founded the Hampstead War Nurseries. The author describes in detail this important period of Anna Freud's career, and discusses the impact it had on later work. He explores the theoretical contribution that Anna Freud made in the post-war years to the debate about the place of direct observation in psychoanalysis, and concludes that Anna Freud's 'double approach' (direct observation plus analytic reconstruction) still has a great deal to offer as a method of both psychoanalytic research and education.

  10. [From reflex arc to psychic apparatus: neurology and psychoanalysis around 1900].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Erik

    2009-03-01

    As a disciple of Ernst Wilhelm von Brücke and Theodor Meynert, Sigmund Freud was familiar with 19th century physiology and neurology. He started his career with laboratory work and began later on, when being a young medic to develop an explicit psychological method for curating hysterics. These cases of hysteria ask riddles to the established medical discourse and practice. Freud's long time unpublished Entwurf einer Psychologie (1895) makes the attempt of a "psychology for the neurologist". He tried to give a sufficient theory of the psychic apparatus on the basis of natural science. At the same time he (together with Josef Breuer) published his Studies on Hysteria, which--in addition to his earlier essay on Aphasia (1891)--argued, that there is no clear cut relation between body and soul. Despite the dubious, non-reductive character of the soma-psyche-relation, Freud gave reason to search for a complex field of interrelations between the physiological and psychological knowledge, beyond the divide of natural sciences and humanities. Not until his groundbreaking Traumdeutung (1900) Freud gave up the claim of reintegrating psychological knowledge into the neuroscientific field for now. But up to his latest work he always adheres to the principal project of unifying the natural and the psychical being of the subject. In the gap between the two spheres, for long occupied by the discursive figure of the 'psycho-physical parallelism', Freud situated the Unconscious. In the passage to a psychoanalytical theory of psychic events Freud took up the model of the reflex arc well known from neurology. The transmission into psychoanalysis complexifies the unilinearity of reflexes, so that the psychic apparatus can be analysed as a cybernetic mechanism 'avant la lettre'. It is interesting enough that inhibition as well as consciousness play a key role in the regulation of the psychic apparatus. In this context Freud stresses the importance of speech and language within the

  11. Competition and postural confrontation in life, sports, and psychoanalytic treatment--illustrated clinically and in relation to Vladimir Nabokov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shengold, Leonard

    2008-04-01

    The importance of the emotions that can be evoked by (face-to-face and face-to-back) postural and visual contrapositions in life and in psychoanalysis-and specifically in relation to sports and games-is delineated and illustrated in clinical and literary material. The latter features aspects of the life and works of the writer Vladimir Nabokov.

  12. Freud's free clinics: a tale of two continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Arnold

    2013-12-01

    Two important schools of thought began in the nineteenth century in Central Europe: Marxism and psychoanalysis. They had much common but there were significant differences. The Marxist influence on early psychoanalysts played out in one way in Europe and another way in the United States. Freud and his Austro-Marxist colleagues were committed to human welfare and social justice. They established a network of clinics that offered psychoanalysis to patients of limited means. The free clinics movement did not cross the Atlantic. There was a cohort of Marxists in the United States who belonged to the United States Communist Party. They were not publicly socially committed, but this paper will try to show that their Marxism influenced their psychoanalytic theory, practice, and politics.

  13. [An enigma named Agostino Gemelli: Catholicism, fascism and psychoanalysis in Italy during the inter-war period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The Franciscan friar Agostino Gemelli has been the subject of much research and debate. This is due to his important political profile and, above all, to the role he played in mediating between the Catholic world and fascism in Italy during the inter-war period. Gemelli was also a central figure in Italian psychology, especially during the 1930s and 1940s. This article is structured to focus in particular on the way that his connections with political and ecclesiastic powers allowed him to become increasingly significant within Italian psychology. Using the example of Gemelli's relationship with psychoanalysis, this study highlights the tension between his relatively open-minded stance and his links to authoritarian, dogmatic ideologies and institutions.

  14. A neuroscientific perspective on dreaming : collaboration between neuroscience and psychoanalysis is needed to progress in dream research

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    Perrine Marie RUBY

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dreaming is still a mystery of human cognition though it has been studied at the experimental level since more than one century. Experimental psychology first investigated dream content and frequency. Then, the neuroscientific approach to dreaming arose at the end of the fifties and rapidly proposed a physiological substrate of dreaming : rapid eye movement sleep (REM. Fifty years later, this hypothesis was challenged because it could not explain all the characteristics of dream reports. The neurophysiological correlates of dreaming, as its functions, remain thus unclear and many questions are left unresolved. Do the representations constituting the dream emerge randomly from the brain or do they surface according to certain parameters? Is the organisation of the dream’s representations chaotic or is it determined by rules? Does dreaming have a meaning? Psychoanalysis provides hypotheses to answer these questions. Until now theses hypotheses have been barely considered in cognitive neuroscience, but the recent creation of neuropsychoanalysis brings new hopes of discussion between the two fields. Considering the psychoanalytical perspective in cognitive neuroscience would provide new directions/leads for dream research and would help to achieve a comprehensive understanding of dreaming. Notably, several subjective issues at the core of psychoanalytic approach, such as the concept of personal meaning, the concept of unconscious episodic memory and the subjects’ history are not addressed or considered in cognitive neuroscience. This paper argues that the expertise of psychoanalysis in singularity and personal meaning is needed to succeed in addressing these issues in cognitive neuroscience and to progress in the understanding of dreaming and psyche.

  15. Desenvolvimento de uma ferramenta didática para o estudo da flexão composta oblíqua em seções quaisquer de concreto armado

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    P. H. C. De Lyra

    Full Text Available Tendo em vista a experiência de professores e pesquisadores do Brasil e do exterior no contexto da busca de novos e melhores métodos didáticos para ensino de Engenharia, constata-se que o uso de recursos multimídia interativa constitui uma abordagem promissora, com amplas possibilidades de aplicação em disciplinas de graduação. Nesse contexto, o presente trabalho trata do desenvolvimento de uma ferramenta multimídia de apoio ao ensino da flexão composta oblíqua no concreto armado, apresentando as suas funcionalidades, a estrutura do código e exemplos de aplicação. Para a construção da ferramenta, o applet “Verificação de seções quaisquer de concreto armado sob flexão composta oblíqua”, foi utilizada a linguagem de programação JavaTM e o ambiente de desenvolvimento NetBeans 5.5.1. O applet tratado neste artigo está disponível na Internet no endereço http://www.lmc.ep.usp.br/pesquisas/TecEdu/.

  16. Instrument development, data collection, and characteristics of practices, staff, and measures in the Improving Quality of Care in Diabetes (iQuaD) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Martin P; Hrisos, Susan; Francis, Jill J; Stamp, Elaine; Johnston, Marie; Hawthorne, Gillian; Steen, Nick; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Elovainio, Marko; Presseau, Justin; Hunter, Margaret

    2011-06-09

    Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness and an important cause of avoidable mortality. Patients are managed by the integrated activities of clinical and non-clinical members of primary care teams. This study aimed to: investigate theoretically-based organisational, team, and individual factors determining the multiple behaviours needed to manage diabetes; and identify multilevel determinants of different diabetes management behaviours and potential interventions to improve them. This paper describes the instrument development, study recruitment, characteristics of the study participating practices and their constituent healthcare professionals and administrative staff and reports descriptive analyses of the data collected. The study was a predictive study over a 12-month period. Practices (N = 99) were recruited from within the UK Medical Research Council General Practice Research Framework. We identified six behaviours chosen to cover a range of clinical activities (prescribing, non-prescribing), reflect decisions that were not necessarily straightforward (controlling blood pressure that was above target despite other drug treatment), and reflect recommended best practice as described by national guidelines. Practice attributes and a wide range of individually reported measures were assessed at baseline; measures of clinical outcome were collected over the ensuing 12 months, and a number of proxy measures of behaviour were collected at baseline and at 12 months. Data were collected by telephone interview, postal questionnaire (organisational and clinical) to practice staff, postal questionnaire to patients, and by computer data extraction query. All 99 practices completed a telephone interview and responded to baseline questionnaires. The organisational questionnaire was completed by 931/1236 (75.3%) administrative staff, 423/529 (80.0%) primary care doctors, and 255/314 (81.2%) nurses. Clinical questionnaires were completed by 326/361 (90

  17. Instrument development, data collection, and characteristics of practices, staff, and measures in the Improving Quality of Care in Diabetes (iQuaD) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness and an important cause of avoidable mortality. Patients are managed by the integrated activities of clinical and non-clinical members of primary care teams. This study aimed to: investigate theoretically-based organisational, team, and individual factors determining the multiple behaviours needed to manage diabetes; and identify multilevel determinants of different diabetes management behaviours and potential interventions to improve them. This paper describes the instrument development, study recruitment, characteristics of the study participating practices and their constituent healthcare professionals and administrative staff and reports descriptive analyses of the data collected. Methods The study was a predictive study over a 12-month period. Practices (N = 99) were recruited from within the UK Medical Research Council General Practice Research Framework. We identified six behaviours chosen to cover a range of clinical activities (prescribing, non-prescribing), reflect decisions that were not necessarily straightforward (controlling blood pressure that was above target despite other drug treatment), and reflect recommended best practice as described by national guidelines. Practice attributes and a wide range of individually reported measures were assessed at baseline; measures of clinical outcome were collected over the ensuing 12 months, and a number of proxy measures of behaviour were collected at baseline and at 12 months. Data were collected by telephone interview, postal questionnaire (organisational and clinical) to practice staff, postal questionnaire to patients, and by computer data extraction query. Results All 99 practices completed a telephone interview and responded to baseline questionnaires. The organisational questionnaire was completed by 931/1236 (75.3%) administrative staff, 423/529 (80.0%) primary care doctors, and 255/314 (81.2%) nurses. Clinical questionnaires were

  18. Psychoanalysis and Translation: A Literature Review (Psicoanálisis y traducción: análisis bibliográfico

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    Meritxell Serrano Tristán

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mutual implication of psychoanalysis with translation has produced a significant body of works that address the issue of subjectivity in the practice and teaching of translation. This paper traces this implication to the early beginnings of psychoanalysis, and reviews some of the most recent literature produced within translation studies. La mutua implicación entre psicoanálisis y traducción ha llevado a un diálogo productivo que trata el problema de la subjetividad en la práctica y la enseñanza de la traducción. Este estudio analiza el origen de esta relación desde los inicios del psicoanálisis hasta la producción académica más reciente en el campo de la traductología.

  19. Pesquisa em psicanálise: da qualificação desqualificante à subversão Psychoanalysis research: from disqualifying qualification to subversion

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    Roberto Calazans

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de apresentar notas para uma discussão sobre o método de pesquisa em psicanálise. Entre a psicanálise e a ciência há uma relação de compatibilidade lógica que se refere ao uso de uma qualificação que desqualifica o sentido habitual dos conceitos, produzindo assim um novo conceito pela via de articulações até então impossíveis. Esse trabalho é chamado pela epistemologia histórica de qualificação desqualificante, e por Lacan, de subversão. A articulação destes dois conceitos atesta a compatibilidade entre o modo de pesquisar em ciência e em psicanálise.This article presents observations for a discussion on the research method in psychoanalysis. Between psychoanalysis and science there is a relationship of logical compatibility that refers to the use of a qualification that disqualifies the usual meaning of the concepts, thus producing a new concept by means of articulations that were previously impossible. This paper is called by the historical epistemology of qualification, disqualifying, and for Lacan, subversion. The articulation of these two concepts certifies the compatibility between the way of researching in science and in psychoanalysis.

