WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychiatry training methods

  1. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Methods Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a ‘Combined’ score for each post. Results The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson’s r = 0.968, ppsychiatry posts as compared to general adult psychiatry posts (Two tailed t-test, p psychiatry as compared to other specialist psychiatry posts (t-test: p = 0.038, 95% CI: -0.3901, -0.0118). Job satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). Conclusions This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees. PMID

  2. Ethics Training in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Guloksuz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although ethics training is one of the core components of psychiatric education, it is not sufficiently addressed in the curricula of many educational institutions. It is shown that many of the psychiatry residents received no ethics training in both residency and medical school. Predictably, over half of the psychiatry residents had faced an ethical dilemma that they felt unprepared to meet, and nearly all of them indicated ethics education would have helped them to solve this dilemma. In addition to learning about the fundamental topics of ethics like confidentiality, boundary violations, justice, benefience and nonmaleficence, psychiatrists must also learn to deal with other hidden ethical dilemmas which are mostly due to the changing world order. It is obvious that residency training should include a well developed ethics curriculum. However, some still believe that ethical principles cannot be taught and are formed in one’s early moral development. Accepting the fact that teaching ethics is difficult, we believe that it is getting easier with the new methods for teaching in medicine. These methods are clinical supervisions, rol-models, case studies, role playing, small group discussions, team based learning and “let’s talking medicine” groups which is a useful methods for discussing ethics dilemmas on daily practice and C.A.R.E (Core Beliefs, Actions, Reasons, Experience which is a special training method for teaching ethics. In this review, the need of ethics training in residency curriculum will be discussed and new methods for teaching ethics will be proposed.

  3. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizrah, Mukhtar; Iacoponi, Eduardo; Parker, Elizabeth; Rymer, Janice; Iversen, Amy; Wessely, Simon

    2013-06-14

    Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a 'Combined' score for each post. The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson's r = 0.968, pquality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees.

  4. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brittlebank, A.; Hermans, M.; Bhugra, D.; Costa, M.; Rojnic-Kuzman, M.; Fiorillo, A.; Kurimay, T.; Hanon, C.; Wasserman, D.; Gaag, R.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Europeenne des Medecins Specialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an

  5. Communication skills in psychiatry training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Halpin, Sean; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Vamos, Marina; Outram, Sue; Bylund, Carma L; Levin, Tomer; Kissane, David; Cohen, Martin; Loughland, Carmel

    2015-08-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience problems communicating distressing diagnostic information to patients and their families, especially about severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. Evidence suggests that interpersonal communication skills can be effectively taught, as has been demonstrated in the specialty of oncology. However, very little literature exists with respect to interpersonal communication skills training for psychiatry. This paper provides an overview of the communication skills training literature. The report reveals significant gaps exist and highlights the need for advanced communication skills training for mental health clinicians, particularly about communicating a diagnosis and/or prognosis of schizophrenia. A new communication skills training framework for psychiatry is described, based on that used in oncology as a model. This model promotes applied skills and processes that are easily adapted for use in psychiatry, providing an effective platform for the development of similar training programs for psychiatric clinical practice. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  6. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Hermans, Marc; Bhugra, Dinesh; Pinto da Costa, Mariana; Rojnic-Kuzman, Martina; Fiorillo, Andrea; Kurimay, Tamas; Hanon, Cecile; Wasserman, Danuta; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an additional European Framework for Competencies in Psychiatry in 2009. Yet these have not been implemented throughout Europe. In this paper, the diversity in training throughout Europe is approached from different angles: the cultural differences between countries with regards to how mental health care is considered and founded on, the cultural differences between people throughout Europe in all states. The position of psychotherapy is emphasised. What once was the cornerstone of psychiatry as medical specialty seems to have become a neglected area. Seeing the patient with mental health problems within his cultural context is important, but considering him within his family context. The purpose of any training is enabling the trainee to gain the knowledge and acquire the competencies necessary to become a well-equipped professional is the subject of the last paragraph in which trainees consider their position and early career psychiatrists look back to see whether what they were trained in matches with what they need in the working situation. Common standard for training and certification are a necessity within Europe, for the benefit of the profession of psychiatrist but also for patient safety. UEMS is advised to join forces with the Council of National Psychiatric Associations (NPAs) within the EPA and trainings and early career psychiatrist, to discuss with the users what standards should be implemented in all European countries and how a European board examination could ensure professional quality of psychiatrists throughout the continent.

  7. Factors Affecting Recruitment into Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jon A.; Lewis, John E.; Katyal, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with…

  8. Effect of communication skill training using group psychoeducation method on the stress level of psychiatry ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Lohrasbi, Fatemeh; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-12-01

    Nursing is a dynamic and supportive job, with the main role of taking care of patients. Maintaining appropriate communication of the nurse with the patients is particularly known as the main core of care in mental health. However, in spite of the importance of providing communication, one of the main sources of stress in nurses of psychiatry wards is communication with the patients. Some important reasons for inappropriate relationship between the nurse and patient can be lack of necessary skills to communicate with patients because of insufficient training. Although training communication skills is an important part of the education of medical and paramedical students, in recent studies it has been demonstrated that the communication skills learned in theoretical courses would not necessarily be transferred to clinical settings, and proving training in clinical settings is a must. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of training communication skills using psychoeducation method on the stress level of nurses of psychiatry wards in 2010. This is a quasi-experimental study. The participants were 45 nurses; 23 and 22 in the experiment and control groups, respectively, working in psychiatry wards of Noor and Farabi hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was carried out by the census method, and then the participants were randomly assigned to the two groups of experiment and control, using random number table. The two groups filled out the demographic data form and also the questionnaire on nurses' occupational stress, designed by the researcher. The questionnaire was filled out three times; before, immediately after, and one month after the training. Training of communication skills was carried out using group psychoeducation method, in six sessions, each lasted for 1.5 hours. The training sessions of the experiment group were held in Farabi Hospital. The findings indicated that before the intervention, the members of the two groups had a high

  9. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  10. Training in Tobacco Treatments in Psychiatry: A National Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nicotine dependence is the most prevalent substance abuse disorder among adult psychiatric patients and is a leading cause of death and disability. This study examines training in tobacco treatment in psychiatry residency programs across the United States. Method The authors recruited training directors to complete a survey of their program’s curriculum related to tobacco treatment, attitudes related to treating tobacco in psychiatry, and perceptions of residents’ skills for addressing nicotine dependence in psychiatric patients. Results Respondents were representative of the national pool. Half of the programs provided training in tobacco treatments for a median duration of 1 hour. Content areas covered varied greatly. Programs with tobacco-related training expressed more favorable attitudes toward addressing tobacco in psychiatry and were more likely to report confidence in their residents’ skills for treating nicotine dependence. Programs without tobacco training reported a lack of faculty expertise on tobacco treatments. Most training directors reported moderate to high interest in evaluating a model tobacco curriculum for psychiatry and stated they would dedicate an average of 4 hours of curriculum time. Conclusions The findings demonstrate the need for and interest in a model tobacco treatment curriculum for psychiatry residency training. Training psychiatrists offers the potential of delivering treatment to one of the largest remaining groups of smokers: patients with mental disorders. PMID:17021144

  11. Psychiatry training experiences: a narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorge, Aspasia; Llewellyn, Anthony; Nash, Louise; Maddocks, Claire; Kaldelis, Dimitra; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Edwards, James; Kelly, Brian

    2016-06-01

    In Australia and internationally, psychiatry has struggled to fill training places to keep up with demand for service. The objective of this study was to review the components of psychiatry terms and placements that determine a positive experience and potentially influence interest in vocational training in psychiatry. A literature review and narrative synthesis was undertaken on 20 papers identified as meeting inclusion criteria. The top themes contributing to positive experiences during the psychiatry term were: receiving high quality supervision; supported autonomy; and witnessing patient recovery. There was a paucity of Australian literature preventing investigation of the Australian context alone. There is a need to better understand how the junior doctor and medical student psychiatry experience influences perceptions of psychiatry and intention to specialise, especially in the Australian context. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  12. Cultural competency training in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, A; Collazos, F; Ramos, M; Casas, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that the quality of care provided to immigrant and ethnic minority patients is not at the same level as that provided to majority group patients. Although the European Board of Medical Specialists recognizes awareness of cultural issues as a core component of the psychiatry specialization, few medical schools provide training in cultural issues. Cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant and ethnic minority patients. Cultural competence training involves the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. Cognitive cultural competence involves awareness of the various ways in which culture, immigration status, and race impact psychosocial development, psychopathology, and therapeutic transactions. Technical cultural competence involves the application of cognitive cultural competence, and requires proficiency in intercultural communication, the capacity to develop a therapeutic relationship with a culturally different patient, and the ability to adapt diagnosis and treatment in response to cultural difference. Perhaps the greatest challenge in cultural competence training involves the development of attitudinal competence inasmuch as it requires exploration of cultural and racial preconceptions. Although research is in its infancy, there are increasing indications that cultural competence can improve key aspects of the psychiatric treatment of immigrant and minority group patients.

  13. Impact of psychiatry training on attitude of medical students toward mental illness and psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Prannay; Das, Subhash; Chavan, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Attitude of fresh graduates toward psychiatric patients is important to bridge the treatment gap due to mental illness. Psychiatry as a subject has been neglected in the undergraduates of MBBS. Aims: (1) To compare the attitude of medical students and interns in a medical college toward mental illness and psychiatry. (2) To assess the impact of psychiatric training on attitude toward the mentally ill person and mental illness. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, single assessment study conducted at a tertiary hospital. Subjects and Methods: Participants consisted of medical students of 1st and 2nd year who didn’t have any exposure to psychiatry and interns, who had completed their compulsory 2 week clinical posting in psychiatry. Participants were individually administered sociodemographic proforma, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), opinion about mental illness (OMI) scale, and attitude to psychiatry-29 (ATP-29) scale. Statistical Analysis: Standard descriptive statistics (mean, percentage), Chi-square test. Results: A total of 135 participants formed the study sample, with 48, 47, and 40 participants from 1st year, 2nd year and interns, respectively. Mean GHQ score was 14.03 for the entire sample. There was better outlook of interns toward psychiatry and patients with mental disorders in comparison to fresh graduate students in some areas. Overall, negative attitude toward mental illness and psychiatry was reflected. Conclusions: Exposure to psychiatry as per the current curriculum seems to have a limited influence in bringing a positive change in OMI and psychiatry. PMID:25316938

  14. Education and Training in Psychiatry in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Stuart; Bhugra, Dinesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective: Recent training and education changes have raised important issues in delivery of psychiatric education at all levels. In this article, the authors describe the current status of mental health education in the training of all doctors and postgraduate training and education in psychiatry in the U.K. Method: The authors explore…

  15. Training Researchers in Cultural Psychiatry: The McGill-CIHR Strategic Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J.; Rousseau, Cecile; Corin, Ellen; Groleau, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The authors aim to summarize the pedagogical approaches and curriculum used in the training of researchers in cultural psychiatry at the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University. Method: We reviewed available published and unpublished reports on the history and development of the McGill cultural psychiatry…

  16. Psychiatry training in Europe: views from the trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Giacco, Domenico; Simmons, Meinou; Wuyts, Philippe; Bausch-Becker, Nikolaus; Favre, Guillaume; Nawka, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In the majority of European countries, postgraduate psychiatry training schemes are developed and evaluated by national bodies in accordance with national legislation. In order to harmonise training in psychiatry across Europe, the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) issued a number of recommendations for effective implementation of training programs in psychiatry. To describe the structure and quality assurance mechanisms of postgraduate psychiatric training in Europe. The European Federation of Psychiatry Trainees (EFPT) conducted a survey, which was completed by the representatives of 29 member national psychiatric associations. In most countries (N = 19), the duration of the training programme is 5 years or more. Twenty-six countries have adapted a basic training programme that includes the 'common trunk' (according to UEMS definition) or a modified version of it. In 25 countries, trainees are evaluated several times during their training with a final exam at the end. In 25 countries, official quality assurance mechanisms exist. However, results demonstrate great variations in their implementation. Overall, psychiatric training programmes and assessment methods are largely compatible with one another across Europe. Quality assurance mechanisms, however, vary significantly. These should receive adequate attention by national and international educational policy makers.

  17. Trends in Psychotherapy Training: A National Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudak, Donna M.; Goldberg, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine current trends in residency training of psychiatrists. Method: The authors surveyed U.S. general-psychiatry training directors about the amount of didactic training, supervised clinical experience, and numbers of patients treated in the RRC-mandated models of psychotherapy (psychodynamic,…

  18. Residency Training in Emergency Psychiatry: A Model Curriculum Developed by the Education Committee of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, Jennifer; Glick, Rachel Lipson; Cobb, Thomas G.; Richmond, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Describe training goals, objectives and requirements in emergency psychiatry to assist residency programs in developing comprehensive training programs to ensure psychiatric residents acquire the necessary skills and knowledge to competently assess and manage patients with psychiatric emergencies. Methods: The American Association for…

  19. Psychiatry in the Deep South: A Pilot Study of Integrated Training for Psychiatry Residents and Seminary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Craig; Campbell, Nioaka; Bragg, John; Moran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe an interdisciplinary training experience developed for psychiatry residents and seminary students that assessed each group's beliefs and attitudes toward the other's profession. The training was designed to enhance awareness, positive attitudes, and interaction between the disciplines. Methods: From 2005 to 2008,…

  20. [Specialized training in geriatric psychiatry during residency in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Alexis; Lavigne, Benjamin; Legros, Emilie; Herrmann, Mathieu; Sebbane, Déborah

    2014-09-01

    Aging of the population is a growing concern in developed countries. Therefore, geriatric psychiatry has gradually emerged from general psychiatry. Many names have been proposed to term this sub-specialty: old age psychiatry (OAP), psychogeriatrics, geropsychiatry. A working group of the French federation of psychiatric trainees (AFFEP) set up an inventory of the theoretical instruction and clinical practice of OAP during the training of psychiatrists in France. Methods. A survey of both academic teaching and practical training for OAP was carried out in the 28 local AFFEP representatives of every French medical residency district, including overseas. We assessed the supply of general courses and seminars devoted to OAP during the training of French residents in psychiatry, and the offer of university or inter-university degrees as well as the possibility of specialized internship in every residency district. Results. 96% of French medical residency districts offered general courses of OAP with a mean volume of 11.5 hours along the four years of psychiatric training in France. Fifty percent of medical residency districts proposed at least one seminar devoted to OAP. Half of medical residency districts also offer a specialized university or inter-university degree. Concerning clinical practice, 86% of medical residency districts had one internship dedicated to OAP, in 39% of cases in teaching hospitals. Conclusion. Nationwide, there is an overall effort to make OAP available to French psychiatric residents by general courses and internship, but some disparity appeared in academic teaching (i.e. offering seminars and university/inter-university degrees) according to various residency districts.

  1. Impact of psychiatry training on attitude of medical students toward mental illness and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Prannay; Das, Subhash; Chavan, B S

    2014-07-01

    Attitude of fresh graduates toward psychiatric patients is important to bridge the treatment gap due to mental illness. Psychiatry as a subject has been neglected in the undergraduates of MBBS. (1) To compare the attitude of medical students and interns in a medical college toward mental illness and psychiatry. (2) To assess the impact of psychiatric training on attitude toward the mentally ill person and mental illness. Cross-sectional, single assessment study conducted at a tertiary hospital. Participants consisted of medical students of 1(st) and 2(nd) year who didn't have any exposure to psychiatry and interns, who had completed their compulsory 2 week clinical posting in psychiatry. Participants were individually administered sociodemographic proforma, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), opinion about mental illness (OMI) scale, and attitude to psychiatry-29 (ATP-29) scale. Standard descriptive statistics (mean, percentage), Chi-square test. A total of 135 participants formed the study sample, with 48, 47, and 40 participants from 1(st) year, 2(nd) year and interns, respectively. Mean GHQ score was 14.03 for the entire sample. There was better outlook of interns toward psychiatry and patients with mental disorders in comparison to fresh graduate students in some areas. Overall, negative attitude toward mental illness and psychiatry was reflected. Exposure to psychiatry as per the current curriculum seems to have a limited influence in bringing a positive change in OMI and psychiatry.

  2. Psychiatry Resident Training in Cultural Competence: An Educator's Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Irma; Johnson, Toni L; Shelton, Pheston G; Glass, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Resident physicians training in psychiatry in the U.S. are required to master a body of knowledge related to cultural psychiatry; are expected to adopt attitudes that endorse the principles of cultural competence; and finally are expected to acquire specific cultural competence skills that facilitate working effectively with diverse patients. This article first provides an overview of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies related to cultural competence, as well as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's (AACAP) recommendations for the cultural competence training of child/adolescent fellows. Next, numerous print and electronic resources that can be used in cultural competence education in psychiatry are reviewed and discussed. Finally, we conclude by providing recommendations for psychiatry residency programs that we culled from model cultural competence curricula.

  3. psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International psychiatry has its roots in Anglo-European societies of the 19th century. Ideas and methods on mental health and illness grew out of the modern concept of disease that had consolidated in the early ... and into the 20th century a medical, organic approach to mental ... It cannot be divorced from the history of the.

  4. Assisting Undergraduate Physician Assistant Training in Psychiatry: The Role of Academic Psychiatry Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Ferguson, Britnay A

    2015-12-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) are medical professionals who practice medicine with the supervision of a physician through delegated autonomy. PA school accreditation standards provide limited guidance for training PAs in psychiatry. As a result, PA students may receive inconsistent and possibly inadequate exposure to psychiatry. Providing broad and in-depth exposure to the field of psychiatry is important to attract PA students to pursue careers in psychiatry and provide a possible solution to the shortage of psychiatrists nationwide. Additionally, this level of exposure will prepare PA students who pursue careers in other fields of medicine to recognize and address their patient's psychiatric symptoms in an appropriate manner. This training can be provided by an academic department of psychiatry invested in the education of PA students. We describe a training model implemented at our university that emphasizes psychiatrist involvement in the preclinical year of PA school and full integration of PA students into the medical student psychiatry clerkship during the clinical years. The benefits and challenges to implementing this model are discussed as well.

  5. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine ...

  6. Status of general medicine training and education in psychiatry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    With the current emphasis on integrated care, the role of psychiatrists is expanding to either directly provide medical care or coordinate its delivery. The purpose of this study was to survey general psychiatry programs on the extent of general medicine training provided during residency. A short web-based survey was sent to 173 residency program directors to recruit participants for a larger survey. Thirty-seven participants were recruited and surveyed, and of these, 12 (32.4%) responded. The survey assessed the extent of general medicine training and didactics during and after the first postgraduate year and attitudes towards enhancing this training in residency. This study was approved by the local institutional review board. Seventy-five percent of programs require only the minimum 4 months of primary care in the first postgraduate year, and didactics during these months is often not relevant to psychiatry residents. Some programs offer elective didactics on chronic medical conditions in the fourth postgraduate year. Respondents are in favor of enhancing general medicine training in psychiatry but indicate some resistance from their institutions. These results suggest that very few programs require additional clinical training in relevant medical illnesses after the first postgraduate year. Respondents indicated favorable institutional support for enhancing training, but also expected resistance. The reasons for resistance should be an area of future research. Also important is to determine if enhancing medical didactics improves patient care and outcomes. The changing role of psychiatrists entails a closer look at resident curricula.

  7. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  8. Psychiatry Trainees' Training and Experience in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Roy; O'Connor, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Alcohol is a teratogen. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) affect about 1% of live births, causing severe impairment. Individuals affected by FASDs are overrepresented in psychiatric settings. This study reports on the education and experience of psychiatry trainees in approaching FASDs. Method: Data were collected from…

  9. Training in Buprenorphine and Office-Based Opioid Treatment: A Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Joji; Ellison, Tatyana V; Connery, Hilary S; Surber, Charles; Renner, John A

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatrists are well suited to provide office-based opioid treatment (OBOT), but the extent to which psychiatry residents are exposed to buprenorphine training and OBOT during residency remains unknown. Psychiatry residency programs in the USA were recruited to complete a survey. Forty-one programs were included in the analysis for a response rate of 23.7 %. In total, 75.6 % of the programs currently offered buprenorphine waiver training and 78.1 % provided opportunities to treat opioid dependence with buprenorphine under supervision. Programs generally not only reported favorable beliefs about OBOT and buprenorphine waiver training but also reported numerous barriers. The majority of psychiatry residency training programs responding to this survey offer buprenorphine waiver training and opportunities to treat opioid-dependent patients, but numerous barriers continue to be cited. More research is needed to understand the role residency training plays in impacting future practice of psychiatrists.

  10. Clinical Simulation Training in Geriatric Medicine: A Review of the Evidence and Lessons for Training in Psychiatry of Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakiotis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Clinical simulation encompasses a broad range of methods and techniques that allow clinical skills to be rehearsed and practiced away from the clinic before being applied to real patients. As such, preparation of doctors and other healthcare professionals for safe clinical practice is one of its main aims. The objective of this paper was to review the evidence regarding the use of clinical simulation training in geriatric medicine education and consider how the findings may be translated to education in the closely related field of psychiatry of old age. Original papers and descriptive case studies of clinical simulation training programs for medical professionals were considered for inclusion. Papers were grouped according to the participants' level of training: (1) undergraduate medical education; (2) postgraduate medical education; and (3) multiple levels of medical learners. A diverse range of effective simulation modalities for teaching geriatric medicine was identified across all levels of learning. The evidence suggests that there is much fertile ground for trainees in geriatric medicine and psychiatry of old age to participate in joint simulation training programs, thereby maximising their reach while minimising associated resource requirements and financials costs. Given the prominent position of psychiatry of old age at the interface between psychiatry and medicine, old age psychiatrists potentially have much to offer in advancing the field of clinical simulation while simultaneously improving patient care.

  11. [Education and training system in child and adolescent psychiatry with view to carry-over towards adulthood psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop and establish a training system in child and adolescent psychiatry in Japan, especially in light of the continuity and integration with general psychiatry. The Japanese authors surveyed the situation of training in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP training) through the literature and conducted collaborative and consensus meetings with the authors in the UK, with its long history of training system development. A comparison was made between Japan and CAP training in the UK and other countries. A recent survey of psychiatric education in Japan clarified the current situation and called attention to parts of the education and training system where development is required. A systematic curriculum has not been established. For the elimination of disparities of competencies and skills among multidisciplinary staff, the CAP training curriculum needs to be comprehensive and fundamental, as shown in the Competency-based Curriculum for Specialists developed by the Royal College of Psychiatrists. CAP training and general psychiatry must be integrated into a comprehensive curriculum in the postgraduate education and training system, with an adequate time and place for training and supervision.

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry ... World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association ...

  13. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... general psychiatry training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry ... More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists ...

  14. Directing child and adolescent psychiatry training for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexson, Sandra B

    2010-01-01

    Directing child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) training for residents is a complex and challenging administrative task that encompasses the broad creativity of the orchestral conductor, the social and interpersonal effectiveness of the best politician, and the orientation to details of the finest accountant. This article examines these roles in detail, recognizing the leadership, administrative, and managerial achievements of the successful child and adolescent program director. Resources for optimizing the chances for success in each of these areas, and the common pitfalls to avoid, are identified and discussed. The article concludes with suggestions for CAP training directors to influence medical student education. Although challenging and sometimes frustrating, the role of the program director in CAP training is almost always exciting and rewarding.

  15. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  16. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some psychiatrists choose additional training in psychoanalysis ...

  17. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  18. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some ...

  19. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind ... has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or ...

  20. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seem to lift or problems functioning, causing everyday life to feel distorted or out of control. Diagnosing ... general psychiatry training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry ...

  1. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... general psychiatry training. They may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry ... maintain private practices and many psychiatrists work in multiple settings. There are about 45,000 psychiatrists in ...

  2. The development of a model of training in child psychiatry for non-physician clinicians in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of trained mental health professionals has been an important barrier to establishing mental health services in low income countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of child psychiatry training within a graduate program in mental health for non-physician clinicians in Ethiopia. Methods The existing needs for competent practitioners in child psychiatry were identified through discussions with psychiatrists working in Ethiopia as well as with relevant departments within the Federal Ministry of Health Ethiopia (FMOHE). As part of a curriculum for a two year Master of Science (MSC) in Mental Health program for non-physician clinicians, child psychiatry training was designed and implemented by Jimma University with the involvement of experts from Addis Ababa University (AAU), Ethiopia, and Ludwig-Maximillian’s University, (LMU), Germany. Graduates gave feedback after completing the course. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Mental Health Gap Action Program (mhGAP) intervention guide (IG) adapted for Ethiopian context was used as the main training material. Results A two-week child psychiatry course and a four week child psychiatry clinical internship were successfully implemented during the first and the second years of the MSC program respectively. During the two week psychiatry course, trainees learned to observe the behavior and to assess the mental status of children at different ages who had a variety of mental health conditions. Assessment of the trainees’ clinical skills was done by the instructors at the end of the child psychiatry course as well as during the subsequent four week clinical internship. The trainees generally rated the course to be ‘very good’ to ‘excellent’. Many of the graduates have become faculty at the various universities in Ethiopia. Conclusion Child psychiatry training for non-physician mental health specialist trainees was developed and successfully

  3. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  4. The phenomenological method in qualitative psychology and psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Englander

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article will closely examine the phenomenological method as applied to qualitative inquiry in psychology and psychiatry. In a critical comparison between Amedeo Giorgi's and Larry Davidson's qualitatively methods, conclusions were drawn with regard to how different kinds of qualitative inquiry are possible while remaining faithful to Husserlian philosophical foundations. Utilizing Lester Embree's recent articulation of how Husserl's method of the epochē can be disclosed as specific to a discipline, varieties of these two qualitative methods were seen in their relation to the original scientific aim instigated by the developer.

  5. Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaffas EM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eisha M Gaffas,1 Reginald P Sequeira,2 Riyadh A Al Namla,1 Khalid S Al-Harbi31Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain; 3King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations.Objective: To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program.Methods: Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited.Results: Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program.Conclusion: A systematic

  6. An Overview of Undergraduate Training in Cultural Competency and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza; Laugharne, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Multiculturalism is a familiar concept in many developed countries. While cultural competency training is part of most medical curricula, training in cultural psychiatry at the undergraduate level is typically minimal. It is important that medical graduates are both culturally competent and able to respond to the mental health needs of patients…

  7. Subspecialty Training and Certification in Geriatric Psychiatry: A 25-Year Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Dorthea; Colenda, Christopher C; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Laura B; Hargrave, Rita; Faulkner, Larry R

    2017-05-01

    The Institute of Medicine estimated that by 2030, from 10.1 to 14.4 million Americans aged 65 years or older will have mental health or substance use disorders. This article reviews the history and current status of training, certification, and practice in geriatric psychiatry against the backdrop of this "silver tsunami." The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) administered the first subspecialty examination in geriatric psychiatry in 1991, and through 2015 3,329 certificates were awarded. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education approved the training requirements in 1993. After a surge in programs and fellows, the numbers appear to have stabilized at about 57 programs and 60-65 trainees per year with fewer than half of the positions filled each year. The majority of graduates seeks and obtains ABPN certification, and the majority of those who were fellowship trained have maintained certification. Despite the unprecedented demand for mental health services for older adults, it must be acknowledged that not enough geriatric psychiatrists can be prepared to meet the needs of an aging U.S. Strategies for addressing the shortage are discussed, including undertaking subspecialty training in the fourth year of psychiatry training, increasing the time devoted to the care of older adults in undergraduate and graduate medical education, and developing alternative training pathways such as mini-fellowships. It is not clear whether more favorable Medicare reimbursement rates for those certified in geriatric psychiatry would increase the numbers seeking fellowship training. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists.

  9. General and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Resident Training in Integrated Care: a Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L; Bentman, Adrienne; Cowley, Deborah S; Dunaway, Kristen; Forstein, Marshall; Girgis, Christina; Han, Jaesu; Hung, Erick; Jones, Jeralyn; Keeble, Tanya; McCarron, Robert M; Varley, Christopher K

    2015-08-01

    Integrated care models are an evidence-based approach for integrating physical and behavioral health services. The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training Integrated Care Task Force sought to describe current practices for providing training in integrated care to general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Directors of US general and child and adolescent psychiatric residency training programs were anonymously surveyed to examine current practices in educating their residents in integrated care. Based on themes that emerged from the survey, the authors make recommendations for integrated care education of general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Fifty-two of 197 (26%) general and 36 of 111 (32%) child and adolescent program directors responded. Results demonstrate that a majority of responding general psychiatry (78%) and child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) (72%) training programs offer integrated care rotations, many of which are electives for senior residents. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) and Federally Qualified Health Centers are common venues for such rotations. Sustainable funding of these rotations is a concern. Fewer than half of programs offer integrated care didactics. This report is intended to help program directors consider options for starting or optimizing their own integrated care curricula. Future research should examine the educational value, and the overall value to health care systems, of training in the integrated care model.

  10. Superstorm Sandy: How the New York University Psychiatry Residency Training Program Weathered the Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Rebecca; Adler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    The teaching hospitals of the New York University psychiatry residency program were evacuated and then closed for a minimum of 3 months in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Faculty and residents were deployed to alternate clinical sites. The authors examine the consequences of Superstorm Sandy and its implications for the New York University psychiatry residency training program. A survey was administered to faculty and residents. The authors tabulated 98 surveys, for which 24 % of faculty and 84 % of residents responded. Among respondents, 61 % believed that being involved in the evacuation of the hospitals was a positive experience. During deployment, most (85 %) found being placed with peers and supervisors to be beneficial, but there were significant disruptions. Despite facing multiple challenges including closed facilities, deployment to nonaffiliated hospitals, and exhausted personal resources, the training program continued to provide accredited clinical experiences, a core curriculum, and supervision for psychiatry residents during and after Superstorm Sandy.

  11. Using entrustable professional activities to guide curriculum development in psychiatry training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyce Philip

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical activities that trainees can be trusted to perform with minimal or no supervision have been labelled as Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs. We sought to examine what activities could be entrusted to psychiatry trainees in their first year of specialist training. Methods We conducted an online survey of Fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP. Results The majority of respondents considered initiating patients with the common medications, discharging patient suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or following a crisis admission, conducting risk assessments and managing psychiatric emergencies were activities that trainees could be entrusted with by the end of the first stage of training. Conclusions Four activities were identified that trainees should be entrusted with by the end of their first year of training. Each of these activities comprises a set of competencies in each of the CanMEDS roles. When a trainee is unable to satisfactorily perform an EPA, deficits in the underpinning competencies can be a focus for remediation. Further EPAs are being identified in areas of more specialised practice for use within more advanced training.

  12. Undergraduate psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods at an Irish university

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbar, Faraz; Casey, Patricia R.; Kelly, Brendan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: At University College Dublin, teaching in psychiatry includes clinical electives, lectures, small-group and problem-based teaching, consistent with international trends. Aims: To determine final-year psychiatry students’ attitudes towards teaching methods. Methods: We distributed questionnaires to all final-year medical students in two classes (2008 and 2009), after final psychiatry examination (before results) and all of them participated (n = 111). Results: Students’ inter...

  13. Training of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellows in Autism and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrus, Natasha; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hellings, Jessica A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Szymanski, Ludwik; King, Bryan H.; Carlisle, L. Lee; Cook, Edwin H., Jr.; Pruett, John R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability can be clinically complex and often have limited access to psychiatric care. Because little is known about post-graduate clinical education in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, we surveyed training directors of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship…

  14. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--part 2: the training process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, N; Kasiakogia, K

    2015-01-01

    In the second part of this diptych, we shall deal with psychiatric training in the United Kingdom in detail, and we will compare it--wherever this is meaningful--with the equivalent system in Greece. As explained in the first part of the paper, due to the recently increased emigration of Greek psychiatrists and psychiatric trainees, and the fact that the United Kingdom is a popular destination, it has become necessary to inform those aspiring to train in the United Kingdom of the system and the circumstances they should expect to encounter. This paper principally describes the structure of the United Kingdom's psychiatric training system, including the different stages trainees progress through and their respective requirements and processes. Specifically, specialty and subspecialty options are described and explained, special paths in training are analysed, and the notions of "special interest day" and the optional "Out of programme experience" schemes are explained. Furthermore, detailed information is offered on the pivotal points of each of the stages of the training process, with special care to explain the important differences and similarities between the systems in Greece and the United Kingdom. Special attention is given to The Royal College of Psychiatrists' Membership Exams (MRCPsych) because they are the only exams towards completing specialisation in Psychiatry in the United Kingdom. Also, the educational culture of progressing according to a set curriculum, of utilising diverse means of professional development, of empowering the trainees' autonomy by allowing initiative-based development and of applying peer supervision as a tool for professional development is stressed. We conclude that psychiatric training in the United Kingdom differs substantially to that of Greece in both structure and process. Τhere are various differences such as pure psychiatric training in the United Kingdom versus neurological and medical modules in Greece, in-training

  15. A Process-Oriented Approach to Teaching Religion and Spirituality in Psychiatry Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaad, Rania; Ali, Sara; Salvador, Melina; Bandstra, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Although the importance of addressing issues of spirituality and religion is increasingly acknowledged within psychiatry training, many questions remain about how to best teach relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Current literature on curricula highlights the importance of maintaining a clinical focus and the balance between didactic content and process issues. The authors present findings from a program evaluation study of a course on religion, spirituality, and psychiatry that deliberately takes a primarily process-oriented, clinically focused approach. Two six-session courses were offered. The first course targeted fourth-year psychiatry residents and the second targeted third-year psychiatry residents. Teaching sessions consisted of brief didactics combined with extensive process-oriented discussion. A two-person faculty team facilitated the courses. Clinical case discussions were integrated throughout the curriculum. A panel of chaplains was invited to participate in one session of each course to discuss the interface between spiritual counsel and psychiatry. A modified version of the Course Impact Questionnaire, a 20-item Likert scale utilized in previous studies of spirituality curricula in psychiatry, assessed residents' personal spiritual attitudes, competency, change in professional practice, and change in professional attitudes before and after the course (N = 20). Qualitative feedback was also elicited through written comments. The results from this study showed a statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-test scale for residents' self-perceived competency and change in professional practice. The findings suggest improvement in competency and professional practice scores in residents who participated in this course. This points toward the overall usefulness of the course and suggests that a process-oriented approach may be effective for discussing religion and spirituality in psychiatric training.

  16. Pilot Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Psychiatry Residents Using Standardized Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Kissane, David; Loughland, Carmel

    2016-10-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience difficulties communicating diagnostic information to patients and their families/carers, especially about distressing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. There is evidence for the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) for improving diagnostic discussions, particularly in specialties such as oncology, but only limited evidence exists about CST for psychiatry. This study evaluated a CST program specifically developed for psychiatry residents called ComPsych that focuses on conveying diagnostic and prognostic information about schizophrenia. The ComPsych program consists of an introductory lecture, module booklets for trainees, and exemplary skills videos, followed by small group role-plays with simulated patients (SPs) led by a trained facilitator. A standardized patient assessment (SPA) was digitally recorded pre- and post-training with a SP using a standardized scenario in a time-limited (15 min) period. Recorded SPAs were independently rated using a validated coding system (ComSkil) to identify frequency of skills used in five skills categories (agenda setting, checking, questioning, information organization, and empathic communication). Thirty trainees (15 males and 15 females; median age = 32) undertaking their vocational specialty training in psychiatry participated in ComPsych training and pre- and post-ComPsych SPAs. Skills increased post-training for agenda setting (d = -0.82), while questioning skills (d = 0.56) decreased. There were no significant differences in any other skills grouping, although checking, information organization, and empathic communication skills tended to increase post-training. A dose effect was observed for agenda setting, with trainees who attended more CST sessions outperforming those attending fewer. Findings support the generalization and translation of ComPsych CST to psychiatry.

  17. National survey of psychotherapy training in psychiatry, psychology, and social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Myrna M; Verdeli, Helen; Gameroff, Marc J; Bledsoe, Sarah E; Betts, Kathryn; Mufson, Laura; Fitterling, Heidi; Wickramaratne, Priya

    2006-08-01

    Approximately 3% of the US population receives psychotherapy each year from psychiatrists, psychologists, or social workers. A modest number of psychotherapies are evidence-based therapy (EBT) in that they have been defined in manuals and found efficacious in at least 2 controlled clinical trials with random assignment that include a control condition of psychotherapy, placebo, pill, or other treatment and samples of sufficient power with well-characterized patients. Few practitioners use EBT. To determine the amount of EBT taught in accredited training programs in psychiatry, psychology (PhD and PsyD), and social work and to note whether the training was elective or required and presented as a didactic (coursework) or clinical supervision. A cross-sectional survey of a probability sample of all accredited training programs in psychiatry, psychology, and social work in the United States. Responders included training directors (or their designates) from 221 programs (73 in psychiatry, 63 in PhD clinical psychology, 21 in PsyD psychology, and 64 in master's-level social work). The overall response rate was 73.7%. Main Outcome Measure Requiring both a didactic and clinical supervision in an EBT. Although programs offered electives in EBT and non-EBT, few required both a didactic and clinical supervision in EBT, and most required training was non-EBT. Psychiatry required coursework and clinical supervision in the largest percentage of EBT (28.1%). Cognitive behavioral therapy was the EBT most frequently offered and required as a didactic in all 3 disciplines. More than 90% of the psychiatry training programs were complying with the new cognitive behavior therapy requirement. The 2 disciplines with the largest number of students and emphasis on clinical training-professional clinical psychology (PsyD) and social work-had the largest percentage of programs (67.3% and 61.7%, respectively) not requiring a didactic and clinical supervision in any EBT. There is a

  18. Metasynthesis: An Original Method to Synthesize Qualitative Literature in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lachal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMetasynthesis—the systematic review and integration of findings from qualitative studies—is an emerging technique in medical research that can use many different methods. Nevertheless, the method must be appropriate to the specific scientific field in which it is used. The objective is to describe the steps of a metasynthesis method adapted from Thematic Synthesis and phenomenology to fit the particularities of psychiatric research.MethodWe detail each step of the method used in a metasynthesis published in 2015 on adolescent and young adults suicidal behaviors. We provide clarifications in several methodological points using the latest literature on metasyntheses. The method is described in six steps: define the research question and the inclusion criteria, select the studies, assess their quality, extract and present the formal data, analyze the data, and express the synthesis.ConclusionMetasyntheses offer an appropriate balance between an objective framework, a rigorously scientific approach to data analysis and the necessary contribution of the researcher’s subjectivity in the construction of the final work. They propose a third level of comprehension and interpretation that brings original insights, improve the global understanding in psychiatry, and propose immediate therapeutic implications. They should be included in the psychiatric common research toolkit to become better recognized by clinicians and mental health professionals.

  19. The State of Sleep Medicine Education in North American Psychiatry Residency Training Programs in 2013: Chief Resident's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Imran S; Dickmann, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Thomas D; Thuras, Paul D; Feinstein, Robert E; Douglass, Alan B; Lee, Elliott Kyung

    2017-08-31

    To assess the current state of sleep medicine educational resources and training offered by North American psychiatry residency programs. In June 2013, a 9-item peer-reviewed Sleep Medicine Training Survey was administered to 39 chief residents of psychiatry residency training programs during a meeting in New York. Thirty-four percent of the participating programs offered an elective rotation in sleep medicine. A variety of innovative approaches for teaching sleep medicine were noted. The majority of the chief residents felt comfortable screening patients for obstructive sleep apnea (72%), half felt comfortable screening for restless legs syndrome (53%), and fewer than half were comfortable screening for other sleep disorders (47%). This is the first report in the last decade to provide any analysis of current sleep medicine training in North American psychiatry residency training programs. These data indicate that sleep medicine education in psychiatry residency programs is possibly in decline.

  20. US Medical Licensing Exam scores and performance on the Psychiatry Resident In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian J; Sexson, Sandra; Shevitz, Stewart; Peeples, Dale; Van Sant, Scott; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-10-01

    This study explores relationships between US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and Psychiatry Resident In-Training Examination (PRITE) scores over a 10-year period at a university-affiliated program. For all MD general psychiatry residents who matriculated from 2003 to 2012 (n = 51), we extracted three-digit first-attempt and passing USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 clinical knowledge (CK) scores and PRITE percentile scores, stratified by global psychiatry and neurology scores, for postgraduate year (PGY)-1, 2, 3, and 4. A mixed model repeated measures analysis was performed to assess the association between USMLE and PRITE scores, adjusting for age, sex, and US medical graduate versus IMG status. Multiple linear regression models of USMLE and PGY-1 PRITE scores were also constructed. USMLE Steps 1 and 2 CK scores were significant predictors of PRITE psychiatry and neurology scores, both in PGY-1 as well as across all years of training (p < 0.01 for each). Given that PRITE scores are a significant predictor of success on the ABPN written examination, USMLE scores may be an important quantitative predictor of performance during residency.

