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Sample records for psychiatric supported housing

  1. Wellbeing, activity and housing satisfaction - comparing residents with psychiatric disabilities in supported housing and ordinary housing with support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Argentzell, Elisabeth; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Tjörnstrand, Carina; Brunt, David

    2017-08-30

    The home is imperative for the possibilities for meaningful everyday activities among people with psychiatric disabilities. Knowledge of whether such possibilities vary with type of housing and housing support might reveal areas for improved support. We aimed to compare people with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing (SH) and ordinary housing with support (OHS) regarding perceived well-being, engaging and satisfying everyday activities, and perceived meaning of activity in one's accommodation. The importance of these factors and socio-demographics for satisfaction with housing was also explored. This naturalistic cross-sectional study was conducted in municipalities and city districts (n = 21) in Sweden, and 155 SH residents and 111 OHS residents participated in an interview that included both self-reports and interviewer ratings. T-test and linear regression analysis were used. The SH group expressed more psychological problems, but better health, quality of life and personal recovery compared to the OHS residents. The latter were rated as having less symptom severity, and higher levels of functioning and activity engagement. Both groups rated themselves as under-occupied in the domains of work, leisure, home management and self-care, but the SH residents less so regarding home management and self-care chores. Although the groups reported similar levels of activity, the SH group were more satisfied with everyday activities and rated their housing higher on possibilities for social interaction and personal development. The groups did not differ on access to activity in their homes. The participants generally reported sufficient access to activity, social interaction and personal development, but those who wanted more personal development in the OHS group outnumbered those who stated they received enough. Higher scores on satisfaction with daily occupations, access to organization and information, wanting more social interaction, and personal

  2. The new asylums in the community: severely ill psychiatric patients living in psychiatric supported housing facilities. A Danish register-based study of prognostic factors, use of psychiatric services, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Pedersen, Marianne G; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reorganization of psychiatric treatment in Denmark involved a declining number of psychiatric long-stay beds and an increasing number of psychiatric supported housing facilities in the community. Very few studies have focused on the population in such facilities. METHODS: Information...... was generated combining addresses of supported psychiatric housing facilities with information from the Danish Civil Registration System to create a case register of persons living in supported psychiatric housing facilities. Through linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we examined predictors...... of becoming a resident in a psychiatric housing facility, use of psychiatric services around the time of entrance to a supported psychiatric housing facility, and mortality rates for residents in a psychiatric housing facility compared to non-residents and to persons in the general population who never...

  3. Emergent leadership among tenants with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Sabetti, Judith; Padgett, Deborah

    2017-12-25

    The overall aim of this study was to explore the experiences of people with psychiatric disabilities living as tenants in independent, supported apartments for the first time. Supported housing provides an alternative to structured, custodial housing models, such as foster homes, or board-and-care homes, for clients in public mental health systems. This article reports findings on how leadership emerged among tenants after making the transition from custodial to supported housing. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with tenants (n = 24) and included questions on their housing history, current living situation, relationships with staff, participation, and understanding or experience of leadership. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, codes generated, and a thematic analysis conducted using a constructivist approach. The findings revealed an understanding and appreciation of leadership among tenants, who identified six pathways to leadership in their housing as a response to unmet tenant needs. Most tenant leaders emerged outside of formal authority or power structures. Supported housing provides a unique social setting and empowering community where the potential of persons with psychiatric disabilities to assume leadership may be realized and further developed. Mental health professionals working in community housing networks are well placed to harness these face-to-face tenant communities, and their natural leaders, as an additional tool in promoting tenant recovery, mutual help, neighbourhood integration, and the broader exercise of citizenship. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Striving for meaning-Life in supported housing for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Rosita; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; Syrén, Susanne; Sandgren, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory about people with psychiatric disabilities, living in supported housing. Interviews as well as observations during the interviews were analyzed together with secondary analyses of quantitative and qualitative material from previous studies. Being deprived of self-determination emerged as the main concern for residents in supported housing and striving for meaning emerged as the pattern of behavior through which this group resolves their main concern. Striving for meaning involves living in the present, striving for self-determination, strengthening self-esteem, emotional processing and resting from the present. The strategies facilitate each other and are used singly, together simultaneously, or alternately. If they are successful, a meaning in the present is perceived. If all the strategies fail repeatedly, escaping from the present is used in order to deal with being deprived of self-determination. The implications of the findings suggest prioritizing a reduction of the institutional nature of the social and physical environment, and to support the residents' self-determination.

  5. Conceptualizing community: a comparison of neighborhood characteristics of supportive housing for persons with psychiatric and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene Wong, Yin-Ling; Stanhope, Victoria

    2009-04-01

    Housing and services for persons with developmental disabilities (DD) have been shaped by the normalization approach, a commitment to full integration within the general community. In contrast, housing and services for persons with psychiatric disabilities (PD) have had various and sometimes conflicting goals, including provision of custodial care, promotion of therapeutic community, and community integration. This cross-field study compares the neighborhood characteristics of publicly-funded housing for the PD and DD populations in a metropolitan community. The aim of the study was to examine whether the contrasting housing approaches are reflected at an ecological level and to consider how these findings relate to the goal of community integration for people with PD and DD. Administrative databases provided residential addresses of 1932 residents with PD living in 297 locations and 1716 residents with DD living in 749 locations in the city of Philadelphia. The 2000 U.S. Census and city's police department database provided information on neighborhood characteristics. Geographic information system (GIS) methodology generated maps displaying the distribution of housing locations in relation to spatial dispersion, distress, stability, safety, and race/ethnic diversity. Statistical analyses compared neighborhood characteristics of the DD and PD populations. Findings indicated that the DD population in supportive housing was more spatially dispersed, and lived in less distressed, less unstable, more secure, but equally racially/ethnically diverse neighborhoods when compared to the PD population in supportive housing. Greater geographic dispersal among persons with DD may be the result of more emphasis on normalization within policies and programs determining the location of their housing. The higher funding levels for housing and residential support for persons with DD also provided programs with the option of placing people in higher income neighborhoods. Given that

  6. Striving for meaning-Life in supported housing for people with psychiatric disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brolin, Rosita; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; Syrén, Susanne; Sandgren, Anna

    2016-01-01

    .... Being deprived of self-determination emerged as the main concern for residents in supported housing and striving for meaning emerged as the pattern of behavior through which this group resolves their main concern...

  7. Social Support Influences on Substance Abuse Outcomes among Sober Living House Residents with Low and Moderate Psychiatric Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L.; Korcha, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    Social support and psychiatric severity are known to influence substance abuse. However, little is known about how their influences vary under different conditions. We aimed to study how different types of social support were associated with substance abuse outcomes among persons with low and moderate psychiatric severity who entered Sober Living…

  8. Validation of the Verbal and Social Interaction questionnaire: carers' focus in the carer-resident relationship in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities (VSI-SH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, D; Rask, M

    2013-04-01

    A questionnaire to measure the verbal and social interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities has been developed. It is an adaptation of a questionnaire originally used in a forensic psychiatric setting. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate the construct validity and the reliability of this new version of the Verbal and Social Interactions questionnaire for use in supported housing facilities (VSI-SH). Two hundred and twenty-three carers from municipal and privately run housing facilities completed the questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed, which resulted in six factors. The number of items was reduced from the original 47 to 30 in order to minimize factorial complexity and multiple loadings. The reliability was tested with Cronbach's alpha and good internal consistency for the questionnaire and five of the six factors was found. The resulting six factors and the items were compared to the conceptual model and four of the six factors corresponded well with the categories in this original theoretical model. The questionnaire can be a useful contribution to the study of interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  9. [Quality of the psychiatric care in social welfare houses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopińiska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is a diagnosis of the level of the psychiatric help in social welfare houses. The research was conducted in the form of a questionnaire. The questionnaire was sent at random to 60 houses of social welfare for people with psychic disorders on the whole territory of Poland. 37 responses were received. All the houses in question provide their inhabitants with regular contact with a psychiatrist, 86% inside the social welfare house. 92% of inhabitants have no problems with obtaining referral to psychiatric hospital, however, 70% inhabitants of the social welfare houses have problems with being admitted to hospital. Half of the houses in question use direct compulsion. All the places studied possess therapeutic-caring teams, in 97% of the houses treatment is based on the individual plan. 14% of the houses do not allow the patients to have access to the medical documentation concerning them. In every house integrated pharmacotherapy is used together with various forms of therapy, 76% of the houses involve the family of the patient into the therapeutic process. 78% of those studied note the existence of different factors reducing the quality of the psychiatric care offered. The level of psychiatric care in the social welfare houses is adjusted to the health needs of the patients in the majority of the houses studied. However, the inhabitants have to face the difficulties connected with being admitted to psychiatric hospitals and can have problems with gaining access to medical documentation concerning them. Treatment and rehabilitation of psychic disorders is based on individualized and multi-directional therapeutic interaction. Preparation of the staff providing psychiatric care, especially therapeutic-caring ones, is diversified in individual houses (half of the therapeutic teams do not have a psychiatrist, whose presence seems to be indispensable). The most essential factors reducing the quality of psychiatric care include insufficient financial

  10. Gender Differences in Psychiatric Symptoms among Methamphetamine Dependent Residents in Sober Living Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L; Buscemi, Raymond; Nayak, Madhabika; Korcha, Rachael; Galloway, Gantt

    2012-06-01

    Although psychiatric symptoms among methamphetamine (MA) dependent individuals have been studied in treatment programs, they have not been examined in services designed to support sustained recovery in the community (e.g. sober living houses). In addition, some disorders more common among women, such as somatoform and bulimia, have been understudied among MA dependent individuals. This study aimed to examine psychiatric symptom differences between MA dependent men and women who we entering sober living houses (SLHs). Two hundred forty five individuals were interviewed within one week of entering SLHs. Instruments included a DSM IV based measure for MA dependence, a psychiatric screen (the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire), demographics, recent substance use and recent use of services. Of the 245 participants, 103 men and 25 women met criteria for MA dependence. Womenwith MA dependence reported more psychiatric symptoms than men. They also trended toward reporting more psychiatric symptoms than non-MA dependent women. For men, psychiatric symptoms did not vary between those with and without MA dependence. Some understudied disorders (e.g., somatoform) had large proportions of women meeting the screening criteria. Additional research is needed on understudied psychiatric disorders that are common among MA dependent women. SLH's should consider ways to address psychiatric symptoms among MA dependent individuals, especially women. Strategies could include increasing linkages with professional mental health services as well as developing peer oriented strategies for managing symptoms.

  11. Mastering Everyday Life in Ordinary Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Brolin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory about people who have psychiatric disabilities and live in ordinary housing with housing support. Interviews and observations during the interviews were analyzed, and secondary analyses of data from previous studies were performed. The impossible mission in everyday life emerged as the main concern and mastering everyday life as the pattern of behavior through which they deal with this concern. Mastering everyday life can be seen as a process, which involves identifying, organizing, tackling, challenging and boosting. Before the process is started, avoiding is used to deal with the main concern. The community support worker, providing housing support, constitutes an important facilitator during the process, and the continuity of housing support is a prerequisite for the process to succeed. If the process mastering everyday life is interrupted by, for example, changes in housing support, the strategy of avoiding is used.

  12. Consumer preference programs for individuals who are homeless and have psychiatric disabilities: a drop-in center and a supported housing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsemberis, Sam J; Moran, Linda; Shinn, Marybeth; Asmussen, Sara M; Shern, David L

    2003-12-01

    We illustrate Fairweather's approach to Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination with two experimental studies of programs to reduce homelessness for 168 and 225 people with mental illness and often substance abuse. Literally homeless participants were randomly assigned to programs that emphasized consumer choice or to the usual continuum of care, in which housing and services are contingent on sobriety and progress in treatment. A drop-in center that eliminated barriers to access to services was more successful than control programs in reducing homelessness, but after 24 months only 38% of participants had moved to community housing. A subsequent apartment program, in which individuals in the experimental condition moved to subsidized apartments directly from the street, with services under their control, had 79% in stable housing (compared to 27% in the control group) at the end of 6 months. Groups in this study did not differ on substance abuse or psychosocial outcomes.

  13. Housing, income support and mental health: Points of disconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csiernik Rick

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exists a disconnection between evolving policies in the policy arenas of mental health, housing, and income support in Canada. One of the complexities associated with analysing the intersection of these policies is that federal, provincial, and municipal level policies are involved. Canada is one of the few developed countries without a national mental health policy and because of the federal policy reforms of the 1970s, the provincial governments now oversee the process of deinstitutionalization from the hospital to the community level. During this same period the availability of affordable housing has decreased as responsibility for social housing has been transfered from the federal government to the provincial and/or municipal levels of government. Canada also stands alone in terms of being a developed nation without national housing policy instead what is considered "affordable" housing is partially dependant upon individuals' personal economic resources. As well, over the past decade rates of income supports have also been reduced. Psychiatric survivors have long been identified as being at risk for homelessness, with the disconnection existing between housing, income and mental health policies and the lack of a national policy in any of these policies areas further contributing to this risk.

  14. Housing, income support and mental health: Points of disconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, Cheryl; Joplin, Libbey; Schofield, Ruth; Csiernik, Rick; Gorlick, Carolyne; Turner, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    There exists a disconnection between evolving policies in the policy arenas of mental health, housing, and income support in Canada. One of the complexities associated with analysing the intersection of these policies is that federal, provincial, and municipal level policies are involved. Canada is one of the few developed countries without a national mental health policy and because of the federal policy reforms of the 1970s, the provincial governments now oversee the process of deinstitutionalization from the hospital to the community level. During this same period the availability of affordable housing has decreased as responsibility for social housing has been transfered from the federal government to the provincial and/or municipal levels of government. Canada also stands alone in terms of being a developed nation without national housing policy instead what is considered "affordable" housing is partially dependant upon individuals' personal economic resources. As well, over the past decade rates of income supports have also been reduced. Psychiatric survivors have long been identified as being at risk for homelessness, with the disconnection existing between housing, income and mental health policies and the lack of a national policy in any of these policies areas further contributing to this risk. PMID:18072980

  15. Admission to women's crisis houses or to psychiatric wards: women's pathways to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M; Rigon, Elena; Cole, Laura; Lawlor, Caroline; Johnson, Sonia

    2008-12-01

    This study compared the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and pathways to admission for women admitted to women's crisis houses and to psychiatric hospitals. A women's crisis house is a residential mental health crisis facility for women who would otherwise be considered for voluntary hospital admission. A survey of all 388 female admissions to women's crisis houses and psychiatric hospitals in four boroughs of London during a 12-week period in 2006 was conducted with questionnaires administered to key workers involved in the admissions. Pathways to admission were significantly less complex for women admitted to the crisis houses (fewer preadmission contacts with police, emergency departments, and other services). Women admitted to psychiatric wards were more likely to require supervision or observation. A multivariate analysis of data for the 245 voluntary admissions indicated that women admitted to women's crisis houses were significantly less likely to have a care coordinator (odds ratio [OR]=.528) or to have gone to an accident and emergency department (OR=.214) before admission. No other differences were found between the two groups. Pathways to admission were somewhat different for women admitted to women's crisis houses, but few clinical or sociodemographic differences were found between the two groups. Women's crisis houses may be a viable alternative to traditional wards for voluntary patients not needing intensive supervision and observation. Research should examine whether women's crisis houses are as effective as traditional inpatient services in treating women with acute psychiatric problems.

  16. Treatment plans in psychiatric community housing programs : Do they reflect rehabilitation principles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer-Wunderink, C.; Visser, E.S.; Caro-Nienhuis, A.; Sytema, S.; van Weeghel, J.; Wiersma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the extent to which treatment plans of service users of community housing programs measure up to rehabilitation principles according to the Choose-Get-Keep model of psychiatric rehabilitation. The study evaluates whether these plans correspond with service-user and

  17. Treatment Plans in Psychiatric Community Housing Programs : Do They Reflect Rehabilitation Principles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer-Wunderink, Charlotte; Visser, Ellen; Caro-Nienhuis, Annemarie D.; van Weeghel, Jaap; Sytema, Sjoerd; Wiersma, Durk

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the extent to which treatment plans of service users of community housing programs measure up to rehabilitation principles according to the Choose-Get-Keep model of psychiatric rehabilitation. The study evaluates whether these plans correspond with service-user and

  18. Housing Choice Voucher Program Support Division (PSD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program Management Programmatic Report for April to June 2010. This is inofrmation collected from Housing Authorities across the nation...

  19. 24 CFR 92.302 - Housing education and organizational support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... organizational support. 92.302 Section 92.302 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Organizations § 92.302 Housing education and organizational support. HUD is authorized to provide education and organizational support assistance, in conjunction with HOME funds made available to community housing development...

  20. A telepsychiatry model to support psychiatric outreach in the public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A telepsychiatry model to support psychiatric outreach in the public sector in South Africa. J Chipps, S Ramlall, M Mars. Abstract. The access of rural Mental Health Care Users in South Africa to specialist psychiatrists and quality mental health care is currently sub-optimal. Health professionals and planners working in ...

  1. Smoking Policy Change Within Permanent Supportive Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Berit; Stewart, Holly C; Walters, Jon; Vijayaraghavan, Maya

    2017-09-07

    Smoke-free policies effectively reduce secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among non-smokers, and reduce consumption, encourage quit attempts, and minimize relapse to smoking among smokers. Such policies are uncommon in permanent supportive housing (PSH) for formerly homeless individuals. In this study, we collaborated with a PSH provider in San Diego, California to assess a smoke-free policy that restricted indoor smoking. Between August and November 2015, residents completed a pre-policy questionnaire on attitudes toward smoke-free policies and exposure to secondhand smoke, and then 7-9 months after policy implementation residents were re-surveyed. At follow-up, there was a 59.7% reduction in indoor smoking. The proportion of residents who identified as current smokers reduced by 13% (95% CI: -38, 10.2). The proportion of residents who reported never smelling SHS indoors (apartment 24.2%, 95% CI: 4.2, 44.1; shared areas 17.2%, 95% CI: 1.7, 32.7); in outdoor areas next to the living unit (porches or patio 56.7%, 95% CI: 40.7, 72.8); and in other outdoor areas (parking lot 28.6%, 95% CI: 8.3, 48.9) was lower post-policy compared with pre-policy. Overall, resident support increased by 18.7%; however, the greatest increase in support occurred among current smokers (from 14.8 to 37.5%). Fewer current smokers reported that the policy would enable cessation at post-policy compared to pre-policy. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of implementing smoke-free policies in PSH for formerly homeless adults. However, policy alone appears insufficient to trigger change in smoking behavior, highlighting the need for additional cessation resources to facilitate quitting.

  2. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  3. Senior Services that Support Housing First in Metro Vancouver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, Sarah L; Battersby, Lupin; Fang, Mei Lan; Wada, Mineko; Barnes, Rebecca; Sixsmith, Andrew

    2017-10-26

    Housing First is a model and philosophy for housing homeless people in immediate and permanent housing. In order to implement and deliver Housing First, research is essential to understand the system of support services as they currently exist. Guided by principles of community-based participatory research, this paper presents the findings from a senior-focused deliberative dialogue workshop in Metro Vancouver, Canada. Participants (16 service providers and 1 service recipient) identified services and resources available to support seniors in maintaining housing and barriers and facilitators for accessing services. Broadly, data were organized into seven themes: (1) Housing; (2) Home support; (3) Transportation; (4) Information availability, accessibility, and navigation; (5) Cultural diversity; (6) Discrimination; and (7) Funding and financial support. Results found that affordable housing that adapts to changing health conditions, income supports, health services, homecare, transportation, and culturally appropriate and nondiscriminatory informational resources are among the supports most needed for persons as young as 50 years old to succeed under the Housing First model in Metro Vancouver. Barriers to Housing First service provision, including rigid eligibility criteria for chronically and episodically homeless, should be revised to better support the growing number of older adults who are newly entering homelessness in Metro Vancouver.

  4. 38 CFR 61.82 - Resident rent for supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resident rent for... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.82 Resident rent for supportive housing. (a) Each resident of supportive housing may be required to pay rent in an amount determined by...

  5. Supported Housing and Supported Independent Living in the Netherlands, with a Comparison with England

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer-Wunderink, Charlotte; Visser, Ellen; Caro-Nienhuis, Annemarie; Sytema, Sjoerd; Wiersma, Durk

    Research into community housing programs for people with severe mental illness is underexposed. The Dutch UTOPIA study describes characteristics of their service users, which may predict their allocation to either supported housing or supported independent living programs. Additionally, a comparison

  6. Living in supportive housing for people with serious mental illness: a paradoxical everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Ericsson, Ulf; Ehliasson, Kent

    2014-10-01

    Since the closure of large psychiatric institutions, various types of community-based supportive housing for people with serious mental illness (SMI) have been developed. There is currently limited knowledge about users' experiences of living in supportive housing. The aim of the present study was to describe user experiences of living in supportive housing for people with SMI. Twenty-nine people living in such facilities participated in open, qualitative interviews. Data were subjected to latent content analysis. Three main themes emerged from this analysis: (i) having a nest, which included the subthemes of a place to rest and having someone to attach to; (ii) being part of a group, with the subthemes of being brought together and a community spirit; and (iii) leading an oppressive life, including the subthemes of questioning one's identity, sense of inequality, and a life of gloom. It could be concluded that user experiences of living in supportive housing are complex and paradoxical. In order to provide supportive housing, staff need to recognize and work within social group processes, and perform continual and structural evaluations of users' social and emotional needs. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Impact of Supported Housing on Social Relationships Among Homeless Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    This study examined social network structure and function among a sample of 460 homeless veterans who participated in an experimental trial of the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program. Participants were randomly assigned to HUD-VASH (housing subsidies and case management), case management only, or standard care. Mixed-model longitudinal analysis was used to compare treatment groups on social network outcomes over 18 months. Veterans in HUD-VASH reported significantly greater increases in social support than veterans in the two other groups, as well as greater frequency of contacts, availability of tangible and emotional support, and satisfaction with nonkin relationships over time. These gains largely involved relationships with providers and other veterans encountered in treatment. Supported housing may play a pivotal role in fostering constructive new relationships with persons associated with service programs but may have a more limited impact on natural support networks.

  8. Objective Community Integration of Mental Health Consumers Living in Supported Housing and of Others in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T.; Stefancic, Ana; Tsemberis, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Housing programs for people with severe mental illnesses aim to maximize community integration. However, little is known about how the community integration of mental health consumers living in supported housing compares with that of other community residents in the socially disadvantaged communities where supported housing is often located. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of objective community integration of mental health consumers living in supported housing and of other persons living in the same communities. Methods Participants were 124 adults (60 mental health consumers and 64 other community residents) residing in designated zip codes in the Bronx, New York. Participants were administered measures of psychiatric symptoms, substance use, physical community integration (participation in local activities), social integration (interactions with community members), and citizenship (political activism or volunteering). Results Mental health consumers living in supported independent housing had significantly lower scores on indicators of objective community integration than other community members. However, differences were relatively small. Among mental health consumers, African-American race, education, and length of time in current residence were associated with better community integration. Conclusions Findings suggest that mental health consumers living in supported housing may not achieve levels of objective community integration that are comparable with other community members; however, psychiatric factors did not account for this difference. Length of time in neighborhoods appears to be an important factor in facilitating social integration. PMID:22549530

  9. A cross-sectional study of prescribing patterns in chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorr, S. G.; Loonen, A. J. M.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Taxis, K.

    Objective: To analyze prescribing patterns of chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities, to identify the extent of polypharmacy and to estimate associated risks in this patient group. Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study the prescription data of 323 chronic

  10. Recent violence in a community-based sample of homeless and unstably housed women with high levels of psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elise D; Cohen, Jennifer; Knight, Kelly R; Decker, Alyson; Marson, Kara; Shumway, Martha

    2014-09-01

    We determined associations between co-occurring psychiatric conditions and violence against homeless and unstably housed women. Between 2008 and 2010, we interviewed homeless and unstably housed women recruited from community venues about violence, socioeconomic factors, and psychiatric conditions. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine independent correlates of violence. Among 291 women, 97% screened positive for 1 or more psychiatric conditions. Types of violence perpetrated by primary partners and persons who were not primary partners (non-primary partners) included emotional violence (24% vs 50%; P violence (11% vs 19%; P violence (7% vs 22%; P violence increased with each additional psychiatric diagnosis and decreasing levels of social isolation. All types of violence were more commonly perpetrated by non-primary partners, suggesting that an exclusive focus on domestic violence screening in health care or social service settings will miss most of the violence in this population. Contrary to some previous studies, the odds of violence decreased as social isolation increased, suggesting that social isolation may be protective in homeless and unstably housed communities with high levels of comorbidity and limited options.

  11. Postsecondary Students With Psychiatric Disabilities Identify Core Services and Key Ingredients to Supporting Education Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, Kathleen; Mizrahi, Raphael; Ringeisen, Heather

    2017-10-26

    Accessing and successfully completing postsecondary educational opportunities may be challenging for those living with psychiatric disabilities. This exploratory study highlights the experiences of individuals with psychiatric disabilities participating in postsecondary educational support initiatives. Investigators conducted case studies with 3 education support initiatives across the United States. Focus groups revealed what concrete supported education services were helpful and key ingredients in delivering education supports. Access to specialists, mindfulness techniques, help with time management and procrastination, and facilitating classroom accommodations were identified as critical. Developing authentic relationships with supported education staff, flexibility in service delivery and access to student peers living with psychiatric disabilities were noted as key ingredients in service delivery. Incorporating the voice of students with psychiatric disabilities into supported education services can increase access, involvement, and retention, therein providing more supports to students with psychiatric disabilities achieving their postsecondary education goals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. [Nursing support in a housing association apartment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederlender, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A transferable lease project jointly run by the municipal authorities, the departmental council, the local mental health council and the hospital, has been set up for the benefit of patients in the process of reintegration. In this context, the work of the nurse is based around the individual support of the patient, integration within networks and the establishment of the project within the community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Boiling water reactor radiation shielded Control Rod Drive Housing Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baversten, B.; Linden, M.J. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Control Rod Drive (CRD) mechanisms are located in the area below the reactor vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Specifically, these CRDs are located between the bottom of the reactor vessel and above an interlocking structure of steel bars and rods, herein identified as CRD Housing Supports. The CRD Housing Supports are designed to limit the travel of a Control Rod and Control Rod Drive in the event that the CRD vessel attachement went to fail, allowing the CRD to be ejected from the vessel. By limiting the travel of the ejected CRD, the supports prevent a nuclear overpower excursion that could occur as a result of the ejected CRD. The Housing Support structure must be disassembled in order to remove CRDs for replacement or maintenance. The disassembly task can require a significant amount of outage time and personnel radiation exposure dependent on the number and location of the CRDs to be changed out. This paper presents a way to minimize personal radiation exposure through the re-design of the Housing Support structure. The following paragraphs also delineate a method of avoiding the awkward, manual, handling of the structure under the reactor vessel during a CRD change out.

  14. A telepsychiatry model to support psychiatric outreach in the public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Model proposed is “virtual”, i.e. not bound to provincial or district referral patterns, aims not to add to the burden on .... Pilot Evaluation a. Implementation and Evaluation of Psychiatric Registrar Training b. Implementation and evaluation of telepsychiatry educational and clinical outreach services in KwaZulu-Natal. 7.

  15. The social support network for black psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ngubane

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out of almost 50% of Black inpatients in a state psychiatric hospital to evaluate the level of accessibility of the family network of the patients. Staff were interviewed on the problems they have with contacting families. The survey shows the extent of inadequate access and identifies reasons for the problem.

  16. Impact of HIV Information and Peer Support on Psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Young people are most vulnerable to acquiring HIV Infection in Zambia and they are at increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders which if left unchecked can have behavioural and health consequences. It's from this background that this study aimed at evaluating the impact of HIV information and peer ...

  17. Homeless Veterans: Management Improvements Could Help VA Better Identify Supportive Housing Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    HOMELESS VETERANS Management Improvements Could Help VA Better Identify Supportive-Housing Projects Report to...VETERANS Management Improvements Could Help VA Better Identify Supportive-Housing Projects What GAO Found As of September 2016, for veterans who...disabled veterans. These supportive-housing EULs receive project -based HUD-VASH vouchers, which provide housing subsidies, on-site case management

  18. Housing, income support and mental health: Points of disconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Csiernik Rick; Schofield Ruth; Joplin Libbey; Forchuk Cheryl; Gorlick Carolyne; Turner Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract There exists a disconnection between evolving policies in the policy arenas of mental health, housing, and income support in Canada. One of the complexities associated with analysing the intersection of these policies is that federal, provincial, and municipal level policies are involved. Canada is one of the few developed countries without a national mental health policy and because of the federal policy reforms of the 1970s, the provincial governments now oversee the process of dei...

  19. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS: A Three-Factor Model of Psychopathology in Marginally Housed Persons with Substance Dependence and Psychiatric Illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle J Giesbrecht

    Full Text Available Rates of psychopathology are elevated in marginalized and unstably housed persons, underscoring the need for applicable clinical measures for these populations. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS is a clinical instrument principally developed for use in schizophrenia to identify the presence and severity of psychopathology symptoms. The current study investigates whether a reliable and valid PANSS factor structure emerges in a marginally housed, heterogeneous sample recruited from the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver where substance use disorders and psychiatric illness are pervasive. Participants (n = 270 underwent structured clinical assessments including the PANSS and then were randomly assigned to either exploratory (EFA or confirmatory factor analytic (CFA subsamples. EFA pointed to a novel three factor PANSS. This solution was supported by CFA. All retained items (28 out of 30 load significantly upon hypothesized factors and model goodness of fit analyses are in the acceptable to good range. Each of the three first-order factor constructs, labeled Psychosis/Disorganized, Negative Symptoms/Hostility, and Insight/Awareness, contributed significantly to measurement of a higher-order psychopathology construct. Further, the latent structure of this 3-factor solution appears temporally consistent over one-year. This PANSS factor structure appears valid and reliable for use in persons with multimorbidity, including substance use disorders. The structure is somewhat distinct from existing solutions likely due to the unique characteristics of this marginally housed sample.

  20. Patients' descriptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-11-01

    People with mental disorders suffer from impaired quality of life (QoL). In psychiatric hospital wards nurses are in a close relationship with patients and have good opportunities to support patients' QoL. Still, relatively little is known about patients' perceptions related to nursing interventions by which nurses can support the QoL of patients with severe mental illness. To explore patients' perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' QoL in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. Explorative descriptive study design. The study was conducted in seven acute 24-h psychiatric wards of general hospitals in Southern Finland. Thirty-five inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder or delusional disorder. The data were generated through semi-structured interviews and processed by means of qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of patients' perceptions of nursing interventions were identified to support QoL from patients' descriptions: empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, security interventions and interventions to support physical health. Impaired QoL of patients with severe mental illness can be supported in acute psychiatric wards through nursing interventions. However, we are not sure how effective these interventions are. Thus, research on the effectiveness of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL is needed.

  1. Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices. Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The "Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices" report describes the outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village program in Sacramento, California. Serna Village is a supportive housing program serving homeless families. Outcomes from the program illustrate that it is…

  2. 75 FR 16820 - Delegated Processing for Certain 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Delegated Processing for Certain 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Projects... 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly projects. OMB Approval Number: 2502-New. Form Numbers: Schedule...

  3. Differences in Health and Social Support between Homeless Men and Women Entering Permanent Supportive Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winetrobe, Hailey; Wenzel, Suzanne; Rhoades, Harmony; Henwood, Benjamin; Rice, Eric; Harris, Taylor

    Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is the leading intervention to end chronic homelessness. Little is known, however, about gender differences, including potential disparities in physical and mental health and social support, that might inform services available through PSH. This study included 421 homeless adults, at least 39 years old, English- or Spanish-speaking, who were moving into PSH through 26 different agencies in the Los Angeles area. Compared with men entering PSH, homeless women (28% of the sample) were younger (p social networks (Coefficient, 0.79, p social support among homeless adults moving into PSH. PSH cannot be a one-size-fits-all approach. Supportive services within housing should be tailored based on gender and other individual needs. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Social Support and Housing Transitions Among Homeless Adults With Serious Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Young, Alexander S; Greenberg, Jared M; Bromley, Elizabeth

    2016-08-22

    Objective: Research suggests that social supports are associated with housing retention among adults who have experienced homelessness. Yet, we know very little about the social support context in consumers find and retain housing. We examined the ways and identified the junctures in which consumers' skills and deficits in accessing and mobilizing social supports influenced their longitudinal housing status. Method: We performed semi-structured qualitative interviews with VA Greater Los Angeles consumers ( n = 19) with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and a history of homelessness; interviews explored associations between longitudinal housing status (categorized as: stable, independent housing; sheltered housing, continually engaged in structured housing programs; and unstable housing) and social supports. We compared data from consumers in these 3 mutually exclusive categories. Results: All participants described social support as important for finding and maintaining housing. However, participants used formal (provider/case managers) and informal (family/friends) supports in different ways. Participants in stable housing relied on formal and informal supports to obtain/maintain housing. Participants in sheltered housing primarily used formal supports, for example, case management staff. Unstably housed participants used formal and informal supports, but some of these relationships were superficial or of negative valence. Interpersonal problems were prevalent across longitudinal housing status categories. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Social context, including patterns of formal and informal support, was associated with participants' longitudinal housing status. Within interventions to end homelessness, these findings suggest the value of future research to identify, tailor, and implement practices that can help consumers improve their social resources. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Evaluating the effects of cognitive support on psychiatric clinical comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalai, Venkata V; Khalid, Sana; Gottipati, Dinesh; Kannampallil, Thomas; John, Vineeth; Blatter, Brett; Patel, Vimla L; Cohen, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    Clinicians' attention is a precious resource, which in the current healthcare practice is consumed by the cognitive demands arising from complex patient conditions, information overload, time pressure, and the need to aggregate and synthesize information from disparate sources. The ability to organize information in ways that facilitate the generation of effective diagnostic solutions is a distinguishing characteristic of expert physicians, suggesting that automated systems that organize clinical information in a similar manner may augment physicians' decision-making capabilities. In this paper, we describe the design and evaluation of a theoretically driven cognitive support system (CSS) that assists psychiatrists in their interpretation of clinical cases. The system highlights, and provides the means to navigate to, text that is organized in accordance with a set of diagnostically and therapeutically meaningful higher-level concepts. To evaluate the interface, 16 psychiatry residents interpreted two clinical case scenarios, with and without the CSS. Think-aloud protocols captured during their interpretation of the cases were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively. In addition, the frequency and relative position of content related to key higher-level concepts in a verbal summary of the case were evaluated. In addition the transcripts from both groups were compared to an expert derived reference standard using latent semantic analysis (LSA). Qualitative analysis showed that users of the system better attended to specific clinically important aspects of both cases when these were highlighted by the system, and revealed ways in which the system mediates hypotheses generation and evaluation. Analysis of the summary data showed differences in emphasis with and without the system. The LSA analysis suggested users of the system were more "expert-like" in their emphasis, and that cognitive support was more effective in the more complex case. Cognitive support impacts

  6. Making housing first happen: organizational leadership in VA's expansion of permanent supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Stefan G; Austin, Erika Laine; Holmes, Sally K; Pollio, David E; Schumacher, Joseph E; White, Bert; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2014-12-01

    While most organizational literature has focused on initiatives that transpire inside the hospital walls, the redesign of American health care increasingly asks that health care institutions address matters outside their walls, targeting the health of populations. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)'s national effort to end Veteran homelessness represents an externally focused organizational endeavor. Our aim was to evaluate the role of organizational practices in the implementation of Housing First (HF), an evidence-based homeless intervention for chronically homeless individuals. This was an interview-based comparative case study conducted across eight VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). Front line staff, mid-level managers, and senior leaders at VA Medical Centers were interviewed between February and December 2012. Using a structured narrative and numeric scoring, we assessed the correlation between successful HF implementation and organizational practices devised according to the organizational transformation model (OTM). Scoring results suggested a strong association between HF implementation and OTM practice. Strong impetus to house Veterans came from national leadership, reinforced by Medical Center directors closely tracking results. More effective Medical Center leaders differentiated themselves by joining front-line staff in the work (at public events and in process improvement exercises), by elevating homeless-knowledgeable persons into senior leadership, and by exerting themselves to resolve logistic challenges. Vertical alignment and horizontal integration advanced at sites that fostered work groups cutting across service lines and hierarchical levels. By contrast, weak alignment from top to bottom typically also hindered cooperation across departments. Staff commitment to ending homelessness was high, though sustainability planning was limited in this baseline year of observation. Key organizational practices correlated with more successful

  7. Canadian community mental health workers' perceived priorities for supportive housing services in northern and rural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Mossey, Sharolyn; Bailey, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    A relationship between mental health and supportive housing has been established, yet there exist enduring challenges in meeting the supportive housing needs of people with severe mental health problems. Furthermore, not all stakeholder viewpoints of supportive housing services are well documented in the research literature, and research has tended to focus on supportive housing provision in large, urban centres. Potentially, distinct challenges and opportunities associated with the provision of supportive housing services in smaller urban and rural communities that define the greater geographical terrain of Canada and other jurisdictions are less developed. This study describes community mental health service workers' priorities for supportive housing services. Using Q methodology, 39 statements about supportive housing services, developed from a mixed-methods parent study, were sorted by 58 service providers working in four communities in northern Ontario, Canada. Data used in this study were collected in 2010. Q analysis was used to identify correlations between service workers who held similar and different viewpoints concerning service priorities. The results yielded four discrete viewpoints about priorities for delivery of supportive housing services including: a functional system, service efficiency, individualised services and promotion of social inclusion. Common across these viewpoints was the need for concrete deliverables inclusive of financial supports and timely access to adequate housing. These findings have the potential to inform the development of housing policy in regions of low population density which address both system and individual variables. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Factors related to rapidity of housing placement in Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program of 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; O'Connell, Maria; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program is the largest supported housing program in the country for homeless veterans who are seeking rapid entry into permanent independent housing. This study examined factors related to how rapidly clients were housed in the early years of the program and how long they stayed in the program. Mental health, substance abuse, work/income, criminal history, and site were examined as predictors of process times. Regression analyses based on 627 HUD-VASH clients who entered the program between 1992 and 2003 showed that client characteristics were not rate-limiting factors for obtaining HUD-VASH housing; i.e., clients who had greater substance abuse problems or more extensive criminal histories did not take longer to obtain housing. The large differences associated with site of entry partly reflected a curvilinear relationship between the duration of operation of the HUD-VASH program and process times; i.e., at relatively younger and older programs, clients entered housing slightly faster than at programs in the middle range. Lastly, HUD-VASH clients whose case managers reported good therapeutic alliances stayed in the program longer. These findings have implications for the continued expansion of the HUD-VASH program.

  9. Meaning in work and emerging work identities of housing support workers: A quest for a comprehensible plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Ulf; Ehliasson, Kent; Bengtsson Tops, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Work and employees are often marginalized in studies on community-based psychiatric care and support systems. This paper highlights the role of the worker at congregated supported housing for people with severe mental illness (SMI). Housing support workers (HSW) are a fairly new professional role and have developed as a result of major changes in Swedish mental health care and services. The development of new roles is not unproblematic and raises intriguing questions. The purpose of this article is to describe housing support workers' experiences of meaning in their work, and in addition illuminate how the work identity of HSWs can be negotiated and constructed. Four focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 25 participants. Additionally, three follow up sessions were conducted with the same participants. The material consists of employees from four different sites. The intepretation of the material was inspired by a constructionist approach. The analysis generated three themes: to do a good job, everyday needs and the formal role. The work identity for HSWs is complex and not easily interpreted. The experience of an unclear assignment affects the description of what is meaningful and important-the work identity and significant affiliations for HSWs. In the long run, this fragmented world can have negative implications for the HSW.

  10. Psychiatric and Psychological Support to Reduce the Psychological Effects Incurred to Female Victim in the Crime of Rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sedaqat Far

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern world with all the blessings of easier and more pleasant life is a world full of unsolved contradictions and complexities. industrialization of communities, the expansion of class gap and poverty, lack of proper management systems, lack of proper sanitation and lack of access to home and many other things have caused irreparable social damage on the body of society. One of these injuries is the problem of sexual violence against women and rape and deliberate and widespread harassment of women in different environments, including enterprises, community, neighborhood, streets and more. Rape is a wrong act and is punished hard in the Iranian criminal law or social convention. Yet, in the meantime, the women affected by this type of sexual violence not only do not enjoy the legal protections but also face identity crisis due to participation in family and community. So the issue of Psychiatric and psychological support for the female victims should be put on the priority of law and women's rights organization committed to ending violence. Methods: this study has been conducted via descriptive and analytical method and library and Internet tools. To describe the psychiatric and psychological support to reduce the psychological effects incurred to female victim in the crime of rape, female victims were interviewed using a case study. To complete the obtained information and analyze research findings using interview, some of the findings of provincial criminal court judges, public courts prosecutors, psychologists and psychiatrists were examined. Finding: The best legal action in support of women victim is psychiatric and psychological supports for these women in safe houses. Women who are suffering from this scourge often commit suicide or live with the fear of this event or their natural life is seriously disrupted. Therefore, it is incumbent on legislators to approve strong support rules in helping and supporting the victim and raped

  11. Forced residential mobility and social support: impacts on psychiatric disorders among Somali migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhui Kamaldeep

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somali migrants fleeing the civil war in their country face punishing journeys, the loss of homes, possessions, and bereavement. On arrival in the host country they encounter poverty, hostility, and residential instability which may also undermine their mental health. Methods An in-depth and semi-structured interview was used to gather detailed accommodation histories for a five year period from 142 Somali migrants recruited in community venues and primary care. Post-codes were verified and geo-mapped to calculate characteristics of residential location including deprivation indices, the number of moves and the distances between residential moves. We asked about the reasons for changing accommodation, perceived discrimination, asylum status, traumatic experiences, social support, employment and demographic factors. These factors were assessed alongside characteristics of residential mobility as correlates of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders. Results Those who were forced to move homes were more likely to have an ICD-10 psychiatric disorder (OR = 2.64, 1.16-5.98, p = 0.02 compared with those moving through their own choice. A lower risk of psychiatric disorders was found for people with larger friendship networks (0.35, 0.14-0.84, p = 0.02, for those with more confiding emotional support (0.42, 0.18-1.0, p = 0.05, and for those who had not moved during the study period (OR = 0.21, 0.07-0.62, p = 0.01. Conclusions Forced residential mobility is a risk factor for psychiatric disorder; social support may contribute to resilience against psychiatric disorders associated with residential mobility.