  20. Psicanálise modernista no Brasil: um recorte histórico Modernist psychoanalysis in Brazil: a historical approach

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    Cristiana Facchinetti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo partiu do pressuposto de que o discurso psicanalítico é sempre apropriado por um intérprete que se filia a uma tradição histórica e cultural. Nesta perspectiva, a produção de subjetividade, que tem lugar na clínica psicanalítica, será marcada por essa tradição privilegiada pelo analista. Assim, julgou-se de grande relevância a investigação das vias discursivas de entrada da psicanálise no Brasil, indicando os pontos de ancoragem da mesma na cultura e na história locais. Com este intuito, traçou-se o processo de urbanização e modernização do Brasil no início do século XX e a entrada da psicanálise em um campo de forças divergentes. Encontrou-se um embate pela hegemonia discursiva entre duas leituras que se constituíram como antagônicas e inconciliáveis, e que levaram a dois modos distintos de uso instrumental da psicanálise: de um lado, o discurso psiquiátrico-higienista, com sua leitura reformista e universalizante da psicanálise; de outro, o discurso da vanguarda modernista, com a leitura da subversão dos códigos estabelecidos e da busca de singularidade. Ambos se constituíram no rastro da busca de forjar o brasileiro que se desejava. Este trabalho percorre o viés da psicanálise modernista, com sua utilização singular para a análise da cultura e das subjetividades, bem como sua função de construção de novos mundos.The current article's basic premise is that psychoanalytic discourse is always appropriated by an interpreter thereof who belongs to a historical and cultural tradition. From this perspective, the production of subjectivity in psychoanalytic practice is marked by the analyst's prime tradition. Thus the major relevance of investigating the discursive routes by which psychoanalysis entered Brazil, identifying its anchoring points in local culture and history. The article thus outlines the urbanization and modernization process in early 20th-century Brazil, together with the

  1. Filosofia e psicanálise: pontos de disjunção/Philosophy and psychoanalysis: disjunctive points

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    Daniel Revah

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata sobre as (impossibilidades do diálogo entre a filosofia e a psicanálise, atentando para tanto em alguns pontos que separam esses dois campos. Em primeiro lugar, considera-se o que a filosofia recusou ao se constituir e se diferenciar de outros campos do discurso e do saber, nos seus primórdios, na Grécia Antiga. O que nessa discussão está em causa é a filosofia socrático-platônica e a sua diferença em face da perspectiva trágica, que é abordada no âmbito das crenças religiosas gregas e na obra dos poetas trágicos. No segundo item são recuperadas certas conceitualizações de Freud sobre o psiquismo, com o intuito de indicar a presença da perspectiva trágica em sua concepção de homem. Finaliza-se retomando algumas das razões que levaram Freud a criticar e se distanciar da filosofia, inclusive da vertente que acolhe a perspectiva trágica. As (impossibilidades do diálogo entre a filosofia e a psicanálise são então apontadas, considerando-se sobretudo as relações que se estabelecem entre esses dois campos depois de Freud. This article deals with the (impossibilities of dialogue between philosophy and psychoanalysis through emphasis on a few points separating these two fields. Firstly, it is taken into consideration what philosophy refused when constituting and making itself different from other areas of discourse and knowledge when these were beginning to develop in Ancient Greece. What is discussed here is the Socratic-Platonic philosophy and its difference from the tragic perspective, which is approached in terms of Greek religious beliefs and of the works of tragic poets. Secondly, certain Freudian concepts on psychism are rescued, in an attempt to indicate the presence of the tragic perspective in its conception of man. Finally some reasons that led Freud to criticize philosophy and move away from it are approached, including the tendency favoring tragic perspective. The (impossibilities of dialogue

  2. Educational Values of the Dream and Reality Psychoanalysis In “Sang Pemimpi” (the Dreamer, a Novel by Andrea Hirata

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    Muhammad Nasir

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to look at psychoanalysis study of a novel concerning on the dream and reality in Sang Pemimpi (the Dreamer by Andrea Hirata. In general, his work portrays mostly about the condition and situational life of Belitung community. Here, Andrea shows his ability as the representative of Belitung's young generation succeeded in fulfilling his dream by explaining the real life of the people in his hometown and villages having bitter experience values in the rich environment. Besides, he tries to describe the difficult life faced by the villagers. The dream in this novel is not only his, but also all dreams of the Belitung community as the manifestation of their life condition comparing to other areas or provinces in the Indonesia. Further, through this novel (work, it is implied an important massage directed to both Indonesian authority and Belitung mayor in order to be able to increase the level of education of grass root community, especially for those who live in the remote area or a very isolated area, such as Belitung. This is the real dream of all participants in the island which remains unsolved.

  3. Men in (Shell-Shock: Masculinity, Trauma, and Psychoanalysis in Rebecca West's The Return of the Soldier

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    Misha Kavka

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper undertakes to read Rebecca West's first novel, The Return of the Soldier (1918, as a critical exploration of masculine trauma on the one hand and an ambivalent engagement with Freudian psychoanalysis on the other. The novel proves interesting as a site in which two shifting cultural contexts intersect: the wartime culture of England facing the "shell shock" of its men, and the contemporaneous infusion of English intellectual culture with psychoanalytic ideas. Though the effects of new war technology and "a newer kind of doctor," West challenge existing notions of stable masculinity, West maintains that masculinity has all along been simply a construct, a shell built around inarticulable trauma. The fact that in this novel West, despite her early pugnaciously feminist journalism, remains as much within the masculine order as critical of it forces us to expand our notions of the forms feminist narrative can take. This paper argues that the novel is a feminist narrative in the sense that it positions masculine trauma as a mark of adherence to the social order for both men and women.

  4. Feminismo, psicanálise, gênero: viagens e traduções Feminism, psychoanalysis, gender: travels and translations

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    Mara Coelho de Souza Lago

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura discutir as articulações/tensões entre teorias feministas e psicanálise, comentando autoras tradicionalmente conhecidas no campo dos estudos de gênero no Brasil. Considerando a questão da difusão das teorias, através da tradução de textos fundadores e relevantes, detém-se nos acidentes e percalços que invariavelmente ocorrem nas "viagens de teorias" para outras línguas, países, continentes, contextos, ressaltando, no entanto, e a despeito deles, a importância da tradução para a difusão e o diálogo das teorias.This article investigates the articulations/tensions between feminist theory and psychoanalysis, discussing traditionally known women authors on gender studies in Brazil. Considering the issue of dissemination of theories, through the translation of basic and relevant texts, they focus on accidents and predicaments that invariably occur in the "travel of theories" (COSTA, 2000 to other languages, countries, continents and contexts, highliting, however, and in spite of them, the importance of translation in the dissemination and dialogue of theories.

  5. Una articulación (casi imposible: derecho y psicoanálisis. // An (almost impossible articulation: law and psychoanalysis.

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    Paula Winkler.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Law constitutes a normative system with self-validation rules, and tries to be objective and timeless. Psychoanalysis, on the other hand, is interested in the subject. The legal ought-to-be of the rule of law intersects with the subject, and the subject, at the same time, intersects with the law. The present article is an attempt to articulate both disciplines, given that Law mediates between the symbolic law of the family novel and the social rule that intends to regulate or distribute the joy; however, as a symptom, Law also performs its own faults. // El Derecho constituye un sistema normativo con reglas de autovalidación, se pretende objetivo y atemporal. El psicoanálisis, por su parte, se interesa en el sujeto. El deber ser jurídico de la norma legal está atravesado por el sujeto, y el sujeto, a su vez, por la ley. En el presente artículo nos interesa articular ambas disciplinas, por cuanto el derecho constituye una mediación entre la ley simbólica del relato familiar y la regla social que intenta regular o distribuir el goce; no obstante, como síntoma, el Derecho también actúa sus propias falencias.

  6. ‘Speaking Kleinian’: Susan Isaacs as Ursula Wise and the Inter-War Popularisation of Psychoanalysis

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    Shapira, Michal

    2017-01-01

    How did the complex concepts of psychoanalysis become popular in early twentieth-century Britain? This article examines the contribution of educator and psychoanalyst Susan Isaacs (1885–1948) to this process, as well as her role as a female expert in the intellectual and medical history of this period. Isaacs was one of the most influential British psychologists of the inter-war era, yet historical research on her work is still limited. The article focuses on her writing as ‘Ursula Wise’, answering the questions of parents and nursery nurses in the popular journal Nursery World, from 1929 to 1936. Researched in depth for the first time, Isaacs’ important magazine columns reveal that her writing was instrumental in disseminating the work of psychoanalyst Melanie Klein in Britain. Moreover, Isaacs’ powerful rebuttals to behaviourist, disciplinarian parenting methods helped shift the focus of caregivers to the child’s perspective, encouraging them to acknowledge children as independent subjects and future democratic citizens. Like other early psychoanalysts, Isaacs was not an elitist; she was in fact committed to disseminating her ideas as broadly as possible. Isaacs taught British parents and child caregivers to ‘speak Kleinian’, translating Klein’s intellectual ideas into ordinary language and thus enabling their swift integration into popular discourse. PMID:28901872

  7. Is there still a place for the concept of 'therapeutic regression' in psychoanalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Laurence S

    2008-06-01

    The author uses his own failure to find a place for the idea of therapeutic regression in his clinical thinking or practice as the basis for an investigation into its meaning and usefulness. He makes a distinction between three ways the term 'regression' is used in psychoanalytic discourse: as a way of evoking a primitive level of experience; as a reminder in some clinical situations of the value of non-intervention on the part of the analyst; and as a description of a phase of an analytic treatment with some patients where the analyst needs to put aside normal analytic technique in order to foster a regression in the patient. It is this third meaning, which the author terms "therapeutic regression" that this paper examines, principally by means of an extended discussion of two clinical examples of a patient making a so-called therapeutic regression, one given by Winnicott and the other by Masud Khan. The author argues that in these examples the introduction of the concept of therapeutic regression obscures rather than clarifies the clinical process. He concludes that, as a substantial clinical concept, the idea of therapeutic regression has outlived its usefulness. However he also notes that many psychoanalytic writers continue to find a use for the more generic concept of regression, and that the very engagement with the more particular idea of therapeutic regression has value in provoking questions as to what is truly therapeutic in psychoanalytic treatment.

  8. The question of drive vs. motive in psychoanalysis: a modest proposal.

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    Meissner, W W

    2009-08-01

    This essay explores the possibility of an alternative hypothesis to the prevailing psychoanalytic instinctual drive theory whose theoretical and clinical validity has been variously critiqued and challenged. Arguments are suggested in support of the concept of motive as a viable alternative theory to the drive theory and as a replacement for the traditional instinctual drive model. Issues discussed include the understanding of the mind-body relation, the meaning of psychic determinism and overdetermination, the opposition of drive vs. motive (and the related distinction of cause vs. motive), the meaning of psychic energy, and the difference between the concept of drives as the source of all mental energy and the concept of personal agency. The discussion concludes with some observations on the clinical implications of these concepts.

  9. The pre-history of health psychology in the United Kingdom: From natural science and psychoanalysis to social science, social cognition and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Health psychology formally came of age in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, but it was prefigured by much discussion about challenges to the dominance of biomedicine in healthcare and debates. This articles focuses on what could be termed the pre-history of health psychology in the UK. This was the period in the earlier 20th century when psychological approaches were dominated by psychoanalysis which was followed by behaviourism and then cognitivism. Review of this pre-history provides the backdrop for the rise of health psychology in the UK and also reveals the tensions between the different theoretical perspectives.

  10. Assessment of Change in Psychoanalysis: Another Way of Using the Change After Psychotherapy Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, António Pazo; Gonçalves, João; Sá, Vânia; Silva, Andrea; Sandell, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A systematic method is presented whereby material from a full course of psychoanalytic treatment is analyzed to assess changes and identify patterns of change. Through an analysis of session notes, changes were assessed using the CHange After Psychotherapy scales (CHAP; Sandell 1987a), which evaluate changes in five rating variables (symptoms, adaptive capacity, insight, basic conflicts, and extratherapeutic factors). Change incidents were identified in nearly every session. Early in the analysis, relatively more change incidents related to insight were found than were found for the other types of change. By contrast, in the third year and part of the fourth year, relatively more change incidents related to basic conflicts and adaptive capacity were found. While changes related to symptoms occurred throughout the course of treatment, such changes were never more frequent than other types of change. A content analysis of the change incidents allowed a determination of when in the treatment the patient's main conflicts (identified clinically) were overcome. A crossing of quantitative data with clinical and qualitative data allowed a better understanding of the patterns of change. © 2016 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  11. The termination phase of psychoanalysis as seen through the lens of the dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenell, Gary

    2002-01-01

    The decision about when to terminate analysis has long been underpinned by a theory-driven criterion model, which may steer the analytic dialogue away from its customary activities of free association, empathic listening, and interpretation. As a remedy to this situation, the author proposes that by paying careful attention to less consciously crafted patient communications such as dreams, the analytic dyad can consider readiness to set a termination date from a perspective that is context-sensitive and less encumbered by preordained criteria. Tracing the dreams of one analysand from the vantage point of contemporary dream theory, the author demonstrates how careful attention to the dream elucidated the patient's readiness to terminate and her complex feelings about the termination process. Finally, the author challenges the notion that the termination phase is of greater evaluative than therapeutic importance, and provides clinical material as evidence that this is not the case.

  12. Qué enseña Atalia de Racine al psicoanálisis. // What does Racine’s Atalia show psychoanalysis?

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    Beatriz Elena Maya Restrepo.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The current text aims to decipher the method used by Lacan in his Seminar about the Psychosis to read a passage of Racine's Atalia, searching for what the poets show psychoanalysis. All this, bearing in mind it is not applied psychoanalysis but the application of the analytic method defined by him as “that method undertaking the interpretation of the signifier without consideration of any supposedly existing form of the signified.” // El presente texto intenta descifrar el método que Lacan empleó en su Seminario sobre la Psicosis para leer un aparte de la Atalía de Racine, en la búsqueda de aquello que enseñan los poetas al psicoanálisis, teniendo claro que no se trata de psicoanálisis aplicado sino de aplicación del método analítico definido por él mismo como “ese método que procede al desciframiento de los significantes sin consideraciones por ninguna presupuesta forma de existencia del significado”.