  1. Formal training in forensic mental health: psychiatry and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Robert L; Dattilio, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic mental health has grown exponentially in the past decades to include forensic psychiatrists and psychologists serving as the primary experts to the court systems. However, many colleagues have chosen to pursue the avenue of serving as forensic experts without obtaining formal training and experience. This article discusses the importance of formal education, training and experience for psychiatrists and psychologists working in forensic settings and the ethical implications that befall those who fail to obtain such credentials. Specific aspects of training and supervised experience are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Training Psychiatry Residents in Professionalism in the Digital World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G; Lang, Michael C; Ingersoll, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    Professionalism is an abstract concept which makes it difficult to define, assess and teach. An additional layer of complexity is added when discussing professionalism in the context of digital technology, the internet and social media - the digital world. Current physicians-in-training (residents and fellows) are digital natives having been raised in a digital, media saturated world. Consequently, their use of digital technology and social media has been unconstrained - a reflection of it being integral to their social construct and identity. Cultivating the professional identity and therefore professionalism is the charge of residency training programs. Residents have shown negative and hostile attitudes to formalized professionalism curricula in training. Approaches to these curricula need to consider the learning style of Millennials and incorporate more active learning techniques that utilize technology. Reviewing landmark position papers, guidelines and scholarly work can therefore be augmented with use of vignettes and technology that are available to residency training programs for use with their Millennial learners.

  3. Using participatory design to develop structured training in child and adolescent psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Ringsted, Charlotte; Bonde, Mie

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Learning during residency in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) is primarily work-based and has traditionally been opportunistic. There are increasing demands from both postgraduate trainees and medical organisations for structured programmes with defined learning outcomes. OBJECTIVES......: The aim of this study was to partner with postgraduate trainees and consultants in psychiatry to identify key learning issues that should be considered during CAP residency and to use these in designing a structured programme to meet the learning outcome requirements of a competency framework. METHODS...

  4. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  5. A new paradigm for teaching behavior change: Implications for residency training in family medicine and psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care physicians (PCPs provide ~50 % of all mental health services in the U.S. Given the widening gap between patient mental health needs and resources available to meet those needs, there is an increasing demand for family medicine and psychiatry trainees to master competencies in both behavioral medicine and primary care counseling during residency-if for no other reason than to accommodate the realities of medical practice given the oft present gap between the need for psychiatric services and the availability, quality, and/or affordability of specialized psychiatric care. To begin to address this gap, a skills-based, interactive curriculum based on motivational interviewing (MI as a teaching method is presented. Methods The curriculum described in this paper is a four-week block rotation taught in the second year of residency. Motivational interviewing (MI is used as a teaching approach toward the goal of clinical behavior change. Residents’ strengths, personal choice and autonomy are emphasized. Each week of the rotation, there is a clinical topic and a set of specific skills for mastery. Residents are offered a “menu” of skills, role modeling, role/real play, practice with standardized patients (SP, and direct supervision in clinic. Results Thirty-nine residents have completed the curriculum. Based on residents’ subjective reporting using pre-post scales (i.e., importance and confidence, all participants to date have reported substantial increases in confidence/self-efficacy using primary care counseling skills in their continuity clinic. Conclusions This paper presents an innovative, empirically based model for teaching the essential skills necessary for physicians providing care for patients with mental/emotional health needs as well as health-behavior change concerns. Implications for training in the broader context, particularly as it relates to multi-disciplinary and collaborative models of

  6. Teaching Psychiatry Residents to Teach: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp-Han, Holly; Chambliss, R. Bryan; Coverdale, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because there have been no previously published national surveys on teaching psychiatry residents about how to teach, the authors surveyed United States psychiatry program directors on what and how residents are taught about teaching. Methods: All psychiatry training programs across the United States were mailed a semistructured…

  7. Attitude of medical students towards psychiatry: the case of Jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The inability to attract medical graduates to specialize in psychiatry has always been a serious challenge to psychiatry training programs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the attitude of medical students towards psychiatry. Methods: A comparative cross-sectional survey was conducted among 122 ...

  8. Systems-Based Aspects in the Training of IMG or Previously Trained Residents: Comparison of Psychiatry Residency Training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Mazhar, Mir Nadeem; Uga, Aghaegbulam; Punwani, Manisha; Broquet, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: International medical graduates (IMGs) account for a significant proportion of residents in psychiatric training in the United States. Many IMGs may have previously completed psychiatry residency training in other countries. Their experiences may improve our system. Authors compared and contrasted psychiatry residency training in the…

  9. Hidden ethical dilemmas in psychiatric residency training: the psychiatry resident as dual agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Jinger G

    2004-01-01

    In addition to learning about confidentiality, civil commitment, informed consent, and other ethical issues, psychiatry residents must deal with less visible ethical dilemmas that arise from the training process itself. Residents grapple with three inherent conflicting duties between their dual roles as physician and learner, as physician and supervisee, and as physician and employee of a training institution. These conflicts must be negotiated at a time of high stress, when residents are plagued with self-doubt, fear, fatigue, and other vulnerabilities that can lead good doctors to make ethically dubious decisions. While such conflicts and stressors are common to residency training in most specialties, they may be heightened in psychiatric residency. This paper proposes a model for understanding covert elements of ethical decision making during psychiatric residency and recommends strategies training programs can use to help residents navigate an ethical minefield.

  10. Mindful of the gaps: enhancing psychiatry training through a trainee workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, Anne; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Holton, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and pilot a workshop for basic trainees in psychiatry to address perceived gaps in the specialist training program and to foster a culture of mentorship. A literature review and consultations with clinicians and managers determined interest in the workshop, preferences for content, and feasibility. Six psychiatrists met on several occasions to plan the workshop. Supervisors were surveyed prior to the workshop to ascertain their perceptions of their trainees' knowledge of particular topics and the content of supervision. Registrar self-evaluations and knowledge were assessed before and after the workshop. Twenty-four registrars attended the first session of the workshop and 22 the second. Following the workshop, self-ratings of knowledge and confidence of trainees in topics including risk assessment and duty of care were significantly better. Registrars rated the program highly for collegiate interactions, format, originality and usefulness. Supervisors identified weaknesses in trainee knowledge corresponding to workshop topics. Trainee self-evaluations of key aspects of clinical psychiatry improved significantly after the workshop. The development process described here for implementing a service-based initiative in psychiatry trainee education tailored to local needs may be transferable to other services.

  11. Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffas, Eisha M; Sequeira, Reginald P; Namla, Riyadh A Al; Al-Harbi, Khalid S

    2012-01-01

    The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs) are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations. To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program. Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited. Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program. A systematic approach using a documentary and content analysis technique was used to develop test blueprints with additional input from an expert panel as appropriate. Test blueprinting is an important step to ensure the test validity in all residency programs.

  12. Clinical teaching and supervision in postgraduate psychiatry training: the trainee perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Alice; Cheung, Gary

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to explore psychiatry trainees' perspectives on clinical teaching and supervision as well as how this might be improved. New Zealand trainees ( n=51) completed online the Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCQT) and three open-ended questions. The majority rated 'agree' or 'strongly agree' to all items of the MCQT. Weaknesses in the feedback process including observation, feedback provision, and formulating learning goals were highlighted. College training requirements and workplace environment were identified as factors impacting on clinical teaching and supervision. A model was proposed to enhance awareness of the various factors involved in the feedback process.

  13. Psychiatry Residency Education in Canada: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of the history of psychiatry residency training in Canada,and outlines the rationale for the current training requirements, changes to the final certification examination,and factors influencing future trends in psychiatry education and training. Method: The author compiled findings and reports on…

  14. Associate residency training directors in psychiatry: demographics, professional activities, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R; Degolia, Sallie G; Esposito, Karin; Miller, Deborah A; Weinberg, Michael; Brenner, Adam M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize associate training director (ATD) positions in psychiatry. An on-line survey was e-mailed in 2009 to all ATDs identified through the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT). Survey questions elicited information regarding demographics, professional activities, job satisfaction, and goals. Of 170 ATDs surveyed, 73 (42.9%) completed the survey. Most respondents (71.3%) had been in their positions for 3 years or less. Many ATDs indicated that they were involved in virtually all aspects of residency training; 75% of respondents agreed that they were happy with their experience. However, specific concerns included inadequate time and compensation for the ATD role in addition to a lack of mentorship and unclear job expectations. Thoughtful attention to the construction of the ATD role may improve job satisfaction.

  15. Undergraduate psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods at an Irish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, F; Casey, P; Kelly, B D

    2016-11-01

    At University College Dublin, teaching in psychiatry includes clinical electives, lectures, small-group and problem-based teaching, consistent with international trends. To determine final-year psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods. We distributed questionnaires to all final-year medical students in two classes (2008 and 2009), after final psychiatry examination (before results) and all of them participated (n = 111). Students' interest in psychiatry as a career increased during psychiatry teaching. Students rated objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as the most useful element of teaching and examination. The most common learning style was "reflector"; the least common was "pragmatist". Two thirds believed teaching could be improved (increased patient contact) and 89 % reported that experience of psychiatry changed attitudes towards mental illness (increased understanding). Students' preference for OSCEs may reflect the closeness of OSCE as a form of learning to OSCE as a form of assessment: OSCEs both focus on specific clinical skills and help prepare for examinations. Future research could usefully examine the extent to which these findings are university-specific or instructor-dependent. Information on the consistency of various teaching, examination and modularisation methods would also be useful.

  16. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  17. What Do Psychiatric Residents Think of Addiction Psychiatry as a Career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, John A., Jr.; Karam-Hage, Maher; Levinson, Marjorie; Craig, Thomas; Eld, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors attempt to better understand the recent decline in the number of applicants to addiction psychiatry training. Methods: The Corresponding Committee on Training and Education in Addiction Psychiatry of APA's Council on Addiction Psychiatry sent out a 14-question anonymous e-mail survey to all postgraduate-year 2 (PGY-2)…

  18. Psychiatry Clerkship Students' Preparation, Reflection, and Results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Gregory W.; Fore-Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Spollen, John J.; Pelic, Christopher; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatry clerkship training involves many learning components, one of which is acquisition of scholarly knowledge. The authors investigate the reading materials and learning methods used by clinical clerks in their preparation for the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Exam (PSE). Methods: Clerkship students…

  19. Realizing the potential of mobile mental health: new methods for new data in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Staples, Patrick; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-08-01

    Smartphones are now ubiquitous and can be harnessed to offer psychiatry a wealth of real-time data regarding patient behavior, self-reported symptoms, and even physiology. The data collected from smartphones meet the three criteria of big data: velocity, volume, and variety. Although these data have tremendous potential, transforming them into clinically valid and useful information requires using new tools and methods as a part of assessment in psychiatry. In this paper, we introduce and explore numerous analytical methods and tools from the computational and statistical sciences that appear readily applicable to psychiatric data collected using smartphones. By matching smartphone data with appropriate statistical methods, psychiatry can better realize the potential of mobile mental health and empower both patients and providers with novel clinical tools.

  20. Results from the Field: Development and Evaluation of a Psychiatry Residency Training Rotation in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamholz, Barbara W; Lawrence, Amy E; Liverant, Gabrielle I; Black, Shimrit K; Hill, Justin M

    2017-06-06

    The goal of this project was to develop and evaluate a new residency training rotation focused on cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT) and to assess outcomes across multiple domains. Data are presented from 30 psychiatry residents. Primary learning-related outcomes included content knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes and behavioral intentions towards evidence-based psychotherapies (e.g., CBT). Residents reported significant increases in CBT knowledge, CBT-specific self-efficacy, overall psychotherapy self-efficacy, belief in patient benefit from CBT, and behavioral intention to use CBT. However, there were almost no changes in attitudes towards evidence-based practice more broadly, with one significant finding showing an increase in skepticism towards such practices. This empirically based example of training program development, implementation, and evaluation appears largely successful and represents one approach for addressing the CBT competency goals outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and Milestone Project Guidelines. Despite these initial, positive findings, conclusions should be tempered by limitations of the project design (e.g., the lack of comparison group, absence of objective measures of resident behavioral change, or assessment of the effect of such changes on patient outcomes). Findings highlight the need for continued development and evaluation of training methods in CBT for residency programs.

  1. Work hours regulations for house staff in psychiatry: bad or good for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasminsky, Sonya; Lomonaco, Allison; Auchincloss, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The movement to limit work hours for house staff has gained momentum in recent years. The authors set out to review the literature on work hours reform, particularly as it applies to psychiatric residency training, and to provide two different viewpoints on the controversy. The authors present the historical background of work hours reform in the United States and review recent literature about resident work hours limitations. Using a debate format, the authors discuss whether the new regulations are having a positive or negative impact on residency training in psychiatry. Drs. Lomonaco and Auchincloss argue that currently-existing work hours restrictions may have unintended consequences for the health of patients and an untoward impact on residents' professional development and academic medicine's overall structure. Dr. Rasminsky argues that work hours restrictions do not go far enough in protecting residents and patients from the harmful effects of fatigue, and that our definition of professionalism needs to be reexamined in light of emerging scientific literature. There should be some limitation on resident work hours, with exact numbers to be determined by growing scientific knowledge about the effects of prolonged wakefulness. More study is needed, particularly in the area of psychiatric residency training.

  2. Psychiatry training in the United Kingdom--Part 1: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiakogia, K; Christodoulou, N

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been a strong trend of emigration of Greek medical doctors. The reason for this phenomenon is certainly multifactorial, but it has been greatly exacerbated due to the latest financial crisis. The United Kingdom is one of the most popular destinations amongst emigrating Greek psychiatric doctors, as reflected by official data and by the sheer volume of requests for information received by the United Kingdom Division of the Hellenic Psychiatric Association. There are many systemic and practical differences between the Greek and the United Kingdom health systems, which complicate training and further career decisions. These complex differences make it hard for psychiatric doctors to decide which steps to take, and often result in them making the "wrong" decision. These "wrong" decisions are very often the result of poor information or misinformation. For instance many doctors are confused about the equivalence of training and service grades between Greece and the United Kingdom, what a good portfolio means, or the significance of the MRCPsych exam. This information exists, sometimes in comprehensive ways on the internet, but for doctors who are not familiar with the system, finding this information can be a time-consuming and laborious task. Therefore, providing a starting point with realistic and useful information about psychiatric training and generally career progression in the United Kingdom to Greek psychiatric doctors has become very important. The United Kingdom Division of the Hellenic Psychiatric Association has decided to pick up the role of providing exactly that information. The first part of this two-piece paper provides a starting point for Greek doctors considering the move to the United Kingdom for training and/or work in psychiatry. Firstly, it gives a general overview of psychiatric training in the United Kingdom, and explains that the pragmatic equivalence between training stages between Greece and the United Kingdom often

  3. Psychiatry chief resident opinions toward basic and clinical neuroscience training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey I; Handa, Kamna; Mahajan, Aman; Deotale, Pravesh

    2014-04-01

    The authors queried attendees to a chief resident conference on whether program education and training in neuroscience or in translating neuroscience research into practice is sufficient and what changes are needed. The authors developed and administered a 26-item voluntary questionnaire to each attendee at the Chief Residents' Leadership Conference at the American Psychiatric Association 2013 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA. Out of 94 attendees, 55 completed and returned questionnaires (58.5%). A majority of respondents stated that their program provided adequate training in neuroscience (61.8%); opportunities for neuroscience research existed for them (78.2%), but that their program did not prepare them for translating future neuroscience research findings into clinical practice (78.9%) or educate them on the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (83.3%). A majority of respondents stated that the ACGME should require a specific neuroscience curriculum (79.6%). Chief residents believe that curricular and cultural change is needed in psychiatry residency neuroscience education.

  4. Training with virtual patients in transcultural psychiatry: do the learners actually learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziaras, Ioannis; Fors, Uno; Ekblad, Solvig

    2015-02-16

    The rapid increase in the number of patients with diverse ethnic backgrounds and previous exposure to severe mental trauma dictates the need for improvement in the quality of transcultural psychiatric health care through the development of relevant and effective training tools. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of training with a virtual patient on the learner's knowledge of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, clinical management, and basic communication skills. The authors constructed an interactive educational tool based on virtual patient methodology that portrayed a refugee with severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. A total of 32 resident psychiatrists tested the tool and completed a pre-interaction and post-interaction knowledge test, including skills, at the time and several weeks later. All of the participants (N=32) completed the pre-interaction and post-interaction test, and 26 (81%) of them completed the online follow-up test. The mean pre-interaction score was 7.44 (male: 7.08, female: 7.65, no statistical significance). The mean post-interaction score was 8.47, which was significantly higher (P<.001) than the pre-interaction score (mean score 7.44). The mean score for the follow-up test several weeks later was 8.38, higher than the pre-interaction score by 0.69 points but not statistically significant. Our results suggest that virtual patients can successfully facilitate the acquisition of core knowledge in the field of psychiatry, in addition to developing skills such as clinical reasoning, decision making, and history taking. Repeated training sessions with virtual patients are proposed in order to achieve sustainable educational effects.

  5. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. FINDINGS: The interplay between physical environment...... sufficient mental health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease...

  6. Cinema in the training of psychiatry residents: focus on helping relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramaglia, Carla; Jona, Amalia; Imperatori, Fredrica; Torre, Eugenio; Zeppegno, Patrizia

    2013-06-21

    Medical schools are currently charged with a lack of education as far as empathic/relational skills and the meaning of being a health-care provider are concerned, thus leading to increased interest in medical humanities. Medical humanities can offer an insight into human illness and in a broader outlook into human condition, understanding of one self, responsibility. An empathic relation to patients might be fostered by a matching approach to humanities and sciences, which should be considered as subjects of equal relevance, complementary to one another. Recently, movies have been used in medical--psychiatric--trainees education, but mainly within the limits of teaching a variety of disorders. A different approach dealing with the use of cinema in the training of psychiatry residents is proposed, based on Jung and Hillman's considerations about the relation between images and archetypes, archetypal experience and learning. Selected full-length movies or clips can offer a priceless opportunity to face with the meaning of being involved in a care-providing, helping profession.

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... therapy is used to treat seasonal depression. Psychiatric Training To become a psychiatrist, a person must complete ... of psychiatry residency. The first year of residency training is typically in a hospital working with patients ...

  8. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Position Statements Publications Bookstore American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Legislative & Regulatory Agenda AAGP eNews (Members Only) Tools ... Funding Training Resources and Curricula For Clinicians >> Geriatric Psychiatry Identifier Webinar: Billing and Coding Consumer Material Clinical ...

  9. A Pilot Study Examining Factors Influencing Readiness to Progress to Indirect Supervision Among First Year Residents in a General Psychiatry Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchet, Bryan; Walker, Ashley; Flanders, Sarah; McIntosh, Heather

    2017-10-05

    In the first year of training, psychiatry residents progress from direct supervision to indirect supervision but factors predicting time to transition between these levels of supervision are unknown. This study aimed to examine times for transition to indirect levels of supervision and to identify resident factors associated with slower progression. The authors compiled data from training files from years 2011-2015, including licensing exam scores, age, gender, medical school, month of first inpatient psychiatry rotation, and transition times between levels of supervision. Correlational analysis examined the relationship between these factors. Univariate analysis further examined the relationship between medical school training and transition times between supervision levels. Among the factors studied, only international medical school training was positively correlated with time to transition to indirect supervision and between levels of indirect supervision. International medical graduate (IMG) interns in psychiatry training may benefit from additional training and support to reach competencies required for the transition to indirect supervision.

  10. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  11. Computational Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia arise from abnormalities in brain systems that underlie cognitive, emotional and social functions. The brain is enormously complex and its abundant feedback loops on multiple scales preclude intuitive explication of circuit functions. In close interplay with experiments, theory and computational modeling are essential for understanding how, precisely, neural circuits generate flexible behaviors and their impairments give rise to psychiatric symptoms. This Perspective highlights recent progress in applying computational neuroscience to the study of mental disorders. We outline basic approaches, including identification of core deficits that cut across disease categories, biologically-realistic modeling bridging cellular and synaptic mechanisms with behavior, model-aided diagnosis. The need for new research strategies in psychiatry is urgent. Computational psychiatry potentially provides powerful tools for elucidating pathophysiology that may inform both diagnosis and treatment. To achieve this promise will require investment in cross-disciplinary training and research in this nascent field. PMID:25442941

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and insomnia. Hypnotics – used to induce and maintain sleep. Mood stabilizers – used to treat bipolar disorder. Stimulants – ... psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some psychiatrists choose additional training in psychoanalysis ...

  13. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... become a psychiatrist, a person must complete medical school and take a written examination for a state ... A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (completed medical school and residency) with special training in psychiatry. A ...

  14. Trends in performance on the psychiatry resident-in-training examination (PRITE®): 10 years of data from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K; Garvan, Cynthia; Hobbs, Jacqueline A

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine trends in the Psychiatry Resident-In-Training Examination (PRITE®) scores at one institution from 2001 to 2010. The authors hypothesized that two factors, the 2003 implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour restrictions and the residency program's 2008 restructuring of its curriculum to a half-day per week of didactics, would lead to improved scores. Residents in the general psychiatry program at the University of Florida College of Medicine from 2001 to 2010 were included in this study. To examine the effect of the 2003 ACGME duty-hours change, the authors compared test results from 2001-2002 and 2003-2010. To examine the effect of the 2008 didactic restructuring, they compared test results from 2001-2007 and 2008-2010. There were 288 PRITE test scores from 2001 to 2010. The authors did not find a statistical difference between test results before and after the 2003 implementation of ACGME duty-hour restrictions or between test results before and after the 2008 restructuring of residency didactics. The hypothesis was rejected. The results of the literature review propose that examination scores are affected by other elements of residency training.

  15. Survey to child/adolescent psychiatry and developmental/behavioral pediatric training directors to expand psychiatric-mental health training to nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; O'Laughlen, Mary C; Kim, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing shortage of child mental health professionals. Nurse practitioners (NPs) who completed behavioral and mental health training have proven that they can diagnose and manage many pediatric problems. To ask the training directors of both child/adolescent psychiatry (CAP) and developmental/behavioral pediatric (DBP) programs about their receptivity and willingness to give additional training for NPs who provide care to children with behavioral and mental health issues and examine the main obstacles to the development of such programs. A survey was sent to 151 CAP and DBP training directors in the United States. The return rate was 67% (N = 101). Only 12% expressed objection to the concept of additional NP training in CAP or DBP, but only 53% of training directors currently reported having sufficient faculty to do so. Some training directors reported already having advanced behavioral and mental health training programs for NPs (31%) and most (82%) would consider expanding, if funded. There is support for advanced training for NPs, but funding is needed to make this a reality. Expansion of such programs might rapidly improve accessibility and reduce waiting time of mental health providers for children and adolescents. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Choosing Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Factors Influencing Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Tiziana; Boydell, Katherine M.; Pignatiello, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factors influencing medical students to choose child and adolescent psychiatry as a career specialty. Method: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A web-based survey was distributed to child and adolescent psychiatrists at the University of Toronto. In-depth interviews were held with select child and adolescent psychiatrists as well as a focus group with psychiatry residents. Retrospective accounts of the factors that influenced their decision to choose psychiatry and/or child and adolescent psychiatry as a specialty were collected. Results: Ninety-two percent of participants indicated that recruitment of child psychiatrists in Canada is a problem. The recent decision by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons to recognize child and adolescent psychiatry as a subspecialty and introduce an extra year of training was identified as a further challenge to recruitment efforts. Other deterrents included lower salary than other subspecialties, lack of exposure during training, stigma, and lack of interest in treating children. Recruitment into psychiatry was enhanced by good role modeling, early exposure in medical school, an interest in brain research, and career and lifestyle issues. Conclusions: A rebranding of the role and perception of psychiatry is needed to attract future psychiatrists. Early exposure to innovations in child and adolescent psychiatry and positive role models are critical in attracting medical students. Recruitment should begin in the first year of medical school and include an enriched paediatric curriculum. PMID:24223044

  17. Recruitment and training of psychiatrists in Hong Kong: what puts medical students off psychiatry--an international experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa Ting Chi

    2013-08-01

    The Hospital Authority employs over 60,000 staff and manages 41 public hospitals and institutions, 47 specialist outpatient clinics and 74 general outpatient clinics throughout Hong Kong. It received HK$41.14 billion (£ 3.475 billion) of funding from the government in the year 2012 to 2013, which represented 92% of its funding income (Census & Statistics Department, 2013). This public healthcare system uses 3% of the Hong Kong gross domestic product (GDP) to provide 88% of inpatient services and 28% outpatient services locally, while the private sector provides only 12% of inpatient services and 72% of outpatient services with 2.3% of GDP. There is a heavy reliance on the public sector to provide healthcare to most of the patients requiring more intensive hospitalization. Hong Kong currently only has about 280 specialists in psychiatry serving a population of over 7 million people, of whom 90 work in the private sector. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) Mental Health Atlas 2011 country profiles (WHO, 2011), the number of psychiatrists per 100,000 population is 4.39, compared to 12.76 in Australia, 10.1 in Japan, 5.12 in Korea, and 2.81 in Singapore. There is a shortage of psychiatrists, especially in the public mental health sector, which urgently needs to be tackled. This article looks at the current trend in psychiatry teaching and recruitment from medical school and the training scheme provided by the Hong Kong College of Psychiatrists.

  18. [Postgraduate training for specialists in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Problem-based learning - evaluation of a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, M; Schnyder, U; Schirlo, C; Wengle, H; Gerke, W

    2011-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes the student's individual needs, their ability to solve complex clinical problems, and a professional attitude that facilitates communication among colleagues. Thus, PBL appears to provide a perfectly suitable didactic format for postgraduate training of medical specialties. To date, it is only rarely used in this area though. In a pilot project, we implemented PBL into the curriculum of postgraduate training in psychiatry and psychotherapy, and evaluated the program over a period of 12 months, using structured questionnaires. A total of 41 PBL courses were held, with 447 residents participating. Participants as well as tutors assessed 19 of 21 aspects as good or very good (5-point Likert scale, mean value >4). Overall, PBL was rated as highly suitable for advanced training (participants: 4.5±0.8; tutors: 5.0±0.2). The results of this pilot project suggest that PBL might be a useful element of multifaceted advanced training programs, strengthening their practical component and the applicability of knowledge in the daily clinical routine.

  19. A proposed solution to integrating cognitive-affective neuroscience and neuropsychiatry in psychiatry residency training: The time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Stern, Adam P; Padmanabhan, Jaya L; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Perez, David L

    2015-10-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of a strong neuroscience and neuropsychiatry education in the training of psychiatry residents, achieving this competency has proven challenging. In this perspective article, we selectively discuss the current state of these educational efforts and outline how using brain-symptom relationships from a systems-level neural circuit approach in clinical formulations may help residents value, understand, and apply cognitive-affective neuroscience based principles towards the care of psychiatric patients. To demonstrate the utility of this model, we present a case of major depressive disorder and discuss suspected abnormal neural circuits and therapeutic implications. A clinical neural systems-level, symptom-based approach to conceptualize mental illness can complement and expand residents' existing psychiatric knowledge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vergleich vom Einsatz Standardisierter Patienten mit Computerfällen in der Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie [Training with standardized patients versus computerized case simulations in psychiatry and psychotherapy: a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathiak, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: In this randomized comparative study, we obtained student evaluations for training with standardized patients as well as for computerized case simulations and correlated them with the student’s learning type. Training with standardized patients was also reviewed regarding acceptance.Methods: Medical students in the 5th clinical semester (N = 222 participated in a course with standardized patients (n = 99 or in computerized case simulations (n = 123. Following the course, the students completed a questionnaire including items concerning the methodology and didactics of both courses.Results: Training with standardized patients was evaluated as superior by the students. There was no correlation with the student’s learning type. Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to compare different methods of instruction in a controlled study. Both teaching methods provide the opportunity to practice clinical skills. Particularly in a neuropsychiatric setting, training with standardized patients can complement other methods as a means of developing communication skills.[german] Zielsetzung: Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Studie wurde der Einsatz von Standardisierten Patienten mit computerbasierten Falldemonstrationen in der psychiatrischen Lehre verglichen und die Bewertungen in Relation zu den Lernstilen der Studierenden gestellt. Darüber hinaus sollte die Akzeptanz von Standardisierten Patienten als innovative Lehrform überprüft werden.Methodik: Studierende des Regelstudiengangs Medizin im 5. klinischen Semester (N=222 nahmen entweder an einem Seminar mit Standardisierten Patienten (N=99 oder an einem Seminar mit computerbasierten Falldemonstrationen (N=123 teil. Im Anschluss an den Unterricht füllten die Studierenden einen Evaluationsbogen aus, welcher Fragen zur Bewertung der Methodik und der Didaktik beider Unterrichtsformen enthielt.Ergebnisse: Die Studenten gaben dem Fallunterricht mit Standardisierten Patienten in

  1. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  2. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine Psychosomatic (mind and body) medicine Sleep medicine Some ...

  3. Telemedicine for Peer-to-Peer Psychiatry Learning between U.K. and Somaliland Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynejad, Roxanne; Ali, Faisal R.; Finlayson, Alexander E. T.; Handuleh, Jibriil; Adam, Gudon; Bowen, Jordan S. T.; Leather, Andrew; Little, Simon J.; Whitwell, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The proportion of U.K. medical students applying for psychiatry training continues to decline, whereas, in Somaliland, there are no public-sector psychiatrists. This pilot study assessed the usefulness and feasibility of online, instant messenger, peer-to-peer exchange for psychiatry education between cultures. Method: Twenty medical…

  4. A 4-Year Curriculum on Substance Use Disorders for Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Rocco; Sanders, Kathy; Greenfield, Shelly F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe an addiction psychiatry curriculum integrated in a general psychiatry training program to demonstrate comprehensive and practical approaches to educating general psychiatric residents on the recognition and treatment of substance use disorders. Methods: The Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital adult…

  5. The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Match: Problems and Potential Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherman, Lee I.; Lamps, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Match was instituted in 1996 to establish fair and uniform resident recruitment practices. METHOD: The impetus for its use was the desire to protect applicants and training programs from premature decisions based on fears of not securing a training position or not filling a program. RESULTS: However,…

  6. Incorporating active learning in psychiatry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sonia; McLean, Loyola; Nash, Louise; Trigwell, Keith

    2017-06-01

    We aim to summarise the active learning literature in higher education and consider its relevance for postgraduate psychiatry trainees, to inform the development of a new Formal Education Course (FEC): the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry) at the University of Sydney. We undertook a literature search on 'active learning', 'flipped classroom', 'problem-based learning' and 'psychiatry education'. The effectiveness of active learning pedagogy in higher education is well supported by evidence; however, there have been few psychiatry-specific studies. A new 'flipped classroom' format was developed for the Master of Medicine (Psychiatry). Postgraduate psychiatry training is an active learning environment; the pedagogical approach to FECs requires further evaluation.

  7. Some gestalt contributions to psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Kathleen A

    2010-07-01

    Gestalt theory and methods support significant behavioral change and personal growth, yet they have not been widely incorporated into modern psychiatric practice. Challenges to employing Gestalt principles in psychiatric practice exist, such as focus on diagnosis to guide treatment planning, key elements of psychiatric training, primacy of medication management in psychiatric practice, and financial pressures. However, the concepts of the co-created relational field in the here and now, the paradoxical theory of change, the cycle of experience, and the use of experiment are Gestalt concepts and methods that can be effectively applied in the modern practice of clinical psychiatry and psychiatric education.

  8. On aims and methods of psychiatry - a reminiscence of 50 years of Tinbergen's famous questions about the biology of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüne, Martin

    2014-12-21

    In 1963, Nicolaas Tinbergen published an article on "the aims and methods of ethology" in which he identified a fundamental framework for the scientific inquiry into the understanding of biological phenomena. In particular, he emphasized to not only study what he called the "proximate" causes, that is, mechanism and ontogeny of a given trait, but to include evolutionary explanations, i.e., the phylogeny and adaptive properties of that trait. While influential in the field of biology and to some degree medicine, psychiatry has fallen short of adopting Tinbergen's approach. This article aims at discussing why Tinbergen's précis has lost nothing of its attractiveness to psychiatry as a medical discipline. Examples will be given for the analysis of emotions, attachment and psychotherapy. Tinbergen has bequeathed to us a scientific framework that can greatly advance our understanding of psychiatric conditions and improve diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders, with similar potential for medicine in general.

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... may become certified in: Child and adolescent psychiatry Geriatric psychiatry Forensic (legal) psychiatry Addiction psychiatry Pain medicine ... American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine American Academy of ...

  10. Impact of duration of psychiatry rotation on medical interns’ attitude towards psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical Council of India allowed the interns to take up an extra 15 days of elective posting in psychiatry along with the mandatory posting of 15 days. The study was planned to assess the effect of the additional period of psychiatry internship on the attitude of interns towards psychiatry. Material and methods: The consenting interns were given a semi structured proforma enquiring about their age and gender and were asked to fill up Attitude Towards Psychiatry (ATP scale. The assessment was done at the beginning and then after 15 days of mandatory posting. Those participants who were willing to do an additional 15 days of elective posting in psychiatry were assessed again on the 30th day of the training. Results: Mean age of the participating interns (n=47 was 25.44±1.52 and the male female ratio was 0.8. Twenty six interns did only the 15 days mandatory psychiatry internship posting (Group 1 and the remaining 21 interns took up the additional elective 15 days posting (Group 2. At the end of the 15 days posting, Mean ATP score of the group 1 increased from 88.34±6.07 to 88.46±6.19 (p=0.80 whereas the same increased from 88.04±7.06 to 88.19±7.65 (p=0.7 in the group 2 and further increased to 91.09±8.3 at the end of the additional 15 days of elective posting (p<0.05. Conclusion: A thirty days exposure of psychiatry during internship had more favourable impact on the attitude of interns towards psychiatry.

  11. The training value of working with armed forces inpatients in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burgh, H Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 10 years, the UK armed forces (UKAF) have been involved in operations worldwide. Mental health in the armed forces (AF) has been the subject of considerable interest in part because of a perceived added risk of psychological distress in this population. Inpatient psychiatric services are provided through partnerships with NHS hospitals. The Cavell Centre, Peterborough's acute inpatient psychiatric unit has up to four beds for service personnel, under the care of a civilian consultant psychiatrist and his AF Foundation Year 2 doctor (F2). This was the only Ministry of Defence (MoD) inpatient unit which had a training post for an AF doctor, but the post ended in August 2014 with the closure of MoD Hospital Unit Peterborough (MDHU(P)). This article outlines the differences in civilian and AF inpatient care and discusses the training value of AF doctors managing service personnel who are psychiatric inpatients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Community Psychiatrists American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry American Association for Emergency Psychiatry ...

  13. Training in a Clozapine Clinic for Psychiatry Residents: A Plea and Suggestions for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Sanders, Kathy M.; Goff, Donald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to develop a model educational clinic and curriculum for psychiatric residents, to increase knowledge and comfort about clozapine prescribing. This matters because clozapine is an important evidence-based treatment for refractory schizophrenia that remains underutilized in clinical practice. Method: This is a…

  14. Factors Affecting the Choice of Psychiatry as a Specialty and Satisfaction among Turkish Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Urun; Ceri, Veysi; Carpar, Elif; Sancak, Baris; Yildirim, Fatma

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the choice of psychiatry among psychiatry residents, identify the fulfillment of expectations, and assess their satisfaction level. Anonymous questionnaires were administered to 98 psychiatry residents, and sociodemographic and professional data were collected. Among the reasons for choosing psychiatry, the opportunity to cultivate interest in humanities, importance of social and relational issues, and intellectual challenge were most frequently selected. The opportunity for complete use of medical training, salary, and opportunity to practice psychotherapy were the expectations least met. The largest group of participants was satisfied to have chosen psychiatry (41.5%), decided on psychiatry training after medical school (35.4%), and attached importance to becoming a clinician (70.7%). Although the satisfaction level was high in this study, addressing the areas in which expectations were not met may increase the satisfaction of psychiatry residents and the selection of psychiatry as a specialty.

  15. A Model for Reintegrating Couples and Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors propose a family-systems training model for general residency training programs in psychiatry based on the couples and family therapy training program in Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Methods: The authors review key elements in couples and family therapy training. Examples are drawn from the…

  16. TRAINING IN THERAPEUTIC WORK WITH CHILDREN. CLINICAL APPROACHES TO PROBLEMS OF CHILDHOOD, VOLUME 2. LANGLEY PORTER CHILD PSYCHIATRY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERLIN, I.N., ED.; SZUREK, S.A., ED.

    THE COLLECTION CONTAINS LECTURES AND PAPERS BY VARIOUS AUTHORS DEALING WITH CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, CONSIDERATION OF CHILD PSYCHIATRY INCLUDES DEFINITION, PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT, FACTORS IN CHILDREN'S PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS, CLINICAL SYNDROMES, CHILDHOOD PSYCHOSES, AND PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOTHERAPY. AN OVERVIEW OF A PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOTHERAPY IN CHILD…

  17. Linkage between Graduate Medical Education Training Practice Profiles in Psychiatry, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Family Practice. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SysteMetrics, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA.

    Provided are appendices for a study which examined the relationship between graduate medical education (GME) and practice profiles in three specialties: family practice, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. Appendix A includes materials related to methodology of the study. Appendices B-D include supplementary materials for family practice,…

  18. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview improves cultural competence in general psychiatry residents: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Xiao, Anna Q; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether a 1-hour didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves the cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. The main hypothesis was that teaching adult psychiatry residents a 1-hour session on the CFI would improve cultural competence. The exploratory hypothesis was that trainees with more experience in cultural diversity would have a greater increase in cultural competency scores. Psychiatry residents at a metropolitan, county hospital completed demographics and preintervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-hour session on the CFI, and were given a postintervention questionnaire. The questionnaire was an adapted version of the validated Cultural Competence Assessment Tool . Paired samples t tests compared pre- to posttest change. Hierarchical linear regression assessed whether pretraining characteristics predicted posttest scores. The mean change of total pre- and posttest scores was significant ( p = .002), as was the mean change in subscales Nonverbal Communications ( p Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved irrespective of previous experience in cultural diversity. More research is needed to further explore the implications of the improved scores in clinical practice.

  19. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  20. Why did you choose psychiatry? a qualitative study of psychiatry trainees investigating the impact of psychiatry teaching at medical school on career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, A; Singh, S; Eady, N; Buszewicz, M

    2017-07-28

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal content of the undergraduate psychiatry curriculum as well as factors contributing to young doctors choosing a career in psychiatry. Our aim was to explore factors which had influenced psychiatry trainees' attitudes towards mental health and career choice. Qualitative in-depth interviews with 21 purposively sampled London psychiatry trainees analysed using the Framework method. Early exposure and sufficient time in undergraduate psychiatry placements were important in influencing psychiatry as a career choice and positive role models were often very influential. Integration of psychiatry with teaching about physical health was viewed positively, although concerns were raised about the potential dilution of psychiatry teaching. Foundation posts in psychiatry were very valuable in positively impacting career choice. Other suggestions included raising awareness at secondary school level, challenging negative attitudes amongst all medical educators, and promoting integration within medical specialties. Improvements in teaching psychiatry could improve medical attitudes and promote recruitment into psychiatry.

  1. Comparison of three respirator user training methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Philip; Boumis, Robert J; Su, Jing; Barrett, Sarah; Alongi, Gabriela

    2013-12-01

    This study addresses methods for training respirator users, particularly when occupational health professionals are not immediately available. A randomized trial compared three training methods-printed brochure, video, and computer-based training-for two respirator types (filtering facepiece and a dual-cartridge half facemask). Quantitative fit testing (PortaCount) measured the effectiveness of training. The study included 226 subjects. For both respirator types, video was significantly superior to either print or computer-based training methods. Conclusions were consistent, whether determined by average fit factor (analysis of variance), log-transformed fit factors, or the number of users in the lowest quartile of achieved fit. Video training for proper respirator use can be effective when direct training from an occupational health professional is unavailable. These methods are particularly relevant to "rapid rollout" situations, such as natural disasters, epidemics, or bioterrorism concerns.