  12. Challenges to Improve Inter-Professional Care and Service Collaboration for People Living With Psychiatric Disabilities in Ordinary Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ann-Christine; Ainalem, Ingrid; Berg, Agneta; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe health care- and social service professionals' experiences of a quality-improvement program implemented in the south of Sweden. The focus of the program was to develop inter-professional collaboration to improve care and service to people with psychiatric disabilities in ordinary housing. Focus group interviews and a thematic analysis were used. The result was captured as themes along steps in process. (I) Entering the quality-improvement program: Lack of information about the program, The challenge of getting started, and Approaching the resources reluctantly. (II) Doing the practice-based improvement work: Facing unprepared workplaces, and Doing twice the work. (III) Looking back--evaluation over 1 year: Balancing theoretical knowledge with practical training, and Considering profound knowledge as an integral part of work. The improvement process in clinical practice was found to be both time and energy consuming, yet worth the effort. The findings also indicate that collaboration across organizational boundaries was broadened, and the care and service delivery were improved.

  13. Understanding the Experiences of Students with Psychiatric Disabilities: A Foundation for Creating Conditions of Support and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belch, Holley A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fastest-growing categories of disability in the college student population is psychiatric disabilities: bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, and borderline personality disorders, among other. Appropriate treatment and support can provide students with psychiatric disabilities the opportunity to develop their talents and realize their…

  14. The impact of current alcohol and drug use on outcomes among homeless veterans entering supported housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-05-01

    Permanent supported housing has increasingly been identified as a central approach to helping homeless individuals with disabilities exit from homelessness. Given that one third or more of homeless individuals actively use substances, it is important to determine the extent to which individuals who report using alcohol and/or drugs at the time of housing benefit from such programs. The current study examines data from the evaluation of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs (HUD-VA) Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program to determine differences in housing and clinical outcomes among participants with two different levels of active alcohol or drug use at time of housing entry. Whereas veterans with 1-15 days of active use and 15-30 days of active use had significantly more days homeless than abstainers, albeit with small effect sizes (.06 and .19, respectively), there were no significant differences in days housed or days in institutions. Interaction analysis suggests that the highest frequency substance users who spent time in residential treatment prior to housing had the poorest housing outcomes, while those who were not in residential treatment had outcomes comparable to abstainers. Although active substance users clearly benefit from supportive housing with small differences in outcomes from abstainers, high frequency substance users who were admitted to residential treatment before housing placement, may be an especially vulnerable population. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Incarceration histories of homeless veterans and progression through a national supported housing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, N; Rosenheck, R; Tsai, J; Kasprow, W; McGuire, J F

    2014-07-01

    There is increasing concern that adults with a past history of incarceration are at particular disadvantage in exiting homelessness. Supported housing with case management has emerged as the leading service model for assisting homeless adults; however there has been limited examination of the success of adults with past history of incarceration in obtaining housing within this paradigm. Data were examined on 14,557 veterans who entered a national supported housing program for homeless veterans, the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program (HUD-VASH) during 2008 and 2009, to identify characteristics associated with a history of incarceration and to evaluate whether those with a history of incarceration are less likely to obtain housing and/or more likely to experience delays in the housing attainment process. Veterans who reported no past incarceration were compared with veterans with short incarceration histories (≤ 1 year) and those with long incarceration histories (>1 year). A majority of participants reported history of incarceration; 43 % reported short incarceration histories and 22 % reported long incarceration histories. After adjusting for baseline characteristics and site, history of incarceration did not appear to impede therapeutic alliance, progression through the housing process or obtaining housing. Within a national supported housing program, veterans with a history of incarceration were just as successful at obtaining housing in similar time frames when compared to veterans without any past incarceration. Supported housing programs, like HUD-VASH, appear to be able to overcome impediments faced by formerly incarcerated homeless veterans and therefore should be considered a a good model for housing assistance programs.

  16. Nurses' perceptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kollanen, Marjo; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to examine nurses' (N=29) perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' quality of life (QoL) in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. An explorative descriptive study design was applied. The data were generated through seven focus group interviews and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL were identified. Interventions were related to care planning, empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, and security interventions. Emphasis should be placed on nurses' opportunities to improve patients' QoL according to patients' individual needs. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Experiences of housing support in everyday life for persons with schizophrenia and the role of the media from a societal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrika Jormfeldt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mental health-care system in Sweden, as in many other counties, has its main focus on the reduction of psychiatric symptoms and the prevention of relapses. People diagnosed with schizophrenia often have significant health issues and experience reduced well-being in everyday life. The social imaginary of mental illness as an imbalance of the brain has implications concerning general attitudes in society. The news media are an important source of information on psychiatric disorders and have an important role in cultivating public perceptions and stigma. News media can contribute to the mental illness stigma and place individuals with mental illnesses at risk of not receiving adequate care and support. The aim of this preliminary study was to describe users’ experiences of housing support in everyday life. Results: The results revealed three themes of housing support, which were needed, but frequently insufficiently fulfilled in the municipality. The three themes were: “Support to Practice Healthy Routines in Daily Life,” “Support to Shape Meaningful Contents in Everyday Life,” and “Support to Meet Needs of Integrity and Respect.” Conclusions: The findings support previous studies arguing that current health care and housing support fails to meet basic needs and may lead to significant and unnecessary health risks. Further investigation is needed regarding the links between attitudes to mental illness in society and political and financial principles for health care and housing support for persons with schizophrenia. Further research is needed regarding the role of the media in policymaking concerning health promotion interventions for people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

  18. Internalized Stigma and Perceived Family Support in Acute Psychiatric In-Patient Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Gülçin; Küçük, Leyla

    2016-02-01

    This descriptive study aims to identify the relationship between internalized stigma and perceived family support in patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric unit. The sample is composed of 224 patients treated in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward in İstanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using information obtained from the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and Social Support from Family Scale. The mean age of the patients was 37±11.56years, and the mean duration of treatment was 6.27±5.81years. Most patients had been hospitalized three or more times. Of the total number of patients, 66.1% had been taken to the hospital by family members. We noted a statistically significant negative correlation between the total scores obtained from the perceived Social Support from Family Scale and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale. The patients were observed to stigmatize themselves more when the perceived social support from their family had decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trajectories and correlates of special education supports for youth with autism spectrum disorder and psychiatric comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Christine J; Lerner, Matthew D; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2017-05-01

    Relatively little is known about patterns of school-based supportive services for youth with autism spectrum disorder. This study describes these supportive services and their correlates, both cross-sectionally and retrospectively, in a large sample ( N = 283) of 6- to 18- year-old youth. To assess whether special education designation and classroom placement patterns were peculiar to autism spectrum disorder, we also conducted analyses comparing youth with autism spectrum disorder to those with other psychiatric diagnoses ( N = 1088). In higher grades, the relative quantity of three common supportive services received by youth with autism spectrum disorder decreased, while total supportive service quantity remained stable over time. Youth with autism spectrum disorder were more likely to receive a special education designation and were placed in less inclusive classroom settings than youth with other psychiatric diagnoses. These findings suggest that as youth with autism spectrum disorder reach higher grades, changes in service provision occur in terms of both time and quantity.

  20. The relationship between social support, help-seeking behavior, and psychological distress in psychiatric clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knisely, J E; Northouse, L

    1994-12-01

    A descriptive exploratory design was used to examine the relationship between the level of social support, the level of psychological distress, and the extent of help-seeking behavior in a nonprobability sample of 53 hospitalized adult psychiatric patients. The subjects completed the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and a researcher-designed Help-Seeking Behavior Questionnaire. The Pearson Product Moment Correlation coefficients and t test were used to analyze the data. No significant correlation was found between the level of psychological distress and either the level of social support or the extent of help seeking. Social support and help seeking were highly correlated. These results have an implication for nursing practice pertaining to the focus of patient treatment both during hospitalization and in postdischarge planning.

  1. Neighbourhood Planning and Community Support for New Multi-Family Housing Projects in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This research study investigates community support and concerns for new multi-family housing projects in Vancouver. It examines the approaches that planners and developers use at the neighbourhood planning and development application stage to increase community support and mitigate concerns for new multi-family housing projects. The research also suggests new approaches and strategies that planners and developers could take to increase community support and mitigate concerns for new multi-fam...

  2. 78 FR 49680 - Streamlining Requirements Governing the Use of Funding for Supportive Housing for the Elderly and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... for Supportive Housing for the Elderly and Persons With Disabilities Programs; Correction AGENCY... for the Elderly (Section 202) and the Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities...--SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 0 1. The authority citation for part 891...

  3. Individual, social, and environmental factors associated with support for smoke-free housing policies among subsidized multiunit housing tenants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nancy E; Ferketich, Amy K; Klein, Elizabeth G; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Pirie, Phyllis

    2013-06-01

    Mandatory smoke-free policies in subsidized, multiunit housing (MUH) may decrease secondhand smoke exposure in households with the highest rates of exposure. Ideally, policies should be based on a strong understanding of factors affecting support for smoke-free policies in the target population to maximize effectiveness. A face-to-face survey was conducted from August to October 2011 using a stratified random sample of private subsidized housing units in Columbus, OH, without an existing smoke-free policy (n = 301, 64% response rate). Lease holders were asked to report individual, social, and environmental factors hypothesized to be related to support for smoke-free policies. Multiple logistic regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with policy support. Most tenants supported smoke-free policies in common areas (82.7%), half supported policies inside units (54.5%), and one third supported a ban outside the building (36.3%). Support for smoke-free policies in units and outdoors was more common among nonsmokers than smokers (71.5% vs. 35.7%, p social, but no environmental, factors were independently associated with policy support. Smokers who intended to quit within 6 months or less were more likely than other smokers to support in-unit policies (45.3% vs. 21.1%; p = .003). More than half of subsidized MUH tenants supported smoke-free policies inside their units. Strategies to address individual- and social-level barriers to behavior change should be implemented in parallel with smoke-free policies. Policies should be evaluated with objective measures to determine their effectiveness.

  4. 78 FR 39003 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... the Elderly Application Submission Requirements AGENCY: Multifamily Housing Program, Office of Housing... Supportive Housing for the Elderly Application Submission Requirements. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0267. Type... Department to assist HUD in determining applicant eligibility and ability to develop housing for the elderly...

  5. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  6. Supported education for individuals with psychiatric disabilities: State of the practice and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeisen, Heather; Langer Ellison, Marsha; Ryder-Burge, Amy; Biebel, Kathleen; Alikhan, Shums; Jones, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Supported education (SEd) is a promising practice that supports and encourages educational goals and attainment among individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This paper provides insights into how SEd objectives are pursued in different settings, assesses the evidence base, and discusses policy implications. Insights from 3 data sources were synthesized: published literature, an environmental scan, and 3 site visits to programs that support the education goals of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. While setting, target populations, level of coordination with supported employment, and financing strategies varied, common SEd components emerged: specialized and dedicated staffing, one-on-one and group skill-building activities, assistance with navigating the academic setting and coordinating different services, and linkages with mental health counseling. The evidence base is growing; however, many published studies to date do not employ rigorous methodology. Conclusions and Implications for Policy and Practice: Continued specification, operationalization, and testing of SEd core components are needed. The components of the evolving SEd model would benefit from rigorous testing to evaluate impact on degree completion and other key impacts such as employment; health, mental health, or recovery; and community participation. In addition to funding streams from special education and Medicaid, new opportunities for increasing the availability of SEd include the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) reauthorization, which requires state vocational rehabilitation agencies to fund preemployment services for transition-age individuals. New "set-aside" requirements for the Mental Health Services Block Grant will increase funding for early intervention services for individuals with serious mental illness, potentially including SEd. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Homeless veterans in supported housing: exploring the impact of criminal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    This article described the criminal histories of a multisite sample of homeless veterans enrolled in the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program, presented a method of categorizing them, and compared outcomes among veterans with different criminal histories. A national dataset on a total of 1,160 participants over a 1-year period was analyzed. Cluster analyses were conducted on the criminal histories of participants and groups of participants were compared on program entry characteristics and outcomes. Before entry into the HUD-VASH program, 79% of participants had been charged with at least one criminal charge. The most common criminal charges were disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and public intoxication. At program entry, participants with more extensive criminal histories showed poorer status in employment, housing, substance abuse, and quality of life compared with participants with minor or no criminal histories. However, once enrolled in supported housing, there were no group differences in outcomes and all groups showed substantial improvements in housing. These findings suggest that most homeless veterans have had involvement in the criminal justice system, albeit mostly to a small extent. Supported housing programs, like HUD-VASH, that serve homeless veterans regardless of their criminal history should be supported.

  8. A randomized trial of individual peer support for adults with psychiatric disabilities undergoing civil commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, E Sally; Maru, Mihoko; Johnson, Gene; Cohee, Julie; Hinkel, Jennifer; Hashemi, Lobat

    2016-09-01

    Given the proliferation of peer-delivered services and its growing but insufficient empirical base, we undertook a randomized trial to examine the effects of such services on individuals with severe psychiatric disabilities undergoing a civil commitment. We recruited n = 113 individuals who were civilly committed for inpatient treatment. Randomly assigned experimental participants were paired with a trained peer specialist to receive intensive 1-on-1 support to assist them with both their recovery and the conditions of their mandated court-ordered services. Individuals in the control group were invited to receive other supportive, peer-delivered services, such as social and group educational activities, but excluding individual peer support. We assessed a variety of outcomes including social supports, quality of life, recovery, symptoms, and functioning. Mounting a randomized trial in this setting and with participants who were court-ordered for inpatient treatment proved challenging in terms of recruitment, service provision, retention in the intervention, and attrition from the research. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed no significant differences in outcomes by study condition. As-treated analyses comparing high- and low-use peer support groups with control group participants found significant differences favoring peer support recipients in quality of life and functioning but no differences in other study outcomes. Difficulties with ensuring the quality of the peer support in this study may be in part responsible for our failure to see more-definitive and -positive results. As the peer support specialist profession evolves, an understanding of its effective ingredients and mechanisms must be elucidated to allow for more-rigorous studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Alcohol and drug use disorders among homeless veterans: prevalence and association with supported housing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the prevalence of alcohol and drug disorders among homeless veterans entering the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program and its association with both housing and clinical outcomes. A total of 29,143 homeless veterans were categorized as either having: no substance use disorder, only an alcohol use disorder, only a drug use disorder, or both alcohol and drug use disorders. Veterans were compared on housing and clinical status prior to admission to HUD-VASH and a smaller sample of 14,086 HUD-VASH clients were compared on their outcomes 6 months after program entry. Prior to HUD-VASH, 60% of program entrants had a substance use disorder and 54% of those with a substance use disorder had both alcohol and drug use disorders. Homeless veterans with both alcohol and drug use disorders had more extensive homeless histories than others, and those with any substance use disorder stayed more nights in transitional housing or residential treatment in the previous month. After six months in HUD-VASH, clients with substance use disorders continued to report more problems with substance use, even after adjusting for baseline differences, but there were no differences in housing outcomes. These findings suggest that despite strong associations between substance use disorders and homelessness, the HUD-VASH program is able to successfully house homeless veterans with substance use disorders although additional services may be needed to address their substance abuse after they become housed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Impact of a Supportive Housing Program on Housing Stability and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Young Adults in New York City Who Were Aging Out of Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungwoo; Singh, Tejinder P; Gwynn, R Charon

    2017-08-01

    Former foster youth are at increased risk of housing instability and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during the transitional period following foster care. We measured housing stability using sequence analysis and assessed whether a supportive housing program in New York, New York, was effective in improving housing stability and reducing STIs among former foster youth. Matched administrative records identified 895 former foster youth who were eligible for the housing program during 2007-2010. The main outcomes included housing stability (as determined from episodes of homelessness, incarceration, hospitalization, and residence in supportive housing) and diagnosed STI case rates per 1,000 person-years during the 2 years after baseline. Marginal structural models were used to assess impacts of the program on these outcomes. Three housing stability patterns (unstable housing, stable housing, and rare institutional dwelling patterns) were identified. The housing program was positively associated with a pattern of stable housing (odds ratio = 4.4, 95% confidence interval: 2.9, 6.8), and negatively associated with diagnosed STI rates (relative risk = 0.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.2, 0.7). These positive impacts on housing stability and STIs highlight the importance of the supportive housing program for youths aging out of foster care and the need for such programs to continue. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. 76 FR 55084 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly... Availability (NOFA) for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program. This announcement contains... Elderly Program is authorized by section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q), as amended by...

  12. 78 FR 64144 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... the Elderly Application Submission Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... Title of Information Collection: Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Application Submission... in determining applicant eligibility and ability to develop housing for the elderly within statutory...

  13. National dissemination of supported housing in the VA: model adherence versus model modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria; Kasprow, Wesley; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    The continuing development and dissemination of emerging evidence-based practices may be facilitated by the availability of descriptive information on the actual delivery of the service, and its variability, across sites. This paper presents data on the participation of 2,925 homeless veterans in the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program at 36 sites across the country, for up to five years. While most conceptual models emphasize rapid placement, sustained intensive case management, rehabilitation services, and "permanent" housing, no program has yet presented empirical data on the actual delivery of such services over an extended period of time. Using extensive longitudinal data from the VA's national homeless outreach program, the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program, a quantitative portrait presents what happens in supported housing in a large real-world dissemination effort. Program entry to HUD-VASH was generally slow with 108 days (sd = 92 days) on average passing between program entry and housing placement. Total program participation lasted 2.6 years on average (sd = 1.6 years)-just half of the possible 5 years. Service delivery became substantially less intensive over time by several measures, and three-fourths of the veterans terminated within five years, although the vast majority (82%) were housed at the time. Few veterans received rehabilitation services (6%) or employment assistance (17%) and most service delivery focused on obtaining housing. These data suggest that real-world supported housing programs may not adhere to the prevalent model descriptions either because of implementation failure or because veteran needs and preferences differ from those suggested by that model.

  14. Strengthening Skills for Success: A Manual To Help Parents Support Their Psychiatrically Disabled Youth's Community Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A.; And Others

    The manual provides information and suggestions to parents of youth with psychiatric disabilities, based on the program at Thresholds, a psychiatric rehabilitation center in Chicago, Illinois. The manual includes case examples, exercises, and space for parent responses. Chapters have the following titles and topics: "The Importance to You of Your…

  15. Client satisfaction with a new group-based model of case management for supported housing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Reddy, Navin; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Supportive housing typically offers rental subsidies and individual intensive community-based case management and has become a predominant service model for homeless adults. Alternative case management models have not been adequately explored. This study evaluates satisfaction with a novel group-intensive peer support (GIPS) model of case management for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program. A total of 95 HUD-VASH clients rated their satisfaction with services and responded to open-ended questions about what they liked best and least about the program. Quantitative and qualitative analyses compared clients who attended groups as part of the GIPS model and those who did not. No significant difference in satisfaction between group and non-group attenders were found. Clients reported what they liked best about the program was the staff; those who attended groups reported what they liked best was the social interaction and peer support. These findings suggest clients who attend groups for their primary source of case management may be as satisfied as those who receive only individual case management. GIPS offers a feasible and acceptable service model and should be further explored along with other alternative models of care in supportive housing services. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Developing empirically supported theories of change for housing investment and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Hilary; Thomas, Sian

    2015-01-01

    The assumption that improving housing conditions can lead to improved health may seem a self-evident hypothesis. Yet evidence from intervention studies suggests small or unclear health improvements, indicating that further thought is required to refine this hypothesis. Articulation of a theory can help avoid a black box approach to research and practice and has been advocated as especially valuable for those evaluating complex social interventions like housing. This paper presents a preliminary theory of housing improvement and health based on a systematic review conducted by the authors. Following extraction of health outcomes, data on all socio-economic impacts were extracted by two independent reviewers from both qualitative and quantitative studies. Health and socio-economic outcome data from the better quality studies (n = 23/34) were mapped onto a one page logic models by two independent reviewers and a final model reflecting reviewer agreement was prepared. Where there was supporting evidence of links between outcomes these were indicated in the model. Two models of specific improvements (warmth & energy efficiency; and housing led renewal), and a final overall model were prepared. The models provide a visual map of the best available evidence on the health and socio-economic impacts of housing improvement. The use of a logic model design helps to elucidate the possible pathways between housing improvement and health and as such might be described as an empirically based theory. Changes in housing factors were linked to changes in socio-economic determinants of health. This points to the potential for longer term health impacts which could not be detected within the lifespan of the evaluations. The developed theories are limited by the available data and need to be tested and refined. However, in addition to providing one page summaries for evidence users, the theory may usefully inform future research on housing and health. Copyright © 2014 The Authors

  17. Using Common Themes: Cost-Effectiveness of Permanent Supported Housing for People with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Thomas Chalmers

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the cost-effectiveness of providing permanent supported housing to homeless people with mental illness. Through the use of billing records and frequency of use charts, researchers were able to map the service usage of a cohort of 268 homeless individuals from both urban and rural communities. The results suggest that…

  18. The California Linkages Program: Doorway to Housing Support for Child Welfare-Involved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrade, Amy; Simon, James David; Fabella, Danna; Castillo, Lolita; Mejia, Cesar; Shuster, David

    2017-09-01

    Housing instability can complicate parents' efforts to provide for their children. Child welfare service agencies have had difficulty adequately serving parents' housing needs due to limited and constrained funding streams. This article integrates the voices of four important stakeholders to illuminate how an innovative model of service system coordination called Linkages addresses housing needs for child welfare-involved parents eligible for public assistance. Facilitated by Linkages, these parents can receive supportive housing services through programs affiliated with the California public assistance program CalWORKs. Personal narratives reflecting the diverse perspectives of stakeholders in the Linkages collaboration-the statewide program director, a child welfare services coordinator, a CalWORKs caseworker, and a parent program participant-shed light on how the collaboration assists parents in attaining case plan goals, and highlights some of the factors facilitating and hindering effective collaboration between the agencies involved. Stakeholders emphasized the value of flexible service approaches, the intensity of the efforts required, the role of advocacy, and the importance of a shared vision between agencies working together to provide housing supports. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  19. In-House Communication Support System Based on the Information Propagation Model Utilizes Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Teranishi, Yuuichi; Harumoto, Kaname; Shimojo, Shinji

    Almost all companies are now utilizing computer networks to support speedier and more effective in-house information-sharing and communication. However, existing systems are designed to support communications only within the same department. Therefore, in our research, we propose an in-house communication support system which is based on the “Information Propagation Model (IPM).” The IPM is proposed to realize word-of-mouth communication in a social network, and to support information-sharing on the network. By applying the system in a real company, we found that information could be exchanged between different and unrelated departments, and such exchanges of information could help to build new relationships between the users who are apart on the social network.

  20. Diagnoses Treated in Ambulatory Care Among Homeless-Experienced Veterans: Does Supported Housing Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H; Andersen, Ronald M; Gelberg, Lillian

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about how permanent supported housing influences ambulatory care received by homeless persons. To fill this gap, we compared diagnoses treated in VA Greater Los Angeles (VAGLA) ambulatory care between Veterans who are formerly homeless-now housed/case managed through VA Supported Housing ("VASH Veterans")-and currently homeless. We performed secondary database analyses of homeless-experienced Veterans (n = 3631) with VAGLA ambulatory care use from October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2011. We compared diagnoses treated-adjusting for demographics and need characteristics in regression analyses-between VASH Veterans (n = 1904) and currently homeless Veterans (n = 1727). On average, considering 26 studied diagnoses, VASH (vs currently homeless) Veterans received care for more (P Veterans were more likely (P homeless Veterans to receive treatment for diagnoses across categories: chronic physical illness, acute physical illness, mental illness, and substance use disorders. Specifically, VASH Veterans had 2.5, 1.7, 2.1, and 1.8 times greater odds of receiving treatment for at least 2 condition in these categories, respectively. Among participants treated for chronic illnesses, adjusting for predisposing and need characteristics, VASH (vs currently homeless) Veterans were 9%, 8%, and 11% more likely to have 2 or more visits for chronic physical illnesses, mental illnesses, and substance use disorder, respectively. Among homeless-experienced Veterans, permanent supported housing may reduce disparities in the treatment of diagnoses commonly seen in ambulatory care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Web-based support for daily functioning of people with mild intellectual disabilities or chronic psychiatric disorders: A feasibility study in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica de Wit

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: The initial results of the use of web-based support for this client population seem promising and justify further research on online support for clients with mild intellectual disabilities or chronic psychiatric disorders.

  2. Differential impact of supported housing on selected subgroups of homeless veterans with substance abuse histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Maria J; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated that supported housing is an effective intervention for individuals who are homeless and have a mental illness or substance use disorder. This study examined data from an experimental trial of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program to identify differences in the program's impact on subgroups defined by sociodemographic or clinical characteristics. Data were analyzed from 259 male homeless veterans with substance abuse problems who were randomly assigned to HUD-VASH (intensive case management [ICM] plus rent subsidy vouchers), ICM only, or treatment as usual between June 1992 and December 1995. Four subgroups were defined: African American versus Caucasian, younger versus older than 42.3 years, co-occurring diagnoses of mental illness versus diagnosis of a substance use disorder only, and active versus less active substance use upon program entry. Mixed models were used to identify significant interactions between HUD-VASH assignment and each subgroup. Compared with ICM alone, HUD-VASH was associated with more positive housing outcomes for Caucasians, veterans with co-occurring mental disorders, and veterans who were active substance users. HUD-VASH was associated with more positive socioclinical outcomes for African Americans. No differences were observed in housing or socioclinical outcomes as a function of age. Among homeless veterans with a substance use disorder, Caucasians and those with active substance use showed greater housing benefits than other veterans from HUD-VASH than from ICM alone. African Americans showed greater socioclinical benefit than Caucasians from HUD-VASH versus ICM. Interaction analysis deserves further study.

  3. Surviving the Recession: Implications for Practitioners to Better Support Pre-Retiree Housing Counseling Clientele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Tobe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Great Recession resulted in significant job loss, producing a decrease in income for many families. Others struggled with unaffordable loans and underwater home mortgages. As a result of the multiple challenges after the recession, housing instability was prevalent. To offer support, local agencies provided education and assistance. Existing research provides an understanding of the economic influence of foreclosure and counseling services on communities, yet little is known about the experience of families during and after crisis. Using Seidman’s (2012 three-stage interview process, a series of phenomenological, semistructured qualitative interviews were completed to give voice to a sample of participants, aged 50-64, who sought housing counseling services at a midwestern university Extension housing counseling office and identify practice implications for counselors. Findings revealed the importance of understanding the unique experience of housing instability and a need to provide information and support to aid coping efforts. Implications for Extension educators and human service professionals, employers, lenders, and policymakers are provided.

  4. Collaborating with a social housing provider supports a large cohort study of the health effects of housing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael G; Zhang, Jane; Blakely, Tony; Crane, Julian; Saville-Smith, Kay; Howden-Chapman, Philippa

    2016-02-16

    Despite the importance of adequate, un-crowded housing as a prerequisite for good health, few large cohort studies have explored the health effects of housing conditions. The Social Housing Outcomes Worth (SHOW) Study was established to assess the relationship between housing conditions and health, particularly between household crowding and infectious diseases. This paper reports on the methods and feasibility of using a large administrative housing database for epidemiological research and the characteristics of the social housing population. This prospective open cohort study was established in 2003 in collaboration with Housing New Zealand Corporation which provides housing for approximately 5% of the population. The Study measures health outcomes using linked anonymised hospitalisation and mortality records provided by the New Zealand Ministry of Health. It was possible to match the majority (96%) of applicant and tenant household members with their National Health Index (NHI) number allowing linkage to anonymised coded data on their hospitalisations and mortality. By December 2011, the study population consisted of 11,196 applicants and 196,612 tenants. Half were less than 21 years of age. About two-thirds identified as Māori or Pacific ethnicity. Household incomes were low. Of tenant households, 44% containing one or more smokers compared with 33% for New Zealand as a whole. Exposure to household crowding, as measured by a deficit of one or more bedrooms, was common for applicants (52%) and tenants (38%) compared with New Zealanders as whole (10%). This project has shown that an administrative housing database can be used to form a large cohort population and successfully link cohort members to their health records in a way that meets confidentiality and ethical requirements. This study also confirms that social housing tenants are a highly deprived population with relatively low incomes and high levels of exposure to household crowding and environmental

  5. Supporting Students with Psychiatric Disabilities in Postsecondary Education: Important Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Scott I.; Schultz, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    We began the exploratory process of identifying knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are important for disability service professionals to possess in order to provide beneficial services to students with psychiatric disabilities in postsecondary education. Using a three-round Delphi survey, two groups of experts identified 54 knowledge, skill,…

  6. Who Receives Confrontation in Recovery Houses and when is it Experienced as Supportive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L

    2009-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Confrontation Scale (ADCS) is a 72-item instrument that measures a construct of confrontation defined as warnings about potential harm associated with alcohol and drug use. This analysis describes the characteristics of individuals entering residential recovery homes (N=323) who received confrontation and when it was experienced as supportive. A large proportion reported receiving at least one confrontational statement (80%), most commonly from family/friends (71%). Individuals who did and did not receive confrontation did not differ by demographics, but those receiving confrontation had more recent substance use, higher perceived costs of sobriety and more severe family and psychiatric problems. Differences were noted in confrontation from the criminal justice system versus family/friends. Overall, residents experienced confrontation as supportive regardless of who confronted them. Residents who experienced confrontation the most helpful were those with higher levels of substance use and those who believed maintaining sobriety would be difficult.

  7. The professional psychiatric/mental health nurse: skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, E; Killoury, F; Nugent, L E

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Nationally and internationally there has been a movement away from the traditional medical model towards a more holistic recovery-oriented approach to mental health care delivery. At every level of service provision the emphasis is firmly on recovery and on facilitating active partnership working and involvement of service users, their carers and family members. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to identify on a national level specific areas of care that are addressed most or least by psychiatric and mental health nurses in care planning for mental health service users in Ireland. In addition, this is the first study to identify nationally how the recovery approach is being implemented by psychiatric and mental health nurses in relation to current recovery-orientated policy. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental healthcare staff require more education on the recovery concept and this needs to be multidisciplinary team wide. Further research is required to establish how best to develop a shared approach to working with service users and their families within the mental healthcare environment. Further investigation is required to help determine how funding could be allocated appropriately for education and training and service development nationally. Introduction The restructuring of national mental health policy to an integrated recovery ethos demands a clarification in the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role, skills and competencies. Aim/Question To explore the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role and identify skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice. Method An exploratory mixed methods study in multiple health services in Ireland with N = 1249 psychiatric/mental health nurses. Data collection used a survey, focus groups and written submissions. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results The medical

  8. 78 FR 37106 - Streamlining Requirements Governing the Use of Funding for Supportive Housing for the Elderly and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... persons with disabilities. In light of the current housing market, with limited private financing for the... supported units in the project, and clarifying that the transfer of physical or financial assets of a... corporation, a housing finance agency, nonprofit organizations, and an association of aging services...

  9. [Psychiatric support for children and adolescents in residential care in a German sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nützel, Jakob; Schmid, Marc; Goldbeck, Lutz; Fegert, Jörg M

    2005-10-01

    Children and adolescents in residential care represent a high risk population for mental disorders. We examined in an epidemiologic survey the level of professional psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment in relation to the prevalence of mental disorders among this group. The study includes 689 children and adolescents living in 20 residential care institutions in a two-step design. Participants with elevated scores in a screening questionnaire were then assessed by a standardized clinical examination. Data on psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment were obtained and correlated with the prevalence of mental disorders. Wishes for cooperation with psychiatry on the part of the child welfare providers were recorded by a self-constructed questionnaire. 57.1% of the children and adolescents of our sample fulfilled the criteria for one or more ICD-10 F diagnosis. As most frequent disorders we found conduct disorders (CD), ADHD and depressive disorders. Highest levels of psychopharmalogical treatment were found in ADHD (25 to 33.3%), half of the children and adolescents with ICD-10 F diagnosis got psychiatric or psychotherapeutic treatment. Compared to the high prevalence of severe mental disorders in children and adolescents living in residential care the levels of psychopharmacological and psychiatric/psychotherapeutic treatment seem to be low, especially in those with conduct disorders (CD) and ADHD. Cooperation between the child welfare providers and child and adolescent psychiatry services should get intensified. Adequate psychiatric diagnostic and multimodal therapeutic procedures are necessary.

  10. Experiences of adults with high-care needs and their family members with housing and support pathways in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Deborah; Fleming, Jennifer; Foster, Michele; Tweedy, Sean

    2017-09-01

    Many adults aged less than 65 years with high-care needs resulting from acquired disabilities are unable to access age-appropriate housing and support, and reside in residential aged care or live with family members who may struggle to navigate the disability support system. This qualitative study aimed to investigate the experiences of adults with high-care needs and their family members regarding pathways related to housing and support. Two in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted six months apart with 21 people aged 18 to 65 with high-care needs of varying etiology and living in different housing settings. Nineteen family members involved in decision-making about housing and supports were also interviewed. Thematic data analysis yielded five themes: (1) Traveling in different directions; (2) "the fight, the battle and the war"; (3) willing but wanting; (4) uncertainty and vulnerability; and (5) redefining social roles and relationships. Current disability policy is not satisfying the housing and support requirements of adults with high-care needs and their families. The findings provide rigorous, empirical evidence which indicate the urgent need to improve access to affordable, individualized housing and support packages, including financial, practical and informational support for family members involved in caring roles. Implications for Rehabilitation Individual preferences are an important consideration in housing and support arrangements for younger people with high-care needs alongside needs-based solutions. Individualized funding approaches may provide flexibility of care and choice in housing and support for people with disability. Family members willingly provide substantial informal care, support and advocacy for younger people with high needs but perceive their role as a constant "battle". Payment of family members in recognition of caring work was perceived as a solution to relieve family hardship and ensure optimal care.

  11. Cognitive Predictors of Work Among Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries With Psychiatric Disorders Enrolled in IPS Supported Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Susan R; Drake, Robert E; Xie, Haiyi; Riley, Jarnee; Milfort, Roline; Hale, Thomas W; Frey, William

    2017-08-31

    Impaired cognitive functioning is a significant predictor of work dysfunction in schizophrenia. Less is known, however about relationships of cognition and work in people with less severe disorders with relatively normal cognitive functioning. This secondary analysis evaluated cognitive predictors of work in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a recent work history who were randomized to receive mental health services, supported employment, and freedom from work disincentives over a 2-year study period in the Mental Health Treatment Study. Of the 1045 participants randomized to the treatment package, 945 (90.4%) received a cognitive assessment at study entry. Competitive work activity was evaluated using a computer-assisted timeline follow-back calendar at baseline and quarterly for 24 months. Mood disorders were the most common psychiatric diagnoses (64.9%), followed by schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (35.1%). Tobit regression analyses predicting the average number of hours worked per week, controlling for demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and work history indicated that the cognitive composite score (P work over the study period. Cognitive functioning predicted work over 2 years in SSDI beneficiaries with mood or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders who were receiving supported employment and mental health interventions, despite a relative absence of cognitive impairment in the study participants. The findings suggest cognitive functioning contributes to competitive work outcomes in persons with psychiatric disorders who have relatively unimpaired cognitive abilities, even under optimal conditions of treatment and vocational support. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Supportive housing: an evidence-based intervention for reducing relapse among low income adults in addiction recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Carol S; Lewinson, Terri; Watkins, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Within the ranks of the homeless are individuals coping with substance addiction and/or chronic physical or mental disability. Their special needs often pose significant barriers to successfully re-integrate into society. For these individuals, simply securing a roof overhead may not be an adequate solution. Supportive housing combines housing with access to on-site social services to assist persons coping with disabling physical and behavioral health conditions. This study examined whether an association could be found between length of residency in supportive housing and subjective well-being. For the purposes of this study, subjective well-being was measured by length of sobriety, self-efficacy, and employment.

  13. Psychiatric advanced practice nurses contributions to supporting survivors and caregivers affected by the Boston marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Barbara E; Delisle, Leslie; Mitchell, Monique; Etheredge, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    The role of the psychiatric advanced practice nurse in promoting psychological health and resiliency for patients, their families and staff following the Boston Marathon bombings is reviewed. On April 15, 2013, 2 bombs exploded near the finish line at the Boston Marathon. Within minutes, 39 patients suffering from multiple injuries presented at a level I trauma center. The magnitude of this event and its effect on our hospital required a comprehensive response that would promote resiliency and healing. Lessons shared from responders to other tragedies were helpful in guiding our interprofessional efforts. The multiple layers of our response are reviewed to offer learnings that may inform others as they work to promote resiliency and healing following traumatic events. In response to this event, we utilized a trauma-informed care framework emphasizing physical, psychological, and emotional safety to assist staff, survivors, and families on their journey of healing. Emotional reactions were dramatic but were eased by the psychological care and education that our patients, their families, and staff received in the first days to weeks after the bombings. The psychiatric advanced practice nurse can influence positive outcomes by utilizing a trauma-informed care framework.

  14. Requiring sobriety at program entry: impact on outcomes in supported transitional housing for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinka, John A; Casey, Roger J; Kasprow, Wesley; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    An important distinction in models of housing for the homeless is whether programs that require abstinence prior to program admission produce better outcomes than unrestricted programs. Data from a large transitional housing program were used to compare client characteristics of and outcomes from programs requiring abstinence at admission and programs not requiring abstinence. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Northeast Program Evaluation Center provided records of individuals who were admitted into, and discharged from, the VA Grant and Per Diem program in 2003-2005. Records contained information from intake interviews, program discharge information, and descriptions of provider characteristics. Analyses were based on 3,188 veteran records, 1,250 from programs requiring sobriety at admission and 1,938 from programs without a sobriety requirement. Group differences were examined with t tests and chi square analyses; predictors of program outcome were determined with logistic regression. Individuals using drugs or alcohol at program admission had more problematic histories, as indicated by several general health and mental health variables, and shorter program stays. There were significant differences between groups in the frequency of program completion, recidivism for homelessness, and employment on program discharge, but effect sizes for these analyses were uniformly small and of questionable importance. Regression analyses did not find meaningful support for the importance of sobriety on program entry on any of the outcome measures. The results add evidence to the small body of literature supporting the position that sobriety on program entry is not a critical variable in determining outcomes for individuals in transitional housing programs.

  15. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SELF-SUPPORT STILT-HOUSES TOWARDS THE DISASTER POTENTIALITY AT THE CAMBAYA COASTAL AREA, MAKASSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isfa Sastrawati

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-support stilt-houses at the coastal area have environment characteristics that are different from inland houses, and they have the disaster potentiality such as hurricanes, tidal waves, abrasion, earthquakes, and even tsunami. The stilt houses are very adaptable to climatic conditions and coastal disasters. The shape of the stilt houses at the coastal area must comply with aspects of safety, security, comfort, and health. This paper examines the characteristics of the stilt houses at the coastal area of Cambaya, Makassar, especially in terms of safety and security aspects. The aspects of safety and security include the resistance of the building construction towards disasters. Along with the development of the urban area, the demanding needs and limited financial-abilities, the owners of the houses at the Cambaya coastal area develop their houses by utilizing the empty space at the coastal area and the space under floor of the stilt house. The change of the building shape gives an effect on the poor quality of the building, building safety, and security. However, there are several stilt houses at Cambaya which could reduce the impacts of disasters on the safety of the residents through their local wisdom.

  16. Supporting institution-to-community transitions for people with psychiatric disabilities: Findings and implications from a participatory action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gossett Zakrajsek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite preference for community-based living, large numbers of people with psychiatric disabilities live in nursing homes throughout the US. Community-based services for this population are limited by public policy and service system barriers. This paper summarizes these barriers and presents the second phase of a participatory action research project jointly developed by university-based researchers and two Centers for Independent Living. A qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of three individuals with psychiatric disabilities reintegrating into the community from nursing homes. Findings revealed themes of social isolation, participation in virtual communities, variability of impairment experiences and unmet needs for community supports. In addition to thematic findings, action products were generated for the benefit of community partners. These products included national best practice resources and a needs assessment survey tool. Study findings and products point to specific systems change and policy recommendations to better support community reintegration for this population. These recommendations are discussed in light of U.S. healthcare reform and broader disability advocacy efforts.

  17. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takusari Eri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Methods Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. Results The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively. Conclusions These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  18. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chizuko; Chida, Fuminori; Nakamura, Hikaru; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Yagi, Junko; Koeda, Atsuhiko; Takusari, Eri; Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio

    2011-03-08

    The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score) for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively). These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  19. Housing Preferences among Adults with Dual Diagnoses in Different Stages of Treatment and Housing Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Bond, Gary R; Davis, Kristin E

    2010-10-01

    Housing is an essential component of psychiatric rehabilitation, particularly for consumers with dual diagnoses. Research has not clearly examined why and when consumers prefer different types of housing. This exploratory study examined 1) whether housing preferences differ between stage of treatment for substance abuse, 2) whether consumers who prefer certain housing types have preferences for certain characteristics, and 3) whether consumers living in different types of housing report differences in social support, choice, and housing satisfaction. A total of 103 participants living in supervised housing (n= 65), independent apartment housing (n= 22), single room occupancy hotels (n= 11), and with family (n= 5) completed self-report questionnaires. Results showed that 1) the majority of participants preferred their own apartment or house across different stages of treatment, 2) preference for supervised housing was associated with on-site staff and peer support while preference for apartment housing was associated with autonomy and privacy, and 3) consumers in single room occupancies reported the least choice and lowest satisfaction. These findings contribute to the understanding of consumers' housing preferences and the differences consumers perceive between certain housing types.