  13. [From anamnesis to the art of interpretation, or: What is a "genuine" psychoanalyst? Wolfgang Warda, Ludwig Binswanger, Wilhelm Strohmayer and the origins of psychoanalysis in Thuringia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Warda and Strohmayer from Thuringia were among the first German physicians who developed an interest in Freuds theory and therapeutic method around 1900. Their contributions reflect the influence of Otto Binswanger, professor of psychiatry in Jena, a representative of the "psychological direction" in psychiatry which in the beginning was relatively receptive to Freud. The paper discusses their rapprochement to, and detachment from, the Freudian school, including also the work of a third young physician: Ludwig Binswanger, Otto's nephew, who was active in Jena at the same time. It points to certain factors contributing to the increasing rejection Freud met in academic circles which have been underrated to date: (1) the transformation of psychoanalysis into an art of interpretation; (2) the introduction of transference. Both factors which were elaborated by Freud as essentials of his theoretical and practical approach around 1900 and published in 1904/05, undermined the claim of academic medicine to objectivity. The paper describes how psychoanalysis officially abandoned the scientific standards of contemporary medicine at the Weimar congress in 1911, at the same time as Warda and Strohmayer left the Freudian group.

  14. El proceso diagnóstico en psicoanálisis The diagnosis process in psychoanalysis

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    Santiago Thompson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo intenta delimitar y desarrollar las características del proceso diagnóstico psicoanalítico. En esta vía, se distinguen el diagnóstico médico y el psicoanalítico, y al diagnóstico psicoanalítico como resultado y como proceso. A continuación se describen los estados iniciales y pasajes que tal proceso supone, señalando los indicadores de los distintos tipos clínicos (neurosis, psicosis, perversión que implican las diversas presentaciones. En este marco se delimita el lugar del motivo de consulta en tal proceso, se establecen diferencias y relaciones entre la ocasión de la consulta y la ocasión de enfermar y se explicitan los pasajes propios del campo transferencial. A continuación se delimitan las relaciones del síntoma, (cuya puesta en forma en el vínculo transferencial se propone como uno de los resultados del proceso diagnóstico psicoanalítico, al saber en los distintos tipos clínicos, así como las presentaciones subjetivas iniciales respecto del saber de las que se derivan tales relaciones. Finalmente se complementa la diferenciación entre diagnóstico como proceso y como resultado tomando como parámetro los efectos que uno y otro tienen sobre el analista y el analizante. Todo el desarrollo se sostiene teóricamente en un enfoque delimitado por trabajos de Sigmund Freud y Jacques Lacan.The present study tries to delimit and develop the characteristics of the psychoanalytical diagnosis process. In this way, the medical diagnosis and the psychoanalytical one are distinguished, portraying the psychoanalytical diagnosis as a result as well as a process. Subsequently, the initial stages and passages that are involved in such process are described , pointing out the indicators of the different clinical types (neurosis, psychosis, perversion that appear in the various presentations. In this framework, the role of the motive for consulting in such process is delimited, the differences and relationships

  15. Clinical implications of contemporary gender theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    The current intellectual scene in psychoanalysis is marked by vigorous theoretical controversies about gender. The ideas being debated have important implications for clinical work, which have not been thoroughly explicated or integrated into common practice. These implications include the following: gender can accrue idiosyncratic meanings; gender identity is considered fluid and rigidity of gender identity deemed problematic; gender-related conflicts are typically described as divergent; analysis of superego conflicts related to gender becomes particularly important; and, finally, gender-related biases are seen as inevitable and must be taken into account in the clinical situation. A detailed clinical example illustrates the application of these ideas. While the more dramatic cases related to gender have been more frequent subjects of study, conflicts about gender are everyday occurrences for our patients and deserve further attention.

  16. Superando o falicismo: sofrimento materno na psicanálise de crianças Superando el falicismo: sufrimiento materno en el psicoanálisis de niños Beyond phallicism: maternal suffering in child psychoanalysis

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    Henriqueta Lúcia Arcoverde de Melo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Interpreta-se, no contexto da psicanálise de uma criança psicótica, o sofrimento materno e suas implicações nos destinos do tratamento. O sofrimento parental interfere negativamente quando compele à repetição fantasmática de traumatismos cujas mensagens, uma vez intrometidas, não são elaboradas pelos pais. Como demonstra o caso clínico, o falicismo materno e a foraclusão da função paterna não necessariamente estão presentes na geração da psicose. Longe de ser falo, originalmente ao paciente foi atribuído o lugar de substituto de um objeto odiado numa cena traumática vivida na infância materna, responsável pela intromissão de mensagens sexuais em torno de experiências de nascimento e morte, revividas fantasmaticamente no contexto da análise de seu filho.Se interpreta, en el contexto del psicoanálisis de un niño psicótico, el sufrimiento materno y sus implicaciones en los objetivos del tratamiento. El sufrimiento parental interfiere negativamente cuando obliga a la repetición fantasmática de traumatismos cuyos mensajes, una vez entrometidos, no han sido procesados por los padres. Como demuestra el caso clínico, el falicismo materno y la foraclusión de la función paterna no están necesariamente presentes en la generación de la psicosis. Originalmente al paciente le fue atribuido el lugar de sustituto de un objeto odiado en una escena traumática vivida en la infancia materna, responsable por la intromisión de mensajes sexuales acerca de experiencias de nacimiento y muerte, revividas fantasmáticamente en el contexto del análisis de su hijo.The article interprets maternal suffering and its implications on a psychotic child's psychoanalysis. Parental suffering interferes with a child's treatment when it induces the repetition of fantasies generated in traumas whose messages, once intruded, were not worked through by the parents. As the clinical case demonstrates, the mother's phallicism and the foreclosure of the

  17. "Non qua servus est, sed qua homo." Der rechtliche Status von Sklaven bei Luis de Molina

    OpenAIRE

    Simmermacher, Danaë

    2014-01-01

    Luis de Molina (1535-1600) grants slaves a legal status through which they can take up a position with respect to their masters between equivalent legal entity and legal object. Here, what is decisive is the figure of the subjective right, which both for Molina and modern proponents of this legal concept describes the 'right per se'. According to Molina's definition of ius, the denial of a subjective right or the hindrance of exercising an individual right represents an injustice. The rights ...

  18. Psychoanalysis through fairy tale

    OpenAIRE

    Muhič, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    In my thesis I present the unconscious process of a man through a fairy tale analysis. All mankind represent a major part of the unconscious. The answers to the questions about the essential, existencialism, are obtained by this major quantity of the unconscious in every man. Through the symbolism of a fairy tale I present the way an individual has to walk to gain selfrealisation in life. Through fairytales a child in the process of his personality maturing step by step says goodb ye to...

  19. Value reprioritization in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Mardi J

    2009-12-01

    As psychoanalysts, we sometimes seem to regard values as radioactive materials that must be handled with heavy lead gloves. But the gloves should not be so thick that they interfere with the goal of sorting out values. Reasons for our hesitation to deal with issues related to values may include real disagreements with the morals of a patient, a fear of evoking unproductive and negative emotional states, and our own unresolved conflicts about value dilemmas. Psychoanalytic technique should at times include clear verbal statements of values. By being explicit about what is often implicit, we can help our patients in their work of ameliorating harsh, primitive, and critical attitudes and to self-own rules, principles, and codes of conduct. A patient with reprioritized personal values may then function with heightened interpersonal compassion, kindness, and cooperation, gaining in return love, intimacy, respect, and self-esteem.

  20. Psychoanalysis and Bible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Here you find the introductory and the final chapter, written by P. Vandermeersch, in R. KESSLER & P. VANDERMEERSCH (eds.), God, Biblical Stories and Psychoanalytical Understanding, Frankfurt a. M., Peter Lang, 2001: `Psychoanalytic Interpretations of Religious Texts. Some Basics' (9-27) en `Looking

  1. Psychoanalysis and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Morris N

    The paper discusses Freud's view of the law as the implementation of collective violence on the individual violator. I focus on the implications of the link between the superego (as the source of moral judgment) and the aggressive drive and suggest that we need to be ever vigilant regarding the danger of employing the law as a disguised means of taking pleasure in collective violence. The paper also discusses Freud's conception of personal responsibility, according to which we are responsible for all our behavior, including unconsciously motivated behavior (such as slips and dreams). However, the kind of responsibility Freud has in mind is not the moral responsibility of blameworthiness or praiseworthiness, but rather responsibility in the sense that, whether or not acknowledged, all our behavior reflects our personal desires and motives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. El suicidio, sus estatutos y ética del psicoanálisis. // Suicide, its statutes and the ethics of psychoanalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vargas Castro.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines Freud´s and Lacan´s perspectives about suicide, emphasizing on the theoretical formulations and statutes given to it in the works of each of the authors mentioned. At the same time, the text brings up and analyses the ethical perspectives underlying such formulations, so they can be traced in the ethics of psychoanalysis proposed by each of these authors. // En el presente texto se abordan las perspectivas de Freud y de Lacan en torno al suicidio, destacando las formulaciones teóricas y estatutos otorgados a este a lo largo de la obra de cada uno de los autores mencionados. A su vez, se resaltan e interrogan las perspectivas éticas que subyacen a dichas formulaciones, de tal forma que puedan rastrearse en la ética del psicoanálisis que cada uno de estos autores propuso.

  3. Una contribución sobre Psicoanálisis y Medicina de Jacques Lacan A contribution on Psychoanalysis and Medicine by Jacques Lacan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo es parte de un proyecto mayor de investigación sobre los aportes de la enseñanza de J. Lacan al tema toxicomanías. La contribución refiere a Medicina y Psicoanálisis de 1966. Se desarrolla la forma en que autor caracteriza la vida contemporánea marcada por lo que llama la universalización y el papel de la ciencia y las leyes del mercado en este proceso. La toxicomanía ya no puede ser tratada como un asunto policial sino como otro modo de goce que muestra el exceso causado por el desarrollo de la ciencia. Esto impone al médico tomar una posición ética e incluir en su práctica categorías del psicoanálisis como demanda y deseo y la concepción del cuerpo como cuerpo de goce.The present work is part of a bigger investigation project about the contributions of J. Lacan's Teaching on drug abuse subject. The contribution refers to Medicine and Psychoanalysis, 1966. It develops the way that the author characterizes the contemporary life marked by what he calls the universalization and the role of science and market's laws in this process. The drug abuse can not be treated as a police subject any more, but as another way of jouissance that shows the excess caused by the scientific development. This imposes the doctor to take an ethical position and also to include in his practice categories from the psychoanalysis such as demand and desire and the conception of the body, as body of jouissance.

  4. Understanding Freud's conflicted view of the object-relatedness of sexuality and its implications for contemporary psychoanalysis: A re-examination of Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Rachel B

    2016-06-01

    Through a re-examination of Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), this paper reveals a fundamental tension in Freud's thinking on the nature of the individual and of his sexuality. In this text Freud portrays the individual and sexuality as inherently object-related and at the same time as inherently independent of such relatedness. The way in which Freud presents these contradictory ideas suggests that he was not merely undecided on object-relatedness and sexuality but rather that the contradiction was integral to this thinking. The paper offers an explanation of the meaning of this contradiction, of why it has been neglected in the analytic literature, and of some implications for contemporary psychoanalysis and its approach to sexuality. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  5. Clinical course of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H; Leckman, James F

    2009-12-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics lasting at least a year in duration. Children with TS often experience comorbid conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit disorder. The goal of this article was to review the long-term clinical course of tics and comorbid conditions in children with TS. We conducted a traditional literature search to locate relevant articles regarding long-term outcome and prognosis in TS and tic disorders. Tics typically have an onset between the ages of 4 and 6 years and reach their worst-ever severity between the ages of 10 and 12 years. On average, tic severity declines during adolescence. By early adulthood, roughly three-quarters of children with TS will have greatly diminished tic symptoms and over one-third will be tic free. Comorbid conditions, such as OCD and other anxiety and depressive disorders, are more common during the adolescence and early adulthood of individuals with TS than in the general population. Although tics are the sine qua non of TS, they are often not the most enduring or impairing symptoms in children with TS. Measures used to enhance self-esteem, such as encouraging strong friendships and the exploration of interests, are crucial to ensuring positive adulthood outcome in TS.