  2. Psychiatry in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Kaplan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry has been practised in Australia in one form or another since the peopling of the continent, originally with the practices of the Aboriginal shamans, and later with the psychiatric treatment necessitated by convict transportation. Over most of the last half-century psychiatry has been administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 psychiatrists in Australia, and num- bers are expected to increase in future. As in many other countries, there is ongoing pressure between the private and public sectors, with endemic under- funding of public and community services. Despite its small number of practitioners and relative isola- tion from major centres, Australian psychiatry has a distin- guished record in the field of research. The most famous dis- covery, by John Cade, was the use of lithium for treatment of mania. Recently governments at state and federal level have acknowledged the effect of psychiatric illness on patients and their families. This has led to the development of pro- grammes to improve public information and eliminate preju- dice. It is anticipated that the practice of psychiatry will flourish in Australia and that the country will remain a leading centre of excellence in psychiatric research and training.

  3. Translational Epidemiology in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Myrna M.; Brown, Alan S.; Talati, Ardesheer

    2012-01-01

    Translational research generally refers to the application of knowledge generated by advances in basic sciences research translated into new approaches for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. This direction is called bench-to-bedside. Psychiatry has similarly emphasized the basic sciences as the starting point of translational research. This article introduces the term translational epidemiology for psychiatry research as a bidirectional concept in which the knowledge generated from the bedside or the population can also be translated to the benches of laboratory science. Epidemiologic studies are primarily observational but can generate representative samples, novel designs, and hypotheses that can be translated into more tractable experimental approaches in the clinical and basic sciences. This bedside-to-bench concept has not been explicated in psychiatry, although there are an increasing number of examples in the research literature. This article describes selected epidemiologic designs, providing examples and opportunities for translational research from community surveys and prospective, birth cohort, and family-based designs. Rapid developments in informatics, emphases on large sample collection for genetic and biomarker studies, and interest in personalized medicine—which requires information on relative and absolute risk factors—make this topic timely. The approach described has implications for providing fresh metaphors to communicate complex issues in interdisciplinary collaborations and for training in epidemiology and other sciences in psychiatry. PMID:21646577

  4. Safety training for working youth: Methods used versus methods wanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierold, Kristina M

    2016-04-07

    Safety training is promoted as a tool to prevent workplace injury; however, little is known about the safety training experiences young workers get on-the-job. Furthermore, nothing is known about what methods they think would be the most helpful for learning about safe work practices. To compare safety training methods teens get on the job to those safety training methods teens think would be the best for learning workplace safety, focusing on age differences. A cross-sectional survey was administered to students in two large high schools in spring 2011. Seventy percent of working youth received safety training. The top training methods that youth reported getting at work were safety videos (42%), safety lectures (25%), and safety posters/signs (22%). In comparison to the safety training methods used, the top methods youth wanted included videos (54%), hands-on (47%), and on-the-job demonstrations (34%). This study demonstrated that there were differences in training methods that youth wanted by age; with older youth seemingly wanting more independent methods of training and younger teens wanting more involvement. Results indicate that youth want methods of safety training that are different from what they are getting on the job. The differences in methods wanted by age may aid in developing training programs appropriate for the developmental level of working youth.

  5. Secular and postsecular psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajević, Izet

    2012-10-01

    Religious method of treatment dominated treatments of psychiatric patients until the start of twentieth century. After psychiatry was recognized as a distinct medical discipline, in nineteenth century, it begun to shift away from religious approach to the treatment of mentally ill persons. During the twentieth century, it was enriched using psychotherapy, socio-therapy and biological methods of treatment, and completely secularized. The renaissance of religion and religious influence on secular events in the beginning of 21th century and postsecular atmosphere has launched a process of desecularization of psychiatry. It can best be seen through the changes in attitude towards spiritual and religious in the process of patients' evaluation, quality of life assessment, respect for the spiritual needs of patients in the process of clinical treatment, and objective consideration of the phenomenon of religiosity by psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Without the ambition to precisely explain and define this notion, the basic sketch of what a postsecular psychiatry is and what it is not will be outlined in this paper. The goal is to open a professional debate over the issue, which would contribute that psychiatry, despite the ongoing challenges and provocations, maintains its essence as a medical discipline and adequately respond to all the needs of its patients, including those related to spirituality and religion. Overcoming rigid secular framework, psychiatry becomes more human and more close to human. In this way, psychiatry does not lose its "scientific component" because the effects of spirituality, beliefs or religious practices on mental health can be scientifically investigated without crossing the boundaries between the natural and spiritual sciences. Although people often consider that science and religion contradict each other, these are by their very nature convergently moving towards the meeting point even if it is located at infinity.

  6. Neuroscience and humanistic psychiatry: a residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James L

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatry residencies with a commitment to humanism commonly prioritize training in psychotherapy, cultural psychiatry, mental health policy, promotion of human rights, and similar areas reliant upon dialogue and collaborative therapeutic relationships. The advent of neuroscience as a defining paradigm for psychiatry has challenged residencies with a humanistic focus due to common perceptions that it would entail constriction of psychiatric practice to diagnostic and psychopharmacology roles. The author describes a neuroscience curriculum that has taught psychopharmacology effectively, while also advancing effectiveness of language-based and relationship-based therapeutics. In 2000, the George Washington University psychiatry residency initiated a neuroscience curriculum consisting of (1) a foundational postgraduate year 2 seminar teaching cognitive and social neuroscience and its integration into clinical psychopharmacology, (2) advanced seminars that utilized a neuroscience perspective in teaching specific psychotherapeutic skill sets, and (3) case-based teaching in outpatient clinical supervisions that incorporated a neuroscience perspective into traditional psychotherapy supervisions. Curricular assessment was conducted by (1) RRC reaccreditation site visit feedback, (2) examining career trajectories of residency graduates, (3) comparing PRITE exam Somatic Treatments subscale scores for 2010-2012 residents with pre-implementation residents, and (4) postresidency survey assessment by 2010-2012 graduates. The 2011 RRC site visit report recommended a "notable practice" citation for "innovative neurosciences curriculum." Three of twenty 2010-2012 graduates entered neuroscience research fellowships, as compared to none before the new curriculum. PRITE Somatic Treatments subscale scores improved from the 23rd percentile to the 62nd percentile in pre- to post-implementation of curriculum (p neuroscience curriculum for a residency committed to humanistic psychiatry

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... What Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ... written examination for a state license to practice medicine, and then complete four years of psychiatry residency. ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More What Is Psychiatry? Back to Patients & Families All Topics What Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on ...

  9. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  10. Case Method: Its Potential for Training Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Greta K.

    1991-01-01

    The case method should be used in both preservice and inservice training for administrators to strengthen training programs and help administrators develop practical human relations skills, learn stress reduction and burnout prevention strategies, learn team-building, and develop critical and reflective thinking skills. (14 references) (MLH)

  11. Transcultural psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vikash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last half of the century the researchers have placed a great deal of importance on brain behavior relations. This has brought upon a huge body of knowledge but unfortunately at the cost of culture - the true roots of much of our behaviour. This general disregard of cultural factors has not only led to false generalizations but has also blocked the understanding of the real forces that motivate and shape our perceptions, attitudes, and actions. This paper is therefore an attempt to highlight the trajectory of transcultural psychiatry, right from the conceptions of its idea, through flaws in methodology, assessment, treatment and to its future and its limitations.

  12. The impact of a psychiatry clinical rotation on the attitude of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about the impact of psychiatry rotations during undergraduate medical training on students' attitudes about psychiatry and eventual specialty choice in developing countries. This study examined the impact of a psychiatry clinical rotation on medical students' attitudes to psychiatry and possible career choice.

  13. Scenistic Methods for Training: Applications and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to complement an earlier article (2010) in "Journal of European Industrial Training" in which the description and theory bases of scenistic methods were presented. This paper also offers a description of scenistic methods and information on theory bases. However, the main thrust of this paper is to describe, give suggested…

  14. An Objective Train Timetabling Quality Evaluation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The train timetable dominates the rail traffic organization. The timetabling quality should be evaluated to check the work skill of train timetable managers. The values of existing timetable evaluation indexes vary with infrastructure features and traffic flow; therefore, they are not comparable in fact. Furthermore, subjective inputs like expert scores are involved in evaluation; this will lead to unreliable results because the experts may have different opinions. To overcome these shortages, we propose a relative train path efficiency index by taking the train paths as production units. Each unit consumes some transport resources and produces some feedback outputs. A DEA model is applied to compute the train path efficiency. Two statistical functions of train path efficiency are used to evaluate the timetabling quality. We verify our method with real-world timetables. First, we use the Shibantan-to-Xinqiao line timetable to test the relative feature of the index proposed, and the results show that the train path efficiency value is relative and can reflect whether the stops are evenly distributed or not. Second, we evaluate the timetabling quality of another two timetables of the Qingdao-to-Jinan line with different traffic flows, and the results show that, compared with the 2012 timetable, the timetabling quality decreased in 2013.

  15. Iranian Medical Students’ Perception of Psychiatry: Before and After a Psychiatry Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Shoar, Saeed; Kaviani, Hosein; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Shabani, Amir; Esmaeili, Sara; Moghaddam, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare the medical students’ attitude towards psychiatry before and after psychiatry clerkship, and to examine the association of choosing psychiatry as a future career with some personal characteristics. Method In a self-controlled, quasi-experimental study, all of the medical students entering the psychiatry clerkship in three major medical schools of Iran located in Tehran (Tehran, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran University of Medical Sciences) were asked to participate anonymously in the study on the first and the last 3-days of their psychiatry clerkship. From 346 invited 4th-5th year medical students, 225 (65%) completed anonymous self-report questionnaires before and after a 4-week psychiatry clerkship. Results Positive response to choose psychiatry as a career was seen in 13.3% and 18.3% before and after psychiatry rotation, respectively. However, the difference was not statistically significant; about one-quarter of the students were turned on to psychiatry and 25% were discouraged during the clerkship. Individual pair wise comparisons revealed significant improvements only in two out of 13 measured aspects of psychiatry. Seventeen out of 38 (47.7%) students who identified psychiatry as the career of choice or strong possibility reported that one of their family members or close friends’ mental illness had an impact on their choice. Those students who considered psychiatry as the strong possibility claimed that they are more interested in humanities (OR = 2.96; 95% CI: 1.17, 7.49), and playing a musical instrument (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.15, 5.57). Conclusion It may be concluded that exposure to psychiatry clerkship could influence medical students’ opinion about psychiatry positively, or negatively. Personal characteristics and individual interests of students may play an important role in choosing psychiatry as their future career. PMID:23682250

  16. Attitudes toward psychiatry among Irish final year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, D; Browne, S; Meagher, D; Lane, A; Larkin, C; Casey, P; Walsh, N; O'Callaghan, E

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of medical students towards psychiatry, both as a subject on the medical curriculum and as a career choice. Three separate questionnaires previously validated on medical student populations were administered prior to and immediately following an 8-week clinical training programme. The results indicate that the perception of psychiatry was positive prior to clerkship and became even more so on completion of training. On completion of the clerkship, there was a rise in the proportion of students who indicated that they might choose a career in psychiatry. Attitudes toward psychiatry correlated positively with the psychiatry examination results. Those that intended to specialise in psychiatry achieved significantly higher examination scores in the psychiatry examination.

  17. Training methods to improve vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gomez, J; Calbet, J A L

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to review the main methods used to improve vertical jump performance (VJP). Although many training routines have been proposed, these can be grouped into four main categories: plyometric training (PT), weight training (WT), whole body vibration training (VT) and electromyostimulation training (ET). PT enhances muscular force, the rate of force development (RFD), muscular power, muscle contraction velocity, cross-sectional area (CSA), muscle stiffness allowing greater storage and release of elastic energy. WT improve muscular force, velocity, power output, and RFD during jumping on a force plate, muscle hypertrophy and neural adaptations. One of the most effective methods to improve VJP is the combination of PT with WT, which takes advantage of the enhancement of maximal dynamic force through WT and the positive effects of PT on speed and force of muscle contraction through its specific effect on type II fibers. Some authors have found an increase in VJP with the use of VT while other did not see such an effect. However, it remains unknown by which mechanisms VT could enhance VJP. ET has been shown to elicit muscle hypertrophy. The VJP may be improved when ET is applied concomitantly with PT or practice of sports. In summary, scientific evidence suggests that the best way to improve VJP is through the combination of PT with WT. Further research is needed to establish if better results are possible by more complex strategies.

  18. Psychiatry in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Il; Oh, Keun-Young; Chung, Young-Chul

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports the current status of Korean psychiatry. In 2011, there were 3005 psychiatrists and 75,000 psychiatric beds. There were 84 psychiatric residency-training hospitals in 2011, which produced about 150 psychiatry board-certified doctors annually. As for academic activity, there is the Korean Neuropsychiatric Association, a main association for neuropsychiatry, and 21 other research societies. Psychiatric residency is a 4-year training program, with different objectives for each grade. The Korean health system accepts National Health Insurance. When severely mentally ill patients register as having a mental disorder, they pay only 10% of their total medical costs. Private clinics usually see patients with less severe conditions such as anxiety, mood and eating disorders; general and university hospitals and special mental hospitals often deal with severe conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. One great concern is an increasing trend to depend upon pharmacotherapy and neglect the role of psychotherapy. Additionally, conflicts among medical sectors are becoming fierce as other doctors request abolition of the current law that restricts them from prescribing anti-depressants for more than 60 days. The average hospitalization period of all mental care institutions was 166 days in 2010, substantially longer compared with developed countries. To win the heart of the general public, cutting edge research to improve the quality of treatment for mental diseases, reformation of psychiatric residency training programs, public campaigns to increase awareness of mental health value, and timely reflection on policy decisions should be pursued persistently. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. THE THERMOVISION METHOD IN SPORT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čoh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the thermovision diagnostic method as one of the tools for monitoring changes in athletes’ loading conditions during their training. The method’s advantage lies in its quantitative approach, fast analysis and the comparative studies involving an application of this method. All basic mechanisms of heat transfer to the skin’s surface are presented, enabling a comprehension of the experimental results. In this article the results are presented as a temperature field distribution on a selected skin segment and they change with time, depending on the integral parameters of an athl- ete’s loading. Also examined were the characteristic changes in the temperature field which depend on an athlete’s physical loading. In addition to a quality evaluation of the temperature field’s topological structures, time-related changes in locally averaged temperatures in a selected window were evaluated as well as the pertaining time-depe- ndent local temperature variations in individual training loading regimes. The results of the study indicate the rationality of applying the IR method for monitoring various types of loading on an athlete’s muscle segments. This method may also be used as a compar- ative tool for establishing the efficiency of different means and methods in the training process.

  20. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Is Psychiatry? Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, ... medical laboratory and psychological tests which, combined with discussions with patients, help provide a picture of a ...

  1. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students ... Disaster, Trauma Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs of Mental Illness What is Psychiatry? What is ...

  2. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Emergency Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs of Mental Illness What is Psychiatry? What is Mental Illness? What ...

  3. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinics, general and psychiatric hospitals, university medical centers, community agencies, courts and prisons, nursing homes, industry, government, ... of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry Academy of ...

  4. Training Methods and Training Instructors' Qualification Are Related to Recruits' Fitness Development During Basic Military Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Lilian; Hofstetter, Marie-Claire; Mäder, Urs; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Adequate physical fitness is essential for successful military service. Military organizations worldwide therefore make continuous efforts to improve their army's physical training (PT) programs. To investigate the effect of the training methods and the qualification of PT instructors on the development of recruits' physical fitness, the present study compared the outcomes of 2 training groups. Both study groups participated in approximately 145 minutes per week of PT. The control group executed the standard army PT prepared and supervised by army PT instructors. Content of the PT in the intervention group was similar to that of the control group, but their training sessions' methods were different. Their training sessions were organized, prepared, and delivered by more and better-qualified supervisors (tertiary-educated physical education teachers). After 10 weeks of training, the participants of the intervention group experienced a significantly greater physical fitness improvement than those of the control group (positive change in endurance 32 and 17%, balance 30 and 21%, and core strength 74 and 45%, respectively). In both groups, the recruits with the lowest initial fitness levels significantly increased their performance. In the intervention group, but not the control, one-third of the recruits with the highest initial fitness levels were able to further improve their general fitness performance. This study demonstrates that the training methods and quality of instruction during PT sessions are relevant for recruits' fitness development in basic military training.

  5. TOWARDS AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, A.W.M.

    The situation of present day psychiatry is described as being dominated by an empiricist perspective. The limitations of this perspective are analyzed and a rough sketch of the hermeneutical approach in psychiatry is offered. It is argued that a fully developed hermeneutical psychiatry implies a

  6. Personalized medicine in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient’s unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention.  Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors......, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention.  Discussion and conclusion: Personalized medicine in psychiatry....... The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine....

  7. Survey of Threats and Assaults by Patients on Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Yael; Moniwa, Emiko; Crisp-Han, Holly; Levy, Dana; Coverdale, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine the prevalence of threats and assaults by patients on psychiatry residents, their consequences, and the perceived adequacy of supports and institutional responses. Method: Authors conducted an anonymous survey of 519 psychiatry residents in 13 psychiatry programs across the United States. The survey…

  8. Contextual barriers to discussing a schizophrenia diagnosis with patients and families: need for leadership and teamwork training in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Sue; Harris, Gillian; Kelly, Brian; Cohen, Martin; Bylund, Carma L; Landa, Yulia; Levin, Tomer T; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Vamos, Marina; Loughland, Carmel

    2015-04-01

    This research sought to gain insight into the processes used by clinicians to discuss a schizophrenia diagnosis with patients/families, with the aim of informing the development of a communications skills training program. A generic qualitative methodological approach was used. Sixteen mental health clinicians were recruited. Semi-structured individual interviews were used to explore their perceptions and experiences communicating a schizophrenia diagnosis. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and thematic analysis undertaken. There were five key themes relating to the process of communication about a diagnosis of schizophrenia: (1) orientation to patient care, (2) planning of communication, (3) the impact of team leadership and inter/intra-professional functioning on communication tasks, (4) the roles of different clinicians in communicating about diagnosis and treatment, and (5) time and resource deficiencies. Despite expressing care and concern for vulnerable patients and embracing the concept of multidisciplinary teams, communicating diagnostic information to patients and families was generally unplanned for, with little consistency regarding leadership approaches, or how the team communicated diagnostic information to the patient and family. This contributed to tensions between different team members. The findings demonstrated a number of issues compromising good communication around a schizophrenia diagnosis, both in terms of clinician skill and clinical context, and support the importance of education and training for all members of the multidisciplinary team about their role in the communication process.

  9. Psychiatry and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Gold, Joel; Henderson, Schuyler W; Merlino, Joseph P; Norwood, Ann; Post, Jerrold M; Shanfield, Stephen; Weine, Stevan; Katz, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Terrorism has dominated the domestic and international landscape since 9/11. Like other fields, psychiatry was not well prepared. With the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attack approaching, it is timely to consider what can be done to prepare before the next event. Much has been learned to provide knowledge and resources. The roles of psychiatrists are challenged by what is known of the causes of, consequences of, and responses to terrorism. Reflecting on knowledge from before and since 9/11 introduces concepts, how individuals become terrorists, how to evaluate the psychiatric and behavioral effects of terrorism, and how to expand treatments, behavioral health interventions, public policy initiatives, and other responses for its victims. New research, clinical approaches, and policy perspectives inform strategies to reduce fear and cope with the aftermath. This article identifies the psychiatric training, skills and services, and ethical considerations necessary to prevent or reduce terrorism and its tragic consequences and to enhance resilience.

  10. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  11. Methods for quantifying training in sprint kayak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Thiago Oliveira; Bullock, Nicola; Duff, Christine; Coutts, Aaron J

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the validity of the session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE) method by comparing 3 different scales of perceived exertion with common measures of training load (TL). A secondary aim was to verify the relationship between TLs, fitness, and performance in Sprint Kayak athletes. After laboratory assessment of maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) and lactate threshold, the athletes performed on water time trials over 200 and 1,000 m. Training load was quantified for external (distance and speed) and internal (session-RPE: 6-20, category ratio [CR]-10 and CR-100 scales, training impulse [TRIMP], and individual TRIMP). Ten (6 male, 4 female) well-trained junior Sprint Kayak athletes (age 17.1 ± 1.2 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak 4.2 ± 0.7 L·min) were monitored over a 7-week period. There were large-to-very large within-individual correlations between the session distance and the various heart rate (HR) and RPE-based methods for quantifying TL (0.58-0.91). Correlations between the mean session speed and various HR- and RPE-based methods for quantifying TL were small to large (0.12-0.50). The within-individual relationships between the various objective and subjective methods of internal TL were large to very large (0.62-0.94). Moderate-to-large inverse relationships were found between mean session-RPE TL and various aerobic fitness variables (-0.58 to -0.37). Large-to-very large relationships were found between mean session-RPE TL and on water performance (0.57-0.75). In conclusion, session-RPE is a valid method for monitoring TL for junior Sprint Kayak athletes, regardless of the RPE scale used. The session-RPE TL relates to fitness and performance, supporting the use of session-RPE in Sprint Kayak training.

  12. Adaptive model training system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M; Lee, Vo

    2014-04-15

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  13. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry Education: A Review of Its Role in Competency-Based Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakiotis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has become an increasingly important part of psychiatry education and assessment in the Australian context. A reappraisal of the evidence base regarding the use of OSCE in psychiatry is therefore timely. This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of OSCE as an assessment tool in both undergraduate and postgraduate psychiatry training settings. Suitable articles were identified using the search terms 'psychiatry AND OSCE' in the ERIC (educational) and PubMed (healthcare) databases and grouped according to their predominant focus: (1) the validity of OSCEs in psychiatry; (2) candidate preparation and other factors impacting on performance; and (3) special topics. The literature suggests that the OSCE has been widely adopted in psychiatry education, as a valid and reliable method of assessing psychiatric competencies that is acceptable to both learners and teachers alike. The limited evidence base regarding its validity for postgraduate psychiatry examinations suggests that more research is needed in this domain. Despite any shortcomings, OSCEs are currently ubiquitous in all areas of undergraduate and postgraduate medicine and proposing a better alternative for competency-based assessment is difficult. A critical question is whether OSCE is sufficient on its own to assess high-level consultancy skills, and aspects of professionalism and ethical practice, that are essential for effective specialist practice, or whether it needs to be supplemented by additional testing modalities.

  14. AWARENESS ABOUT PSYCHIATRY IN UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS IN NEPAL

    OpenAIRE

    Chadda, R. K.; Singh, Meghachandra M.

    1999-01-01

    Undergraduate medical students in developing countries have a number of misnotions and misconceptions about psychiatry. Carefully planned teaching programmes providing more interactions of students with faculty during a short span may be helpful in increasing students′ awareness and positive attitude towards psychiatry. This study was conducted to assess the impact of a two weeks training programme on the awareness of medical students about psychiatry, its scope and treatment modalities. The ...

  15. Preventive psychiatry: Current status in contemporary psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Chadda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventive psychiatry is one of the most ignored subdiscipline of psychiatry, which has got important role to play in the contemporary psychiatry. Mental disorders are very common with lifetime prevalence of about 25%, and tend to be chronic. Due to the stigma associated with mental disorders, lack of awareness, and also lack of adequate mental health resources, nearly 60%–80% of the persons suffering from mental disorders do not access mental health care services. Mental and substance use disorders have been identified as one of the major contributors to the disease-related burden and disability-adjusted life years. In this background, preventive psychiatry has an important role to play in public health sector. Since etiology of most of the mental disorders is not known, it is not possible to follow here the standard model of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of public health. A concept of universal, selective, and indicated prevention has been proposed in primary prevention. Preventive approaches in psychiatry focus on evidence-based risk and protective factors, promoting quality of life, reducing stressors, and improving resilience. Such interventions, when planned targeting at specific mental disorders, have a potential to prevent mental disorders. Thus, preventive psychiatry has a crucial role to play in mental health, considering the high prevalence of mental disorders, the associated disability and burden, and a great drain on human resources.

  16. Social challenges of contemporary psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras, N

    2017-01-01

    , refugee camp or battle-front. New technologies should be included for public information and education together with e-mental health, training of providers, tele-psychiatry and self-help methods delivered via IT. The boundaries of mental health are enlarging very rapidly and indeed new stakeholders and partners should be welcomed. This opens exciting possibilities but also creates some risks and strong evidence base should continue to guide us. Likelihood of finding early diagnostic and individualized treatment for psychosis, autism and dementia are likely to be of high financial cost. The importance of the social challenges of modern psychiatry was recognised by including mental health for the first time in the New Sustainable Development Goals of United Nations that will determine the global development by 2030 aiming at the promotion of life expectancy for all.8 Strengthening the prevention and treatment of mental health problems is a massive task for sustainable development as mental health has a direct impact on the whole range of Sustainable Development Goals.

  17. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Results All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Conclusions Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  18. Computational neurology and psychiatry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta; Cochran, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest research in computational methods for modeling and simulating brain disorders. In particular, it shows how mathematical models can be used to study the relationship between a given disorder and the specific brain structure associated with that disorder. It also describes the emerging field of computational psychiatry, including the study of pathological behavior due to impaired functional connectivity, pathophysiological activity, and/or aberrant decision-making. Further, it discusses the data analysis techniques that will be required to analyze the increasing amount of data being generated about the brain. Lastly, the book offers some tips on the application of computational models in the field of quantitative systems pharmacology. Mainly written for computational scientists eager to discover new application fields for their model, this book also benefits neurologists and psychiatrists wanting to learn about new methods.

  19. The Functions and Methods of Mental Training on Competitive Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianshe

    Mental training is the major training method of the competitive sports and the main factor of athletes skill and tactics level.By combining the psychological factor with the current competitive sports characteristics, this paper presents the function of mental training forward athletes, and how to improve the comprehensive psychological quality by using mental training.

  20. Computer-Based Training Methods for Surgical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    MAC) to Innovative Sports Training (IST) to fulfill the requisite subtasks outlined by Technical Objective 1.0. This partnership was necessary to...effort with Innovative Sports Training and Motion Analysis Corporation. Individual templates were created in Cortex to automatically identify each tool...retractors. 01ed: themodial and liller<:~t SidM to make sure the femoral cOfilponent Is rut ty illll)(laQd. Remo \\!e any ~ess cen)Q(l( In a thorough

  1. Linkage between Graduate Medical Education Training Practice Profiles in Psychiatry, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Family Practice. Deliverable No. 5. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Christy; And Others

    This study examined the relationship between graduate medical education (GME) and practice profiles in three specialties: family practice, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. Two analyses were performed, the first assessing the relationship between GME and current practice patterns and the second assessing the relationship between GME and…

  2. [250 years of English psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H

    1996-08-01

    The history of British psychiatry is considered from five main viewpoints: clinical practice, the institutional basis, the legislative basis, lay perspectives of-mental disorder, and European influences. Its philosophical basis can be traced back to the work of the seventeenth-century philosophers. Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. In Scotland, both 'philosophy of mind' and new clinical methods flourished during its Enlightenment; the concept of 'neurosis' was developed by William Cullen. Around 1800, James Prichard's concept of 'moral insanity' became the foundation of modern work on personality disorder and psychopathy. The psychotic illness of King George III, beginning in 1788, led to greater public sympathy for the mentally ill. Attitudes since then have varied, with 'antipsychiatry' becoming very influential in the 1960s. By the mid-eighteenth century, specialised institutions for the mentally ill existed in a number of cities, there were also units attached to charitable general hospitals, but none of these continued after about 1830. The neglect of patients in private madhouses, prisons, and poorhouses led to increasing concern by Parliament, which resulted in the development of public asylums throughout the country. Severe legal restrictions on their activities were modified in 1930 and completely reformed in 1959. From the mid-nineteenth century, French and German influences became increasingly strong, but British universities played no active part in psychiatry until the 1950s. Psycho-analysis did not develop strongly in Britain, where the main contribution was through translation and biography, but some leading analysts came as refugees in the 1930s-as did other psychiatrists from central Europe. Another important influence was that of Adolf Meyer at the Institute of Psychiatry, London, particularly through Sir Aubrey Lewis; physical treatment methods also came to Britain from Europe. In the second half of this century, the most important British

  3. The Future of Psychiatry as Clinical Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Lewis, David A.; Detre, Thomas; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Kupfer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatry includes the assessment, treatment, and prevention of complex brain disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, developmental disorders (e.g., autism), and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer dementia). Its core mission is to prevent and alleviate the distress and impairment caused by these disorders, which account for a substantial part of the global burden of illness-related disability. Psychiatry is grounded in clinical neuroscience. Its core mission, now and in the future, is best served within this context because advances in assessment, treatment, and prevention of brain disorders are likely to originate from studies of etiology and pathophysiology based in clinical and translational neuroscience. To ensure its broad public health relevance in the future, psychiatry must also bridge science and service, ensuring that those who need the benefits of its science are also its beneficiaries. To do so effectively, psychiatry as clinical neuroscience must strengthen its partnerships with the disciplines of public health (including epidemiology), community and behavioral health science, and health economics. The authors present a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis of psychiatry and identify strategies for strengthening its future and increasing its relevance to public health and the rest of medicine. These strategies encompass new approaches to strengthening the relationship between psychiatry and neurology, financing psychiatry’s mission, emphasizing early and sustained multidisciplinary training (research and clinical), bolstering the academic infrastructure, and reorganizing and refinancing mental health services both for preventive intervention and cost-effective chronic disease management. PMID:19318776

  4. Psychiatry for the person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John L; Gray, Alison J

    2009-11-01

    This review considers much recent work focused around the Psychiatry for the Person Programme of the World Psychiatric Association. Yet we have also considered the wider medical context, based on recent publications familiar to us in the fields of ethics, religion, spirituality and person-centred medicine as well as 'medicine of the person' as developed by Tournier. There is an urgent need for evaluative outcome studies of person-centred care, including the narratives of service users, rigorous scientific methods and new conceptual models; and for a reformulation of the bio-psychosocial model to incorporate new knowledge in the neurosciences, philosophy, anthropology, ethics and theology. We suggest that a biosocial/psychospiritual (BSPS) approach to relationship-based healthcare should be more actively considered.

  5. Personalized medicine in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel; McIntyre, Roger S

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient's unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention. Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention. Personalized medicine in psychiatry is challenged by the current taxonomy, where the diagnostic categories are broad and great biological heterogeneity exists within each category. There is, thus, a gap between the current advanced research prospects and clinical practice, and the current taxonomy is, thus, a poor basis for biological research. The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine.

  6. SPEED POWER AFTER DIFFERENT TRAINING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Gužvica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As the strength is a very important capability, with which are more or less, related and all other motor skills relevant to the successful conduct of sports fight in karate, we were interested in what extent the ability of the speed of force development changes under the influence of different types of loads. For this purpose we used two different methods: the development of speed power with weights and plyometric method. Research is organized on a sample of 20 subjects (first year students of the College of Internal Affairs in Banja Luka, divided into two groups, of which only 12 students responded to the demands of research. The program was implemented during the period of six weeks for two hours per week. Before beginning and three days after the training process, we also tested levels of speed power using eight specific motor tests. After completion of the initial and final measurements, data were analyzed by appropriate statistical procedures, where all respondents, across the various tests, achieved better results. However, statistically significant differences were not obtained in both groups. Specifically, statistically significant differences were obtained in the group T across the various tests, while in group P, statistically significant differences were not obtained in three tests conducted. Given results allowed us that, with caution, we conclude that the method of working with weights, in a limited period of time, when it comes to beginners, is still more efficient than the plyometric method of work. Therefore recommendation for increasing the speed power, in a limited period of time, is to use a method of working with weights.

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and ... Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2018 ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and ... Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 ...

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Emergency Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 American Psychiatric ...

  10. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Emergency Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2018 American Psychiatric ...

  11. Social psychiatry in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-02-17

    Feb 17, 2004 ... World Association of Social Psychiatry (WASP) in association with the. South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP) with support from the. World Psychiatric Association (WPA) invites you to the. 1st Regional Congress of Social Psychiatry in Africa. Where: Caesars Convention Centre, Johannesburg, ...

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2018 American Psychiatric ...

  13. Psychiatry in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    ing of research on every aspect of psychiatry. A few areas where Australian research has achieved interna- tional recognition include the classification of depression, the concept of abnormal illness behaviour, treatment of anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and perinatal psychiatry. In the past it was common ...

  14. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychiatry Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists Mental Health Disorders A – Z Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2017 American Psychiatric ...

  15. The EEG in psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... 13th National Psychiatry Congress. The EEG in psychiatry. Roland Eastman. Division of Neurology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa orders. Epilepsy is primarily a clinical diagnosis, but the EEG may provide strong support by the finding of inter-ictal epi- leptogenic discharges and also be ...

  16. Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry publishes original scientific papers, review articles, short reports and opinion papers in all areas of psychiatry and related fields, such as sociology, applied anthropology and neurosciences. Vol 14, No 1 (2016). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  17. History of psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review examines recent contributions to the evolving field of historical writing in psychiatry. Recent findings Interest in the history of psychiatry continues to grow, with an increasing emphasis on topics of current interest such as the history of psychopharmacology, electroconvulsive therapy, and the interplay between psychiatry and society. The scope of historical writing in psychiatry as of 2007 is as broad and varied as the discipline itself. Summary More than in other medical specialties such as cardiology or nephrology, treatment and diagnosis in psychiatry are affected by trends in the surrounding culture and society. Studying the history of the discipline provides insights into possible alternatives to the current crop of patent-protected remedies and trend-driven diagnoses. PMID:18852567

  18. Toilet training method is not related to dysfunctional voiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Johnson, Kelly; Schneider, Dona; Barone, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Toilet training is an important marker of physical and psychosocial development, but the best strategy for implementing training is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare dysfunctional voiding outcomes for 2 common toilet training strategies: parent-oriented training and child-oriented training. This study was completed using a case-control design, with participants between the ages of 4 and 12 years. All participants were asked to complete questionnaires related to demographics and toilet training method. Results were then analyzed between cases and controls. In all, 215 patients with a mean age 7.76 years participated in this study. Cases and controls showed no significant difference for demographic measures and socioeconomic status. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in dysfunctional voiding between toilet training methods. Toilet training method does not seem to have any long-term effect on dysfunctional voiding. As such, clinicians should advise parents that both methods are acceptable.

  19. Using the Script Concordance Test to Evaluate Clinical Reasoning Skills in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazour, François; Richa, Sami; Zoghbi, Marouan; El-Hage, Wissam; Haddad, Fady G

    2017-02-01

    Although clinical reasoning is a major component of psychiatric training, most evaluating tools do not assess this skill properly. Clinicians mobilize networks of organized knowledge (scripts) to assess ambiguous or uncertain situations. The Script Concordance Test (SCT) was developed to assess clinical reasoning in an uncertainty context. The objective of this study was to test the usefulness of the SCT to assess the reasoning capacities of interns (7th year medical students) during the psychiatry training. The authors designed a SCT for psychiatry teaching, adapted to interns. The test contained 20 vignettes of five questions each. A reference panel of senior psychiatrists underwent the test, and we used their scoring as a reference for the student group. The SCT assessed the competence of students at the beginning and the end of their training in psychiatry. A panel of 10 psychiatrists and 47 interns participated to this study. As expected, the reference panel performed significantly (ppsychiatry rotation. The students improved significantly (ppsychiatry. This study shows the feasibility of this procedure and its utility in the field of psychiatry for evaluating medical students in their clinical reasoning competence. It can provide a valid alternative to classical evaluation methods.

  20. State of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry in India: Current status and vision for future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Over the years Consultation-Liaison (C-L) psychiatry has contributed significantly to the growth of the psychiatry and has brought psychiatry very close to the advances in the medicine. It has also led to changes in the medical education and in the providing comprehensive management to the physically ill. In India, although the General Hospital Psychiatric units were established in 1930s, C-L Psychiatry has never been the main focus of training and research. Hence there is an urgent need to improve C-L Psychiatry services and training to provide best and optimal care to the patients and provide best education to the trainees. PMID:22135437

  1. Vision training methods for sports concussion mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph F; Colosimo, Angelo; Ellis, James K; Mangine, Robert; Bixenmann, Benjamin; Hasselfeld, Kimberly; Graman, Patricia; Elgendy, Hagar; Myer, Gregory; Divine, Jon

    2015-05-05

    There is emerging evidence supporting the use vision training, including light board training tools, as a concussion baseline and neuro-diagnostic tool and potentially as a supportive component to concussion prevention strategies. This paper is focused on providing detailed methods for select vision training tools and reporting normative data for comparison when vision training is a part of a sports management program. The overall program includes standard vision training methods including tachistoscope, Brock's string, and strobe glasses, as well as specialized light board training algorithms. Stereopsis is measured as a means to monitor vision training affects. In addition, quantitative results for vision training methods as well as baseline and post-testing *A and Reaction Test measures with progressive scores are reported. Collegiate athletes consistently improve after six weeks of training in their stereopsis, *A and Reaction Test scores. When vision training is initiated as a team wide exercise, the incidence of concussion decreases in players who participate in training compared to players who do not receive the vision training. Vision training produces functional and performance changes that, when monitored, can be used to assess the success of the vision training and can be initiated as part of a sports medical intervention for concussion prevention.

  2. Why is psychiatry prone to fads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Joel

    2013-10-01

    Psychiatry has long been prone to fads. The main reason is that mental illness is poorly understood and can be difficult to treat. Most diagnostic fads have involved the extension of well-known categories into broader spectra. The most prominent treatment fads have involved the overuse of pharmacological interventions and a proliferation of methods for psychotherapy. The best antidote to fads is a commitment to evidence-based psychiatry.

  3. Space Psychology and Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanas, N.; Manzey, D.

    2003-09-01

    This book deals with psychological, psychiatric, and psychosocial issues that affect people who live and work in space. Unlike other books that focus on anecdotal reports and ground-based simulation studies, this book emphasizes the findings from psychological research conducted during actual space missions. Both authors have been active in such research. What is presented in this readable text has previously been found only in scientific journal articles. Topics that are discussed include: behavioral adaptation to space; human performance and cognitive effects; crewmember interactions; psychiatric responses; psychological counter-measures related to habitability factors, work-design, selection, training, and in-flight monitoring and support; and the impact of expeditionary missions to Mars and beyond. People finding this book of interest will include: psychology and social science students and professors in universities; medical students and residents in psychiatry and aerospace medicine; human factors workers in space and aviation professions; individuals involved with isolated environments on Earth (e.g., the Antarctic, submarines); aerospace workers in businesses and space agencies such as NASA and ESA; and anyone who is interested in learning the facts about the human side of long-duration space missions. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1341-8

  4. Is Marathon Training Harder than the Ironman Training? An ECO-method Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Moreno-Pérez, Diego; Cardona, Claudia A; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Muñoz, Iker; Sellés, Sergio; Cejuela, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absolute and relative training load of the Marathon (42k) and the Ironman (IM) training in recreational trained athletes. Methods: Fifteen Marathoners and Fifteen Triathletes participated in the study. Their performance level was the same relative to the sex's absolute winner at the race. No differences were presented neither in age, nor in body weight, height, BMI, running VO 2max max, or endurance training experience ( p > 0.05). They all trained systematically for their respective event (IM or 42k). Daily training load was recorded in a training log, and the last 16 weeks were compared. Before this, gas exchange and lactate metabolic tests were conducted in order to set individual training zones. The Objective Load Scale (ECOs) training load quantification method was applied. Differences between IM and 42k athletes' outcomes were assessed using Student's test and significance level was set at p Training Weekly Avg Time (IM 12.9 h ± 2.6 vs. 42k 5.2 ± 0.9), and Average Weekly ECOs (IM 834 ± 171 vs. 42k 526 ± 118) were significantly higher in IM ( p Training Load and Training Time was superior for 42k runners when comparing ECOs (IM 65.8 ± 11.8 vs. 42k 99.3 ± 6.8) ( p training time or load vs. Competition Time were superior for 42k ( p Training Time/Race Time: IM 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 1.7 ± 0.5), (ECOs Training Load/Race Time: IM 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 2.9 ± 1.0). Conclusions: In spite of IM athletes' superior training time and total or weekly training load, when comparing the ratios between training load and training time, and training time or training load vs. competition time, the preparation of a 42k showed to be harder.