  20. Examining the bidirectional association between veteran homelessness and incarceration within the context of permanent supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Meagan; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Homelessness and incarceration share a bidirectional association: individuals experiencing homelessness are more likely to be incarcerated and former inmates are more likely to become homeless. Permanent supportive housing (PSH) programs have demonstrated positive outcomes for participants with criminal histories, yet participants continue to exit to jail or prison and experience subsequent homelessness. Using data on Veterans participating in a PSH program at 4 locations between 2011 and 2014 (N = 1,060), logistic regression was used to examine the risk factors for exiting PSH because of incarceration and returning to homelessness. Though exiting because of incarceration was uncommon, Veterans with a drug use disorder who decreased the frequency of related care over time had an increased risk for this outcome, and a history of incarceration increased Veterans' risk of experiencing ongoing homelessness. Findings can inform housing and reentry interventions which should account for participant risk factors and service needs in an effort to end the cycle of homelessness and incarceration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series: continued support towards more sustainable human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goss, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of current policy as it relates to the establishment of sustainable human settlements and specifically settlement locality. The objective of the Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series is to guide housing / settlement investment decisions by various...

  2. MST-80 microprocessor trainer. [Uses INTEL 8080A CPU and support chips housed in attache case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. D.

    1976-05-21

    This trainer is a complete, self-contained microcomputer system housed in a brief case for portability and convenience of use. It utilizes INTEL's 8080A microprocessor and associated support chips. The trainer is designed to allow the student to explore and learn the hardware and software capability of the 8080 microprocessor. It includes a breadboard socket so that experiments can be interfaced to the trainer. This option allows the student to learn both interfacing techniques and programing. A keyboard and numerical display are provided for the student to communicate with the trainer. The keyboard and numerical display can be used with either the octal number system or the hexadecimal number system. 8 figures. (RWR)

  3. A telepsychiatry model to support psychiatric outreach in the public sector in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, J; Ramlall, S; Mars, M

    2012-07-01

    The access of rural Mental Health Care Users in South Africa to specialist psychiatrists and quality mental health care is currently sub-optimal. Health professionals and planners working in psychiatry lack a well-defined and feasible outreach model to facilitate the delivery of services to remote and rural areas. In response to this challenge, a three-year action research telepsychiatry study was undertaken by the Departments of Psychiatry and TeleHealth at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, to develop a telepsychiatry outreach model based on local research and international evidence. The Model draws on needs and infrastructure assessments of the designated psychiatric hospitals in the province, a review of the published international evidence on telepsychiatry and videoconference-based education, and an evaluation of local clinical and educational telepsychiatry implementations in KwaZulu-Natal. The Model proposed is "virtual", i.e. not bound to provincial or district referral patterns, aims not to add to the burden on the current workforce and is intended to be integrated into psychiatry outreach services and policy. The Model should be subjected to in situ testing for validation and implementation. It is hoped that an implementation of this Model will improve the access of Mental Health Care Users to specialist psychiatry care.

  4. Peer-led healthy lifestyle program in supportive housing: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Stefancic, Ana; O'Hara, Kathleen; El-Bassel, Nabila; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Luchsinger, José A; Gates, Lauren; Younge, Richard; Wall, Melanie; Weinstein, Lara; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2015-09-02

    The risk for obesity is twice as high in people with serious mental illness (SMI) compared to the general population. Racial and ethnic minority status contribute additional health risks. The aim of this study is to describe the protocol of a Hybrid Trial Type 1 design that will test the effectiveness and examine the implementation of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention in supportive housing agencies serving diverse clients with serious mental illness who are overweight or obese. The Hybrid Trial Type 1 design will combine a randomized effectiveness trial with a mixed-methods implementation study. The effectiveness trial will test the health impacts of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention versus usual care in supportive housing agencies. The healthy lifestyle intervention is derived from the Group Lifestyle Balanced Program, lasts 12 months, and will be delivered by trained peer specialists. Repeated assessments will be conducted at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months post randomization. A mixed-methods (e.g., structured interviews, focus groups, surveys) implementation study will be conducted to examine multi-level implementation factors and processes that can inform the use of the healthy lifestyle intervention in routine practice, using data from agency directors, program managers, staff, and peer specialists before, during, and after the implementation of the effectiveness trial. This paper describes the use of a hybrid research design that blends effectiveness trial methodologies and implementation science rarely used when studying the physical health of people with SMI and can serve as a model for integrating implementation science and health disparities research. Rigorously testing effectiveness and exploring the implementation process are both necessary steps to establish the evidence for large-scale delivery of peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention to improve the physical health of racial/ethnic minorities with SMI. www

  5. Trajectories and Correlates of Special Education Supports for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Psychiatric Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Christine J.; Lerner, Matthew D.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2017-01-01

    Relatively little is known about patterns of school-based supportive services for youth with autism spectrum disorder. This study describes these supportive services and their correlates, both cross-sectionally and retrospectively, in a large sample (N = 283) of 6- to 18-year-old youth. To assess whether special education designation and classroom…

  6. Smoking cessation care in state-operated or state-supported psychiatric hospitals: from policy to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar; Schacht, Lucille; Lane, G Michael

    2013-07-01

    The aims of this study were to identify changes in smoking policies and their implementation and to determine the level of smoking cessation care provided at state-operated or state-supported psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Hospitals were surveyed in 2008 (N=219) and 2011 (N=206) about their smoking policies and practices, and changes in specific policies and practices, such as staff specialty training about smoking cessation care, assessment at intake, provision of smoking cessation treatment and education, and aftercare planning, were examined. Smoking cessation care was categorized as best, good, average, or poor. The survey was completed in both 2008 and 2011 by 108 hospitals. The number of hospitals prohibiting smoking rose by 73%, from 48% in 2008 to 83% in 2011. The provision of specialty training to staff did not significantly improve. Nearly all hospitals assessed smoking status at admission, and nicotine replacement therapy was provided by more hospitals than any other treatment in both 2008 and 2011. The number of hospitals providing no follow-up of smoking cessation care after discharge dropped significantly, from 64% to 41%, and significantly more provided good versus average smoking cessation care. Analysis of smoking policies at state-operated or state-supported psychiatric inpatient hospitals found significant movement in adopting nonsmoking policies and some increase in active treatment, notably wellness counseling. Educational resources have not reached full penetration, and continuum of care activities are also lagging behind. Additional resources and staff training may be needed to continue to address smoking cessation both during and after hospitalization.

  7. The relationships among personality, social support, and resilience of abused nurses at emergency rooms and psychiatric wards in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fen; Chang, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to identify factors associated with resilience that helped abused nurses face and cope with violent events. The data for this cross-sectional study were collected from June 2013 to December 2013; 272 participants were recruited from emergency rooms and psychiatric wards in four hospitals in central Taiwan. Among these participants, 230 (84.6%) met the inclusion criterion and completed all questionnaires; 69 (30%) of them reported having experienced only verbal violence; 46 (20%) reported having experienced only physical violence, and 115 (50%) reported having experienced a combination of verbal and physical violence. The following were positively associated with resilience score: having a college education or greater (exp((β)()) = 1.045, p = .018), extraversion (exp((β)()) = 1.012 per unit increase in the score, p support (exp((β)()) = 1.004 per unit increase in the score, p = .031), peer support (exp((β)()) = 1.008 per unit increase in the score, p = .006), and lower level of neuroticism (exp((β)()) = 0.983 per unit increase in the score, p resilience was explained by the variables assessed. Adequate support and advanced education are important for abused nurses to enhance their resilience.

  8. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  9. Development and usability testing of a web-based decision support for users and health professionals in psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2017-09-01

    Shared decision making (SMD) related to treatment and rehabilitation is considered a central component in recovery-oriented practice. Although decision aids are regarded as an essential component for successfully implementing SDM, these aids are often lacking within psychiatric services. The aim of this study was to use a participatory design to facilitate the development of a user-generated, web-based decision aid for individuals receiving psychiatric services. The results of this effort as well as the lessons learned during the development and usability processes are reported. The participatory design included 4 iterative cycles of development. Various qualitative methods for data collection were used with potential end users participating as informants in focus group and individual interviews and as usability and pilot testers. Interviewing and testing identified usability problems that then led to refinements and making the subsequent prototypes increasingly user-friendly and relevant. In each phase of the process, feedback from potential end-users provided guidance in developing the formation of the web-based decision aid that strengthens the position of users by integrating access to information regarding alternative supports, interactivity between staff and users, and user preferences as a continual focus in the tool. This web-based decision aid has the potential to strengthen service users' experience of self-efficacy and control as well as provide staff access to user knowledge and preferences. Studies employing participatory models focusing on usability have potential to significantly contribute to the development and implementation of tools that reflect user perspectives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Perspectives on Sustainability: Exploring the Views of Tenants in Supported Social Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalyn A. V. Robison

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Government policy aimed at curbing carbon emissions often focusses on encouraging individual action, however the effectiveness of this approach has been limited. Investigations of why this might be have included segmentation, to identify different groups who undertake more or less action, and analysis of various “barriers” to action. Those on lower incomes who are not home owners have previously been found to be less engaged in seeking out energy efficiency information. Working with low-income tenants living in supported social housing we conducted three group interviews, accompanied by a 7-item scale measuring general attitude towards the environment. The interviews were aimed at opening up discussion about environmental and energy issues, including exploring more deeply what, for these participants, underlies barriers to conservation behaviours. We found participants to be very willing to engage in conversation and knowledgeable about a range of relevant issues. Barriers explored include: lack of confidence in existing levels of knowledge, habit, self-interest and lack of agency, and in all cases several different perspectives were voiced by participants. Implications for policy, interventions and public engagement are given, including ways to increase dialogue and reflection on sustainability issues for all sectors of society.

  11. The Brazilian psychiatric reform: historical and technical-supportive aspects of experiences carried out in the cities of São Paulo, Santos and Campinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Amélia Luzio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian psychiatric reform: historical and technical-supportive aspects of experiences carried out in the cities of São Paulo (capital, Santos and Campinas, in order to understand their material, social and political impacts, the progress in the process of breaking away from the psychiatric ward model, and the establishment of creative and productive groups, required to build up the psychosocial treatment in regard to mental health, as well as to evaluate the contribution that the SUS (Brazilian Public Health System had on the psychiatric reform in the mentioned cities. The research, which is the basis of this paper, is part of a thesis regarding mental health care, whereby the innovative projects implemented in those cities served as framework and basis for comparison to analyze mental health policy in small and medium-sized cities and towns in the state of São Paulo.

  12. Psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, and perceived social support among elderly population: a community-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The growth in the elderly population means an inevitable increase in general physical health, psychobiological and mental health-related problems. Aim of the study: The present study aims to examine psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, and perceived social support among elderly population. Research design: A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. People in age group of 60 years and above, who were permanent members of their respective households of Ranga Pukri Para and Dekargaon village in Tezpur, Sonitpur district of Assam, were the sample for the present study. One thousand four hundred and ninety adult populations had been identified as sample frame from the electorate list. One hundred and four people of age 60 years and above had been identified from the list for the study purpose. Random sampling method was used for selection of the sample. Semi-structured socio-demographic datasheet, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12, CAGE questionnaire, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF scale were administered to the respondents. Results: Based on the GHQ-12 score, it was found that 24% of the respondents showed an indication of mental health problems and from the CAGE score, it indicated that 13% of the respondents were found to be misusing or was in dependence in alcohol. The result from the present study indicated that elderly population was getting more family social support, followed by friends and from significant others. The result indicated that the mean score was low in the domain of social relationships. Environment domain was high followed by physical health and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF. Conclusion: In the elderly population, overall health can be influenced by multiple factors, including a person’s physical, psychological, behavioural, and social factors. The mental health professionals can provide resources, services

  13. Provider perceptions on HIV risk and prevention services within permanent supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Henwood, Benjamin; Harris, Taylor; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rhoades, Harmony

    2017-10-01

    Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is an evidence-based solution to homelessness for persons experiencing chronic or long-term homelessness and one or more physical or behavioral health problems. Health services through PSH typically focus on physical and behavioral health. With the exception of programs specifically designed for persons living with HIV/AIDS, little attention has focused on services through PSH to prevent transmission of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), yet sexual risk behavior continues after homeless persons move into PSH. The purpose of this study was to investigate how PSH providers approach HIV prevention and the challenges they perceive surrounding HIV prevention in PSH. Results serve as a critical first step toward addressing the acceptability and feasibility of providing HIV/STI prevention services to PSH residents. As part of a longitudinal mixed methods study examining HIV risk and prevention behavior among homeless unaccompanied adults moving into PSH in Los Angeles, we conducted eleven focus groups with a total of 60 frontline staff across 10 PSH agencies. Thirty-three percent of focus group participants were African American, 32% were Hispanic, and 55% were women. Results suggest that provider awareness and knowledge of PrEP is very limited, and provision of formal HIV prevention programing for residents is perceived as challenging. Informal, ad hoc conversations with residents about sexual risk and HIV prevention do occur when providers have rapport with clients and perceive risk. There are significant gaps in HIV prevention services through PSH but also opportunities to enhance providers' efforts to promote the health of residents through prevention.

  14. Developing a peer-based healthy lifestyle program for people with serious mental illness in supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kathleen; Stefancic, Ana; Cabassa, Leopoldo J

    2017-12-01

    Overweight and obesity disproportionally impact people with serious mental illness (SMI). Healthy lifestyle interventions can improve the health of people with SMI but may need to be adapted for this population. The aims of this study were: to (1) examine the feasibility and acceptability of delivering the Peer-based Group Lifestyle Balance (PGLB) intervention and (2) describe intervention adaptations for people with SMI in supportive housing. Peer specialists and social workers co-facilitated 12 weekly PGLB sessions for 14 supportive housing clients. We conducted structured interviews and collected qualitative data through field notes and two focus groups. Frequencies and measures of central tendencies were used to describe participant characteristics and PGLB feasibility and acceptability measures. Qualitative data was analyzed using directed content analysis. Participants on average attended 8 of 12 sessions, and reported that services were satisfactory and helpful. Intervention adaptations, ongoing throughout the study, focused on adding peer-specialists as co-facilitators, increasing individualized support and developing strategies to address socioeconomic barriers impacting participants' ability to engage in healthy lifestyle changes. Study findings suggest that participants with SMI in supportive housing perceived PGLB as feasible and acceptable. Expanding the relevance and reach of peer-based healthy lifestyle interventions in community settings serving people with SMI requires careful adaptations to the socioeconomic realities of this population and the complexities of living with co-morbid health and mental health conditions.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Spring-Supported Piston in a Vibrated Liquid-Filled Housing: II. Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, T. J.; Torczynski, J. R.; Clausen, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a piston supported by a spring in a vibrated liquid-filled housing is investigated experimentally. The housing containing the piston and the liquid is subjected to vibrations along its axis. A post fixed to the housing penetrates a hole through the piston and produces a flow resistance that depends on piston position. Flexible bellows attached to the housing ends enable the piston, liquid, and bellows to execute a collective motion that forces little liquid through the flow resistance. The low damping of this motion leads to a resonance, at which the flow-resistance nonlinearity produces a net force on the piston that can cause it to compress its spring. Experiments are performed to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of this system, and these results are compared to theoretical and numerical results. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Planning support in estimating green housing opportunities for different socioeconomic groups in Nanjing, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Hong; Geertman, Stan; Hooimeijer, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The sustainable city concept is often criticized for being unaffordable for the majority. To cater for various socioeconomic groups, it is essential that planners consider both affordability and sustainability. We provide planners with a methodology for estimating green housing potential for various

  17. The Relationship between Housing and Children's Literacy Achievement: Implications for Supporting Vulnerable Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Jace

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between housing, a critical aspect of socio-economic conditions, and literacy achievement of children from a school in a high density suburb in South Africa. Data was collected through a quantitative survey that was administered to learners (N = 160) from four Grade Five classes. The survey included five…

  18. Fair Housing and Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Herminia L.

    Latinos need the protection of the proposed Fair Housing Amendments of 1987 and the active support of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to overcome housing discrimination. Latinos are both disproportionately poor and inadequately housed, but low income alone cannot fully explain the poor housing conditions under which many…

  19. Psychiatric morbidity and its sociodemographic correlates among women in Irbid, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, T K; Alawan, A; Al Ma'aitah, R; Otoom, S A

    2006-01-01

    The rate of psychiatric morbidity and its sociodemographic correlates was estimated in 2000 women attending 3 primary care centres in Irbid, Jordan. Women completed standardized diagnostic tools that yielded psychiatric diagnoses, a stress scale and sociodemographic details. The rate of psychiatric morbidity was 26.3% and psychological distress 39.0%. A significant association was found between the amount and severity of stress and psychiatric morbidity. Post-marital status (separated, divorced, widowed), woman's illiteracy, family violence, violent marital relationship, living independently, being in a non-cousin marriage, being a second wife, poor housing and absence of a social support system were significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity in this group of women.

  20. Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES): A Framework for Developing Performance Measures for Behavioral Health Crisis and Psychiatric Emergency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Margaret E; Tanner, Kathleen; Jurica, Paul J; Rhoads, Richard; Carson, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Crisis and emergency psychiatric services are an integral part of the healthcare system, yet there are no standardized measures for programs providing these services. We developed the Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES) framework to create measures that inform internal performance improvement initiatives and allow comparison across programs. The framework consists of two components-the CRISES domains (timely, safe, accessible, least-restrictive, effective, consumer/family centered, and partnership) and the measures supporting each domain. The CRISES framework provides a foundation for development of standardized measures for the crisis field. This will become increasingly important as pay-for-performance initiatives expand with healthcare reform.

  1. Social support improves mental health among the victims relocated to temporary housing following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shihoko; Aida, Jun; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kondo, Naoki; Subramanian, S V; Ito, Kanade; Kobashi, Gen; Masuno, Kanako; Kondo, Katsunori; Osaka, Ken

    2014-11-01

    The victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami have been forced to live in temporary housing, mainly by two different methods of resettlement: group allocation that preserved pre-existing local social ties and lottery allocation. We examined the effects of various factors, including the resettlement methods and social support, on mental health. From February to March 2012, we completed a cross-sectional survey of 281 refugees aged 40 years or older, who had lost their homes in the tsunami and were living in temporary housing in Iwanuma city. Psychological distress of the victims was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) that consists of six self-reported items. Participants were also asked whether they had provided or received social support during this time. Participants were categorized as "providing social support" if they listened to someone else's concerns and complaints, or "receiving social support" if they have someone who listened to their concerns and complaints. After adjusting for age and sex, multiple log-binomial regression analysis showed that participants without social support had a higher risk of psychological distress. Group allocation victims were more likely to receive social support than those who underwent lottery allocation. However, the resettlement approach did not significantly correlate with distress. Other factors associated with a higher risk of psychological distress were a younger age (55 or younger), living with either 3 people or 6 or more people, and having a lower income. The present results suggest that social support promotes the mental health of disaster victims.

  2. VA health service utilization for homeless and low-income Veterans: a spotlight on the VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program in greater Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H; Andersen, Ronald M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Gelberg, Lillian

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-VA Supportive Housing (VASH) program-the VA's Housing First effort-is central to efforts to end Veteran homelessness. Yet, little is known about health care utilization patterns associated with achieving HUD-VASH housing. We compare health service utilization at the VA Greater Los Angeles among: (1) formerly homeless Veterans housed through HUD-VASH (HUD-VASH Veterans); (2) currently homeless Veterans; (3) housed, low-income Veterans not in HUD-VASH; and (4) housed, not low-income Veterans. We performed a secondary database analysis of Veterans (n=62,459) who received VA Greater Los Angeles care between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. We described medical/surgical and mental health utilization [inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department (ED)]. We controlled for demographics, need, and primary care use in regression analyses of utilization data by housing and income status. HUD-VASH Veterans had more inpatient, outpatient, and ED use than currently homeless Veterans. Adjusting for demographics and need, HUD-VASH Veterans and the low-income housed Veterans had similar likelihoods of medical/surgical inpatient and outpatient utilization, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Adjusting first for demographics and need (model 1), then also for primary care use (model 2), HUD-VASH Veterans had the greatest decrease in incident rates of specialty medical/surgical, mental health, and ED care from models 1 to 2, becoming similar to the currently homeless, compared with the housed, not low-income group. Our findings suggest that currently homeless Veterans underuse health care relative to housed Veterans. HUD-VASH may address this disparity by providing housing and linkages to primary care.

  3. Social return on investment of mutual support based housing projects: Potential for socio-economic cost savings and higher living quality

    OpenAIRE

    Borgloh, Sarah; Westerheide, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Our paper describes the results of a Social Return on Investment analysis of four new housing projects in Germany. A common characteristic of all projects is the central importance of mutual neighborly support to meet the demand for the assistance of older residents. All projects share some common architectural features and infrastructural characteristics. Furthermore, in each housing project, some form of support by social workers takes place. Using a propensity score matching approach, we c...

  4. Requirements of decision support tools based on total cost of ownership for collective self-organised housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkmans, T.J.A.; Klerks, S.A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Collective self-organised (CSO) housing refers to the process of a collective of individuals that organize, finance, plan and commission their own housing projects. CSO housing can refer both to new construction, and retrofitting /refurbishment processes. The unique feature of CSO housing is the

  5. 76 FR 45282 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Street S Tacoma WA 98444 $179,013 25 SPOKANE HOUSING AUTHORITY 55 W Mission Avenue........ Spokane WA...-VASH) Program for Fiscal Years (FY) 2010 AGENCY: Office of Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION..., Office of Public and Indian Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW...

  6. Bias due to sample selection in propensity score matching for a supportive housing program evaluation in New York City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Little is known about influences of sample selection on estimation in propensity score matching. The purpose of the study was to assess potential selection bias using one-to-one greedy matching versus optimal full matching as part of an evaluation of supportive housing in New York City (NYC. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: Data came from administrative data for 2 groups of applicants who were eligible for an NYC supportive housing program in 2007-09, including chronically homeless adults with a substance use disorder and young adults aging out of foster care. We evaluated the 2 matching methods in their ability to balance covariates and represent the original population, and in how those methods affected outcomes related to Medicaid expenditures. RESULTS: In the population with a substance use disorder, only optimal full matching performed well in balancing covariates, whereas both methods created representative populations. In the young adult population, both methods balanced covariates effectively, but only optimal full matching created representative populations. In the young adult population, the impact of the program on Medicaid expenditures was attenuated when one-to-one greedy matching was used, compared with optimal full matching. CONCLUSION: Given covariate balancing with both methods, attenuated program impacts in the young adult population indicated that one-to-one greedy matching introduced selection bias.

  7. Health status, quality of life, residential stability, substance use, and health care utilization among adults applying to a supportive housing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Stephen W; Gogosis, Evie; Chambers, Catharine; Dunn, James R; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Aubry, Tim

    2011-12-01

    Supportive housing, defined as subsidized housing in conjunction with site-based social services, may help improve the health and residential stability of highly disadvantaged individuals. This study examined changes in health status, quality of life, substance use, health care utilization, and residential stability among 112 homeless and vulnerably housed individuals who applied to a supportive housing program in Toronto, Canada, from December 2005 to June 2007. Follow-up interviews were conducted every 6 months for 18 months. Comparisons were made between individuals who were accepted into the program (intervention) and those who were wait-listed (usual care) using repeated-measures analyses. Individuals who were accepted into the housing program experienced significantly greater improvements in satisfaction with living situation compared with individuals in the usual care group (time, F(3,3,261) = 47.68, p life measures, health status, health care utilization, or substance use between the two groups over time. Significant improvement in residential stability occurred over time, independent of assigned housing group (time, F(3,3,261) = 9.96, p < 0.01; group × time, F(3,3,261) = 1.74, p = 0.17). The ability to examine the effects of supportive housing on homeless individuals was limited by the small number of participants who were literally homeless at baseline and by the large number of participants who gained stable housing during the study period regardless of their assigned housing status. Nonetheless, this study shows that highly disadvantaged individuals with a high prevalence of poor physical and mental health and substance use can achieve stable housing.

  8. Effects of a live educational music therapy intervention on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support and trust in the therapist: a four-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Social support is associated with enhanced illness management and recovery in persons with mental illness, making it an important topic addressed through acute inpatient psychoeducational programs. In addition, trust in the therapist may mediate clinical outcomes in this patient population. To date, few studies have examined the effect of music-based psychoeducational programs on these variables. The purpose of this study was to isolate and examine the component parts of a live educational music therapy intervention, and its effect on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support from significant others, family, and friends and trust in the therapist. This study also explored whether trust in therapist varied across conditions, but did not examine it as a mediator for social support. Participants (N = 96) were cluster-randomized in a single-session posttest-only design to one of four conditions: live educational music therapy, recorded educational music therapy, education without music, or recreational music therapy without education. Conditions were designed to isolate the following intervention components: live vs. recorded music, educational vs. non-educational content, and music vs. nonmusic modality. Dependent measures were assessed post intervention via established self-report instruments evaluating perceived social support and trust in the therapist. There were no significant between-group differences for social support or trust in therapist total scores. However, subscale score analyses revealed two significant between-group differences: (a) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived therapist competence compared with the Recorded Educational Music Therapy condition; (b) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived support from friends compared with the Recreational Music Therapy condition. Live educational music therapy may be a way to

  9. Mind over matter? The role of individual perceptions in understanding the social ecology of housing environments for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret

    2014-12-01

    There is a disagreement in place-based research regarding whether objective indicators or individual perceptions of environments are better predictors of well-being. This study assessed environmental influences on well-being for 373 individuals with psychiatric disabilities living independently in 66 neighborhoods in the southeastern United States. Three questions were examined utilizing random effects models: (1) How much variance in personal and neighborhood well-being can be explained by neighborhood membership? (2) What is the relationship between participant perceptions of neighborhood quality and researcher ratings of neighborhood quality? and (3) What is the relative influence of individual perceptions, perceptions aggregated by neighborhood, and researcher ratings of neighborhood quality in predicting personal and neighborhood well-being? Results indicate that individual perceptions of neighborhood quality were more closely related to well-being than either aggregated perceptions or researcher ratings. Thus, participants' perceptions of their neighborhoods were more important indicators of their well-being than objective ratings made by researchers. Findings have implications for measurement approaches and intervention design in placed-based research.

  10. Snapshot of the supports of communication used by patients at a French psychiatric hospital: a digital or social division?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Murielle; Nubukpo, Philippe; Malauzat, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    The role of information and communications technology is becoming increasingly prevalent in daily life and in the organization of medical care: are some people being left out? To evaluate access to and the uses of communication resources by psychiatric patients, focusing on the means of communication (e.g. mobile phones and computers), access and frequency of internet use. A questionnaire was distributed, over a period of 1 week, to inpatients or day hospitalised patients aged over 12 years in all care units. Access to and the uses of modern communication resources were lower than in the general population. Among places and means of internet consultation, the personal computer was most often cited, but only by 34%, and the use of mobile phones is still not widespread. Finally, day hospitalised subjects, the elderly, or subjects being treated in the psychosis care sector use internet and technology the least. Some differences exist between this population with mental illness and the general population on the use of new communication technologies. The possibility of integrating these techniques in individualized psychiatric care requires prior equipment and/or updates.

  11. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Self-management of health care: multimethod study of using integrated health care and supportive housing to address systematic barriers for people experiencing homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsell, Cameron; Ten Have, Charlotte; Denton, Michelle; Walter, Zoe

    2017-04-07

    Objectives The aims of the present study were to examine tenants' experiences of a model of integrated health care and supportive housing and to identify whether integrated health care and supportive housing improved self-reported health and healthcare access. Methods The present study used a mixed-method survey design (n=75) and qualitative interviews (n=20) performed between September 2015 and August 2016. Participants were tenants of permanent supportive housing in Brisbane (Qld, Australia). Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Integrated health care and supportive housing were resources for tenants to overcome systematic barriers to accessing mainstream health care experienced when homeless. When homeless, people did not have access to resources required to maintain their health. Homelessness meant not having a voice to influence the health care people received; healthcare practitioners treated symptoms of poverty rather than considering how homelessness makes people sick. Integrated healthcare and supportive housing enabled tenants to receive treatment for health problems that were compounded by the barriers to accessing mainstream healthcare that homelessness represented. Conclusions Extending the evidence about housing as a social determinant of health, the present study shows that integrated health care and supportive housing enabled tenants to take control to self-manage their health care. In addition to homelessness directly contributing to ill health, the present study provides evidence of how the experience of homelessness contributes to exclusions from mainstream healthcare. What is known about the topic? People who are homeless experience poor physical and mental health, have unmet health care needs and use disproportionate rates of emergency health services. What does the paper add? The experience of homelessness creates barriers to accessing adequate health care. The provision of onsite multidisciplinary integrated health care in

  13. In-house consultation to support professionals' responses to child abuse and neglect: Determinants of professionals' use and the association with guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Kaya, Anna H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and professionals' performance of six recommended activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN for preventive child health care professionals. A total of 154 professionals met the study's inclusion criteria. They filled in a questionnaire that measured in-house consultation practices and twelve determinants associated with the professional, the in-house expert, and the organizational context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the participants (46.8%) reported to consult the in-house expert in (almost) all of their suspected CAN cases. Professionals who reported better recollection of consulting the in-house expert (i.e. not forgetting to consult the expert) (p=.001), who were more familiar with consultation (p=.002), who had more positive attitudes and beliefs about consultation (p=.011) and who reported being more susceptible to the behavior (p=.001) and expectations/opinions (p=.025) of colleagues regarding in-house expert consultation were more likely to consult the in-house expert. Furthermore, in-house expert consultation was positively associated with two of six key guideline activities: consulting the regional child protection service and monitoring whether support was provided to families. The implications of these results for improving professionals' responses to CAN are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  15. Psychiatric Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Agrawal, Arpana; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2018-01-01

    into biologically, clinically, and therapeutically meaningful insights. The emerging findings suggest that we are entering a phase of accelerated genetic discovery for multiple psychiatric disorders. These findings are likely to elucidate the genetic portions of these truly complex traits, and this knowledge can...... then be mined for its relevance for improved therapeutics and its impact on psychiatric practice within a precision medicine framework. [AJP at 175: Remembering Our Past As We Envision Our Future November 1946: The Genetic Theory of Schizophrenia Franz Kallmann's influential twin study of schizophrenia in 691...

  16. Serological Evaluation for Supporting the Potential Role of House Sparrows in LPAIV (H9N2) Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Hadipour; A. Vosoughi; M. Fakhrabadipour; F. Azad; I. Khademi

    2011-01-01

    House sparrows (Passer domesticus) are abundant and widespread species of birds within the order Passeriformes and may contribute to AIV transmission and maintenance in nature. This study was carried out to find the role of house sparrows in the spread of low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses as carrier birds. For this reason seroprevalence survey was carried out in two-hundred house sparrows, using the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test. The studied sparrows did not show any clinical ...

  17. Homeless female U.S. veterans in a national supported housing program: comparison of individual characteristics and outcomes with male veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kane, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    As more women serve in the U.S. military, the proportion of females among homeless veterans is increasing. The current study compares the individual characteristics and 1-year outcomes of homeless female and male veterans in the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program nationally. Administrative data on 43,853 veterans (10.69% females; 89.31% males) referred to HUD-VASH were analyzed for gender differences at baseline and over a 1-year period. Homeless female veterans were younger, had shorter homeless and incarceration histories, and were less likely to have substance use disorders than men. However, despite being less likely to report combat exposure, female veterans were more likely to have posttraumatic stress disorder. Homeless female veterans were also much more likely to have dependent children with them and to plan to live with family members in supported housing. Once admitted to HUD-VASH, there were no gender differences in attrition or main housing outcomes. Case managers were faster to admit female veterans to the program, reported better working alliances, and provided more services related to employment and income than male veterans. These findings suggest homeless female veterans may have certain strengths, including being younger, less involved in the criminal justice system, and more adept at relating to professional and natural supports; but special attention to noncombat trauma and family-oriented services may be needed.

  18. 75 FR 16163 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ...,688 105 Nevada Rural Housing Authority........ 3695 Desatoya Drive...... Carson City NV 89701 407,291.... 300. City of Virginia Beach Princess Anne Park Virginia Beach VA 23456 270,541 35 Municipal Center...

  19. Pandemic flu knowledge among dormitory housed university students: a need for informal social support and social networking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Susan L; Huttlinger, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The declaration of a Phase 6 pandemic of influenza A (H1N1) by the World Health Organization in June 2009, triggered the activation of preparedness responses worldwide. During 2009 spring and fall, many US universities actuated their emergency pandemic preparedness plans. This article describes a research study that used a modified community based participatory research (CBPR) approach between August and November 2009 at New Mexico State University's main Las Cruces campus to determine influenza (pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza knowledge, attitudes, and health communication (informal support networks and social networking) strategies specifically related to influenza among dormitory housed (on-campus living) undergraduate students. The goal was to produce data for use in the university's pandemic illness/disaster preparedness and response plans. Following activation of the university's campus-wide efforts to educate students about pandemic flu, university community partners were asked for input regarding information for flu preparedness for the university's undergraduate students. Student participants were recruited for the present study from those housed in four campus dormitories. A purposive convenience sample was used to collect survey data from 175 students during the peak week of reported flu cases on campus. Each participant was given an anonymous, face-to-face, self-administered survey and 167 surveys were able to be analyzed. A χ² goodness of fit test was used to determine whether observed proportions of categorical variables differed from hypothesized proportions. Four categorical data were analyzed by topics: (1) demographics; (2) flu awareness; (3) flu immunization knowledge and practices; and (4) communication and health information practices. The average age was 19.6 years (SD = 1.8), with no significant differences by sex (86 males and 76 females, 5 undisclosed) or race/ethnicity (57 White, 43 Hispanic, 44 Other). All

  20. Housing Preferences among Adults with Dual Diagnoses in Different Stages of Treatment and Housing Types

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Jack; Bond, Gary R; Davis, Kristin E.

    2010-01-01

    Housing is an essential component of psychiatric rehabilitation, particularly for consumers with dual diagnoses. Research has not clearly examined why and when consumers prefer different types of housing. This exploratory study examined 1) whether housing preferences differ between stage of treatment for substance abuse, 2) whether consumers who prefer certain housing types have preferences for certain characteristics, and 3) whether consumers living in different types of housing report diffe...

  1. "It was just realizing ... that life isn't one big horror": a qualitative study of supported socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, L; Haglund, K E; Stayner, D A; Rakfeldt, J; Chinman, M J; Tebes, J K

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the qualitative component of a large-scale study of supported socialization. Paralleling the recent advances made through supported housing, supported employment, and supported education, this approach seeks to increase the involvement of individuals with psychiatric disabilities in naturally occurring social and recreational activities in community settings of their choice. After a review of social relationships and psychiatric disability, we describe the Partnership Project and present findings from a series of qualitative interviews conducted with a subsample of participants. We then discuss the implications of these findings for the community integration of individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

  2. Expression, Covariation, and Genetic Regulation of miRNA Biogenesis Genes in Brain Supports their Role in Addiction, Psychiatric Disorders, and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Kathleen Mulligan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of miRNA and miRNA biogenesis genes in the adult brain is just beginning to be explored. In this study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the expression, genetic regulation, and co-expression of major components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway using human and mouse data sets and resources available on the GeneNetwork web site (genenetwork.org. We found a wide range of variation in expression in both species for key components of the pathway—Drosha, Pasha, and Dicer. Across species, tissues, and expression platforms all three genes are generally well correlated. No single genetic locus exerts a strong and consistent influence on the expression of these key genes across murine brain regions. However, in mouse striatum, many members of the miRNA pathway are correlated—including Dicer, Drosha, Pasha, Ars2 (Srrt, Eif2c1 (Ago1, Eif2c2 (Ago2, Zcchc11, and Snip1. The expression of these genes may be partly influenced by a locus on Chromosome 9 (105.67 to 106.32 Mb. We explored ~1500 brain phenotypes available for the C57BL/6J x DBA/2J (BXD genetic mouse population in order to identify miRNA biogenesis genes correlated with traits related to addiction and psychiatric disorders. We found a significant association between expression of Dicer and Drosha in several brain regions and the response to many drugs of abuse, including ethanol, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Expression of Dicer, Drosha, and Pasha in most of the brain regions explored is strongly correlated with the expression of key members of the dopamine system. Drosha, Pasha, and Dicer expression is also correlated with the expression of behavioral traits measuring depression and sensorimotor gating, impulsivity, and anxiety, respectively. Our study provides a global survey of the expression and regulation of key miRNA biogenesis genes in brain and provides preliminary support for the involvement of these genes and their product miRNAs in addiction and psychiatric disease

  3. Residents’ experiences of relationships with nurses in community-based supported housing – a qualitative study based on Giorgi’s method of analysis and self psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rønning SB

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solrun Brenk Rønning, Stål Bjørkly Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Care, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Abstract: One of the prioritizations in the World Health Organization’s (WHO Mental Health Action Plan 2013–2020 is the provision of community mental health and social care services, such as supported housing. The ongoing process of such deinstitutionalization has raised issues concerning the impact on users’ quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore how residents in supported housing experience receiving professional help and how they perceived their relationships with nurses. The second aim was to investigate the relevance of Giorgi’s method of analysis and self psychology in analyzing these experiences. Four residents were interviewed individually. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by Giorgi’s method of analysis. Relations were interpreted within self psychology. The residents reported that they not only felt safe in the community but also felt a greater awareness of wanting to appear normal. They seemed to have an easier daily life and felt that the personnel met their selfobject needs when routines allowed for it. Professional awareness of empathic attunement and selfobject roles might enhance residents’ self-cohesiveness. The interviews were analyzed by Giorgi’s method of analysis, and the use of clinical concepts from self psychology was chosen to achieve a more dynamic understanding of the participants’ relational experiences and needs in supported housing. Keywords: mental health, nursing relationship, self psychology, supported housing, experiences

  4. Residents' experiences of relationships with nurses in community-based supported housing - a qualitative study based on Giorgi's method of analysis and self psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønning, Solrun Brenk; Bjørkly, Stål

    2017-01-01

    One of the prioritizations in the World Health Organization's (WHO) Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 is the provision of community mental health and social care services, such as supported housing. The ongoing process of such deinstitutionalization has raised issues concerning the impact on users' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore how residents in supported housing experience receiving professional help and how they perceived their relationships with nurses. The second aim was to investigate the relevance of Giorgi's method of analysis and self psychology in analyzing these experiences. Four residents were interviewed individually. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by Giorgi's method of analysis. Relations were interpreted within self psychology. The residents reported that they not only felt safe in the community but also felt a greater awareness of wanting to appear normal. They seemed to have an easier daily life and felt that the personnel met their selfobject needs when routines allowed for it. Professional awareness of empathic attunement and selfobject roles might enhance residents' self-cohesiveness. The interviews were analyzed by Giorgi's method of analysis, and the use of clinical concepts from self psychology was chosen to achieve a more dynamic understanding of the participants' relational experiences and needs in supported housing.

  5. The situation of being supported and conformed to the tobacco control law by the people serving in coffee houses, cafes and restaurants in Kayseri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elçin Balcı

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study it was aimed to reveal the opinions about smoking ban of the employers and employees in coffee houses, cafes and restaurants and their situation of being affected from the ban and the effects of smoke-free workplaces on smoking. Method: It is a cross-sectional type research done over 1161 individuals serving in 405 coffee houses, cafes and restaurants in Kayseri in October 2010. This survey including 25 questions was applied to people interviewing personally. Results: 41.4% of the individuals who took part in this survey fully supported the ban, 45.8% supported partly and 12.8% stated that they were completely against the ban. The rate of supporting the ban was significantly lower among those working in coffee houses, having smoking habits, working in places with no outdoor area and those who are employers or responsible for the workplace. 44.4% of the individuals pointed out that the number of their customers decreased after the legal regulation. 37.2% of stated that the rate of their customers unchanged and 5.2% pointed out that it increased after the regulation, 13.1% did not express an opinion. The rate of the individuals who stated that the number of their customers decreased was higher among those who work in places which don’t have outdoor area and work in coffee houses. 16.0% of the individuals stated that their customers always had positive look to the ban, 58.8% them pointed out that their customers got accustomed to it despite the earlier negative reactions. It has been found out the number of the cigarettes they smoke has decreased significantly both in workplace and daily compared before the legal regulation. Conclusion: It can be seen that these result have started to give positive impacts one year after the legal regulation although the support has not reached the desired level yet. The support to the regulation is thought to increase with making employees and particularly those who think smoking indoors

  6. Community Movement in Applying Mosquito Net on House Ventilations: An Initial Support for Green Architecture to Decrease Dengue Disease in Bandung Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinawan, F. R.; Dewi, I. P. P.; Haifa, G. Z.; Suharno, K. D.; Oktavinus, K.; Lyn, P. S.