  6. Reflexiones respecto al problema de la constitución subjetiva: el psicoanálisis y las (otras ciencias. // Thoughts on the issue of subjective constitution: psychoanalysis and the (oher sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Andrpes Rojas.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the link between psychoanalysis and sciences, a relationship that has been historically characterized by a fundamental disagreement. Science criticizes psychoanalysis and questions its value, methods and contributions, by considering that it is a theory without empirical or experimental basis. This is owing to the fact that some of the main theories in psychoanalysis resulting from readings, observation and scientific studies reviews are ignored. As an example of this, we have the psychoanalytic theory about the subjective constitution, which is supported by the studies from experimental psychologists. // El presente artículo reflexiona respecto a la articulación entre el psicoanálisis y las ciencias, relación marcada históricamente por un desencuentro fundamental. La ciencia establece una crítica al psicoanálisis, dudando de su valor, métodos y aportes debido a que lo considera una teoría alejada de lo empírico y la experimentación. Sin embargo, esto se debe a que suele olvidarse que algunas de las principales teorizaciones del psicoanálisis vienen de la lectura, observación y crítica a estudios científicos. Caso ejemplar de lo anterior es la teoría psicoanalítica de la constitución subjetiva, la cual encuentra correlato en los estudios de los psicólogos experimentales.

  7. Freedom and authority in the Clinical Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erős, Ferenc

    2014-12-01

    The paper discusses some philosophical, ethical and political-philosophical implications of Ferenczi's Clinical Diary, with special regard to the concepts of freedom and authority. These topics are already present in Ferenczi's early writings that explicitly deal with social and political issues, the central concept of which is "individual socialism". The paper also discusses (and publishes in Appendix) two short manuscripts by Ferenczi, written probably in 1920, which attempts to parallel psychoanalysis with Marxism, and with liberal socialism, respectively. It is shown that in 1932, the last year of his life, Ferenczi avoids using political and ideological concepts directly in his Diary, but, in the spirit of his earlier writings, he proposes a balance between "ruthless capitalism and fanciful egalitarianism". Finally, the significance of Utopia in Ferenczi's thinking is discussed.

  8. Klein, Ferenczi and the clinical diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Halton, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this article is to revisit Ferenczi's Clinical Diary (1932) to investigate the influence he had on Melanie Klein's work. It starts from the position that insufficient recognition has been given to Ferenczi's contribution to Klein's body of work and her professional development. Her analysis with Ferenczi lasted 5 years, a relatively long analysis for the period. It explores his influence in three specific areas: the importance of raw and early emotion in the maternal bond, the importance of freedom and authenticity in the analytic relationship, and finally the use of transference and countertransference feelings. Ferenczi's ill-fated experiment with mutual analysis will be discussed as it opened up a route to explore the analytic relationship, with important consequences for the future development of psychoanalysis.

  9. Psychotherapeutics and the problematic origins of clinical psychology in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E

    2000-09-01

    The problematic place of psychotherapy within the larger history of scientific psychology is reviewed, especially in the absence of any definitive history of clinical psychology yet written. Although standard histories of psychology imply that psychotherapy was somehow derived from the tradition of German laboratory science, modern historiography reveals a dramatically different story. Personality, abnormal, social, and clinical psychology have their roots in an international psychotherapeutic alliance related more to French neurophysiology, and this alliance flourished for several decades before psychoanalysis. Reconstruction of the American contribution to this alliance, the so-called Boston school of abnormal psychology, suggests an era of medical psychology in advance of today. Note is also made of the possible misattribution of Lightner Witmer as the father of clinical psychology.

  10. The need for true controversies in psychoanalysis: the debates on Melanie Klein and Jacques Lacan in the Rio de la Plata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    Controversies are part of the process of scientific knowing. In psychoanalysis, the diversity of theoretical, technical and epistemological positions makes the debate particularly necessary and by the same token difficult. In this paper, the author examines the function of controversies and the obstacles to their development, taking as examples the debates held in the Río de la Plata (Buenos Aires and Montevideo) during the nineteen seventies, when the dominant Kleinian ideas came into contact with Lacanian thought. The author examines different examples of argumentative discourses, using concepts taken from the theory of argumentation. The major difficulties encountered did not hinge on characteristics pertaining to psychoanalytic theories (i.e. the lack of commensurability between them), but on the defensive strategies aimed at keeping each theory's premises safe from the opposing party's arguments. A true debate implies the construction of a shared argumentative field that makes it possible to lay out the different positions and see some interaction between them and is guided by the search for the best argument. When this occurs, controversies promote the discipline's development, even when they fail to reach any consensus.

  11. Contribuição ao debate entre psicanálise e ciência: Feyerabend Contribution to the debate between psychoanalysis and science: Feyerabend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menezes Coelho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de apresentar a contribuição de Paul Feyerabend ao debate entre psicanálise e ciência. A obra deste autor parece fornecer um novo horizonte de discussão, pois esvazia a pretensão de idealizar a ciência e a apresenta como atividade humana, impura, sem qualquer regra racional de funcionamento. Primeiro, faremos uma 'varredura' pelo campo atual de discussão, destacando alguns artigos que contribuem para esse debate. Seguiremos com uma crítica ao esforço de regramento epistemológico; e, por fim, apresentaremos a obra de Feyerabend, concentrando nossa atenção na leitura do célebre volume Contra o método, e no que esta obra acrescenta ao debate.Our goal is to present the contribution of Paul Feyerabend's works to the debate between psychoanalysis and science. Feyerabend's works seem to presents a new discussion horizon, since it empties out there the pretension to idealize science, and presents it as a human activity, impure, without any rational rule of functioning. First, we will scan the current discussion field, highlighting some articles that contribute to the debate. We will follow by doing some critics to epistemology and its ruling efforts. Finally, we will present Feyerabend's works, concentrating our attention on the lecture of Against Method, his famous volume, and what this work adds to the debate.

  12. Infância - educação e psicanálise: a (impossibilidade de diálogo?!/Infancy - education and psychoanalysis: (impossibilidade of dialogue?!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinalva Imaculada Cuzin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto apresenta um breve histórico sobre o conceito de infância, tendo como referência pensadores como Ariès que caracteriza o infante como “não–falante”, não existente. Destaca as transformações influenciadas pelos iluministas, em especial por Rousseau iniciando um processo de direito à fala, à palavra; e o infans para Lacan ocupando um lugar marcado pelo desejo materno, alienando-se na imagem de um Outro. Busca a relação entre psicanálise e educação, a necessidade do professor rever seus conceitos e postura ética para se utilizar dos conhecimentos psicanalíticos em sua prática educativa, num encontro com as diferenças, sendo o conhecimento o objeto de desejo que circula entre professor e aluno e a subjetividade dessa relação entre professor-aluno-conhecimento. Traz a discussão sob a perspectiva do sujeito “que não aprende”, que é “des” qualquer coisa, “des-interessado, des-motivado” e no endereçamento ao professor que é um suposto-saber. Defende uma educação que pensa em “sujeitos” e não em “massas uniformizadas” dentro de uma sala de aula, que respeite a singularidade de cada aluno, apesar do constrangimento e insegurança gerados pelo convívio com as diferenças. Reflete sobre a escola enquanto instituição normativa e a importância da construção do trabalho em grupo. The text presents a historical briefing about infancy concept, having as reference philosophers, such as Ariès that describe infant as “non-talker”, does not existing. It shows the transformations influenced by the illuminists, in special Rousseau initiating a process of right to the speech, the word and infants for Lacan occupying a place marked for the maternal desire, becoming alienated of one image to Another one. It search’s the relation between psychoanalysis and education, the necessity of the professor to review its concepts and ethical position to use itself of the psychoanalysis knowledge in

  13. Entre a Psicanálise e o Romantismo: a razão, o limite e a civilização = Between Psychoanalysis and Romantism: reason, limit and civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Melo França

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é contextualizar e problematizar as semelhanças e diferenças entre o modo como a Psicanálise e o Romantismo tratam a (necessidade da razão. Partindo da ideia de racionalidade e de domínio da natureza e do desejo, mostraremos como essas duas disciplinas possuem o mesmo objeto de análise, mas métodos e perspectivas diferentes de abordá-lo. Para isso, em alguns momentos será necessário situar tanto a Psicanálise quanto o Romantismo frente ao Iluminismo. Como parâmetro para o nosso estudo, tomaremos o texto A posição de Freud na moderna história das ideias, de Thomas Mann, onde o autor destaca o modo como a psicanálise ao mesmo tempo preza pela racionalidade mas não recai no naturalismo científico.The aim of this study is to contextualize and problematize the similarities and differences between the place that reason holds in the core of psychoanalytic and romantic thinking. Starting from the idea of rationality and mastery of nature and desire, we show how psychoanalysis and romanticism have the same object of analysis, but different methods and perspectives of approach. For this, at certain times it will be necessary to situate both psychoanalysis and Romanticism against the Enlightenment. As a parameter for our study, we will take the text A posição de Freud na moderna história das ideias, by Thomas Mann, where the author highlights how psychoanalysis at the same time stands for rationality but falls outside the scientific naturalism.

  14. Psicanálise e educação: banquete, fast food e merenda escolar Psychoanalysis and education: banquet, fast food and school meals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Simões Corrêa Neder Bacha

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste trabalho é refletir sobre a educação na perspectiva da formação psicológica do professor na Universidade. Um breve histórico ressalta a complexidade com que foi tratada pela Antigüidade, de onde emerge tecida por uma trama simbólica sobre as mesas dos banquetes. A partir desta relação entre educação e alimento, e da intimidade simbólica de oralidade e procriação demonstrada pela psicanálise, articula-se educação e sedução, mantendo-se, no horizonte, a idéia do engendramento de um filho imaginário. Situam-se, então, os conceitos modernos de infância no interior da educação assim compreendida, discutindo-se a possibilidade de derivar limites próprios e inerentes a uma tal combinação, especialmente dificuldades de aprendizagem, e o modo restrito como a educação costuma ser praticada nas escolas.The reason of this study is to think about education under the perspective of the psychological formation of the university professor. A brief historical study highlights the complexity with which it was symbolically treated by Antiquity. Considering the relationship of education and food, and the symbolic intimacy between orality and procreation demonstrated by psychoanalysis, education and seduction are articulated, maintaining on the horizon the idea of engendering an imaginary child. Hence, our modern concept of childhood placed within the notion of education thus understood and the difficulties in learning, as well as the restricted manner with which education is normally practiced in schools, are discussed.

  15. The use of dreams in the clinical context: convergencies and divergencies: an interdisciplinary proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Susana Vinocur

    2011-04-01

    This paper aims to define some unexpected convergences and foreseeable divergences regarding the conceptualization of dreams and their use as a research tool, specifically in clinical practice with non-neurotic patients. It includes a concise review of different lines of thought on the vicissitudes of dreams throughout the history of psychoanalysis: from their initial conception up to their use to examine transference and relational aspects in the context of a psychoanalytic process. The idea of the merely evacuative function of dreams from patients in certain diagnostic categories is discussed and compared with that of their potential communicative value. Lastly, the essay sets forth an interdisciplinary semiotic-pragmatic approach to the function of dreams and their clinical and technical use in the context of the intersubjective dynamic field. Based on the hypothesis that dreams related in the session are communicative signs, this proposal argues their significance as a symbolic matrix that generates processes of psychic semiosis. To do so, it combines certain lines of psychoanalytic thought with ideas coming from C. S. Peirce's analytic semiotics. Clinical material is included to illustrate this viewpoint. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. ACERCA DE LOS CELOS EN PSICOANÁLISIS. UNA APROXIMACIÓN PROUSTIANA // ON JEALOUSY IN PSYCHOANALYSIS. A PROUSTIAN APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Lutereau

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, en un primer momento, conside-raremos la variedad clínica de los celos, de acuerdo con un célebre planteo freudiano; luego, expondremos una diferencia clínica de relativa importancia, entre celos y envidia; por último, elucidaremos un tipo específico de celos, de acuerdo con un análisis de ciertos pasajes de En busca del tiempo perdido, de Marcel Proust, con el propósito de construir un fantasma escópico que los subtiende. // This paper, at first, considers the clinical variety of jealousy according to a famous Freudian concep-tion. Then, a relatively-important clinical difference between jealousy and envy will be discussed. Finally, a specific type of jealousy will be elucidat-ed according to an analysis of certain passages of ―In search of Lost Time‖ by M. Proust, in order to build the scopic fantasy that underlies it.

  17. La filosofía antigua como “terapéutica del alma”, ¿antecedente del psicoanálisis?/Ancient philosophy as "the soul therapeutics", antecedent of psychoanalysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Díaz Genis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo recuperamos la tradición antigua del cuidado de sí, que asocia a la filosofía con el psicoanálisis, entendido como una cura del alma a través de la palabra, el autoexamen y la relación entre médico- paciente o filósofo-discípulo y de una verdad que necesita de la “conversión” del sujeto. Se recupera para ello la filosofía del Banquete de Platón y La Tranquilidad del Alma de Séneca.In this paper we bring back the ancient tradition of self-care, which associates psychoanalysis, with philosophy, understanding psychoanalysis as a cure of the soul through the word, the self examination, the relationship between patient and physician or philosopher and disciple, and a kind of truth which needs the subject’s "conversion". It is brought back through the philosophy of Plato's Symposium and “Tranquility of the soul” by Seneca.