  5. Improve train tunnel. A dynamical ventilation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phaff, J.C.; Gids, W.F. de

    1996-01-01

    Train tunnels and subways are an interesting field of ventilation. Trains move air through tunnels at rates of 600 m3/s (over 2 x 106 m3 per hour) which is much more than flow rates in buildings. Air pressures can vary up to some 3000 Pa leading to air velocities in the range of 10 to 50 m/s. This

  6. Development of the TARGET Training Effectiveness Tool and Underlying Algorithms Specifying Training Method - Performance Outcome Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    task/skill type (e.g., cognitive- quantitative reasoning skills, perceptual skills, psychomotor skills ) in order to identify which training methods...Moreover, if a user was interested in only examining part-task training for training psychomotor skills , with far transfer being the focus outcome of...studies examining methods in which to train psychomotor skills ). In sum, this capability enables users to view and examine summary information for only

  7. Narrative and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley

    2011-11-01

    The study of narrative has become increasingly important in the humanities and social sciences and there is a growing use of narrative in the clinical domains of medicine and psychotherapy. Narrative psychiatry is also on the rise and promises to help psychiatry be responsive to increasing critical concerns from inside and outside the field. The field of narrative is vast and cuts across a variety of disciplines. Contemporary scholars in narrative medicine build on 30 years of work in medical humanities and bioethics to rigorously understand human variables in medicine and to improve physician empathy. Narrative psychotherapists have developed a new model of psychotherapy and a meta-narrative theory of diverse mental health interventions. Psychiatrists have picked up these insights and are finding them invaluable for navigating contemporary issues in psychiatry. Narrative theory has become important in the humanities, social sciences, medicine, and psychotherapy for understanding human meaning making. Increasingly, the tools of narrative are proving valuable for psychiatry as well. Narrative psychiatry does not negate or supersede other knowledge and research in psychiatry, but it can help psychiatry understand how people use psychiatric knowledge, among other cultural resources, for making sense of psychic difficulties and psychic differences.

  8. Challenges in conducting psychiatry studies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifuddin Kharawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of psychiatry studies are conducted in India. Psychiatry studies are complex and present unique challenges in the Indian setting. Ethical issues pertaining to the risk of worsening of illness, use of placebo and validity of informed consents are commonly faced. Site selection can be difficult due to the relative paucity of ICH-GCP (International Conference on Harmonisation - Good Clinical Practice trained psychiatry investigators in India. Recruitment can be challenging due to issues such as strict eligibility criteria, (lack of availability of caregiver, illness-related considerations, etc. Assessment of the consent capacity of patients is not simple, while structured assessments are not commonly employed. As the illness fluctuates, the consent capacity may change, thus requiring continued assessment of consent capacity. Study patients run the risk of worsening of illness and suicide due to exposure to inactive treatments; this risk is counterbalanced by use of appropriate study designs, as well as the indirect psychotherapeutic support received. Psychiatry studies are associated with a high placebo response. This necessitates conduct of placebo-controlled studies despite the attendant difficulties. Also, the high placebo response is often the cause of failed trials. Rating scales are essential for assessment of drug response. Some rating instruments as well as some rater training procedures may not be suitable for the Indian setting. Technological advancements may increase the procedural complexity but improve the quality of ratings. Psychiatry studies present monitors and auditors with unique scenarios too. Utilization of psychiatry specific training and expertise is recommended to ensure successful conduct of these studies in India.

  9. [Conceptual Aspects of the Teaching Psychiatry in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Dávila, César Augusto

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of Psychiatry in Colombia is the result of the accumulation of different conceptual streams dating back to early twentieth century and the beginning of Psychiatric study. By a way of different teaching methods, this knowledge was transferred from generation to generation to materialize into its current formation. Different key moments are recognied in the history of Psychiatry throughout the world and the introduction of these trends in Colombia, and specifically its impact on teaching. The current structure derives from French elemens of organ-dynamic Psychiatry, both conceptual and clinical, likewise, it is formed from conception kraepeliana and biologic therapies introduced from the second quarter of the last century and the psychoanalytic trend introduced since 1950. The Psychiatric Departments of Colombia form prominently in Pychiatry and are skillful in managing mental illness, with basic knowledge of pathophysiology and psychopathology, as well as good training in psychopharmacology and psychotherapy. A limitation is evident in the formation of community mental health. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    OpenAIRE

    THANOS KRIEMADIS; ANNA KOURTESOPOULOU

    2008-01-01

    In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD). For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development ...

  11. Ethics in psychiatry: a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Defining bioethics as the rational use of dialogue in the formulation, justification, and application of ethical principles, with the aim ofgenerating good practices in research, clinical practice, and advocacy, this paper focuses on methods for bioethical deliberation relevantto psychiatry. Stressing that bioethics fuses the two main ethical traditions in Western thought, the deontological and the teleological, thepaper emphasizes the three conditions that any intervention, if considered in the context of bioethics, should fulfil: it should be appropriateto the problem at hand, it should be good (in the sense that it does good to those who receive it but also to those who perform it),and it should be just (in the sense that its outcomes can be generalized to the whole of society). Some implications of these notions for thepractice and teaching of psychiatry are presented.

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Foundation APA Learning Center APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Terms of Use Copyright Contact © 2018 American Psychiatric Association. All Rights Reserved. 800 Maine ...

  13. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Patients & Families Patients & Families ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections What Is Psychiatry? Back ...

  14. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meet with their psychiatrist periodically to monitor the effectiveness of the medication and any potential side effects. ... written and oral examination given by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology to become a "board ...

  15. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... order or perform a full range of medical laboratory and psychological tests which, combined with discussions with ... written examination for a state license to practice medicine, and then complete four years of psychiatry residency. ...

  16. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in research or clinical practice. Psychologists treat mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association of Community Psychiatrists ...

  17. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. A psychiatrist ... Coping After Disaster, Trauma Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs of Mental Illness What is Psychiatry? ...

  18. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC ...

  19. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association American Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry American Association ...

  20. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC ...

  1. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... illnesses and the relationships with genetics and family history, to evaluate medical and psychological data, to make ... written examination for a state license to practice medicine, and then complete four years of psychiatry residency. ...

  2. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Policies Work at APA Contact Us Newsroom News Releases Message from the President Reporting on Mental ... Learning Center APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General ...

  3. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Patients & Families Patients & ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections What Is Psychiatry? ...

  4. Psychiatry in a Dish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyba; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa; Thorsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a group of pervasive neurodevelopmental conditions with heterogeneous etiology, characterized by deficits in social cognition, communication, and behavioral flexibility. Despite an increasing scientific effort to find the pathophysiological explanations for the disea...... engineering tool in psychiatry....

  5. Jung's Contribution to Clinical Psychiatry : (Section of Psychiatry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, M

    1935-06-01

    This attempt to correlate Jung's work with practical psychiatry is concerned mainly with his conception of clinical types. Jung went far away from the provinces of clinical medicine and psychiatry for his evidence, and the possible cause for this is discussed.He expands his view of introversion and extraversion, and so the suggestion is made that for practical purposes his early limitation of these terms should be maintained. The difficulties encountered in type description by comparison and contrast are emphasized. The value of his conception of basic functions is discussed and criticized.A review is made of the personalities he describes, and a simplification of his resulting classification suggested for practical purposes. The notion is put forward that Jung describes one type in psychological adaptation much better than any others, and it is hinted that his psycho-pathological description of this type in nerve disorder constitutes his main contribution to clinical psychiatry. A review of the treatable nerve disorders suggests that this disorder has received more adequate description from Jung than any other, and reveals a unique method of investigation and therapy. This does not apply to his other descriptions. Possibly some of the vagueness attributed to Jung is because he did not give this disorder an adequate diagnosis, and an explanation for this is offered.The correlation between the simplified classification and the classification of treatable nerve disorders is close, and it is suggested that this constitutes Jung's contribution to clinical psychiatry in general. The application of Jung's principles is of daily help to the practising psychiatrist.

  6. Psychiatry and music

    OpenAIRE

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry...

  7. History of Norwegian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringlen, Einar

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatry as a professional and scientific enterprise developed in Norway in the middle of the 19th century. During the last part of this century, four state asylums were erected, followed by several county asylums during the first part of the 20th century. From the 1870 s, institutions for private care were established, usually in the vicinity of the asylums. During the middle of the 19th century, psychiatry in Norway was influenced by "moral treatment", but during the end of the century somatic ideas prevailed. After the Second World War, Norwegian psychiatry was influenced by Dutch and British social psychiatry, followed by American psychoanalytic-oriented psychiatry during the 1960-70s. Since the 1980s, the climate changed, with more emphasis on classification and drug therapy. The new American DSM-III also influenced Norwegian psychiatry, and cognitive-behavioral therapies became more prevalent. Norwegian psychiatric research has during the last few decades been characterized by epidemiological studies, clinical follow-ups and twin research.

  8. Teacher Training for EST: Problems and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the problems and strengths of an English for Science and Technology teacher-training course at the University of Chile (Santiago). Since most students come to the course with a humanities background, coupled with a "traditional" or "general" English background, they have the following types of problems: attitudinal,…

  9. Novel training methods for robotic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Sun

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of these different entities to create a standardized curriculum for robotic surgery remains elusive. Selection of training modalities and assessment tools should be based upon performance data-based validity and practical feasibility. Comparative assessment of different modalities (cross-modality validity can help strengthen the development of common skill sets. Constant data collection must occur to guide continuing curriculum improvement.

  10. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THANOS KRIEMADIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD. For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development will be presented. Basic theories and models will be analysed as well as the benefits earned and evaluation concerns about the effectiveness of such training programs.

  11. Evaluation of Professional Role Competency during Psychiatry Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujich, Nikola N.; Razmy, Ajmal; Zaretsky, Ari; Styra, Rima G.; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine psychiatry residents' perceptions on the current method of evaluating professional role competency and the use of multi-source feedback (MSF) as an assessment tool. Method: Authors disseminated a structured, anonymous survey to 128 University of Toronto psychiatry residents, evaluating the current mode of…

  12. Does psychiatry rotation in undergraduate curriculum bring about a change in the attitude of medical student toward concept and practice of psychiatry: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaj Konwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the attitude of MBBS student toward concept and practice of psychiatry between groups of students exposed to psychiatry rotation versus those not yet exposed to. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out. Anonymity and confidentiality of the respondent was emphasized. Attitude was measured with 30-item "attitude toward psychiatry" scale. Results: Attitude toward psychiatry was found to be better in groups of medical students exposed to 2 weeks clinical rotation in psychiatry . However, the same reached statistical significance in only 36.7% of the questions. Conclusion: Clinical rotation in Psychiatry in undergraduate has a favorable effect on the attitude of medical students toward concept and practice of psychiatry. Better curriculum and more hours in psychiatry may yield better gain.

  13. Choosing psychiatry as a career: motivators and deterrents at a critical decision-making juncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenfeld, Lesley; Abbey, Susan; Takahashi, Sue Glover; Abrahams, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    To examine factors influencing the choice of psychiatry as a career between residency program application and ranking decision making. Using an online questionnaire, applicants to the largest Canadian psychiatry residency program were surveyed about the impact of various factors on their ultimate decision to enter psychiatry residency training. Applicants reported that patient-related stigma was a motivator in considering psychiatry as a career, but that negative comments from colleagues, friends, and family about choosing psychiatry was a deterrent. Training program length, limited treatments, and insufficient clerkship exposure were noted as deterrents to choosing psychiatry, though future job prospects, the growing role of neuroscience, and diagnostic complexity positively influenced choosing psychiatry as a specialty. Research and elective time away opportunities were deemed relatively unimportant to ranking decisions, compared with more highly weighted factors, such as program flexibility, emphasis on psychotherapy, service- training balance, and training program location. Most applicants also reported continuing to fine tune ranking decisions between the application and ranking submission deadline. Stigma, exposure to psychiatry, diagnostic complexity, and an encouraging job market were highlighted as positive influences on the choice to enter psychiatry residency. Interview and information days represent opportunities for continued targeted recruitment activity for psychiatry residency programs.

  14. [The tasks and aims of hospital psychiatry today and in the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, A; Sierink, D; Verwey, B

    Care provided by consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry and general hospital (GH) psychiatry varies widely. This means that certain services are almost unrecognisable and therefore less readily available to patients. AIM: To describe the core tasks of current CL- and GH-psychiatry care and to suggest how these tasks can best be performed and developed in the future. METHOD: We conducted a selective review of relevant CL- and GH-related literature and combined the information we obtained with the results of a consultation with CL-psychiatrists about how CL- and GL psychiatry should function in the future. RESULTS: Core tasks of CL- and GH-psychiatry are: 1. inpatient and outpatient care for complex patients with combined somatic and psychiatric problems (including addiction) and 2. acute care, diagnosis and treatment of patients referred to the Emergency Department. We gave an outline of how the quality of training can be maintained and/or improved and we suggest ways in which the funding of CL- and GH-psychiatry can be safeguarded and, if possible, increased in the future. CONCLUSION: We strongly recommend that large teaching hospitals and all university hospitals should have at their disposal a psychiatric consultation service that includes psychiatric Emergency Department facilities and specialised CL and GH inpatient and outpatient facility such as a medical-psychiatric unit. The CL- and GH-service should have a psychiatrist as gatekeeper and should be integrated into the hospital's chain of care. Partners in this chain of care are interns who have other medical specialisms, mental health specialists employed at other (mainly psychiatric) hospitals and general practitioners (GPs).

  15. [Hundred years' psychiatry in Korea (1899-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhi, B Y

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatry, Kyŏngsŏng Imperial University) was the center for psychiatry training. The Korean War (1950-1953) enabled the interchanges between. Korean and American military psychiatrist, and motivated great change in Korean psychiatry from biologic oriented German descriptive psychiatry to the American dynamic psychobiological psychiatry. The German educational clinical systems were completely displaced by the American system, when internship and residency training system was conducted since 1958. However, there were always attempts to integrate old traditional Korean wisdoms into the modern psychiatry and to introduce European approaches and knowledges in psychiatry. With the rapid industrialization and economic development of the country since the late 1960s and the prevailing social defensive attitudes towards mentally ill patients of the leaders of the military regimes the increase of private asylums appeared where many chronically ill mental patients were kept without adequate treatment. The reform of asylums in the mid 1980s was gradually proceeded by the government leading consequently to the increase of huge mental hospitals in the land. With the democratization of the political situation as well as the social welfare policy of the government in the 1990s and with the steady stimulation elicited by some NGOs Mental Health Act was enacted in 1995 and the community mental health centers were increasingly set up in several districts. In concern with research activities in psychiatry remarkable development in social cultural as well as biological fields are recognized especially since in the 1970s academic societies for the subspecialities of psychiatry have been organized which cover the various schools of psychotherapy, social psychiatry as well as many subspecialities of biological psychiatry. The number of training hospitals have been increased as the result, the number of psychiatry specialists was increased from 93 in 1956 to 1593 in 1999. KNPA (Korean

  16. Is Marathon Training Harder than the Ironman Training? An ECO-method Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Esteve-Lanao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the absolute and relative training load of the Marathon (42k and the Ironman (IM training in recreational trained athletes.Methods: Fifteen Marathoners and Fifteen Triathletes participated in the study. Their performance level was the same relative to the sex's absolute winner at the race. No differences were presented neither in age, nor in body weight, height, BMI, running VO2max max, or endurance training experience (p > 0.05. They all trained systematically for their respective event (IM or 42k. Daily training load was recorded in a training log, and the last 16 weeks were compared. Before this, gas exchange and lactate metabolic tests were conducted in order to set individual training zones. The Objective Load Scale (ECOs training load quantification method was applied. Differences between IM and 42k athletes' outcomes were assessed using Student's test and significance level was set at p < 0.05.Results: As expected, Competition Time was significantly different (IM 11 h 45 min ± 1 h 54 min vs. 42k 3 h 6 min ± 28 min, p < 0.001. Similarly, Training Weekly Avg Time (IM 12.9 h ± 2.6 vs. 42k 5.2 ± 0.9, and Average Weekly ECOs (IM 834 ± 171 vs. 42k 526 ± 118 were significantly higher in IM (p < 0.001. However, the Ratio between Training Load and Training Time was superior for 42k runners when comparing ECOs (IM 65.8 ± 11.8 vs. 42k 99.3 ± 6.8 (p < 0.001. Finally, all ratios between training time or load vs. Competition Time were superior for 42k (p < 0.001 (Training Time/Race Time: IM 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 1.7 ± 0.5, (ECOs Training Load/Race Time: IM 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 2.9 ± 1.0.Conclusions: In spite of IM athletes' superior training time and total or weekly training load, when comparing the ratios between training load and training time, and training time or training load vs. competition time, the preparation of a 42k showed to be harder.

  17. Flipped clinical training: a structured training method for undergraduates in complete denture prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Anbarasi; K, Kasim Mohamed; Vijayaraghavan, Phagalvarthy; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2016-12-01

    To design and implement flipped clinical training for undergraduate dental students in removable complete denture treatment and predict its effectiveness by comparing the assessment results of students trained by flipped and traditional methods. Flipped training was designed by shifting the learning from clinics to learning center (phase I) and by preserving the practice in clinics (phase II). In phase I, student-faculty interactive session was arranged to recap prior knowledge. This is followed by a display of audio synchronized video demonstration of the procedure in a repeatable way and subsequent display of possible errors that may occur in treatment with guidelines to overcome such errors. In phase II, live demonstration of the procedure was given. Students were asked to treat three patients under instructor's supervision. The summative assessment was conducted by applying the same checklist criterion and rubric scoring used for the traditional method. Assessment results of three batches of students trained by flipped method (study group) and three traditionally trained previous batches (control group) were taken for comparison by chi-square test. The sum of traditionally trained three batch students who prepared acceptable dentures (score: 2 and 3) and unacceptable dentures (score: 1) was compared with the same of flipped trained three batch students revealed that the number of students who demonstrated competency by preparing acceptable dentures was higher for flipped training (χ 2 =30.996 with pflipped training in enhancing students competency and hence recommended for training various clinical procedures.

  18. Residents' perceived physician-manager educational needs: a national survey of psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Maggi, Julie

    2008-11-01

    To determine Canadian psychiatry residents' perceived gaps in physician-manager competencies during their residency training. Residents at 16 Canadian psychiatry residency programs were mailed an 11-item questionnaire (a copy is available from the authors) assessing their perceived deficiencies in selected managerial knowledge (GSk) and skill (GSs) areas as determined by gap scores (GS). GSs are defined as the difference between residents' perceived current and desired level of knowledge or skill in selected physician-manager domains. Residents' educational preferences were also elicited in the questionnaire. Among the 494 psychiatry residents who were sent the survey, 237 residents (48%) responded. Residents reported the greatest GSk in Program Planning and the greatest GSs in Personal and Professional Self-Care. Predictors of greater total GSks included a lack of previous administrative education during medical school, higher training level, and female sex. Only sex was a significant predictor of total GSss. More than 50% of residents preferred workshops, small groups, mentoring, and didactic learning methods for furthering their knowledge and skills. Residents report significant gaps in specific physician-manager training areas, specifically Program Planning, and Personal and Professional Self-Care. The results of this national survey can inform the development of formal physician-manager curricula. To appeal to residents, such curricula should incorporate more interactive pedagogical methods combined with mentoring opportunities.

  19. SPECT in psychiatry. SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocka, A. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Feistel, H. (Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Ebert, D. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Lungershausen, E. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D[sub 2] and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.)

  20. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness.

  1. Anthology of Venezuelan psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Portilla-Geada, Néstor de la; Téllez Pacheco, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Reception of Psychiatry in Venezuela since the 19th Century to the late 20th Century merits a historical approach. The following work proposes to research some of the very origins of Venezuelan psychiatry and its possible influence on contemporary mental health practice. Through documental research, the early works of local authors from the 19th Century through 20th Century finals: Carlos Arvelo, Lisandro Alvarado, Francisco Herrera Luque, Jose Luis Vethencourt and Jose Solanes, are subjected to study. This journey illustrates a descriptive panoramic view which allows to better comprenhend the current state of our psychiatry. In a brief introduction the most important events are described, since the arrival of Pinel's ideas, followed by the early research paperworks published and the beginnings of the academic teachings of this specialty in Venezuela and displaying the main contemporary research groups thorough the country.

  2. [Psychiatry and psychotherapeutic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, E

    1998-01-01

    Starting from a sketch of the basic view points from which the topic will be elucidated, the author focuses on the different logics of psychiatry and psychotherapies. The connections between the topic and the somatopsychosocial model, the intercorrelation of psycho-genetic interpretative models and indication for psychotherapy indicate an approach which is oriented towards the disordered person (and not the disorder). This concept is compared with the often used definition of psychotherapy by Strotzka. The dependence of the concept on traditions in psychiatry (Krafft-Ebing, Jaspers, Kretschmer, E. Bleuler, and M. Bleuler) and its consistency with modern multiaxial diagnostic systems (Frances et al.) are stressed. Finally the border to psychotherapeutic medicine outside psychiatry, both in theory and practice, is stressed.

  3. Scenistic Methods in Training: Definitions and Theory Grounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to describe the scenistic approach to training with corresponding activities and the theory bases that support the approach. Design/methodology/approach: Presented is the definition of the concept of scenistic training along with the step-by-step details of the implementation of the approach. Scenistic methods,…

  4. [Medical theory and psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas Stepke, F

    1990-01-01

    The need for a theory is grounded on the heterogeneity of Medicine: Of basic situation, of medical subsystems and of praxis. The relationship between theory and practice in Medicine should be considered as a task of theoretical reflection, beyond contexts, application, and orientation. As a theory of theories--metatheory--its model lies closer to a "science of actions" than a "science of objects", considered as paradigmatic forms of Medicine. The relevance of these concepts to Psychiatry is illustrated on the basis of the influence of behavioral sciences upon biomedicine, whose advancement rests with Psychiatry.

  5. Clinical thinking in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Lloyd A

    2015-06-01

    I discuss the lack of precision in the term 'clinical reasoning' and its relationship to evidence-based medicine and critical thinking. I examine critical thinking skills, their underemphasis in medical education and successful attempts to remediate them. Evidence-based medicine (and evidence-based psychiatry) offer much but are hampered by the ubiquity and flaws of meta-analysis. I explore views of evidence-based medicine among psychiatry residents, as well as capacity for critical thinking in residents before and after a course in philosophy. I discuss decision making by experienced doctors and suggest possible futures of this issue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Psychiatry Morbidity and Mortality Rounds: Implementation and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stuart; Demaso, David R.; Kemler, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the implementation of psychiatry morbidity and mortality rounds (M&Ms) on the clinical and educational practice in a children's hospital. Methods: Attendees to monthly M&Ms between July 2005 and May 2007 included staff and trainees from psychiatry, psychology, nursing, and social work. Cases were selected based on a…

  7. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  8. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  9. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  10. Using the Technique of Journal Writing to Learn Emergency Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Stern, Theodore; Beresin, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss journal writing in learning emergency psychiatry. Methods: The journal of a psychiatry intern rotating through an emergency department is used as sample material for analysis that could take place in supervision or a resident support group. A range of articles are reviewed that illuminate the relevance of journal…

  11. Turnover of First-Time Chairs in Departments of Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Peter F.; Rayburn, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the tenure of first-time Chairs in academic departments of psychiatry in order to stimulate discussion on extant workforce and leadership issues. Method: Data on tenure of Chairs in psychiatry and other nonsurgical specialties were derived from the longitudinal database of the Association of American Medical Colleges…

  12. Encompassing Sexual Medicine within Psychiatry: Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segraves, Robert Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the positive and negative aspects of psychiatry encompassing sexual medicine within its purview. Methods: MEDLINE searches for the period between 1980 to the present were performed with the terms "psychiatry," "sexual medicine," and "sexual dysfunction." In addition, sexual medicine texts were reviewed for chapters…

  13. Promoting careers in academic research to psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S; Stitzer, Maxine L; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2014-04-01

    With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists and to promote careers in academic research. The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth-year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum's participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3 and 2 years, respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Results suggest that it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, causes little disruption to the residents' schedule and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training.

  14. Practising forensic psychiatry: creating awareness amongst psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mausumi

    2010-10-01

    Forensic psychiatry is still obscure a discipline amongst the practising psychiatrists; so awareness should be created in the young residents pursuing this stream. It is prudent of setting a curriculum for the general psychiatry residents to learn the relevant topics of forensic psychiatry through didactic lectures, seminars, case-discussions and witnessing case proceedings. This topic could enable budding psychiatrists to acquire the skills of the legal aspects of psychiatry. This challenging yet little known branch of medicine can rejuvenate trainee psychiatry residents to specialise further orconduct research activities.

  15. Toilet training: methods, parental expectations and associated dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Denise M; Barros, Aluisio J D

    2008-01-01

    To review both the scientific literature and lay literature on toilet training, covering parents' expectations, the methods available for achieving bladder and bowel control and associated morbidities. Articles published between 1960 and 2007, identified via the MEDLINE, Cochrane Collaboration, ERIC, Web of Science, LILACS and SciELO databases plus queries on the Google search engine; a search of related articles, references of articles, by author and of pediatrics societies. A total of 473 articles were examined and 85 of these were selected for this review. Parents have unrealistic expectations about the age at which diapers can be withdrawn, not taking child development into account. Toilet training strategies have not changed over recent decades, and in the majority of countries the age at which children are trained has been postponed. Training methods are rarely used. Starting toilet training prematurely and stressful events during this period can extend the training process. Children who have not been trained correctly present with enuresis, urinary infection, voiding dysfunction, constipation, encopresis and refusal to go to the toilet more frequently. Literature intended for lay parents is both abundant and adequate, available in book form and on the Internet, but it is not widely available to the Brazilian population. Just three international pediatrics societies have published guidelines on toilet training. Toilet training is occurring later in the majority of countries. The training methods that exist are the same from decades ago and are rarely used by mothers and valued little by pediatricians; incorrect training can be a causative factor for bladder and bowel disorders, which in turn cause problems for children and their families.

  16. Training load quantification in elite swimmers using a modified version of the training impulse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Feriche, Belén; Calderón, Carmen; Iglesias, Xavier; Barrero, Anna; Chaverri, Diego; Schuller, Thorsten; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-01-01

    Prior reports have described the limitations of quantifying internal training loads using hear rate (HR)-based objective methods such as the training impulse (TRIMP) method, especially when high-intensity interval exercises are performed. A weakness of the TRIMP method is that it does not discriminate between exercise and rest periods, expressing both states into a single mean intensity value that could lead to an underestimate of training loads. This study was designed to compare Banister's original TRIMP method (1991) and a modified calculation procedure (TRIMPc) based on the cumulative sum of partial TRIMP, and to determine how each model relates to the session rating of perceived exertion (s-RPE), a HR-independent training load indicator. Over four weeks, 17 elite swimmers completed 328 pool training sessions. Mean HR for the full duration of a session and partial values for each 50 m of swimming distance and rest period were recorded to calculate the classic TRIMP and the proposed variant (TRIMPc). The s-RPE questionnaire was self-administered 30 minutes after each training session. Both TRIMPc and TRIMP measures strongly correlated with s-RPE scores (r = 0.724 and 0.702, respectively; P training load, particularly when monitoring interval training sessions, since it allows weighting both exercise and recovery intervals separately for the corresponding HR-derived intensity.

  17. Formation of spatial thinking skills through different training methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornkasem, Sorachai; Black, John B

    2015-09-01

    Spatial training can be durable and transferable if the training involves cognitive process-based tasks. The current study explored different spatial training methods and investigated the sequences of process-based mental simulation that was facilitated by various structures of external spatial representation, 3D technology, spatial cues, and/or technical languages. A total of 115 Columbia University's students were conducted through three experiments using a between-subjects design to examine the effects of spatial training methods on spatial ability performance. The conditions for training environments included 3D-virtual and 3D-physical interactions with abstract (nonsense-geometric) and concrete (everyday-object) contents. Overall, learners in the treatment conditions improved in their spatial skills significantly more than those in the control conditions. Particularly, 3D-direct-manipulation conditions in the third experiment added promising results about the specific sequences during spatial thinking formation processes.

  18. Training Methods for Image Noise Level Estimation on Wavelet Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Stefano

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the standard deviation of noise contaminating an image is a fundamental step in wavelet-based noise reduction techniques. The method widely used is based on the mean absolute deviation (MAD. This model-based method assumes specific characteristics of the noise-contaminated image component. Three novel and alternative methods for estimating the noise standard deviation are proposed in this work and compared with the MAD method. Two of these methods rely on a preliminary training stage in order to extract parameters which are then used in the application stage. The sets used for training and testing, 13 and 5 images, respectively, are fully disjoint. The third method assumes specific statistical distributions for image and noise components. Results showed the prevalence of the training-based methods for the images and the range of noise levels considered.

  19. Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Psychiatry Trainees: Findings of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, Misoo; Brown, Julie; Ibrahim, Hicham; Jha, Manish K

    2016-02-01

    The authors report on the current status of motivational interviewing education and training director attitudes about providing it to psychiatry residents. Training directors of general, child/adolescent and addiction psychiatry training programs were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Of the 333 training directors who were invited to participate, 66 of 168 (39.3%) general, 41 of 121 (33.9%) child/adolescent, and 19 of 44 (43.2%) addiction psychiatry training directors completed the survey. The authors found that 90.9% of general, 80.5% of child/adolescent, and 100% of addiction psychiatry training programs provided motivational interviewing education. Most programs used multiple educational opportunities; the three most common opportunities were didactics, clinical practice with formal supervision, and self-directed reading. Most training directors believed that motivational interviewing was an important skill for general psychiatrists. The authors also found that 83.3% of general, 87.8% of child/adolescent, and 94.7% of addiction psychiatry training directors reported that motivational interviewing should be taught during general psychiatry residency. Motivational interviewing skills are considered important for general psychiatrists and widely offered by training programs. Competency in motivational interviewing skills should be considered as a graduation requirement in general psychiatry training programs.

  20. Assessment of an undergraduate psychiatry course in an African setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leuvennink Johan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International reports recommend the improvement in the amount and quality of training for mental health workers in low and middle income countries. The Scotland-Malawi Mental Health Education Project (SMMHEP has been established to support the teaching of psychiatry to medical students in the University of Malawi. While anecdotally supportive medical educational initiatives appear of value, little quantitative evidence exists to demonstrate whether such initiatives can deliver comparable educational standards. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an undergraduate psychiatry course given by UK psychiatrists in Malawi by studying University of Malawi and Edinburgh University medical students' performance on an MCQ examination paper. Methods An undergraduate psychiatry course followed by an MCQ exam was delivered by the SMMHEP to 57 Malawi medical students. This same MCQ exam was given to 71 Edinburgh University medical students who subsequently sat their own Edinburgh University examination. Results There were no significant differences between Edinburgh students' performance on the Malawi exam and their own Edinburgh University exam. (p = 0.65. This would suggest that the Malawi exam is a comparable standard to the Edinburgh exam. Malawi students marks ranged from 52.4%–84.6%. Importantly 84.4% of Malawi students scored above 60% on their exam which would equate to a hypothetical pass by UK university standards. Conclusion The support of an undergraduate course in an African setting by high income country specialists can attain a high percentage pass rate by UK standards. Although didactic teaching has been surpassed by more novel educational methods, in resource poor countries it remains an effective and cost effective method of gaining an important educational standard.

  1. Evaluating Psychiatry Residents as Physician-Managers: Development of an Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Maggi, Julie D.; Zaretsky, Ari; Stovel, Laura; Hodges, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: With the emergence of physician-manager (PM) curricula in medical education, more effective assessment tools are needed to evaluate psychiatry trainees in this role. The aim of this study was to determine psychiatry residents', program directors', and PM educators' perceptions about PM role-assessment. Methods: Psychiatry residents at…

  2. Evaluating the Workload of On-Call Psychiatry Residents: Which Activities Are Associated with Sleep Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K.; Cooke, Erinn O.; Sharfstein, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the workload inventory of on-call psychiatry residents and to evaluate which activities were associated with reductions in on-call sleep. Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted, following 20 psychiatry residents at a 231-bed psychiatry hospital, from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.…

  3. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  4. Psychiatry in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    measles and smallpox decimated their numbers. In Tasmania the Aboriginal people were wiped out (although their genes live on in many locals, and in recent years there has been a resurgence of cultural pride in Tasmanian Aboriginal descen- dants). The 20th century. By the start of the 20th century, psychiatry in Australia ...

  5. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... APA Organization Documents and Policies Work at APA Contact Us Newsroom News Releases Message from the President Reporting on Mental Health Conditions APA Blogs Advocacy & APAPAC APA Sites APA Publishing APA Learning Center APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline ...

  6. Psychiatry in Australia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    resurgence of cultural pride in Tasmanian Aboriginal descen- dants). The 20th century. By the start of the 20th ... administered by the Royal Australian and New Zealand. College of Psychiatrists. There are over 2 000 ... psychiatry in Australia followed suit, picking up new ideas and trends. After World War I this included fever ...

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Schizophrenia Sleep Disorders Somatic Symptom Disorder Specific Learning Disorder More Topics A – Z Ask An Expert Coping After Disaster, Trauma Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs of Mental Illness What is Psychiatry? What is Mental Illness? ...

  8. Epistemology of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Ivana S; Berrios, German E

    2012-01-01

    In historical and epistemological terms, psychiatry is a new discipline born during the 19th century. Rooted in both the natural and social sciences, psychiatric objects of inquiry, namely mental symptoms and mental disorders, are hybrid, constituted by the blending of components arising from disparate sources of knowledge ranging from the biological to the semantic in its widest sense. This poses problems for psychiatric research and therapy. Whilst conventional pluralism may be a convenient approach to manage aspects of psychiatric practice, it lacks the capacity to analyse psychiatric objects in their entirety. For the latter, psychiatry demands a new, tailored regional epistemology. This paper outlines the main features of an epistemology specific to the needs of psychiatry. It highlights the relational approach that needs to be taken and illustrates the usefulness of this approach by analysing the structure of psychiatric objects, exploring the manner in which they may be inscribed in the brain, and identifying the need to periodically recalibrate the language of psychiatry. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Uzbekistan: psychiatry in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, A; Heinz, A; Ströhle, A

    2009-12-01

    The center of a national medical identity in Uzbekistan is Abu Ali Ibn Sina born in 980 AD representing Islamic medicine and scientific universalism. Psychiatric institutions were founded under Russian influence starting in the late 19th century. Today, the great challenge in psychiatry is the development of a post-Soviet identity integrating Russian and Islamic traditions.

  10. Weight and psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Behavioural Disorders. Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines. The clinical relevance of weight in psychiatry varies. It may be:- I. an associated clinical feature, either primary, as in anorexia nervosa, or secondary as in mood, anxiety or psychotic disorders. II. a related clinical issue, as in bulimia nervosa or an eating ...

  11. Weight and psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    weight loss in morbidly obeses patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Obes Surg. 2002; 12: 835-40. 11. World Health Organisation. The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and. Behavioural Disorders. Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines. The clinical relevance of weight in psychiatry varies. It may be:- I. an associated ...

  12. Psychiatrie en reclassering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, Walter

    1967-01-01

    Het doel van dit onderzoek is geweest de bestudering van de bijdrage die de hedendaagse psychiatrie aan de reclassering van met de justitie in aanraking gekomen delinquenten kan leveren. In de inleiding wordt erop gewezen hoe de reclassering zich in ons land heeft ontwikkeld van een persoonlijk

  13. Factors Affecting the Choice of Psychiatry as a Specialty in ‎Psychiatry Residents in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saeed Sadr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the current factors affecting the choice of ‎psychiatry as a specialty and to detect the main factors in their choice.‎Method: This descriptive study included 75 first year psychiatry residents in the academic year of ‎‎2014/2015. A Likert-type anonymous questionnaire consisting of academic and ‎demographic data with 43 questions, which evaluated the reason for choosing ‎psychiatry as a specialty, was given to the residents.‎Results: The participants had a positive opinion about 28 items of the questionnaire, meaning that ‎these items had a positive effect in choosing psychiatry as a specialty (questions with P ‎value less than 0.05 and a positive mean. More than 80% of the residents had a positive ‎opinion about six items of the questionnaire (amount of intellectual challenge, variety of ‎knowledge fields relevant to psychiatry, emphasis on the patient as a whole person, the ‎importance of treating mental illnesses in the future, work pressure and stress of the ‎field during residency and coordinating with the person's life style. The participants ‎had a negative opinion about two items of the questionnaire (questions with a P value ‎less than 0.05 and a negative mean. They included experiencing mental illness ‎personally through relatives or close friends as well as the income in psychiatry. ‎Moreover, 36% of the residents with a more definite opinion mentioned that they chose ‎psychiatry as a specialty because of the limitations in residency exam.‎Conclusion: Assistants had a positive opinion about most of the questions and this positive attitude ‎seemed to be an important factor in their specialty choice. However, attending to the ‎preventing factors may increase the selection of psychiatry as a specialty.‎

  14. Effect of different physical activity training methods on overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatrehsamani, Shohreh; Khavarian, Noushin; Beizaei, Maryam; Ramedan, Reza; Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya

    2010-01-01

    In view of the growing trend of obesity around the world, including in our country, and the effect of reduced physical activity in increasing the incidence of obesity and overweight in children and adolescents and limitations of families in providing transport for their children to attend exercise classes, as well as time limitations of students in taking part in these classes, accessing appropriate methods for presenting physical activity training seems essential. This non-pharmacological clinical trial was performed during six months from May to November 2007 on 105 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years with obesity, randomly assigned to 3 groups of thirty-five. Nutrition and treatment behavior were the same in all groups, but physical activity training in the first group was taking part in physical activity training classes twice a week, in the second group by providing a training CD, and in the third group via face-to-face training. Before and after the intervention, anthropometric indicators were measured and recorded. Mean body mass index (BMI) of participants in group attended physical activity training classes, and in the group undergone training with CD, after the interventions was significantly lower than that before the intervention. Our findings demonstrated that training using CDs can also be effective in reducing BMI in overweight and obese children and adolescents as much as face-to-face education and participation in physical training classes. Extending such interventions can be effective at the community level.

  15. Neuroimaging in psychiatry: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Linden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This perspective considers the present and the future role of different neuroimaging techniques in the field of psychiatry. After identifying shortcomings of the mainly symptom-focussed diagnostic processes and treatment decisions in modern psychiatry, we suggest topics where neuroimaging methods have the potential to help. These include better understanding of the pathophysiology, improved diagnoses, assistance in therapeutic decisions and the supervision of treatment success by direct assessment of improvement in disease-related brain functions. These different questions are illustrated by examples from neuroimaging studies, with a focus on severe mental and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression and dementia. Despite all reservations addressed in the article, we are optimistic, that neuroimaging has a huge potential with regard to the above-mentioned questions. We expect that neuroimaging will play an increasing role in the future refinement of the diagnostic process and aid in the development of new therapies in the field of psychiatry.

  16. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry.

  17. Efficient Training Methods for Conditional Random Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Learning (ICML), 2007. [63] Bruce G. Lindsay. Composite likelihood methods. Contemporary Mathematics, pages 221–239, 1988. 189 [64] Yan Liu , Jaime...graphical models: Approximate MCMC algorithms. In Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), 2004. [86] Ara V. Nefian, Luhong Liang, Xiaobo ...Pi, Liu Xiaoxiang, Crusoe Mao, and Kevin Murphy. A coupled HMM for audio-visual speech recognition. In IEEE Int’l Conference on Acoustics, Speech and

  18. [Science, Psychiatry, and the DSM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atbaşoğlu, E Cem; Gülöksüz, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    The upcoming publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), provides an opportunity to revisit the seldom-addressed methodological issues in contemporary psychiatry. We think that DSM widely determines the scientific and clinical orientation of the discipline, and therefore provides a good vantage point to critique the current psychiatric methodology. The main scientific problem is a perseverative attempt at validating descriptively defined disorders that are standardized and simplified to achieve diagnostic reliability. Lack of a single psychiatric phenomenon that is valid, i.e. natural, for initiating any reduction limits research to inductive-probabilistic methods, basically correlational analyses. Furthermore, reduction in psychiatry is typically directed at basic sciences, neglecting general medical diagnoses as possible intermediary correlates. The subcategory "Due to a General Medical Condition" is elusive, and the biopsychosocial approach does no more than strengthen the brain-disease illusion surrounding DSM definitions by justifying psychiatry as a branch of medicine while failing to stipulate detailed medical assessment and discouraging psychopathology-based clinical reasoning. It is therefore no surprise that, although our understanding of the neural basis and mechanisms of behavior has improved along with advances in the neurosciences, not a single DSM disorder has been validated by the discovery of a specific cause, pathophysiology, or structural abnormality since the adoption of the descriptive approach in 1980. New knowledge involves single traits or dimensions of mood, thought, or behavior, none of which are specific to any disorder. The optimum approach today would be to redefine the discipline as neuropsychiatry.