    2017-10-01

    Green architecture still has risk to dengue disease when trees cover house roofs’ gutter. This study was aimed to continue a geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) study on roofs factor association with dengue disease by initiating community movement in applyingmosquito net on house ventilations to cut the disease transmission and mosquito breeding sites inside house. Our methods was an operational research in which improvement of interventions, policies and regulations towards dengue disease prevention is our intended endpoint. Several steps were conducted such as: (1) research problems formulation from GIS-RS analysis from previous phase research in Bandung city, (2) informal and formal approach to community leaders and primary healthcare centre (Puskesmas), (3) Video education and focus group discussion (FGD), (4) initial application of mosquito nets on house in communities; and (5) advocacy to Mayor of Bandung city (was on progress).Our study resulted several supports: one of sub-city leaders (Camat) in the city, village leaders (Lurah), and sub-village leaders (Ketua RW) of 5 villages (kelurahan), one kelurahan which mainly comprised formal settlements needed more efforts, which was experts on dengue disease from university to directly explain the mosquito nets application to its community. Informal leaders in all kelurahan’s community suggested only mothers movement was not enough, thus, youths in community was mentioned to help the community movement on the mosquito nets application.

  7. 77 FR 9682 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Authority. Avenue. Public Housing Agency of the 555 N. Wabasha Saint Paul...... MN 55102 162,378 25 City of St Paul. Street, Suite 400. PHA in and for the City of 1001 Washington Minneapolis..... MN 55401 298,128 50 Minneapolis. Avenue N. HRA of St. Cloud, Minnesota.. 1225 W. Saint Germain Saint Cloud..... MN...

  8. Between marketing and financial support : Dutch municipal policy instruments to improve the quality of private housing stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambach, M.; Meijer, F.; Visscher, H.

    2011-01-01

    Dutch municipalities are faced with an ageing private housing stock, of which parts show a diversity of quality backlogs, including their energy quality. Dutch municipalities are in the process of developing a combination of communicative and economic policy instruments to seduce private homeowners

  9. Ecological Assessment of Clinicians’ Antipsychotic Prescription Habits in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Novel Web- and Mobile Phone–Based Prototype for a Dynamic Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Nitzburg, George C; Ovejero, Santiago; Alvarez-Garcia, Raquel; Carballo, Juan; Walter, Michel; Billot, Romain; Lenca, Philippe; Delgado-Gomez, David; Ropars, Juliette; de la Calle Gonzalez, Ivan; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) hold the potential to significantly improve pharmacological treatment management. Objective The aim of our study was to develop a novel Web- and mobile phone–based application to provide a dynamic CDSS by monitoring and analyzing practitioners’ antipsychotic prescription habits and simultaneously linking these data to inpatients’ symptom changes. Methods We recruited 353 psychiatric inpatients whose symptom levels and prescribed medications were inputted into the MEmind application. We standardized all medications in the MEmind database using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and the defined daily dose (DDD). For each patient, MEmind calculated an average for the daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics (using the N05A ATC code), prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to DDD ratio. Results MEmind results found that antipsychotics were used by 61.5% (217/353) of inpatients, with the largest proportion being patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (33.4%, 118/353). Of the 217 patients, 137 (63.2%, 137/217) were administered pharmacological monotherapy and 80 (36.8%, 80/217) were administered polytherapy. Antipsychotics were used mostly in schizophrenia spectrum and related psychotic disorders, but they were also prescribed in other nonpsychotic diagnoses. Notably, we observed polypharmacy going against current antipsychotics guidelines. Conclusions MEmind data indicated that antipsychotic polypharmacy and off-label use in inpatient units is commonly practiced. MEmind holds the potential to create a dynamic CDSS that provides real-time tracking of prescription practices and symptom change. Such feedback can help practitioners determine a maximally therapeutic drug treatment while avoiding unproductive overprescription and off-label use. PMID:28126703

  10. From psychiatric ward to the streets and shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, C; Russell, G; Kingston-Macclure, S; Turner, K; Dill, S

    2006-06-01

    The issue of discharge from hospital ward to the streets is seldom explored in the literature, but all too commonly experienced by individuals experiencing psychiatric disorders. The Community University Research Alliance on Housing and Mental Health sought to determine how frequently people were discharged from psychiatric wards to shelters or the street in London, Ontario, Canada. A number of data sources were accessed to determine instances of discharges to shelters or the street. Data were analysed to determine the number of moves occurring between hospital and shelter or no fixed address. All datasets revealed the problem of discharge to shelters or the street occurred regularly. All data sources used have the difficulty of likely underestimating the extent of the problem. This type of discharge occurred at least 194 times in 2002 in London, Ontario, Canada. Policies that contribute to this problem include income-support policies, the reduction in psychiatric hospital beds and the lack of community supports. Without recognition, this problem is at risk of remaining invisible with no further improvements to the situation.

  11. Community Context of Sober Living Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L; Henderson, Diane; Trocki, Karen; Evans, Kristy; Wittman, Fried

    2012-12-01

    The success or failure of programs designed to address alcohol and drug problems can be profoundly influenced by the communities where they are located. Support from the community is vital for long term stability and conflict with the community can harm a program's reputation or even result in closure. This study examined the community context of sober living houses (SLHs) in one Northern California community by interviewing key stakeholder groups. SLHs are alcohol and drug free living environments for individuals attempting to abstain from substance use. Previous research on residents of SLHs showed they make long-term improvements on measures of substance use, psychiatric symptoms, arrests, and employment. Interviews were completed with house managers, neighbors, and key informants from local government and community organizations. Overall, stakeholders felt SLHs were necessary and had a positive impact on the community. It was emphasized that SLHs needed to practice a "good neighbor" policy that prohibited substance use and encouraged community service. Size and density of SLHs appeared to influence neighbor perceptions. For small (six residents or less), sparsely populated houses, a strategy of blending in with the neighborhood seemed to work. However, it was clear that larger, densely populated houses need to actively manage relationships with community stakeholders. Strategies for improving relationships with immediate neighbors, decreasing stigma, and broadening the leadership structure are discussed. Implications for a broad array of community based programs are discussed.

  12. Housing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesdahl, Else; Scholkmann, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    On houses and their furniture and fittings, and on the study of this - with a comparison of rural, urban, monastic and aristocratic housing, and a special section on heating technologies.......On houses and their furniture and fittings, and on the study of this - with a comparison of rural, urban, monastic and aristocratic housing, and a special section on heating technologies....

  13. Psychiatric aspects of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Nada L

    2011-08-01

    Approximately one third of the women in the United States have an abortion during their lives. In the year 2008, 1.21 million abortions were performed in the United States (Jones and Koolstra, Perspect Sex Reprod Health 43:41-50, 2011). The psychiatric outcomes of abortion are scientifically well established (Adler et al., Science 248:41-43, 1990). Despite assertions to the contrary, there is no evidence that abortion causes psychiatric problems (Dagg, Am J Psychiatry 148:578-585, 1991). Those studies that report psychiatric sequelae suffer from severe methodological defects (Lagakos, N Engl J Med 354:1667-1669, 2006). Methodologically sound studies have demonstrated that there is a very low incidence of frank psychiatric illness after an abortion; women experience a wide variety of feelings over time, including, for some, transient sadness and grieving. However, the circumstances that lead a woman to terminate a pregnancy, including previous and/or ongoing psychiatric illness, are independently stressful and increase the likelihood of psychiatric illness over the already high baseline incidence and prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders among women of childbearing age. For optimal psychological outcomes, women, including adolescents, need to make autonomous and supported decisions about problem pregnancies. Clinicians can help patients facing these decisions and those who are working through feelings about having had abortions in the past.

  14. Social Housing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Hedvig; Scanlon, Kath J

    2014-01-01

    Social housing is a cornerstone in the Danish welfare society and is accessible for all households. By law, social housing must be rented at cost rents, which are based on historical costs; rents do not respond to market forces. Social housing aims to provide good standard, secure and affordable...... for the individual associations as well as each housing estate. In principle, each estate and the association it belongs to must balance its books. An important feature of the sector is the build-up of a funding system which makes it possible to support the financing of major renovations and energy measures as well...... as social initiatives in the existing stock....

  15. Housing Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Baker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Australia, an increasing number of households face problems of access to suitable housing in the private market. In response, the Federal and State Governments share responsibility for providing housing assistance to these, mainly low-income, households. A broad range of policy instruments are used to provide and maintain housing assistance across all housing tenures, for example, assisting entry into homeownership, providing affordability assistance in the private rental market, and the provision of socially owned and managed housing options. Underlying each of these interventions is the premise that secure, affordable, and appropriate housing provides not only shelter but also a number of nonshelter benefits to individuals and their households. Although the nonshelter outcomes of housing are well acknowledged in Australia, the understanding of the nonshelter outcomes of housing assistance is less clear. This paper explores nonshelter outcomes of three of the major forms of housing assistance provided by Australian governments—low-income mortgage assistance, social housing, and private rent assistance. It is based upon analysis of a survey of 1,353 low-income recipients of housing assistance, and specifically measures the formulation of health and well-being, financial stress, and housing satisfaction outcomes across these three assistance types. We find clear evidence that health, finance, and housing satisfaction outcomes are associated with quite different factors for individuals in these three major housing assistance types.

  16. Correctional Officers and the Incarcerated Mentally Ill: Responses to Psychiatric Illness in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanek, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a U.S. men’s prison, I investigate how this social and cultural context structures relations between correctional officers and inmates with severe mental illness. Utilizing interpretivist perspectives, I explore how these relations are structured by trust, respect, and meanings associated with mental illness. Officers’ discretionary responses to mentally ill inmates included observations to ensure psychiatric stability and flexibility in rule enforcement and were embedded within their role to ensure staff and inmate safety. Officers identified housing, employment, and social support as important for inmates’ psychiatric stability as medications. Inmates identified officers’ observation and responsiveness to help seeking as assisting in institutional functioning. These findings demonstrate that this prison’s structures and values enable officers’ discretion with mentally ill inmates, rather than solely fostering custodial responses to these inmates’ behaviors. These officers’ responses to inmates with mental illness concurrently support custodial control and the prison’s order. PMID:25219680

  17. Minority Stress Experiences and Psychological Well-Being: The Impact of Support from and Connection to Social Networks within the Los Angeles House and Ball Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carolyn F.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Holloway, Ian W.; Meyer, Ilan H.; Kipke, Michele D.

    2013-01-01

    African American young men who have sex with men (AAYMSM) from the House and Ball communities are at high risk for HIV infection. Because these communities are not only sources of risk, but also support for AAYMSM, researchers must also consider the resources these communities possess. This knowledge will assist in the formulation of more effective prevention strategies and intervention approaches. Using Minority Stress Theory as a framework, the current study illustrates the impact minority stress has on the psychological well-being of a sample of MSM from the Los Angeles House and Ball communities and investigates how these factors affect the relationship between minority stress and psychological well-being. Surveys were administered to participants over the course of a year. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate a model of the associations between minority stressors, support, connection to social network, and psychological well-being/distress (N=233). Results indicated significant associations between different sources of minority stress, including distal minority stress (e.g., racism, homophobia), gay identification, and internalized homophobia. Minority stressors were in turn significantly associated with greater distress. However, greater instrumental support significantly reduced the effects of distal minority stress on distress. Greater connection to social network also significantly reduced stress associated with gay identification on distress. Findings captured the diverse sources of minority stress faced by this population and how these stressors are interrelated to impact mental health. Results also illustrate how support from and connection to social networks can reduce the negative impact of minority stress experiences. PMID:23412944

  18. Minority stress experiences and psychological well-being: the impact of support from and connection to social networks within the Los Angeles House and Ball communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carolyn F; Schrager, Sheree M; Holloway, Ian W; Meyer, Ilan H; Kipke, Michele D

    2014-02-01

    African American young men who have sex with men (AAYMSM) from the House and Ball communities are at high risk for HIV infection. Because these communities are not only sources of risk but also support for AAYMSM, researchers must also consider the resources these communities possess. This knowledge will assist in the formulation of more effective prevention strategies and intervention approaches. Using minority stress theory as a framework, the current study illustrates the impact minority stress has on the psychological well-being of a sample of MSM from the Los Angeles House and Ball communities and investigates how these factors affect the relationship between minority stress and psychological well-being. Surveys were administered to participants over the course of a year. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate a model of the associations between minority stressors, support, connection to social network, and psychological well-being/distress (N = 233). The results indicated significant associations between different sources of minority stress, including distal minority stress (e.g., racism, homophobia), gay identification, and internalized homophobia. Minority stressors were in turn significantly associated with greater distress. However, greater instrumental support significantly reduced the effects of distal minority stress on distress. Greater connection to social network also significantly reduced stress associated with gay identification on distress. The findings captured the diverse sources of minority stress faced by this population and how these stressors are interrelated to impact mental health. The results also illustrate how support from and connection to social networks can reduce the negative impact of minority stress experiences.

  19. Literacy Mediation in Neighbourhood Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between staff in Neighbourhood Houses, and the socially and educationally disadvantaged community members who visit Neighbourhood Houses, have been viewed through many lenses, including community development, social support, caring and compassion. This paper looks at Neighbourhood Houses as sites of pedagogical practice. More…

  20. [Psychiatric complications of abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpegui, Manuel; Jurado, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The psychiatric consequences of induced abortion continue to be the object of controversy. The reactions of women when they became aware of conception are very variable. Pregnancy, whether initially intended or unintended, may provoke stress; and miscarriage may bring about feelings of loss and grief reaction. Therefore, induced abortion, with its emotional implications (of relief, shame and guilt) not surprisingly is a stressful adverse life event. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS: There is agreement among researchers on the need to compare the mental health outcomes (or the psychiatric complications) with appropriate groups, including women with unintended pregnancies ending in live births and women with miscarriages. There is also agreement on the need to control for the potential confounding effects of multiple variables: demographic, contextual, personal development, previous or current traumatic experiences, and mental health prior to the obstetric event. Any psychiatric outcome is multi-factorial in origin and the impact of life events depend on how they are perceived, the psychological defence mechanisms (unconscious to a great extent) and the coping style. The fact of voluntarily aborting has an undeniable ethical dimension in which facts and values are interwoven. No research study has found that induced abortion is associated with a better mental health outcome, although the results of some studies are interpreted as or Some general population studies point out significant associations with alcohol or illegal drug dependence, mood disorders (including depression) and some anxiety disorders. Some of these associations have been confirmed, and nuanced, by longitudinal prospective studies which support causal relationships. With the available data, it is advisable to devote efforts to the mental health care of women who have had an induced abortion. Reasons of the woman's mental health by no means can be invoked, on empirical bases, for inducing an abortion.

  1. Lamotrigine in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jennifer G; Gitlin, Michael J; Altshuler, Lori L

    2013-07-01

    Owing to the prevalence of medication side effects and treatment resistance, prescribers often consider off-label uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents for the treatment of persistent symptoms. The authors review the available literature on the FDA-approved and non-FDA-approved uses of lamotrigine in adults with psychiatric disorders. We used PubMed, MEDLINE, and a hand search of relevant literature to find studies published between 1990 and 2012 and available in English language. The following keywords were searched: lamotrigine, psychiatric, mood disorders, depression, personality disorders, anxiety, schizophrenia, side effects, and rash. Data were selected from 29 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When RCTs were not available, open-label trials (6), retrospective case reviews (10), and case series (4) were summarized. We extracted results of monotherapy and augmentation trials of lamotrigine on primary and secondary outcome measures. Lamotrigine is generally well tolerated, with the best evidence for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, particularly in prevention of depressive episodes. In acute bipolar depression, meta-analyses suggested a modest benefit, especially for more severely depressed subjects, with switch rates similar to placebo. In unipolar depression, double-blind RCTs noted benefit on subsets of symptoms and improved response in more severely depressed subjects. Data are limited but promising in borderline personality disorder. Use of lamotrigine in schizophrenia and anxiety disorders has little supportive evidence. Lamotrigine is recommended in bipolar maintenance when depression is prominent. It also has a role in treating acute bipolar depression and unipolar depression, though the latter warrants more research. Data are too limited in other psychiatric disorders to recommend its use at this time. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. Rethinking Child Welfare to Keep Families Safe and Together: Effective Housing-Based Supports to Reduce Child Trauma, Maltreatment Recidivism, and Re-Entry to Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Marny; Sullivan, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of children who are placed in child protective custody have parents with a substance use disorder. This placement occurs despite evidence that the trauma of removal is associated with poor long-term child outcomes. This article describes a collaborative model of a continuum of housing-based clinical and support services for the whole family that has safely reduced foster care placement. An external evaluation of this pilot in Jackson County, Oregon, found significant differences in subsequent maltreatment, foster care re-entry, and family permanency outcomes favoring the treatment group. After initial external grant funds, this program is continuing and expanding across Oregon due to state legislation, and funding and can be a model for other states.

  3. "Making the best of what we have": The lived experiences of community psychiatric nurses, day centre managers and social workers supporting clients with dementia attending a generic day care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Elizabeth A; McGurk, Phyllis; Reid, Bernie; Ryan, Assumpta

    2017-12-01

    This study explored the experiences and perspectives of community psychiatric nurses, day centre managers and social workers about supporting clients living with and without dementia attending a generic day care service. The purpose of the study was to elucidate approaches that enable clients living with dementia to access and derive benefit from the service. In the light of international ageing demographics and strategy towards social inclusion, it is anticipated that demand for generic day care services for clients living with and without dementia will increase. A descriptive qualitative design utilised three focus groups for data collection. Community psychiatric nurses (n = 4), day centre mangers (n = 4) and social workers (n = 12) participated in the study. Data analysis informed a narrative description of the approaches that support adults living with dementia in day care. An exhaustive description is encapsulated in five key themes. These are "easing the transition to day care," "proactively managing supervision and complexity of need," "sustaining the person and family carer," making the best of what we have" and "encountering a need for change," The data conveyed a sensitivity to the life story and needs of clients with dementia. Whilst the data revealed deficits in the physical environment of the centres, there were indications of the generation of a positive social environment. A generic day care service that provides an integrated blend of care and treatment and social and recreational support to older adults, irrespective of whether they have or have not dementia, is realistic and manageable. The routine of day centre attendance may have value in sustaining clients with dementia and family care-giving relationships. Approaches to support the attendance of clients with dementia at day care include home visits, life story work, proactive supervision and careful planning of social groupings and recreational activities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient's at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient's symptoms and improve the individual's quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Literature review was done by using the keywords "home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing" from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015.

  5. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  6. SCHREINER HOUSE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    natural environment. This article focuses on the role played by. Schreiner House in the conservation of this country's architect- ... architectural heritage; explore the IT'Onner in which the House contributes to providing a social record of .... reference to the arch1tectural hentage within the urban landscape. SOCIAL RECORD.

  7. Care in a new age: the work of caregivers with psychiatric patients in houses Cuidar en tiempos nuevos: el trabajo de cuidadores con pacientes psiquiátricos en residencias terapéuticas Cuidar em novo tempo: o trabalho de cuidadores com pacientes psiquiátricos em moradias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila Sprioli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to analyze the caregivers' work developed with psychiatric patients in assisted living facilities. The research used the ethnographic method and is theoretically based on Interpretative Anthropology for the analysis of the meanings of practices related to the caregiver's work in these residential devices. The techniques used in the research were participant observation and interviews. The main subjects of the search were the eleven caregivers and the secondary subjects were four supervisors. The results show the bond established between caregivers and residents, the possibility of a regular discussion under supervision, the impact of different equipments at the dwelling house on the daily reality of professionals and patients. The main conclusions permit recognizing the relevance of caregivers' work. Despite its deficient education, training and legal definition, this work supports behavioral changes observed in dwellers, which reveal the ongoing rehabilitation process.El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar el trabajo de cuidadores con pacientes psiquiátricos en dos tipos de servicios en residencias terapéuticas. La investigación recurrió al método etnográfico, basado en la Teoría Interpretativa, y utilizó las técnicas de observación participativa y entrevistas en profundidad. Los sujetos principales son once cuidadores y los sujetos secundarios, cuatro supervisores. Los principales hallazgos consisten en: identificación de la formación y capacitación del cuidador; actividades por las cuales se responsabiliza y ; concepciones que tiene sobre ellas; cambios desencadenados en los servicios en residencias terapéuticas; vínculo que se establece entre cuidadores y residentes; posibilidad de discusión regular del trabajo en supervisión; e, impacto de los diferentes equipamientos de la residencia en lo cotidiano de cuidadores y pacientes. Las conclusiones permiten reconocer la relevancia del trabajo de los

  8. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing.

  9. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  10. CDBG Housing Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to housing, including multifamily rehab, housing services, code enforcement, operation and repair of foreclosed property and public housing...

  11. In-house consultation to support professionals’ responses to child abuse and neglect : Determinants of professionals’ use and the association with guideline adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke Ariënne Johanneke; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Kaya, Anna H.; Haasnoot, Maria E.; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and

  12. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  13. [Promoting "successful aging" in community psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimura, Hidehito; Nemoto, Takahiro; Sakuma, Kei; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, patients with schizophrenia have been progressively aging in a way similar to that of the general population. In Japan, community mental health care has become more active in the context of the policy of promoting the discharge of patients from psychiatric hospitals. Patients with chronic schizophrenia who have been discharged are already approaching old age. "Successful aging" may be a key concept in their community-based psychiatric care. Successful aging does not emphasize a loss of youth, but focuses on gains and growth achieved with aging. In the Sasagawa Project, 78 patients with schizophrenia were gradually transferred from a psychiatric hospital to a community dwelling. Eight years have passed since the project began. Elder patients (>60 years old) showed stable psychiatric symptoms and were rarely readmitted to the psychiatric ward. They were, however, more often readmitted to hospital due to physical disease (for example, lifestyle-related disease or fracture) than were middle -aged patients (aging, but they are not sufficiently prepared for old age. In the mental health care of aging psychiatric patients, it is necessary to not only control psychiatric symptoms, but also promote and improve their quality of life by maintaining their ability to continue living in the community (for example, by supporting their preparations for old age).

  14. Psychiatric services in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the current provision of psychiatric services in Algeria - in particular, in-patient and out-patient facilities, child psychiatry and human resources. Education, training, associations and research in the field of mental health are also briefly presented. The challenges that must dealt with to improve psychiatric care and to comply with international standards are listed, by way of conclusion.

  15. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  16. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  17. Perinatal psychiatric episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Maegbaek, M L; Johannsen, B M

    2016-01-01

    and childbirth, which suggests differences in the underlying etiology. We further speculate varying treatment incidence and prevalence in pregnancy vs postpartum may indicate that the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 peripartum specifier not adequately describes at-risk periods......Perinatal psychiatric episodes comprise various disorders and symptom severity, which are diagnosed and treated in multiple treatment settings. To date, no studies have quantified the incidence and prevalence of perinatal psychiatric episodes treated in primary and secondary care, which we aimed...... psychiatric facilities, 2.5 births were followed by an episode treated at outpatient psychiatric facility and 12 births by GP-provided pharmacological treatment. We interpret our results the following way: treated severe and moderate psychiatric disorders have different risk patterns in relation to pregnancy...

  18. Housing Market and Housing Investment (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    UNAYAMA Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explain why housing investment in Japan stagnated in the 2000s. Housing investment consists of two parts: replacement and a net increase of housing stock, which can be further decomposed into changes in the number of households and the housing utilization rate. Using the Housing and Land Survey, it is shown that all of the following factors caused the decrease in housing investment: house replacement decreased due to an increasing share of non-wooden houses and collective h...

  19. Fabricated Helicopter Transmission Housing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    rotor head, rotor blades, swashplate assembly, main rotor controls, and internal gearing. Flight loads on the fabricated housing were determined for...The servo support brackets react induced loads from the swashplate on the servos. A swashplate guide is mounted to the top of the upper housing and...serves to locate the swashplate and react any induced side loads. The scissor bracket connects the upper main housing and the stationary swashplate

  20. Genetic Counselling for Psychiatric Disorders: Accounts of Psychiatric Health Professionals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sian; Arribas-Ayllon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Genetic counselling is not routinely offered for psychiatric disorders in the United Kingdom through NHS regional clinical genetics departments. However, recent genomic advances, confirming a genetic contribution to mental illness, are anticipated to increase demand for psychiatric genetic counselling. This is the first study of its kind to employ qualitative methods of research to explore accounts of psychiatric health professionals regarding the prospects for genetic counselling services within clinical psychiatry in the UK. Data were collected from 32 questionnaire participants, and 9 subsequent interviewees. Data analysis revealed that although participants had not encountered patients explicitly demanding psychiatric genetic counselling, psychiatric health professionals believe that such a service would be useful and desirable. Genomic advances may have significant implications for genetic counselling in clinical psychiatry even if these discoveries do not lead to genetic testing. Psychiatric health professionals describe clinical genetics as a skilled profession capable of combining complex risk communication with much needed psychosocial support. However, participants noted barriers to the implementation of psychiatric genetic counselling services including, but not limited to, the complexities of uncertainty in psychiatric diagnoses, patient engagement and ethical concerns regarding limited capacity.

  1. Housing retention in single-site housing first for chronically homeless individuals with severe alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Susan E; Malone, Daniel K; Clifasefi, Seema L

    2013-12-01

    We studied housing retention and its predictors in the single-site Housing First model. Participants (n = 111) were chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems who lived in a single-site Housing First program and participated in a larger nonrandomized controlled trial (2005-2008) conducted in Seattle, Washington. At baseline, participants responded to self-report questionnaires assessing demographic, illness burden, alcohol and other drug use, and psychiatric variables. Housing status was recorded over 2 years. Participants were interested in housing, although a sizable minority did not believe they would be able to maintain abstinence-based housing. Only 23% of participants returned to homelessness during the 2-year follow-up. Commonly cited risk factors--alcohol and other drug use, illness burden, psychiatric symptoms, and homelessness history--did not predict resumed homelessness. Active drinkers were more likely to stay in this housing project than nondrinkers. We found that single-site Housing First programming fills a gap in housing options for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems.

  2. Harm reduction services as a point-of-entry to and source of end-of-life care and support for homeless and marginally housed persons who use alcohol and/or illicit drugs: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Ryan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeless and marginally housed persons who use alcohol and/or illicit drugs often have end-of-life care needs that go unmet due to barriers that they face to accessing end-of-life care services. Many homeless and marginally housed persons who use these substances must therefore rely upon alternate sources of end-of-life care and support. This article explores the role of harm reduction services in end-of-life care services delivery to homeless and marginally housed persons who use alcohol and/or illicit drugs. Methods A qualitative case study design was used to explore end-of-life care services delivery to homeless and marginally housed persons in six Canadian cities. A key objective was to explore the role of harm reduction services. 54 health and social services professionals participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. All participants reported that they provided care and support to this population at end-of-life. Results Harm reduction services (e.g., syringe exchange programs, managed alcohol programs, etc. were identified as a critical point-of-entry to and source of end-of-life care and support for homeless and marginally housed persons who use alcohol and/or illicit drugs. Where possible, harm reduction services facilitated referrals to end-of-life care services for this population. Harm reduction services also provided end-of-life care and support when members of this population were unable or unwilling to access end-of-life care services, thereby improving quality-of-life and increasing self-determination regarding place-of-death. Conclusions While partnerships between harm reduction programs and end-of-life care services are identified as one way to improve access, it is noted that more comprehensive harm reduction services might be needed in end-of-life care settings if they are to engage this underserved population.

  3. The situation of being supported and conformed to the tobacco control law by the people serving in coffee houses, cafes and restaurants in Kayseri

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elçin Balci; Ahmet Öztürk; Iskender Gün; Sule Sarli

    2016-01-01

      Objective: In this study it was aimed to reveal the opinions about smoking ban of the employers and employees in coffee houses, cafes and restaurants and their situation of being affected from the ban...

  4. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  5. Risk behavior and access to HIV/AIDS prevention services in a community sample of homeless persons entering permanent supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Harris, Taylor; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric; Henwood, Ben

    2017-05-01

    Homeless persons suffer disproportionately high rates of HIV infection, and moving into permanent supportive housing (PSH) can provide a stable base from which to access needed prevention services. However, little is known about HIV risk or prevention behavior during this critical time of transition. The current study investigated STI and HIV risk and prevention behavior and recent use of prevention and treatment services (i.e., education, testing, medication) among homeless persons preparing to move into PSH. Data come from interviews with 421 homeless adults before they moved into PSH. Thirty-seven percent of the respondents were sexually active; of those, 75.7% reported unprotected sex. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported past year HIV testing and 40% reported testing for another STI. Fewer than one-third (31%) of respondents reported receiving posttest counseling at their last HIV test. HIV seropositivity was self-reported by 10%. Among those persons who were HIV-positive, 57.1% reported less than 100% antiretroviral (ARV) adherence. Among HIV-negative respondents, less than 1% had been prescribed preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Less than half (46.4%) of the sample reported any HIV prevention education in the past year. This population of homeless adults about to move into PSH report high rates of HIV risk behavior, but low rates of HIV prevention education and very little PrEP utilization. Further, low rates of ARV adherence among HIV-positive respondents indicate significant risk for HIV transmission and acquisition. Entering PSH is a period of transition for homeless persons when integrated care is critically important to ensure positive health outcomes, but these data suggest that PrEP and other HIV prevention services are poorly accessed among this population. As such, multipronged services that integrate PrEP and other HIV prevention services are needed to prevent transmission and acquisition of HIV in this high-risk, vulnerable population and ensure the

  6. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide - Table of Contents Facts For Families Guide - View by Topic Chinese Facts for Families Guide ... Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate for any child or adolescent ...

  7. Predictors of frequent visits to a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Aagaard, Andreas; Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of the psychiatric emergency room throughout the whole period. Furthermore, the emergence and continual presence of the predictors: severe mental illness (1999-onwards), substance abuse (2002-onwards) and sheltered housing (2002-2003-2005-onwards) indicated changes in the general profile of frequent visitors...

  8. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopat...

  9. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  10. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  11. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Smart Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    GWS takes plans for a new home and subjects them to intensive computerized analysis that does 10,000 calculations relative to expected heat loss and heat gain, then provides specifications designed specifically for each structure as to heating, cooling, ventilation and insulation. As construction progresses, GWS inspects the work of the electrical, plumbing and insulation contractors and installs its own Smart House Radiant Barrier. On completion of the home, GWS technicians use a machine that creates a vacuum in the house and enables computer calculation of the air exchanged, a measure of energy efficiency. Key factor is the radiant barrier, borrowed from the Apollo program. This is an adaptation of a highly effective aluminized heat shield as a radiation barrier holding in or keeping out heat, cold air and water vapor.

  13. Incidence of mental retardation as compared with other psychiatric disorders and necessary support to persons placed at the Public Institution for Placement of Persons with Mental Disabilities "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelošević, Edin; Karahmet, Amar; Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Bjelošević, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Aim To compare the frequency of mental retardation with other psychiatric disorders at the Institute for Mentally Disabled Persons "Drin" Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, to asses psychosocial condition and necessary support to persons with mental retardation. Methods In this retrospective, descriptive and epidemiologic study neuropsychiatric findings and reports of the Institute's social services of 527 residents (beneficiaries) were analyzed in the period 2013-2014 (age, gender, mobility, years of life spent in the Institute, visits of family members and close relatives, visits to families, mental retardation - degree, required support). Results The research included 213 (40.42%) women and 314 (59.58%) men. The average age was 39.64 years. The average number of years spent in the Institute was 10.42.Fifty-four 25.47%) examinees with mental retardation had occasional visits to their families, while 69 (32.54%) had regular visits. Thirty-four (16.04%) examinees had mild mental retardation, 70 (33.02%) had moderate retardation, 52 (24.52%) were with severe, and 56(26.42%) with profound retardation. It was found that 66 (31.13%)beneficiaries with the diagnosis of mental retardation completely depended on other persons. Conclusion The degree of mental retardation has a direct impact on the process of resocialization. A very small number of people diagnosed with mental retardation had been successfully involved in the process of resocialization. It is necessary work intensively on thecreation of conditions for the realization of the Independent Living Support program, thus making a step forward to deinstitutionalization. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  14. Conceptions of mobile emergency service health professionals concerning psychiatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Bonfada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the Brazilian Psychiatric Reformation, assistance to psychological seizures represents a challenge for the emergency services. Therefore, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the conceptions of health professionals who work at the Mobile Emergency Service in Natal on psychiatric emergency care. This paper is, then, a qualitative study that used interviews as tools for collecting information. By using thematic analysis, the speeches were grouped into three categories: the stigma on patients and the professionals' fear of services interventions in psychiatric emergencies; having psychiatric emergencies regarded as harmful to patients and others' security; psychiatric emergencies being taken as patients' aggressiveness or severe depression. The data collected indicate that the interviewed professionals' ideas are supported by elements associated with the ideology that insanity implies social segregation and dangerousness. Thus, the survey prompted reflection on relevant issues to the process of psychiatric reformation implementation.

  15. Barometric pressure, emergency psychiatric visits, and violent acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schory, Thomas J; Piecznski, Natasha; Nair, Sunil; el-Mallakh, Rif S

    2003-10-01

    Associations between human behaviour and psychiatric decompensation and weather variables have been inconsistent. We studied the association of certain weather variables (specifically, humidity, wind speed, and barometric pressure) with emergent psychiatric presentations, psychiatric admissions, incidence of violent crimes, and suicides in a metropolitan area. We performed a retrospective study for the year 1999 in a mid-sized city. We included all documented emergent psychiatric visits to the city's psychiatric emergency room. We obtained violence data from the city police department and suicide data from the country medical examiner. The data suggest that total numbers of acts of violence and emergency psychiatry visits are significantly associated with low barometric pressure. Psychiatric inpatient admissions and suicides are not associated with any of the weather variables investigated. While alternate conclusions can be drawn, we propose that the data support the interpretation that low barometric pressure is associated with an increase in impulsive behaviours. Additional investigation is warranted.

  16. Malaysian Affordability Housing Policies Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Diwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing has always been a significant aspiration of family expression and distinctly priciest investment by household. It plays a momentous role in the country’s economy and so central to the societal well-being that is emplaced in the United Nation Universal declaration of Human rights. Yet in developed and developing world alike, cities struggle to provide decent housing for lower and middle income population. The provision of affordable housing is a major policy concern around the world with Malaysia being no exception; rising income hardly keep pace with price hike of housing unit and housing interventions has majorly concentrated on demand side leading to a non-responsive supply sector. Therefore, this paper highlights affordable housing issues pertaining Malaysia. It formulates Malaysian Map of affordability and conducts an evaluation of global housing schemes to better identify policy priorities for Malaysia. It’s significant to harmonize supply and demand side factors in the housing market to ensure that housing supply fits the needs of citizens based on the location, price and target group. In case of Malaysia supply oriented initiative are of urgency in short and medium run. This must be supported by long term demand side schemes in parallel. Convergence of these two factors is essential for a balanced equilibrium and obtaining affordability.

  17. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  18. Assisting the Frail Elderly Living in Subsidized Housing for the Independent Elderly: A Profile of the Management and Its Support Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Leonard F.

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 64 site managers of subsidized housing for independent elderly to determine staff response to residents' loss of functional independence. Found that most sites lacked adequate staff with training to monitor aging population. No clear policies were found regarding when to retain or transfer residents. Staff appeared unprepared to locate or…

  19. Governance Instruments for Energy Neutral Housing Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Han; Sahul Reddy Kadarpeta; Bauke de Vries

    2011-01-01

    Netherlands has set national energy targets for year 2020 following the European Union vision. In this context at the local level Eindhoven Municipality has set its ambition to go energy neutral in housing sector by 2020 and decided to develop new energy neutral housing areas. Lack of strict regulations and appropriate forms of support aimed at relevant stakeholders involved has attributed to the lack of acceptance for energy neutral housing in the current housing market. Further lack of a de...

  20. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joginder Pal Attri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient′s physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse.

  1. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service......, and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics...

  2. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    , and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics......A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service...

  3. Active house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kurt Emil; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med dette abstrakt er at illustrere, at huse kan være konstrueret til at basere sig udelukkende på vedvarende energikilder og samtidig være CO2-neutrale og producere mere energi end de forbruger. Active House Visionen undersøger disse muligheder i otte demonstration huse i fem forskellige...... europæiske lande, hvor husene konstrueres, fremstilles og testes. Kvalitative og kvantitative målinger vil blive designet til at vurdere husene i forhold til energi, indeklima og miljø....

  4. Effectiveness of interventions to improve the health and housing status of homeless people: a rapid systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouyoumdjian Fiona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on interventions to positively impact health and housing status of people who are homeless has received substantially increased attention over the past 5 years. This rapid review examines recent evidence regarding interventions that have been shown to improve the health of homeless people, with particular focus on the effect of these interventions on housing status. Methods A total of 1,546 articles were identified by a structured search of five electronic databases, a hand search of grey literature and relevant journals, and contact with experts. Two reviewers independently screened the first 10% of titles and abstracts for relevance. Inter-rater reliability was high and as a result only one reviewer screened the remaining titles and abstracts. Articles were included if they were published between January 2004 and December 2009 and examined the effectiveness of an intervention to improve the health or healthcare utilization of people who were homeless, marginally housed, or at risk of homelessness. Two reviewers independently scored all relevant articles for quality. Results Eighty-four relevant studies were identified; none were of strong quality while ten were rated of moderate quality. For homeless people with mental illness, provision of housing upon hospital discharge was effective in improving sustained housing. For homeless people with substance abuse issues or concurrent disorders, provision of housing was associated with decreased substance use, relapses from periods of substance abstinence, and health services utilization, and increased housing tenure. Abstinent dependent housing was more effective in supporting housing status, substance abstinence, and improved psychiatric outcomes than non-abstinence dependent housing or no housing. Provision of housing also improved health outcomes among homeless populations with HIV. Health promotion programs can decrease risk behaviours among homeless populations

  5. Tents in Concrete: What Internationally Funded Housing Does to Support Recovery in Areas Affected by War; The Case of Bosnia-Herzegovinia

    OpenAIRE

    Skotte, Hans

    2004-01-01

    This work is about how international housing assistance to societies affected by war contributes toward long-term recovery. Or does not. Current wars are characterized by large, often identity specific population movements causing an extreme and urgent need for shelter. This research does not deal with (emergency) ‘shelter’, but with (permanent) ‘housing’, which has come to be one of the largest funding sectors of international aid to countries ravaged by war. It is my contention that hou...

  6. Psychiatric Disability in Law Enforcement Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marilyn

    2017-03-01

    Law enforcement officers all across the world are exposed to violence, confrontation, and traumatic incidents. They regularly witness death and suffering and are at risk of personal injury. Psychiatric sequelae include an increased risk for trauma-related symptoms, depression, alcohol-use disorders, and stress-related medical conditions. Law enforcement officers have been applying for early disability retirement pensions at an increased rate for stress-related psychiatric and medical conditions. As a result, law enforcement agencies are prematurely losing valuable resources, officers with training and experience. Departments have become proactive in trying to address mental health issues to prevent psychiatric disability by implementing employee wellness plans and stress reduction interventions. Programs have been developed to mitigate the effects of stress on law enforcement personnel. Many law enforcement agencies have developed strategies to encourage early confidential referral for psychiatric treatment. They utilize peer support groups and employee assistance programs and develop alliances with mental health professionals. When these approaches fail, a fitness for duty process can be used to identify impairment in work functioning due to psychiatric factors with the prospect of later returning the officer to full duty. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Psychiatric impairment and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-03

    Dec 3, 2002 ... Impairment and disability assessment on psychiatric grounds has always been subjective, controversial ... informed medical advisors doing their disability assessments. Many of these advisors have expressed ..... that will empower the affected employee and that is non- stigma- tising. In order to do so it is ...

  8. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated wh...

  9. Psychiatric genetics:AJP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pippa

    their caregivers in South Africa. The heritability of the majority of the psychiatric disorders is ... linkage analyses in a cohort of Bantu-speaking black South. Africans.17-22 Areas of implied linkage to schizophrenia ... one of the studies of a Bantu-speaking schizophrenia cohort. Table I. Glossary of genetic terminology. Allele.

  10. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Baldaçara,Leonardo; Borgio,João Guilherme Fiorani; Lacerda,Acioly Luiz Tavares de; Jackowski,Andrea Parolin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electron...

  11. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  12. Face processing in psychiatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, J; Hay, D C; Young, A W

    1992-02-01

    Functional models of face processing have indicated that dissociations exist between the various processes involved, e.g. between familiar face recognition and matching of unfamiliar faces, and between familiar face recognition and facial expression analysis. These models have been successfully applied to the understanding of the different types of impairment that can exist in neuropsychological patients. In the present study, aspects of face processing in psychiatric patients were investigated in relation to Bruce & Young's (1986) model. Based on this functional model different predictions can be made. We contrast here the impaired expression analysis hypothesis, which is that psychiatric patients would show a deficit in facial expression recognition, but not in facial identity recognition or unfamiliar face matching, with the generalized deficit hypothesis, that patients would be impaired on all tasks. These hypotheses were examined using three forced-choice tasks (facial recognition, facial expression recognition, and unfamiliar face matching) which were presented to schizophrenic and depressed patients, and to non-patient controls. Results showed that schizophrenic patients performed at a significantly lower level than non-patient controls on all three tasks, supporting the generalized deficit hypothesis.

  13. Caring Science and the Development of Forensic Psychiatric Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to discuss how caring science can contribute and provide a theoretical foundation for the development of caring within forensic psychiatric care. It is not only a challenge but also a great opportunity to use caring science theory within forensic psychiatric care when caring for the patients and supporting their health processes. There is a need for more knowledge about, understanding of, and willingness to care for patients within forensic psychiatric settings in a "true caring" way. In order to achieve this, a caring culture is required, one that supports carers and provides them with opportunities to further develop a caring attitude. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Energy efficient affordable housing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    In 1994, the Southface Energy Institute, working with support from US DOE, initiated a program to provide technical assistance to nonprofit organizations developing affordable housing in the Olympic target communities of Atlanta. The specific project goals were: Identify the barriers that nonprofit affordable housing providers face in increasing the energy and resource efficiency of affordable housing; Assist them in developing the resources to overcome these barriers; Develop specific technical materials and program models that will enable these affordable housing groups to continue to improve the energy efficiency of their programs; and, To transfer the program materials to other affordable housing providers. This report summarizes the progress made in each of these areas.