  18. “Lo niño “ y el psicoanálisis: ¿posibilidad o imposibilidad?/“The children” and psycho-analysis: possible or impossible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Fern��ndez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo reflexionamos sobre el surgimiento del concepto “niño” a partir de la modernidad, los primeros planteos respecto del psicoanálisis de niños y las relaciones que se establecieron con la pedagogía en el interior del psicoanálisis. Desde los inicios, con Anna Freud y Melanie Klein, las curas con niños dieron lugar a dos dispositivos psicoanalíticos diferentes: una nueva forma de la pedagogía o la exploración del funcionamiento psíquico. Posteriormente, desde Lacan “lo niño” entendido como “el niño”, en tanto que sujeto en relación a un discurso familiar, y “lo infantil”, en tanto irrupción de algo del orden de lo subjetivo posibilitará un abordaje diferente. In this paper we reflex about the start of the concept “children” from the beginning of modernity, the first approaches referring to the psycho-analysis of children and the relationships that were established with the pedagogy.From the beginning with Anna Freud and Melanie Klein, the cures with children caused the creation of two different psycho-analysis: a new pedagogy or the exploration of the psychic functions. Then, since Lacan “the children” will allowed a different treatment.

  19. Freud's 'transference': Clinical technique in the 'Rat Man' case and theoretical conceptualization compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Michael

    2017-07-31

    A considerable gap exists between clinical psychoanalytic concepts and psychoanalytic practice. It can be traced back to the early beginnings of psychoanalysis and to Freud's own handling of concepts that he had developed himself. Focusing on the concept of 'transference' that Freud in several steps coined so precisely from his experiences with hysteric patients and especially from his understanding of the 'Dora' case, it can be shown that he - seen from today - could not fully apply the meaning of his own concept in the later treatment of the so-called 'Rat Man'. Freud's 'Original record of the case' is used to scrutinize his way of understanding and handling the transference with this patient. To a substantial extent transference as well as counter-transference was rather enacted than understood in this case, partly due to Freud's own personal and scientific interests and to his ambitions to use this case as a demonstration of his therapeutic approach. In order to show this, it is unavoidable to correct several blurry or even misleading passages of Strachey's translation. Findings from numerous workshops using 'comparative clinical methods' indicate that up till now we analysts - like Freud - have great difficulties in applying Freud's incredible insight that "a whole series of former psychic experiences comes alive not as the past but as the present relationship to the person of the physician" (Freud, 1905c [1901], p. 279/280, my translation). Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  20. QuaIity control of medicaI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Il; Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Yong Moon; Ahn, Kook Jin

    2004-01-01

    Medical imaging is the one of the most important diagnostic tools of modern medical science and quality control of the medical imaging is already systemized in the advanced countries. However, in Korea, quality control of medical imaging has not been properly performed until now and low quality examinations have been done without any regulation. The Korean Radiological Society, as society of supervision of medical imaging, has emphasized the importance of quality control and in 2003, the law for the quality control of medical imaging was made. In conformity of the law, the regulation of the quality control of medical imaging will commence, but this is just the beginning and there are still many tasks left for settling down and expanding the range of the quality control of the medical imaging. We reviewed the history of the quality control of medical imaging in Korea and explained the particulars of mammography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also looked into future prospect and tasks of the quality control of medical imaging

  1. SeaQuaKE: Sea-optimized Quantum Key Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    spatial modes (e.g. orbital angular momentum), on the other hand, will not be considered here, due to the challenges that harsh atmospheric propagation...three smaller subsystems, including the pump source, time-bin multiplexer , polarization entanglement & pair generation elements. Also shown are some...quality f Time-bin/ polariz. analysis Hyper- entangled source Tx aperture ALICE Laser pump f f ff f f PBSf f MZI SPDs MZI PBS Time-Bin Entanglement

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: A SINE-QUA-NON FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    verse ranging from sea surge and flooding, melting of ice caps with potential ... level has grown from under 15,000 in 1970 to approximately 1.2 million today. Moreover ... (2004) state a rise in environmental awareness from the 1970s due to increased ..... (Doctoral thesis, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA).

  3. Rockets and spacecraft: Sine qua non of space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of the national launch vehicle stable is presented along with lists of launch vehicles used in NASA programs. A partial list of spacecraft used throughout the world is also given. Scientific spacecraft costs are presented along with an historial overview of project development and funding in NASA.

  4. Experiencing Photographs Qua Photographs: What's So Special about Them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Benovsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Merely rhetorically and answering in the negative, Kendall Walton has asked: "Isn't photography just another method people have of making pictures, one that merely uses different tools and materials; cameras, photosensitive paper, and darkroom equipment, rather than canvas, paint, and brushes? And don't the results differ only contingently and in degree, not fundamentally, from pictures of other kinds?" Contrary to Walton and others, I answer with a resounding "Yes" to Walton’s questions in this article. It is a widely shared view that photographs are somehow special and that they fundamentally differ from hand-made pictures such as paintings, both from a phenomenological point of view (in the way we experience them and an epistemic point of view (since they are supposed to have a different that is, greater, epistemic value from paintings that gives us a privileged access to the world. I almost reject the totality of these claims and, as a consequence, there remains little difference between photographs and paintings. As we shall see, “photographs are always partly paintings,” a claim that is true not only of retouched digital photographs but of all photographs, including traditional ones made using photosensitive film and development techniques.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: A SINE-QUA-NON FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    embeddedness on formation of specific attitudes and behavioral intentions. Personality and. Social Psychology Bulletin, 22(8), 845-861. Purwanto, H. (1999). Human Behavior Based For Nursing. Jakarta: EGC. Robinson, J. O. (2013). Environmental Education and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: Breaking the missing ...

  6. Being qua becoming: Aristotle's "Metaphysics", quantum physics, and Process Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David Kelley

    In Aristotle's First Philosophy, science and philosophy were partners, but with the rise of empiricism, went their separate ways. Metaphysics combined the rational and irrational (i.e. final cause/unmoved mover) elements of existence to equate being with substance, postulating prime matter as pure potential that was actuated by form to create everything. Modern science reveres pure reason and postulates its theory of being by a rigorous scientific methodology. The Standard Model defines matter as energy formed into fundamental particles via forces contained in fields. Science has proved Aristotle's universe wrong in many ways, but as physics delves deeper into the quantum world, empiricism is reaching its limits concerning fundamental questions of existence. To achieve its avowed mission of explaining existence completely, physics must reunite with philosophy in a metascience modeled on the First Philosophy of Aristotle. One theory of being that integrates quantum physics and metaphysics is Process Philosophy.

  7. Clinical holistic medicine: avoiding the Freudian trap of sexual transference and countertransference in psychodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-04-14

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an "idealized father" figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem "Freud's Trap". Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient's internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  8. Influences on my clinical practice and identity. Jungian analysis on the couch-what and where is the truth of it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The author considers the various influences that have shaped his clinical practice and particular identity as a Jungian analyst. It is hoped that the sharing of these observations will, like a shard of a hologram, reflect aspects of the Jungian community as a whole. The author also attempts to put Jungian analysis 'on the couch' by looking at the current debate in the Journal between traditional and relational psychoanalysis. This is compared to the discourse that philosophy has been struggling with for centuries concerning the nature of truth. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. Perspectives of Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Maluschke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En la antigüedad clásica y en la Edad Media europea, la religión era la fuente principal de las normas éticas, y se consideraba a la vida moral como sumisión a un orden cosmológico preestablecido. En los tiempos modernos, se puede detectar una mudanza radical en la ética, debido a una nueva concepción de la subjetividad humana, lo que origina opiniones relativistas en la ética así como la pérdida de una orientación moral absolutamente cierta. Se considera a las normas morales como invenciones humanas, diferenciándolas de civilización a civilización, comprensión ésta que se está imponiendo especialmente en la filosofía anglo-sajónica. También para Freud, los valores morales son productos culturales, y a este respecto su pensamiento se parece con el abordaje empírico en la ética filosófica. Según Freud, los principios morales y la conciencia son resultado del sentimiento de culpa y de la renuncia pulsional impuesta de esta manera. Considerando que en el abordaje psicoanalítico de Freud prevalece el diagnóstico del malestar causado por la cultura y por la ética, el análisis ético-filosófico está mucho más interesado en los efectos positivos de la moralidad en la sociedad.

  10. Art and emotion in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurist, Elliot L

    2006-10-01

    Freud's view that art satisfies psychic needs has been taken to mean that art has its source in the unconscious and that it unifies pleasure and reality. The author argues that there is a third point that Freud repeatedly emphasizes, which should not be overlooked, that art influences our emotions. The author examines what Freud means by this claim, in particular, his reading of Michelangelo's Moses. Freud's focus here on emotions as fundamental to subjective experience, as subject to regulation and as potentially healthy forms of communication serves to supplement and even challenge what he says in his theory of affect. The author concludes by making inferences about a contemporary psychoanalytic theory of affects: that it ought to be inclusive of science (more receptive to neurobiology and less bound to Freud) as well as art (preserving the focus on subjective experience, especially the processing of complex emotions), which is illustrated with the concept of mentalized affectivity.

  11. Enactments in Psychoanalysis: Therapeutic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stanley

    The therapeutic benefits of enactments are addressed. Relevant literature reveals disparate conceptions about the nature and use of enactments. Clarification of the term is discussed. This analyst's theoretical and technical evolution is addressed; it is inextricably related to using enactments. How can it not be? A taxonomy of enactments is presented. The article considers that enactments may be fundamental in the evolution from orthodox to contemporary analytic technique. Assumptions underlying enactments are explored, as are guidelines for using enactments. Finally, the article posits that enactments have widened the scope of analysis and contributed to its vitality.

  12. Psicanálise e neurociências: um mapa dos debates Psicoanálisis y neurociencias: un mapa de los debates Psychoanalysis and neurosciences: a map of the debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Moraes Davidovich

    2010-12-01

    , el tercer grupo entiende que la articulación sin la jerarquización de los modelos en juego, es fuente fértil para la formulación de nuevas hipótesis teóricas y para la revisión del edificio conceptual de la psicoanálisis.This article will present an overview of the debate about the connections between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. In the psychoanalytic camp, the three main groups are identified as: (1 hybridisation, (2 isolation and (3 interlocution. The first group understands the need for creating a hybrid field, as neurosciences can provide psychoanalysis with underpinnings, methodological techniques and firmer concepts of mental function. This idea is developing as the foundation of Neuropsychoanalysis. The second group, marked strongly by the lacanian discourse, rejects any linkage, thinking them epistemologically incompatible, and predicting an inevitable subjugation of psychoanalysis to scientific dictums. Finally the third group understands interlocution, without hierarchification of the models in play, as a fertile ground for the formulation of new hypotheses and the renovation of the conceptual edifice of psychoanalysis.