  19. Impact of a psychiatry clerkship on stigma, attitudes towards psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza; Janca, Aleksandar

    2015-03-07

    Mental illnesses are a major public health problem around the world and the prevalence and burden of common mental disorders is growing. Psychiatry is an unpopular career choice for many medical students and this impacts negatively on the supply of psychiatrists to the workforce. The psychiatry clerkship can play an important role in influencing students' attitudes towards psychiatry, either positively or negatively. However, stigma towards mental illness detracts students from considering a career in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an eight week psychiatry clerkship on i) student knowledge and interest in psychiatry; ii) psychiatry as a career choice; iii) attitudes towards psychiatry; and iv) perceptions of stigma towards mental illness. Year 4 medical students at the University of Western Australia completed two questionnaires, the Balon Attitudes Towards Psychiatry and the Mental Illness Clinicians Attitudes (MICA), at the beginning and end of the psychiatry clerkship. Interest in, knowledge of, and consideration of psychiatry as a career were also assessed. Non-parametric tests were used to compare baseline and follow-up differences on the Balon and MICA. Unpaired t-tests compared mean differences for interest, knowledge and psychiatry as a career. Attitudes towards psychiatry were positive at the beginning of the clerkship. Overall, there was a significant decrease in negative and stigmatising views towards mental illness post clerkship measured by the MICA, but the follow-up mean score remained close to the neutral value with views in some areas becoming more negative. There was no significant improvement in students' interest in psychiatry post clerkship, however, knowledge of psychiatry improved significantly. Numbers of students 'definitely considering' psychiatry as a career increased significantly from 7 (4.6%) students at baseline to 17 (10.5%) at follow-up. The clerkship made a modest impact on students' attitudes to

  20. New Learning Methods for Marine Oil Spill Response Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justiina Halonen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Finland the Regional Fire and Rescue Services (RFRS are responsible for near shore oil spill response and shoreline cleanup operations. In addition, they assist in other types of maritime incidents, such as search and rescue operations and fire-fighting on board. These statutory assignments require the RFRS to have capability to act both on land and at sea. As maritime incidents occur infrequently, little routine has been established. In order to improve their performance in maritime operations, the RFRS are participating in a new oil spill training programme to be launched by South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences. This training programme aims to utilize new educational methods; e-learning and simulator based training. In addition to fully exploiting the existing navigational bridge simulator, radio communication simulator and crisis management simulator, an entirely new simulator is developed. This simulator is designed to model the oil recovery process; recovery method, rate and volume in various conditions with different oil types. New simulator enables creation of a comprehensive training programme covering training tasks from a distress call to the completion of an oil spill response operation. Structure of the training programme, as well as the training objectives, are based on the findings from competence and education surveys conducted in spring 2016. In these results, a need for vessel maneuvering and navigation exercises together with actual response measures training were emphasized. Also additional training for maritime radio communication, GMDSS-emergency protocols and collaboration with maritime authorities were seemed important. This paper describes new approach to the maritime operations training designed for rescue authorities, a way of learning by doing, without mobilising the vessels at sea.

  1. Training methods for horses: habituation to a frightening stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J W; Rundgren, M; Olsson, K

    2006-09-01

    Responses of horses in frightening situations are important for both equine and human safety. Considerable scientific interest has been shown in development of reactivity tests, but little effort has been dedicated to the development of appropriate training methods for reducing fearfulness. To investigate which of 3 different training methods (habituation, desensitisation and counter-conditioning) was most effective in teaching horses to react calmly in a potentially frightening situation. 1) Horses are able to generalise about the test stimulus such that, once familiar with the test stimulus in one situation, it appears less frightening and elicits a reduced response even when the stimulus intensity is increased or the stimulus is presented differently; and 2) alternative methods such as desensitisation and counter-conditioning would be more efficient than a classic habituation approach. Twenty-seven naive 2-year-old Danish Warmblood stallions were trained according to 3 different methods, based on classical learning theory: 1) horses (n = 9) were exposed to the full stimulus (a moving, white nylon bag, 1.2 x 0.75 m) in 5 daily training sessions until they met a predefined habituation criterion (habituation); 2) horses (n = 9) were introduced gradually to the stimulus and habituated to each step before the full stimulus was applied (desensitisation); 3) horses (n = 9) were trained to associate the stimulus with a positive reward before being exposed to the full stimulus (counter-conditioning). Each horse received 5 training sessions of 3 min per day. Heart rate and behavioural responses were recorded. Horses trained with the desensitisation method showed fewer flight responses in total and needed fewer training sessions to learn to react calmly to test stimuli. Variations in heart rate persisted even when behavioural responses had ceased. In addition, all horses on the desensitisation method eventually habituated to the test stimulus whereas some horses on the

  2. Methods of Physical Recreation of Students Trained in Kickboxing Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. А. Пашкевич

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing sports massage in recreation of kickboxing students to improve their sports performance. Materials and methods. The research used: review and analysis of literature, pedagogical observations, physiological (relay test, strength endurance test, fatigue intensity assessment and statistical methods. The participants of the research were three groups (5 persons in each group. The first group of students (C1 received preliminary warming massage (20 min, the second group (C2 received recreational massage after the training (20 min, the third group (C3 had passive rest before and after the training (20 min. Before and after the massage session, assessment of the response rate and strength endurance took place three times during the training (at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end with regard to the level of the students’ fatigue intensity during the training. For the rough evaluation of the cause-effect relationship between the influencing factor and the effect appearance, the research used the relative risk indicator (RR. Research results. The sports massage reduced the athletes’ fatigue during the training (RR = 5.0, p < 0.05, i.e. the coach could increase the training load without any significant impact on the functional systems of the athletes. The preliminary massage had a more distinct positive effect on the students’ response rate and endurance indicators. The recreational massage improved only the students’ endurance processes during the training.

  3. Imaging-Genetics Applications in Child Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To place imaging-genetics research in the context of child psychiatry. Method: A conceptual overview is provided, followed by discussion of specific research examples. Results: Imaging-genetics research is described linking brain function to two specific genes, for the serotonin-reuptake-transporter protein and a monoamine oxidase…

  4. Validation method training: nurses' experiences and ratings of work climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Mona; Norberg, Astrid; Hansebo, Görel

    2014-03-01

    Training nursing staff in communication skills can impact on the quality of care for residents with dementia and contributes to nurses' job satisfaction. Changing attitudes and practices takes time and energy and can affect the entire nursing staff, not just the nurses directly involved in a training programme. Therefore, it seems important to study nurses' experiences of a training programme and any influence of the programme on work climate among the entire nursing staff. To explore nurses' experiences of a 1-year validation method training programme conducted in a nursing home for residents with dementia and to describe ratings of work climate before and after the programme. A mixed-methods approach. Twelve nurses participated in the training and were interviewed afterwards. These individual interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed, then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The Creative Climate Questionnaire was administered before (n = 53) and after (n = 56) the programme to the entire nursing staff in the participating nursing home wards and analysed with descriptive statistics. Analysis of the interviews resulted in four categories: being under extra strain, sharing experiences, improving confidence in care situations and feeling uncertain about continuing the validation method. The results of the questionnaire on work climate showed higher mean values in the assessment after the programme had ended. The training strengthened the participating nurses in caring for residents with dementia, but posed an extra strain on them. These nurses also described an extra strain on the entire nursing staff that was not reflected in the results from the questionnaire. The work climate at the nursing home wards might have made it easier to conduct this extensive training programme. Training in the validation method could develop nurses' communication skills and improve their handling of complex care situations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. [The relevance of ethology for psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüne, M

    1998-07-01

    Darwin's evolutionary theory was the starting point for ethology, associated with an impact on scientific psychiatry. Psychiatry and ethology have common scientific and methodological prerequisites: inductive and deductive methods and "gestalt theory" as a basis for observing and describing behaviour patterns with subsequent causal analysis. There have been early endeavours to anchor ethological thinking in psychiatry but this tendency did not prevail for the following reasons: on the one hand, the methodology of ethology was immature or not applicable to man, whereas on the other hand the dominating experiential phenomenological school of Karl Jaspers and Kurt Schneider stressed the privileged position of human thinking, perception, and feeling. These fundamental categories of human existence did not appear amenable to any causal ethological analysis. Psychiatry and evolutionary biology were linked in an atrocious manner during the Nazi regime, both being abused for propaganda purposes and genocide. More recently, there is a "reconciliation" of both disciplines. In psychiatric nosology, operational, behaviour-oriented diagnostic systems have been introduced; ethology has opened up for theories of learning; new subsections like human ethology and sociobiology have evolved. The seeming incompatibility of (behavioural) biological psychiatry and experiential phenomenological psychopathology may be overcome on the basis of Konrad Lorenz' evolutionary epistemology. The functional analysis of human feeling and behaviour in psychotic disorders on the basis of Jackson's theory of the evolution and dissolution of the nervous system may serve as an example. The significance of an "ethological psychiatry" for diagnostic and therapeutical processes of psychiatric disorders derive from prognostic possibilities and the analysis of non-verbal communication in therapist-patient-interactions, but have not yet been systematically investigated.

  6. Attitudes toward neuroscience education among psychiatry residents and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Akil, Mayada; Widge, Alik; Roberts, Laura Weiss; Etkin, Amit

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the attitudes of psychiatry trainees toward neuroscience education in psychiatry residency and subsequent training in order to inform neuroscience education approaches in the future. This online survey was designed to capture demographic information, self-assessed neuroscience knowledge, attitudes toward neuroscience education, preferences in learning modalities, and interest in specific neuroscience topics. Volunteers were identified through the American Psychiatric Association, which invited 2,563 psychiatry trainees among their members. Four hundred thirty-six trainees completed the survey. Nearly all agreed that there is a need for more neuroscience education in psychiatry residency training (94%) and that neuroscience education could help destigmatize mental illness (91%). Nearly all (94%) expressed interest in attending a 3-day course on neuroscience. Many neuroscience topics and modes of learning were viewed favorably by participants. Residents in their first 2 years of training expressed attitudes similar to those of more advanced residents and fellows. Some differences were found based on the level of interest in a future academic role. This web-based study demonstrates that psychiatry residents see neuroscience education as important in their training and worthy of greater attention. Our results suggest potential opportunities for advancing neuroscience education.

  7. Effects of different strength training methods on postexercise energetic expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Rodrigo Lavinas; Brentano, Michel Arias; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2010-08-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strength training in increasing energetic expenditure (EE) both during and after training sessions, there are no studies available that analyze the influence on EE of the order in which exercises are performed. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to verify whether the order in which exercises are performed, represented by 2 different methods of strength training (circuit [CT] and pre-exhaustion [PE]), influences the magnitude of the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) as well as the EE. Eight nonstrength-trained women participated in the study. Two strength training sessions, with different orders of execution, were held with 7 exercises performed with loads of between 50% and 55% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). The oxygen uptake was measured before the training sessions, and the difference between the values found was taken as the EPOC of each training session and used in later analysis. No significant differences were found in either the EPOC (CT: 7.19 L +/- 6.17 an. PE: 7.22 +/- 5.84 L) or the postexercise EE (CT: 34.67 +/- 29.76 Kcal, PE: 34.77 +/- 28.15 Kcal) of the 2 training methodologies. Our results indicate that, in strength training, the magnitude of the EPOC is not linked to the order in which the exercises are performed. However, the absence of recovery periods between the sets and the exercises promotes an increase in the magnitude of the EPOC to the levels found in training sessions with higher percentages of 1RM.

  8. Timing, methods and prospective in citizenship training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Carta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The current models of development are changing the balance between human activity and Nature on a local ands global level and the urgent need to establish a new relationship between Man and the environment is increasingly apparent. The move towards a more caring approach to the planet introducing concepts such as limits, impact on future generations, regeneration of resources, social and environmental justice and the right to citizenship should make us consider (aside from international undertakings by governments exactly how we can promote a culture of sustainability in schools in terms of methods, time scales, and location. Schools are directly involved in these processes of change however it is necessary to plan carefully and establish situations that will result in greater attention being paid to the interaction between man and the environment, and highlighting the lifestyles and attitudes that are currently incompatible with a sustainable future. These solutions, although based on technical-scientific knowledge, cannot be brought about without the involvement of the individual and local agencies working together. However we have chosen to concentrate on the links between educational policies and local areas interpreting declarations made by international bodies such as UNESCO and suggestions aimed at bringing sustainability to the centre of specific policies. Bringing about these aims requires great educational effort that goes well beyond simple environmental education since it requires a permanent process for educating adults. Looking at stages of the history of the theories regarding the development and education of adults shows how the topic of sustainability made its entry into the debate about permanent education and how in the last ten years it has taken on an unrivalled importance as a point of reference for educational policies and pedagogical reflection. The origin of the concept of sustainability, although belonging to natural

  9. Psychiatry and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy. PMID:24891698

  10. IMPRESSIONS OF SOVIET PSYCHIATRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, George J.

    1960-01-01

    Psychiatry in the Soviet Union is essentially conservative, middle-of-the-road and eclectic. It rejects both extremes: radical surgical treatment such as prefrontal lobotomy, and Freudian psychoanalysis. It is Pavlovian and neurophysiological in its orientation and closely linked to Marxian philosophy; most personal problems are believed to be sociocultural in origin, and they are expected to diminish as the country moves closer toward its political and economic goals, making psychiatry progressively more circumscribed in its applications. The varieties of therapy include work therapy, aimed toward returning patients to society quickly and productively; electrosleep therapy and electroconvulsive therapy, both of which seem to be falling into disrepute; insulin-coma therapy, widely used in psychosis; hunger therapy; pharmacotherapy similar to our own but lacking in the large numbers of drugs we use; tissue therapy; psychotherapy, of limited depth and chiefly concerned with the rational, conscious elements in the patient's life. PMID:13783499

  11. Psychiatry and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-04-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy.

  12. Neuropsychiatry and neuroscience education of psychiatry trainees: attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Sheldon; Travis, Michael J; Cooper, Joseph J; Dickey, Chandlee C; Reardon, Claudia L

    2014-04-01

    The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) Task Force on Neuropsychiatry and Neuroscience Education of Psychiatry Residents was established in 2011 with the charge to seek information about what the field of psychiatry considers the core topics in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience to which psychiatry residents should be exposed; whether there are any "competencies" in this area on which the field agrees; whether psychiatry departments have the internal capacity to teach these topics if they are desirable; and what the reception would be for "portable curricula" in neuroscience. The task force reviewed the literature and developed a survey instrument to be administered nationwide to all psychiatry residency program directors. The AADPRT Executive Committee assisted with the survey review, and their feedback was incorporated into the final instrument. In 2011-2012, 226 adult and child and adolescent psychiatry residency program directors responded to the survey, representing over half of all US adult and child psychiatry training directors. About three quarters indicated that faculty resources were available in their departments but 39% felt the lack of neuropsychiatry faculty and 36% felt the absence of neuroscience faculty to be significant barriers. Respectively, 64 and 60% felt that neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience knowledge were very important or critically important to the provision of excellent care. Ninety-two percent were interested in access to portable neuroscience curricula. There is widespread agreement among training directors on the importance of neuropsychiatry and neuroscience knowledge to general psychiatrists but barriers to training exist, including some programs that lack faculty resources and a dearth of portable curricula in these areas.

  13. The child and adolescent psychiatry trials network (CAPTN: infrastructure development and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breland-Noble Alfiee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network (CAPTN under the Advanced Center for Services and Intervention Research (ACSIR mechanism. At the time, CAPTN was believed to be both a highly innovative undertaking and a highly speculative one. One reviewer even suggested that CAPTN was "unlikely to succeed, but would be a valuable learning experience for the field." Objective To describe valuable lessons learned in building a clinical research network in pediatric psychiatry, including innovations intended to decrease barriers to research participation. Methods The CAPTN Team has completed construction of the CAPTN network infrastructure, conducted a large, multi-center psychometric study of a novel adverse event reporting tool, and initiated a large antidepressant safety registry and linked pharmacogenomic study focused on severe adverse events. Specific challenges overcome included establishing structures for network organization and governance; recruiting over 150 active CAPTN participants and 15 child psychiatry training programs; developing and implementing procedures for site contracts, regulatory compliance, indemnification and malpractice coverage, human subjects protection training and IRB approval; and constructing an innovative electronic casa report form (eCRF running on a web-based electronic data capture system; and, finally, establishing procedures for audit trail oversight requirements put forward by, among others, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Conclusion Given stable funding for network construction and maintenance, our experience demonstrates that judicious use of web-based technologies for profiling investigators, investigator training, and capturing clinical trials data, when coupled to innovative approaches to network governance, data management and site management, can reduce the costs and burden and improve the feasibility of

  14. The teaching of the biological basis of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, T

    1995-05-01

    1. What is usually taught as biological psychiatry in psychiatric residency training is mainly psychopharmacology, but biology has a lot more to offer to psychiatry educators. 2. The main thesis of this article is that an introductory course on the applications to psychiatry based on the theory of the evolution of the species by natural selection and mutation, along with a comprehensive theory of mind, may contribute to: (i) helping young physicians to integrate the diverse and extensive knowledge acquired during the residency training; (ii) aid in keeping the psychiatrist within the medical approach to mental illnesses while promoting the specific features of the specialty, and (iii) perhaps developing a general theoretical framework that allows psychiatrists to maintain a prominent role in the mental health staff. 3. The author describes how he has conducted such training in Venezuela. It is expected that the author's ideas will serve as a forum for discussion of this pivotal subject.

  15. Confidentiality principles in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasevici, B

    2015-01-01

    Confidentiality stands out in psychiatry through its multiple connotations as an intrinsic necessity in the ethics of professional relationships. Thus it represents an important characteristic of this profession and at the same time a stringent request which, through its specificity, implies a direct contact with persons in need for help. Despite being inserted in professional codes and legislative systems, confidentiality in psychiatry is far from being considered a clarified matter and does not stand aside from ethical controversy. Keeping the professional secret is often a hard task due to the pressure of the law or of other professional groups who can bring multiple justifications, including that of action for the benefit of society. The therapist is often sub- mitted to a tension caused on the one hand by the promise of keeping the professional secret and on the other hand by multiple requests of breaking the confidentiality. So the problem of confidentiality in Psychiatry deserves special attention because in this profession, more than in other branches of medicine, the gain of the patient's trust is essential in the psychotherapeutic relationship.

  16. A hybrid training method for neural energy estimation in calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silva, P V M; Seixas, J

    2001-01-01

    A neural mapping is developed to improve the overall performance of Tilecal, which is the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector. Feeding the input nodes of a multilayer feedforward neural network with the energy values sampled by the calorimeter cells in beam tests, it is shown that the original energy scale of pion beams is reconstructed over a wide energy range and linearity is significantly improved. As it happens for classical methods, a compromise between nonlinearity correction and the optimization of the energy resolution of the detector has to be accomplished. A hybrid training method for the neural mapping is proposed to achieve this design goal. Using the backpropagation algorithm, the method intercalates an epoch of training steps, for which the neural mapping mainly focus on linearity correction, with another block of training steps, in which the original energy resolution obtained by linearly combining the calorimeter cells becomes the main target. (6 refs).

  17. An overview of Bayesian methods for neural spike train analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Neural spike train analysis is an important task in computational neuroscience which aims to understand neural mechanisms and gain insights into neural circuits. With the advancement of multielectrode recording and imaging technologies, it has become increasingly demanding to develop statistical tools for analyzing large neuronal ensemble spike activity. Here we present a tutorial overview of Bayesian methods and their representative applications in neural spike train analysis, at both single neuron and population levels. On the theoretical side, we focus on various approximate Bayesian inference techniques as applied to latent state and parameter estimation. On the application side, the topics include spike sorting, tuning curve estimation, neural encoding and decoding, deconvolution of spike trains from calcium imaging signals, and inference of neuronal functional connectivity and synchrony. Some research challenges and opportunities for neural spike train analysis are discussed.

  18. An Overview of Bayesian Methods for Neural Spike Train Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural spike train analysis is an important task in computational neuroscience which aims to understand neural mechanisms and gain insights into neural circuits. With the advancement of multielectrode recording and imaging technologies, it has become increasingly demanding to develop statistical tools for analyzing large neuronal ensemble spike activity. Here we present a tutorial overview of Bayesian methods and their representative applications in neural spike train analysis, at both single neuron and population levels. On the theoretical side, we focus on various approximate Bayesian inference techniques as applied to latent state and parameter estimation. On the application side, the topics include spike sorting, tuning curve estimation, neural encoding and decoding, deconvolution of spike trains from calcium imaging signals, and inference of neuronal functional connectivity and synchrony. Some research challenges and opportunities for neural spike train analysis are discussed.

  19. Applied psychometrics in clinical psychiatry: the pharmacopsychometric triangle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Bech, P

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To consider applied psychometrics in psychiatry as a discipline focusing on pharmacopsychology rather than psychopharmacology as illustrated by the pharmacopsychometric triangle. METHOD: The pharmacopsychological dimensions of clinically valid effects of drugs (antianxiety, antidepress......OBJECTIVE: To consider applied psychometrics in psychiatry as a discipline focusing on pharmacopsychology rather than psychopharmacology as illustrated by the pharmacopsychometric triangle. METHOD: The pharmacopsychological dimensions of clinically valid effects of drugs (antianxiety...... psychometrics in psychiatry have been found to cover a pharmacopsychometric triangle illustrating the measurements of wanted and unwanted effects of pharmacotherapeutic drugs as well as health-related quality of life....

  20. The evolution of sport psychiatry, circa 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Ira D; Kamm, Ronald; Morse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the world of both amateur and professional sports has expanded greatly and become more complex. In part related to these changes - and relatively unknown to sports medicine practitioners - the field of sport psychiatry has steadily evolved and grown. This paper focuses on what these changes have been. A sport psychiatrist is a physician-psychiatrist who diagnoses and treats problems, symptoms and/or disorders associated with an athlete, with their family/significant others, with their team, or with their sport, including spectators/fans. The primary aims of the specialty are to (i) optimize health, (ii) improve athletic performance, and (iii) manage psychiatric symptoms or disorders. The training includes medical training to provide knowledge and skills unique to physicians; psychiatric training to provide knowledge and skills inherent in that field, and training and/or experience in sport psychiatry to provide knowledge and skills about psychiatric aspects of sports. The sport psychiatrist first makes an individual, family-systems and phenomenological diagnosis of the clinical situation. Based on this evaluation, he sets goals for not only the athlete, but also for significant others involved. He delivers treatment based on the psychiatric disorder or problem using a combination of medication, psychotherapy or self-help group interventions plus strategies targeted to specific sport performance issues. Evolution of the International Society of Sport Psychiatry as well as the field, including incorporation into school and professional team sports, is described along with a 'typical day' for a sport psychiatrist. Case examples, a training curriculum and core literature are included.

  1. African Journal of Psychiatry: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Andrew Thomas Division of Psychiatry, Department of Neurosciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA Email: inhouse@iafrica.com ...

  2. Psychiatry beyond the current paradigm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Pat

    2012-12-01

    A series of editorials in this Journal have argued that psychiatry is in the midst of a crisis. The various solutions proposed would all involve a strengthening of psychiatry\\'s identity as essentially \\'applied neuroscience\\'. Although not discounting the importance of the brain sciences and psychopharmacology, we argue that psychiatry needs to move beyond the dominance of the current, technological paradigm. This would be more in keeping with the evidence about how positive outcomes are achieved and could also serve to foster more meaningful collaboration with the growing service user movement.

  3. Assessment methods in surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenios Evgeniou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A career in surgery in the United Kingdom demands a commitment to a long journey of assessment. The assessment methods used must ensure that the appropriate candidates are selected into a programme of study or a job and must guarantee public safety by regulating the progression of surgical trainees and the certification of trained surgeons. This review attempts to analyse the psychometric properties of various assessment methods used in the selection of candidates to medical school, job selection, progression in training, and certification. Validity is an indicator of how well an assessment measures what it is designed to measure. Reliability informs us whether a test is consistent in its outcome by measuring the reproducibility and discriminating ability of the test. In the long journey of assessment in surgical training, the same assessment formats are frequently being used for selection into a programme of study, job selection, progression, and certification. Although similar assessment methods are being used for different purposes in surgical training, the psychometric properties of these assessment methods have not been examined separately for each purpose. Because of the significance of these assessments for trainees and patients, their reliability and validity should be examined thoroughly in every context where the assessment method is being used.

  4. Working with the 'difficult' patient: the use of a contextual cognitive-analytic therapy based training in improving team function in a routine psychiatry service setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Rosangela; Biancosino, Bruno; Borghi, Cristiana; Marmai, Luciana; Kerr, Ian B; Grassi, Luigi

    2013-12-01

    The clinical management of 'difficult' patients is a major challenge which exposes mental health teams to an increased risk of frustration and stress and may lead to professional burnout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a cognitive-analytic therapy (CAT) based training undertaken by a mental health team working with 'difficult' patients reduced professional burnout symptoms, improved patients' service engagement and increased the levels of team-cohesion. Twelve mental health staff members from different professional and educational backgrounds took part in five 2-hour sessions providing a basic CAT training intervention, an integrative and relational model of psychotherapy for the treatment of borderline personality disorders. Participants were administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Service Engagement Scale (SES) and the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) before (T0) and after (T1) CAT training, and at 1-month follow-up (T2). A significant decrease were found, at T2, on the MBI Emotional Exhaustion scores, the SES Availability subscale, the GEQ Attraction to Group-Social and Group Integration-Social, while the MBI-Personal Accomplishment scores increased from baseline.The results of this study suggest that a CAT-based training can facilitate team cohesion and patient engagement with a service and reduce burnout levels among mental health team members dealing with 'difficult' patients.

  5. The role of spirituality in specialist psychiatry: A review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... but within the professional scope of the discipline, while all faith traditions and belief systems should be regarded equally. Beyond South Africa, it is envisaged that the review has implications for the practice of psychiatry in Africa. Keywords: Spirituality; Practice and training; Psychiatry; Medical literature; Qualitative inquiry ...

  6. Preparing International Medical Graduates for Psychiatry Residency: A Multi-Site Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Hawa, Raed; Al-Battran, Mazin; Abbey, Susan E.; Zaretsky, Ari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite the growing number of international medical graduates (IMGs) training in medicine in Canada and the United States, IMG-specific challenges early in psychiatry residency have not been fully explored. Therefore, the authors conducted a needs-assessment survey to determine the needs of IMGs transitioning into psychiatry residency.…

  7. Measuring the stigma of psychiatry and psychiatrists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zäske, Harald; Cleveland, Helen-Rose

    2011-01-01

    to improve the image of psychiatry and to reduce potential stigmatizing attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatrists. To evaluate such interventions, a questionnaire has been developed that assesses opinions and attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatry in different samples of medical specialists...

  8. Designing Training for Temporal and Adaptive Transfer: A Comparative Evaluation of Three Training Methods for Process Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Annette; Sauer, Juergen; Burkolter, Dina; Ritzmann, Sandrina

    2010-01-01

    Training in process control environments requires operators to be prepared for temporal and adaptive transfer of skill. Three training methods were compared with regard to their effectiveness in supporting transfer: Drill & Practice (D&P), Error Training (ET), and procedure-based and error heuristics training (PHT). Communication…

  9. Beginning the Work of Integration: An Investigation of Primary Care Physicians' Attitudes Toward Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sheila A; Dobbins, Mary I; Hill-Jordan, Janice; Thomas, Mark C; Lee, Stacy; Albers, Janet

    2016-08-01

    The authors sought to better understand the attitudes of primary care physicians toward psychiatrists in order to assess their receptivity for further psychiatric education. A survey about attitudes toward psychiatrists in comparison to other specialties was distributed among four family medicine residency programs at Southern Illinois University. Respondents rated psychiatry lower than other specialties in the areas measured. However, family medicine physicians expressed a desire to work with psychiatrists and receive further education in psychiatry. Favorable attitudes toward psychiatrists and education in psychiatry suggest the potential for additional family medicine training in psychiatry.

  10. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  11. Modern methodic of power cardio training in students’ physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipov A.Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: significant increase of students’ physical condition and health level at the account of application of modern power cardio training methodic. Material: 120 students (60 boys and 60 girls participated in the research. The age of the tested was 19 years. The research took one year. We used methodic of power and functional impact on trainees’ organism (HOT IRON. Such methodic is some systems of physical exercises with weights (mini-barbells, to be fulfilled under accompaniment of specially selected music. Results: we showed advantages of power-cardio and fitness trainings in students’ health improvement and in elimination obesity. Control tests showed experimental group students achieved confidently higher physical indicators. Boys demonstrated increase of physical strength and general endurance indicators. Girls had confidently better indicators of physical strength, flexibility and general endurance. Increase of control group students’ body mass can be explained by students’ insufficient physical activity at trainings, conducted as per traditional program. Conclusions: students’ trainings by power-cardio methodic with application HOT IRON exercises facilitate development the following physical qualities: strength and endurance in boys and strength, flexibility and endurance in girls. Besides, it was found that such systems of exercises facilitate normalization of boys’ body mass and correction of girls’ constitution.

  12. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  13. Treatment resistance and psychodynamic psychiatry: concepts psychiatry needs from psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 30 years psychiatry and psychoanalysis have moved in substantially divergent directions. Psychiatry has become rich in methodology but conceptually limited, with a drift toward biological reductionism. Psychoanalysis has remained relatively limited in methodology, but conceptually rich. The rich methodology of psychiatry has led to major contributions in discovering gene by environment interactions, the importance of early adversity, and to recognition of the serious problem posed by treatment resistance. However, psychiatry's biologically reductionistic conceptual focus interferes with the development of a nuanced clinical perspective based on emerging knowledge that might help more treatment resistant patients become treatment responders. This article argues that recognition of the problem of treatment resistance in psychiatry creates a need for it to reconnect with the conceptual richness of psychoanalysis in order to improve patient care. Psychodynamic psychiatry is defined as the relevant intersection of psychiatry and psychoanalysis where this reconnection can occur. I will suggest selected aspects of psychoanalysis that are especially relevant to psychiatry in improving outcomes in work with treatment resistant patients.

  14. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Methods Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students’ career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students’ attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. Results 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were “quite likely”, and 25% were “definitely not” considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p psychiatry clubs), experience of acutely unwell patients and perceived clinical responsibility were all associated with choice of psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression revealed six factors associated with students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p psychiatry before medical school, OR 10.8 (5.38 to 21.8, p psychiatry special study module, OR 1.45 (1.05 to 2.01, p = 0.03) or elective OR 4.28 (2.87- 6.38, p psychiatry club, OR 3.25 (2.87 to 6.38, p psychiatry teaching which affect career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally. PMID

  15. [Forensic psychiatry. Its relations to clinical psychiatry and criminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröber, H-L

    2005-11-01

    A basic task of psychiatry is to identify and treat mentally disordered persons at risk of committing crimes. Psychiatry has an important function in preserving social peace, law, and order. How the psychiatric world handles this duty has changed with time. There have been very important changes from asylums to mental hospitals and from voluntary or involuntary inpatient treatment to outpatient care; but clinical psychiatry cannot give up forensic psychiatry. As a result of developments, inpatient care in mental hospitals often concentrates on crisis management, risk assessment, and risk management. On the other hand, forensic psychiatry has made great efforts in recent decades with special therapies for mentally disturbed criminals and collaborated closely with criminologists in developing instruments for risk assessment and prognosis of repeat offenses.

  16. BIOETHICS AND FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Călin SCRIPCARU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent laws on mental health define psychiatric illness as a loss of consciousness and understanding of consequences of self-behavioral acts, evaluated by loss of discernment. As discernment represents the main criteria of responsibility towards personal actions, this study attempts at presenting the ethical issues related to discernment evaluation from the perspective of forensic medicine. We propose a "mint" representation of the content and consequences of one’s own actions as a new criteria of evaluation, taking into account the modern principles of psychology and psychiatry.

  17. Opinions Regarding Benzodiazepine Teaching and Prescribing Among Trainees in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garakani, Amir; Abdullah, Hussain M; Chang, Christine M; Mendelsohn, Nathaniel; Lapidus, Kyle A B

    2017-07-06

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for a variety of symptoms and illnesses. There has been limited investigation on the training psychiatry residents receive regarding benzodiazepine prescribing. This study surveyed US psychiatric trainees about their didactic and clinical experience with benzodiazepines, investigating how experience with benzodiazepines may shape trainees' opinions and likelihood to prescribe. The 14-question online survey was distributed to residents and fellows at US training programs through an invitation from their training directors. Of 466 programs contacted, with an estimated 1345 trainees, a total of 97 programs (20.8%) and 424 trainees (31.5%) responded. The analyses focused only on the 342 general psychiatry trainees who responded. Most trainees reported having formal didactics on benzodiazepines, and earlier training was correlated with higher trainee quality of instruction assessments (p general. The survey indicated that psychiatry trainees generally feel adequately trained through didactic and clinical experience with benzodiazepines. Trainees perceived pressure by patients to prescribe benzodiazepines, but generally felt comfortable in managing benzodiazepine usage. Psychiatry attendings' opinions on benzodiazepines most impacted trainees. Influences on trainees' prescribing patterns are important variables that can impact future benzodiazepine prescribing.

  18. Archives: African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 53 ... Archives: African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Psychiatry. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 53 Items ...

  19. An Improved Method of Training Overcomplete Dictionary Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuozheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training overcomplete dictionary pair is a critical step of the mainstream superresolution methods. For the high time complexity and susceptible to corruption characteristics of training dictionary, an improved method based on lifting wavelet transform and robust principal component analysis is reported. The high-frequency components of example images are estimated through wavelet coefficients of 3-tier lifting wavelet transform decomposition. Sparse coefficients are similar in multiframe images. Accordingly, the inexact augmented Lagrange multiplier method is employed to achieve robust principal component analysis in the process of imposing global constraints. Experiments reveal that the new algorithm not only reduces the time complexity preserving the clarity but also improves the robustness for the corrupted example images.

  20. [Use of Simulated Pacients in Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Silvia J Franco; Delgado, Marta Beatriz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advances and the complexity of human knowledge generate a constant need for creating new tools intended to facilitate learning in an agreeable and lasting form. Simulated patients are one of such tools in medical education. Standardized or simulated patients are actors or people vigorously trained to represent a medical history or, if possible, specific physical findings with the purpose of using such representations as an educational and evaluating supplement in clinic practice. The use of simulated patients has been very well received, particularly in the psychiatric field; however, its usefulness in areas such as psychotherapy or evaluation of residents remains questionable. A search was made in PubMed with the MESH words ("Psychiatry/education" and "Patient Simulation"); a search was also made in LILACS and scholar Google using similar words. Simulated patients are widely used throughout the world in the psychiatry field and their usefulness as an academic tool for pre-graduate students is confirmed in most of the literature reviewed. One of the main benefits of the use of this kind of patients is the acquisition of specific abilities (e.g.: medical history recording); nevertheless, its efficacy in more complex experiences like psychotherapy or certification of psychiatry residents is questioned. Notwithstanding the controversy, most of the literature reviewed confirms the benefits and acceptance of this methodology in the formation of students and psychiatrists. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. [Hipoccrates and psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Milovanović, Srdjan; Crnobarić, Cvetana

    2008-01-01

    Hippocrates, the "father of medicine", is the establisher of a new scientific approach in medicine. He has followed the Hellenic philosophical school that man is the measure of all things, so the "cult of health" is a part of the essence of life. He thoroughly systemized all parts of medicine. He is the establisher of positive (inductive) medicine, which throws away superstition. His approach to medicine is as that of art and natural sciences, and not only as a skill. In his teaching he uses dialectic principles, the establish concept of knowing aetiology, systematization of diagnostics and therapy. He underlined great importance of prognoses of disease based on empirics. He is the founder of holistic medicine, modern concept of psychophysiology, which significantly enabled the disclosure of the etiopathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. His teaching is persistently psychosomatic and weaves in the most modern concepts of psychiatry today. In his aphorisms he described diagnostics and enrolled the principals of treatment of different kind of psychiatry disorders as depression, mania, hysteria, neurotic disorders, psychosis and psychosomatic diseases.

  2. Compulsory treatment in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Kathleen A

    2009-11-01

    Compulsory treatment is a common, yet controversial, practice in psychiatry. This paper reviews recent studies on the use of compulsory measures in hospital, the community and special populations. Researchers continue to examine the rates and patterns of involuntary hospitalization. However, they have extended their investigations to care in the community, acknowledging it as the primary locus of treatment for most patients. Research shows that the implementation of community mental health legislation presents complex clinical and practical issues that require further investigation. Recognition that compulsory treatment is an objective event which is subjectively experienced by patients, families and clinicians has led to research investigating stakeholder views. The therapeutic relationship has been found to be an important modifier of the experience of compulsory treatment. Recent studies have also focused on specific coercive practices, such as forced medication and seclusion, and the use of these in patient subgroups, including those with eating disorders and adolescents. The debate about whether compulsory treatment is ethical continues in the literature. Compulsory treatment in psychiatry remains an ethically and clinically contentious issue. As ethical concerns are generally countered by the argument that compulsory measures can lead to beneficial clinical outcomes, further empirical investigation in this area is required.

  3. Coercion in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallert, Thomas Wilhelm

    2008-09-01

    This paper highlights issues in the field of coercion in psychiatry which have gained importance in 2007. Reviews on 'involuntary hospital admission' demonstrated negative and positive consequences on various outcome domains. Papers on 'coercion and the law' identified cross-national differences of legal regulations, or addressed justice and equality issues. Studies on the 'patient's perspective', and 'family burden of coercion' showed that involuntariness is associated with feeling excluded from participation in the treatment. A review on 'outpatient commitment' recommended the evaluation of a range of outcomes if this specific legislation is introduced. 'Coercion in special (healthcare) settings and patient subgroups' needs to be assessed in detail. This refers to somatic hospitals, establishments for mentally retarded patients, prisons, forensic settings, and coercion mechanisms for addiction treatment, eating disorders, and minors. Empirical findings in other areas focused on attitudes towards involuntary treatment; decision variables for involuntary commitment; guidelines on the use of coercive measures; and intervention programs for staff victims of patient assaults. Coercion in psychiatry is an important area for future clinical and research initiatives. Because of the linkages with legal, human rights and ethical issues, a huge number of individual questions needs to be addressed.

  4. IMPROVING THE METHODS OF ESTIMATION OF THE UNIT TRAIN EFFECTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro KOZACHENKO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of freight transportation by unit trains. The article is aimed at developing the methods of the efficiency evaluation of unit train dispatch on the basis of full-scale experiments. Duration of the car turnover is a random variable when dispatching the single cars and group cars, as well as when dispatching them as a part of a unit train. The existing methodologies for evaluating the efficiency of unit trains’ make-up are based on the use of calculation methodologies and their results can give significant errors. The work presents a methodology that makes it possible to evaluate the efficiency of unit train shipments based on the processing of results of experimental travels using the methods of mathematical statistics. This approach provides probabilistic estimates of the rolling stock use efficiency for different approaches to the organization of car traffic volumes, as well as establishes the effect for each of the participants in the transportation process.

  5. Effect of Portfolio Application on Satisfaction and Educational Achievement of Nursing Students in psychiatry clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed vaghees

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Due to the unpredictability of events in routine clinical psychiatry and replacing experience with assignments including therapeutic relationship with patients, using modern methods of measurement in this environment without students' acceptance and satisfaction is not possible. To determine the effect of portfolio application on satisfaction and educational achievement of nursing students in psychiatry clerkship, we conducted the present study. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 60 nursing students who were spending psychiatry clerkship in Ebn-Sina psychiatry hospital in Mashhad (Summer of 2015 were studied. They were allocated to two portfolio and educational goals (The usual method of evaluation group non-randomly. Before the intervention, educational objective was the same for both groups. Data collection tools included a questionnaire of nursing students satisfaction and a written functional (educational achievement test. Data analysis was performed by SPSS (11.5 version software and the independent t-test, Fisher's exact test and chi-square tests. Results: In this research, 51.7% (n = 31 participating nursing students were male and were 48.3% (n = 29 female. The independent t-test results showed a significant difference between the mean of the nursing student satisfaction in the Portfolio (34.3 ± 2.5 and educational goals (30.5 ± 4.2 groups (p<0.001. Also, there was a difference between the mean of educational achievement in the Portfolio (61.8 ± 14/7 and educational goals (53.0 ± 14.2 group (p<0/02. Conclusion: Using Portfolio in training can increase nursing student satisfaction and educational achievement. Therefore, it is recommended that nursing teachers use it to assess clinical education.