  15. [Rheumatic fibromyalgia: psychiatric features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarró Alvarez, S

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatic fibromyalgia, also known as fibrositis or myofascial pain, is a common syndrome whose diagnoses, founded mainly on physical examination, usually delays due to symptom unspecificity, amount of complementary tests requested and intercourse with psychiatric disorders. Psychyatrists and psychologists get often involved in fibromyalgia treatment. Its proper knowledge prevents not only physicians and patients' psychological discourage but also development of depression and mental health expenses, as well as allows designing a treatment plan according to the main symptoms which may offer improvement chances to fibromyalgia patients. This article intends to offer an up-to-date and complete information about this entity, focused on psychiatric aspects, to better identify and manage such a puzzling disease.

  16. United States housing, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2016-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of the 2013 U.S. housing market, including updated information and data, and is part of an ongoing series of quarterly and annual housing reports that provide historical information on housing permits, starts, houses under construction, and completions. In addition, short briefs present information regarding house sales,...

  17. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  18. House Demolitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordechai Kremnitzer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the nature of “house demolitions” as used by the State of Israel in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. In our opinion, and in contrast to the view of Israel’s Supreme Court, such demolition orders constitute a penal sanction. As a penal sanction, we argue that this measure violates the basic principles of criminal liability. Even if this conclusion is not accepted, it will be argued that making innocent people homeless is an illegal collective measure. Even if assuming arguendo that it is not an illegal collective measure, it violates the basic principle of personal responsibility. The general conclusion of the article is that the examination of the nature of sanctions should go beyond the labels that are attached to them. Labeling sanctions as either penal or civil may not always reflect its true nature, and labels are sometimes deliberately used or rather misused in order to escape from the requirements stemming from the true essence of a sanction.

  19. American Housing Survey (AHS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The AHS is the largest, regular national housing sample survey in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the AHS to obtain up-to-date housing statistics...

  20. United States housing, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2013-01-01

    Provides current and historical information on housing market in the United States. Information includes trends for housing permits and starts, housing completions for single and multifamily units, and sales and construction. This report will be updated annually.

  1. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  2. [Forensic psychiatric patients in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tina Gram; Valbak, Lone; Perto, Gurli; Reinert, Kjeld

    2006-06-05

    In Denmark the number of forensic psychiatric patients is increasing. The objective of this study was to explore whether the increased number of forensic psychiatric patients has been reflected in the use of psychiatric inpatient facilities. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate differences in the treatment of various diagnostic groups of forensic patients and of forensic and non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Information about admissions and outpatient contact was extracted from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register for all Danish patients sentenced to psychiatric treatment in the period 1994-2003. Furthermore, a group of first-admission forensic patients suffering from schizophrenia was compared to a control group of first-admission non-forensic patients with schizophrenia, matched for sex, age and time of admission. The number of forensic psychiatric patients increased markedly in the period 1994-2003; at the same time, the use of inpatient facilities for this group of patients did not increase to a similar degree but actually decreased. Forensic patients in the group F20-F29 spent more time in hospital than did forensic patients with affective disorders and personality disorders. Forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia had significantly longer periods of hospitalization than did non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Forensic psychiatric patients' use of psychiatric inpatient facilities during the last 10 years did not increase to the extent expected relative to the increasing number of forensic psychiatric patients. This raises the question of whether these patients are receiving necessary and sufficient treatment.

  3. Housing Data Base for Sustainable Housing Provision

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    ATBU Journal of Environmental Technology 10, 1, June 20 I 7. 53 ... impact on the type and nature of houses provided within the city .... architects. The common data usually obtained when it comes to mass housing estates provision has been that of income capability of the house owners as shown in researches by Igbinosa.

  4. Study of the use of a micro hydro in knockdown container completed with a cylindrical form housing of francis hydraulic turbine to support the development program of energy self-sustainability for remote and isolated areas in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Samsul; Prajitno; Pardadi, Janu

    2017-11-01

    With an intention to reduce the consumption of energy from fossil fuels and the CO2 emission in relation with the climate change solution, Indonesian Government has targeted that the role of the New and Renewable Energy (NRE) resources reaches at least 23% , or about 27 GW , in 2025 and it is expected to increase to the extent of about 134 GW in 2050 within the scenario of mixed energy supply. Geographically Indonesia has many remote and isolated areas with lack of appropriate infrastructure supports. But in the most of the areas, huge potential of new and renewable energy are available such as hydro energy is about 75 GW, biomass energy is about 32 GW and bio fuel is about 32 GW. The total utilization of the energy from small hydro energy up to this year for example is only about 300 MW. The significant obstacle in optimizing the utilization of small hydro energy in the areas is mainly on the infrastructure conditions and the local manufacture capabilities. Difficulties in mobilization of experts, skill worker , parts and constructions material result in very time consuming and costly for site construction. In this research a hydro turbine built in knock down container completed with a Francis turbine in cylindrical form housing is proposed and reported its performance on implementation. The hydro in a knock down container concept comes from the idea to manufacture hydro power solutions in a knock down container, readymade to be transported to installation sites. It can be easily manufactured in a quality controlled and cost effective environment, transported and installed in remote areas, to operate and maintain with minimal amount of equipment. It shows that the implementation of the unit in a remote area has reduced the total site construction time by 1/3 compared to the predicted one with conventional unit. The performance of the Francis turbine with cylindrical form housing has shown comparable with the conventional one which has volute form housing. The

  5. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimenyimana, E; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C; van Niekerk, V

    2009-09-01

    Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch 's (Creswell, 2004: 256) method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT); and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an "I don't care" attitude.

  6. Evaluating the impact of dental care on housing intervention program outcomes among homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Elizabeth; Gibson, Gretchen; Jones, Judith A; Schinka, John A

    2013-12-01

    In this retrospective longitudinal cohort study, we examined the impact of dental care on outcomes among homeless veterans discharged from a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) transitional housing intervention program. Our sample consisted of 9870 veterans who were admitted into a VA homeless intervention program during 2008 and 2009, 4482 of whom received dental care during treatment and 5388 of whom did not. Primary outcomes of interest were program completion, employment or stable financial status on discharge, and transition to permanent housing. We calculated descriptive statistics and compared the 2 study groups with respect to demographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric history (including alcohol and substance use), work and financial support, and treatment outcomes. Veterans who received dental care were 30% more likely than those who did not to complete the program, 14% more likely to be employed or financially stable, and 15% more likely to have obtained residential housing. Provision of dental care has a substantial positive impact on outcomes among homeless veterans participating in housing intervention programs. This suggests that homeless programs need to weigh the benefits and cost of dental care in program planning and implementation.

  7. Love House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Maryellen B.; Cizek, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    In February of 2004, the Department of Human Development/Family Studies at the University of Delaware hosted the Austrian Institute of Family Studies. Social worker Olaf Kapella and psychologist Brigitte Cizek presented their LoveTalks workshop which is a model for the community supported sex education program in Austria. The workshop leaders were…

  8. The book house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Henrik; Agger, Steen

    1989-01-01

    base retrieval system for novice users - both adults and children. The use of icons within a spatial metaphor to facilitate direct manipulation of the displayed objects on the screen forms the basis for the interface in guiding the users' navigation in the BOOK HOUSE. This report, one of three......, is based on the contribution to the project from the Royal Danish Art Academy's Architect School. It describes the approach used to cope with the problems of conveying through a computer-based medium the visual information necessary to support and enhance user interaction with the system....

  9. Substance use and violence among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2015-03-01

    Nursing staff on psychiatric wards often attribute patient violence and aggression to substance use. This study examined incidents of alcohol and illicit drug use among acute psychiatric inpatients and associations between substance use and violence or other forms of aggression. A sample of 522 adult psychiatric inpatients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2 weeks of admission. Only a small proportion of the sample was reported to have used or been under the influence of alcohol (5%) or drugs (3%). There was no physical violence during a shift when a patient had used alcohol or drugs. Substance using patients were also no more likely than others to behave violently at any point during the study period. However, incidents of substance use were sometimes followed by verbal aggression. Beliefs that substance using patients are likely to be violent were not supported by this study, and could impact negatively on therapeutic relationships between nurses and this patient group. Future studies are needed to examine how staff intervene and interact with intoxicated patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Parricide: Psychiatric morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunjić Bojana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Parricide is defined as a murder of parents by their children; the patricide is murder of father, while matricide is murder of mother. This entity is classified as homicide, but it differs in the fact that victims are parents and the killers are their children. Mostly, it is associated with psychiatric morbidity. OBJECTIVE To describe sociodemographic and psychopathological characteristics of parricide committers and to analyze circumstances of parricide and psychiatric morbidity in order to achieve better recognition and prevention of risks. METHOD This retrospective study included all homicide autopsy records (1991-2005 performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Medical School, University of Belgrade. For further analyses, all parricide records were selected out. The study analyzed all available parameters, which concerned parricide committers, victims and the act itself. Methods of descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS Between 1991 and 2005, there were 948 cases of homicide; of these, 3.5% were parricides. The committers of parricide were on average 31.2±11.9 years old, 87.8% were males, 60.6% with psychiatric symptoms most commonly with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, personality disorder etc. Victims were on average 63.7±11.9 years old, 54.5% males, and 21.2% had a diagnosed mental illness. CONCLUSION Parricide is a rare kind of homicide accounting for 3% of all homicides. Committers are mostly unemployed males in early adulthood who have mental disorder. The phenomenon of parricide deserves a detailed analysis of the committer (individual bio-psycho-social profile and the environ- mental factors (family, closely related circumstances to enable a precise prediction of the act and prevention of the fatal outcome, which logically imposes the need of further studies.

  11. The dialectic of friendship for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Katherine M; Gladstone, Brenda M; Crawford, Elaine Stasiulis

    2002-01-01

    In the psychiatric literature, the meaning and importance of friendship has remained largely unexplored, subsumed under the rubric of social support or viewed as a component of community integration. Twenty-one qualitative interviews were conducted with individuals suffering from psychiatric disabilities focusing on the meaning of friendship as they described it. Analysis revealed the contrasts, contradiction and paradox of friendship for this group of people. The ongoing struggles of people with psychiatric disabilities regarding the need to connect with others and have friends, and conversely, the need to be alone and to withdraw from others, was highlighted.

  12. Psychiatric aspects of dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, J S; Ford, C V; Rimoin, D L

    1976-02-01

    Sixteen adult dwarfs - 11 with achondroplasia and 5 with hypopituitarism - were studied by means of psychiatric interviews and psychological tests. There were no significant differences between the two groups; in general, the subjects had achieved a satisfactory life adjustment despite the stress of having bodies uniquely different from those of the general population. They had secure identities as "little people" and successfully used coping mechanisms such as a sense of humor and a pleasant interpersonal style. Male dwarfs tended to experience more emotional distress than female dwarfs.

  13. Sustainable Living and Co-Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Bella; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine aspects of the different arguments for the environmental advantages of co-housing compared with individual households. The analysis is structured around four main questions, which are argued to be decisive for the question of co-housing and sustainability. The first...... is whether co-housing offers better opportunities for choosing and using more sustainable technologies, which also relates to the question of whether co-housing offers better opportunities for building smaller and denser and thus more energy efficient buildings. The second and third questions are socially...... oriented; one relates to the claim that co-housing can support pro-environmental behaviour among residents as they can support each other’s norms and practices. The fourth and last claim relates to a discussion of co-housing as a more sustainable opportunity especially for people living alone...

  14. Exploring the People's Housing Process: An application of the 1986 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A formal policy supporting the People's Housing Process (PHP) was released in. 1998. This policy and subsequent support measures in many ways mandates a policy implementation network. The South African Department of Housing's. (DOH) interpretation of self-built housing as expressed in the PHP should, ...

  15. Christel House Academy: The Art and Science of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Christel House, a public school charter approved through the office of the mayor of Indianapolis, was founded in 2002 and continues to be supported by the children's charity Christel House International. To support the high expectations asked of students, Christel House recognizes the importance of motivating students and providing a program that…

  16. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldaçara, Leonardo; Borgio, João Guilherme Fiorani; Lacerda, Acioly Luiz Tavares de; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electronic search was done up to April 2008. Structural and functional cerebellar abnormalities have been reported in many psychiatric disorders, namely schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, dementia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported smaller total cerebellar and vermal volumes in schizophrenia, mood disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies using cognitive paradigms have shown alterations in cerebellar activity in schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In dementia, the cerebellum is affected in later stages of the disease. Contrasting with early theories, cerebellum appears to play a major role in different brain functions other than balance and motor control, including emotional regulation and cognition. Future studies are clearly needed to further elucidate the role of cerebellum in both normal and pathological behavior, mood regulation, and cognitive functioning.

  18. Prevalence of smoking in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Marie-France; Canceil, Olivier; Baylé, Franck; Millet, Bruno; Bourdel, Marie-Chantal; Moatti, Cécile; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Attar-Lévy, Dominique

    2002-04-01

    Compelling evidence that tobacco-smoking is a form of drug addiction exists. The aim of this study is to determine the following: (1) prevalence of tobacco-smoking and of nicotine dependence in French psychiatric patients; (2) rates and patterns of tobacco smoking and of nicotine dependence according to diagnosis; (3) relationship between current smoking status and antipsychotic medications; and (4) relationship between cigarette smoking and neurological side effects induced by neuroleptics. A population of 711 psychiatric in- and outpatients was assessed using: (1) a detailed smoking self-questionnaire for smoking history and nicotine dependence; and (2) a questionnaire for staff covering treatments and DSMIII-R diagnoses. Data were analyzed using chi2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests (one factor) for quantitative comparisons between groups of patients, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test with age covariate was performed for age-dependent variables. Prevalence of smoking in the population of psychiatric patients was significantly higher than in the French general population. Diagnoses among current smokers were mainly substance-related disorder and schizophrenia. The authors established correlations between prevalence of smoking and age, sex, marital and socioeconomic status, alcohol use, coffee consumption and other psychoactive substance use or abuse. The authors did not find relationship between smoking prevalence and institutionalization. Neuroleptic neurological side effects were significantly fewer among smokers compared to nonsmokers. However, the rate of smokers was significantly higher in psychiatric patients receiving neuroleptic drugs. Nicotine abuse in psychiatric patients, and especially in schizophrenic patients, could support the hypothesis that smoking is consistent with self-medication.

  19. Overcoming Residents Opportunity Apathy in Danish Social Housing Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss how various technologies can support democratic collaboration in the social housing sector in Denmark, and help overcome opportunity apathy. I exemplify the discussion with an ongoing process of strategy development, in a Danish housing organization....

  20. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  1. Housing policies in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, Sock-yong; Helble, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Singapore has developed a unique housing system, with three-quarters of its housing stock built by the Housing & Development Board (HDB) and homeownership financed through Central Provident Fund (CPF) savings. As a result, the country's homeownership rate of 90% is one of the highest among market economies. At different stages of its economic development, the Government of Singapore was faced with a different set of housing problems. An integrated land-housing supply and financing framework w...

  2. We and they in the house of healing: debate among Arab complementary medicine practitioners on an integrative versus alternative approach to supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Schiff, Elad; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2013-11-01

    Complementary and traditional medicine (CTM) plays an important role in culture-centered care for cancer patients in the Middle East. In this article, we have studied the attitudes of Arab CTM therapists concerning integration of complementary medicine within the conventional supportive cancer care of Arab patients in northern Israel. Semistructured interviews were held with 27 Arab therapists who use medicinal herbs, the Quran, and various CTM modalities, with the aim of characterizing their treatment practices and learning about their perspectives regarding conventional cancer care. We first summarized the different characteristics of the various CTM therapists, including training, typical practice, and so on. Thematic analysis revealed that folk healers and complementary medicine therapists describe their role as supportive and secondary to that of physicians. Their goal was not to cure patients with cancer but rather to enhance their quality of life by reducing the severity of both the disease symptoms and the side effects of cancer treatment. Religious healers, by contrast, purport to cure the disease. While folk healers opt for parallel alternative care and complementary therapists support integrative care, religious healers claimed that they offer an alternative to conventional medicine in terms of both etiology and practice. The majority of Arab CTM therapists support integration of their treatments with the conventional system, but in practice, they are not sure how to bring about this change or create a parallel model in which 2 different systems are active, but not integrated. Our findings emphasized the need to promote doctor-CTM practitioner communication based on structured referral and bidirectional consultation. Moreover, we recommend intensifying research on the efficacy and safety of CTM in the Middle East and the potential role in promoting culture-based supportive care.

  3. Treating the disconfirmed psychiatric client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineken, J

    1983-01-01

    Frequent disconfirmation behaviors have been documented in psychiatric clients. Individuals who demonstrate maladaptive patterns of disconfirmation can learn to understand and modify this dysfunctional sequence. Through one to one interactions and group discussions, psychiatric nurses can help clients learn more positive communication behaviors. This accomplishment will positively affect the client's interpersonal responsiveness and self-esteem.

  4. Psychiatric comorbidity : fact or artifact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, Hanna; Romeijn, Johannes

    The frequent occurrence of comorbidity has brought about an extensive theoretical debate in psychiatry. Why are the rates of psychiatric comorbidity so high and what are their implications for the ontological and epistemological status of comorbid psychiatric diseases? Current explanations focus

  5. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  6. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric...... person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform...... faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  8. Japanese Social Exclusion and Inclusion from a Housing Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro Okamoto

    2016-01-01

    "This paper examines conditions of social exclusion and attempts at social inclusion in Japan from a housing perspective. Companies, households and the government have previously supported housing in Japan. However, corporate welfare was withdrawn following the globalization of the economy from the 1990s onwards, support from families and communities declined due to a reduction in household size, and governmental housing support has shifted away from direct support. A reduction in income and ...

  9. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    Two houses in the same street can be built in the same year, they can look the same, and still they might provide very different support for sustainable living. This article points to the Strategic Facilities Management Organisation (SFMO) as the most important concept, to understand and manage...... implementation of sustainable facilities management in housing administration. The concept provides a frame for understanding the roles and relations of tenants, owners, administrators and operators. The paper is based on a Danish research project on environmentally sound building operation including literature...... literature on sustainable facilities management, where it fills a gap as it deals with housing and strategic FM. Intended readers are those interested in housing administration and especially the transition of existing housing into more sustainable housing. Intended readers include building owners, policy...

  10. The Role of Neighborhood Factors and Community Stigma in Predicting Community Participation Among Persons With Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren; Yanos, Philip T; Stefancic, Ana; Alexander, Mary Jane; Harney-Delehanty, Brianna

    2017-09-15

    This study examined the association between neighborhood characteristics, stigma related to mental illness reported by local community members, and measures of perceived stigma and community participation among individuals with psychiatric disabilities living in independent scattered-site housing or in congregate housing in three neighborhoods in the New York City metropolitan area. Neighborhood characteristics were drawn from the 2010 U.S. Census. Surveys focusing on attitudes and intended behavior toward people with mental illness were administered to 608 general community members, and clinical interviews were conducted with 343 persons with psychiatric disabilities. Of neighborhood characteristics, both greater socioeconomic disadvantage and more "suburban values" (lower housing density and greater political conservativism) predicted more perpetrated stigma reported by community members. There was no significant relationship between stigma reported by community members and perceived stigma among participants with psychiatric disabilities. Community stigma predicted vocational involvement and demonstrated interaction effects with housing, such that persons living in congregate housing demonstrated more community participation in communities with more stigma, whereas persons living in scattered-site housing demonstrated less participation in these communities. Perceived stigma was significantly negatively related to community participation. Findings suggest that effects of neighborhood characteristics and community stigma on people with psychiatric disabilities are complex and are partly conditioned by housing context.

  11. Understanding interpersonal function in psychiatric illness through multiplayer economic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Casas, Brooks; Chiu, Pearl H

    2012-07-15

    Interpersonal factors play significant roles in the onset, maintenance, and remission of psychiatric conditions. In the current major diagnostic classification systems for psychiatric disorders, some conditions are defined by the presence of impairments in social interaction or maintaining interpersonal relationships; these include autism, social phobia, and the personality disorders. Other psychopathologies confer significant difficulties in the social domain, including major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and psychotic disorders. Still other mental health conditions, including substance abuse and eating disorders, seem to be exacerbated or triggered in part by the influence of social peers. For each of these and other psychiatric conditions, the extent and quality of social support is a strong determinant of outcome such that high social support predicts symptom improvement and remission. Despite the central role of interpersonal factors in psychiatric illness, the neurobiology of social impairments remains largely unexplored, in part due to difficulties eliciting and quantifying interpersonal processes in a parametric manner. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging, combined with multiplayer exchange games drawn from behavioral economics, and computational/quantitative approaches more generally, provide a fitting paradigm within which to study interpersonal function and dysfunction in psychiatric conditions. In this review, we outline the importance of interpersonal factors in psychiatric illness and discuss ways in which neuroeconomics provides a tractable framework within which to examine the neurobiology of social dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrating a professional apprenticeship model with psychiatric clinical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, Mark C; McNiesh, Susan G

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we present a theory-based application of clinical simulation in psychiatric-mental health nursing education. As described by Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, and Day, a three-pronged apprenticeship that integrates intellectual, practical, and ethical aspects of the professional role is critical in the development of practical reasoning in nursing education and training. Clinical encounters are often fraught with ambiguity and uncertainty. Therefore, educating for a practice discipline requires experiential and situated learning. Using the three-pronged experiential model in simulated psychiatric-mental health nursing practice supports the development of critical nursing skills, ethics, and theoretical concepts. A clinical scenario is presented that demonstrates the application of this model of professional apprenticeship in psychiatric-mental health education. Applications of the concept presented may be used in training nurses new to the practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Housing Data Base for Sustainable Housing Provision

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    that the housing provision as currently practised is not socially sustainable as it does not rely on data from the .... Design Base. One of the first issues the architect always tries to address before embarking on a design is to obtain the design brief and analyse the data provided. ..... of Housing. Nigeria: Jos Universal. Press.

  14. Motivational Factors that Help in Coping with Barriers to Provision of Psychiatric Nursing Care: Perspective of Psychiatric Nurses in a Hospital Setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimba, Solomon Musa; Duma, Sinegugu

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative case study explored barriers to provision of psychiatric nursing care in a hospital in Plateau State, Nigeria, and revealed motivational factors that helped the nurses to cope with these barriers. Data collection methods included grand tour and in-depth interviews and participant observation. Motivational factors were related to the psychiatric nurse's individual intrinsic belief system, as well as to their intrinsic belief system as influenced by the environment. These motivational factors highlight how psychiatric nurses continue to cope with the barriers they face in provision of care. The findings indicate the need for hospital management to create and sustain an environment to complement the existing intrinsic motivation of psychiatric nurses to provide psychiatric nursing care, and to provide prompt and appropriate emotional and psychological support to psychiatric nurses worldwide.

  15. Gender, status, and psychiatric labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K; Brown, Ryan P; Thomas, Lauren S

    2015-11-01

    We examine a key modified labeling theory proposition-that a psychiatric label increases vulnerability to competence-based criticism and rejection-within task- and collectively oriented dyads comprised of same-sex individuals with equivalent education. Drawing on empirical work that approximates these conditions, we expect the proposition to hold only among men. We also expect education, operationalized with college class standing, to moderate the effects of gender by reducing men's and increasing women's criticism and rejection. But, we also expect the effect of education to weaken when men work with a psychiatric patient. As predicted, men reject suggestions from teammates with a psychiatric history more frequently than they reject suggestions from other teammates, while women's resistance to influence is unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Men also rate psychiatric patient teammates as less powerful but no lower in status than other teammates, while women's teammate assessments are unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Also as predicted, education reduces men's resistance to influence when their teammate has no psychiatric history. Education also increases men's ratings of their teammate's power, as predicted, but has no effect on women's resistance to influence or teammate ratings. We discuss the implications of these findings for the modified labeling theory of mental illness and status characteristics theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychiatric disorders in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Ybarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. METHOD: Forty-one patients with MG answered to a structured psychiatric interview (MINI-Plus. RESULTS: Eleven (26.1% patients were diagnosed with a depressive disorder and 19 (46.3% were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Patients with dysthymia were older (p=0.029 and had longer disease duration (p=0.006. Patients with social phobia also had longer disease duration (p=0.039. CONCLUSION: Psychiatric disorders in MG are common, especially depressive and anxiety disorders.

  17. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  18. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  19. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  20. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  1. Housing of Hobson's Choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Hedvig

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at policies implemented to improve troubled housing estates during more than two decades. Based on evaluations of implemented programmes and case studies the paper provides a basis for discussing a number of questions: • Why do we have troubled housing estates? • What...... is the definition of troubled housing estates? • Who lives on troubled housing estates? • Who owns and manages the troubled housing estates? • What have been the reasons behind improvement programmes for troubled housing estates? • What kind of improvement programmes have been implemented and with what kind...... of results? • Have improvement programmes changed the position of the estates on the local housing markets? • What are the changes in policies and results? • What are the perspectives for policy initiatives in the field of troubled housing estates?...

  2. Essays on Housing Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckman, Claes

    impacts for all, and should therefore be a topic of major interest for economists and policy makers alike. This Ph.D. thesis, entitled “Essays on Housing Markets”, analyzes the Danish housing market during the 2000s, with a focus on how policy changes affected house prices and how changes in house prices...... affect households. While independent, each chapter in this thesis attempts to contribute to our understanding of how housing markets function, and has important lessons for policy-makers and economists around the world.......In Denmark and in many countries around the world, housing markets are of considerable importance for households and policy-makers alike. As the boom and bust in the US and Danish housing market so aptly demonstrated, disruptions in the housing market potentially have wide-ranging consequences...

  3. Allegheny County Older Housing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Older housing can impact the quality of the occupant's health in a number of ways, including lead exposure, housing quality, and factors that may exacerbate...

  4. House While Woman Grows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şengül Öymen Gür

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Discourses on woman/space relations boomed in the 90s. The fundamental reason was to give support to the Feminist Movement. This trend which has had feeble effect on architectural design remained controversial. The comprehensive research expounded in this article which was based on an open-ended questionnaire that targeted at determining the gender roles at home, applied to female subjects who simulated the national demographics, clearly demonstrated that the home experience of an average Turkish woman basically consists of kitchens; the female who runs the house does not really have a place for herself at home. However she does not perceive her restrained, secondary role an issue worthy of struggling to change and she grants spaces for recreation and study to the male. The well-established civil laws conducive for equality has not changed this disturbing situation and do not seem to do so in the near future.

  5. Rabeprazole and psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Paola; Gallo, Adele; Gallo, Salvatore; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille P

    2007-07-01

    To report the case of a patient who developed marked anxiety associated with episodes of panic attacks after starting rabeprazole therapy. An otherwise healthy 55-year-old woman was prescribed rabeprazole 20 mg/day administered in the morning for persistent symptoms of dyspepsia. Ten days later, she presented with a 7 day history of marked anxiety associated with panic attacks, night terror (pavor nocturnus), episodic mental confusion, and attention deficit. Within 2 days of discontinuing rabeprazole, the patient recovered completely from the neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subsequent esomeprazole therapy did not cause psychiatric symptoms. Rabeprazole-induced hypergastrinemia may have played a role in this neuropsychiatric adverse reaction. Several lines of evidence have indicated that gastrin-releasing peptide, whose release is mediated by proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced secretion of gastrin, is involved in regulating aspects of behavior that might be altered in disorders such as anxiety, depression, and dementia. The fact that rabeprazole has the highest capacity of inducing gastrin increase compared with other PPIs might explain why our patient's panic symptoms disappeared after switching to esomeprazole. Based on the Naranjo probability scale, rabeprazole was the probable cause of the adverse reaction. Specific studies are needed to investigate the potential role of PPI-induced hypergastrinemia in neuropsychiatric adverse reactions.

  6. Insulator for laser housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  7. Evaluation of a Regional Retrofit Programme to Upgrade Existing Housing Stock to Reduce Carbon Emissions, Fuel Poverty and Support the Local Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Louise Patterson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first-ever legally binding global climate deal that will be adopted by 195 countries was introduced in Paris in 2015, highlighting that climate change is being recognised as a real and urgent global problem. Legislative interventions need to be accompanied by significant action across all sectors of the built environment through reducing energy demand, providing energy supply from low carbon sources and combining with this with energy storage to enable necessary targets to be met. Retrofitting existing buildings is critical to making these cuts as 80% of buildings currently in existence will still be present in 2050. These retrofits need to be undertaken rapidly using replicable and affordable solutions that benefit both the householder whilst significantly reducing emissions. This paper will present an evaluation of a £9.6 million regional scale retrofit programme funded under the Welsh Governments Arbed 1 Programme which aimed to reduce fuel poverty, reduce carbon emissions and support the energy efficiency and renewable supply chain and encourage recruitment and training in the sector. Results have been obtained from desk top data collection and energy modelling calculations. The evaluation work presents the technical, environmental and economic impacts of the programme and demonstrates lessons learnt to help improve the implementation of the other regional retrofit projects providing evidence of the impacts of a large scale retrofit programme that are necessary for the deep carbon reductions required in the near future.

  8. Equal Opportunity in Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC.

    This overview of developments in housing opportunities for minorities and women includes an historical review of housing discrimination, its nature, and its effects. Federal legislation and Federal actions which were taken to assure equal housing opportunities for women and minorities are described. Other topic areas addressed include minority…

  9. Dutch house price fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffner, M.E.A.; de Vries, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses house price developments in the Netherlands, specifically focussing on the question whether current house prices in the Dutch owner-occupied market are likely to decrease. We analyse three aspects of the question based on a literature review: (1) whether there is a house price

  10. Lesion procedures in psychiatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaun R; Aronson, Joshua P; Sheth, Sameer A; Eskandar, Emad N

    2013-01-01

    Lesion procedures for psychiatric indications have a history that spans more than a century. This review provides a brief history of psychiatric surgery and addresses the most recent literature on lesion surgery for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. Relevant data described in publications from the early 1900 s through the modern era regarding lesion procedures for psychiatric indications, both historical and current use, are reported. The early procedures of Burkhardt, Moniz, and Freeman are reviewed, followed by descriptions of the more refined techniques of Leksell, Knight, Foltz, White, and Kelly. The application of lesion procedures to obsessive-compulsive disorder, mood disorders, and addiction are discussed. Lesioning procedures have informed modern deep brain stimulation targets. Recent lesioning studies demonstrate the efficacy and durability of these procedures in severely disabled patients. Judicious application of these techniques should continue for appropriately selected patients with severe, refractory psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Tics, ADHD and Psychiatric Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of teacher-rated tic behaviors in 3006 school children, from preschool to adolescence, was determined in a study of comorbid psychiatric symptoms at State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY.

  12. Tics, ADHD and Psychiatric Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of teacher-rated tic behaviors in 3006 school children, from preschool to adolescence, was determined in a study of comorbid psychiatric symptoms at State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY.

  13. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Ingmar

    2011-07-01

    Recent research has shown that depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis are more common than previously supposed in elderly populations without dementia. It is unclear whether the frequency of these disorders increases or decreases with age. Clinical expression of psychiatric disorders in old age may be different from that seen in younger age groups, with less and often milder symptoms. Concurrently, comorbidity between different psychiatric disorders is immense, as well as comorbidity with somatic disorders. Cognitive function is often decreased in people with depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis, but whether these disorders are risk factors for dementia is unclear. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly are often related to cerebral neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease, although psychosocial risk factors are also important. Psychiatric disorders, common among the elderly, have consequences that include social deprivation, poor quality of life, cognitive decline, disability, increased risk for somatic disorders, suicide, and increased nonsuicidal mortality.

  14. Overcrowding of Residential Houses in Ethiopia: A Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Existing housing related evidences attest to the fact that many Ethiopians live in houses that are not conducive for healthy life. This article examines the nature of overcrowding of residential units in Ethiopia using the 2007 Population and Housing Census data supported by literature. Descriptive and multivariate statistical ...

  15. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  16. Assisted Housing - Public Housing Authorities - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Public Housing was established to provide decent and safe rental housing for eligible low-income families, the elderly, and persons with disabilities. Public housing...

  17. Psychiatric characteristics of homicide defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Christine A; Mulvey, Edward P; Yang, Suzanne; Nemoianu, Andrei; Shugarman, Ryan; Soliman, Layla

    2013-09-01

    The authors examined the rate of mental disorders in an unselected sample of homicide defendants in a U.S. jurisdiction, seeking to identify psychiatric factors associated with offense characteristics and court outcomes. Defendants charged with homicide in a U.S. urban county between 2001 and 2005 received a psychiatric evaluation after arrest. Demographic, historical, and psychiatric variables as well as offense characteristics and legal outcomes were described. Bivariate analyses examined differences by age group and by race, and logistic models examined predictors of multiple victims, firearm use, guilty plea, and guilty verdict. Fifty-eight percent of the sample had at least one axis I or II diagnosis, most often a substance use disorder (47%). Axis I or II diagnoses were more common (78%) among defendants over age 40. Although 37% of the sample had prior psychiatric treatment, only 8% of the defendants with diagnosed axis I disorders had outpatient treatment during the 3 months preceding the homicide; African Americans were less likely than non-African Americans to be in treatment. African American males were more likely to use a firearm and to have a male victim. In exploratory analyses, psychiatric factors did not predict multiple victims, firearm use in the crime, or a guilty verdict. Rates of axis I disorders were lower than reported in previous studies. Few homicide defendants were in psychiatric treatment at the time of the crime, suggesting limited opportunities for prevention by mental health providers.

  18. Zero energy house

    OpenAIRE

    Milián Martínez, Irene; Vink, Willem; Ortiz Braulio, Ruben

    2008-01-01

    The zero energy house project talks about sustainability. In general terms the house is designed to produce as much energy as it consume. If you take a look to the house its possible to find several systems that takes as much profit as possible to the renewable energies like photovoltaic electricity production, geothermal energy used to run a heat pump or a well thought isolated house. First of all it’s possible to find general information about the topics in house, to make people understa...

  19. Sustainable housing transformations : The housing association as a change agent for environmental innovation and social regeneration - Two case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van J.D.M. (Anke); Femenías, P.

    2009-01-01

    The starting point for this study is the central role of the housing association in sustainable transformations of existing post-war housing stocks in Europe. The paper explores the role of the housing association to drive and support transformation processes where the aim is to address both

  20. Moodulmaja Passion House = "Passion House" modular home

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2015-01-01

    Moodulmaja Passion House. Arhitektuuri sihtkapitali innovatsioonipreemia 2013 kvaliteetse disaini ja perspektiivika arendustegevuse oskusliku sidumise eest. Arhitekt Eero Endjärv (Arhitekt11), sisearhitekt Hannelore Kääramees (Arhitekt11)

  1. Housing assistance and case management: improving access to substance use disorder treatment for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Jaime L; Shealy, Suzanne E; Kropp, Gary J; Felkins-Dohm, Donna; Gonzales-Nolas, Cheryl; Francis, Elie

    2013-05-01

    The problem of waiting list attrition in addiction treatment programs is widespread, and homeless and marginally housed individuals are particularly susceptible. This naturalistic, retrospective study describes an intervention (Transitional Supportive Housing and Case Management) that effectively promoted treatment admission for this high-risk group above and beyond that which could be explained by certain pretreatment factors. The clinical records of 211 military veterans referred to intensive outpatient addiction treatment were reviewed for factors related to treatment program admission, including 3 interventions designed to prevent waiting list attrition. Chi-square tests evaluated univariate predictors of treatment entry, and a hierarchical binary logistic regression evaluated several variables simultaneously. Results showed that fewer than 50% of wait-listed patients achieved treatment admission. Univariate predictors of treatment entry were not having a current partner, having a legal problem, and having had past substance use disorder treatment. The logistic regression showed that patients who received the intervention were 4.5 times more likely to enter the treatment program, and individuals with a current legal problem were 2.5 times more likely to enter treatment. Participation in a weekly support group and/or contact with a psychiatric nurse practitioner did not increase the likelihood of program admission. It may be possible to enhance treatment entry for the homeless and marginally housed by providing case management and housing services. Future research is needed to determine how the individual-level factors predicting treatment entry in this study can be used to tailor other interventions to further address the problem of waiting list attrition. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Assisted Housing - Multifamily Properties - Assisted

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Multifamily Housing property portfolio consist primarily of rental housing properties with five or more dwelling units such as apartments or town houses, but...

  3. [The psychiatric aspects of animal assisted therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánszky, Noémi; Kardos, Edina; Rózsa, Linda; Gerevich, József

    2012-01-01

    Animal assisted therapy is a known preventive and interventive method which is held by the contribution of specially trained animals and professionals. One of its main indication fields is psychiatry. The purpose of this summary is to give an overview on the animal assisted therapy's background, possible uses and effectiveness with literature. It looks for the answer if this therapeutic method can be used for effectively easing the symptoms of specific psychiatric diseases and on which fields can it be used most effectively. Due to the data provided by literature it can be determined that the therapy supported by animals is able to give an effective help on the fields of various psychiatric supports, preventions, interventions and rehabilitations regardless of the age. It is mostly used in the case of depression, anxiety, addiction, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder. Aside from these it could also be used effectively in the rehabilitation of victims of sexual abuse especially in the case of children. It can also play a role in the re-socialization of inadapted adolescences and adults, even with farmtherapy. Due to experiences the therapies supported by animals are effective on the following fields: improving social and communication skills, easing anxiety, improving mood, helping independent living, improving emphatic skills.

  4. Access to housing subsidies, housing status, drug use and HIV risk among low-income U.S. urban residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; McAuliffe, Timothy; Convey, Mark; Weeks, Margaret; Owczarzak, Jill

    2011-11-23

    Much research has shown an association between homelessness and unstable housing and HIV risk but most has relied on relatively narrow definitions of housing status that preclude a deeper understanding of this relationship. Fewer studies have examined access to housing subsidies and supportive housing programs among low-income populations with different personal characteristics. This paper explores personal characteristics associated with access to housing subsidies and supportive housing, the relationship between personal characteristics and housing status, and the relationship between housing status and sexual risk behaviors among low-income urban residents. Surveys were conducted with 392 low-income residents from Hartford and East Harford, Connecticut through a targeted sampling plan. We measured personal characteristics (income, education, use of crack, heroin, or cocaine in the last 6 months, receipt of welfare benefits, mental illness diagnosis, arrest, criminal conviction, longest prison term served, and self-reported HIV diagnosis); access to housing subsidies or supportive housing programs; current housing status; and sexual risk behaviors. To answer the aims above, we performed univariate analyses using Chi-square or 2-sided ANOVA's. Those with significance levels above (0.10) were included in multivariate analyses. We performed 2 separate multiple regressions to determine the effects of personal characteristics on access to housing subsidies and access to supportive housing respectively. We used multinomial main effects logistic regression to determine the effects of housing status on sexual risk behavior. Being HIV positive or having a mental illness predicted access to housing subsidies and supportive housing, while having a criminal conviction was not related to access to either housing subsidies or supportive housing. Drug use was associated with poorer housing statuses such as living on the street or in a shelter, or temporarily doubling up with

  5. Access to housing subsidies, housing status, drug use and HIV risk among low-income U.S. urban residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson-Gomez Julia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much research has shown an association between homelessness and unstable housing and HIV risk but most has relied on relatively narrow definitions of housing status that preclude a deeper understanding of this relationship. Fewer studies have examined access to housing subsidies and supportive housing programs among low-income populations with different personal characteristics. This paper explores personal characteristics associated with access to housing subsidies and supportive housing, the relationship between personal characteristics and housing status, and the relationship between housing status and sexual risk behaviors among low-income urban residents. Methods Surveys were conducted with 392 low-income residents from Hartford and East Harford, Connecticut through a targeted sampling plan. We measured personal characteristics (income, education, use of crack, heroin, or cocaine in the last 6 months, receipt of welfare benefits, mental illness diagnosis, arrest, criminal conviction, longest prison term served, and self-reported HIV diagnosis; access to housing subsidies or supportive housing programs; current housing status; and sexual risk behaviors. To answer the aims above, we performed univariate analyses using Chi-square or 2-sided ANOVA's. Those with significance levels above (0.10 were included in multivariate analyses. We performed 2 separate multiple regressions to determine the effects of personal characteristics on access to housing subsidies and access to supportive housing respectively. We used multinomial main effects logistic regression to determine the effects of housing status on sexual risk behavior. Results Being HIV positive or having a mental illness predicted access to housing subsidies and supportive housing, while having a criminal conviction was not related to access to either housing subsidies or supportive housing. Drug use was associated with poorer housing statuses such as living on the

  6. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bimenyimana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch’s (Creswell, 2004:256 method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT; and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an “I don’t care” attitude.