  13. Subverting Sanity by Madness --A Psychoanalysis of the Central Figures in Tender is the Night%疯癫对文明的颠覆——对《夜色温柔》主人公的精神分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨澜

    2012-01-01

    In the novel Tender is the Night, the hero and the heroine exchange their roles of patient and doctor, in- sanity and culture. The interchange between madness and normality is the keynote of the book, as well as a meta- phor. From the perspective of psychoanalysis, the interchange also echoes the complex relations between ego and id, those of domination and counter-strike, of control and break-off.%《夜色温柔》中的男女主人公完成了各自从医生到“疯子”与从病人到正常人的角色互换。疯癫即是小说的主题,也是重要隐喻。从心理分析的角度看,二人的关系接近本能与自我互相制约、互相对抗的关系。

  14. Investigación, psicoanálisis, educación Parte II: avance de investigación: Freud, la educación, el psicoanálisis (Research, Psychoanalysis and education - Part II: Research advance: Freud, education, psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bustamante Zamudio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenMomentos de Freud. 1913: la educación mejoraría si conociera el desarrollo infantil; dirigir las pulsiones hacia metas valiosas salvaguarda la creatividad y el disfrute. 1925: la educación tiene sus funciones, aunque no conduzca a la madurez; lo cual no puede subsanar el psicoanálisis, pues no es instalable la transferencia con niños. La provechosa instrucción psicoanalítica calaría hondo en pedagogos psicoanalizados. 1932: igual procedimiento pedagógico no beneficia homogéneamente; imposible hacer profilaxis psíquica. El niño, incapaz de alcanzar el dominio de las pulsiones, es psicoanalizable. Además de un educador con información y terapia psicoanalíticas, conviene tener padres que hayan experimentado un análisis.AbstractFreud’s moments. 1913: Education would be better if children it were aware of children development. Directing drive toward s worthy goals enhances both creativity and joy. 1925: Education has its functions, though it does not lead to maturity; this cannot be resolved by psychoanalysis, because transference does not work within children. The advantageous psychoanalytic instruction would go deep into psychoanalyzed teachers. 1932: the same pedagogic procedure does not homogeneously benefit, it is not possible to make a psychic prophylaxis. Children, unable to govern drives, can be psychoanalyzed. It is convenient having parents who have been psychoanalyzed, besides having a teacher who knows psychoanalytic information and therapy.ResumoMomentos de Freud. 1913: a educação melhoraria se conhecesse o desenvolvimento; dirigir as pulsões para metas valiosas salvaguarda a criatividade e o gozo. 1925: a educação tem suas funções, ainda que não conduza à maturidade; o que não pode corrigir a psicanálise, pois não é instaurável a transferência com crianças. A proveitosa instrução psicanalítica marcaria os pedagogos psicanalisados. 1932: igual procedimento pedagógico não beneficia

  15. En diálogo con los artículos del dossier psicoanálisis y filosofía. ¿Hay un diálogo posible?/In dialogue with the articles of dossier psychoanalysis and phylosophy. Is there a possible dialogue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Fernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la pregunta que anima este número de la revista ¿hay un diálogo posible entre el psicoanálisis y la filosofía? el presente artículo tiene como cometido realizar un dialogo con algunos autores del Dossier, tomando como punto de referencia los trabajos en los cuales está presente cierta problematización del psicoanálisis a través de los trabajos de Foucault. The main question that brings about this new issue of the Journal is about the possible or impossible dialog between psychoanalysis and philosophy. Particularly, this article considers author contributions to this issue challenging psychoanalysis through the lens of Foucauldian theory.

  16. Metapsychological and clinical issues in psychosomatics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    The author starts by treating the general epistemological problems inherent to research and emphasizes that all investigation takes place between two poles: a creative pole and one that is defensive in relation to the unknown and formlessness. In the psychosomatic field, an additional difficulty resides in the western dualistic vision of the relationship between psyche and soma which influences our way of thinking about the body as well as about otherness. The author continues by exploring Pierre Marty's psychosomatic model. Its psychosomatic monism is revolutionary but incomplete and creates a distance with the other, the somatizing patient, resulting in a medically oriented nosology symptomatic of the impossibility to think about some of the most important aspects of counter-transference. With the help of clinical material, the author considers these unthought aspects and some of their theoretical implications, particularly the way of understanding the negative often so prevalent with these patients. Based on these reflections as well as Freud's on beyond the pleasure principle and Winnicott's theorization on the fear of breakdown, the author suggests some directions for research. Somatic illness might occur when the attempts at filling the cracks created by a breakdown are unsuccessful. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. Shortfalls in pediatric hydrocephalus clinical outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walid, Mohammad Sami; Robinson, Joe Sam

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we used search engine technology to study outcome analysis and cost awareness of child hydrocephalus in the literature. The aggregate hospital charges of hydrocephalus treatment procedures for patients years old was extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) data. Hydrocephalus literature was probed through the PubMed biomedical search engine. Aggregate hospital charges associated with ventriculo-peritoneal shunting as the principle procedure for patients years old have increased 1.7-fold over a 13-year period to 235.6 million in 2009. Hospital discharges, however, decreased from 3,390 in 1997 to 2,525 in 2009 (25.5% decrease over 13 years). The number of papers in English language indexed by PubMed in relation to child hydrocephalus in humans increased from 81 papers in 1996 to 133 in 2010 (1.6-fold increase), totaling 1,694 over 15 years. Randomized controlled trials published in relation to child hydrocephalus totaled 16 over the same period (0.94% of child hydrocephalus papers). Papers related to child hydrocephalus with "costs and cost analysis" as medical subject heading totaled 13 papers (0.77%). Over the past 15 years, disappointingly the number of printed child hydrocephalus papers appeared to have only plateaued. Strikingly, only a very small number of these papers were directed toward randomized control studies, the sine qua non of high-grade clinical evidence. Moreover, very few papers make reference to cost analysis or economics in the treatment of hydrocephalus - an issue coming increasingly before the nation at this point.

  18. The marginalisation of dreams in clinical psychological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Linda; Dawson, Drew

    2018-04-22

    The longstanding human interest in dreams has led to a significant body of psychological and philosophical discourse, including research. Recently, however, dreams have been relegated to the periphery of clinical psychological practice. This is potentially problematic as clients continue to bring dreams to therapy and many psychologists lack the confidence or competence to respond effectively to dream material. Building on the structural, professional and research cultures surrounding psychology using a cultural-historical activity theory framework, we argue the marginalisation of dreams is due to cultural-historical factors. These factors include the political and economic context in which psychology developed; psychology's early attempts to differentiate from psychoanalysis by identifying with behaviourism and the natural sciences; and a discipline-specific definition of what constitutes evidence-based practice. These factors led to professional discourses within which dreams are seen as of little clinical or therapeutic value, or that dream work is only for long-term therapy and requires extensive therapist training. However, there are diverse models of dream work consistent with most theoretical orientations within contemporary psychological practice. We conclude with recommendations on how to rebuild clinical confidence and competence in the use of dream material within the current professional environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Construcción de tradiciones historiográficas en psicología y psicoanálisis The making of historiographic traditions in psychology and psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Klappenbach

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación revisa dos tradiciones historiográficas en psicología; la tradición historiográfica anglo sajona, introducida por Boring en Estados Unidos y la tradición historiográfica psicoanalítica, introducido por Jones en Inglaterra. Se propone el nombre de tradición historiográfica para describir las operaciones y reconstrucciones historiográficas que tamizan el conocimiento de la historia de la psicología y del psicoanálisis. El trabajo analiza los presupuestos de ambas tradiciones desde el campo de los estudios históricos y algunas concepciones de la historiografía, en particular de la obra de Hobsbawn y José Luis Romero, tanto como el significado mítico de ambas tradiciones.The present paper reviews two historiographic traditions within psychological field: the Anglo-Saxon historiographic tradition, introduced by Boring in the United States, and the psychoanalytical historiographic tradition, introduced by Jones in England. The name historiographic tradition is proposed to describe the historiographic operations and reconstructions that sift the knowledge of the history of psychology and psychoanalysis. The research points out the historiographic bases of both traditions from the point of view of historical studies. Some concepts from the historians Eric Hobsbawm and Jose Luis Romero are analyzed as well as the mythical significance of both traditions.

  20. Psicoanálisis y filosofía: el problema del a priori de la investigación en Heidegger y Winnicott Psychoanalysis and philosophy: the problem of a priori research in Heidegger and Winnicott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bareiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo intenta presentar la relación entre saber psicoanalítico y filosofía a partir de un diálogo entre Winnicott y Heidegger. Para ello se llevará a cabo dos reconstrucciones argumentativas. En primer lugar, se expondrá el modo en que Heidegger determina el carácter a priori de su investigación. En segundo lugar, se hará un recorrido por la obra de Winnicott a fin de determinar cómo concibe el vínculo entre psicoanálisis y filosofía y, fundamentalmente, para establecer si hay lugar en su pensamiento para un a priori que permita trazar un vínculo con la filosofía.This paper aims to present the relationship between psychoanalytic knowledge and philosophy through to dialogue between Winnicott and Heidegger. This will take place two reconstructions argumentative. First, it exposed the way in which Heidegger determines the a priori character of their research. Secondly, it will go through to Winnicott´s work to determine how he conceives the relationship between psychoanalysis and philosophy and, crucially, to establish if a form in their thinking to a priori that allows a link with philosophy.

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions and clinical trials. Optimizing our Clinical Trials Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical ... multi-pronged approach to Optimize our Clinical Trials Enterprise that will make our clinical trials enterprise even ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  4. Lacan’s construction and deconstruction of the schema of the two mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn eVanheule

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the nineteen fifties Jacques Lacan developed a set-up with a concave mirror and a plane mirror, based on which he described the nature of human identification. He also formulated ideas on how psychoanalysis, qua clinical practice, responds to identification. In this paper Lacan’s schema of the two mirrors is described in detail and the theoretical line of reasoning he aimed to articulate with aid of this spatial model is discussed. It is argued that Lacan developed his double-mirror device to clarify the relationship between the drive, the ego, the ideal ego, the ego ideal, the other and the Other. This model helped Lacan describe the dynamics of identification and explain how psychoanalytic treatment works. He argued that by working with free association, psychoanalysis aims to articulate unconscious desire, and bypass the tendency of the ego for misrecognition. The reasons why Lacan stressed the limits of his double-mirror model and no longer considered it useful from the early nineteen sixties onward are examined. It is argued that his concept of the gaze, which he qualifies as a so-called ‘object a,’ prompted Lacan move away from his double-mirror set-up. In those years Lacan gradually began to study the tension between drive and signifier. The schema of the two mirrors, by contrast, focused on the tension between image and signifier, and missed the point Lacan aimed to address in this new era of his work.

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM, salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference. This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  6. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy. PMID:18454245

  7. Embodied simulation in exposure-based therapies for posttraumatic stress disorder—a possible integration of cognitive behavioral theories, neuroscience, and psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvia Peri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the trauma memory is the common denominator of most evidence-based interventions for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Although exposure-based therapies aim to change associative learning networks and negative cognitions related to the trauma memory, emotional interactions between patient and therapist have not been thoroughly considered in past evaluations of exposure-based therapy. This work focuses on recent discoveries of the mirror-neuron system and the theory of embodied simulation (ES. These conceptualizations may add a new perspective to our understanding of change processes in exposure-based treatments for PTSD patients. It is proposed that during exposure to trauma memories, emotional responses of the patient are transferred to the therapist through ES and then mirrored back to the patient in a modulated way. This process helps to alleviate the patient's sense of loneliness and enhances his or her ability to exert control over painful, trauma-related emotional responses. ES processes may enhance the integration of clinical insights originating in psychoanalytic theories—such as holding, containment, projective identification, and emotional attunement—with cognitive behavioral theories of learning processes in the alleviation of painful emotional responses aroused by trauma memories. These processes are demonstrated through a clinical vignette from an exposure-based therapy with a trauma survivor. Possible clinical implications for the importance of face-to-face relationships during exposure-based therapy are discussed.

  8. The words we work with that work on us: clinical paradigm and cumulative relational trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Birgit

    2017-11-01

    This paper addresses a gap between analytic clinical theory and practice which emerges when examining the words we work with via textual and narrative research of case histories. Both subject matter and methodology fit with the remit of conceptual research in psychoanalysis, currently ranging from inductive to nomothetical approaches. Research of clinical language reveals an implicit account of human nature and the world which undergirds clinical practice. Based in the critical philosophy of the previous century, this is termed clinical paradigm. Such implicit views are induced rather than explicitly taught during analytic training, and need to be spelled out in order to become available to discourse and difference of opinion. Textual research shows these implicit pre-clinical attitudes to be inherently pessimistic and thus too similar to the views of self and others found in cumulative relational trauma. Moreover, clinical accounts tend to normalize subtly antagonistic forms of relating, recently recognised as micro-trauma. Importantly, this contravenes the agapic orientation of our theories and ethics. Paradigmatic reflection as a form of professional individuation addresses this gap. This includes a more optimistic outlook which can be traced through the philosophical implications of quantum theory. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often had to ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... participants. Children and Clinical Studies Learn about the importance of children in clinical studies and get answers ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  13. Educação, psicanálise e sociedade: possibilidades de uma relação crítica Education, psychoanalysis and society: possibilities of a critical connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Soares dos Santos Batista

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é buscar, na relação entre psicanálise e educação, possíveis elementos que ultrapassem a psicologização dos problemas educacionais essencialmente de origem social, política e econômica. Entretanto, não se descarta o aspecto frutífero desta relação, que pode ser a utilização da hermenêutica psicanalítica aliada à crítica dialética da cultura. Ao nos apropriamos de uma leitura frankfurtiana do pensamento de Freud, procuramos mostrar a importância da psicanálise para a reflexão sobre a produção do conhecimento, sobre a relação professor-aluno e para a denúncia de posturas pedagógicas meramente adaptativas e não emancipatórias. Se a ambigüidade da formação cultural, e, em sentido estrito, da educação, não pode ser eliminada simplesmente com um esclarecimento terminológico, é tarefa da Teoria Crítica contrapor os conceitos à realidade. Portanto, formação cultural é a negação do que vivenciamos até então: semiformação socializada (Halbbildung possível de ser apreendida na educação por meio de parâmetros pedagógicos que não têm aprofundado sua reflexão sobre a cultura e a teoria do conhecimento, sobre a democratização do ensino, a indústria cultural e os processos inconscientes existentes na relação escola-sociedade. Reivindicamos o esforço teórico em contraposição ao praticismo reinante nas intervenções feitas em prol da educação.The aim of this paper is to search in the relationship between psychoanalysis and education for possible elements that allow us to overcome the psychologization of educational problems, which are essentially of a social, political and economical nature. However, the fruitful aspect of that relationship is not desregarded, which one is represented by the use of the psychoanalytical hermeneutics associated with the dialectical critique of culture. By adopting a Frankfurtian reading of the Freudian thinking, the paper points out the