  6. Biological Psychiatry Congress 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Temmingh

    2015-08-01

    . Current prescribing practices for obsessive-compulsive disorder in South Africa: Controversies and consensus C Lochner, L Taljaard, D J Stein 16. Correlates of emotional and behavioural problems in children with preinatally acquired HIV in Cape Town, South Africa K-A Louw, N Phillips, JIpser, J Hoare 17. The role of non-coding RNAs in fear extinction S Malan-Muller, L Fairbairn, W M U Daniels, M J S Dashti, E J Oakleley, M Altorfer, J Harvey, S Seedat, J Gamieldien, S M J Hemmings 18. An analysis of the management og HIV-mental illness comorbidity at the psychiatric unit of the Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital M L Maodi, S T Rataemane, T Kyaw 19. The identification of novel genes in anxiety disorders: A gene X environment correlation and interaction study N W McGregor, J Dimatelis, S M J Hemmings, C J Kinnear, D J Stein, V Russel, C Lochner 20. Collaborations between conventional medicine and traditional healers: Obstacles and possibilities G Nortje, S Seedat, O Gureje 21. Thought disorder and form perception: Relationships with symptoms and cognitive function in first-episode schizophrenia M R Olivier, R Emsley 22. Investigating the functional significance of genome-wide variants associated with antipsychotic treatment response E Ovenden, B Drogemoller, L van der Merwe, R Emsley, L Warnich 23. The moral and bioethical determinants of "futility" in psychiatry W P Pienaar 24. Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS and volumetry of the amylgdala in social anxiety disorder in the context of early developmental trauma D Rosenstein, A T Hess, J Zwart, F Ahmed-Leitao, E Meintjies, S Seedat 25. Schizoaffective disorder in an acute psychiatric unit: Profile of users and agreement with Operational Criteria (OPCRIT R R Singh, U Subramaney 26. The right to privacy and confidentiality: The ethics of expert diagnosis in the public media and the Oscar Pistorius trial C Smith 27. A birth cohort study in South Africa: A psychiatric perspective D J Stein 28. 'Womb

  7. Residents as teachers: psychiatry and family medicine residents' self-assessment of teaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Michael W; Ekambaram, Vijayabharathi; Tucker, Phebe; Aggarwal, Ruchi

    2013-09-01

    Residents are one of the prime sources of information and education for medical students. As an initial step in supporting residents as teachers, a baseline self-assessment of residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching was conducted among psychiatry and family medicine residents to compare and improve their confidence and skills as teachers. Psychiatry residents (N=12) and family medicine residents (N=23) completed self-assessments of their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching. Residents also were asked to list steps used in the One-Minute Preceptor process and estimate the time each spent in teaching. Descriptive summary statistics were used for four main areas related to teaching; t-test and chi-square analyses were conducted to ascertain whether there was a significant difference in resident groups. In the current study, the perceived amount of time spent for teaching patients was significantly higher among family practice residents, whereas no group differences were found for time teaching medical students, peers, community members, non-physicians, or others. However, family medicine residents rated themselves higher than psychiatry residents in their understanding of their roles in teaching medical students and teaching patients. Also, family medicine residents' self-reported teaching skills were more advanced (82.4%) than psychiatry residents' (54.2%). They most likely applied at least two different teaching methods in inpatient and outpatient settings, as compared with psychiatry residents. No significant group differences were found in the other 15 items assessing teaching knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values. Results indicate that residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values regarding teaching varies across institutions and training programs. The psychiatry residents in this study do not clearly understand their role as educators with patients and medical students; they have a less clear

  8. Application of methods of experiential education in corporate trainings

    OpenAIRE

    Šneiderová, Vilma

    2008-01-01

    The bachelor thesis discusses possible applications of the experiential learning method in adult education, mainly in professional training. The thesis defines the experiential pedagogy concept and covers the history of this area of pedagogy. It focuses on games as an important experiential learning tool as well as on conditions of their application in the development of adults. It explains how to prepare a game for adults and how to work with it to make it a real developmental tool. One sect...

  9. Promoting Scholarship during Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Enrico; Hamoda, Hesham M.; DeMaso, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) drew attention to the critical national shortage of psychiatrist-researchers and the need for competency-based curricula to promote research training during psychiatry residency as one way to address this shortage at the institutional level. Here, the authors report on the adaptation,…

  10. Videoconference-based education for psychiatry registrars at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching and general mental health training to general health students or staff were excluded. Evaluation of videoconference-based Education Program. In 2008, videoconferencing commenced for psychiatry registrar education consisting of two sessions per week from the Medical School to three and four distant sites.

  11. Computational Psychiatry in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Sarah K; Stahl, Dylan; Corlett, Philip

    2017-03-01

    We review the literature on the use and potential use of computational psychiatry methods in Borderline Personality Disorder. Computational approaches have been used in psychiatry to increase our understanding of the molecular, circuit, and behavioral basis of mental illness. This is of particular interest in BPD, where the collection of ecologically valid data, especially in interpersonal settings, is becoming more common and more often subject to quantification. Methods that test learning and memory in social contexts, collect data from real-world settings, and relate behavior to molecular and circuit networks are yielding data of particular interest. Research in BPD should focus on collaborative efforts to design and interpret experiments with direct relevance to core BPD symptoms and potential for translation to the clinic.

  12. Teacher Acquisition of Functional Analysis Methods Using Pyramidal Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Sacha T.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Giles, Aimee F.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal training involves an experienced professional training a subset of individuals who, in turn, train additional individuals. Pyramidal training is effective for training a variety of behavior-analytic skills with direct-care staff, parents, and teachers. As teachers' roles in behavioral assessment increase, pyramidal training may be…

  13. Initialization independent clustering with actively self-training method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Feiping; Xu, Dong; Li, Xuelong

    2012-02-01

    The results of traditional clustering methods are usually unreliable as there is not any guidance from the data labels, while the class labels can be predicted more reliable by the semisupervised learning if the labels of partial data are given. In this paper, we propose an actively self-training clustering method, in which the samples are actively selected as training set to minimize an estimated Bayes error, and then explore semisupervised learning to perform clustering. Traditional graph-based semisupervised learning methods are not convenient to estimate the Bayes error; we develop a specific regularization framework on graph to perform semisupervised learning, in which the Bayes error can be effectively estimated. In addition, the proposed clustering algorithm can be readily applied in a semisupervised setting with partial class labels. Experimental results on toy data and real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed clustering method on the unsupervised and the semisupervised setting. It is worthy noting that the proposed clustering method is free of initialization, while traditional clustering methods are usually dependent on initialization.

  14. Jinn and psychiatry: Beliefs among (muslim) doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Uvais, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The belief that jinn can cause mental illness in human through afflictions or possession is widely accepted among Muslims. Belief about jinn in Muslim medical professionals, especially medical doctors has not been studied till date. Aim: To explore the belief among Muslim doctors regarding jinn and psychiatry. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among Muslim doctors using a study questionnaire. Results: Majority of the participants believed in the existence...

  15. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient's physical and mental state. Their education and clinical training equip them to understand the complex relationship ... usually has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research ...

  16. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  17. Dimensional Approach in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ozdemir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In psychiatry there is a traditional categorical conception stating that several disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have distinct etiologies. On the other hand, dimensional approach claims that these entities are actually the same disorder reflecting different clinical aspects of same mental disorder in the course of time. ICD and DSM classifications are based on separate categories of different mental disorders. Howewer, it is quite difficult to consider a mental disorder as a discrete entity that has absolute boundaries from other disorders. There are patients manifesting symptoms of two or more categories but do not fulfill all diagnostic criteria for any mental disorder. Dimensional approach handles the psychopathology as a continuing process and establish the patients to the different ongoing points. According to this view, in fact, multiple diagnosis reflect dimensions of the same disease.

  18. YouTube and 'psychiatry'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Miller, John; Collins, Noel

    2015-12-01

    YouTube is a video-sharing website that is increasingly used to share and disseminate health-related information, particularly among younger people. There are reports that social media sites, such as YouTube, are being used to communicate an anti-psychiatry message but this has never been confirmed in any published analysis of YouTube clip content. This descriptive study revealed that the representation of 'psychiatry' during summer 2012 was predominantly negative. A subsequent smaller re-analysis suggests that the negative portrayal of 'psychiatry' on YouTube is a stable phenomenon. The significance of this and how it could be addressed are discussed.

  19. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  20. Simple method for generating adjustable trains of picosecond electron bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muggli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple, passive method for producing an adjustable train of picosecond electron bunches is demonstrated. The key component of this method is an electron beam mask consisting of an array of parallel wires that selectively spoils the beam emittance. This mask is positioned in a high magnetic dispersion, low beta-function region of the beam line. The incoming electron beam striking the mask has a time/energy correlation that corresponds to a time/position correlation at the mask location. The mask pattern is transformed into a time pattern or train of bunches when the dispersion is brought back to zero downstream of the mask. Results are presented of a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating this novel technique that was performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. This technique allows for easy tailoring of the bunch train for a particular application, including varying the bunch width and spacing, and enabling the generation of a trailing witness bunch.

  1. Power Mobility Training Methods for Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Hostnik, Lisa; McElroy, Rachel; Peterson, Courtney; Farris, John P

    2018-01-01

    To summarize and critically appraise the existing evidence related to power mobility training methods used in research studies conducted with children 21 years or younger. A systematic review was conducted using 16 electronic databases to identify primary source quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals. Data extraction, determination of level of evidence, evaluation of methodological rigor, and assessment of the risk of bias were completed. The Evidence Alert Traffic Light Grading System (EATLS) was used. Twenty-seven studies were included in the review. Levels of evidence were II to V; scientific rigor scores were 2 to 7. An overall Yellow EATLS level of evidence was found indicating that therapists should use caution when providing power mobility training interventions and measure outcomes related to established goals in areas such as development, functional skills, or use of a power mobility device.

  2. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry.

  3. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  4. Nursing interventions in inpatient psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Muller-Staub, M.; Needham, I.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    The successful application of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) in inpatient psychiatry depends on whether the classification adequately describes nursing care in this setting. The present study aimed to identify nursing interventions mentioned in journal articles on psychiatric

  5. Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Malan, A. S. et al, (1990). Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Liberian refugees. British Journal of Psychiatry, 174, 339-354. Harry, R. C. (1967) Theory of motivation. Eds. O. Princewill & R. George. Harper & Row publisher, New Uork.

  6. Parity of publication for psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Rampuri, Riaz; Ragunathan, Thivvia; Young, Allan H

    2016-09-01

    There is an established disparity between physical and mental healthcare. Parity of research outputs has not been assessed internationally across influential medical journals. To assess parity of publication between physical and mental health, and within psychiatry. Four major medical disciplines were identified and their relative burden estimated. All publications from the highest-impact general medical journals in 2001, 2006 and 2011 were categorised accordingly. The frequency of psychiatry, cardiology, oncology and respiratory medicine articles were compared with the expected proportion (given illness burdens). Six subspecialties within psychiatry were also compared. Psychiatry was consistently and substantially underrepresented; other specialties were overrepresented. Dementia and psychosis demonstrated overrepresentation, with addiction and anxiety disorders represented proportionately and other disorders underrepresented. The underrepresentation of mood disorders increased more recently. There appears to be an important element of disparity of esteem; further action is required to achieve equivalence between mental and physical health research publications. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  7. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Franzan, Jamie; O'Connor, Ryan; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kitts, Robert; Boland, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatry residents have numerous online educational resources readily available to them although currently there are no data regarding residents' use and perception of such websites. A survey was offered to 62 residents from all four years of training as well as recent graduates of a single psychiatry residency training program. Residents reported utilizing online resources on average 68 % of the time, in comparison to 32 % on average for printed materials. Residents reported UpToDate, PubMed, and Wikipedia as the most visited websites and ranked each highly but for different purposes. Thirty-five percent of residents felt that insufficient faculty guidance was a barrier to use of these educational websites. Pilot data indicate psychiatry residents use online resources daily for their education in various settings. Resident perceptions of individual website's trustworthiness, ease of use, and sources of clinical decision-making and personal learning suggest potential opportunities for educators to better understand the current use of these resources in residency training. Reported barriers including lack of faculty guidance suggest opportunities for academic psychiatry. Further study is necessary at multiple sites before such results may be generalized.

  8. Cultural psychiatry in the French-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    For the last five centuries, France's international influence has been constant. This has been particularly evident in the areas of general culture, history and science. In psychiatry, the role of Pinel during the French Revolution, and the discovery of the first psychotropic agent, chlorpromazine, by Delay and Deniker are two outstanding historical facts. This chapter examines the contributions of French social scientists in the understanding of the sequelae of colonial exploitation, racism and political oppression. The establishment of a multi-ethnic society in France and Francophile regions of the world has led to the gradual creation of a cultural psychiatry rich in terminological influences, clinical understanding, training programs and research. Closer connections between French psychiatric thought and Anglophile psychiatry is likely to produce beneficial effects. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  10. Spaced learning using emails to integrate psychiatry into general medical curriculum: Keep psychiatry in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Mary C; Dantz, Bezalel; Wright, Mary C; Fiedorowicz, Jess G

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, medical students on clinical rotations receive instruction on principles of mental health only during the psychiatry clerkship. We used emails to insert teaching of psychiatric concepts beyond the psychiatry clerkship into other rotations using the method of spaced learning, the delivery of brief morsels of information repeated over time intervals. We predicted that the intervention would improve attitudes and confidence towards the integration of psychiatry and knowledge retention. We developed and distributed a series of emails relating key psychiatric concepts targeted to the other core clerkships. In a cluster-randomized trial over one academic year (intervention group n = 71, control group n = 61), scores on the Attitudes and Confidence in the Integration of Psychiatry scale and on the knowledge quiz did not differ significantly. Students who actively engaged with the emails demonstrated significantly higher scores on the knowledge test. Email users valued the timing, format of delivery and application of psychiatric principles outside the psychiatric setting. Participants recommended simplifying the format and previewing the benefits of spaced learning to increase utilization. Delivering spaced learning through emails, within a curriculum designed to foster engagement, may provide an efficient means of addressing the widely-recognized but elusive goal of integrating teaching across medical disciplines.

  11. Social network analysis of international scientific collaboration on psychiatry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorder is harmful to human health, effects social life seriously and still brings a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the indispensable choice for progress in the field of biomedicine. However, there have been few scientific publications on scientific collaboration in psychiatry research so far. The aim of this study was to measure the activities of scientific collaboration in psychiatry research at the level of authors, institutions and countries. We retrieved 36557 papers about psychiatry from Science Ciation Index Expanded (SCI-Expanded) in web of science. Additionally, some methods such as social network analysis (SNA), K-plex analysis and Core-Periphery were used in this study. Collaboration has been increasing at the level of authors, institutions and countries in psychiatry in the last ten years. We selected the top 100 prolific authors, institutions and 30 countries to construct collaborative map respectively. Freedman, R and Seidman, LJ were the central authors, Harvard university was the central institution and the USA was the central country of the whole network. Notably, the rate of economic development of countries affected collaborative behavior. The results show that we should encourage multiple collaboration types in psychiatry research as they not only help researchers to master the current research hotspots but also provide scientific basis for clinical research on psychiatry and suggest policies to promote the development of this area.

  12. Academic Training Lecture: Statistical Methods for Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2012-01-01

    2, 3, 4 and 5 April 2012 Academic Training Lecture  Regular Programme from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant Statistical Methods for Particle Physics by Glen Cowan (Royal Holloway) The series of four lectures will introduce some of the important statistical methods used in Particle Physics, and should be particularly relevant to those involved in the analysis of LHC data. The lectures will include an introduction to statistical tests, parameter estimation, and the application of these tools to searches for new phenomena.  Both frequentist and Bayesian methods will be described, with particular emphasis on treatment of systematic uncertainties.  The lectures will also cover unfolding, that is, estimation of a distribution in binned form where the variable in question is subject to measurement errors.

  13. Introduction of the Formal Methods in Software Engineering Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Toledo B.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Formal methods were developed to provide systematic and rigorous techniques for software development, and as initiative will be introduced in training in Software Engineering (SE. This article discusses the importance of including these scientific principles and describes several specific techniques in order to improve the processes of the IS. It also provides an analysis of the principles that should be taken into account in a curriculum to systematically introduce in university education and business. Several methods have been tried in recent years to achieve this goal in undergraduate and graduate universities programs, as well as IT professionals. Experience shows that participants gain confidence in formal methods only when they learn their clear benefits in the context of software engineering.

  14. Effect of brief training on reliability and applicability of Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Five Psychiatrists and five Psychiatric Clinical Officers (PCOs) or Assistant Medical Officers who hold a 2 year diploma in Clinical Psychiatry were randomly selected to independently rate a video-recorded psychiatric interview according to the DSM IV-TR. The PCOs were then offered a one-hour training on how to ...

  15. [Malaise in psychiatry and its history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebili, S

    2016-04-01

    The main hypothesis of this paper is the presence of malaise in psychiatry. The malaise has two sides: on one hand, the end of psychiatry hegemony that dominated the theoretical field of psychiatry until the 1990s. The loss of influence of psychoanalysis is due to its inability to be submitted to any kind of assessment. On the other hand, the supremacy of neurosciences. The idea is not to underestimate the importance of neurosciences but rather to affirm that they occupy the whole theoretical field of psychiatry. This is an unusual situation that is specific to our time. Indeed, this monism has succeeded to an epistemological dualism that has existed throughout the history of psychiatry. In this article, we'll try to draw a history of dualism in psychiatry. Firstly, with Pinel, we find a tension between a metaphysical philosophical pole and a physiological one. Pinel's philosophy has something to do with Condillac's ideology as Pinel applies the analytical method to mental diseases. Under Cabanis's influence, the author of the famous Rapports du physique et du moral de l'homme, this ideology is under pressure with physiologism. As a materialist, he gives an essential part to the brain that distributes pieces of information throughout the body because he thinks that mind influences body. Secondly, dualism lies between the doctrine of localizations defended by Gall and the theory of degeneration elaborated by Magnan. Gall, in Anatomie et physiologie du système nerveux en général, seeks to know how bumps or hollows that are found on the skull are shaped. Gall is for the theory of delocalizations. He is the counterpart of Magnan who wrote a work about Les Dégénérés, that takes its part in the physiological trend with the famous theory of degeneration. For him, degeneration means the imperfect state of a subject whose cerebral functions are in a noticeably imperfect state. Thirdly, with Henry Ey, dualism starts to be less important. Indeed, he tends a monist

  16. Workplace Based Assessment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Devrim Basterzi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Workplace based assessment refers to the assessment of working practices based on what doctors actually do in the workplace, and is predominantly carried out in the workplace itself. Assessment drives learning and it is therefore essential that workplace-based assessment focuses on important attributes rather than what is easiest to assess. Workplacebased assessment is usually competency based. Workplace based assesments may well facilitate and enhance various aspects of educational supervisions, including its structure, frequency and duration etc. The structure and content of workplace based assesments should be monitored to ensure that its benefits are maximised by remaining tailored to individual trainees' needs. Workplace based assesment should be used for formative and summative assessments. Several formative assessment methods have been developed for use in the workplace such as mini clinical evaluation exercise (mini-cex, evidence based journal club assesment and case based discussion, multi source feedback etc. This review discusses the need of workplace based assesments in psychiatry graduate education and introduces some of the work place based assesment methods.

  17. ‎ Factors Affecting the Choice of Psychiatry as a Specialty in ‎Psychiatry Residents in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Seyed Saeed; Nayerifard, Razieh; Samimi Ardestani, Seyed Mehdi; Namjoo, Massood

    2016-07-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the current factors affecting the choice of ‎psychiatry as a specialty and to detect the main factors in their choice.‎ Method: This descriptive study included 75 first year psychiatry residents in the academic year of ‎‎2014/2015. A Likert-type anonymous questionnaire consisting of academic and ‎demographic data with 43 questions, which evaluated the reason for choosing ‎psychiatry as a specialty, was given to the residents.‎ Results: The participants had a positive opinion about 28 items of the questionnaire, meaning that ‎these items had a positive effect in choosing psychiatry as a specialty (questions with P ‎value less than 0.05 and a positive mean). More than 80% of the residents had a positive ‎opinion about six items of the questionnaire (amount of intellectual challenge, variety of ‎knowledge fields relevant to psychiatry, emphasis on the patient as a whole person, the ‎importance of treating mental illnesses in the future, work pressure and stress of the ‎field during residency and coordinating with the person's life style). The participants ‎had a negative opinion about two items of the questionnaire (questions with a P value ‎less than 0.05 and a negative mean). They included experiencing mental illness ‎personally through relatives or close friends as well as the income in psychiatry. ‎Moreover, 36% of the residents with a more definite opinion mentioned that they chose ‎psychiatry as a specialty because of the limitations in residency exam.‎ Conclusion: Assistants had a positive opinion about most of the questions and this positive attitude ‎seemed to be an important factor in their specialty choice. However, attending to the ‎preventing factors may increase the selection of psychiatry as a specialty.‎.

  18. ‎ Factors Affecting the Choice of Psychiatry as a Specialty in ‎Psychiatry Residents in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Seyed Saeed; Nayerifard‎‎, Razieh; Samimi Ardestani, Seyed Mehdi; Namjoo, Massood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the current factors affecting the choice of ‎psychiatry as a specialty and to detect the main factors in their choice.‎ Method: This descriptive study included 75 first year psychiatry residents in the academic year of ‎‎2014/2015. A Likert-type anonymous questionnaire consisting of academic and ‎demographic data with 43 questions, which evaluated the reason for choosing ‎psychiatry as a specialty, was given to the residents.‎ Results: The participants had a positive opinion about 28 items of the questionnaire, meaning that ‎these items had a positive effect in choosing psychiatry as a specialty (questions with P ‎value less than 0.05 and a positive mean). More than 80% of the residents had a positive ‎opinion about six items of the questionnaire (amount of intellectual challenge, variety of ‎knowledge fields relevant to psychiatry, emphasis on the patient as a whole person, the ‎importance of treating mental illnesses in the future, work pressure and stress of the ‎field during residency and coordinating with the person's life style). The participants ‎had a negative opinion about two items of the questionnaire (questions with a P value ‎less than 0.05 and a negative mean). They included experiencing mental illness ‎personally through relatives or close friends as well as the income in psychiatry. ‎Moreover, 36% of the residents with a more definite opinion mentioned that they chose ‎psychiatry as a specialty because of the limitations in residency exam.‎ Conclusion: Assistants had a positive opinion about most of the questions and this positive attitude ‎seemed to be an important factor in their specialty choice. However, attending to the ‎preventing factors may increase the selection of psychiatry as a specialty.‎ PMID:27928251

  19. Educational needs assessment for psychiatry residents to prevent suicide: A qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Barekatain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a commonly encountered and stressful event in professional life of any psychiatrist. Suicide risk assessment is a major gateway to patient treatment and management. It is a core competency requirement in training of psychiatry. The present study designed to assesseducational needsfor suicide prevention in residents of psychiatry in two medical schools in Iran, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS and Shahid Beheshti Medical University (SBUMS inTehran. Methods: This was a qualitative triangulation study, conducted in two steps. The first step was based on a phenomenological approach and the second was based on focus groups. The studied population was the psychiatric residents of IUMS and SBUMS. Purposive sampling was implemented until saturation. Interviews were performed. Colaizzi method was used to analyze the data. In the second step, participants attended a session, in which all final codes of the first step were discussed, and regarding the views, educational priorities and needs were listed. Results: A total of 2047 codes, extracted from 31 interviews, analyzed through Colaizzi method, were categorized in three groups: Educational, facilities and processes, human resources. Conclusions: According to defects of current educational program, we suggest regular reevaluations and revisions of clinical training programs according to current needs.

  20. [Research and Post-graduate in Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, A Palacio A

    2012-01-01

    The research component and the acquisition of skills related to the generation of knowledge in the training of medical and surgical specialists in the country is an issue that has recently begun to be discussed. For over 50 years this training has included only the area of professionalism as a copy of an educational model from the mid-twentieth century. Currently the country requires specialists with critical and analytical skills to question their actions and knowledge and generate alternative clinical care to apply to the general population in the search of bettering their own welfare. This article is a review in which the current situation of the teaching of psychiatry and the inclusion of research in the academic processes of our medical specialties in the country are analyzed. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Is psychiatry an art or a science? The views of psychiatrists and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Parker, Damon

    2005-12-01

    It is generally considered by many practitioners that psychiatry is an art, that is, one of the humanities, as well as being a science. We systematically collected the views of practitioners and trainee psychiatrists regarding the question 'Is psychiatry an art or a science?' Eleven supervisors and nine trainees were interviewed and their responses analysed, using a qualitative method, the modified framework approach. Several themes emerged from the data: that 'art' and 'science' are different; psychiatry as a discipline is difficult to define; psychiatry demands a broader range of skills than other medical specialties; the relationship of psychology to psychiatry; supervisor cynicism to the 'science' of psychiatry; and the 'art' and 'science' of the assessment process. The tension that exists within the profession's identity as a discipline has important implications for teaching, learning, and clinical and research practices.

  2. [Psychopathy in forensic psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A; Hell, D

    2001-12-01

    The review refers to the construct of psychopathy which is of increasing relevance for forensic psychiatry and psychology, especially empiric studies on legal prognosis and predictors of therapeutic efficacy. Psychopathy is related to early-onset delinquency, number and severeness of violent crimes, number of sexual victims in rapists, and unfavorable legal prognosis. Recent research has also indicated that the treatment of psychopaths is complicated by low levels of motivation and high rates of attrition. In psychiatric-diagnostic terms, psychopathy is related to substance abuse and dependency and to cluster A and B personality disorders (PD), especially to antisocial and borderline PD. In juvenile with "psychopathic tendencies", a relationship to impulsivity, emotional and behavioral difficulties, and learning behavior (card sorting test) had been shown and interpreted by reference to an anatomical level. In connection with these findings, the relevance of psychopathic disorder for testimonies on legal responsibility should also be discussed again. Further research on psychopathy, especially psychiatric morbidity and psychosocial functioning in non-forensic groups, is needed.

  3. Psychiatry and movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Vuković, Olivera; Jovanović, Aleksandar A; Jasović-Gasić, Miroslava

    2009-06-01

    As one of the most potent and substantial form of mass communication, film exercises a very significant influence upon the perceptions of the audience, especially in relation to mental illness issues, and that perception is very much blurred with populists' misinterpretation and lack of awareness regarding problems faced by persons suffering from mental disorders. Movies such as "Psycho", "One Flew Over Cuckoo's Nest", "Exorcist", despite being valuable in an artistic sense, corroborated and encouraged confusion and undermined the clarity and certainty concerning the fine line separating mental health from mental illness. Modern film makers and movie theoreticians try to overcome these limitations which are often generated by exploitation of stereotypes and myths referring to mentally ill people. This paper defines and discusses the most frequent thematic stereotypes seen in movies which are perpetuating stigmatization of mentally ill people. They are: free-spirited rebel, maniac on a killing spree, seducer, enlightened member of society, narcissistic parasite, beastly person (stereotype of animal sort). Psychiatry and cinematography are linked inseparably not only because they creatively complement each other, but also as an opportunity of mutual influences blending into didactical categories and professional driving forces, benefiting both the filmmakers' and the psychiatrists' professions.

  4. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  5. Psychiatry in Latvia: a journey through the past three centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancāns, Elmārs; Tērauds, Elmārs; Taube, Māaris

    2012-12-01

    While there is close contact established between Latvia and the Nordic psychiatric community now, there are many pages of our history we have not had opportunity to share. The aim of this article is to highlight the most important facts of more than 200 years of history of psychiatry in Latvia. The development of the psychiatric services in Latvia started with the building of an asylum-type establishment at the end of the 1700s. To address the increasing needs, psychiatric hospitals of various size and quality were gradually opened all over the country. Psychiatry as a field of science emerged in Latvia after the Declaration of Independence in 1918. Active and progressive development of services and the academic environment took place between the World Wars. During the Soviet regime, psychiatric services were rebuilt within the frameworks and guidelines of the existing system. Following the restoration of Independence in 1991, a number of rapid and positive changes took place. There was a gradual decrease in the number of hospital beds, outpatient services were developed and modern treatment methods were established. Policy documents in the field of mental health were developed and legislation improved. Active collaboration with other, particularly Scandinavian, countries was developed. Academic education continued and specialist training was provided following European standards. The role of the psychiatric professional organization was strengthened. Many positive changes in the mental healthcare in Latvia have taken place, but there are still some aspects to be addressed. The strengthening of our regional collaboration could be crucial for our future development.

  6. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

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  5. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... Psychiatric Training To become a psychiatrist, a person must complete medical school and take a written examination ... Neurology to become a "board certified" psychiatrist. They must be re-certified every 10 years. Some psychiatrists ...

  6. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or clinical practice. Psychologists treat mental disorders with psychotherapy and some specialize in psychological testing and evaluation. More Resources World Psychiatric Association ...

  7. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... usually has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or clinical practice. Psychologists treat mental disorders with psychotherapy and ...

  8. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... training then spends at least three additional years learning the diagnosis and treatment of mental health, including ... PTSD) Schizophrenia Sleep Disorders Somatic Symptom Disorder Specific Learning Disorder More Topics A – Z Ask An Expert ...

  9. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or ... Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Autism Spectrum Disorder Bipolar Disorders Depression Dissociative Disorders Eating Disorders Gambling Disorder Gender Dysphoria ...

  10. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or ... Alzheimer's Anxiety Disorders Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Autism Spectrum Disorder Bipolar Disorders Depression Dissociative Disorders Eating ...

  11. What Is Psychiatry?

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    Full Text Available ... has an advanced degree, most commonly in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or ... Topics A – Z Ask An Expert Coping After Disaster, Trauma Share Your Story Suicide Prevention Warning Signs ...

  12. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blogs Advocacy & APAPAC APA Sites APA Publishing APA Learning Center APA Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News ... training then spends at least three additional years learning the diagnosis and treatment of mental health, including ...

  13. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... additional years learning the diagnosis and treatment of mental health, including various forms of psychotherapy and the use of psychiatric medications and other treatments. Training takes place in in- ...

  14. Integrating Neuroscience Knowledge and Neuropsychiatric Skills Into Psychiatry: The Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildkrout, Barbara; Benjamin, Sheldon; Lauterbach, Margo D

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the integration of neuroscience knowledge and neuropsychiatric skills into general psychiatric practice would facilitate expanded approaches to diagnosis, formulation, and treatment while positioning practitioners to utilize findings from emerging brain research. There is growing consensus that the field of psychiatry would benefit from more familiarity with neuroscience and neuropsychiatry. Yet there remain numerous factors impeding the integration of these domains of knowledge into general psychiatry.The authors make recommendations to move the field forward, focusing on the need for advocacy by psychiatry and medical organizations and changes in psychiatry education at all levels. For individual psychiatrists, the recommendations target obstacles to attaining expanded neuroscience and neuropsychiatry education and barriers stemming from widely held, often unspoken beliefs. For the system of psychiatric care, recommendations address the conceptual and physical separation of psychiatry from medicine, overemphasis on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and on psychopharmacology, and different systems in medicine and psychiatry for handling reimbursement and patient records. For psychiatry residency training, recommendations focus on expanding neuroscience/neuropsychiatry faculty and integrating neuroscience education throughout the curriculum.Psychiatry traditionally concerns itself with helping individuals construct meaningful life narratives. Brain function is one of the fundamental determinants of individuality. It is now possible for psychiatrists to integrate knowledge of neuroscience into understanding the whole person by asking, What person has this brain? How does this brain make this person unique? How does this brain make this disorder unique? What treatment will help this disorder in this person with this brain?

  15. Curriculum in Psychiatry and Neurology for Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopheide, Julie A; Bostwick, Jolene R; Goldstone, Lisa W; Thomas, Kelan; Nemire, Ruth; Gable, Kelly N; Cates, Marshall; Caballero, Joshua; Smith, Tawny; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy curricula in psychiatry and neurology and to report on neuropsychiatric pharmacy specialists' views on optimal curriculum. Methods. Design and administer one electronic survey to accredited pharmacy programs asking them to report information on curricula in psychiatry and neurology for the 2014-2015 academic year. Design and administer a separate electronic survey to board certified pharmacists with an academic affiliation who are members of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) asking about their teaching activities and their opinion on optimal curricula. Results. Fifty-six percent of pharmacy programs and 65% of CPNP members responded to the surveys. The program survey revealed greater than 80% of topics were taught by full-time faculty. Didactic lecturing, team-based learning, and case studies were the most common teaching methods. Programs dedicated the most didactics (3 to 5+ hours) to epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and pain. Autism, traumatic brain injury, personality, and eating disorders were either not taught or given ≤ 1 hour of didactics in most programs. Inpatient psychiatry had the most APPE placements with a mean of 19.6, range 0-83. APPE electives in psychiatry outnumbered those in neurology 5 to 1. CPNP member survey results showed 2 out of 3 members agreed that curriculum could be improved with additional APPEs in psychiatry and neurology. Conclusion. Didactic hour distribution in psychiatry and neurology could be improved to better align with board certification in psychiatric pharmacy (BCPP) recommendations and disorder prevalence and complexity. Specialists recommend an experiential component in neurology and psychiatry to combat stigma and improve pharmacist knowledge and skills.

  16. Commentary: Coming Full Circle--Psychoanalysis, Psychodynamics, and Forensic Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    Drs. Simopoulos and Cohen argue that knowledge of one's unconscious processes improves the forensic psychiatrist's capacity to manage complex forensic situations and to generate forensic formulations and opinions that are demonstrably more valid and reliable, much like competence in cultural assessment and formulation. In practice, the challenges posed by the application of these principles in forensic settings are far outweighed by the potential benefit. Forensic practice is informed by many specialties. Forensic psychiatrists do not have to complete full training in these disciplines to make use of the knowledge and perspectives they offer. The same may not be true of psychodynamic assessment and formulation. Although much can be learned from supervision, case seminars, conferences, and reading, such knowledge does little to foster awareness of one's unconscious processes that by definition operate outside awareness and thus contribute to the vitiating effect of bias. To date, the only method whereby psychiatrists can effectively come to appreciate their own unconscious processes in action is arguably through their own analysis conducted in the course of training in analysis or psychodynamic psychotherapy. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  17. Cultural psychiatry: international perspectives. Epilogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbrega, H

    2001-09-01

    The psychiatry of the 21st century will have to be different from the psychiatry of the 20th century. The latter began its journey in a socially, compartmentalized world in which sharp categories and boundaries for the definition of mental illness were assumed to be relevant. International psychiatry completed its hegemonic hold over the territory of mental health and illness with a commanding home-stretch run of success borne in the confidence and optimism of its neurobiologic and culture free program and agenda. The world in which psychiatry now exists, however is changing rapidly and will continue to change and so of necessity will the practice of psychiatry need to change. This issue offers a guidelines and a vision of the direction that should be followed. Migration and transnational communication and awareness of cultural differences are changing the character of communities around the world. These changes considered in the context of world wide political economic factors are bringing into close physical and symbolic juxtaposition persons from distinct nations and ethnic groups. Clashes in world views, attitudes, spiritual orientation, and general philosophic and moral outlook are becoming ever-present realities of urban centers around the world. In traditional contexts and among persons who do not physically migrate, the power of communications media manages to psychologically migrate them; that is, to challenge their local, native cultural traditions about mental health with the scientific perspectives about mental health and illness. Advances in the social and cultural sciences have underscored ways in which assumptions of reductionism and universalism need to be chastened with an appreciation of human differences and humane considerations as these relate to mental health problems. The science of psychiatry of the 21st century will have to accomodate to this new creolized world of ethnic pluralism, cultural differences, and clashing perspectives between

  18. Functional MRT in psychiatry and neurology; Funktionelle MRT in Psychiatrie und Neurologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, F. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie; Fink, G.R. (eds.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Almost no other method has reach such an interest as the functional imaging in psychiatric and neurological science; it is fascinating to observe the brain at work. The fundamentals of functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) and the interpretation of MRT images are explained; the state-of-the-art is discussed. The book is focussed on the functional imaging within psychiatry and neurology. The book contains 45 contributions within the following chapters: fundamentals, higher brain accomplishments, disease pattern, examinatory examples, perspectives.

  19. The naturalization of psychiatry in Indonesia and its interaction with indigenous therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Porath

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatry developed as a modern branch of medical knowledge in Western societies and arrived in Southeast Asia in the late nineteenth century. Dutch colonialism brought psychiatry and psychology to the Dutch East Indies as part of the development of European therapeutics in that part of the empire. During the twentieth century, psychiatry was naturalized in Indonesia (and other Southeast Asian countries and integrated into the national health care system. In the post-independence period, most Indonesian psychiatrists – there are currently about 450 – received training at Western universities and brought the knowledge of this subject back with them to their home country.

  20. Improving clinician competency in communication about schizophrenia: a pilot educational program for psychiatry trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Carmel; Kelly, Brian; Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Vamos, Marina; Outram, Sue; Levin, Tomer

    2015-04-01

    Important gaps are observed in clinicians' communication with patients and families about psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Communication skills can be taught, and models for education in these skills have been developed in other fields of medicine, such as oncology, providing a framework for training communication skills relevant to psychiatric practice. This study evaluated a pilot communication skills education program for psychiatry trainees, focusing on discussing schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Communication skills training modules were developed based on an existing theoretical framework (ComSkil), adapted for discussing a schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Pre-post training rating of self-reported confidence in a range of communication tasks was obtained, along with trainee views on the training methods. Thirty-eight participants completed the training. Significant improvements in confidence were reported post training for discussing schizophrenia prognosis, including an increased capacity to critically evaluate their own communication skills. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. This preliminary study provides support for the translation of a well-established educational model to psychiatric training addressing core clinical communication tasks and provides the foundation for the development of a more comprehensive evaluation and an extended curriculum regarding other aspects of care for patients with schizophrenia: ongoing management and recovery, dealing with conflict, and conducting a family interview.

  1. The Role of Regional Conferences in Research Resident Career Development: The California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besterman, Aaron D; Williams, Jody K; Reus, Victor I; Pato, Michele T; Voglmaier, Susan M; Mathews, Carol A

    2017-04-01

    For psychiatry research resident career development, there is a recognized need for improved cross-institutional mentoring and networking opportunities. One method to address this need is via regional conferences, open to current and recently graduated research residents and their mentors. With this in mind, we developed the biennial California Psychiatry Research Resident Retreat (CPRRR) and collected feedback from participants to 1) Assess resident satisfaction, 2) Determine the utility of the retreat as a networking and mentorship tool, and 3) Identify areas for improvement. We gathered survey data from resident attendees at the two first CPRRRs. We analyzed the data to look for trends in satisfaction as well as areas that need improvement. Thirty-two residents from five California training programs attended the CPRRR in 2013 while 33 attended from six programs in 2015. The residents were from all years of training, but concentrated in their second and third years. Approximately 41% and 49% of the attendees were female and 53% and 39% had an MD/PhD in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Twenty-four and 32 residents provided anonymous feedback in 2013 and 2015, respectively. Mean feedback scores were very high (> 4/5) for overall satisfaction, peer- and faculty-networking, the keynote speaker and the flash talks for both years. Mean feedback scores for the ethics debates and mentoring sessions were somewhat lower (≤ 4/5), however, both showed significant improvement from 2013 to 2015. The CPRRRs appear to be an effective mechanism for providing psychiatry research residents with a meaningful cross-institutional opportunity for networking and mentorship. Feedback-driven changes to the CPRRRs improved participant satisfaction for several components of the conference. Future efforts will be aimed at broadening mentorship and networking opportunities, optimizing teaching approaches for research ethics, and considering different feedback-gathering approaches to allow for

  2. Optimization methods for the Train Unit Shunting Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Jørgen Thorlund; Lusby, Richard Martin; Wagenaar, Joris Camiel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the Train Unit Shunting Problem, an important planning problem for passenger railway operators. This problem entails assigning train units from shunting yards to scheduled train services in such a way that the resulting operations are without conflicts. The problem arises at every...... shunting yard in the railway network and involves matching train units to arriving and departing train services as well as assigning the selected matchings to appropriate shunting yard tracks. We present an extensive comparison benchmark of multiple solution approaches for this problem, some of which...