  7. [Perception of ethical aspects in psychiatric patient care: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenschlag, Franziska; Steinauer, Regine; Heimann, Regine; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2014-10-01

    Research on staff perception of ethical aspects of psychiatric patient care are scarce; little is known about systematic supplies of ethics support in psychiatric institutions. The goal of this pilot study is to inform the implementation of Clinical Ethics Support Services in psychiatric institutions by assessing which topics of psychiatric practice are considered ethically challenging by the staff. Explorative survey as pilot study by questionnaire with clinical staff, quantitative (descriptive) and qualitative (coding) data-analysis. Involuntary treatment, the relationship between healthcare professionals and patients, staff shortage and the collaboration between the professions as well as dealing with patient relatives came up as ethical challenges. Clinical Ethics Support in psychiatric patient care should not only cover aspects that are specific for psychiatry, but also structural topics such as short resources, interprofessional collaboration and communication with relatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Social mobility and psychiatric disabilities: an assessment of the social causation and social selection hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Uk; Han, Chang-Wan; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Social mobility is the movement of individuals, families and groups from one social position to another. Researchers indicate that people with psychiatric disabilities tend to come from lower socioeconomic status groups, and that the causal relationship between lower socioeconomic status and mental illness occurs through social mobility process. The purpose of this study was to examine the occupational social mobility process of a sample of self-identified psychiatrically disabled individuals who have been active members of the labor force for most of their adult lives. A total of 200 participants were recruited from the customers of a One-Stop Career Center in Gloucester County, New Jersey. The social mobility pattern of persons with psychiatric disabilities was compared to that of persons without psychiatric disabilities (n = 100 for each group). That is, the social selection and the social causation hypotheses were applied to the social mobility patterns of people with psychiatric disabilities. It was revealed that the social class distribution for fathers of people with psychiatric disabilities was not different from that of people without psychiatric disabilities and also there was no significant social mobility difference between the two groups. These findings do not support the social causation and the social selection hypotheses. Specifically, the findings demonstrate that occupational capabilities and skills of people with psychiatric disabilities have been stabilized and are similar to those of people without psychiatric disabilities. Furthermore, these results may dispute several biases and prejudices with regard to social mobility process of persons with psychiatric disabilities.

  9. Burnout in nonhospital psychiatric residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Laura; Magni, Laura Rosa; Giovannini, Caterina; Panetta, Valentina; Zacchi, Valeria; Rossi, Giuseppe; Placentino, Anna

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated levels and risk factors of burnout in a sample of mental health professionals employed in nonhospital psychiatric residential facilities of northern Italy. Nurses, nurse assistants, and educators completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic variables, burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), job characteristics (Job Diagnostic Survey), workload, relationships with colleagues, and support from supervising coordinators. A total of 202 (83% response rate) questionnaires were analyzed. Logistic linear regressions were used to estimate predictors of burnout dimensions. Burnout risk was widespread. Low feedback about job performance, poor support from coordinators, and young age predicted emotional exhaustion. Low feedback about job performance predicted feelings of depersonalization. Low task identity and young age predicted reduced feelings of personal accomplishment. Interventions to prevent burnout among employees should be developed. These include providing feedback about performance, clearly identifying the tasks of the job, and providing support.

  10. Psychiatric and psychosocial correlates of sexual risk behavior among adults with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2007-04-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This study examined multivariate correlates of sexual risk among 152 adults with SMI receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment. Structured interviews assessed psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors. The majority was sexually active (65%), and many reported unprotected intercourse (73%), multiple partners (45%), and sex trading (21%) in the past year. Logistic regression models found that sexual behaviors were differentially associated with non-psychotic disorder, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, childhood sexual abuse, romantic partnership, and social support (all ps < .05). Findings underscore the need for targeted HIV prevention interventions that address psychiatric and psychosocial risk factors.

  11. Homelessness and Housing Insecurity Among Former Prisoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire W. Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The United States has experienced dramatic increases in both incarceration rates and the population of insecurely housed or homeless persons since the 1980s. These marginalized populations have strong overlaps, with many people being poor, minority, and from an urban area. That a relationship between homelessness, housing insecurity, and incarceration exists is clear, but the extent and nature of this relationship is not yet adequately understood. We use longitudinal, administrative data on Michigan parolees released in 2003 to examine returning prisoners’ experiences with housing insecurity and homelessness. Our analysis finds relatively low rates of outright homelessness among former prisoners, but very high rates of housing insecurity, much of which is linked to features of community supervision, such as intermediate sanctions, returns to prison, and absconding. We identify risk factors for housing insecurity, including mental illness, substance use, prior incarceration, and homelessness, as well as protective “buffers” against insecurity and homelessness, including earnings and social supports.

  12. Vancouver At Home: pragmatic randomized trials investigating Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented among the homeless. Housing First (HF) has been shown to promote positive outcomes in this population. However, key questions remain unresolved, including: how to match support services to client needs, the benefits of housing in scattered sites versus single congregate building, and the effectiveness of HF with individuals actively using substances. The present study aimed to recruit two samples of homeless mentally ill participants who differed in the complexity of their needs. Study details, including recruitment, randomization, and follow-up, are presented. Methods Eligibility was based on homeless status and current mental disorder. Participants were classified as either moderate needs (MN) or high needs (HN). Those with MN were randomized to HF with Intensive Case Management (HF-ICM) or usual care. Those with HN were randomized to HF with Assertive Community Treatment (HF-ACT), congregate housing with support, or usual care. Participants were interviewed every 3 months for 2 years. Separate consent was sought to access administrative data. Results Participants met eligibility for either MN (n = 200) or HN (n = 297) and were randomized accordingly. Both samples were primarily male and white. Compared to participants designated MN, HN participants had higher rates of hospitalization for psychiatric reasons prior to randomization, were younger at the time of recruitment, younger when first homeless, more likely to meet criteria for substance dependence, and less likely to have completed high school. Across all study arms, between 92% and 100% of participants were followed over 24 months post-randomization. Minimal significant differences were found between study arms following randomization. 438 participants (88%) provided consent to access administrative data. Conclusion The study successfully recruited participants meeting criteria for homelessness and current mental disorder. Both MN

  13. Targeted research training: developing minority psychiatric investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Harold; Guerra, Ernesto; Regier, Darrel

    2014-04-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to review the career outcomes of a research training program specifically targeted to young psychiatric researchers from minority populations underrepresented in psychiatry. The aims of the program were (1) to support psychiatric investigators from under-represented populations in the development and maintenance of research careers and (2) to identify the factors which influence successful research career development. Demographic data from 99 program participants were collected from an online survey as part of a systematic program evaluation, and through a follow-up internet search. Outcome measures included current academic position, number and types of post-training grants received, number of peer-reviewed publications, and comparison of post-training career outcomes with those from other highly regarded research training programs. Of the 99 psychiatrists accepted into the program, 55 responded to the online survey; additional information on non-responders was obtained through a follow-up internet search. Results indicated that 64% of program trainees identified their primary employment setting as academic/research; 70% reported publication of their research findings, and 64% reported the award of post-training research grants. The percentage of program graduates appointed to academic faculty positions and their receipt of R01 and/or K awards, exceeded that of two highly regarded national training programs. The study further identified major factors influencing successful research career development. Findings from this study strongly suggest that research training programs targeted to young minority psychiatrists can be successful in supporting the development and maintenance of their research careers. The decline in the availability of such programs does not portend well for increasing the numbers of underrepresented minority psychiatric researchers.

  14. Psychiatric conditions associated with bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Kirsti

    2008-01-01

    Bullying is a complex phenomenon moderated not only by the personal characteristics and behavioral traits of the individual but also by family rearing practices, as well as by situational factors such as the frequency and type of bullying. The phenomenon is also affected by group processes among the individuals present during the event. Bullying is a distressing experience that is often continuous over years and predicts both concurrent and future psychiatric symptoms and disorders, even in adulthood. At young ages, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and depression, as well as anxiety, are prevalent concurrently with bullying among the children involved. Later in young adulthood, male victims are at risk for anxiety, male bullies for personality disorders, and male bully-victims for both personality disorders and anxiety, and the risk is especially increased if the child is disturbed when involved in bullying at school age. Rarely does any single behavior predict future problems as clearly as bullying does, and additional assessment of psychiatric problems is always warranted, if the child is involved in bullying as a bully, victim or bully-victim. Based on our current knowledge, school-based interventions regulating the behavior of the child, increasing pro-social skills and promoting peer relationships are recommended for those without concurrent psychiatric disturbance, but those displaying psychiatric symptoms and disorders should be referred for psychiatric consultation and intervention.

  15. OCCUPATIONAL ROLE AFTER PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH.R GHASSEMI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe Psychiatricillness is accompanied by gross disturbances in patient's occupational role. This study presents a comparative picture of work performance before and after psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Subjects comprised 440 psychiatric admitters from Noor Medical center - Isfahan - Iran, who were followed from November 1999 to November 2000. Their work adjustment was measured by means of Weiss man's index. Data were computer analyzed using SPSS by running paired t- student and ANOVA. Results: Majority of the patients (53 % were without permanent sources of income before psychiatric hospitalization, about 12 percent of those who were working prior to hospitalization lost their job after being discharged from hospital. Better work adjustment before hospitalization was positively correlated with better work adjustment after discharge for working patients (r =0/66. Working ability of the patients after discharge was lesser than before the attack f9r patients with regular and irregular job (P < 001. Discussion: Job loss or poor working ability after psychiatric admission reported by several researchers and has bean confirmed in this study as well. These observatoins have been discussed in view of the current socio economic problems in the society and nature of psychiatric disturbances.

  16. Support Care Facility Prague House, Freshford, Kilkenny.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cleary, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this audit was to review current practice within a rural mental health service area on the monitoring and documentation of side effects of antipsychotic depot medication. Following a review of the literature on best practice internationally, an evidence based audit tool was adapted. A sample of 60 case files, care plans and prescriptions were audited between January and May 2010. This represented 31% of the total number of service users receiving depot injections in the mental health service region (n=181). The audit results revealed that most service users had an annual documented medical review and a documented prescription. However, only 5 (8%) case notes examined had documentation recorded describing the condition of the injection site and alternation of the injection site was recorded in only 28 (47%) case notes. No case notes examined had written consent to commence treatment recorded, and only 3 (5%) of case notes had documented that information on the depot injection and side effects was given. In 57 (95%) of case notes no documentation of recorded information on the depot and on side effects was given. Documentation of physical observations and tests revealed that 58% of cases had full blood count, liver function tests, thyroid function tests and fasting lipids recorded. All other tests (i.e. temperature, pulse, respirations, blood pressure, ECG) were recorded in less than 50% of cases. Prolactin levels were not recorded in any case. The lack of written consent was partly attributed to lack of recording of consent. The failure to monitor and record some\\r\

  17. Support Care Facility Prague House, Freshford, Kilkenny

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2009-08-01

    Increased frequency of prothrombin time testing, facilitated by patient self-testing (PST) of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) can improve the clinical outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). However, oversight of this type of management is often difficult and time-consuming for healthcare professionals. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of an automated direct-to-patient expert system, enabling remote and effective management of patients on OAT.

  18. 75 FR 4100 - Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair Housing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair...- MultifamilyHousing, Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan- Single Family Housing andAffirmative Fair...

  19. Characteristics and Use of Services Among Literally Homeless and Unstably Housed U.S. Veterans With Custody of Minor Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kasprow, Wesley J; Kane, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The study examined the number of homeless veterans with minor children in their custody ("children in custody"), compared sociodemographic and clinical characteristics among homeless veterans with and without children in custody, and observed differences in referral and admission patterns among veterans with and without children in custody for a variety of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) programs for homeless veterans. Data were obtained from the VA Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System for 89,142 literally homeless and unstably housed veterans. Sociodemographic, housing, health, and psychosocial characteristics of veterans were analyzed. Among literally homeless veterans, 9% of men and 30% of women had children in custody; among unstably housed veterans, 18% of men and 45% of women had children in custody. Both male and female veterans with children in custody were younger and less likely to have chronic general medical conditions and psychiatric disorders compared with other veterans, but, notably, 11% of homeless veterans with children in custody had psychotic disorders. Veterans with children in custody were more likely than other veterans to be referred and admitted to the VA's permanent supported housing program, and women were more likely than men to be admitted to the program. A substantial proportion of homeless veterans served by the VA have severe mental illness and children in custody, which raises concerns about the parenting environment for their children. Particular focus should be directed at VA's supported-housing program, and the practical and ethical implications of serving homeless parents and their children need to be considered.

  20. [Sick house syndrome: governmental actions and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomonori; Kigawa, Mika

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1980s, sick house syndrome has become one of the major challenges in environmental health. In Japan in 1980, first governmental measures were taken to limit formaldehyde release from building materials. In 2003, the Building Standards Law and the Community Health Law were revised, and these laws clarified the responsibility of building companies, local governments and health officers in preventing sick house syndrome. Telephone survey results demonstrated the decrease in the prevalence of sick house syndrome between 2002 and 2006 in Tokyo and Sapporo. Knowledge about sick house syndrome enabling patients to better deal with the syndrome and stricter regulations seem to have contributed to the decrease in the prevalence of the syndrome. Questionnaire surveys carried out through regional health centers demonstrated that the number of possible sick house syndrome patients visiting regional health centers varied, possibly reflecting different local prevalences and needs. Most of the regional health centers had staff members who were able to measure in-house environments, but their ability to discuss on health-related issues was limited, and cooperation between the centers and healthcare organizations was not sufficient. Information about healthcare organizations that can treat patients with sick house syndrome and simple self-diagnostic tools were among the most often cited useful support needs. Establishment of a hub regional health center to construct a comprehensive consultation and referral system that can meet local needs in dealing with sick house syndrome is recommended.

  1. A highly sustainable house

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Raúl; Mercader-Moyano, Pilar (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    A sustainable house is capable of generating and self-sustaining energy by itself to function autonomously, that is to say, without depending on external supply networks. That is possible by supplying the internal energy consumption through renewable energy. This work describes and analyzes the construction of a sustainable house in Paute, Ecuador. The goal of this house was to achieve selfsustainability in several aspects such as construction techniques, creative and functi...

  2. House-Dust Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C A

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial.

  3. [Nursing perspective on psychiatric care in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Michaël Bilson is a nurse at the psychiatric hospital of Bingerville, in Ivory Coast. Here, he describes his mission supporting the National Health Worker Training Institute. It is the only nurse training school in Ivory Coast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Concerns and Needs of University Students with Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Enid; Weiner, Judith

    1996-01-01

    A study using individual interviews with 24 university students with psychiatric disabilities identified five areas of concern: problems with focusing attention and organization, low self-esteem, problems with trust, stigma, and high stress levels. Findings point to need for comprehensive services, including peer support group, one-to-one…

  5. Self-Reported Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Robert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) to 108 adolescent inpatients diagnosed with mixed psychiatric disorders. Examined relationships of Beck Depression Inventory, Anxiety Inventory, and Hopelessness Scale with BSI. Results support use of BSI with adolescent inpatients. Findings indicated that hopelessness was related to suicidal…

  6. Mathari psychiatric hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    correlated with physical exhaustion, sleep disorder, substance abuse and family problems.3. Earlier studies report that risk factors for burnout included younger age, lack of role clarity, perceived inadequacy of resources, lack of personal support and workloadi5 On the other hand, hardiness, which is the individual's relative ...

  7. Moral learning in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitvast, J E; Widdershoven, G A M; Abma, T A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate moral learning in persons with a psychiatric disability who participated in a nursing intervention, called the photo-instrument. This intervention is a form of hermeneutic photography. The findings are based on a multiple case study of 42 patients and additional interviews with eight of them. Photo groups were organized within three settings of psychiatric services: ambulatory as well as clinical, all situated in the Netherlands. Data were analysed according to hermeneutic and semiotic principles. Two cases are presented. Findings show that voice and face are concepts that help to identify elements of moral learning in the rehabilitation process of persons with a psychiatric disability. During the process patients become more aware of their responsibilities towards themselves and others.

  8. Transposable elements and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Guia; Gaudi, Simona; Fallon, James H; Sobell, Janet; Potkin, Steven G; Pato, Carlos; Macciardi, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Transposable Elements (TEs) or transposons are low-complexity elements (e.g., LINEs, SINEs, SVAs, and HERVs) that make up to two-thirds of the human genome. There is mounting evidence that TEs play an essential role in genomic architecture and regulation related to both normal function and disease states. Recently, the identification of active TEs in several different human brain regions suggests that TEs play a role in normal brain development and adult physiology and quite possibly in psychiatric disorders. TEs have been implicated in hemophilia, neurofibromatosis, and cancer. With the advent of next-generation whole-genome sequencing approaches, our understanding of the relationship between TEs and psychiatric disorders will greatly improve. We will review the biology of TEs and early evidence for TE involvement in psychiatric disorders. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Unofficial policy: access to housing, housing information and social services among homeless drug users in Hartford, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbett A Michelle

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much research has shown that the homeless have higher rates of substance abuse problems than housed populations and that substance abuse increases individuals' vulnerability to homelessness. However, the effects of housing policies on drug users' access to housing have been understudied to date. This paper will look at the "unofficial" housing policies that affect drug users' access to housing. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 65 active users of heroin and cocaine at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Participants were purposively sampled to reflect a variety of housing statuses including homeless on the streets, in shelters, "doubled-up" with family or friends, or permanently housed in subsidized, unsubsidized or supportive housing. Key informant interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with 15 housing caseworkers. Data were analyzed to explore the processes by which drug users receive information about different housing subsidies and welfare benefits, and their experiences in applying for these. Results A number of unofficial policy mechanisms limit drug users' access to housing, information and services, including limited outreach to non-shelter using homeless regarding housing programs, service provider priorities, and service provider discretion in processing applications and providing services. Conclusion Unofficial policy, i.e. the mechanisms used by caseworkers to ration scarce housing resources, is as important as official housing policies in limiting drug users' access to housing. Drug users' descriptions of their experiences working with caseworkers to obtain permanent, affordable housing, provide insights as to how access to supportive and subsidized housing can be improved for this population.

  10. Impact House 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheller, W.G.

    The Boston Edison Impact 2000 House is described. The house, currently under construction in Brookline, MA is the season's feature on the national PBS television series ''This Old House''. The house features passive solar gain, super insulation, active solar domestic hot water, a ground-couple heat pump, an integrated solar sunspace, and a 4.0 kW peak roof-integrated array of photovoltaic modules. The PV system will be utility-interactive with the Boston Edison grid.

  11. The architects house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welling, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The architects house is an article on Edward Heiberg's own house built in 1924. Edward Heiberg was a strong advocate of functionalism, and of the notion that hitherto individualistic and emotional architecture should be replaced by an objective function-based architecture with dwellings for every......The architects house is an article on Edward Heiberg's own house built in 1924. Edward Heiberg was a strong advocate of functionalism, and of the notion that hitherto individualistic and emotional architecture should be replaced by an objective function-based architecture with dwellings...

  12. [Multisystemic therapy for child abuse and neglect (MST-CAN): description of the treatment, psychiatric morbidity, and the psychiatrist's role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, F N; Brand-De Wilde, O M; van der Rijken, R E A

    2015-01-01

    Many untreated psychiatric problems occur in families where there is child abuse. It is very important to find ways of ensuring that the hard-to-reach families receive adequate psychiatric assessment and appropriate treatment. To describe the treatment method and first results of multisystemic therapy for child abuse and neglect (mst-can). We report the psychiatric problems of the first 18 families that were treated and we report the follow-up during the first 18 months. In addition, the mst-can treatment and the psychiatrist's role are illustrated by taking two cases as an example. Most of the families agreed to a psychiatric assessment and subsequent treatment. In most families safety improved considerably and out-of-house placements were avoided. The first results suggest that mst-can is a promising treatment for families where there is child abuse. Essential elements of mst-can are targeted psychiatric diagnostic assessment and subsequent treatment.

  13. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin

    2006-01-01

    characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0......OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...

  14. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; Mc Donald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, T. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This is the second volume of a two volume report on energy efficient industrialized housing. Volume II contains support documentation for Volume I. The following items are included: individual trip reports; software bibliography; industry contacts in the US, Denmark, and Japan; Cost comparison of industrialized housing in the US and Denmark; draft of the final report on the systems analysis for Fleetwood Mobile Home Manufacturers. (SM)

  15. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  16. Social support, health, and illness: a complicated relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, R

    2011-01-01

    .... A useful resource for clinical practitioners and researchers, Social Support, Health, and Illness addresses the effects of intimate support on a wide variety of medical and psychiatric conditions...

  17. Potential problems of detecting and treating psychosis in the White House. Potential psychosis in the White House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambill, J

    1980-01-01

    Numerous books and articles have described the emotional difficulties suffered by President Nixon and how they influenced functioning in the White House and other branches of government during his presidency. I am not able to ascertain whether Nixon was temporarily psychotic; but the reported emotional turmoil suggests he may have been at high risk for committing suicide or developing a psychosis. This article analyzes the reactions of numerous people to the questionably irrational behaviour of Richard Nixon. Examples of psychiatric risks in other Presidents, presidential candidates, and public figures are also discussed. The potential difficulties in detecting and treating severe psychiatric illness in Presidents and other public figures should not prevent us from taking action now to minimize future risks. It is recommended that future Presidents appoint a psychiatrist, at least on a part-time basis, as one of their personal physicians in order to increase Presidential access to psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

  18. Privacy in psychiatric treatment: threats and responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    The author provides an overview of the current status of privacy in psychiatric treatment, with particular attention to the effects of new federal regulations authorized by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). The author reviews the ethical and legal underpinnings for medical privacy, including the empirical data supporting its importance; discusses those portions of the new federal regulations most relevant to psychiatric practice; and suggests steps that psychiatrists can take to maintain their patients' privacy in the new environment. Medical ethics and law, in keeping with patients' preferences, traditionally have provided strong protection for the information that patients communicate while receiving medical care. In general, release of information has required patients' explicit consent. However, limitations of the consent model and technological innovations that permit the aggregation of computerized medical information have led to pressure for greater access to these data. Although the new federal regulations offer patients some additional protections (including security for psychotherapy notes), they also mark a retreat from reliance on patient consent and open up records to previously unauthorized uses, among them law enforcement investigations and marketing and fundraising by health care organizations. However, states retain the power to provide higher levels of protection. The new regulatory environment is less friendly to medical privacy but still leaves a great deal of discretion in physicians' hands. A commitment to protecting privacy as an ethical norm can be advanced by psychiatrists' requesting patients' consent even when it is not required, by ensuring that patients are aware of the limits on confidentiality, and by avoiding unnecessary breaches of privacy in the course of providing psychiatric care.

  19. Perceived Spirituality, Mindfulness and Quality of Life in Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, João P; Pereira, Anabela M S

    2017-02-01

    There is some evidence of the relationship between spirituality and quality of life, but there are few bibliographic references on these constructs for patients suffering from mental illness; thus, this study was aimed at revealing the possible role of spiritual outlooks as a protective factor in these individuals. The sample consisted of 96 Portuguese psychiatric patients, selected from a psychiatric hospital and assessed based on parameters for quality of life, spirituality and mindfulness. The data support some theories about the nature of the spirituality. Spiritual beliefs are poorly correlated with the quality of life index, and there is a moderate association between these beliefs and some aspects of mindfulness. It is suggested that a spiritual outlook of psychiatric patients should be taken into account in psychological interventions.

  20. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... supporting positive outcomes of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing is not convincing. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. All permanently employed nursing staff members at three general psychiatric wards at a Danish university hospital (n = 83) were allocated to either...... on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision....

  1. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  2. Dream house in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Asgaard

    2004-01-01

    This first book in the Utzon Library, which deals with Utzon's own houses, contains a number of drawings that have not previously been published. This is especially true of the four projects for his house in Bayview, Sydney, which unfortunately never got past the drawing stage, as Utzon had left ...

  3. Ethnic minorities and housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, G.

    2012-01-01

    Glossary Assimilation in the housing market The process of declining differences between ethnic groups in terms of quality of dwellings, quality of neighbourhoods, and access to homeownership. Constraints Barriers on the housing market which are beyond the control of individual households and which

  4. House Prices and Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedsted Nielsen, Mads

    This paper is the first to consider a large scale natural experiment to estimate the effect of taxes on house prices. We find that a 1 percentage-point increase in income tax rates lead to a drop in house prices of at most 2.2%. This corresponds to a tax capitalization for the average household...

  5. Housing: Issues, policies, solutions

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the keeping of pets by individual tenants/residents. It will consider the issues surrounding pet ownership in an integrated society of those who wish to own animals and those who do not. Suggestions will be given to enable housing providers to establish an inclusive policy that incorporates pet ownership in their housing stock / premises.

  6. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  7. Multiple pump housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott; Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  8. Curricular approaches to research ethics training for psychiatric investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Donna T

    2003-12-01

    Training in research ethics is crucial for psychiatric investigators. Addressing ethical dimensions of human subjects research requires knowledge about the rules and norms governing research; sensitivity to ethical implications of actions; and skills in ethics problem solving. Investigators in training who are physicians have the additional challenge of developing identities as investigators that sometimes conflict with their identities as physicians. To propose a curriculum for psychiatric research ethics training. Review of literature on ethics education and presentation of a curricular approach to research ethics training for psychiatric investigators. Research ethics can be learned and should be taught. Involvement of active investigators in teaching research ethics is important. While core topics of psychiatric research ethics training have not yet been identified, there are available models from which to draw. Research ethics should be introduced early and integrated throughout the research training period. Lack of resources and institutional support can be obstacles to development of comprehensive research ethics curricula. Small-group, case-based discussion is best for teaching ethics problem-solving skills. Examples of teaching module ideas and a fully developed sample teaching module are presented. There is opportunity for creative models for teaching psychiatric research ethics. Work is needed to identify core topics, target pedagogical strategies to trainees at different levels, and develop evaluation methods.

  9. Causal attributions of job loss among people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctôt, Nathalie; Bergeron-Brossard, Prunelle; Sanquirgo, Nathalie; Corbière, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Guided by Weiner's attribution theory (1985), the aim of this study is to describe the reasons given by people with psychiatric disabilities to explain job loss. Using a sample of 126 people with psychiatric disabilities participating in a prospective study design, the authors evaluated the causal attributions pattern to explain job loss. During a 9-month follow-up phone interview, clients of supported employment programs were asked to explain the reasons why they had lost their jobs. The reasons provided were categorized according to type of job loss (voluntarily vs. involuntarily), locus of control (external vs. internal) and controllability (controllable vs. uncontrollable). The results show that 73% of participants had voluntarily ended their jobs. For the majority of participants, the reasons given to explain job loss were related to external and uncontrollable factors. Moreover, men used more external (34.1% vs. 23%) and uncontrollable (68.2% vs. 40%) reasons than women. Severity of symptoms and level of education also affected the attributional pattern. However, self-esteem, psychiatric diagnosis and work centrality did not correlate significantly to the attributional pattern. The results demonstrated that reasons given to explain job loss among people with psychiatric disabilities are mostly external. A more systematic evaluation of environmental factors should be put in place to favor longer job tenure for people with psychiatric disabilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Improvement of psychiatric symptoms in youth following resolution of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Talia; Sidell, Douglas; Gans, Hayley; Brown, Kayla; Farhadian, Bahare; Gustafson, Melissa; Sherr, Janell; Thienemann, Margo; Frankovich, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in psychiatric illness, and the onset or exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms may follow non-CNS infections. Here, we provide the first detailed description of obsessive-compulsive and related psychiatric symptoms arising concurrently with sinusitis. We reviewed the charts of 150 consecutive patients evaluated in our Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes clinic for documented sinusitis as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Sinusitis treatments, sinonasal imaging, and neuropsychiatric symptoms before, during, and after sinusitis onset were noted. Patients were included in the final review if they had a clear diagnosis of isolated sinusitis (without concurrent illness and/or immunodeficiency), and were evaluated during an episode of sinusitis. 10/150 (6.6%) patients had isolated sinusitis at the time of their neuropsychiatric deterioration. Eight patients received antibiotics to treat sinusitis, three of whom also received sinus surgery. Neuropsychiatric symptoms improved in all eight patients concurrent with resolution of sinusitis per parent report and clinician assessment. One patient did not follow through with recommended sinus surgery or antibiotics and her psychiatric symptoms persisted. One patient was lost to follow-up. Improvement of psychiatric symptoms correlated with resolution of sinus disease in this retrospective study. Identification, treatment, and resolution of underlying infections, including sinusitis, may have the potential to change the trajectory of some neuropsychiatric illnesses. Randomized clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychiatric sequelae of Amok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, E K; Carr, J E

    1977-04-01

    The authors present evidence of an indigenous diagnostic system by which Malay culture defines Amok, and of the disparate relations between individual conceptualization, behavior, and tradition which contributes to the labeling process. Amok is viewed as a cultural prescription for violent behavior in response to a given set of conditions. It is not a disease but rather a behavioral sequence, perceived as illness, that may be precipitated by various etiological factors. Finally, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that traditional forms of Amok are being replaced by new variants in which psychopathology is increasingly evident.

  12. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  13. Genetic counseling for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuang, D W; Faraone, S V; Tsuang, M T

    2001-04-01

    Like other medical conditions, some psychiatric disorders are inherited, whereas others are not. Human genetics research is moving at a rapid pace. Genes for over 450 genetic disorders have been cloned and many disease-causing mutations have also been identified. The explosion of this new knowledge has created many new exciting opportunities in the diagnosis of these heritable disorders. The rapid pace of gene discovery will aid the identification of susceptibility genes for psychiatric disorders. Indeed, we can look forward to answers to many clinical and research questions. These are some of the gifts that the expanding field of human genetics research will continue to bring to medical science. However, as genetic tests for the detection of psychiatric disorders become available, many ethical, legal, and social implications will need to be considered. In this article, we review the principles of genetic counseling for psychiatric disorders, as well as the social and ethical dilemmas that genetic testing may bring. Although medical and scientific advances may bring many gifts, we should approach this new knowledge with caution, as one of the gifts may be a Pandora's box.

  14. Moral learning in psychiatric rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitvast, J.E.; Widdershoven, G.G.A.M.; Abma, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate moral learning in persons with a psychiatric disability who participated in a nursing intervention, called the photo-instrument. This intervention is a form of hermeneutic photography. The findings are based on a multiple case study of 42 patients and

  15. Therapeutic abortion on psychiatric grounds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-23

    Apr 23, 1983 ... those with psychiatric disorder; severe reactive depression was found in 27,5% and 50% were considered to have personality disorders sufficient to be identified as pathological. Such assessments were based on a record of longstanding neurotic or habitually maladaptive behaviour characterized by ...

  16. Predictors of psychiatric readmissions to

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    identification of early symptoms of relapse, application of immediate and appropriate measures, and adequate record-keeping by health institutions are ... hospitalization, resulting from the policy of de-institutionalization in. Nigeria has led to ..... adolescent psychiatric care Aust N Z ] Psychiatry 2005; 39: 600-606. 3. vaett C.

  17. Dyspepsia in chronic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, E.J.; Meijs, V.M.M.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Leufkens, H.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on dyspeptic complaints among patients hospitalized in the long-stay ward of a general psychiatric hospital. Methods: A representative sample of the patients was interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results: Eighty percent of the patients reported one or more

  18. Study of the use of a micro hydro in knockdown container completed with a cylindrical form housing of francis hydraulic turbine to support the development program of energy self-sustainability for remote and isolated areas in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Samsul

    2017-01-01

    It shows that the implementation of the unit in a remote area has reduced the total site construction time by 1/3 compared to the predicted one with conventional unit. The performance of the Francis turbine with cylindrical form housing has shown comparable with the conventional one which has volute form housing. The superiority was even more pronounced by introducing a deflection insert in its input flow channel. The insertion was capable to create more distributed flow into the runner. Efficiency of the turbine up to 80% was performed in this research. Local manufacture for turbine usually use many craft work and welding to built a volute form housing for the Francis turbine. The cylindrical form housing here has also proven significantly in reducing the time and price for the turbine manufacturing process.

  19. Sustainable Housing Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Gert Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Housing Design. Integrating technical and housing quality aspects of sustainable architecture in civil engineering education. Summary An integrated design approach to sustainable architecture is outlined that combines concerns for zero energy building, good indoor climate and adequate...... constructions, private and public outdoor space, housing, urban and architectural quality. The educational framework, curriculum and inte-grated design methods are preconditions for optimizing a design process where technical criteria, functional concerns and housing quality are addressed from the initial...... phases. The outcome shows that integrated design further solutions where sustainable urban forms of settlement can be highly energy efficient while also attractive from a user perspective. Key words: Sustainable architecture, integrated design, zero-energy-housing, dense urban living. 1. Introduction...

  20. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokai, Masahiro [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Wang, Shangdong; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2001-04-01

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  1. Assisted Housing - Public Housing Developments - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The general location of an entire Public Housing Development. A distinct address is chosen to represent the general location of an entire Public Housing Development,...

  2. Bullying, psychiatric pathology and suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobry, Yuriy; Braquehais, María Dolores; Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is a highly prevalent behavior which carries a significant social, medical and financial cost for its victims and perpetrators, with powerful and long-lasting psychological and social impact. Bullying has been defined as a specific form of intentional, repeated aggression, that involves a disparity of power between the victim(s) and perpetrator(s). The aggression can take physical, verbal or gestural forms. The behavior of bullying crosses sociodemographic categories of age, gender, ethnicity, level of academic achievement and professional environment. It has been abundantly observed by teachers and parents in elementary schools, but has also shown its negative presence in corporate boardrooms. The direct outcome of bullying, for both victims and perpetrators, is an increased risk of psychiatric disorders including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders, substance abuse and suicidal behavior. Cruelty (and bullying, as one of its manifestations) breaks the basis of morality. Mental health professionals usually treat the victims of those actions unfortunately long after they have been exposed to the harm. The evidence does not support the idea that the majority of cruel actions are intrinsically "pathological", in the sense of being motivated by "mental disorders". Therefore, only moral rules and legal actions - but not psychiatric or psychological interventions - may dissuade humans from this form of cruelty.

  3. Housing Loan and the Price of Housing in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Addae-Dapaah, K.

    2014-01-01

    We use the Johansen co-integration test and the Vector Error Correction Model (VECM) to analyze data on housing loan, housing price, interest rate and GDP from 19911Q to 20102Q to particularly ascertain the extent to which housing loan affects house prices in Singapore. The results show the existence of a long run co-integration among housing loan, house price, interest rate and GDP. Furthermore, housing loan is found to be positively correlated with house price and GDP but negatively correla...

  4. Housing Affordability Data System (HADS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Housing Affordability Data System (HADS) is a set of files derived from the 1985 and later national American Housing Survey (AHS) and the 2002 and later Metro...

  5. The Housing Bubble Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Dean Baker

    2005-01-01

    This paper explains the basic facts about the current housing market. It lays out the evidence that the rise in housing prices constitutes a housing bubble - and explains what can be expected when it inevitably collapses.

  6. American Housing Survey (AHS) 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The AHS is the largest, regular national housing sample survey in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the AHS to obtain up-to-date housing statistics...

  7. Need for adaptation: transformation of temporary houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemann, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    Building permanent accommodation after a disaster takes time for reasons including the removal of debris, the lack of available land, and the procurement of resources. In the period in-between, affected communities find shelter in different ways. Temporary houses or transitional shelters are used when families cannot return to their pre-disaster homes and no other alternative can be provided. In practice, families stay in a standard interim solution for months or even years while trying to return to their routines. Consequently, they adapt their houses to meet their midterm needs. This study analysed temporary houses in Chile and Peru to illustrate how families modify them with or without external support. The paper underlines that guidance must be given on how to alter them safely and on how to incorporate the temporary solution into the permanent structure, because families adapt their houses whether or not they are so designed. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  8. The "Free from Housing Accessibility Problems" App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Oskar; Slaug, Björn; Haak, Maria; Mårtensson, Knut; Schmidt, Steven M; Oswald, Frank; Rimland, Joseph M; Tomsone, Signe; Svensson, Torbjörn; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The present study concerns the development of a computerized tool targeting housing accessibility issues. A user-centered approach involving professionals from the housing sector and senior citizens from four European countries resulted in a fully functional prototype of a mobile application (app) including an apartment database. The app raises awareness on housing accessibility and has the potential to support decision making and strengthen all citizens regardless of functional capacity to be more active in their endeavors for a satisfying housing solution. Further refinements and additional features are needed to enhance the potential benefits; they include addressing potential challenges facing senior citizens, developing interactive features that allow users to provide input and adapting to different national contexts to make the app applicable for the European market.

  9. Retrofitting the Southeast. The Cool Energy House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, W. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Shapiro, C. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Vijayakumar, G. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Puttagunta, S. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings research team has provided the technical engineering and building science support for a highly visible demonstration home that was unveiled at the National Association of Home Builders' International Builders Show on Feb. 9, 2012, in Orlando, FL. The two previous projects, the Las Vegas net-zero ReVISION House and the 2011 VISION and ReVISION Houses in Orlando, met goals for energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, and information dissemination through multiple web-based venues. This report describes the deep energy retrofit of the Cool Energy House (CEH), which began as a mid-1990s two-story traditional specification house of about 4,000 ft2 in the upscale Orlando suburb of Windermere.

  10. Retrofitting the Southeast: The Cool Energy House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, W.; Shapiro, C.; Vijayakumar, G.; Puttagunta, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings has provided the technical engineering and building science support for a highly visible demonstration home in connection with the National Association of Home Builders' International Builders Show. The two previous projects, the Las Vegas net-zero ReVISION House and the 2011 VISION and ReVISION Houses in Orlando, met goals for energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, and information dissemination through multiple web-based venues. This project, which was unveiled at the 2012 International Builders Show in Orlando on February 9, is the deep energy retrofit Cool Energy House (CEH). The CEH began as a mid-1990s two-story traditional specification house of about 4,000 ft2 in the upscale Orlando suburb of Windermere.

  11. Supervised housing for people with severe mental illness in Asturias: restrictive environment or open to the community?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Garcia-Perez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Community care model and philosophy of psychosocial rehabilitation as engine key recovery personal, social and employment of people with severe mental disorder is assumed from the psychiatric reform process begun in Spain in 1985. In this sense, the accommodation is an essential component to the extent that there is sufficient evidence to assert that the provision of adequate accommodation represents a critical condition to ensure community care, becoming one of the most important programs of social support. The aims of the study are to evaluate housing supervised for people with severe mental disorder in Principado of Asturias in its aspects of infrastructure and the inner workings of the same. This uses the Environmental Index (AI, and the scale of opportunity to the Basic Everyday Living Schedule (BELS, as well as the information provided by the residential programs and key informants of the same. Housing obtained from half a score in the environmental index of 17,29 on a maximum of 55, giving it a more open than the institutional, although far environments functionality yet of the supervised homes of other residential programs. In short, outcomes provide a level of considerable independence to carry out basic and social skills of the users, but true danger of institutional environment in its daily operation, in aspects such as the network of users, formed largely by the staff of the housing, time who is residing in them or their low participation and social integration is denoted.

  12. Automatic mining of symptom severity from psychiatric evaluation notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karystianis, George; Nevado, Alejo J; Kim, Chi-Hun; Dehghan, Azad; Keane, John A; Nenadic, Goran

    2017-12-22

    As electronic mental health records become more widely available, several approaches have been suggested to automatically extract information from free-text narrative aiming to support epidemiological research and clinical decision-making. In this paper, we explore extraction of explicit mentions of symptom severity from initial psychiatric evaluation records. We use the data provided by the 2016 CEGS N-GRID NLP shared task Track 2, which contains 541 records manually annotated for symptom severity according to the Research Domain Criteria. We designed and implemented 3 automatic methods: a knowledge-driven approach relying on local lexicalized rules based on common syntactic patterns in text suggesting positive valence symptoms; a machine learning method using a neural network; and a hybrid approach combining the first 2 methods with a neural network. The results on an unseen evaluation set of 216 psychiatric evaluation records showed a performance of 80.1% for the rule-based method, 73.3% for the machine-learning approach, and 72.0% for the hybrid one. Although more work is needed to improve the accuracy, the results are encouraging and indicate that automated text mining methods can be used to classify mental health symptom severity from free text psychiatric notes to support epidemiological and clinical research. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Psychiatric morbidity following Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, D; Mellman, T A; Mendoza, L M; Kulick-Bell, R; Ironson, G; Schneiderman, N

    1996-07-01

    The nature of psychiatric morbidity in previously non-ill subjects from the area most affected by Hurricane Andrew was investigated at 6-12 months posthurricane. Preliminary associations of morbidity with personal and event-related risk factors were also determined. Fifty one percent (31/61) met criteria for a new-onset disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 36%, major depression (MD) in 30%, and other anxiety disorders in 20%. Thirty four subjects (56%) had significant symptoms persisting beyond 6 months. Having sustained "severe damage" was the risk factor most strongly associated with outcome. Our data underscore the range of psychiatric morbidity related to a natural disaster, and suggest a relationship to chronic stressors.

  14. [Psychiatric emergencies in drug addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamina, Amine; Bouchez, Jacques; Rahioui, Hassan; Reynaud, Michel

    2003-06-01

    The practitioner is very frequently confronted by emergencies in drug-addicted patients also having psychiatric symptomatology. In this article the authors will address emergencies related to alcohol (notably intoxication, pre-DTs and the encephalopathies); emergencies related to cannabis (notably intoxication, psychotic states and panic attacks); and emergencies related to other psycho-active substances (overdoses, drug-withdrawal, psychiatric complications related to cocaine or amphetamines). In the domain of drug addiction, as in psychiatry, the practitioner must give as much importance to the organisation of the long-term healthcare plan for the drug addict, ulterior to the management of the immediate emergency. For example, whereas 90% of subjects presenting to the emergency department for acute alcoholic intoxication have a pathological consumption of alcohol (abuse or dependance), management of the alcoholism is proposed in only 2% of them.

  15. Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse

    2009-01-01

    , however, the built environment shows serious deficits when it comes to accessibility. This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of inter-rater reliability, when used in occupational therapy practice. The instrument was translated from...... statistics. Overall good percentage agreement for all parts of the instrument was shown, indicating that the Nordic Housing Enabler is sufficiently reliable for application in practice and research in the Nordic context. The kappa results varied and possible explanations are discussed, which should be kept......Development and reliability testing of the Nordic Housing Enabler – an instrument for accessibility assessment of the physical housing. Tina Helle & Åse Brandt University of Lund, Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine (SE) and University College Northern Jutland, Occupational Therapy department (DK...