  14. A psicanálise como formação do inconsciente: a dinâmica dos atos nas obras de Freud/The psychoanalysis as formation of the unconscious: the dynamics of the acts in the freud workmanship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto de Oliveira Preu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo consiste em uma breve apreciação sobre o jogo entre intenção e realização na psicanálise. Busca assinalar como o sucesso de Freud no estabelecimento de uma verdade sobre o psiquismo se dá ao preço de uma subversão de seus projetos iniciais e de boa parte de suas concepções epistemológicas. Partindo da caracterização do ato intencional e de seu correlato psicanalítico, o ato falho, busca, por meio de exemplos ilustrativos dos impasses e desvios da obra freudiana, sustentar que seu legado é, em parte uma formação do inconsciente. Nesse sentido, procura caracterizar o criador da psicanálise como um herói que venceu por seus fracassos e pela travessia do trágico, bem ao estilo do que caracteriza, acima de tudo, o sujeito da psicanálise: o sujeito do inconsciente. This paper approaches the interaction between intention and realization in psychoanalysis. It intends to show how Freud’s successes in determine a truth about the psychic apparatus due to subversion on his initial project as well as on his epistemological conceptions. Beginning with the definition of intentional act and its psychoanalytical associate, the parapraxis, it intends, through illustrative examples of the impasses and detours on Freud’s work, to sustain that his legacy is, in part, an unconscious formation. In this sense, it tries to characterize Psychoanalysis´ initiator as a hero who won by its failures and working through tragedy, just like how it is defined, above all, the subject of Psychoanalysis: the subject of the unconscious.

  15. A constituição do sujeito na psicanálise lacaniana: impasses na separação La constitución del sujeto en el psicoanálisis lacaniano: impases en la separación The constitution of the subject in lacanian psychoanalysis: impairments in separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Ricotta Bruder

    2007-12-01

    la luz de las teorías vigentes.A theoretical research on the constitution of the subject in Lacanian Psychoanalysis is provided. The clinical aspect which motivates current research is the dealing with children bearing serious problems (psychosis, autism, mental disability, etc and with their mothers, coupled to difficulties encountered at a specific moment in the treatment, or rather, when the structural separation between mother and child occurs. There are two ways through which the subject constitutes itself: the mirror phase and the topology of alienation and separation are both carefully presented and investigated. Although alienation is analyzed, the study focuses on the emergence of the subject within the unconscious, as distinct from the ego which is essentially imaginary. Emergence is given according to the Lacanian reading of Descartes’s Cogito, ergo sum. Impairments in the clinical treatment when separation occurs - especially the emergence of physical symptoms in the mother - are taken into account and analyzed in the light of the above-mentioned theories.

  16. Anísio Teixeira e a psicologia: o diálogo com a psicanálise - Anísio Teixeira and psychology: dialogue with psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Fernanda Bortoloti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho analisa as ideias e a atuação de Anísio Teixeira nos primeiros anos da década de 1930, focalizando as suas concepções acerca do valor da Psicanálise para a renovação educacional no Brasil. Considerando que as ideias e as práticas de Teixeira devem ser compreendidas no contexto histórico em que se desenvolveram, o trabalho apresenta um histórico da inserção dos conhecimentos psicanalíticos no movimento educacional renovador brasileiro, destacando a relevância do higienismo na difusão das teses de Freud na educação. As conclusões indicam que Teixeira interagiu com os conceitos da Psicanálise por intermédio do movimento higienista e das ideias de Arthur Ramos, considerando o indivíduo como um ser vinculado ao ambiente social.Palavras-chave: história da educação brasileira, escola nova, Anísio Teixeira, psicologia, psicanálise. ANÍSIO TEIXEIRA AND PSYCHOLOGY: DIALOGUE WITH PSYCHOANALYSISAbstractThis paper analyses the ideas and the work of Anísio Teixeira in the first years of the 1930s, focusing his conceptions concerning the value of Psychoanalysis for Educational Reform in Brazil. Whereas the ideas and practices Teixeira should be understood in the historical context in which they were developed, the work presents the history of the introduction of the psychoanalytic knowledge in the Brazilian Renovator Educational Movement, highlighting the relevance of hygienism in the dissemination of Freud’s theses in education. The findings indicate that Teixeira interacted with the concepts of Psychoanalysis through the hygienist movement and the ideas of Arthur Ramos, considering the individual as being linked to the social environment.Key-words: history of brazilian education, new school, Anísio Teixeira, psychology, psychoanalysis. ANÍSIO TEIXEIRA Y PSICOLOGÍA: DIÁLOGO CON EL PSICOANÁLISISResumemEste trabajo analiza las ideas y el trabajo de Anísio Teixeira en los primeros años de la década de 1930

  17. Morte, luto e organização familiar: à escuta da criança na clínica psicanalítica Death, mourning and family structure: observation of the child in clinical psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Leônia Cavalcante Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    As especificidades da clínica com crianças pequenas interrogam os conhecimentos já estabelecidos sobre os sintomas e as possibilidades de abordagem psicanalítica. Quando se trata de crianças, a clínica se constitui no entrecruzamento de subjetividades, imprimindo impasses e possibilidades para o paciente, seus pais e o analista. Objetivou-se investigar os efeitos da clínica com crianças no processo de re-configuração da organização familiar. O estudo de um caso clínico foi privilegiado, tendo...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

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    Full Text Available ... or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies ... parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, ...

  9. Review of Cold War Freud, Psychiatry in Communist Europe, and Psiquiatría, Psicoánalisis y Cultura Comunista: Batallas Ideológicas en la Guerra Fria [Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Communist Culture: Ideological Battles in the Cold War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innamorati, Marco

    2017-08-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Freud by D. Herzog (2016), Psychiatry in Communist Europe edited by M. Savelli and S. Marks (2015), and Psiquiatría, Psicoánalisis y Cultura Comunista: Batallas Ideológicas en la Guerra Fria [Psychiatry, psychoanalysis and communist culture: Ideological battles in the Cold War] by H. Vezzetti. On the whole, the three books show how the Cold War influenced, in various ways, psychiatric and psychotherapeutic cultures. Beyond the Iron Curtain, as one can perceive from the book edited by Savelli and Marks (2015), politics explicitly set the agenda for the psychological sciences, using them even to invent ad hoc nosologies, useful for purposes related to power. In the United States, on the other hand, as Herzog (2016) pinpoints, the political situation affected the same field, even if indirectly, as in the Christianization of a discipline-psychoanalysis-the creator of which proudly declared himself an atheist Jew. In other Western countries, the relationship between psychiatry and power could bring about paradoxical results. From Vezzetti's (2016) book, one can ascertain that psychiatric culture might assume an overtly opposing stance toward political power. Vezzetti scans the case of Argentina, and partly of France, but they were not isolated cases. In Italy, for example, a movement of radical psychiatrists understood their role as a necessary opposition to political power, having as an aim the "liberation" of patients locked up in the psychiatric hospitals (Foot, 2015). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Clinical Trials

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  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

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    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key ... Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children have the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the ... more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about ... clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies ...

  17. Conducere apothecam, in qua exercere artem nostram: Το εργαστήριο ενός βυζαντινού και ενός βενετού ζωγράφου στην Κρήτη

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Μαρία ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΟΥΔΑΚΗ-ΚΙΤΡΟΜΗΛΙΔΟΥ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marie Constantoudaki-KitromilidesConducere apothecam,  in  qua exercere artem nostram. L'atelier d'un peintre byzantin et d'un peintre vénitien à CandieIl y a plus de trente ans, le père Mario Cattapan publia une première série de documents, provenant des Archives d'État de Venise et concernant des peintres ayant exercé en Crète de 1300 à 1500. Ce travail constitua un tournant important pour l'étude de la peinture dans l'île sous domination vénitienne. Depuis, des témoignages nouveaux ont éclairé l'activité d'artistes connus de la même époque; d'autres ont révélé les noms et l'activité d'artistes inconnus jusqu'à maintenant.La recherche du père Cattapan, ainsi que des documents étudiés par nous-même, ont apporté de données nouvelles sur l'activité du peintre Nicolaos Philanthropenos, habitant de Candie et probablement descendant d'une famille originaire de Constantinople. De ce dossier, nous publions et commentons ici une pièce rare.Il s'agit d'un contrat, rédigé dans la ville de Candie et daté du 23 novembre 1400, qui concerne la collaboration, sous forme de coopération professionelle (societas, entre Nicolaos Philantrhopenos et le peintre vénitien Nicolaus (Nicolò Storlado. Les deux artistes décident de louer ensemble une boutique pour exercer leur métier pendant une période de trois ans.L'analyse du document et son commentaire nous permettent de mieux comprendre l'activité du peintre Nicolaos Philanthropenos dans l'île de Crète mais aussi à Constantinople et à Venise. En effet, la production artistique de Philanthropenos s'étendait depuis les icônes byzatntines aux retables (pale d'altare de type occidental et aux mosaïques de Saint Marc de Venise. D'autre part, notre document éclaire les chemins de contact entre les peintres crétois et l'art vénitien. Le fonctionnement d'un atelier commun, tenu par deux peintres de formation et expérience culturelle différentes peut être interp

  18. Bridging the reductive and the synthetic: some reflections on the clinical implications of synchronicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Angela

    2015-04-01

    When Jung introduced the concepts of synchronicity and the psychoid unconscious, he expanded analytical psychology into decidedly uncanny territory. Despite the early interest shown by Freud, anomalous phenomena such as telepathy have become a taboo subject in psychoanalysis. Today, however, there is an increasing interest in thought transference and synchronicity, thus opening the way for a fruitful exchange between different psychoanalytical schools on their clinical implications. I propose to examine some of the ambiguities of Jung's thinking, to clarify how we define synchronicity, the relationship between synchronicities and parapsychological events, and their clinical significance. At the present moment, we are still unsure if such events should be considered as normal and a way of facilitating individuation, or as an indication of psychopathology in the patient or in the analyst, just as we are uncertain about the particular characteristics of the intersubjective field that can lead to synchronicities. Making use of the typology of mind-matter correlations presented by Atmanspacher and Fach, and the distinction they draw between acategorial and non-categorial states of mind, I will use two clinical vignettes to illustrate the different states of mind in analyst and analysand that can lead to synchronicities. In particular I will focus on the relationship between analytical reverie and synchronicity. © 2015, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  19. Clinical Trials

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  5. Clinical Pharmacopsychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fava, Giovanni A.; Tomba, Elena; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    of its most representative expressions and reference to current challenges of clinical research, with particular reference to clinimetrics. The domains of clinical pharmacopsychology encompass the clinical benefits of psychotropic drugs, the characteristics that predict responsiveness to treatment...... effects, (b) treatment-induced unwanted side effects, and (c) the patient's own personal experience of a change in terms of well-being and/or quality of life. Clinical pharmacopsychology offers a unifying framework for the understanding of clinical phenomena in medical and psychiatric settings. Research......The aim of this critical review was to outline emerging trends and perspectives of clinical pharmacopsychology, an area of clinical psychology that is concerned with the psychological effects of medications. The historical development of clinical pharmacopsychology is outlined, with discussion...

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  5. Cine Qua Non: The Political Import and Impact of The Battle of Algiers Cine Qua Non : L’impact de La bataille d’Alger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Whitfield

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Co-production italo-algérienne (en français et en arabe, La Battaglia di Algeri (1965, mérite le titre de meilleur film jamais réalisé. Gillo Pontecorvo, réalisateur et co-scénariste, montre avec brio et perspicacité les luttes de groupes d’insurgés se livrant à une guérilla urbaine dans l’Alger des années 1954-1957. Dans son portrait des exactions terroristes, ce film anticipe une vision du monde actuel, empli d’une violence effroyable, insoutenable. Ce film prémonitoire a un impact indéniable sur le temps présent. Que l’on soit de gauche ou de droite, de 1965 à nos jours, ce film ne cesse de fasciner. Ainsi dans le cadre de cette étude, je tenterai de mettre en relief la réalité historique à travers l’art cinématographique. Censuré en France en 1965, et peu projeté en salle dans la décennie qui suivit, ce film garde de sa force impressionnante grâce à son style étonnant mais aussi au thème choisi, criant par son éternelle actualité.