  3. A reappraisal of American psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R M

    1979-02-03

    Remarkable changes have taken place in American psychiatry over the past twenty years. The era of psychoanalytical supremacy has passed, and realism is replacing the exaggerated claims which were made of psychiatry's ability to produce personal, social, and even political change. The importance of phenomenology and accurate diagnosis is increasingly recognised, and American researchers have made many impressive contributions to psychiatric genetics and to psychopharmacology. Despite these advances, office practice generally continues to function on an outmoded model and psychiatric resources remain inequitably distributed.

  4. The question of certainty and the issue of epistemology in psychiatry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this essay is to make a case for the adoption of reasonable ideas and conclusions arrived at through reasoning; in addition to those arrived at through the popular empirical methods in psychiatry. There are a lot in psychology and psychiatry that cannot be objectively demonstrated or explained on the basis of ...

  5. Assessment of Psychopharmacology on the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Dorthea; Winstead, Daniel K.; Sheiber, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the assessment of psychopharmacology on the certification and recertification exams in general psychiatry and in the subspecialties administered by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). METHODS: The ABPN's core competencies for psychiatrists were reviewed. The number of items addressing psychopharmacology or…

  6. M. D. Faculty Salaries in Psychiatry and All Clinical Science Departments, 1980-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Mark G.; Dial, Thomas H.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare trends in the salaries of physician faculty in academic departments of psychiatry with those of physician faculty in all academic clinical science departments from 1980-2006. Methods: The authors compared trend lines for psychiatry and all faculty by academic rank, including those for department chairs, by graphing…

  7. Subspecialty Exposure in a Psychiatry Clerkship Does Not Improve Student Performance in the Subject Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamero, Carolina; Ramchandani, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the NBME subject examination scores and subspecialty profiles of 3rd-year medical students who were assigned to psychiatry subspecialties during their clerkship with those who were not. Method: The authors collated and analyzed the shelf examination scores, the clinical grades, and the child psychiatry and emergency…

  8. Modified Attitudes to Psychiatry Scale Created Using Principal-Components Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Rohit; Laugharne, Richard; Pritchard, Colin; Joshi, Pallavi; Dhar, Romika

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Attitudes to Psychiatry Scale (APS) is a tool used to assess medical students' attitudes toward psychiatry. This study sought to examine the internal validity of the APS in order to identify dimensions within the questionnaire. Method: Using data collected from 549 medical students from India and Ghana, the authors analyzed 28…

  9. Fostering Psychiatry in Ghana: The Impact of a Short Review Course through an International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugharne, Jonathan; Appiah-Poku, John; Laugharne, Richard; Stanley, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate a short review course in psychiatry conducted at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology medical school and any change in student interest in a career in psychiatry. Method: Students were asked to complete a general psychiatric knowledge questionnaire before and immediately…

  10. What Medical Students Say about Psychiatry: Results of a Reflection Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Adam M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The author describes the results of a reflection exercise for psychiatry clerkship students. Method: The author performed a qualitative analysis on 100 "reflection" papers written by medical students in their psychiatry clerkship and identified the most prominent thematic content. Results: The most common thematic content involved…

  11. Effect of Curriculum Change on Exam Performance in a 4-Week Psychiatry Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermier, Julie; Way, David; Kasick, David; Kuperschmidt, Rada

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated whether curriculum change could produce improved performance, despite a reduction in clerkship length from 8 to 4 weeks. Methods: The exam performance of medical students completing a 4-week clerkship in psychiatry was compared to national data from the National Board of Medical Examiners' Psychiatry Subject…

  12. Promoting Psychiatry as a Career Option for Ghanaian Medical Students through a Public-Speaking Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku; McLoughlin, Declan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Authors assessed the impact of a public-speaking competition on the level of interest in psychiatry of Ghanaian medical students. Method: An inter-medical school public-speaking competition was organized to promote psychiatry as a fulfilling career option for Ghanaian medical students. Feedback questionnaires were completed by the…

  13. Cross-Sector Problems of Collaboration in Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Petersen, Anne; Lyager Kaae, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    existed in Danish psychiatry since the 1980s when mental health service provisions were split into two psychiatric systems. Material and methods: We report from two qualitative studies: STUDY#1 (n = 24) consisted of twenty-four individ­ual, qualitative interviews with the staff and management...... during service users’ admission to and discharge from hospital and during hospitalization and measures to increase cross-sector know­ledge about each system’s practices and methods. Conclusion: Improvement of cross-sector collaboration in psychiatry should take the form of a multi-faceted approach...

  14. Towards real persons: Clinical judgement and philosophy of psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Thornton

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the motivations for the new philosophy of psychiatry is the need to understand changing ideas in mental health care. In the last century, changes in both physical and biological theory prompted work in philosophy of physics and philosophy of biology to understand those fields better, attempts which were continuous with empirical work. At the start of this century, changes in psychiatry promise increased interest in the philosophy of psychiatry as an attempt, alongside empirical research, to understand the conceptual underpinnings of mental heath care. While philosophical methods are distinct from empirical methods, the work is truly interdisciplinary, growing organically from the complexities of demand on psychiatric care and, although philosophical, carried out by philosophers and psychiatrists alike. One focus is the nature of clinical judgement in psychiatric diagnosis. In this short note I will briefly sketch some issues that arise from a current idea: that psychiatric diagnosis should include idiographic elements.

  15. Psychiatry in Australia | Kaplan | South African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  16. Artiss Symposium 2013: Psychiatry and Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Uniformed Services Uni- versity of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland...Medicine, Hypnosis , Somatoform Spectrum Disorders, Trauma, Pain, and Consultation Liaison Psychiatry. Emerson Wickwire, PhD Dr. Emerson Wickwire is

  17. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a patient's physical and mental state. Their education and clinical training equip them to understand the complex relationship between emotional and other medical illnesses and the relationships with genetics and family history, to evaluate medical and psychological data, to make ...

  18. What Is Psychiatry?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Values, and Goals Meet Our Organization Read APA Organization Documents and Policies Work at APA Contact Us Newsroom News Releases Message ... the U.S. maintain private practices and many psychiatrists work in multiple ... in clinical psychology, and often has extensive training in research or ...

  19. Burrowing as a novel voluntary strength training method for mice : A comparison of various voluntary strength or resistance exercise methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemers, P; Mazzola, P N; De Deyn, P P; Bossers, W J; van Heuvelen, M J G; van der Zee, E A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary strength training methods for rodents are necessary to investigate the effects of strength training on cognition and the brain. However, few voluntary methods are available. NEW METHOD: The current study tested functional and muscular effects of two novel voluntary strength

  20. Comparing and Contrasting the Use of Problem-Based Learning in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Dale; Guerrero, Anthony; Bernstein, Bettina; Hunt, Jeffrey; Ong, Say How; Santos, Cynthia; Sexson, Sandra; Skokauskas, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is one of the core components of medical education. To facilitate the spread and use of PBL in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) fellowship training, a special interest study group (SISG) was formed at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP). Different approaches to the implementation of PBL between programs represented at the SISG are compared in this report. The authors distributed a survey to SISG participants after the 2015 annual AACAP meeting, which gathered information about the different approaches programs use to implement PBL in graduate medical education. Six CAP training programs responded to the survey, providing descriptions of the structure and content of PBL seminars. Programs chose to include a wide variety of topics in PBL courses and approach course organization in a number of ways. To the degree that PBL draws from identified reference texts, programs were similar in selecting definitive textbooks, practice parameters, and seminal articles. This small pilot study is intended to provide a snapshot of the state of PBL implementation in CAP fellowship programs. It reflects that programs can incorporate PBL in a variety of ways, tailored to the needs of the institution. Future directions of research include assessment of resident satisfaction with PBL, impact on resident education, and identifying successful methods of implementation of PBL.

  1. AED training and its impact on skill acquisition, retention and performance--a systematic review of alternative training methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce; Okamoto, Deems; Soar, Jasmeet; Perkins, Gavin D

    2011-06-01

    The most popular method of training in basic life support and AED use remains instructor-led training courses. This systematic review examines the evidence for different training methods of basic life support providers (laypersons and healthcare providers) using standard instructor-led courses as comparators, to assess whether alternative method of training can lead to effective skill acquisition, skill retention and actual performance whilst using the AED. OVID Medline (including Medline 1950-November 2010; EMBASE 1988-November 2010) was searched using "training" OR "teaching" OR "education" as text words. Search was then combined by using AND "AED" OR "automatic external defibrillator" as MESH words. Additionally, the American Heart Association Endnote library was searched with the terms "AED" and "automatic external defibrillator". Resuscitation journal was hand searched for relevant articles. 285 articles were identified. After duplicates were removed, 172 references were reviewed for relevance. From this 22 papers were scrutinized and 18 were included. All were manikin studies. Four LOE 1 studies, seven LOE 2 studies and three LOE 4 studies were supportive of alternative AED training methods. One LOE 2 study was neutral. Three LOE 1 studies provided opposing evidence. There is good evidence to support alternative methods of AED training including lay instructors, self directed learning and brief training. There is also evidence to support that no training is needed but even brief training can improve speed of shock delivery and electrode pad placement. Features of AED can have an impact on its use and further research should be directed to making devices user-friendly and robust to untrained layperson. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. South African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal is the leading psychiatric journal of Africa. It provides open-access scholarly reading for psychiatrists, clinical psychologists and all with an interest in mental health. It carries empirical and conceptual research articles, reviews, editorials, and scientific letters related to psychiatry. It publishes work from various ...

  3. Which future for social psychiatry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uchtenhagen, Ambros A.

    2008-01-01

    Social psychiatry started over a century ago under the auspices of mental and racial hygiene, but after World War II it embraced concepts of community-based care and de-institutionalization. The major psychiatric reforms in the second half of the last century were mainly based on such concepts,

  4. Computerizing a Department of Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul; Eng, Lenny

    1987-01-01

    Describes the process by which a department of psychiatry computerized its clinical services under a single communication network. Presents the program in detail, demonstrating the recording of various clinical, administrative and demographic data. Emphasizes the value of such information for returning patients, immediate updating of information,…

  5. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  6. Improving Medication Safety in Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Lisby, Marianne; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this controlled, before-and-after study in the Department of Psychiatry in a university hospital in Denmark, was to examine the potential effects and characteristics of nurses reviewing psychiatric patients' medication records to identify potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs...

  7. Mechanisms and Reduction in Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise Marie

    2017-01-01

    The view that psychiatry should be elucidating the mechanisms behind mental phenomena is gaining momentum. This view, coupled with an intuition that such mechanisms must, by nature, be biological, has inspired the field to look to cognitive neuroscience for classification of mental illnesses. One...

  8. The Task before Psychiatry Today Redux: STSPIR*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai R

    2014-01-01

    stories.SCIENCE: Shrugging ambivalence and disagreement and searching for commonalities in psychiatric phenomena;An idiographic orientation which stresses individuality cannot, and should not, preclude the nomothetic or norm laying thrust that is the crux of scientific progress.The major contribution of science has been to recognize such commonalities so they can be researched, categorized and used for human welfare.It is a mistake to stress individuality so much that commonalities are obliterated.While the purpose and approach of psychiatry, as of all medicine, has to be humane and caring, therapeutic advancements and aetiologic understandings are going to result only from a scientific methodology.Just caring is not enough, if you have not mastered the methods of care, which only science can supply.PSYCHOTHERAPY: Psychiatrists continuing to do psychotherapy:Psychotherapy must be clearly defined, its parameters and methods firmly delineated, its proof of effectiveness convincingly demonstrated by evidence based and controlled trials;Psychotherapy research suffers from neglect by the mainstream at present, because of the ascendancy of biological psychiatry;It suffers resource constraints as major sponsors like pharma not interested;Needs funding from some sincere researcher organisations and altruistic sponsors, as also professional societies and governments;Psychotherapy research will have to provide enough irrefutable evidence that it works, with replicable studies that prove it across geographical areas;It will not do for psychiatrists to hand over psychotherapy to clinical psychologists and others.INTEGRATE APPROACHES: Welcoming biological breakthroughs, while supplying psychosocial insights:Experimental breakthroughs, both in aetiology and therapeutics, will come mainly from biology, but the insights and leads can hopefully come from many other fields, especially the psychosocial and philosophical;The biological and the psychological are not exclusive but

  9. Meaningful assessment method for laparoscopic suturing training in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botden, Sanne M B I; de Hingh, I H J T; Jakimowicz, J J

    2009-10-01

    To be an effective training tool, a laparoscopic simulator has to provide metrics that are meaningful and informative to the trainee. Time, path length and smoothness are often used parameters, but are not very informative on the quality of the performance. This study aims to validate a newly developed assessment method for laparoscopic suturing on the ProMIS augmented reality simulator, and compares it with scores of objective observers. Twenty-four participants practised their suturing skills on the augmented reality suturing module: experienced participants (n = 10), >50 clinical laparoscopic suturing experience; and novice participants (n = 14), without laparoscopic experience. The performances were recorded and assessed by two unrelated observers and compared with the assessment scores. The assessment score was a calculation of time spent in the correct area and quality (strength) of the knot. To test the accuracy of the individual assessment parameters, we compared these with each other. The experienced participants had significantly higher performance scores than the novice participants in the beginner-level mode (mean 95.73 vs. 60.89, standard deviation 2.63 vs. 17.09, p < 0.001, independent t-test). The performance scores of the assessment method (n = 43) correlated significantly with the scorings of the objective observers (Spearman's rho 0.672; p < 0.001). The parameter time spent in correct area had a calculated significant correlation with the strength of the knot (n = 229, Spearman's rho 0.257, p < 0.001), but this was clinically irrelevant. This assessment method is a valid tool for objectively assessing laparoscopic suturing skills. Although assessment parameters can correlate, to provide informative feedback it is important to combine meaningful measurements in the assessment of suturing skills.

  10. Attitudes of U.S. Psychiatry Residents and Fellows towards Mental Illness and its Causes: a Comparison Study with Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Catherine; Stefanovics, Elina; Rosenheck, Robert

    2018-01-13

    Stigma towards people with mental illness remains a burden for patients and healthcare providers. This study at a large US university examined the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows towards mental illness and its causes, and whether their attitudes differed from the medical student attitudes previously studied utilizing the same survey method. An electronic questionnaire examining attitudes toward people with mental illness, causes of mental Illness, and treatment efficacy was used to survey the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows. Exploratory factor analysis derived from the authors' medical student survey was used to examine attitudinal factors. The study response rate was 54.2% (n = 94). Factor analysis employed three factors previously identified reflecting social acceptance of mental illness, belief in supernatural causes, and belief in biopsychosocial causes. Residents and fellows reporting more personal experiences with mental illness, both as a group and when compared with medical students, were significantly more willing to socialize with the mentally ill. Respondents who had more professional (work) experience other than medical school or post-graduate training were less likely to believe in supernatural causes of mental illness. Female residents and fellows were more willing to socialize with the mentally ill, and were less likely to believe in supernatural causes for mental illness than their male counterparts. In our study, increased social acceptance of the mentally ill relates to having personal experiences, advanced training in psychiatry, and female gender. Both professional experiences outside of training and female gender reduced the belief in supernatural causes.

  11. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry among Chinese medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joshua A; Liu, Ni; Afzal, Khalid; Cooper, Brian; Sherer, Renslow; Morgan, Ivy; Dong, Hongmei

    2014-02-01

    Increasingly positive attitudes have been reported among young people in China towards mental illness, but little is known about Chinese medical students' attitudes towards psychiatry, psychiatric services and patients. We administered a bilingual survey to Wuhan University medical students in the final years of their clinical training. Primary outcomes were composite scores on a 21-item attitudes toward psychiatry (ATP) survey and the number of correct responses to diagnostic questions following a series of three clinical case vignettes. Mean composite score on the ATP items was 78/105 (SD = 9.6), representing overall positive attitudes among the students. Female gender and having learned about more psychiatric disorders were positively associated with a higher mean ATP score and remained so after adjustment for relevant covariates. Chinese medical students reported positive attitudes towards psychiatry, openness with regard to psychiatric services, and respect for psychiatric patients. Learning about a broad spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses and greater clinical contact with patients may improve overall attitudes of Chinese medical students towards psychiatry and their ability to make accurate diagnoses.

  12. Crossroads: Identity struggles in Latin America and Latin American psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D; Pérez-Rincón, Héctor

    2010-01-01

    Identity can be defined from different perspectives such as those from philosophy, social sciences and phenomenology. The latter entails sameness, uniqueness, distinctiveness, continuity, diversity, universality and equality connotations to define characteristics of the existence and action of individuals, institutions, entities, organizations and collectivities. In order to elaborate on the identity of Latin American Psychiatry, this chapter deals first with the identity of the Latin American continent, the result of a 'collision of cultures' with mestizaje as its most prominent collective contribution. In turn, the Latin American population (and its 'Hispanic' equivalent in other countries and regions of the world) has been the subject of a pluralistic search, and played a combined role of hope and conflict, advances and setbacks in a fascinating historical process. In such context, Latin American psychiatry offers a mixed identity, resulting from a succession of mythic-religious, moral, phenomenologico-existential, biological and social/community-based routes. Each of them are assessed, and the contributions of two eponymous figures, Honorio Delgado and Gregorio Bermann, are duly delineated. Current realities in Latin American psychiatry and mental health in socio-political, conceptual, professional, ideological, academic and heuristic areas, are examined. The chapter ends with considerations of the future of psychiatry in the continent, the postulation of a 'new synthesis' embracing the essence of contemporary neurobiological knowledge and a new, revitalized humanism in the context of a healthy eclecticism, progressive educational training and didactic programmes, and concrete contributions embodying the promise of well justified expectations.

  13. Academic Productivity in Psychiatry: Benchmarks for the H-Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P; Swansburg, Rose; Rittenbach, Katherine

    2017-08-01

    Bibliometrics play an increasingly critical role in the assessment of faculty for promotion and merit increases. Bibliometrics is the statistical analysis of publications, aimed at evaluating their impact. The objective of this study is to describe h-index and citation benchmarks in academic psychiatry. Faculty lists were acquired from online resources for all academic departments of psychiatry listed as having residency training programs in Canada (as of June 2016). Potential authors were then searched on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) for their corresponding h-index and total number of citations. The sample included 1683 faculty members in academic psychiatry departments. Restricted to those with a rank of assistant, associate, or full professor resulted in 1601 faculty members (assistant = 911, associate = 387, full = 303). h-index and total citations differed significantly by academic rank. Both were highest in the full professor rank, followed by associate, then assistant. The range in each, however, was large. This study provides the initial benchmarks for the h-index and total citations in academic psychiatry. Regardless of any controversies or criticisms of bibliometrics, they are increasingly influencing promotion, merit increases, and grant support. As such, benchmarking by specialties is needed in order to provide needed context.

  14. The new field of 'precision psychiatry'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Brisa S; Williams, Leanne M; Steiner, Johann; Leboyer, Marion; Carvalho, André F; Berk, Michael

    2017-04-13

    Precision medicine is a new and important topic in psychiatry. Psychiatry has not yet benefited from the advanced diagnostic and therapeutic technologies that form an integral part of other clinical specialties. Thus, the vision of precision medicine as applied to psychiatry - 'precision psychiatry' - promises to be even more transformative than in other fields of medicine, which have already lessened the translational gap. Herein, we describe 'precision psychiatry' and how its several implications promise to transform the psychiatric landscape. We pay particular attention to biomarkers and to how the development of new technologies now makes their discovery possible and timely. The adoption of the term 'precision psychiatry' will help propel the field, since the current term 'precision medicine', as applied to psychiatry, is impractical and does not appropriately distinguish the field. Naming the field 'precision psychiatry' will help establish a stronger, unique identity to what promises to be the most important area in psychiatry in years to come. In summary, we provide a wide-angle lens overview of what this new field is, suggest how to propel the field forward, and provide a vision of the near future, with 'precision psychiatry' representing a paradigm shift that promises to change the landscape of how psychiatry is currently conceived.

  15. Psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry residents: a pan-Canadian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Granich, Annette; Chan, Peter; Abbey, Susan; Galbaud du Fort, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Psychosomatic medicine (PM) is recognized as a psychiatric subspecialty in the US, but continues to be considered a focused area of general psychiatric practice in Canada. Due to the unclear status of PM in Canada, a national survey was designed to assess the perception of and training experiences in PM among psychiatry residents. Residents enrolled at one of 13 psychiatry programs in Canada participated in the study. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the effect of PM training experiences and career interest in PM on the perception of PM, controlling for number of months already completed in PM, training level, and residency program. The response rate was 35%, n = 199. 68% of respondents identified PM as a definite subspecialty, with the majority of respondents believing that PM was as important a subspecialty as child (53%), forensic (67%) and geriatric psychiatry (75%). Eighty percent of the respondents believed a PM specialist should complete more than 3 months of additional training to be competent/qualified. There was significant heterogeneity in training experiences across programs, with a differential effect of certain training components-seminar, journal club-associated with a more favorable perception of PM as a subspecialty. The above results challenge the notion that PM represents only a focused area of general psychiatric practice in Canada. PM appears to require additional training beyond residency for trainees to feel competent and qualified. Results from this survey suggest Canada should follow the US lead on recognizing PM as a subspecialty. Copyright © 2011 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing HIV Testing in Inpatient Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Martha; Mangurian, Christina; Carraher, Noah; Momenzadeh, Amanda; Leary, Mark; Lee, Emily K; Dilley, James W

    2017-10-23

    People with serious mental illness (SMI) are at elevated risk of HIV infection, but do not receive HIV tests regularly. Inpatient psychiatric admissions provide opportunities for HIV testing. This study retrospectively examined the impact of three sequential interventions designed to increase HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service: (1) advocacy by an administrative champion, (2) an on-site HIV counselor, and (3) a clinician championing HIV testing. Demographic and HIV testing data were extracted from hospital data systems for 11,360 admissions of HIV-negative patients to an inpatient psychiatry service between 2006 and 2012. Relationships among interventions, length of stay, patient demographics, and receipt of an HIV test were examined using general estimating equation methods. In the year prior to the intervention, 7.2% of psychiatric inpatients received HIV tests. After 1 year of administrative advocacy, 11.2% received tests. Following the HIV counseling intervention, 25.1% of patients were tested. After the counseling intervention ended, continued administrative and clinical advocacy was associated with further increases in testing. In the final year studied, 30.3% of patients received HIV tests. Patients with shorter inpatient stays and those of Black or Asian race/ethnicity were less likely to be tested. Further, 1.6% of HIV tests were positive. Three interventions of varying intensity were associated with a 5-fold increase in HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service. Nonetheless, 70% of inpatients were not tested. Continued efforts are needed to increase HIV testing in inpatient psychiatric settings. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychiatry in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikara, F; Manley, M R

    1991-09-01

    Like many developing countries, Zimbabwe has a shortage of trained mental health professionals. The country is coping by developing an expanded role for nurses and other nonphysician mental health workers and by emphasizing use of medication in treating mental illnesses. The authors review traditional Zimbabwean beliefs about mental illness and healing and describe culturally specific patterns of illness presentation. To reverse the historic pattern in which psychiatric care was centralized in cities, Zimbabwe is establishing a countrywide system of primary health clinics, part of whose role is to screen and treat common mental disorders, educate communities about mental illness, and promote prevention of illness.

  18. Hypoxic training methods for improving endurance exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Sinex

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic performance is highly related to a number of factors that can be altered through altitude and hypoxic training including increases in erythrocyte volume, maximal aerobic exercise capacity, capillary density, and economy. Physiological adaptations in response to acute and chronic exposure to hypoxic environments are well documented and range from short-term detrimental effects to longer-term adaptations that can improve performance at altitude and in sea-level competitions. Many altitude and hypoxic training protocols have been developed, employing various combinations of living and training at sea-level, low, moderate, and high altitudes and utilizing natural and artificial altitudes, with varying degrees of effectiveness. Several factors have been identified that are associated with individual responses to hypoxic training, and techniques for identifying those athletes most likely to benefit from hypoxic training continue to be investigated. Exposure to sufficiently high altitude (2000–3000 m for more than 12 h/day, while training at lower altitudes, for a minimum of 21 days is recommended. Timing of altitude training related to competition remains under debate, although general recommendations can be considered.

  19. A Comparison of Isotonic, Isokinetic, and Plyometric Training Methods for Vertical Jump Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christine D.

    This annotated bibliography documents three training methods used to develop vertical jumping ability and power: isotonic, isokinetics, and plyometric training. Research findings on all three forms of training are summarized and compared. A synthesis of conclusions drawn from the annotated writings is presented. The report includes a glossary of…

  20. Training to improve reading speed in patients with juvenile macular dystrophy: a randomized study comparing two training methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung X; Stockum, Andrea; Hahn, Gesa A; Trauzettel-Klosinski, Susanne

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we examined the clinical application of two training methods for optimizing reading ability in patients with juvenile macular dystrophy with established eccentric preferred retinal locus and optimal use of low-vision aids. This randomized study included 36 patients with juvenile macular dystrophy (35 with Stargardt's disease and one with Best's disease). All patients have been using individually optimized low-vision aids. After careful ophthalmological examination, patients were randomized into two groups: Group 1: Training to read during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) with elimination of eye movements as far as possible (n = 20); Group 2: Training to optimize reading eye movements (SM, sensomotoric training) (n = 16). Only patients with magnification requirement up to sixfold were included in the study. Training was performed for 4 weeks with an intensity of ½ hr per day and 5 days a week. Reading speed during page reading was measured before and after training. Eye movements during silent reading were recorded before and after training using a video eye tracker in 11 patients (five patients of SM and six of RSVP training group) and using an infrared reflection system in five patients (three patients from the SM and two patients of RSVP training group). Age, visual acuity and magnification requirement did not differ significantly between the two groups. The median reading speed was 83 words per minute (wpm) (interquartile range 74-105 wpm) in the RSVP training group and 102 (interquartile range 63-126 wpm) in the SM group before training and increased significantly to 104 (interquartile range 81-124 wpm) and 122, respectively (interquartile range 102-137 wpm; p = 0.01 and 0.006) after training, i.e. patients with RSVP training increased their reading speed by a median of 21 wpm, while it was 20 wpm in the SM group. There were individual patients, who benefited strongly from the training. Eye movement recordings before and after training

  1. Trip optimization system and method for a train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajith Kuttannair; Shaffer, Glenn Robert; Houpt, Paul Kenneth; Movsichoff, Bernardo Adrian; Chan, David So Keung

    2017-08-15

    A system for operating a train having one or more locomotive consists with each locomotive consist comprising one or more locomotives, the system including a locator element to determine a location of the train, a track characterization element to provide information about a track, a sensor for measuring an operating condition of the locomotive consist, a processor operable to receive information from the locator element, the track characterizing element, and the sensor, and an algorithm embodied within the processor having access to the information to create a trip plan that optimizes performance of the locomotive consist in accordance with one or more operational criteria for the train.

  2. 'Simulation-based learning in psychiatry for undergraduates at the University of Zimbabwe medical school'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Angharad; Muchirahondo, Florence; Mangezi, Walter; Iversen, Amy; Cowan, Frances; Dube, Michelle; Peterkin, Hugh Grant-; Araya, Ricardo; Abas, Melanie

    2015-02-21

    The use of simulated patients to teach in psychiatry has not been reported from low-income countries. This is the first study using simulation teaching in psychiatry in Africa. The aim of this study was to introduce a novel method of psychiatric teaching to medical students at the University of Zimbabwe and assess its feasibility and preliminary effectiveness. We selected depression to simulate because students in Zimbabwe are most likely to see cases of psychoses during their ward-based clinical exposure. Zimbabwean psychiatrists adapted scenarios on depression and suicide based on ones used in London. Zimbabwean post-graduate trainee psychiatrists were invited to carry out the teaching and psychiatric nursing staff were recruited and trained in one hour to play the simulated patients (SPs). All students undertaking their psychiatry placement (n = 30) were allocated into groups for a short didactic lecture on assessing for clinical depression and then rotated around 3 scenarios in groups of 4-5 and asked to interview a simulated patient with signs of depression. Students received feedback from peers, SPs and facilitators. Students completed the Confidence in Assessing and Managing Depression (CAM-D) questionnaire before and after the simulation session and provided written free-text feedback. Post-graduate trainers, together with one consultant, facilitated the simulated teaching after three hours training. Student confidence scores increased from mean 15.90 to 20.05 (95% CI = 2.58- 5.71) t (20) = 5.52, (p > 0.0001) following the simulation teaching session. Free-text feedback was positive overall with students commenting that it was "helpful", "enjoyable" and "boosted confidence". In Zimbabwe, simulation teaching was acceptable and could be adapted with minimal effort by local psychiatrists and implemented by post-graduate trainees and one consultant, Students found it helpful and enjoyable and their confidence increased after the teaching. It offers students a

  3. Mind, brain and person: reviewing psychiatry's constituency | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To clarify monist, dualist, and pluralist philosophy that could help psychiatrists to explain how mental and physical states relate in general. Method: Varieties of monism and dualism are summarised and the problems that they entail for psychiatry are briefly described. Pluralism in the mind-body debate is reviewed ...

  4. [Quality of life measurement in child-psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.M. de; Hodiamont, P.P.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality of life (QoL) has become an important outcome measure in health care, including in child psychiatry. AIM: To formulate assessment criteria with regard to instruments that are designed to measure QoL in children. METHOD: Literature search, using five key electronic databases.

  5. A pilot course for training-in-context in statistics and research methods : radiation oncology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madzima, T.R; Boshoff, M; Tsikai, N; Badran, A; Abuidris, D; Jones, G.W; Erlwanger, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Inadequate training of investigators in statistics and research methods in Africa contributes to having limited local evidence and infrastructure to support multi-centre international trials...

  6. A novel CPR training method using a smar tphone app

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Elliot Srither

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to validate that a smartphone application can assist in the learning and skills retention for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. This cardiopulmonary resuscitation feature of the Crowdsav platform is designed to record the chest compression performance as well as the rate of compressions of the trainee. Crowdsav is available for downloading in the public domain. The application, once downloaded can be utilised during training and be replayed by the trainee at his/her own will or via reminders from the training centre. The goal of using this application is to minimise the decay of the knowledge and compression skills and perhaps even reduce the resource for recertification, as skills and performance can be kept up, maintained and monitored remotely by a training centre using the application.

  7. Objective and subjective methods for quantifying training load in wheelchair basketball small-sided games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturricastillo, Aitor; Granados, Cristina; Los Arcos, Asier; Yanci, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the training load in wheelchair basketball small-sided games and determine the relationship between heart rate (HR)-based training load and perceived exertion (RPE)-based training load methods among small-sided games bouts. HR-based measurements of training load included Edwards' training load and Stagno's training impulses (TRIMP MOD ) while RPE-based training load measurements included cardiopulmonary (session RPEres) and muscular (session RPEmus) values. Data were collected from 12 wheelchair basketball players during five consecutive weeks. The total load for the small-sided games sessions was 67.5 ± 6.7 and 55.3 ± 12.5 AU in HR-based training load (Edwards' training load and TRIMP MOD ), while the RPE-based training loads were 99.3 ± 26.9 (session RPEres) and 100.8 ± 31.2 AU (session RPEmus). Bout-to-bout analysis identified greater session RPEmus in the third [P training loads. It is suggested that HR-based and RPE-based training loads provide different information, but these two methods could be complementary because one method could help us to understand the limitations of the other.

  8. Career Interests of Canadian Psychiatry Residents: What Makes Residents Choose a Research Career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Vincent; Rapoport, Mark J; Andrew, Melissa; Davidson, Marla; Rej, Soham

    2016-02-01

    Training future clinician-researchers remains a challenge faced by Canadian psychiatry departments. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of residents interested in pursuing research and other career options as part of their practice, and to identify the factors associated with interest in research. Data from a national online survey of 207 Canadian psychiatry residents from a total of 853 (24.3% response rate) were examined. The main outcome was interest in research as part of residents' future psychiatrist practice. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify demographic and vocational variables associated with research interest. Interest in research decreases by 76% between the first and fifth year of psychiatry residency (OR 0.76 per year, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.97). Training in a department with a residency research track did not correlate with increased research interest (χ2 = 0.007, df = 1, P = 0.93). Exposing and engaging psychiatry residents in research as early as possible in residency training appears key to promoting future research interest. Psychiatry residency programs and research tracks could consider emphasizing research training initiatives and protected research time early in residency. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Emergency Psychiatry Experience, Resident Burnout, and Future Plans to Treat Publicly Funded Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Nora M; Swartz, Marvin S

    2015-08-01

    This study examined psychiatry resident burnout in emergency departments and its association with residents' posttraining plans to care for Medicaid patients and others publicly insured. Between November and December 2013, psychiatry residents in North Carolina were recruited for a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey concerning emergency department experiences, attitudes about their roles, feelings of burnout, and posttraining intentions to treat Medicaid patients. The completion rate was 51% (N=91). In bivariate analyses (N=82 with an emergency psychiatry rotation), burnout was positively associated with frequent exhaustion (pburnout scores (pemergency department indicated decreased likelihood of treating publicly insured patients after training (Medicaid, odds ratio=.09, pemergency department during psychiatry residency appear to be linked to professional burnout and threaten to shape long-term plans regarding care for publicly insured patients.

  10. [Education effect of the simple suspension method training for fifth-year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Hidenori; Kawate, Yuri; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Izushi, Fumio; Izishi, Fumio; Araki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The clinical training curriculum for fifth-year students of a school of medicine (Department of Medicine) includes training in clinical pharmacy, which is conducted by the Department of Pharmacy. Following training involving the simple suspension method, a survey was conducted to examine its effects to improve medical students' knowledge on the proper use of drugs. Forty-eight 5th-year students of Ehime University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, underwent training that employed the simple suspension method, and examinations were conducted prior to and following it to assess its effects. Following the training, the questionnaire results were analyzed using Quantification Theory Class II to examine whether knowledge acquired from it had motivated the students to use the simple suspension method. A correspondence structural analysis was also conducted to identify improvements in the training. The correct answer rate increased from 55.2±2.4% before to 83.8±1.7% after training, which supports its learning effects. The presence or absence of changes in disposition and the efficacy of the method for patients with dysphagia strongly motivated the medical students to use the method. As a future improvement, it is necessary to describe differences between the crushing and simple suspension methods during training. The results of a survey on training involving medical students conducted based on the simple suspension method suggested its learning effects and knowledge that motivated them to use the method.

  11. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szasz Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry.

  13. Resilient Systemics to Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Reliably expanding our clinical practice and lowering our overhead with telepsychiatry, telepsychology, distance counseling and online therapy, requires resilient and antifragile system and tools. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include more reliable treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The wise and proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding social results. We present, as an example, the main steps to achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support, devoted to psychiatry and psychology application. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  14. Psychiatry and the burden of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, R C

    1998-10-01

    increasingly be called on to show economic arguments to justify its services. Pressure to support a primary care model by changing practice styles, developing new skills, and training practitioners will probably occur. The major growth area likely will be geriatric psychiatry.

  15. [Perception of Psychiatry among Undergraduate Students of a School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabogal, Yahira Rossini Guzmán; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Allende, Jorge Rodríguez-Losada

    2012-01-01

    Learn about perceptions and beliefs regarding psychiatry among undergraduate medicine students and compare their conceptions and appreciations concerning positive and negative aspects, before and after specific training in psychiatry. Observational, cross-sectional study; qualitative and quantitative research with application of a survey for undergraduate medicine students of the Universidad de La Sabana, before and after a specific psychiatry course. 90 students answered the survey in two groups: one of them before the course, and the other one afterwards; 52,2% corresponded to semesters prior to the course of psychiatry; 25.5% expressed the purpose to specialize in Psychiatry before the course, and such percentage decreased to 13.4% after the course. Association was found between the purpose of not specializing in Psychiatry with the fact of having taken said course (Fisher's exact test, p=0,042). Most students would not specialize in psychiatry because they are interested in other areas. Before the course, students made emphasis on the biological aspects of mental disease. After the course, they also directed their attention to other factors. The two groups believe that the management of these patients is mainly pharmacological. The incurable character of mental illness was also highlighted together with the risk of getting ill and the stigma it entails. Psychiatry is perceived as a medical specialization with emphasis on pharmacological treatment. There is a low frequency of students interested in this area. The course of psychiatry is associated with reduction of this frequency and limits the variability of the psychiatric concept. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. [Diagnostics of attachment in child and adolescent psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, M J

    Growing concern about how the neglect and abuse of children can be tackled and prevented has led to increased interest in the parent-child relationship and the concept of attachment. It is vitally important that the diagnostics relating to attachment are accurate. One of the main problems is that up till now the parent-child relationship has not been assessed and analysed in accordance with reliable, unambiguous standards. AIM: To search the literature in order to identify the prerequisites for reliable diagnostics of attachment. METHOD: PubMed articles concerning instruments for measuring attachment were reviewed. The found articles were based on more extensive search strategies used in English-language meta-analysis, and included reflections on possible implications of mental health care. RESULTS: Accurate detailed analysis of attachment is particularly important in cases that involve cumulative risk factors. The task must be performed by trained professionals who used thoroughly tested, reliable measuring instruments. CONCLUSION: The application of the concept of attachment in child and adolescent psychiatry is in its infancy. Those applying the concept need to have breadth of vision and evidence-based skills in applying relevant diagnostics.

  17. [Ethical aspects of forensic psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muysers, Jutta

    2014-07-01

    Ethical aspects of forensic psychiatry disclose a tension between complementary and conflicting issues. The field of tension extends from offenders and their criminal offence to experts, therapists and conditions of inpatient treatment. In addition, there are legal and political aspects as well as aspects concerning the public, the victims and their next of kins and finally the media. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. State of psychiatry in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Jeanett Østerby; Okkels, Niels; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-01-01

    of common mental disorders, in particular depression and anxiety. Furthermore, 'new' diagnostic groups are represented in the treatment statistics with steeply increasing incidences, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and eating disorders, especially in the outpatient part......Danish psychiatry has gone through profound changes over the past two to three decades, reducing inpatient-based treatment and increasing outpatient treatment markedly. The number of patients treated has almost doubled, and the diagnostic profile has broadened, now including a substantial number...

  19. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Mechanical restraint in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Sestoft, Dorte Maria

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how potential mechanical restraint preventive factors in hospitals are associated with the frequency of mechanical restraint episodes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study employed a retrospective association design, and linear regression was used to assess the associations. FINDING...