  16. State Housing Revival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    with the dilemma of what to do with existing government-funded housing which are no longer socially or physically suitable for the current demographic. New Zealand has a large cultural diversity with many new immigrants from the Pacific Islands and Asia. There is a need for culturally flexible and inclusive......Government funded housing for people in need is a challenge many countries face around the world. This research investigates how to sustainably regenerate post-war suburban state housing in New Zealand, in particular, the suburb of Glen Innes in Auckland. Reviving the community and regenerating...... the buildings is essential for improving the overall quality of the neighbourhoods both socially and physically. Achieving this in a holistic sustainable manner illustrates that there are alternatives to demolition and new builds, as the answer to the current housing shortage problems. New Zealand is confronted...

  17. Rental Housing Finance Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The purpose of the RHFS is to provide current and continuous measure of the financial health and property characteristics of single-family and multifamily rental...

  18. Allegheny County Housing Tenure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Home ownership provides a number of financial, social, and health benefits to American families. Especially in areas with housing price appreciation, home ownership...

  19. In-house (disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Pavey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In May 2007 UNHCR established an internal working group to look at developing in-house policies for people with disabilities both for the benefit of people of concern to us and for staff members.

  20. The arsonists portrait- as seen by forensic psychiatric examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Simona Delia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES The aim of our study is to determine the mental state of the arsonists that have undergone forensic psychiatric evaluation. MATERIALS AND METHODS We have examined the mental health records between years 2014-2015. Only subjects who committed fire setting crimes and were referred to the Legal Medicine Institute from Timișoara for a psychiatric evaluation were selected for the study. We analysed the following data: socio-demographic parameters, psychiatric diagnosis, motivation for the perpetrated crime, alcohol and drug addiction, the applied safety measure, the administrated neuroleptic and complementary treatment and the social support network. RESULTS The portrait of the arsonist is mainly male, young, single, poorly educated, unskilled and unemployed, living mostly in rural areas and with alcohol or drugs additction at the time of comitting the fire setting. Regarding the mental state of the patient, the most common diagnoses among the subjects were: psychoses, toxic substance delusional disorder, mixed personality disorder and intellectual disabilities. In most cases, arsonists lost discerment at the time of comitting the criminal act and they were not held accountable for it. CONCLUSIONS Our study established the most common psychiatric disturbances of arsonists as seen by forensic psychiatric examination. Different reasons for setting up fire have also been discussed. Patients were both delusional and irritated. We attempted to sketch a "portrait" of the arsonist and suggestions were included in order to ensure further "profiling" information gathering. REFERENCES 1. Rasanen P, Hakko H, Vaisanen E. The mental state of arsonists as determined by forensic psychiatric examinations. Bull Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 1995;23:547-553. 2. Tyler N, Gannon TA. Explanations of firesetting in mentally disordered offenders: A review of the literature. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes. 2012;75:150-166. 3. Inciardi JA. The adult

  1. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    knowledge for nursing care and its demands in this setting and therefore supports the daily nursing psychiatric care and its needs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. We are different: the voices of psychiatric advanced practice nurses on the performance of their roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Yuen-Ling; Chan, Zenobia C Y; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have affirmed that psychiatric advanced practice nurses (APNs) perform multifaceted roles. However, only a limited amount of research has been conducted on their perceptions of the performance of their roles. To explore the lived experiences of psychiatric APNs concerning the performance of their roles. Data were collected from individual semi-structured interviews and analysed using the interpretative phenomenological analysis method. The study was conducted in a hospital cluster in Hong Kong. Thirteen psychiatric APNs were purposively recruited. Three themes were discerned, namely, 'We are different', 'Who am I?', and 'I am who I am'. The findings can help psychiatric APNs and nurse administrators to better understand the needs of the role-bearers (APNs) and to develop strategies to support the development of advanced psychiatric nursing practices in Hong Kong and worldwide.

  3. Dysfunctions in public psychiatric bureaucracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, L R

    1988-03-01

    The author describes common dysfunctions in public psychiatric organizations according to the model of bureaucracy articulated by Max Weber. Dysfunctions are divided into the categories of goal displacement, outside interference, unclear authority structure and hierarchy, and informal relations in the work place. The author emphasizes the bureaucratic nature of public psychiatry and the need for mental health professionals to understand the dysfunctions of the organizations in which they work, including the impact of these dysfunctions on the provision of quality care.

  4. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Abhyankar

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  5. Treatment Adherence in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite developments in treatment options there is no significant increase in treatment adherence ratios. Inadherence in psychiatric disorders is higher than the other diseases. Loss of insight, drugs' side effects, sociodemographic features, personality traits are major factors affecting the treatment adherence. Determining and overcoming these factors for each disorder will help to improve adherence and reduce the treatment costs and hospitalization. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 85-93

  6. Psychiatric thoughts in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  7. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  8. Dissociative Experiences in Psychiatric Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Firoozabadi; Nooshin Reza Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are conditions that involve disruptions of memory, awareness, identity, or perception. Data collected in diverse geographic locations underline the consistency in clinical symptoms of dissociative disorders. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, prevalence of dissociative experiences has been screened in hospitalized patients in psychiatric wards of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Iran. One hundred and sixty patients in two hospitals entered the study. Our...

  9. In a Private House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Volkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article features the advantages of living in a private house, such as feeling of privacy and safety and redistribution of roles between spouses, which have a positive impact on the family relationships, housekeeping and raising children. Besides, living in the country allows to cut down expenses: energy efficiency of present-day building materials enables to build a warm private house with minimum expenditure on warming, and with the possibility to freely regulate the heating system.

  10. The first Government House

    OpenAIRE

    Kelso, Jane

    2017-01-01

    The first Government House was not a simple singular structure but a complex with a yard, outbuildings, guardhouse, garden and great domain. It was a home, and office and a venue for public and private entertaining, but also a symbol of British authority, with all that that meant to different people, both then and now. A place of intimacy and officaldom, birth and death, celebration, confrontation and reconciliation, the first Government House was the scene of significant moments in the young...

  11. Pragmatic housing policy in the quest for low-income group housing delivery in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bawa Chafe Abdullahi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The low income group (LIG housing is one of the contemporary challenges of most developing countries and it is assuming to be 'perpetual' problem in some of these countries. This paper explores the Malaysian housing policies on its meticulous implementation and how the pragmatism aspect of such policies improve significantly the housing affordability and accessibility to the majority of the LIG in the country. The study built upon multiple data sources. These sources include empirical data collected through structured and semi-structured questionnaires administered to the household respondents and stakeholder agencies respectively. In addition, published literature and periodicals were reviewed. The five low-cost housing estates in Kuala Lumpur, a Federal Territory of Malaysia, were selected to serve as case study, in order to enrich the study. The findings of the study show that the majority of the beneficiaries of low-cost housing programmes fall within the principal target of LIG and much contribution has been made to the cohort housing. The study also provides evidence that is contrary to path dependent policies. In particular, the Malaysian housing policies adoption of pragmatic and all inclusive role of the government, provide institutional support for a well functional housing delivery to the LIG not only in Kuala Lumpur, but for the entire country.

  12. Psychiatric aspects of bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Huang, Chih-Kuan; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery has been consistently shown to be effective in long-term marked weight loss and in bringing significant improvement to medical comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome. Empirical data suggest a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among bariatric surgery candidates. In this review, we focus on the studies published recently with a high impact on our understanding of the role of psychiatry in bariatric surgery. Recent findings This article reviews the specific psychopathologies before surgery, changes in psychopathologies after surgery, suicide risk related to bariatric surgery, factors associated with weight loss, and recommendations for presurgical and postsurgical assessment and management. Research indicates a decrease in certain psychiatric symptoms after weight loss with bariatric surgery. However, the risk of suicide and unsuccessful weight loss in some bariatric surgery patients make monitoring following surgery as important as careful assessment and management before surgery. Specific considerations for youth and older populations and future potential research foci are discussed. Summary Recent publications suggest new directions for psychiatric evaluation and interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Future research on outcomes of specific populations, effectiveness of psychopharmacotherapy, and underlying pathophysiology are warranted for the advancement of treating bariatric surgery patients. PMID:25036421

  13. Psychiatric trainees in Finland 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkonen, Hanna; Holi, Matti; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Korkeila, Jyrki; Eronen, Markku

    2005-01-01

    This study examined Finnish psychiatric trainees' views on their education. This was a survey study of nationwide data on Finnish psychiatric trainees in 2001. The quality of training was considered at least moderate by 84% of the respondents. Training on epidemiology, on taking history and status, and on psychopharmacology was considered the best. Quality was rated bad for training in leadership and administration, and educating the community. Research was done by 20%, and a personal clinical supervisor was appointed to 52% of the respondents. Offensive treatment had been experienced by 49% of the trainees in this study. Generally, studies of training also reflect strengths and weaknesses of the profession. Based on our results, it seems especially that training in leadership and in educating the community need to be improved; both of these are quintessential skills to survive in the struggle for economic and human resources. Furthermore, treatment of the trainees could still be better; attention should be paid to supervision of all trainees. Moreover, research must become more attractive. Psychiatry can be developed by the development of psychiatric training.

  14. The impact of sleep and psychiatric symptoms on alcohol consequences among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary Beth; Van Reen, Eliza; Barker, David H; Roane, Brandy M; Borsari, Brian; McGeary, John E; Seifer, Ronald; Carskadon, Mary A

    2017-03-01

    Independent lines of research have documented links between psychiatric symptoms and poor sleep quality, psychiatric symptoms and alcohol use, and alcohol use and poor sleep quality. The current study examined the synergistic effect of poor sleep quality and psychiatric symptoms on alcohol-related consequences in heavy-drinking young adults. Matriculating college students reporting at least one heavy drinking episode over the first nine weeks of the semester (N=385, 52% female) were categorized as experiencing 'good' (n=280) versus 'poor' sleep quality (n=105) and screening 'positive' (n=203) or 'negative' (n=182) for a psychiatric disorder. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; psychiatric diagnosis was assessed using the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire; and alcohol-related consequences were assessed using the Brief Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire. General linear models were used to examine the main effects and interaction between sleep quality and psychiatric symptoms on alcohol-related consequences. Sleep quality moderated the association between psychiatric screen and alcohol-related consequences among heavy-drinking college students, such that psychiatric symptoms were associated with more alcohol-related consequences in the context of poor sleep quality. The combination of poor sleep quality and psychiatric symptoms is associated with increased alcohol-related consequences among heavy-drinking college students. Given the significant interaction between these symptoms, healthcare providers are encouraged to screen for the presence of sleep and psychiatric disorders among heavy-drinking young adults and to provide empirically-supported treatments as appropriate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  16. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  17. Critical Success Factors (CSFs for achieving sustainable social housing (SSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanbi Olusayo Oyebanji

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The overarching objective of social housing is to meet housing needs, particularly those of the vulnerable households – low and middle income earners. However, there is evidence to show that social housing is not adequately supported to achieve sustainable goals despite its significance for addressing the housing crisis. The aim of this study is to determine the Critical Success Factors (CSFs for achieving Sustainable Social Housing (SSH from economic, environmental and social perspectives for meeting housing needs. The document content analysis approach involving relevant literature resources was used for generating the success factors (SFs for achieving SSH. Findings from this approach were refined before using them in preparing a questionnaire used to gather data from housing authorities (public and private non-profit social housing organisations in England and they were asked to rank the criticality level of the identified success factors. The data gathered through the relevant documents and respondents were analysed respectively with NVivo and Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS. Findings revealed some of the CSFs for achieving SSH for meeting housing needs as: adequate funding and provision, affordability, efficient economic planning, appropriate construction technology, environmental protection, use of environmental friendly materials, effective land use planning, appropriate design, security of lives and property, provision of social services and ensuring social cohesion. The paper recommends the use of efficient sustainable development (SD strategies and legal and institutional frameworks for monitoring and evaluating the delivery of SSH. The Government must embark on effective housing programmes for ensuring adequate provision of social housing that is sustainable for meeting housing needs in the short and long-run. There is need for the Government to regularly provide financial supports to social housing providers and users

  18. The Housing Development NGOs offering Housing Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Housing Development NGOs offering Housing Education and Training Programmes in South Africa. ISSN 0378-5254 Journal of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences, Vol 29, 2001. 28. The Housing Development NGOs offering Housing. Education and Training Programmes in South Africa. Winnie Lombard and Ria ...

  19. Housing data base for sustainable housing provision | Anunobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined selected data requirements for housing provision in selected housing estates as applicable to house owners with the view of determining the degree of relevance to mass housing provision. The research employed a mixed method approach by collecting both quantitative and qualitative data which ...

  20. The journey between ideal and real: Experiences of beginners psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankeh, Hamidreza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Hoseini, Seyaid-Ali; Khodai-Ardekandi, Mohammad-Reza; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Bohm, Katarina; Nakhaie, Maryam; Ranjbar, Maryam; Castrén, Maaret

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how novice nurses perceive their career in the psychiatric ward can be helpful for nurse educators and managers to gain insight into psychiatric nursing care and adding applicable knowledge to the development of support strategies for this group. The aim of this study was to describe and illuminate experiences of new graduated nurses working at a psychiatric ward in an Iranian context. A descriptive phenomenology has been chosen. Participants with baccalaureate degrees in nursing were selected purposefully and they all had less than 6 months of work experience in psychiatric wards beforehand. The study was conducted at the Razi Hospital in Iran. Data were collected through unstructured individual in-depth interviews and analyzed according to the Colaizzi method by means of Husserlian phenomenology. Three main themes were found in this study, of which six sub-themes were constructed as follows: Being in the world of fear and complaint, which has been abstracted by having mixed feelings of conflict and compliant on entry to the psychiatric ward, doubt about adequacy of being a psychiatric nurse and working in psychiatric ward and a frightening and non-supportive environment; A sense of imprisoned and confined, which has been constructed by different experience with different environmental milieu in psychiatric ward, as a lock sense; Becoming a psychiatric nurse, which has been constructed as a sense of usefulness, a sense of sympathy and compassion for patients and a sense of professional identity. This study identified areas that require modification by providing insight into lived experiences of beginners' nurses as the value in psychiatric ward. New graduated nurses may face negative perceptions and feelings due to confrontation with a new environment, patients and colleagues as well as shortcomings in the preparation.

  1. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Crisis Hotline Information Coping with a Crisis Suicide Prevention Information Psychiatric Hospitalization ... sign-up Education info, training, events Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/ ...

  2. Psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and HIV status among people using opioids in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin; Schottenfeld, Richard; Chawarski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The Russian Federation is experiencing a very high rate of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, few studies have explored characteristics of people with co-occurring opioid use disorders and HIV, including psychiatric symptom presentations and how these symptoms might relate to quality of life. The current study therefore explored a.) differences in baseline psychiatric symptoms among HIV+ and HIV- individuals with opioid use disorder seeking naltrexone treatment at two treatment centers in Saint Petersburg, Russia and b.) associations between psychiatric symptom constellations and quality of life. Participants were 328 adults enrolling in a randomized clinical trial evaluating outpatient treatments combining naltrexone with different drug counseling models. Psychiatric symptoms and quality of life were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory and The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF, respectively. Approximately 60% of participants were HIV+. Those who were HIV+ scored significantly higher on BSI anxiety, depression, psychoticism, somatization, paranoid ideation, phobic anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and GSI indexes (all p<0.05) than those HIV-. A K-means cluster analysis identified three distinct psychiatric symptom profiles; the proportion of HIV+ was significantly greater and quality of life indicators were significantly lower in the cluster with the highest psychiatric symptom levels. Higher levels of psychiatric symptoms and lower quality of life indicators among HIV+ (compared to HIV-) individuals injecting drugs support the potential importance of combining interventions that target improving psychiatric symptoms with drug treatment, particularly for HIV+ patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Life-resistant housing: home automation through the eyes of the caregiver : What opportunities do caregivers see for the use of home automation in order to support independent living for the elderly?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Oppewal-Raadsveld

    2013-01-01

    Design and outcomes of research regarding the question which changes in the field of housing and healthcare technology would, according to caregivers, enable people over 50 in shrinking areas in The Northern Netherlands to continue living in their own homes as long as possible.

  4. Park Accessibility Impacts Housing Prices in Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Han Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing prices are determined by a variety of factors, including the features of the building and the neighborhood environment, and a potential buyer decides to buy a house after reviewing these factors and concluding that it is worth the price. We used Hedonic Price Methods to find the relationship between monetary value of house and access conditions to urban parks. Two meaningful results were discovered in this study: first, as the distance from the park increases, the value of the park inherent in the housing price decreases; second, the greater walking accessibility, to the park, the higher the park value inherent in housing prices. Despite presenting shorter distances to walk and more entrances, poorly accessible zones were deemed as such due to the necessity of crossing an arterial road. This indicates that the results can define accessibility not as the Euclidian distance but as the shortest walking distance while considering crossroads and park entrances. The results of this study have significant implications for urban park economic impact analyses in Seoul. Also, the increase in housing prices closer to parks supports the idea that access is dependent on the residents’ socioeconomic status. Lastly, the results of this study can improve walking accessibility to the park.

  5. Next Generation House Call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jamie L; Tarolli, Christopher G; Dorsey, E Ray

    2017-01-01

    Just as online shopping is supplanting visits to the mall, and distance learning is part of the new wave in higher education, so is health care coming to a computer or mobile device near you. In the next few years, telehealth will increasingly become part of psychiatric and neurological care. Still to overcome is an unwieldy health care system that will need to adapt to practices that have the potential to lower costs and improve care.

  6. Social Housing Provision in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsenkova, Sasha; Vestergaard, Hedvig

    The paper provides an overview of trends and processes of change affecting new social housing provision in Denmark with a focus on Copenhagen. The local responses are reviewed within the context of changes to the unitary national housing system that functions with a robust range of private and non......-profit housing providers, and a wide range of fiscal and regulatory instruments enhancing the competitive performance of the social housing sector. The research analyses recent housing policy measures and their impact on new social housing provision in Copenhagen. The emphasis is on the mix of housing policy...... instruments implemented in three major policy domains-fiscal, financial and regulatory-to promote the production of new social housing. The system of new social housing provision is examined as a dynamic process of interaction between public and private institutions defining housing policy outcomes...

  7. Domotics Project Housing Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Morón

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated.

  8. Domotics Project Housing Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-05-23

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated.

  9. Domotics Project Housing Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated. PMID:27223285

  10. Delayed sleep phase syndrome: a forerunner of psychiatric distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Surriya

    2013-12-01

    To determine the association of extrinsic delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) and psychiatric distress. Cross-sectional, analytical study. Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from July 2009 to September 2010. Sales personnel employed in different shopping malls in Karachi operating from 2 pm afternoon to 12.00 mid-night were inducted. The instrument used to define DSPS included difficulty in falling sleep timely at night and early rising in the morning. The proven DSPS subjects were studied by the Aga Khan University Anxiety Depression Scale (AKUADS) to explore the association of extrinsic (motivational) DSPS with anxiety and depression syndrome along with a survey questionnaire having twelve questions based on the criteria of ICSD (International Classification of Sleep Disorder) on DSPS, to study different characteristics of these subjects and its relationship with psychiatric illness. Eight hundred and eleven subjects were inducted, majority were male (n = 757, 93.3%). Three hundred and forty-five (42.5%) subjects scored > 19 with mean value of 41.4 ± 15.90. Result supported an association between DSPS and psychiatric distress. Extrinsic DSPS prevention necessitates attention because of its positive relationship with psychiatric distress.

  11. ON PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHIATRIC IMPACT OF PIRACY ON SEAFARERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aleksandrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been discussed that being held hostage can have harmful short and often long-term physical, psychological, familial and social effects on the victims. This is a complex area of research and the data is sparse yet. The aim of our study is to present our experience concerning some psychological and psychiatric consequences on Bulgarian seamen victims of pirate's attack long captivity and to suggest a suitable methodology of a psychological investigation in such cases. Methods: Seven Bulgarian hostage survivors underwent comprehensive psychological and psychiatric assessments twenty days after pirate’s captivity release. Results and discussion: In general terms, the psychological and psychiatric impact on the victims is similar to that of being exposed to other serious life-threatening events, including terrorist incidents and natural disasters. All the subjects, who have been examined in our study, reported feelings of detachment and alienation from close others and startle by noises, nightmares and sleep disturbances. Anxiety symptoms, characterized by apprehension, tension and fear in particular situations, and some depressive features (depressive mood, lack of interest and activities, lassitude on a sub- clinical level were registered. Conclusion: Despite some limitations our report discusses important issues, concerning psychological and psychiatric consequences on Bulgarian seamen victims of pirate’s attack long captivity and present a suitable model of a psychological investigation in such cases and states the need of supportive care of the victims.

  12. Evolutionary Conservation in Genes Underlying Human Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Michelle Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago and thirty one non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in primates supports the hypothesis that schizophrenia and autism are a cost of higher brain function. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  13. Housing Dynamics: Theory Behind Empirics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Xie, Danyang

    2014-01-01

    We construct a dynamic general equilibrium model of housing, incorporating some key features that bridge time and space. We model explicitly the evolution of housing structures/household durables and the separate role played by land, fully accounting for households’ locational choice decisions. Housing services derive positive utility, but are decayed away from the city center. Our model enables a full characterization of the dynamic paths of housing as well as housing and land prices. The mo...

  14. Towards a systems definition of psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkis, H A; Yanovski, A

    1976-04-01

    Assessment of psychiatric practice has been difficult largely because of the apparent diversity of psychiatrists' theories, procedures, and goals. Searching for a unifying principle, we propose system identification failure (SIF), a defect in data-processing, as the unit of psychopathology underlying all psychiatric disorder (and other behavioral error). Definitive treatment must not only identify and correct the data-processing defect, but also eliminate the secondary symptoms. Emphasis is not on method of treatment but on goal or intent. Preparatory treatment includes supportive psychological and environmental measures and somatic therapies (regardless of type, duration, or intensity) which make definitive treatment possible. Palliative treatment must be frequently reviewed. Preventive treatment should prevent SIF-formation. We consider our proposal a distillate of the aims and implicit intent of experienced psychiatrists regardless of their training or theoretical orientation. The search for a functional definition of the practice of psychiatry was perhaps at one time an academic or lexicographic exercise, but, with the advent of peer review, it has become a pragmatic matter deserving of earnest attention. What is psychiatric practice? In a universe criss-crossed by psychiatrists "riding madly off in all directions." not only are the descendants of Anna O. and Dora analyzed in vivo and those of Little Hans at one remove, but also are distant figures and cultures subjected, often iv vitro, to critical scrutiny, while the "talking treatment" is applied to couples, families, groups, "networks" and communities. When one adds to this the diversity of biological therapies and institutional, environmental, and behavioral manipulations, the task of finding a common theme, much less procedure, becomes a worthy problem in hermeneutics, general semantics, or system analysis. Thus we must ask not only the operational question, "What do psychiatrists do?" BUt also, "What did

  15. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  16. Design and evaluation of an online teaching strategy in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane S; Marfurt, Stephanie; daCunha, Miguel; Engebretson, Joan

    2005-12-01

    Psychiatric nurse educators are challenged to prepare graduates in meeting the needs of individuals with a mental illness within an increasingly technology-based environment. This requires the development and evaluation of educational strategies that immerse students in web-based learning. This article presents an overview of a hybrid teaching design that includes classroom teaching and asynchronous threaded discussion in a teaching module in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course. Evaluation of student preferences, advantages and disadvantages, and learning, as well as qualitative evaluation of students' description of critical thinking, supports the value of online teaching in psychiatric nursing education.

  17. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, T.; Nygren, C.; Slaug, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument...... was translated from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers, and professional translators...... Enabler. Inter-rater reliability was calculated by means of percentage agreement and kappa statistics. Overall good percentage agreement for the personal and environmental components of the instrument was shown, indicating that the instrument was sufficiently reliable for application in practice...

  18. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Slaug, Bjørn; Brandt, Åse

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients and their home environments. The instrument was translated...... from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers and professional translators...... Enabler. Inter-rater reliability was calculated by means of percentage agreement and kappa statistics. Overall good percentage agreement for the personal and environmental components of the instrument was shown, indicating that the instrument was sufficiently reliable for application in practice...

  19. Psychiatric diagnosis in legal settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Allan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available When asked to give a diagnosis in legal settings practitioners should be mindful of the tentative nature of psychiatric diag- noses and that courts require that such a diagnosis must have scientific credibility. South African courts are not explicit about the test they will apply to determine whether a diagno- sis is scientifically credible, but some guidance can be found in United States case law. This paper examines these criteria with reference to the disorders included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR.

  20. Psychiatric specialty training in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margariti, M; Kontaxakis, V; Ploumpidis, D

    2017-01-01

    The reform and development of psychiatric services require, in addition to financial resources, reserves in specialized human resources. The role of psychiatrists in this process, and at reducing the consequences of mental morbidity is evident. Psychiatrists are required to play a multifaceted role as clinicians, as experts in multidisciplinary team environments and as advisors in the recognition of public needs in mental health issues, as teachers and mentors for students and other health professionals, as researchers in order to enrich our knowledge in the scientific field of psychiatry, and as public health specialists in the development of the mental health services system. This multifaceted role requires the continuous education of modern psychiatrists, but above all a broad, substantial and comprehensive training regime in the initial stage of their professional career, that is to say during specialization. Training in Psychiatry, as indeed has happened in all other medical specialties, has evolved considerably in recent decades, both in the content of education due to scientific advances in the fields of neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, genetics, psychopharmacology, epidemiology and psychiatric nosology, and also because of advances in the educational process itself. Simple apprenticeship next to an experienced clinician, despite its importance in the clinical training of young psychiatrists, is no longer sufficient to meet the increased demands of the modern role of psychiatrists, resulting in the creation of educational programs defined by setting and pursuing minimum, though comprehensive educational objectives. This development has created the global need to develop organizations intended to supervise training programs. These organizations have various forms worldwide. In the European Union, the competent supervising body for medical specialties is the UEMS (European Union of Medical Specialities) and particularly in the case of the psychiatric

  1. Cultural relativism and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrega, H

    1989-07-01

    Psychiatry has had a long-standing association with sociology and, especially, cultural anthropology. These social sciences have been influential in developing the concept of cultural relativism and applying it to psychiatry, sometimes in a challenging way and with much detriment. The concept has been used by some antipsychiatrists in attempts to discredit psychiatric practice. Contemporary psychiatrists endorsing a form of biological determinism have tended to either disregard the concept or judge it as trivial if not nonsensical. This study describes the concept of cultural relativism, reviews its applications to illness, and analyzes its implications from a historical and theoretical point of view. Its varied aspects, power, and limitations are discussed.

  2. [Gender aspects of psychiatric publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, Marion; Unger, Annemarie; Vyssoki, Benjamin; Wancata, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Are authors of German language psychiatric journals more often male or female? Are there gender differences regarding scientific topics? Analysis of publications of two German-language journals (Neuropsychiatrie, Psychiatrische Praxis) for the period 2008-2009. We could not find any gender differences concerning the number of first authors, but the number of male co-authors was nearly double as high as of female co-authors. Qualitative research methods were used more often by female researchers, but there were no significant differences regarding scientific topics. Overall, we found fewer gender differences than expected concerning authorship.

  3. China's sputtering housing boom poses broad economic challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Koech, Janet; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    China’s economic slowdown and changing demographics cloud its housing market’s long-term prospects. While urbanization and a lack of alternative investment opportunities provide short-run support, the housing sector’s difficulties imperil China’s financial sector and the global recovery.

  4. Magical or Monstrous? Hybridity in Social Housing Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blessing, A.

    2012-01-01

    While a growing number of national social housing strategies rely on the work of hybrid entities blending social and commercial tasks, the state/market dualism continues to dominate the conceptual landscape of housing research. This exploratory paper develops a conceptual approach to support

  5. Breeding biology of House Crows ( Corvus splendens ) in Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding biology of House Crows (Corvus splendens) in Durban, South Africa. D G Allan, G B Davies. Abstract. Nesting House Crows Corvus splendens were studied in the suburb of Merewent, Durban, South Africa, during the summer breeding season of 1999–2000. The c. 1km2 study area supported 52–62 pairs.

  6. [Kinshicho Model for Community Care by Multifunctional Vertical Integration of Psychiatric Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The future of psychiatric community care in Japan requires a medical team for outpatient care to offer support and take responsibility for a region; respecting human rights and supporting high risk patients who have concluded a long-period of hospitalized or repeated involuntary commitment, and for people who suffer from social withdraws over a long period of time. There are over 3,000 private psychiatric outpatient clinics in Japan. Over 400 of them are multifunctional psychiatric outpatient clinics that provide daycare services and outreach activities. In the future, if systematized those clinics entrusted by an administrative organ with performing as a "community mental health center". Multifunctional vertical integration of psychiatric care is possible in Japan to create a catchment area with 24 hours phone service and continued free access.

  7. Women with and without intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders: an examination of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, L; McMillan, R; Lawson, A

    2008-09-01

    This article examines the literature on women with and without intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders, using a gender social model of health. Relevant empirical studies, international literature reviews and policies between 1980 and 2007 were identified from electronic databases, journals and secondary sources. Three areas were examined: psychiatric disorders, their contextual background, and their clinical presentation. There are minimal levels of research into women with intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders. However, this article hypothesizes that women with intellectual disability have higher rates of psychiatric disorders than women without. This may result from greater vulnerability related both to internal factors (;intra': cognitive deficits, poorer communication skills, limited social skills) and to the external world (;inter': lack of opportunities, stigma, poor social support networks). The article argues that such women require gender-sensitive mental health services. However, more empirical evidence is required to support this claim and to inform development and delivery of services.

  8. Renovation of social housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rask; Hvejsel, Marie Frier; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    in the renovation of social housing. Methodologically, this hypothesis is investigated by re-reading the task of energy renovation through the lens of tectonic architectural theory. Specifically, Eduard Sekler’s etymological distinction between structure, construction, and tectonics is developed as a framework...... for addressing the spatial implications and potentials of technical initiatives in contemporary energy renovations within the continuum described by Scott. The framework is applied in two case studies of recent energy renovations of social housing dwellings. Finally, the paper discusses whether the technical...

  9. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  10. Housing Price Forecastability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Lasse; Møller, Stig Vinther

    2016-01-01

    We examine U.S. housing price forecastability using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS), and sparse PLS (SPLS). We incorporate information from a large panel of 128 economic time series and show that macroeconomic fundamentals have strong predictive power for future...... movements in housing prices. We find that (S)PLS models systematically dominate PCA models. (S)PLS models also generate significant out-of-sample predictive power over and above the predictive power contained by the price-rent ratio, autoregressive benchmarks, and regression models based on small datasets....

  11. Psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care: the first adolescent forensic psychiatric service in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahila, K; Kilkku, N; Kaltiala-Heino, R

    2004-04-01

    Finland does not have a history of providing forensic adolescent psychiatric units although the need for this kind of service has been established. According to legislation patients who are minors have to be treated separately from adults, however, this has not been possible in practice. Also, adolescent psychiatric wards have not always been able to admit the most severely ill patients, those with impulsive and aggressive behaviours, because of lack of staff resources, problems associated with protecting other vulnerable patients and a shortage of secure environments. A previous report demonstrated the significant increase in adolescent's involuntary treatment within adult psychiatric wards. Data from this report were acknowledged as an important starting point in the planning process for the psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care. This paper describes the background, development process, plan of action, tailor-made education programme and supporting evidence for the first Finnish adolescent forensic service opened in April 2003 in the Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital. The tool used for planning the unit's activities and staff education programme was the Balanced Score Card approach, the structure and development of which is also outlined within the paper.

  12. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprakash Chaudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost half of the people suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI may later be diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. The literature (PubMed, IndMed of past 30 years on psychiatric disturbances associated with TBI is reviewed. The authors highlight the close link between head injury and psychiatry and provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk-factors, and mechanisms of psychiatric sequelae including, cognitive deficits, substance abuse, psychoses, mood disorders, suicide, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, post-concussion syndrome, and personality changes following head injury. The various psychiatric sequelae are briefly discussed.

  13. Approaches to psychiatric nosology: A viewpoint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avasthi, Ajit; Sarkar, Siddharth; Grover, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric nosology is required for communication among clinicians and researchers, understanding etiology, testing treatment efficacy, knowing the prevalence of the problems and disorders, health...

  14. Assessing high house prices: Bubbles, fundamentals, and misperceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelberg, Charles; Mayer, Christopher; Sinai, Todd

    2005-01-01

    How does one tell when rapid growth in house prices is caused by fundamental factors of supply and demand and when it is an unsustainable bubble? In this paper, we explain how to assess the state of house prices—both whether there is a bubble and what underlying factors support housing demand—in a way that is grounded in economic theory. In doing so, we correct four common fallacies about the costliness of the housing market. For a number of reasons, conventional metrics for assessing pricing...

  15. An approach to measure compliance to clinical guidelines in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Forsner, Tord; Wistedt, Anna Åberg; Brommels, Mats; Forsell, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to measure six months compliance to Swedish clinical guidelines in psychiatric care after an active supported implementation process, using structured measures derived from the guidelines. Methods In this observational study four psychiatric clinics each participated in active implementation of the clinical guidelines for the assessment and treatment of depression and guidelines for assessment and treatment of patients with suicidal behaviours dev...

  16. Circadian Clock and Stress Interactions in the Molecular Biology of Psychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, MJ; Welsh, DK

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA). Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by circadian rhythm abnormalities, including disturbed sleep/wake cycles, changes in locomotor activity, and abnormal endocrine function. Animal models with mutations in circadian “clock genes” commonly show disturbances in reward processing, locomotor activity and novelty seeking behaviors, further supporting the idea of a connection between the circadian clock and psychiatric dis...

  17. Psychiatric nursing menbers' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... they influence participation rates. Twenty-two psychiatric hospital nursing staff members were interviewed with a semistructured interview guide. Interview transcripts were interpreted by means of Ricoeur's hermeneutic method. The respondents understood clinical supervision to be beneficial, but with very...

  18. Legal duties of psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beahrs, J O

    1990-01-01

    Psychiatric practice involves an implied contract in which each party fulfills a specialized role and incurs corresponding duties and obligations to be discharged as best able. Patients incur duties at three levels. First are specific duties that arise from patients' specialized role in their own health care: (1) to provide accurate and complete information, and (2) to cooperate with treatment within the bounds of informed consent. Second are general duties that apply to all citizens, but are especially relevant within the mental health context: (1) to respect the physical integrity of self, others, and property, and (2) to obey the law. The controversial "duty to protect" is at a third level, a transcendent duty that is specific to the context at hand, but in principle can apply to more than one party. Advantages of enforcing patients' duties include better care by treating professionals, optimum level of functioning of patients, and improved systems-wide morale and safety. Breach of patients' duty has many potential consequences in the forensic sphere: termination of care, malpractice defense, criminal prosecution, and tort liability. Complicating factors include the degree and effect of patients' psychiatric impairment, patients' legal status, and the role played by psychotherapeutic transference.

  19. Time Perception and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ceviz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time perception is an ability which we use in every moment of daily life, that guides the formation and continuation of our behaviors and from an evolutionary perspective ensures survival. Internal clock models help us to understand time perception. Time perception is known to vary between individuals and particular situations. This variability is explained with the mechanisms which is associated with the processes related to attention, the speed of the internal clock and the memory unit. It is suggested that time perception is mainly associated with the activities of dopamine and acetylcholine. Some dopaminergic psychoactive substances like cocaine and amphetamine have all been shown to change time perception by increasing the speed of internal clock while on the other hand some antipsychotic drugs make an opposite change in time perception by descreasing the speed of the clock. Similarly, time perception is affected in some psychiatric disorders and an ethiopathological relationship between time perception disturbances and psychiatric disorders is suggested. In this article time perception changes in schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity syndrome, depression, anxiety disorders and personality disorders are briefly reviewed.

  20. [Compulsive buying and psychiatric comorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Astrid; Mühlhans, Barbara; Silbermann, Andrea; Müller, Ulrike; Mertens, Christian; Horbach, Thomas; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2009-08-01

    Compulsive buying is an excessive behavior that has begun to receive attention from researchers in recent years. The current study provides an overview of research on compulsive buying and examines the psychiatric co-morbidity in a German female treatment seeking compulsive buying sample in comparison with age and gender-matched normal buying control groups. Thirty women suffering from compulsive buying disorder, 30 community controls, and 30 bariatric surgery candidates were assessed with the German versions of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses (SCID). Women with compulsive buying disorder showed significantly higher prevalence rates of affective, anxiety, and eating disorders compared to community controls, and suffered significantly more often from affective and anxiety disorders compared to bariatric surgery candidates. The compulsive buying group presented with the highest rates of personality disorders, most commonly avoidant, depressive, obsessive-compulsive, and borderline personality disorder, and reported the highest prevalence rates of other impulse control disorders, especially for intermittent explosive disorder. The findings suggest an elevated psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with compulsive buying disorder.

  1. Epigenetic signaling in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-10-09

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models reveals new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, Bob; Chandra, Subrato; Baden, Steven; Cummings, Jim; Cummings, Jamie; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Dutton, Wanda; Fairey, Philip; Fonorow, Ken; Gil, Camilo; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Kerr, Ryan; Peeks, Brady; Kosar, Douglas; Hewes, Tom; Kalaghchy, Safvat; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McIlvaine, Janet; Moyer, Neil; Liguori, Sabrina; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Stroer, Dennis; Thomas-Rees, Stephanie; Daniel, Danielle; McIlvaine, Janet

    2010-11-30

    This report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP - www.baihp.org) during the final budget period (BP5) of our contract, January 1, 2010 to November 30, 2010. Highlights from the four previous budget periods are included for context. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida. With over 50 Industry Partners including factory and site builders, work in BP5 was performed in six tasks areas: Building America System Research Management, Documentation and Technical Support; System Performance Evaluations; Prototype House Evaluations; Initial Community Scale Evaluations; Project Closeout, Final Review of BA Communities; and Other Research Activities.

  3. Housing Welfare Policies in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    marketization, welfare criticism and internationalization. The aim is to provide outside readers a theoretically guided empirical insight into Scandinavian social housing policy. The paper first lines up the core of the inbuilt argument of historical institutionalism in housing policy. Secondly, it briefly...... the past quarter of a decade. The third section then concentrates on the differences between Denmark, Sweden and Norway in which social housing is, our was originally, embedded in a universal welfare policy targeting the general level of housing quality for the entire population. Differences stand out...... of the governance model of social housing policy in which the housing associations are conceived of as 'dialogue partners' in the local housing policy, expected to create solutions to, rather than produce problems in social housing areas. The reform testifies to the strategic ability of the Danish social housing...

  4. Which skills boost service provider confidence when managing people presenting with psychiatric emergencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremski, Daniel; Lim, Xin Ya; Kunjithapatham, Ganesh; Koh, Doris; Alexander, Mark; Cheng, Lee

    2016-12-01

    The way service seekers interact with the staff at emergency services has been shown to influence the standard of care, especially in the case of certain psychiatric manifestations. Staff reactions to psychiatric complaints have been linked to their comfort dealing with these types of service users as well as their competencies understanding the illness. It is therefore vital to understand which skills increase confidence in treating psychiatric emergencies. Twenty-six open-ended convergent interviews were conducted with staff working in a psychiatric emergency department. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Participants reported several non-technical skills which developed from exclusively serving people with psychiatric emergencies: 1) Vigilance allowed staff to be sensitive to minor changes in behavior which precede psychiatric emergencies. 2) The ability to negotiate and find tangible solutions was particularly important when dealing with psychiatric complaints which may not have tangible resolutions. 3) The ability to appraise social support networks allowed staff to plan follow-up actions and ensure continuity of care when support was available. 4) The ability to self-reflect allowed participants to learn from their experience and avoid burnout, frustration, and fatigue. Participants also reported several other clinical skills which they gained during training, including teamwork, de-escalating techniques and risk assessment. Tentatively speaking, these skills improve staff's confidence when treating psychiatric emergencies. Certain skills may be generalized to staff working in medical emergency departments who frequently encounter psychiatric complaints. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Pensioners' quality of life in social care houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczak, Bogumiła; Stawska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Elderly people need special and complex dental care. They have the right to a dignified life and for the dental care. In elderly the need for social and family support grows. However, many seniors live their last stages of life in the Social Care Houses. Governmental institutions fail to provide full support to seniors since almost the entire psychosocial domain is neglected. Social Care Houses, despite having the word "home" in its name, are only institutions providing the patients with nursing care. The aim of the work was to study the quality of life and psychosocial status in residents of Social Care Houses. The study enrolled 135 individuals aged from 66 to 87 years. It was found that the quality of life in residents of Social Care Houses was low and their psychosocial status was poor. Majority of the studied individuals did not like their life so far. They were overwhelmed by the feeling of tiredness, loneliness and fear about tomorrow. Despite feeling lonely the residents of Social Care Houses showed strong tendency towards isolation. Low psychical and physical activity influenced negatively the psychosocial status of the seniors. It seems that psychotherapists should be the staff members in the Social Care Houses. 1. The quality of pensioners' life in Social Care Houses does not offer happy existence to them. 2. The pensioners' psychosocial state is poor in Social Care Houses. 3. It seems that Social Care Houses should employ psychotherapists.