  6. Lessons from Watergate. A derivative for psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangell, L

    1976-01-01

    Periods of social upheaval, by revealing aspects of behavior ordinarily repressed, provide an opportunity for deepening out insights into the nature of man. The searing experience of Watergate is viewed not as the psychopathology of a man, or the group psychology of forty men under the ex-President, but as reflecting psychic processes at the base of the population pyramid. The people supported Nixon for a quarter century during which his character traits were known, and were in collusion with the cover-up to the end during the two and half years of Watergate. The theory is advanced that this was due to an identification with Nixon based on the universal wish to triumph over the superego. Ego-superego conflicts are as ubiquitous and ongoing in mental life as the struggle between ego and id. The latter results in neuroses, the former in compromises of integrity. The 'syndrome of the compromise of integrity' is on a par with neurosis in human affairs.

  7. Psychoanalysis and Deconstruction, A Love Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In The Right to Narcissism: A Case for Im-Possible Self-Love, Pleshette DeArmitt opens the space for an alternative to origin story so popular with political philosophers, namely, the social contract, which assumes a rational and self-identical subject.  She does this obliquely by deconstructing narcissism as love of the self-same, or, love of what Kristeva might call “the clean and proper self.”  Like Echo interrupting Narcissus’s soliloquy of deadly self-absorbed pleasure and his solitary auto-affection upon seeing his own reflection, Pleshette interrupts the seeming proximity of self-same, the closeness of near, and the propinquity of proper by deflecting the image of Narcissus onto the voice of Echo, who comes into her own by repeating his words.  How, asks Pleshette, can Echo’s reiteration of the words of another be anything more than mere repetition or reduplication?  Echoing Derrida, she answers that it is through a declaration of love.  Echo’s repetition of the words of Narcissus take on new meaning, and allow her to express herself, and her love, through the words of the other.  After all words are words of the other.  Language comes to us from the other.  Echo becomes a self, a “little narcissist,” through an address from and to the other, through the appropriation and ex-appropriation of the other’s words. 

  8. Psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and urban poverty in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epele, Maria Esther

    2016-12-01

    Based on ethnographic research carried out in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, this paper examines the views of social actors on the psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy focused on marginalized populations. From Foucault's perspective on the forms of truth-telling, the aim of this paper is to analyze, as a preliminary research report, treatments according to the native ways of speaking and listening, which dominate the description of therapeutic experiences of patients who come to the treatment without any professional intermediation. The neoliberal transformations of the past decades in Argentina changed both the landscape of the public health system and the daily lives of marginalized people. Considering such changes, this paper examines the ways in which verbal actions (speaking and listening) take place in psychotherapy and mark the course not only of treatments but also the temporal rhythms of their development, and their various levels of efficacy. Finally, the discussion focuses on how ways of speaking and listening in treatments are modeled not only by institutional dynamics but also by the characteristics these verbal activities take in everyday life under the logics of power that prevail over them.

  9. Psychoanalysis in Post-Apartheid South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elda Storck-van Reenen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper seeks to describe the trajectory of psychoanalytic endeavours in South Africa since the political thaw of the 1990s. The first part, written by Elda Storck – van Reenen, centres on the alignment of psychoanalytic training to international standards and the formation of institutions to contain these developments. Encouraging demographic and professional diversity and addressing the deficit of personal therapy – «Selbsterfahrung» – in formal training modalities are of primary importance. The second part, written by Mary-Anne Smith, elaborates on the application of basic psychoanalytic concepts to community and outreach work in an impoverished and traumatized society. In addition, the aspiration of engaging the interest and support of governmental agencies around the value and relevance of psychoanalytic thinking for primary and preventative health care is explored.

  10. Fig: ure it Out: A Creative Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigmund Freud’s contribution to the field of psychology was significant, not because it was flawless but because it challenged conventional views of the time.   In the modern era, an individual’s view of the world is constantly being challenged due, in large part, to insurmountable information made available for public consumption. It’s an unrelenting bombardment of input that has made prominent the rift between facts and beliefs. This inquisitive article is an exploration of that conflict.   By applying Freudian psychology to one of the most confrontational and debatable topics of the 21st century—the environment—Fig: ure It Out reviews our environmental problems from one psychological perspective. Do we define truths by facts or by the way in which we cope with new information? It’s an example of human behaviour within a changing world.

  11. Psychoanalysis, Islam, and the other of Liberalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the terms and methods used by psychoanalytic authors to explain and understand something they other as "Islam." The paper engages critically and psycho-analytically with these authors' attempts to read "Islam" psychoanalytically, and finds that more often than not they subject it to liberal principles that are not defined in psychoanalytic terms. Focusing on the work of Tunisian author Fethi Benslama, the paper analyses and deconstructs certain key semantic and conceptual confusions of "Islam" and "Islamism" that are manifest in the general psychoanalytic literature on "Islam".

  12. Mourning beyond melancholia: Freud's psychoanalysis of loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewell, Tammy

    2004-01-01

    Freud's mourning theory has been criticized for assuming a model of subjectivity based on a strongly bounded form of individuation. This model informs "Mourning and Melancholia" (1917), in which Freud argued that mourning comes to a decisive end when the subject severs its emotional attachment to the lost one and reinvests the free libido in a new object. Yet Freud revised his mourning theory in writings concerned with the Great War and in The Ego and the Id (1923), where he redefined the identification process previously associated with melancholia as an integral component of mourning. By viewing the character of the ego as an elegiac formation, that is, as "a precipitate of abandoned object-cathexes," Freud's later work registers the endlessness of normal grieving; however, it also imports into mourning the violent characteristics of melancholia, the internal acts of moralized aggression waged in an effort to dissolve the internal trace of the other and establish an autonomous identity. Because it is not immediately clear how Freud's text offers a theory of mourning beyond melancholy violence, his account of the elegiac ego is shown here to ultimately undermine the wish for an identity unencumbered by the claims of the lost other and the past, and to suggest the affirmative and ethical aspects of mourning.

  13. THE NOTION OF TRAUMA IN PSYCHOANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    ANA BEATRIZ FAVERO

    2009-01-01

    Este estudo analisa as contribuições de Sigmund Freud, Sándor Ferenczi e Jacques Lacan sobre o trauma em psicanálise, destacando as principais características de cada abordagem teórica. A concepção de trauma sofre mudanças nas diversas fases da construção teórica freudiana e suas diferentes acepções são discutidas desde a neurotica até a última teoria de angústia (Freud, 1926 [1925]), como também em Moisés e o monoteísmo (Freud, 1939 [1934-1938]). Em Ferenczi, há d...

  14. "Wo Es War": Psychoanalysis, Marxism, and Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Subjectivity, for Descartes, emerged when he doubted the veracity of his knowledge. Instead of truth, he counted this knowledge to be inherited myth. Cartesian subjectivity has been helpful for forming a critical education predicated on doubting ideology and hegemony. But Marx indicates a very different kind of knowledge in his analysis of…

  15. ILLUSION, DISILLUSION, AND IRONY IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John

    2016-04-01

    The author draws a parallel between an analyst listening to a patient and a member of an audience watching a play. In both situations, it is important to be able to adopt a dual identity in order to participate in the action through identification and then to withdraw from the identification to adopt the position of an observer. The author discusses two plays, Ibsen's The Wild Duck (1884) and Sophocles's Oedipus the King (5th century BC, a), and concludes that an ironic attitude to these works can help the spectator to adopt these dual identities and to recognize the value of truth, while at the same time appreciating that reality can be harsh and sometimes unbearable. A similar ironic vision in relation to his patients can enable the analyst to retain a respect for truth alongside a sympathetic awareness of the need for illusion. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  16. Buddhism and psychoanalysis: a personal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, David

    2006-06-01

    Around 600 BC Siddhartha Gotama practiced intensive meditation for several years and found a way for people to cultivate a sense of equanimity, wisdom, and compassion in their lives. Around 1900 AD Sigmund Freud undertook several years of intensive self-analysis and developed theories and therapeutic techniques for understanding how the unconscious operates in our lives to perpetuate neurotic suffering, and how we might gain insight and relief from that suffering and be more free to move toward our potential in this life. This article gives an overview of Buddhist theory and practice, gives an account of the author's personal journey through both disciplines, and then point outs the similarities and differences in them, leading to an integration of elements of these two paths of exploration of the psyche, for the purpose of mutual enrichment.

  17. Sexualidade e pulsão: conceitos indissociáveis em psicanálise? Sexualidad y pulsión: conceptos inseparables en psicoanálisis? Sexuality and drive: inseparable concepts in psychoanalysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Klier Padilha Netto

    2012-09-01

    , discutimos cómo conciliar los aspectos violentos y perturbadores de la sexualidad humana con la dimensión de ligación inherente a Eros.Psychoanalysis has as one of its central operators an innovative understanding of human sexuality. The concept of drive, of the sexual drive in particular, has a prominent place. Determinations and implications of the relocation of this concept in Freud's work create theoretical difficulties in the sexual issue and its relation to otherness. In the first drive dualism, the sexual drive is a disruptive force, opposed to self-conservative ones because of its destabilizing character for the ego. With the emergence of the concept of narcissism, the ego's constitution takes on an eminently sexual character, and the opposition between ego and sexuality is problematized. In the second drive theory, grounded on the opposition between Eros and the death drive, the latter is a destructive force, whose nature, according to Freud, would not be sexual. Drawing on Jean Laplanche, we discuss how to reconcile the violent and disruptive features of human sexuality with the linking dimension inherent to Eros.

  18. The Cinema as Therapy: Psychoanalysis in the Work of Woody Allen Miguel Ángel Huerta Floriano Facultad de Comunicación, Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca (Spain. Correspondence: Miguel Ángel Huerta Floriano. Facultad de Comunicación de la Universi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Huerta Floriano

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available There is undoubtedly no other film producer who has devoted such attention to psychoanalysis and psychoanalysts as Woody Allen. The work of this New York film maker is based on a series of formal, narrative, and thematic constants in which issues such as emotional instability and its psychotherapeutic treatment –normally addressed in comic tone- are featured strongly. Additionally, owing to their peculiar structures some of the most representative movies of Allen’s universe can in the long run be understood as exercises in psychological release. In Allen’s films the figure of the psychiatrist is usually represented with criticism in mind, although the need for such professionals in this contemporary urban world of ours, in which confusion and meaninglessness are rampant, is not demeaned. For all of the above, then, Woody Allen is considered to be one of the pivotal references in the cinematographic treatment of the obsessions of our times.

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Groth, Kristian; Skakkebæk, Anne; Høst, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Recently, new clinically important information regarding Klinefelter syndrome (KS) has been published. We review aspects of epidemiology, endocrinology, metabolism, body composition, and neuropsychology with reference to recent genetic discoveries.......Recently, new clinically important information regarding Klinefelter syndrome (KS) has been published. We review aspects of epidemiology, endocrinology, metabolism, body composition, and neuropsychology with reference to recent genetic discoveries....

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    Pallesen, Ulla

    universities and practicing dentists restore millions of teeth throughout the World with composite resin materials. Do we know enough about the clinical performance of these restorations over time? Numerous in vitro studies are being published on resin materials and adhesion, some of them attempting to imitate...... in vivo conditions. But real life is different and in vitro studies cannot include all variables. Only clinical studies can provide valid information on the clinical performance of restorations over time. What do we know about longevity of posterior resin restorations? What are the reasons for replacement...... and results from own up to 30-year prospective clinical university studies and practice based studies from Public Dental Health Service on the clinical performance of posterior composite resin restorations....

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    Christensen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the logic of problem solving and the production of scientific knowledge through the utilisation of clinical research perspective. Ramp-up effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and organizational excellence are topics that continue to engage research and will continue doing so...... for years to come. This paper seeks to provide insights into ramp-up management studies through providing an agenda for conducting collaborative clinical research and extend this area by proposing how clinical research could be designed and executed in the Ramp- up management setting....

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    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Locator DBSA In-Person Support ... by participating in a clinical trial is to science first and to the patient second. More About ...

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    Full Text Available ... as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results ...

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    Full Text Available ... or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that ...

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees all research ...

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  10. Clinical proteomics

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    Albrethsen, Jakob; Frederiksen, Hanne; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS)-platforms...... standards and calibrants. The present challenge is to examine if targeted proteomics of IGF-I can truly measure up to the routine performance that must be expected from a clinical testing platform.......Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS......)-platforms already implemented in many clinical laboratories for routine quantitation of small molecules (i.e. uHPLC coupled to triple-quadrupole MS). Progress in targeted proteomics of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) have provided valuable insights about tryptic peptides, transitions, internal...

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    Full Text Available ... studies. View funding information for clinical trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and ...

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