  1. Neurofeedback: One of today's techniques in psychiatry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, M; Batail, J-M; Bioulac, S; Congedo, M; Daudet, C; Drapier, D; Fovet, T; Jardri, R; Le-Van-Quyen, M; Lotte, F; Mehler, D; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Purper-Ouakil, D; Vialatte, F

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback is a technique that aims to teach a subject to regulate a brain parameter measured by a technical interface to modulate his/her related brain and cognitive activities. However, the use of neurofeedback as a therapeutic tool for psychiatric disorders remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize and to comment the level of evidence of electroencephalogram (EEG) neurofeedback and real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback for therapeutic application in psychiatry. Literature on neurofeedback and mental disorders but also on brain computer interfaces (BCI) used in the field of neurocognitive science has been considered by the group of expert of the Neurofeedback evaluation & training (NExT) section of the French Association of biological psychiatry and neuropsychopharmacology (AFPBN). Results show a potential efficacy of EEG-neurofeedback in the treatment of attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, even if this is still debated. For other mental disorders, there is too limited research to warrant the use of EEG-neurofeedback in clinical practice. Regarding fMRI neurofeedback, the level of evidence remains too weak, for now, to justify clinical use. The literature review highlights various unclear points, such as indications (psychiatric disorders, pathophysiologic rationale), protocols (brain signals targeted, learning characteristics) and techniques (EEG, fMRI, signal processing). The field of neurofeedback involves psychiatrists, neurophysiologists and researchers in the field of brain computer interfaces. Future studies should determine the criteria for optimizing neurofeedback sessions. A better understanding of the learning processes underpinning neurofeedback could be a key element to develop the use of this technique in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. METHODICAL APPROACH TO DEFINING INFRASTRUCTURE COMPONENT OF THE COSTS FOR THE PARTICULAR PASSENGER TRAIN TRAFFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Barash

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the scientific paper a methodical approach concerning determining the infrastructure component of the costs for traffic of the particular passenger train should be developed. It takes into account the individual characteristics of the particular train traffic. Methodology. To achieve the research purposes was used a method which is based on apportionment of expenses for the traffic of a particular passenger train taking into account the factors affecting the magnitude of costs. This methodology allows allocating properly infrastructure costs for a particular train and, consequently, to determine the accurate profitability of each train. Findings. All expenditures relating to passenger traffic of a long distance were allocated from first cost of passenger and freight traffic. These costs are divided into four components. Three groups of expenses were allocated in infrastructure component, which are calculated according to the certain principle taking into account the individual characteristics of the particular train traffic. Originality. The allocation method of all passenger transportation costs of all Ukrzaliznytsia departments for a particular passenger train was improved. It is based on principles of general indicators formation of each department costs, which correspond to the main influential factors of operating trains. The methodical approach to determining the cost of infrastructure component is improved, which takes into account the effect of the speed and weight of a passenger train on the wear of the railway track superstructure and contact network. All this allows allocating to reasonably the costs of particular passenger train traffic and to determine its profitability. Practical value. Implementing these methods allows calculating the real, economically justified costs of a particular train that will correctly determine the profitability of a particular passenger train and on this basis it allows to make management

  3. Advances and perspectives in mental health: is psychiatry being stigmatized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, R

    2011-01-01

    whom should be either a psychologist or a psychiatrist". We all know that psychologists play a very important role in mental health care, but the medical training of psychiatrists will surely enable them to make very complex medical decisions such as the decision to confine a patient into hospital. Some other aspects to be mentioned about this law are that no reference is made to outpatient services, although they are of utmost importance in everyday practice, and that there is a bureaucratization of hospitalization. Such decision is no longer made by a professional, as a means to achieve the best treatment possible, but by a judge, who is expected to know what is best for the patient. However, there are basic contents in this law which are definitely positive: it defends patients' rights; it promotes interdisciplinary team work; it recommends deinstitutionalization, community services and, if necessary, inpatient services in general hospitals. However, there are many doubts as regards the way this will be put into practice. In most countries psychiatry is also threatened by a shortage of psychiatrists. In Argentina, the number of medical students who choose this branch of medicine as their specialty has declined the past twenty years, while the number of prospective psychologists has soared in the meantime. These are some of the reasons why many believe that psychiatry is being discredited. In this scenario, where there are both internal and external risks for psychiatry, our main professional interest is based on improving our patients' quality of life, which obviously includes their mental health. In order to achieve the best results we should avoid militant attitudes and the ideologization of reality, and be as creative as possible looking for the best way to do so.

  4. Communication skills training in dementia care: a systematic review of effectiveness, training content, and didactic methods in different care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenberger, Eva; Heimerl, Katharina; Bennett, Michael I

    2013-03-01

    Caring for and caring about people with dementia require specific communication skills. Healthcare professionals and family caregivers usually receive little training to enable them to meet the communicative needs of people with dementia. This review identifies existent interventions to enhance communication in dementia care in various care settings. We searched MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Gerolit, and Web of Science for scientific articles reporting interventions in both English and German. An intervention was defined as communication skills training by means of face-to-face interaction with the aim of improving basic communicative skills. Both professional and family caregivers were included. The effectiveness of such training was analyzed. Different types of training were defined. Didactic methods, training content, and additional organizational features were qualitatively examined. This review included 12 trials totaling 831 persons with dementia, 519 professional caregivers, and 162 family caregivers. Most studies were carried out in the USA, the UK, and Germany. Eight studies took place in nursing homes; four studies were located in a home-care setting. No studies could be found in an acute-care setting. We provide a list of basic communicative principles for good communication in dementia care. Didactic methods included lectures, hands-on training, group discussions, and role-play. This review shows that communication skills training in dementia care significantly improves the quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and increases positive interactions in various care settings. Communication skills training shows significant impact on professional and family caregivers' communication skills, competencies, and knowledge. Additional organizational features improve the sustainability of communication interventions.

  5. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  6. The Historical Method of Inquiry in a Teacher Training Program: Theory and Metatheory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Ron

    A historical method of inquiry can be applied to an experimental teacher training program, specifically, the Ford Training and Preparation Program (FTPP). The historical method requires gathering a lot of loose ideas and events that have been part of the project and hanging them together in an integrated way. To achieve this, two organizing…

  7. How Good Are Trainers' Personal Methods Compared to Two Structured Training Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    Training methods naturally employed by trainers were analyzed and compared to systematic structured training procedures. Trainers were observed teaching retarded subjects how to assemble a bicycle brake, roller skate, carburetor, and lawn mower engine. Trainers first taught using their own (personal) method, which was recorded in terms of types of…

  8. Sampling Methods and the Accredited Population in Athletic Training Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Context: We describe methods of sampling the widely-studied, yet poorly defined, population of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Objective: There are two purposes to this study; first to describe the incidence and types of sampling methods used in athletic training education research, and second to clearly define the…

  9. Meaningful assessment method for laparoscopic suturing training in augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botden, S.M.B.I.; De Hingh, I.H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    To be an effective training tool, a laparoscopic simulator has to provide metrics that are meaningful and informative to the trainee. Time, path length and smoothness are often used parameters, but are not very informative on the quality of the performance. This study aims to validate a newly

  10. Bacteriological Methods in Water Quality Control Programs. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on basic bacteriological laboratory procedures as required by Federal Register Water Quality Guidelines. Course topics include: characteristics, occurrences, and significance of bacterial indicators of pollution; bacteriological water quality standards and criteria; collection and handling of samples;…

  11. Content and Method in a Thanatology Training Program for Paraprofessionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Audrey P.

    1980-01-01

    A training program of paraprofessionals was developed in a university teaching hospital. Trainees were exposed to seminars and a supervised practicum. The objectives of the experience included sensitization of persons in the natural helping network to psychosocial needs of seriously ill persons and their families. (Author)

  12. Training for Template Creation: A Performance Improvement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There are three purposes to this article: first, to offer a training approach to employee learning and performance improvement that makes use of a step-by-step process of skill/knowledge creation. The process offers follow-up opportunities for skill maintenance and improvement; second, to explain the conceptual bases of the approach; and…

  13. [Neurolaw: its relevance for forensic psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynen, G

    2014-01-01

    Neurolaw is a new interdisciplinary area of research which investigates, from different perspectives, the significance of the neurosciences for law. To clarify the relevance of neurolaw for forensic psychiatry. The importance of neurolaw developments for forensic psychiatry was analysed on the basis of recent literature. Some of the developments in the field of neurolaw research concern issues that are currently evaluated by forensic psychiatrists, such as risk of recidivism and legal insanity. Developments in neurolaw are relevant for forensic psychiatry in a number of ways. An important problem, not yet resolved, is to what extent psychiatry will be prepared to help in shaping these developments.

  14. Positive psychiatry: its time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeste, Dilip V; Palmer, Barton W; Rettew, David C; Boardman, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, psychiatry has been defined and practiced as a branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses. Based on growing empirical evidence, we believe that this definition warrants expansion to include the concept of positive psychiatry. In the present article, we provide a critical overview of this emerging field and a select review of relevant scientific literature. Positive psychiatry may be defined as the science and practice of psychiatry that seeks to understand and promote well-being through assessment and interventions involving positive psychosocial characteristics (PPCs) in people who suffer from or are at high risk of developing mental or physical illnesses. It can also benefit nonclinical populations. Positive psychiatry has 4 main components: (1) positive mental health outcomes (eg, well-being), (2) PPCs that comprise psychological traits (resilience, optimism, personal mastery and coping self-efficacy, social engagement, spirituality and religiosity, and wisdom-including compassion) and environmental factors (family dynamics, social support, and other environmental determinants of overall health), (3) biology of positive psychiatry constructs, and (4) positive psychiatry interventions including preventive ones. There are promising empirical data to suggest that positive traits may be improved through psychosocial and biological interventions. As a branch of medicine rooted in biology, psychiatry, especially with the proposed conceptualization of positive psychiatry, is well poised to provide major contributions to the positive mental health movement, thereby impacting the overall health care of the population. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Comparison of Two Different Curricula in Psychiatry Clerkship at Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Ahmadi-Abhari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new psychiatry clerkship curriculum which was designed to improve the knowledge and skills of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran.Methods:This quasi-experimental study was conducted in two consecutive semesters from February 2009 to January 2010. In total, 167 medical students participated in the study. In the first semester, as the control group, the clerks’ training was based on the traditional curriculum. In the next semester, we constructed and applied a new curriculum based on the SPICES model (student-centered, problem-based, integrated, community-based, elective and systematic.At the end of the clerkship, the students were given two exams: Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ to assess their knowledge, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE to assess their skills. Baseline data and test performance for each student were analyzed. Results:Compared to the control group, students in the intervention group showed significantly higher OSCE scores (P= 0.01. With respect to MCQ score, no significant difference was found between the two groups.Conclusions:The results suggest that the revised curriculum is more effective than the traditional one in improving the required clinical skills in medical students during their psychiatry clerkship.

  16. Sport psychology education: a preliminary survey on chartered physiotherapists' preferred methods of training delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvinen-Barrow, Monna; Hemmings, Brian; Becker, Caryl A; Booth, Lynn

    2008-11-01

    To gain an insight to the existing suggestions and recommendations on chartered physiotherapists' preferred methods of delivery for further training in sport psychology. 22 delegates (14 women, 8 men) from the 2006 Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine/International Federation of Sports Physiotherapy annual conference (response rate 53.7%). A questionnaire survey for best method of sport psychology delivery was developed. The most suitable methods for sport-psychology-training delivery were workshops, seminars, mentoring, and coaching. Intense training days and weekends were considered most appropriate. The vast majority were willing to travel over 50 miles to receive training, and they indicated that the most suitable organizations to arrange training would be professional bodies and associations. The findings provide suggestions into how further training in sport psychology for chartered physiotherapists could be delivered. To gain more detailed information on these issues, however, further research with a larger sample size is recommended.

  17. Development and Analysis of Train Brake Curve Calculation Methods with Complex Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geza Tarnai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an efficient method using simulation for developing and analyzing train brake curve calculation methods for the on-board computer of the ETCS system. An application example with actual measurements is also presented.

  18. Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry and Psychiatry as a Career: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The discipline of psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career option, have been negatively regarded by medical students for decades. There is a large amount of literature on attitudes of students and the factors that attract them to and detract from psychiatry. The aim of this article is to systematically review this literature from 1990 to…

  19. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry. Kraniale Computertomographie in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkai, P. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany)); Bogerts, B. (Rheinische Landes- und Hochschulklinik Duesseldorf, Psychiatrische Klinik der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.)

  20. Educational supervision and the impact of workplace-based assessments: a survey of psychiatry trainees and their supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julyan T Everett

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educational supervision (ES is considered to be an essential component of basic specialist training in psychiatry in the UK. However, previous studies have indicated variation in its provision, and uncertainty about structure and content. Workplace-based assessments (WPBAs were introduced in 2007 as part of major postgraduate medical training reform. Placing considerable time demands on trainees and supervisors alike, the extent to which WPBAs should utilise ES time has not been specified. As ES and WPBAs have discrete (although complementary functions, there is the potential for this increased emphasis on assessment to displace other educational needs. Methods All junior doctors and their educational supervisors in one UK psychiatry training scheme were surveyed both before and after the introduction of WPBAs. Frequency and duration of ES were established, and structure, content and process were ascertained. Opinions on usefulness and responsibility were sought. The usage of ES for WPBAs was also assessed. Results The response rate of 70% showed general agreement between trainees and supervisors, but some significant discrepancies. Around 60% reported 1 hour of ES taking place weekly or 3 times per month. Most agreed that responsibility for ES should be shared equally between trainees and supervisors, and ES was largely seen as useful. Around 50% of trainees and supervisors used 25–50% of ES time for WPBAs, and this did not appear to affect the usefulness of ES or the range of issues covered. Conclusion ES continues to be an important component of psychiatric training. However, using ES for WPBAs introduces the potential for tension between trainees' education and their assessment by emphasising certain training issues at the expense of others. The impact of reduced training time, WPBAs and uncertainties over ES structure and content should be monitored to ensure that its benefits are maximised by remaining tailored to

  1. Interactions Validation Methods for Training Resources Control Engine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Waldemar Bernaś

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The training courseware complexity proper selection is one of the most difficult factors looking from an intelligent application engine development. The application needs individual settings, the most relevant for the application structure matching to the users' individual expectations. What  is more,  the  obtained  structure  allows  controlling  dynamically  the  application within a time it is used. The application units description with their controlling functions allow joining the database components into individual composition of the courseware. The paper in-troduces several aspects of distance learning resources development, fulfilling the demanding assumptions of the interactive training units.

  2. Music Therapy as Psychotherapy in Psychiatry at all Levels of the GAF Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    Presentation and disussion on how to apply different music therapy methods and techniques in psychiatry at different levels of the GAF (Global Functioning Scoring system) scale described in combination with McGlashan's relational process levels and other therapeutic principles as illustrated in 5...... books on 'relational treatment in psychiatry' by Lars Thorgaard (DK) and Ejvind Haga (N). Is music therapy as psychotherapy applicable also at the lower GAF scorings? Which methods/techniques?...

  3. A New Training Method for Analyzable Structured Neural Network and Application of Daily Peak Load Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizaka, Tatsuya; Matsui, Tetsuro; Fukuyama, Yoshikazu

    This paper presents a daily peak load forecasting method using an analyzable structured neural network (ASNN) in order to explain forecasting reasons. In this paper, we propose a new training method for ASNN in order to explain forecasting reason more properly than the conventional training method. ASNN consists of two types of hidden units. One type of hidden units has connecting weights between the hidden units and only one group of related input units. Another one has connecting weights between the hidden units and all input units. The former type of hidden units allows to explain forecasting reasons. The latter type of hidden units ensures the forecasting performance. The proposed training method make the former type of hidden units train only independent relations between the input factors and output, and make the latter type of hidden units train only complicated interactions between input factors. The effectiveness of the proposed neural network is shown using actual daily peak load. ASNN trained by the proposed method can explain forecasting reasons more properly than ASNN trained by the conventional method. Moreover, the proposed neural network can forecast daily peak load more accurately than conventional neural network trained by the back propagation algorithm.

  4. Method of Parallel-Hierarchical Network Self-Training and its Application for Pattern Classification and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMCHENKO, L.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Propositions necessary for development of parallel-hierarchical (PH network training methods are discussed in this article. Unlike already known structures of the artificial neural network, where non-normalized (absolute similarity criteria are used for comparison, the suggested structure uses a normalized criterion. Based on the analysis of training rules, a conclusion is made that application of two training methods with a teacher is optimal for PH network training: error correction-based training and memory-based training. Mathematical models of training and a combined method of PH network training for recognition of static and dynamic patterns are developed.

  5. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine.

  6. The association between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Psychiatry as the specialty choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chong; Richard, George; Durkin, Martin

    2016-02-06

    The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the association between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and prospective psychiatry residents. Forty-six American medical schools were contacted and asked to participate in this study. Data were collected and an aggregated list was compiled that included the following information: date of MBTI administration, academic year, MBTI form/version, residency match information and student demographic information. The data includes 835 American medical students who completed the MBTI survey and matched into a residency training program in the United States. All analyses were performed using R 3.1.2. The probability of an introvert matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of an extravert (p= 0.30). The probability of an intuitive individual matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a sensing type (p=0.20). The probability of a feeling type matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a thinking type (p= 0.50). The probability of a perceiving type matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a judging type (p= 0.60). Further analyses may elicit more accurate information regarding the personality profile of prospective psychiatry residents. The improvement in communication, team dynamics, mentor-mentee relationships and reduction in workplace conflicts are possible with the awareness of MBTI personality profiles.

  7. Jinn and psychiatry: Beliefs among (muslim doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Uvais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The belief that jinn can cause mental illness in human through afflictions or possession is widely accepted among Muslims. Belief about jinn in Muslim medical professionals, especially medical doctors has not been studied till date. Aim: To explore the belief among Muslim doctors regarding jinn and psychiatry. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among Muslim doctors using a study questionnaire. Results: Majority of the participants believed in the existence of jinn and a significant proportion of the sample believed in jinn possessing humans and jinn causing mental illness in humans and recommended treatment by doctor and religious figures together for jinn afflictions. Conclusion: The belief in jinn and jinn causing mental illness are common among Muslims and remain intact even after medical education. It deserves attention from practitioners in the field of mental health care and demand strengthening of liaison between religious leaders and mental health services.

  8. Graphology in German psychiatry (1870-1930).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Armin

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses both the use of graphology in German psychiatry (1870-1930) and the use of handwriting in psychiatric experiments. The examination of handwriting was part of an ensemble of diagnostic tools. Although disorders of handwriting seemed to indicate psychic diseases, graphology did not seem the right method to produce valid observations. Nevertheless, psychiatrists began to incorporate the process of writing into research and diagnosis and to make the process of handwriting an experimental field. Emil Kraepelin invented an apparatus - the so-called Writing-Scale - with which he could measure the dynamics of writing in various dimensions and, in particular, the pressure of movements. The experiments produced a huge amount of data, but the psychiatrists were unable to interpret them in a comprehensible way. Although psychiatrists failed to grasp the psychopathology in handwriting, they discovered a systemic behaviour of the organism controlled by feedback. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Interkulturelle Kompetenz in der Facharztausbildung von Psychiatern in Deutschland: Ergebnisse einer Umfrage [Intercultural competence in the psychiatric training curriculum in Germany: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machleidt, Wielant

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: This study was carried out to assess the situation of and the demand for specific training in transcultural psychiatry as part of the residency program in Germany. Method: A semistructured questionnaire with 30 questions (28 structured, 2 open was developed, for which the “Local Survey of Realities in Transcultural Psychiatry” of the (APA served as a model and was modified accordingly. This questionnaire was sent out to all directors of psychiatric training institutions in Germany (N = 450. The directors of official psychiatric training institutions are authorized for residency training by the state medical associations. The responses were not anonymous. Results: The return rate was 25.5% (N = 114. In 71.7% of the training institutions (81 out of 113 valid cases, specific training in transcultural psychiatry occurred only rarely or not at all. 83.3% of the directors of psychiatric training institutions (70 out of 84 valid cases reported a demand for training in transcultural psychiatry in their training institutions; in 94.5% of the cases, the directors of psychiatric training institutions (69 out of 73 valid cases reported a need for transcultural issues as part of the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency program in Germany. The most frequently reported aspects were teaching of general cultural competence and of culture-specific issues in mental disorders. Implications: Cultural aspects currently are not a mandatory part of the official training curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany. With respect to the reported need for training in cultural issues of mental disorders, the implementation of transcultural psychiatry within the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany should be discussed. [german] Zielsetzung: Ziel der vorliegenden Studie ist die Erhebung des Status quo der Weiterbildungssituation in transkultureller Psychiatrie für den Facharzt in

  10. Music and Dyslexia: A New Musical Training Method to Improve Reading and Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Michel eHabib; Chloe eLardy; Tristan eDesiles; Celine eCommeiras; Julie eChobert; Mireille eBesson

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Numerous arguments in the recent neuroscientific literature support the use of musical training as a therapeutic tool among the arsenal already available to therapists and educators for treating children with dyslexia. In the present study, we tested the efficacy of a specially-designed Cognitivo-Musical Training (CMT) method based upon three principles: (1) music-language analogies: training dyslexics with music could contribute to improve brain circuits which are com...

  11. Geriatric psychiatry in the psychiatry clerkship: a survey of current education practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susan W; Blazek, Mary C; Popeo, Dennis M

    2015-06-01

    The aging of the US population and shortage of geriatric psychiatrists mean that all medical students must be prepared to evaluate psychiatric symptoms in older patients. The authors sought to describe current geriatric psychiatry teaching practices during the psychiatry clerkship. Psychiatry clerkship directors at 110 American medical schools were surveyed about didactic and clinical experiences of geriatric psychiatry. Sixty-two (56 %) of programs responded. One fifth of programs lacked specific instruction in geriatric psychiatry. Programs were more likely to include instruction on dementia than late-life depression. Increased geriatric psychiatry educational offerings were associated with the following: number of geriatric psychiatrists on faculty, presence of a geriatric psychiatrist on the medical education committee, and inclusion of geriatric psychiatry specific items in clerkship learning objectives. Current practices in some clerkships are inadequate to prepare medical students to care for older patients with psychiatric symptoms.

  12. Applied Research of Decision Tree Method on Football Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will make an analysis of decision tree at first, and then offer a further analysis of CLS based on it. As CLS contains the most substantial and most primitive decision-making idea, it can provide the basis of decision tree establishment. Due to certain limitation in details, the ID3 decision tree algorithm is introduced to offer more details. It applies information gain as attribute selection metrics to provide reference for seeking the optimal segmentation point. At last, the ID3 algorithm is applied in football training. Verification is made on this algorithm and it has been proved effectively and reasonably.

  13. Genetics and Psychiatry: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juli, Giada; Juli, Rebecca; Juli, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Greek mythology and philosophical speculations were the first human productions on madness and psychiatry. Likewise, the origins of genetics sink their roots in a very remote and difficult time. This work tries to give an idea of the relationship between genetics and psychiatry through the myth and reality.

  14. Medical error | Vorster | African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Medical error. Merryll Vorster, Michael Berk. Abstract. South African Psychiatry ...

  15. Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry publishes original scientific papers, review articles, short reports and opinion papers in all areas of psychiatry and related fields such as sociology, applied anthropology and neurosciences. Section Policies. Articles. Checked Open Submissions, Checked Indexed ...

  16. Adjustment method for train disintegration and classification sequence in marshalling station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenkun; Zhu, Changfeng; Sun, Ran

    2017-04-01

    Adjustment of train disintegrating and classifying schemes in the marshalling station is the key of wagon-flow allocating optimization. The train disintegration and classification sequence is subjected to the priority of time departure. Under above-mentioned arrangement, the priority of time departure scheme is difficult to ensure the full-load of each departure train. On the basis of analyzing for interval time of departure train, waiting departure time and the relation among each time parameter, several concepts will be given. Using the method of single machine scheduling problem is to minimize the influence for classification and disintegration sequence adjustment. The necessary conditions of adjustment can be obtained and the influence after adjustment is shown by graphic deduction. Finally, the conception of time pass theory is provided. The rationality of this method has been proved by a case study. This method lays a foundation for adjustment of train classification and disintegration sequences.

  17. Results of a Multisite Survey of U.S. Psychiatry Residents on Education in Professionalism and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shaili; Dunn, Laura B.; Warner, Christopher H.; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors assess the perspectives of psychiatry residents about the goals of receiving education in professionalism and ethics, how topics should be taught, and on what ethical principles the curriculum should be based. Method: A written survey was sent to psychiatry residents (N = 249) at seven U.S. residency programs in Spring 2005.…

  18. Validation of the colorado psychiatry evidence-based medicine test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Brian; Feinstein, Robert E; Guiton, Gretchen

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become an important part of residency education, yet many EBM curricula lack a valid and standardized tool to identify learners' prior knowledge and assess progress. We developed an EBM examination in psychiatry to measure our effectiveness in teaching comprehensive EBM to residents. We developed a psychiatry EBM test using the validated EBM Fresno Test of Competence for family medicine. The test consists of case scenarios with open-ended questions. We also developed a scoring rubric and obtained reliability with multiple raters. Fifty-seven residents provided test data after completing 3, 6, 25, or 31 EBM sessions. The number of sessions for each resident was based on their length of training in our program. The examination had strong interrater reliability, internal reliability, and item discrimination. Many residents showed significant improvement on their examination scores when data were compared from tests taken before and after a sequence of teaching sessions. Also, a threshold for the level of expert on the examination was established using test data from 5 EBM teacher-experts. We successfully developed a valid and reliable EBM examination for use with psychiatry residents to measure essential EBM skills as part of a larger project to encourage EBM practice for residents in routine patient care. The test provides information on residents' knowledge in EBM from entry level concepts through expert performance. It can be used to place incoming residents in appropriate levels of an EBM curriculum and to monitor the effectiveness of EBM instruction.

  19. The history of Italian psychiatry during Fascism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Andrea; Testa, Luana; Del Missier, Giovanni; Dario, Mariopaolo; Stocco, Ester

    2011-09-01

    Specific features characterized Italian psychiatry during Fascism (1922-45), distinguishing it from Nazi psychiatry and giving rise to different operational outcomes, so we have investigated the state of Italian psychiatry during this period. We review the historical situation that preceded it and describe the social and health policies that Fascism introduced following new legislative and regulatory acts. We examine the preventive and therapeutic role played by psychiatry (the electric shock was an Italian invention) and, thanks to the Enciclopedia Italiano published during those years, we are able to highlight psychiatry's relationship to psychology, psychoanalysis, philosophy and religion. The shortcomings of Italian psychiatric research and practice are also seen in terms of what the State failed to do rather than what it did.

  20. The molecular turn in psychiatry: a philosophical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Abraham

    2002-06-01

    Biological psychiatry has been dominated by a psychopharmacologically-driven neurotransmitter dysfunction paradigm. The objective of this paper is to explore a reductionist assumption underlying this paradigm, and to suggest an improvement on it. The methods used are conceptual analysis with a comparative approach, particularly using illustrations from the history of both biological psychiatry and molecular biology. The results are that complete reduction to physicochemical explanations is not fruitful, at least in the initial stages of research in the medical and life sciences, and that an appropriate (non-reducible) integrative principle--addressing a property of the whole system under study--is required for each domain of research. This is illustrated in Pauling's use of a topological integrative principle for the discovery of the functioning of proteins and in Watson and Crick's use of the notion of a genetic code as an integrative principle for the discovery of the structure of genes. The neurotransmitter dysfunction paradigm addresses single molecules and their neural pathways, yet their interactions within the CNS as a whole seem most pertinent to mental disorders such as schizophrenia. The lack within biological psychiatry of an integrative principle addressing a property of the CNS as a whole may be responsible for the empirical failure of orthomolecular psychiatry, as well as for the central role that serendipity has played in the study of mental disorders, which is dominated by the neurotransmitter paradigm. The conclusion is that research in biological psychiatry may benefit from using, at least initially, some integrative principle(s) addressing a property of the CNS as a whole, such as connectionism or a hierarchical notion.

  1. Against explanatory minimalism in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eThornton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticised both as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell’s criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation respectively and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein’s Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein’s remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of level of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation.

  2. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell's criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein's Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein's remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation.

  3. Psychiatry, religion and cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, David

    2003-06-01

    To see whether certain findings in cognitive science can serve to bridge the conceptual gap between psychiatry, particularly in its psychotherapeutic aspects, and religious/spiritual understanding. A brief review is given of certain basic differences between psychiatric understanding in its psychotherapeutic aspects, and much of Western religious/spiritual understanding. Reference is then made to certain findings in contemporary cognitive science which might challenge the implicit mind-body split of Western religious tradition and its parallel in psychotherapeutic practice. Attention is also drawn to elements in religious/spiritual tradition that run counter to this dualistic point of view. Much of contemporary religious/spiritual understanding, and of modern psychiatric understanding, especially in terms of psychotherapy, appear to exist in quite separate domains. Psychotherapy and the greater part of Western religious thinking, however, share a belief in the existence of a transcendent mind. Recent developments in cognitive science and certain spiritual traditions, challenge this implicit mind-body split, providing an opportunity for a renewed dialogue between psychiatry and religion and the possibility of collaborative research.

  4. [Coercion in Psychiatry - a taboo?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meise, Ullrich; Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Stippler, Stippler; Wancata, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    History shows that the discussion concerning coercive measures against mentally ill is as old as psychiatry itself. The dilemma of psychiatry lies in its double role - having both a therapeutic and a regulatory function. Violence against sick and disabled people conflicts with the ethical principles of helping professions. This, however, is where the danger lies: that the violent parts of psychiatric work - which in the opinion of experts cannot be entirely avoided - are repressed or seen as taboo and are therefore more difficult to control. Comparisons between EU countries of the nature, frequency and duration of coercive measures are difficult because of the heterogeneity of regulation and differences in established practice. Scientific examination of this issue seems to be insufficient. There are only a few studies on important issues such as how patients rate these measures. An open and thorough debate about the meaning and meaninglessness of coercion and violence in psychiatric treatment would be necessary to prevent "routine violence" or the excessive use of force against the mentally ill.

  5. [Deep brain stimulation in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figee, M; Bervoets, C; Denys, D

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is now used regularly to treat therapy-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorders, and is being applied experimentally for refractory depression, Tourette syndrome, addiction, eating disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, autism and schizophrenia. To review the effects and mechanisms of dbs and to consider the future opportunities for this type of treatment in psychiatry. We reviewed the literature using PubMed.  DBS is effective and safe to use in the treatment of therapy-refractory OCD and has produced encouraging results in cases of refractory depression and Tourette syndrome. However, further investigations are needed with regard to the use of DBS for treating other psychiatric disorders. DBS influences brain networks that are relevant for a whole range of psychiatric symptoms.  DBS should always be considered as possible treatment for therapy-refractory OCD. DBS often leads to marked and rapid improvement in mood, anxiety, behaviour and other psychiatric symptoms, making it a promising intervention for a variety of refractory patient groups. The development of DBS for psychiatry will benefit from our increased knowledge about how specific brain networks relate to psychiatric dysfunctioning.

  6. [Child psychiatry and social security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme García, E; Dallal y Castillo, E

    1978-01-01

    The historic development of the units that provided psychiatric care to children and adolescents, which finally yielded the first child guidance clinic early this century is briefly reviewed. We describe the organization of a child psychiatry unit within a social security institute (ISSSTE). The importance of a child psychiatrist, a psychologist and a social worker working together in a team approach to the evaluation and treatment of children is emphasized. The ISSSTE has provided psychiatric care to children and adolescents since 1961. For this purpose the Institute has five psychiatric units, four of them within a general hospital, the other in a neuropsychiatry out-patient clinic. This clinic admitted 749 new cases to the Child Psychiatry department during 1976. Up to December 1976, the total population of the clinic was 14 271 patients, of which 5 471 are children and adolescents. Last but not least, we describe an ambitious project for an in-patient unit for children and adolescents as part of a psychiatric hospital.

  7. Dropouts in Swiss Vocational Education and the Effect of Training Companies' Trainee Selection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsblom, Lara; Negrini, Lucio; Gurtner, Jean-Luc; Schumann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the Swiss vocational education system, which is often called a "Dual System", trainees enter into an apprenticeship contract with a training company. On average, 25% of those contracts are terminated prematurely (PCT). This article examines the relationship between training companies' selection methods and PCTs. The investigation is…

  8. Training Delivery Methods as Source of Dynamic Capabilities: The Case of Sports' Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraya, Marco António Mexia; Porfírio, Jose António

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Training as an important source of dynamic capabilities (DC) is important to the performance of sports' organisations (SO) both to athletes and to non-athletic staff. There are a variety of training delivery methods (TDMs). The purpose of this study is to determine from a set of six TDMs which one is considered to be the most suitable to…

  9. Method for training honeybees to respond to olfactory stimuli and enhancement of memory retention therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCade, Kirsten J.; Wingo, Robert M.; Haarmann, Timothy K.; Sutherland, Andrew; Gubler, Walter D.

    2015-12-15

    A specialized conditioning protocol for honeybees that is designed for use within a complex agricultural ecosystem. This method ensures that the conditioned bees will be less likely to exhibit a conditioned response to uninfected plants, a false positive response that would render such a biological sensor unreliable for agricultural decision support. Also described is a superboosting training regime that allows training without the aid of expensive equipment and protocols for training in out in the field. Also described is a memory enhancing cocktail that aids in long term memory retention of a vapor signature. This allows the bees to be used in the field for longer durations and with fewer bees trained overall.

  10. A Frequency Matching Method for Generation of a Priori Sample Models from Training Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Katrine; Cordua, Knud Skou; Frydendall, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a Frequency Matching Method (FMM) for generation of a priori sample models based on training images and illustrates its use by an example. In geostatistics, training images are used to represent a priori knowledge or expectations of models, and the FMM can be used to generate...... new images that share the same multi-point statistics as a given training image. The FMM proceeds by iteratively updating voxel values of an image until the frequency of patterns in the image matches the frequency of patterns in the training image; making the resulting image statistically...

  11. Medical students' views about an undergraduate curriculum in psychiatry before and after clinical placements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebode Femi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that medical students wish to focus their learning in psychiatry on general skills that are applicable to all doctors. This study seeks to establish what aspects of psychiatry students perceive to be relevant to their future careers and what psychiatric knowledge and skills they consider to be important. It is relevant to consider whether these expectations about learning needs vary prior to and post-placement in psychiatry. To what extent these opinions should influence curriculum development needs to be assessed. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to medical students before they commenced their psychiatry placement and after they had completed it. The questionnaire considered the relevance of psychiatry to their future careers, the relevance of particular knowledge and skills, the utility of knowledge of psychiatric specialties and the utility of different settings for learning psychiatry. Results The students felt skills relevant to all doctors, such as assessment of suicide risk, were more important than more specialist psychiatric skills, such as the management of schizophrenia. They felt that knowledge of how psychiatric illnesses present in general practice was important and it was a useful setting in which to learn psychiatry. They thought that conditions that are commonly seen in the general hospital are important and that liaison psychiatry was useful. Conclusion Two ways that medical students believe their teaching can be made more relevant to their future careers are highlighted in this study. Firstly, there is a need to focus on scenarios which students will commonly encounter in their initial years of employment. Secondly, psychiatry should be better integrated into the overall curriculum, with the opportunity for teaching in different settings. However, when developing curricula the need to listen to what students believe they should learn needs to be balanced against the necessity of

  12. psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    them properly was their social and cultural content. The latter required giving attention to how communities defined, understood, interpreted, valued, and realised their respective values and tradi- tions in personal experience and symbolic behaviour. It was in relation to such locally shaped cultural psychologies and cultural.

  13. Convergent validity of a novel method for quantifying rowing training loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jacqueline; Rice, Anthony J; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Elite rowers complete rowing-specific and non-specific training, incorporating continuous and interval-like efforts spanning the intensity spectrum. However, established training load measures are unsuitable for use in some modes and intensities. Consequently, a new measure known as the T2minute method was created. The method quantifies load as the time spent in a range of training zones (time-in-zone), multiplied by intensity- and mode-specific weighting factors that scale the relative stress of different intensities and modes to the demands of on-water rowing. The purpose of this study was to examine the convergent validity of the T2minute method with Banister's training impulse (TRIMP), Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE when quantifying elite rowing training. Fourteen elite rowers (12 males, 2 females) were monitored during four weeks of routine training. Unadjusted T2minute loads (using coaches' estimates of time-in-zone) demonstrated moderate-to-strong correlations with Banister's TRIMP, Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE (rho: 0.58, 0.55 and 0.42, respectively). Adjusting T2minute loads by using actual time-in-zone data resulted in stronger correlations between the T2minute method and Banister's TRIMP and Lucia's TRIMP (rho: 0.85 and 0.81, respectively). The T2minute method is an appropriate in-field measure of elite rowing training loads, particularly when actual time-in-zone values are used to quantify load.

  14. Why psychiatry needs psychedelics and psychedelics need psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Without researching psychedelic drugs for medical therapy, psychiatry is turning its back on a group of compounds that could have great potential. Without the validation of the medical profession, the psychedelic drugs, and those who take them off-license, remain archaic sentiments of the past, with the users maligned as recreational drug abusers and subject to continued negative opinion. These two disparate groups--psychiatrists and recreational psychedelic drug users--are united by their shared recognition of the healing potential of these compounds. A resolution of this conflict is essential for the future of psychiatric medicine and psychedelic culture alike. Progression will come from professionals working in the field adapting to fit a conservative paradigm. In this way, they can provide the public with important treatments and also raise the profile of expanded consciousness in mainstream society.

  15. Bicycling crashes on streetcar (tram) or train tracks: mixed methods to identify prevention measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teschke, Kay; Dennis, Jessica; Reynolds, Conor C. O; Winters, Meghan; Harris, M. Anne

    2016-01-01

    ... agency and bike shops. Methods We compared personal, trip, and route infrastructure characteristics of 87 crashes directly involving streetcar or train tracks to 189 crashes in other circumstances in Toronto, Canada...

  16. Comparison of respiratory muscle training methods in individuals with motor complete tetraplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, G.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Perret, C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of inspiratory resistance training (IRT) and isocapnic hyperpnea (IH) versus incentive spirometry (placebo) on respiratory function, voice, and quality of life in individuals with motor complete tetraplegia. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 24

  17. The Evaluation on Data Mining Methods of Horizontal Bar Training Based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of science and technology, data analysis has become an indispensable part of people’s work and life. Horizontal bar training has multiple categories. It is an emphasis for the re-search of related workers that categories of the training and match should be reduced. The application of data mining methods is discussed based on the problem of reducing categories of horizontal bar training. The BP neural network is applied to the cluster analysis and the principal component analysis, which are used to evaluate horizontal bar training. Two kinds of data mining methods are analyzed from two aspects, namely the operational convenience of data mining and the rationality of results. It turns out that the principal component analysis is more suitable for data processing of horizontal bar training.

  18. Integration of Basic and Clinical Science in the Psychiatry Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Kirsten M; Moore, David; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Briscoe, Gregory W

    2017-06-01

    Integration of basic and clinical science is a key component of medical education reform, yet best practices have not been identified. The authors compared two methods of basic and clinical science integration in the psychiatry clerkship. Two interventions aimed at integrating basic and clinical science were implemented and compared in a dementia conference: flipped curriculum and coteaching by clinician and physician-scientist. The authors surveyed students following each intervention. Likert-scale responses were compared. Participants in both groups responded favorably to the integration format and would recommend integration be implemented elsewhere in the curriculum. Survey response rates differed significantly between the groups and student engagement with the flipped curriculum video was limited. Flipped curriculum and co-teaching by clinician and physician-scientist are two methods of integrating basic and clinical science in the psychiatry clerkship. Student learning preferences may influence engagement with a particular teaching format.

  19. New teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Kuriplachová; Dagmar Magurová; Anna Hudáková; Štefánia Andraščíková; Ľubica Rybárová

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present new teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA (Competency based Curriculum Reform in Nursing and Healthcare in Western Balkan Universities) No. 544169-TEMPUS-1-2013-1-BE-TEMPUS-JPCR. Implementation of new practical teaching methods, such as learning with simulator mannequins, practical workshop, nursing process, mind mapping, case studies and problem-based learning (PBL) in practical training could help to i...

  20. Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of French physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Bonnevie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Questions: How common is inspiratory muscle training by physiotherapists in the intensive care unit (ICU? Which patients receive the training? What methods are used to administer the training? Is maximal inspiratory pressure used to evaluate the need for the training and the patient's outcome after training? Design: Cross-sectional survey of all ICUs in France. Participants: Two hundred and sixty-five senior physiotherapists. Results: The response rate was 99% among eligible units. Therapist experience in ICU was significantly associated with the use of inspiratory muscle training (p = 0.02. Therapists mainly used inspiratory muscle training either systematically or specifically in patients who failed to wean from mechanical ventilation. The training was used significantly more in non-sedated patients (p < 0.0001. The most commonly nominated technique that respondents claimed to use to apply the training was controlled diaphragmatic breathing (83% of respondents, whereas 13% used evidence-based methods. Among those who applied some form of inspiratory muscle training, 16% assessed maximal inspiratory pressure. Six respondents (2%, 95% CI 1 to 5 used both an evidence-based method to administer inspiratory muscle training and the recommended technique for assessment of inspiratory muscle strength. Conclusion: Most physiotherapists in French ICUs who apply inspiratory muscle training use methods of uncertain efficacy without assessment of maximal inspiratory pressure. Further efforts need to be made in France to disseminate information regarding evidence-based assessment and techniques for inspiratory muscle training in the ICU. The alignment of inspiratory muscle training practice with evidence could be investigated in other regions. [Bonnevie T, Villiot-Danger J-C, Gravier F-E, Dupuis J, Prieur G, Médrinal C (2015 Inspiratory muscle training is used in some intensive care units, but many training methods have uncertain efficacy: a survey of