  6. Stigmatization of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric service use: a vignette-based representative population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia F; Lange, Claudia; Euler, Sebastian; Hachtel, Henning; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G

    2017-06-01

    Background There is evidence for two different types and/or sources of mental illness stigma, namely the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. However, no current study has compared the two. Furthermore, gaps exist in our knowledge of both types of stigma. Little is known about the perceived stigma of specific psychiatric service treatment environments, for instance forensic settings. In addition, systematic research on stigma attached to symptoms of personality disorders in the general population is scarce, and for borderline personality disorder, nonexistent. Methods We conducted a representative survey of the general population (N = 2207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to read a vignette depicting either the psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution to which the character had been admitted, and indicate desired social distance (an indicator for stigma). Type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied between vignettes. Findings Desired social distance was significantly lower in relation to psychiatric service use than to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and the fictitious character's being male tend to increase stigmatization. Interestingly, the character's being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital and also respondent familiarity with psychiatric services tend to decrease stigmatization. Interpretation Familiarity of the general population with psychiatric patients should be increased. Furthermore, treatment in psychiatric units located within general hospitals should be promoted, as such treatment is associated with decreased stigma.

  7. ASD, a Psychiatric Disorder, or Both? Psychiatric Diagnoses in Adolescents with High-Functioning ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Oswald, Donald P.; Day, Taylor N.; Eack, Shaun M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Varied presentations of emotion dysregulation in autism complicate diagnostic decision making and may lead to inaccurate psychiatric diagnoses or delayed autism diagnosis for high-functioning children. This pilot study aimed to determine the concordance between prior psychiatric diagnoses and the results of an autism-specific psychiatric interview…

  8. Stress load during childhood affects psychopathology in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Tzvetan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood stress and trauma have been related to adult psychopathology in different psychiatric disorders. The present study aimed at verifying this relationship for stressful experiences during developmental periods by screening stress load across life in adult psychiatric inpatients with different diagnoses compared to healthy subjects. In addition, a relationship between the amount of adverse experiences and the severity of pathology, which has been described as a 'building block' effect in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, was explored for non-traumatic events in psychiatric disorders other than PTSD. Methods 96 patients with diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, schizophrenia, drug addiction, or personality disorders (PD and 31 subjects without psychiatric diagnosis were screened for adverse experiences in childhood (before the age of six years, before onset of puberty, and in adulthood using the Early Trauma Inventory and the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale. Effects of stress load on psychopathology were examined for affective symptoms, PTSD, and severity of illness by regression analyses and comparison of subgroups with high and low stress load. Results High stress load in childhood and before puberty, but not in adulthood, was related to negative affect in all participants. In patients, high stress load was related to depressive and posttraumatic symptoms, severity of disorder, and the diagnoses of MDD and PD. Conclusion Results support the hypothesis of stress-sensitive periods during development, which may interact with genetic and other vulnerability factors in their influence on the progress of psychiatric disorders. A 'dose' effect of stress load on the severity of psychopathology is not restricted to the relationship between traumata and PTSD.

  9. Housing First is associated with reduced use of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Jessica L; Collins, Susan E; Clifasefi, Seema L

    2014-01-01

    Chronically homeless adults with severe alcohol problems are disproportionately burdened with health-care problems and are high utilizers of emergency medical services (EMS). Single-site Housing First (HF), which provides immediate, permanent, low-barrier, nonabstinence-based, supportive housing, has been associated with reduced publicly funded service utilization. The aims of the current study were to determine whether time spent in single-site HF predicted decreases in EMS contacts 2 years subsequent to single-site HF move-in, and to describe medical conditions and injuries associated with EMS contacts in a sample of chronically homeless individuals with severe alcohol problems. Participants were 91 chronically homeless adults with severe alcohol problems who were enrolled in a single-site HF program between December 2005 and March 2007 in Seattle, Washington. We obtained administrative data on exposure to HF and EMS utilization for the 2 years prior to and the 2 years subsequent to participants' move-in date. EMS utilization variables included patient type (i.e., primary presenting problem), trauma/injury mechanism (i.e., EMS classification of the cause of the trauma or injury), level of care (i.e., basic life support, advanced life support), and transport destination. After controlling for baseline EMS contacts, participants evinced 3% fewer EMS contacts for each additional month of single-site HF exposure. From the baseline to follow-up period, the mean number of EMS contacts declined from 15.85 (SD = 22.96) to 9.54 (SD = 15.08), representing a 54% reduction in the number of EMS contacts. Most calls were responded to by EMTs providing basic life support, and the majority resulted in transport to a local level I trauma center. The most common presenting difficulties were medical illness and trauma. Substance use and psychiatric difficulties were infrequently documented as the primary problem. Our findings support recent assertions that housing is health care

  10. Housing First i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Dyrby, Therese Marie; Enemark, Morten Holm

    og organisatoriske rammer, målgruppen for indsatserne og om de konkrete indsatser i kommunerne. Evalueringen viser, at både borgere og kommuner har gode erfaringer med Housing First, men at især manglen på billige og passende boliger er en alvorlig barriere for udbredelsen af indsatsen. Evalueringen...

  11. House of Generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    participate in the project: Health and Care, Children and Youth, and Social Conditions and Employment. A public housing association that provides student dorms also participates in the project. The physical framework will be a building with a total area of approx. 25,000 m², located at Pier 4, at Aarhus...

  12. Interactive Mold House Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Get a quick glimpse of some of the most important ways to protect your home from mold by this interactive tour of the Mold House. Room-by-room, you'll learn about common mold issues and how to address them.

  13. Doll's House Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Bob

    2009-01-01

    School physics rarely stands still for long. Environmental physics is now an option in some post-16 courses in England. The physics of environments, and in particular the built environment, offers a recognizable context in which to see the applications of physics at work. This article considers how a model doll's house might be used to help…

  14. Woodworking & housing: impacts & actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt Bumgardner; Urs Buehlmann; Karen. Koenig

    2015-01-01

    The woodworking industry relies heavily on the construction-based markets, particularly those companies involved in cabinetry, furniture, millwork and components. Market conditions, trends and investments all have an impact. It's against this backdrop, that the sixth annual housing market study was conducted in early 2015. A joint effort by Virginia Tech, the U.S...

  15. Housing Design : A Manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uytenhaak, R.; Jürgenhake, B.; Nottrot, R.; Zondag, J.; Leupen, B.; Mooij, H.

    2011-01-01

    This manual sheds light on every aspect of designing housing. The organization of the living space and the residential building is dealt with systematically, from the breadth, depth, stacking, access to dwellings and the urban ensemble. This revised edition has been expanded with 20 new exemplary

  16. Dutch House Martins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T.; van der Velde, M.

    2012-01-01

    In a southern Spanish population of the colonial-breeding Afrotropical migrant House Martins Delichon urbicum, a high overall prevalence of (molecularly assayed) haemosporidian infections (in the non-parasitological literature usually denoted with the inclusive term 'malaria') was associated with

  17. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [BA-PIRC, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  18. The Children's House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Lili E.

    2013-01-01

    Lili Peller's "The Children's House" essay begins where Maria Montessori left off in her description of space articulations. Peller does not name Montessori specifically as she always had a desire to become independent in her own right as a neo-Freudian child analyst. But the Haus Der Kinder founded in summer of 1922 suggests a total…

  19. Haunted by Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Two fourth-grade teachers presented the idea of using the author's art class to inspire the students to write creatively. The theme of scary stories needed an art project to match. The author immediately had a favorite lesson in mind. By putting a small twist on one of her standard "Frank Lloyd Wright House" projects, scary plans began to take…

  20. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  1. Does housing chronically homeless adults lead to social integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Mares, Alvin S; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Supported housing programs have been successful in helping homeless adults obtain housing. This study examined whether improvements in social integration occur after clients obtain supported housing. Measures of social integration were examined for 550 chronically homeless adults with mental illness who participated in the 11-site Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness. Social integration was conceptualized as a multidimensional construct of variables in six domains: housing, work, social support, community participation, civic activity, and religious faith. Changes in baseline measures related to the six domains and their interrelationships were examined at six and 12 months after entry into the supported housing program. Chronically homeless adults showed substantial improvements in housing but remained socially isolated and showed limited improvement in other domains of social integration, which were only weakly correlated with one another. More attention is needed to develop rehabilitation interventions in supported housing programs to improve social integration of chronically homeless adults. Because improvements in some domains of social integration were only weakly related, it may be necessary to intervene in multiple domains simultaneously.

  2. History of the Nordic psychiatric cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knorring, Lars

    2012-03-01

    The Nordic countries include Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden as well the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Svalbard and Åland. The countries share much common history as well as common traits in their respective societies. As early as 1906, a Scandinavian Psychiatric Association was suggested. The first Nordic Psychiatric Congress was held in Copenhagen 1913. After the First World War, at the 6th Nordic Psychiatric Congress in Stockholm 1935, a Nordic Psychiatric Association was founded and it was decided that a Nordic Journal of Psychiatry should be founded. After the Second World War, at the 8th Nordic Psychiatric Congress in Copenhagen 1946, the Nordic Psychiatric Association was terminated. At this time, the most important task of the Association, to found a Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, had been achieved. After 1946, there has been a close cooperation between the Nordic countries but no common Nordic Psychiatric Association. Today, the Nordic Psychiatric Cooperation is active and ongoing. The 30th Nordic Psychiatric Congress is scheduled to be held in Tromsö, in 2012. The Nordic Journal of Psychiatry is publishing its 64 th volume. The Journal is indexed in the important international databases and the impact factor is increasing. The Joint Committee of the Nordic psychiatric associations has established itself as the owner of the Journal and the organizer of the congresses. There are also a series of Nordic cooperations in a series of different fields, such as the Scandinavian Societies of Biological Psychiatry, the Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology (SCNP), the bi-annual Nordic Psychoanalytical Congresses, the Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review, the Nordic Association of Psychiatric Epidemiology, NAPE, and so on.

  3. Radon in Saudi houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    A total of 637 passive radon dosemeters (CR-39 nuclear track detectors in a closed chamber) were used in a survey in 400 houses in Saudi Arabia. The radon concentration was found to vary from 5 to 36 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.13 to 0.98 pCi.l/sup -1/) with a mean of 16 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.43 pCi.l/sup -1/). The unoccupied houses showed a concentration of 29+-7 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.78+-0.19 pCi.l/sup -1/) double that of the occupied houses, 14+-1 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.39+-0.02 pCi.l/sup -1/), in the same area. The radon daughter concentration measured with a Working Level monitor in 17 unoccupied houses was found to vary from 1.35x10/sup -3/ to 24x10/sup -3/ WL with an average of 6.9+-1.4x10/sup -3/ WL. The average exhalation rate measured in 37 houses by 95 passive detectors in cans sealed to the walls ranged from 0.013 to 0.044 Bq.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/(0.35 to 1.2 pCi.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/) with an average of 0.021+-0.003 Bq.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/(0.56+-0.09 pCi.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/). This survey is the first in Saudi Arabia (a hot climate) and can usefully be compared with similar surveys in countries with cold climates.

  4. Assisted Housing - Public Housing Buildings - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The approximate physical location of each individual Public Housing Building. If the building has more than one entrance or street address, the address of the...

  5. Success parameters for housing co-operatives in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimoh Richard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The roles of the various governments have been the driving force of the housing co-operatives in those countries due to the tremendous support received. The implication is that the housing co-operatives in any country cannot do it alone without the support of government in areas such as having legislation and policies, providing support services and embarking on regular education and training. The need to explore the housing co-operatives in South Africa with a view to determine the successes recorded over the years becomes imperative in order to advance strategies that will ensure virile and sustainable housing co-operatives. Results revealed that a lack of understanding exists as a result of inadequate information among government officials responsible for housing delivery and the public in the application of co-operative housing as a delivery approach. Also, inadequate training of co-operative members in leadership positions lead to a lack of administrative and management capabilities in the processes and operations of housing co-operatives. A pragmatic approach should be adopted so that legislation and policies that are beneficial to the housing co-operatives be enacted.

  6. Social Housing in times of crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Pozzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of the economic crisis on a social level are bringing about a series of changes in how we live and reside. Some of these transformations are destined to become structural and affect how housing is designed, to take into consideration new housing models, cultural diversity, nomadism linked to working mobility, and the ageing of the population.The provision of social housing must adapt to these transformations in society and respond to the challenge by expanding the services available to residents, in a new framework of relations between the public and private sectors.Public operators are joined by new parties such as foundations while attempting new forms of support for the private initiative, which adapts to cover a part of the requirement of the middle classes made more fragile by the crisis.

  7. Mink's adaptation to group housing in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen W; Møller, Steen Henrik

    2012-01-01

    of observation was low on farm A, B, and C, and significantly lower than on farm D. This partly supports the hypothesis about having developed mink populations and or management adapted to group housing. The investigation has confirmed that the level of bite marks is a useful, objective measuring parameter...... and in mink kept in social groups. In total, the project included 1,191 brown mink housed on four farms in up to five different types of social groups. The result showed that mink in groups had significantly more bite marks than mink kept in pairs, and that mink with bite wounds had significantly more bite...... marks than mink that did not haev bite wounds. Thus, based upon bite mark results, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that mink populations adapted to group housing have been developed. The number of mink that had died or had been removede during the test period, or that had bite wounds at the time...

  8. Analysis of the Dynamic Relationship between Fluctuations in the Korean Housing Market and the Occurrence of Unsold New Housing Stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghoon Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we intend to identify the characteristics of occurrence of unsold new housing stocks and draw the implications for the housing business strategy that can effectively cope with the market risk under the Korean housing market. As a result of the analysis, most of the theoretical causality of occurrence of unsold new housing stocks under the three-dimensional Korean housing market was found to correspond to the empirical analysis result. In addition, the chonsei market that produces the characteristic movement of Korean housing market had a significant relation with occurrence of unsold new housing stocks. Because of these results, it is thought that the proposed housing business strategy can effectively cope with the housing market risk. It is thought that we need to additionally examine the financial validity of the proposed housing business model by calculating the cash flow and grope for policy support measures to materialize it on the basis of the analysis result of this paper.

  9. The behaviour of housing developers and aggregate housing supply

    OpenAIRE

    Łaszek, Jacek; Olszewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The article presents an theoretical analysis of the developer sector, which bases on the observed functioning of the market. We explain the behaviour of developers in the short and medium run and show why they add to the creation of a real estate bubble instead of mitigating it. The bubbles result from the interactions between housing developers who keep high prices and households, who increase housing demand even if house prices rise. The housing developer, due to the asymmetry of informatio...

  10. The impact of prior psychiatric medical treatment on return to work after a diagnosis of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Laura Schärfe; Overgaard, Charlotte; Garne, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Breast cancer and psychiatric disorders negatively impact work life, both positively associated with unemployment and early retirement. Our purpose was to assess whether being prescribed psychiatric medication, 2-4 yrs prior to a diagnosis of breast cancer, could impact the likelihood...... of returning to work after cancer therapy. METHODS: 16,868 self-supporting women, diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark from 2000 to 2012, were identified from a population-based clinical database, then cross-referenced to data held for psychiatric medication usage, sociodemographics, and labour......-market participation. The association between historic psychiatric medication and return to work was estimated using a modified Poisson regression model. 'Return to work' was defined as being self-supporting one year after diagnosis of breast cancer. RESULTS: 16% of our cohort had used psychiatric medical treatment 2...

  11. 78 FR 52460 - Single Family Housing Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Agency oversight or minimum competency standards. This proposed rule will impose experience, training... Agency's housing program, increasing specialized support available to them to complete the application..., ensure those packagers are qualified and trained, perform quality assurance reviews to prevent the...

  12. Attitudes of Chinese community members and psychiatrists towards forensic psychiatric assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoling, Zhong; Jun, Wang; Graham, Mellsop; Chen, Chen; Simei, Zhang; Qiguang, Li; Qun, Wang; Jiansong, Zhou; Xiaoping, Wang

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese community members and psychiatrists towards forensic psychiatric assessments. A questionnaire designed to record attitudes toward the current forensic psychiatric assessment procedures and the disposal of mentally ill offenders was developed and distributed via a mobile App. A total of 134 community members and 132 psychiatrists voluntarily completed the questionnaire. Most of responders agreed that the department of public-security has the right to apply for a forensic psychiatric assessment but should not be held solely by that department. Community members were less significantly confident in the validation of forensic psychiatric opinions than were the psychiatrists. A significantly higher proportion of community members than psychiatrists considered that offenders judged Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD) should be punished as would be sane people. In addition, only a minority of responders supported that NCRMD should not be held criminally responsible. Our results indicate that both groups have comments on the current distribution of right of startup of forensic psychiatric assessments. Compared to psychiatrists, community members have lower confidence in the validation of forensic psychiatric assessment and have stricter attitudes toward the disposal of offenders with psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The missing p in psychiatric training: why it is important to teach pain to psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Igor; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Pain problems are exceedingly prevalent among psychiatric patients. Moreover, clinical impressions and neurobiological research suggest that physical and psychological aspects of pain are closely related entities. Nonetheless, remarkably few pain-related themes are currently included in psychiatric residency training. To provide clinical and scientific rationale for psychiatric-training enrichment with basic tenets of pain medicine and to raise the awareness and sensitivity of physicians, scientists, and educators to this important yet unmet clinical and public health need. We present 3 lines of translational research evidence, extracted from a comprehensive literature review, in support of our objectives. First, the neuroanatomical and functional overlap between pain and emotion/reward/motivation brain circuitry suggests integration and mutual modulation of these systems. Second, psychiatric disorders are commonly associated with alterations in pain processing, whereas chronic pain may impair emotional and neurocognitive functioning. Third, given its stressful nature, pain may serve as a functional probe for unraveling pathophysiological mechanisms inherent in psychiatric morbidity. Pain training in psychiatry will contribute to deeper and more sophisticated insight into both pain syndromes and general psychiatric morbidity regardless of patients' pain status. Furthermore, it will ease the artificial boundaries separating psychiatric and medical formulations of brain disorders, thus fostering cross-fertilizing interactions among specialists in various disciplines entrusted with the care of patients experiencing pain.

  14. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners' ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temane, Annie M; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris P H

    2014-04-07

    Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field. The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners' ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch's method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature. The data analysis generated the following themes - that the supervisor should have or possess: (a) professional competencies, (b) personal competencies and (c) specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa. This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  15. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners’ ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Temane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field.Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners’ ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa.Method: A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch’s method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature.Results: The data analysis generated the following themes – that the supervisor should have or possess: (a professional competencies, (b personal competencies and (c specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa.Conclusion: This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  16. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-23

    Dec 23, 2011 ... Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a public health problem and is associated with many complications. However little is known about the psychiatric sequelae of TBI in Nigeria. This study described the pattern and determinants of psychiatric sequelae among subjects with TBI. Materials and Methods: ...

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychiatric patients are considered high risked group for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This has been found to be as a result of poor judgment and irrationality associated with some of the disorders. However, there is dearth of literature on the prevalence of HIV infection among psychiatric ...

  18. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information obtained included the sociodemographic characteristics, type of injury, durations of unconsciousness (LOC) and posttraumatic amnesia (PTA), psychiatric and psychoactive substance use history. Psychiatric diagnosis was based on the criteria of the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases ...

  19. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of ... impairment of memory, concentration, motivation, self- esteem, relationships with others and ..... at increasing nursing students' and psychiatric nurses' insight about psychiatric ...

  20. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of psychiatric patients with regard to marijuana use in Potchefstroom, North West Province, as well as to formulate recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of psychiatric ...

  1. Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalum, Anette Ellegaard; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2014-01-01

    Søg 1 - 1 ud af 1 Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment. Anette Ellegaard Dalum, Sidse Arnfred, 2014, vol. 176, nummer 34, 2014. Ugeskrift for laeger Artikel Importer Fjern......Søg 1 - 1 ud af 1 Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment. Anette Ellegaard Dalum, Sidse Arnfred, 2014, vol. 176, nummer 34, 2014. Ugeskrift for laeger Artikel Importer Fjern...

  2. Establishment of a local psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1981-01-01

    of senile psychoses. The total increase amounts to 2.4 times the admission rates of psychiatric cases to the General Hospital and 4.4 times the admission rates to the Psychiatric Hospital in Nykøbing in the last years prior to the start of the local service. The outpatient department has grown steadily...

  3. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AMONG CHILDREN AND YOUNG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-06-06

    Jun 6, 2003 ... Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric disorders among children and young persons appearing in .... by a computer using the Statistical Package for Social. Sciences (SPSS) Version 8.0 and a ..... for further psychiatric assessment and treatment as necessary. The Juvenile court ...

  4. Sleep in Children With Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal; Ivanenko, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in pediatric psychiatric disorders and constitute key elements in diagnostic symptomatology of various primary psychiatric disorders including bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety disorder. Although sleep is not included in key defining criteria of some impairing illnesses such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia, these disorders present with a very high prevalence of sleep disturbances. The interaction between sleep and psychopathology is very complex with significant interrelationship in development, severity, and prognosis of psychiatric disorders and comorbid sleep disturbances. The research ranging from small intervention case series to large epidemiologic studies have demonstrated the role of specific sleep complaints in specific psychiatric diagnoses. However, the research using objective instruments such as polysomnography and actigraphy remains limited in youth with psychiatric disorders. The intervention studies using pharmaceutical treatment specifically focusing on sleep disturbances in psychiatric disorders are also sparse in the pediatric literature. Early identification of sleep disturbances and behavioral management using cognitive behavior therapy-based tools appear to be the most effective approach for treatment. The use of psychotropic medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of primary psychiatric disorder often alleviate the psychological barriers for sleep but may lead to emergence of other sleep issues such as restless leg syndrome. The safety and efficacy data of hypnotics for primary sleep disorders are limited in pediatrics and should be avoided or used with extreme caution in children with comorbid sleep and psychiatric problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceived sleep quality of psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Niet, G. J. (Gerrit); Tiemens, B. G. (Bea); Lendemeijer, H. H. G. M. (Bert); Hutschemaekers, G. J. M. (Giel)

    This paper aims at acquiring knowledge about the quality of sleep of adult and elderly psychiatric patients who receive clinical or outpatient nursing care, and identifying key factors in perceiving a sleep problem. To do so, a sample of 1699 psychiatric patients were asked whether they perceived a

  6. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Methods Subjects were retrospectively recruited from an obesity treatment center in Taiwan. The obesity treatments included bariatric surgery and non-surgery treatment. All subjects underwent a standardized clinical evaluation with two questionnaires and a psychiatric referral when needed. The psychiatric diagnosis was made thorough psychiatric clinic interviews using the SCID. A total of 841 patients were recruited. We compared the difference in psychiatric disorder prevalence between patients with surgical and non-surgical treatment. Results Of the 841 patients, 42% had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders and eating disorders were the most prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders. Females had more mood disorders and eating disorders than males. The surgical group had more binge-eating disorder, adjustment disorder, and sleep disorders than the non-surgical group. Conclusion A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders was found among ethnic Chinese seeking obesity treatment. This is consistent with study results in the US and Europe.

  7. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Koelen, J.A.; Smit, H.F.E.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a

  8. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Koelen, J.A.; Smit, H.F.E.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in

  9. determining treatment levels of comorbid psychiatric conditions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    ABSTRACT. Background: Psychiatric co-morbidities occur more frequently in patients with epilepsy but are usually under- treated. Treatment of these disorders is key to reducing mortality via suicide and other causes. This study determined the levels of treatment of psychiatric co- morbidities at clinics in Lusaka, Zambia.

  10. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... of reducing the readmission of psychiatric patients following marijuana-induced psychosis. A qualitative ... The findings of this study include perceptions of psychiatric patients on the use of marijuana, the negative effects of marijuana .... to the nursing body of knowledge that cannot be obtained by any other ...

  11. Psychiatric disorders in women with fertility problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Kjaer, S K; Albieri, V

    2013-01-01

    Do women who don't succeed in giving birth after an infertility evaluation have a higher risk of psychiatric disorders compared with women who do?......Do women who don't succeed in giving birth after an infertility evaluation have a higher risk of psychiatric disorders compared with women who do?...

  12. Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals. P L van der Merwe, A Allan, M M Allan. Abstract. Background. In order to preserve scarce resources, treabnent in tertiary psychiatric hospitals should be restricted to those whose treatment needs make admission to such hospitals essential. However, anecdotal ...

  13. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  14. Informal activities delivering formal housing: A case study of house ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenge of housing provision in the developing countries is quite enormous. Various efforts at addressing these problems have seen both the institutional and individual intervention in provision of residential housing. Informal players in the house-building industry are on the increase though their intervention in ...

  15. Informal worker phenomenon in housing construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayaningtyas, Maranatha; Sipan, Ibrahim; Lukiyanto, Kukuh

    2017-11-01

    The informal workers phenomenon on housing construction projects in Indonesia is different from workers in other sectors who would always request as permanent employees. Substantively, the informal workers are disinclined to be bound as permanent employees which different from the general labor paradigm. Hence, the objective of this study is to find out how the labour selection process, the factors that affected their performance, and the suitable wage system to achieve the target completion of housing construction project. The qualitative method is used to uncover and understand the meaning behind the phenomena (numina) of informal workers action and their influence on housing construction project which called phenomenological approach. Five informal workers and two project managers were selected as informants based on predetermined criteria with in-depth interviews. The results showed that the informal worker were more satisfied with the wage based on unit price while working in the housing construction project for the flexibility in working hours. In addition, the developer was also relieved because they only control the quality and the achievement of the project completion time which supported by informal worker leader. Therefore, these findings are beneficial for both of developer and government as policy maker to succeed the housing program in Indonesia.

  16. Herbal Medicines In The Treatment of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This review will indicate the quality of the evidence supporting the clinical effects of a number of commonly used types of herbal medicines for psychiatric and neurological disorders. Method: We conducted a review of literature to understand the biochemical and evidential bases for the use of herbs in psychiatric and neurological disorders as follow: 1 Alzheimer’s disease, 2 Depression, 3 Anxiety, 4 Insomnia, 5 Substance use disorders, 6 Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 7 Migraine. Results: Evidences support use of Ginkgo biloba, Huperzine A, Galantamine, Melissa officinalis,and Salvia officinalis for Alzheimer’s disease; St. John’s wort, Lavender, and Saffron for depression; Passionflower, and Kava, for anxiety disorders; Valerian, and English Lavender for sleep disorders; Hypericum for substance related disorders; Ginkgo biloba, and Passionflower for ADHD; and feverfew, and Butterbur root for migraine. The highest level of confidence derives from well-designed, randomized, double blind controlled studies. Conclusion: Herbs may have beneficial effects in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorder; however we must consider their potential side effects and drug-drug interactions.

  17. [Towards a history of the family care of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Inserting adults with psychic problems into families has recently been practiced in various European countries and also in Italy, where some mental health departments support such families. Beyond the well known story of Gheel, the etero and omofamily care of psychiatric patients has a forgotten history. On the basis of unexplored and exceptionally rich sources from the archives of the asylums in Florence, as well as of the Province di Florence, which funded assistance to the mentally ill--this research focuses on the subsidized "domestic custody" of hundreds of psychiatric patients, who had already been institutionalized. Beginning in 1866, outboarding was supported by the provincial administration in Florence with the collaboration of the asylum medical direction. In the late 19th C. and in the early 20th C. prestigious psychiatrists sought alternatives to the institutionalisation. These alternatives involved varied participants in a community (the patients and their families, the administrators and the medical specialists, the neighborhood and the police). The families played a special role that historians of the psychiatry exclusively dedicated to the insane asylums have not really seen. The role of the families in the interaction with the psychiatric staff is not, even on a historiographical level, simply an additional and marginal chapter of the practices and of the culture of the mental health. These archival evidence contradicts some common places on the past of the Italian psychiatry before 1978, and provokes new reflections of possible relevance to the present.

  18. Parental psychiatric hospitalisation and offspring schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M

    2009-01-01

    The risk of schizophrenia has been linked with a family history of schizophrenia and less strongly with other psychiatric disorders in family members. Using data from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort and from the Danish Psychiatric Case Register, we studied the relationship between offspring risk...... of schizophrenia and a range of psychotic and non-psychotic psychiatric diagnoses in parents. Psychiatric admission data after 1969 were available for 7047 cohort members born between 1959 and 1961, and for 7006 mothers and 6993 fathers. Univariate analysis showed that neurosis, alcohol and substance dependence...... in both parents were associated with elevated risk of offspring schizophrenia; in addition, maternal schizophrenia, affective disorder and personality disorder were associated with elevated risk. Controlling for parental age, parental social status, and parental psychiatric co-diagnosis, offspring risk...

  19. Animal cruelty and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleyzer, Roman; Felthous, Alan R; Holzer, Charles E

    2002-01-01

    Animal cruelty in childhood, although generally viewed as abnormal or deviant, for years was not considered symptomatic of any particular psychiatric disorder. Although animal cruelty is currently used as a diagnostic criterion for conduct disorder, research establishing the diagnostic significance of this behavior is essentially nonexistent. In the current study, investigators tested the hypothesis that a history of substantial animal cruelty is associated with a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (APD) and looked for associations with other disorders commonly diagnosed in a population of criminal defendants. Forty-eight subjects, criminal defendants who had histories of substantial animal cruelty, were matched with defendants without this history. Data were systematically obtained from the files by using four specifically designed data retrieval outlines. A history of animal cruelty during childhood was significantly associated with APD, antisocial personality traits, and polysubstance abuse. Mental retardation, psychotic disorders, and alcohol abuse showed no such association.

  20. Acupuncture therapy for psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has traditionally been used for problems including anxiety, insomnia, stress, and depression in China and other East Asian countries. A range of different neurobiological responses to acupuncture have been investigated including modulation of serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems; effects on GABA and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; and inflammatory responses. Interpretation of the findings is challenging because the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders has yet to be fully elucidated. Limitations also arise from the use of animal models and the selection of appropriate control treatments. Further complexity is added by acupuncture treatment being nonstandardized with acupuncture points often selected on the basis on traditional practice and theory. Potentially promising findings require further investigation and substantiation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Data mining in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Diego; Cornejo, Eduardo; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Guarracino, Mario R; Pardalos, Panos M

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical sciences and computational methods have found new applications in fields like medicine over the last few decades. Modern data acquisition and data analysis protocols have been of great assistance to medical researchers and clinical scientists. Especially in psychiatry, technology and science have made new computational methods available to assist the development of predictive modeling and to identify diseases more accurately. Data mining (or knowledge discovery) aims to extract information from large datasets and solve challenging tasks, like patient assessment, early mental disease diagnosis, and drug efficacy assessment. Accurate and fast data analysis methods are very important, especially when dealing with severe psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia. In this paper, we focus on computational methods related to data analysis and more specifically to data mining. Then, we discuss some related research in the field of psychiatry.

  2. Psychiatric features in perpetrators of homicide-unsuccessfulsuicide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unsuccessful-suicide (HUS), those cases in which the perpetrator is referred for forensic psychiatric observation present an opportunity to explore psychiatric features pertaining to the event. Objective. To identify possible contributing psychiatric features ...

  3. Public Housing Agency (PHA) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The dataset contains current data on low rent and Section 8 units in PHA's administered by HUD. The Section 8 Rental Voucher Program increases affordable housing...

  4. FEMA Housing Assistance Owners - API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset lists aggregated, non-PII dataset of FEMA Housing Assistance Program for House Owners The data was generated by FEMA's ECIM (Enterprise Coordination...

  5. FEMA Housing Assistance Renters - API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset lists aggregated, non-PII dataset of FEMA Housing Assistance Program for House Renters The data was generated by FEMA's ECIM (Enterprise Coordination...

  6. Allergy-Proof Your House

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vent moisture outside. Temperature and humidity. Hot, humid houses are breeding grounds for dust mites and mold. ... Smoking. Don't allow smoking anywhere inside your house. References Allergens and irritants. National Institute of Environmental ...

  7. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following events are open to the press: WHO: House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs WHAT: Legislative Hearing on ... From Shielding Dangerous Doctors 13 Oct On Thursday, House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs Committee Chairman Phil Roe ( ...

  8. Multifamily Housing Physical Inspection Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Real Estate Assessment Center conducts physical property inspections of properties that are owned, insured or subsidized by HUD, including public housing and...

  9. Public Housing Physical Inspection Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Real Estate Assessment Center conducts physical property inspections of properties that are owned, insured or subsidized by HUD, including public housing and...

  10. HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD sponsors housing counseling agencies throughout the country that can provide advice on buying a home, renting, defaults, foreclosures, and credit issues. This...

  11. A psychiatric study of 247 liver transplantation candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzepacz, P T; Brenner, R; Van Thiel, D H

    1989-01-01

    This study prospectively evaluated 247 consecutive liver transplantation candidates for the presence of psychiatric disorders. While one-half did not meet DSM-III criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis, 18.6% had delirium, 19.8% had an adjustment disorder, 9% had alcohol abuse or dependence, 4.5% had major depression, and 2% had other drug abuse or dependence. Delirious subjects were significantly more likely to have a lower serum albumin, lower Mini-Mental State exam scores, higher Trailmaking Test scores (both A and B), and more dysrhythmia on electroencephalogram (EEG). In addition, while both delirious and nondelirious subjects were judged to have high levels of overall stress, those with delirium had significantly poorer adaptive functioning and lower occupational, family, and social scale ratings. Thus, while all liver transplant candidates are under substantial psychosocial stress and require psychosocial support, those identified as being delirious require particular attention because of their numerous cognitive, medical, and psychosocial problems.

  12. Choking risk among psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamine T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Takahiko Nagamine1Division of Psychiatric Internal Medicine, Seiwakai-Kitsunan Hospital, Suzenji, JapanChoking is a life-threatening and not infrequent occurrence in psychiatric hospitals. There is, however, little information available about the risk factors or methods to prevent choking. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the 8 patients who had a cardiopulmonary arrest due to choking and received resuscitation at our hospital during the 6-year period from April 2005 to March 2011. The study involved 6 males and females, all of whom were patients with schizophrenia taking antipsychotics orally. They were aged from 56 to 79 (mean ± SD: 69.0 ± 7.5 years, with the duration of illness from 28 to 54 years (39.9 ± 7.9 years. In 6 of the 8 cases, choking was diagnosed immediately on the basis of the situation at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest. In the remaining 2 cases, cardiopulmonary arrest was initially unexplained, and choking was only diagnosed subsequently. Choking was caused by bread in all cases. Tracheal intubation was carried out in all cases and resulted in successful resuscitation, causing no subsequent change in functions compared with the prechoking condition. All 8 patients had been receiving multiple antipsychotics before the event (mean number of drugs used 2.5 ± 0.7, with a total dose level ranging from 600 to 1800 mg/day chlorpromazine equivalents (mean 1113 ± 341 mg/day. Seven of the 8 patients had mild to moderate involuntary movements, and 5 patients were diagnosed with antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. During the 5-year period before the choking event, 7 of the 8 patients had at least 1 treatment interruption, and some patients had up to 4 interruptions.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with Atypical Odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Anna; Tu, Trang T H; Shinohara, Yukiko; Mikuzuki, Lou; Kawasaki, Kaoru; Sugawara, Shiori; Suga, Takayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Watanabe, Motoko; Umezaki, Yojiro; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Motomura, Haruhiko; Takenoshita, Miho; Maeda, Hidefumi; Toyofuku, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Atypical Odontalgia (AO) is a condition characterized by tooth pain with no apparent cause. Although psychiatric comorbidity seems to be very common, it has rarely been studied. To clarify the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the clinical features in patients with AO, we retrospectively evaluated their examination records. Clinical features and psychiatric diagnoses of 383 patients with AO were investigated by reviewing patients' medical records and referral letters. Psychiatric diagnoses were categorized according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). We also analyzed visual analogue scale (VAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) scores. Of the 383 patients with AO, 177 (46.2%) had comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most common were depressive disorders (15.4%) and anxiety disorders (10.1%). Serious psychotic disorders such as bipolar disorder (3.0%) and schizophrenia (1.8%) were rare. Dental trigger of AO was reported in 217 (56.7%) patients. There were no significant correlations between psychiatric comorbidities and most of the demographic features. Higher VAS and SDS scores, higher frequency of sleep disturbance, and higher ratings of "Fearful" and "Punishing-cruel" descriptors of the SF-MPQ were found in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. About half of AO patients had comorbid psychiatric disorders. Dental procedures are not necessarily causative factors of AO. In AO patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders, pain might have a larger emotional component than a sensory one. VAS, SDS, and SF-MPQ scores might aid in the noticing of underlying comorbid psychiatric disorders in AO patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Psychiatric and psychological aspects of premenstrual syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limosin, F; Ades, J

    2001-01-01

    the beginning of the nineties, with clomipramine and fluoxetine, and later fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline and citalopram. Studies having compared the efficiency of antidepressants according to their serotonin activity (paroxetine or sertraline versus maprotiline, that is a selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor), showed that serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were significantly more efficient on all symptoms than maprotiline, that was not more efficient than placebo. Low doses of clomipramine (10 to 50 mg per day) seem to be sufficient and it appears also preferable to prescribe an intermittent treatment because of a possible tolerance effect, susceptible to be warned by phases free of treatment. Alprazolam was the most studied benzodiazepine in this indication. Most studies were positive, using daily posologies of 0.25 to 4 mg during the 6 days preceding the menses, with improvement of irritability, anxiety and depressive mood. The general practitioner frequently carries out psychological support, in particular in case of mild symptoms without consequences. Nevertheless, underestimate a more severe psychological suffering is a risk, firstly because there is no systematic interrelationship between the somatic symptoms intensity and the psychological distress, and secondly because premenstrual period is a special emotionally moment to put in evidence psychological or relational disruption. All kinds of psychotherapy can be relevant, even though the training of relaxation techniques is particularly suitable in such an indication. In conclusion, and in spite of the generalization of the diagnosis criteria in the international psychiatric classifications as the DSM, the premenstrual syndrome remains a complex and polymorphous disorder. The premenstrual syndrome was considered for a long time like a somatic disease, but now the psychiatric symptoms severity justifies most often the medical cares. In order to distinguish some isolated and mild complaints, of a

  15. Ideas about housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2009-01-01

    This booklet is a project documentation of a short-term project titled ‘IDEAS ABOUT HOUSING Arkitektkonkurrencernes boligløsninger’. Architectural competitions have been used to develop new living concepts reacting on current political, economical and social flows. Participation in an architectural...... competition provides the architects a possibility to reflect on the current social patterns, and to propose suitable spaces. In this light, the competition proposals represent the visions and dreams of the architects to the contemporary society. “For most of the 20th century, design competitions have been...... an important part of the world of architecture and planning in Denmark. Competitions, sponsored by government organizations, housing associations, or private business, are usually requests to make proposals for a specific project, but they are also sometimes used to elicit ideas about a general project type...

  16. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  17. Housing characteristics 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

  18. Health risk factors and differences in outcomes between younger and older veterans using VA transitional housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Barnett, Scott D; Frahm, Kathryn A; Schinka, John A; Schonfeld, Lawrence; Casey, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    This study examined age-related differences in general medical and mental health risk factors for veterans participating in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Grant Per Diem (GPD) transitional supportive housing program. The subpopulation of older homeless veterans is growing, and little is known about the implications of this fact for health care providers and for supportive programs intended to meet homeless veterans' needs. Data were obtained from the VA records of all veterans (N=40,820) who used the GPD program during fiscal years 2003 to 2009. Unconditional adjusted and unadjusted odds ratios for general medical and psychiatric characteristics were calculated and were the primary study focus. Significant predictors of homeless program completion assessed from univariate models were then evaluated in multivariate models. Younger (homeless veterans reported an equal number of days homeless before enrollment. Younger veterans averaged 19 fewer days in GPD. Older veterans had more general medical problems and approximately $500 more in program costs. Findings from this study indicate that older homeless veterans are at increased risk of serious medical problems. This group is especially vulnerable to experiencing negative consequences related to homelessness. Addressing these complex needs will allow the VA to provide enhanced care to older homeless veterans.

  19. Housing market transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, Tina; Boardman, Brenda (Environmental Change Inst., Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    2009-07-01

    Reducing energy use in the existing building stock requires a substantial and rapid transformation of the whole sector. Using a market transformation approach provides a useful framework and poses some new problems in comparison with appliances: houses don't break down in the same way as fridges, but can be improved piecemeal. The Energy Performance in Buildings Directive provides the foundation (and the x axis) for policies to achieve substantial reductions in residential energy use and carbon emissions by 2050. The technology is known, but has to be chosen by the householder it cannot be incorporated in the factory by a manufacturer. Education and awareness are, therefore, more important, both for the householder and for the installers. What is the role, if any, of mandatory minimum standards? The types and mix of policies require a clear understanding of the challenges provided by low-income groups, capital shortages, the length of residence in the house, the landlord-tenant split and user knowledge. This paper reviews the challenges and examines the extent to which the well-known market transformation theories work for the housing sector. Most of the examples are from the UK, but have been developed into generic principles.

  20. The White House saga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daković Nevena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Frank Capra expressed his gratitude to the immigrant dream come true by creating a brilliant cinematic myth about the American political system, presenting it as an 'inherently good' when in the hands of honest and good people. His 'morality fairytales', 'fantasies of good will' imbued with belief in restoration of old-new principles, offer complex reflections on an idealised Americanism of the 1930s which have become the foundation of representations of the American political system. The Capraesque narrative - 'a blend of optimism, humor, patriotism, and, to those who really understand his work, (and darkness, despair, and the need to fight for things you care about...' (Bassinger 1982: 48 - as a combination of all-American values, ordinary people and historical figures, a democracy myth - has been extended by an endless network of intertextual echoes in film and TV production. Following the developmental lines - through political melodrama, melodramatic politics and political soap opera - one will be led from Capra to the series The West Wing (1996 - 2006, House of Cards (2013 - 2015 and Madame Secretary (2014 - ; from the comprehensive Washington Postcard (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939 to the focal points at the White House; from Capra's comedy to the saga of the fight against terrorism led by the president and both ordinary and trained American citizens (White House Down, 2013, Roland Emmerich.